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Sample records for airfoil design method

  1. An airfoil design method for viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, J. B.; Narramore, J. C.; Sankar, L. N.

    1990-01-01

    An airfoil design procedure is described that has been incorporated into an existing two-dimensional Navier-Stokes airfoil analysis method. The resulting design method, an iterative procedure based on a residual-correction algorithm, permits the automated design of airfoil sections with prescribed surface pressure distributions. This paper describes the inverse design method and the technique used to specify target pressure distributions. An example airfoil design problem is described to demonstrate application of the inverse design procedure. It shows that this inverse design method develops useful airfoil configurations with a reasonable expenditure of computer resources.

  2. Airfoil design method using the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, J. B.; Narramore, J. C.; Sankar, L. N.

    1991-01-01

    An airfoil design procedure is described that was incorporated into an existing 2-D Navier-Stokes airfoil analysis method. The resulting design method, an iterative procedure based on a residual-correction algorithm, permits the automated design of airfoil sections with prescribed surface pressure distributions. The inverse design method and the technique used to specify target pressure distributions are described. It presents several example problems to demonstrate application of the design procedure. It shows that this inverse design method develops useful airfoil configurations with a reasonable expenditure of computer resources.

  3. An inverse design method for 2D airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi-Yong; Cui, Peng; Zhang, Gen-Bao

    2010-03-01

    The computational method for aerodynamic design of aircraft is applied more universally than before, in which the design of an airfoil is a hot problem. The forward problem is discussed by most relative papers, but inverse method is more useful in practical designs. In this paper, the inverse design of 2D airfoil was investigated. A finite element method based on the variational principle was used for carrying out. Through the simulation, it was shown that the method was fit for the design.

  4. Approximate method of designing a two-element airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abzalilov, D. F.; Mardanov, R. F.

    2011-09-01

    An approximate method is proposed for designing a two-element airfoil. The method is based on reducing an inverse boundary-value problem in a doubly connected domain to a problem in a singly connected domain located on a multisheet Riemann surface. The essence of the method is replacement of channels between the airfoil elements by channels of flow suction and blowing. The shape of these channels asymptotically tends to the annular shape of channels passing to infinity on the second sheet of the Riemann surface. The proposed method can be extended to designing multielement airfoils.

  5. Inverse design of airfoils using a flexible membrane method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thinsurat, Kamon

    The Modified Garabedian Mc-Fadden (MGM) method is used to inversely design airfoils. The Finite Difference Method (FDM) for Non-Uniform Grids was developed to discretize the MGM equation for numerical solving. The Finite Difference Method (FDM) for Non-Uniform Grids has the advantage of being used flexibly with an unstructured grids airfoil. The commercial software FLUENT is being used as the flow solver. Several conditions are set in FLUENT such as subsonic inviscid flow, subsonic viscous flow, transonic inviscid flow, and transonic viscous flow to test the inverse design code for each condition. A moving grid program is used to create a mesh for new airfoils prior to importing meshes into FLUENT for the analysis of flows. For validation, an iterative process is used so the Cp distribution of the initial airfoil, the NACA0011, achieves the Cp distribution of the target airfoil, the NACA2315, for the subsonic inviscid case at M=0.2. Three other cases were carried out to validate the code. After the code validations, the inverse design method was used to design a shock free airfoil in the transonic condition and to design a separation free airfoil at a high angle of attack in the subsonic condition.

  6. A finite-difference method for transonic airfoil design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, J. L.; Klineberg, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes an inverse method for designing transonic airfoil sections or for modifying existing profiles. Mixed finite-difference procedures are applied to the equations of transonic small disturbance theory to determine the airfoil shape corresponding to a given surface pressure distribution. The equations are solved for the velocity components in the physical domain and flows with embedded shock waves can be calculated. To facilitate airfoil design, the method allows alternating between inverse and direct calculations to obtain a profile shape that satisfies given geometric constraints. Examples are shown of the application of the technique to improve the performance of several lifting airfoil sections. The extension of the method to three dimensions for designing supercritical wings is also indicated.

  7. A new direct design method for the medium thickness wind turbine airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quan; Chen, Jin; Pang, Xiaoping; Li, Songlin; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2013-11-01

    The newly developed integral function of airfoil profiles based on Trajkovski conformal transform theory could be used to optimize the profiles for the thin thickness airfoil. However, it is hard to adjust the coefficients of the integral function for the medium thickness airfoil. B-spline curve has an advantage of local adjustment, which makes it to effectively control the airfoil profiles at the trailing edge. Therefore, a new direct design method for the medium thickness wind turbine airfoil based on airfoil integral expression and B-spline curve is presented in this paper. An optimal mathematical model of an airfoil is built. Two new airfoils with similar thickness, based on the new designed method and the original integral method, are designed. According to the comparative analysis, the CQU-A25 airfoil designed based on the new method exhibits better results than that of the CQU-I25 airfoil which is designed based on the original method. It is demonstrated that the new method is feasible to design wind turbine airfoils. Meanwhile, the comparison of the aerodynamic performance for the CQU-A25 airfoil and for the DU91-W2-250 airfoil is studied. Results show that the maximum lift coefficient and the maximum lift/drag ratio of the CQU-A25 airfoil are higher than the ones of DU91-W2-250 airfoil in the same condition. This new airfoil design method would make it possible to design other airfoils with different thicknesses.

  8. A robust inverse inviscid method for airfoil design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaviaropoulos, P.; Dedoussis, V.; Papailiou, K. D.

    An irrotational inviscid compressible inverse design method for two-dimensional airfoil profiles is described. The method is based on the potential streamfunction formulation, where the physical space on which the boundaries of the airfoil are sought, is mapped onto the (phi, psi) space via a body-fitted coordinate transformation. A novel procedure based on differential geometry arguments is employed to derive the governing equations for the inverse problem, by requiring the curvature of the flat 2-D Euclidean space to be zero. An auxiliary coordinate transformation permits the definition of C-type computational grids on the (phi, psi) plane resulting to a more accurate description of the leading edge region. Geometry is determined by integrating Frenet equations along the grid lines. To validate the method inverse calculation results are compared to direct, `reproduction', calculation results. The design procedure of a new airfoil shape is also presented.

  9. A streamline curvature method for design of supercritical and subcritical airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.; Brooks, C. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An airfoil design procedure, applicable to both subcritical and supercritical airfoils, is described. The method is based on the streamline curvature velocity equation. Several examples illustrating this method are presented and discussed.

  10. An inverse method with regularity condition for transonic airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Ziqiang; Xia, Zhixun; Wu, Liyi

    1991-01-01

    It is known from Lighthill's exact solution of the incompressible inverse problem that in the inverse design problem, the surface pressure distribution and the free stream speed cannot both be prescribed independently. This implies the existence of a constraint on the prescribed pressure distribution. The same constraint exists at compressible speeds. Presented here is an inverse design method for transonic airfoils. In this method, the target pressure distribution contains a free parameter that is adjusted during the computation to satisfy the regularity condition. Some design results are presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the method.

  11. Inverse airfoil design procedure using a multigrid Navier-Stokes method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, J. B.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Modified Garabedian McFadden (MGM) design procedure was incorporated into an existing 2-D multigrid Navier-Stokes airfoil analysis method. The resulting design method is an iterative procedure based on a residual correction algorithm and permits the automated design of airfoil sections with prescribed surface pressure distributions. The new design method, Multigrid Modified Garabedian McFadden (MG-MGM), is demonstrated for several different transonic pressure distributions obtained from both symmetric and cambered airfoil shapes. The airfoil profiles generated with the MG-MGM code are compared to the original configurations to assess the capabilities of the inverse design method.

  12. Improved method for transonic airfoil design-by-optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, R. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An improved method for use of optimization techniques in transonic airfoil design is demonstrated. FLO6QNM incorporates a modified quasi-Newton optimization package, and is shown to be more reliable and efficient than the method developed previously at NASA-Ames, which used the COPES/CONMIN optimization problem. The design codes are compared on a series of test cases with known solutions, and the effects of problem scaling, proximity of initial point to solution, and objective function precision are studied. In contrast to the older method, well-converged solutions are shown to be attainable in the context of engineering design using computational fluid dynamics tools, a new result. The improvements are due to better performance by the optimization routine and to the use of problem-adaptive finite difference step sizes for gradient evaluation.

  13. Improved method for transonic airfoil design-by-optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, R. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An improved method for use of optimization techniques in transonic airfoil design is demonstrated. FLO6QNM incorporates a modified quasi-Newton optimization package, and is shown to be more reliable and efficient than the method developed previously at NASA-Ames, which used the COPES/CONMIN optimization program. The design codes are compared on a series of test cases with known solutions, and the effects of problem scaling, proximity of initial point to solution, and objective function precision are studied. In contrast to the older method, well-converged solutions are shown to be attainable in the context of engineering design using computational fluid dynamics tools, a new result. The improvements are due to better performance by the optimization routine and to the use of problem-adaptive finite difference step sizes for gradient evaluation.

  14. Airfoil design and optimization methods: recent progress at NLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soemarwoto, B. I.; Labrujère, Th. E.

    1999-05-01

    The present paper considers the problem of aerodynamic airfoil shape optimization where the shape of an airfoil is to be determined such that a priori specified design criteria will be met to the best possible extent. The design criteria are formulated by defining an objective or cost function, the minimum of which represents the solution to the design problem. A survey is given of developments at NLR applying the adjoint operator approach, utilizing a compressible inviscid flow model based on the Euler equations and a compressible viscous flow model based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Computational results are presented for a two-point drag-reduction design problem. Copyright

  15. Transonic airfoil design code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, F.; Garabedian, P.; Korn, D.

    1980-01-01

    Program aids in design of shockless airfoils, assists development of fuel-conserving, supercritical wings. Algorithm calculates approximate airfoil shape given prescribed pressure distribution. This allows design of families of transonic airfoils for use in aircraft wings or turbine and compressor blades. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution on CDC-6000.

  16. Hybrid airfoil design methods for full-scale ice accretion simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Farooq

    The objective of this thesis is to develop a design method together with a design philosophy that allows the design of "subscale" or "hybrid" airfoils that simulate fullscale ice accretions. These subscale or hybrid airfoils have full-scale leading edges and redesigned aft-sections. A preliminary study to help develop a design philosophy for the design of hybrid airfoils showed that hybrid airfoils could be designed to simulate full-scale airfoil droplet-impingement characteristics and, therefore, ice accretion. The study showed that the primary objective in such a design should be to determine the aft section profile that provides the circulation necessary for simulating full-scale airfoil droplet-impingement characteristics. The outcome of the study, therefore, reveals circulation control as the main design variable. To best utilize this fact, this thesis describes two innovative airfoil design methods for the design of hybrid airfoils. Of the two design methods, one uses a conventional flap system while the other only suggests the use of boundary-layer control through slot-suction on the airfoil upper surface as a possible alternative for circulation control. The formulation of each of the two design methods is described in detail, and the results from each method are validated using wind-tunnel test data. The thesis demonstrates the capabilities of each method with the help of specific design examples highlighting their application potential. In particular, the flap-system based hybrid airfoil design method is used to demonstrate the design of a half-scale hybrid model of a full-scale airfoil that simulates full-scale ice accretion at both the design and off-design conditions. The full-scale airfoil used is representative of a scaled modern business-jet main wing section. The study suggests some useful advantages of using hybrid airfoils as opposed to full-scale airfoils for a better understanding of the ice accretion process and the related issues. Results

  17. A Method for the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.; Whitesides, John L.; Campbell, Richard L.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    1996-01-01

    A fully automated iterative design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. Drag reductions have been realized using the design method over a range of Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers and airfoil thicknesses. The thrusts of the method are its ability to calculate a target N-Factor distribution that forces the flow to undergo transition at the desired location; the target-pressure-N-Factor relationship that is used to reduce the N-Factors in order to prolong transition; and its ability to design airfoils to meet lift, pitching moment, thickness and leading-edge radius constraints while also being able to meet the natural laminar flow constraint. The method uses several existing CFD codes and can design a new airfoil in only a few days using a Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  18. Inverse Design of a Thick Supercritical Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pambagjo, Tjoetjoek Eko; Nakahashi, Kazuhiro; Obayashi, Shigeru

    In this paper, a study on designing a thick supercritical airfoil by utilizing Takanashi’s inverse design method is discussed. One of the problems to design a thick supercritical airfoil by Takanashi’s method is that an oscillation of the geometry may occur during the iteration process. To reduce the oscillation, an airfoil parameterization method is utilized as the smoothing procedure. A guideline to determine the target pressure distribution to realize the thick airfoil is also discussed.

  19. Development of the highly loaded axial flow turbine airfoils, making use of the improved inverse channel flow design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K.

    1985-11-01

    To reduce the number of the turbine airfoils or the solidity as far as possible without increasing energy loss, a study of highly loaded turbine airfoils was conducted. These airfoils were designed for the typical velocity diagrams of the first and second stages of a jet engine low pressure turbine. With regard to the design procedures, an improved inverse method, and also a boundary layer analysis technique were employed to optimize the airfoil shapes. These airfoils, and state-of-the-art aft loaded conventional airfoils designed for almost equivalent velocity diagrams were tested in the high speed cascade wind tunnel. The airfoils showed lower kinetic energy loss coefficient characteristics and wider useful incidence ranges over the wider range extended to the high subsonic regime compared with the aft loaded ones, in spite of their higher loading. In addition to some main parts of the design procedures, theoretical and experimental results are discussed.

  20. A multi-point inverse airfoil design method based on conformal mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, Michael S.; Maughmer, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    An exact method of multipoint inverse airfoil design for incompressible flow is presented. Multipoint design is handled by dividing the airfoil into a number of desired segments. For each segment the velocity distribution is prescribed together with an angle of attack at which the prescribed velocity distribution is to be achieved. In this manner, multipoint design objectives can be taken into account in the initial specification of the velocity distribution. In order for the multipoint inverse airfoil design problem to be well posed, three integral constraints and several conditions arise which must be satisfied. Further restrictions are imposed if the airfoil is to have a specified pitching moment, thickness ratio, or other constraints. The system of equations is solved partly as a linear system and partly through multidimensional Newton iteration. Since the velocity distribution is prescribed about the circle in the angular coordinate, specification of the velocity in terms of arc length is handled through the multidimensional Newton iteration as well. The current formulation sets the stage for a more general multipoint inverse airfoil design method in which it will be possible to specify the velocity distribution, some boundary-layer development, or the surface geometry along a segment.

  1. Coupling Optimization Design of Aspirated Compressor Airfoil and Aspirated Scheme Based on Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm and CST Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Yan; Yang, Xiaodong; Lu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    This paper focuses on creating a new design method optimizing both aspirated compressor airfoil and the aspiration scheme simultaneously. The optimization design method is based on the artificial bee colony algorithm and the CST method, while the flow field is computed by one 2D computational program. The optimization process of the rotor tip and stator tip airfoil from an aspirated fan stage is demonstrated to verify the effectiveness of the new coupling method. The results show that the total pressure losses of the optimized stator tip and rotor tip airfoil are reduced relatively by 54% and 20%, respectively. Artificial bee colony algorithm and CST method indicate a satisfying applicability in aspirated airfoil optimization design. Finally, the features of aspirated airfoil designing process are concluded.

  2. An artificial viscosity method for the design of supercritical airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, G. B.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical technique is presented for the design of two-dimensional supercritical wing sections with low wave drag. The method is a design mode of the analysis code H which gives excellent agreement with experimental results and is widely used in the aircraft industry. Topics covered include the partial differential equations of transonic flow, the computational procedure and results; the design procedure; a convergence theorem; and description of the code.

  3. Airfoil Design and Optimization by the One-Shot Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, G.; Taasan, Shlomo; Salas, M. D.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient numerical approach for the design of optimal aerodynamic shapes is presented in this paper. The objective of any optimization problem is to find the optimum of a cost function subject to a certain state equation (governing equation of the flow field) and certain side constraints. As in classical optimal control methods, the present approach introduces a costate variable (Lagrange multiplier) to evaluate the gradient of the cost function. High efficiency in reaching the optimum solution is achieved by using a multigrid technique and updating the shape in a hierarchical manner such that smooth (low-frequency) changes are done separately from high-frequency changes. Thus, the design variables are changed on a grid where their changes produce nonsmooth (high-frequency) perturbations that can be damped efficiently by the multigrid. The cost of solving the optimization problem is approximately two to three times the cost of the equivalent analysis problem.

  4. Inverse transonic airfoil design including viscous interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique was developed for the analysis of specified transonic airfoils or for the design of airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution, including the effect of weak viscous interaction. The method uses the full potential equation, a stretched Cartesian coordinate system, and the Nash-MacDonald turbulent boundary layer method. Comparisons with experimental data for typical transonic airfoils show excellent agreement. An example shows the application of the method to design a thick aft-cambered airfoil, and the effects of viscous interaction on its performance are discussed.

  5. Generalized multi-point inverse airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, Michael S.; Maughmer, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    In a rather general sense, inverse airfoil design can be taken to mean the problem of specifying a desired set of airfoil characteristics, such as the airfoil maximum thickness ratio, pitching moment, part of the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development, etc., then from this information determine the corresponding airfoil shape. This paper presents a method which approaches the design problem from this perspective. In particular, the airfoil is divided into segments along which, together with the design conditions, either the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development may be prescribed. In addition to these local desired distributions, single parameters like the airfoil thickness can be specified. The problem of finding the airfoil shape is determined by coupling an incompressible, inviscid, inverse airfoil design method with a direct integral boundary-layer analysis method and solving the resulting nonlinear equations via a multidimensional Newton iteration technique. The approach is fast and easily allows for interactive design. It is also flexible and could be adapted to solving compressible, inverse airfoil design problems.

  6. A new airfoil design concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henne, P. A.; Gregg, R. D.

    1989-01-01

    The present airfoil design concept is based on utilizing unconventional geometry characteristics near the airfoil trailing edge which include a finite trailing edge thickness, strongly divergent trailing edge upper and lower surfaces, and high surface curvature on the lower surface at or near the lower surface trailing edge. This paper presents computational analyses of airfoils and a wing utilizing the concept, airfoil validation wind tunnel test results of several configurations, and wing-validation wind tunnel test results for a complete wing design. In addition to validating the concept, the airfoil and wing testing provided additional detailed data to better understand the aerodynamic advantage of such an unconventional trailing edge configuration. It is demonstrated that the concept represents a significant step in airfoil technology beyond that achieved with the Supercritical Airfoil. This concept provides the aerodynamicist an additional degree of design freedom and flexibility previously unrecognized.

  7. Airfoil Design and Rotorcraft Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between global performance of a typical helicopter and the airfoil environment, as represented by the airfoil angles of attack and Mach number, has been examined using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. A general correspondence is observed between global performance parameters, such as rotor L/D, and airfoil performance parameters, such as airfoil L/D, the drag bucket boundaries, and the divergence Mach number. Effects of design parameters such as blade twist and rotor speed variation have been examined and, in most cases, improvements observed in global performance are also observed in terms of airfoil performance. The relations observed between global Performance and the airfoil environment suggests that the emphasis in airfoil design should be for good L/D, while the maximum lift coefficient performance is less important.

  8. Method of making an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moracz, Donald J. (Inventor); Cook, Charles R. (Inventor); Toth, Istvan J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An improved method of making an airfoil includes stacking plies in two groups. A separator ply is positioned between the two groups of plies. The groups of plies and the separator ply are interconnected to form an airfoil blank. The airfoil blank is shaped, by forging or other methods, to have a desired configuration. The material of the separator ply is then dissolved or otherwise removed from between the two sections of the airfoil blank to provide access to the interior of the airfoil blank. Material is removed from inner sides of the two separated sections to form core receiving cavities. After cores have been placed in the cavities, the two sections of the airfoil blank are interconnected and the shaping of the airfoil is completed. The cores are subsequently removed from the completed airfoil.

  9. Method of making an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moracz, Donald J. (Inventor); Cook, Charles R. (Inventor); Toth, Istvan J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An improved method of making an airfoil includes stacking plies in two groups. A separator ply is positioned between the two groups of plies. The groups of plies and the separator ply are interconnected to form an airfoil blank. The airfoil blank is shaped, by forging or other methods, to have a desired configuration. The material of the separator ply is then dissolved or otherwise removed from between the two sections of the airfoil blank to provide access to the interior of the airfoil blank. Material is removed from inner sides of the two separated sections to form core receiving cavities. After cores have been placed in the cavities, the two sections of the airfoil blank are interconnected and the shaping of the airfoil is completed. The cores are subsequently removed from the completed airfoil.

  10. Analysis and design of steady transonic flow over airfoils by the method of parametric differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halt, D. W.; Harris, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The results reported here are based on applying the method of parametric differentiation (MPD) to transform the nonlinear differential equation governing small-disturbance transonic flow to a linear equation. Implicit approximate factorization and monotone methods were used to accelerate convergence of the linear problem by an order of magnitude over successive line over-relaxation. The relative merits of using MPD are discussed in comparison to conventional small-disturbance applications. Several MPD analyses are performed on an array of airfoils. A design procedure utilizing MPD is discussed and demonstrated for two nonlifting cases.

  11. Airfoil Design Using a Coupled Euler and Integral Boundary Layer Method with Adjoint Based Sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, S.; Reuther, J.; Chattot, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a control theory approach for the design of airfoils in the presence of viscous compressible flows. A coupled system of the integral boundary layer and the Euler equations is solved to provide rapid flow simulations. An adjunct approach consistent with the complete coupled state equations is employed to obtain the sensitivities needed to drive a numerical optimization algorithm. Design to target pressure distribution is demonstrated on an RAE 2822 airfoil at transonic speed.

  12. Airfoil design using a coupled euler and integral boundary layer method with adjoint based sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, S.; Reuther, J.; Chattot, J. J.

    The objective of this paper is to present a control theory approach for the design of airfoils in the presence of viscous compressible flows. A coupled system of the integral boundary layer and the Euler equations is solved to provide rapid flow simulations. An adjoint approach consistent with the complete coupled state equations is employed to obtain the sensitivities needed to drive a numerical optimization algorithm. Design to a target pressure distribution is demonstrated on an RAE 2822 airfoil at transonic speeds.

  13. Transonic airfoil design using Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique for designing transonic airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution (the inverse problem) is presented. The method employs the basic features of Jameson's iterative solution for the full potential equation, except that inverse boundary conditions and Cartesian coordinates are used. The method is a direct-inverse approach that controls trailing-edge closure. Examples show the application of the method to design aft-cambered and other airfoils specifically for transonic flight.

  14. A surrogate assisted evolutionary optimization method with application to the transonic airfoil design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrokhi, Ava; Jahangirian, Alireza

    2010-06-01

    A multi-layer perceptron neural network (NN) method is used for efficient estimation of the expensive objective functions in the evolutionary optimization with the genetic algorithm (GA). The estimation capability of the NN is improved by dynamic retraining using the data from successive generations. In addition, the normal distribution of the training data variables is used to determine well-trained parts of the design space for the NN approximation. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by two transonic airfoil design problems considering inviscid and viscous flow solvers. Results are compared with those of the simple GA and an alternative surrogate method. The total number of flow solver calls is reduced by about 40% using this fitness approximation technique, which in turn reduces the total computational time without influencing the convergence rate of the optimization algorithm. The accuracy of the NN estimation is considerably improved using the normal distribution approach compared with the alternative method.

  15. Improvements in surface singularity analysis and design methods. [applicable to airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The coupling of the combined source vortex distribution of Green's potential flow function with contemporary numerical techniques is shown to provide accurate, efficient, and stable solutions to subsonic inviscid analysis and design problems for multi-element airfoils. The analysis problem is solved by direct calculation of the surface singularity distribution required to satisfy the flow tangency boundary condition. The design or inverse problem is solved by an iteration process. In this process, the geometry and the associated pressure distribution are iterated until the pressure distribution most nearly corresponding to the prescribed design distribution is obtained. Typically, five iteration cycles are required for convergence. A description of the analysis and design method is presented, along with supporting examples.

  16. Low speed airfoil design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, R.; Somers, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    A low speed airfoil design and analysis program was developed which contains several unique features. In the design mode, the velocity distribution is not specified for one but many different angles of attack. Several iteration options are included which allow the trailing edge angle to be specified while other parameters are iterated. For airfoil analysis, a panel method is available which uses third-order panels having parabolic vorticity distributions. The flow condition is satisfied at the end points of the panels. Both sharp and blunt trailing edges can be analyzed. The integral boundary layer method with its laminar separation bubble analog, empirical transition criterion, and precise turbulent boundary layer equations compares very favorably with other methods, both integral and finite difference. Comparisons with experiment for several airfoils over a very wide Reynolds number range are discussed. Applications to high lift airfoil design are also demonstrated.

  17. Inverse transonic airfoil design methods including boundary layer and viscous interaction effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    The development and incorporation into TRANDES of a fully conservative analysis method utilizing the artificial compressibility approach is described. The method allows for lifting cases and finite thickness airfoils and utilizes a stretched coordinate system. Wave drag and massive separation studies are also discussed.

  18. The method of complex characteristics for transonic airfoil design, with an application to compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bledsoe, M.; Garabedian, P.

    1985-01-01

    The use of mathematical models to study physical problems of current interest to aeronautical engineers has been made possible by the development of numerical techniques to compute solutions of the differential equations of transonic aerodynamics. These advances have encouraged the improvement of supercritical wing technology. A method to determined steady, shockless flow of an inviscid, compressible fluid past a cascade of airfoils in the (x,y)-plane is considered, taking into account also the case of an isolated airfoil. The method of complex characteristics solves the equations in the hodograph plane by extending all variables into the complex domain, where the notion of type is no longer significant. Attention is given to the mathematical background, the method of complex characteristics, and numerical calculations.

  19. Trailing edge flow conditions as a factor in airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Maughmer, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Some new developments relevant to the design of single-element airfoils using potential flow methods are presented. In particular, the role played by the non-dimensional trailing edge velocity in design is considered and the relationship between the specified value and the resulting airfoil geometry is explored. In addition, the ramifications of the unbounded trailing edge pressure gradients generally present in the potential flow solution of the flow over an airfoil are examined, and the conditions necessary to obtain a class of airfoils having finite trailing edge pressure gradients developed. The incorporation of these conditions into the inverse method of Eppler is presented and the modified scheme employed to generate a number of airfoils for consideration. The detailed viscous analysis of airfoils having finite trailing edge pressure gradients demonstrates a reduction in the strong inviscid-viscid interactions generally present near the trailing edge of an airfoil.

  20. An analytical study for the design of advanced rotor airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical study has been conducted to design and evaluate two airfoils for helicopter rotors. The best basic shape, designed with a transonic hodograph design method, was modified to meet subsonic criteria. One airfoil had an additional constraint for low pitching-moment at the transonic design point. Airfoil characteristics were predicted. Results of a comparative analysis of helicopter performance indicate that the new airfoils will produce reduced rotor power requirements compared to the NACA 0012. The hodograph design method, written in CDC Algol, is listed and described.

  1. Design of high lift airfoils with a Stratford distribution by the Eppler method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    Airfoils having a Stratford pressure distribution, which has zero skin friction in the pressure recovery area, were investigated in an effort to develop high lift airfoils. The Eppler program, an inverse conformal mapping technique where the x and y coordinates of the airfoil are developed from a given velocity distribution, was used.

  2. Transonic airfoil analysis and design in nonuniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. F.; Lan, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    A nonuniform transonic airfoil code is developed for applications in analysis, inverse design and direct optimization involving an airfoil immersed in propfan slipstream. Problems concerning the numerical stability, convergence, divergence and solution oscillations are discussed. The code is validated by comparing with some known results in incompressible flow. A parametric investigation indicates that the airfoil lift-drag ratio can be increased by decreasing the thickness ratio. A better performance can be achieved if the airfoil is located below the slipstream center. Airfoil characteristics designed by the inverse method and a direct optimization are compared. The airfoil designed with the method of direct optimization exhibits better characteristics and achieves a gain of 22 percent in lift-drag ratio with a reduction of 4 percent in thickness.

  3. The design and analysis of low-speed airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, R.; Somers, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    PROFILE program solves diverse and inverse airfoil-flow problems. It combines conformational mapping method for design of airfoils with prescribed velocity-distribution characteristics, panel method for potential-flow analysis, and boundary-layer method. PROFILE is written in FORTRAN IV for implementation on CDC 6000-series computer.

  4. Design optimization of transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joh, C.-Y.; Grossman, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical optimization procedures were considered for the design of airfoils in transonic flow based on the transonic small disturbance (TSD) and Euler equations. A sequential approximation optimization technique was implemented with an accurate approximation of the wave drag based on the Nixon's coordinate straining approach. A modification of the Euler surface boundary conditions was implemented in order to efficiently compute design sensitivities without remeshing the grid. Two effective design procedures producing converged designs in approximately 10 global iterations were developed: interchanging the role of the objective function and constraint and the direct lift maximization with move limits which were fixed absolute values of the design variables.

  5. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine and compared to earlier methods. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  6. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  7. Boundary-layer stability and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeffrey K.

    1986-01-01

    Several different natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils have been analyzed for stability of the laminar boundary layer using linear stability codes. The NLF airfoils analyzed come from three different design conditions: incompressible; compressible with no sweep; and compressible with sweep. Some of the design problems are discussed, concentrating on those problems associated with keeping the boundary layer laminar. Also, there is a discussion on how a linear stability analysis was effectively used to improve the design for some of the airfoils.

  8. Numerical Airfoil Optimization Using a Reduced Number of Design Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.; Hicks, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A method is presented for numerical airfoil optimization whereby a reduced number of design coordinates are used to define the airfoil shape. The approach is to define the airfoil as a linear combination of shapes. These basic shapes may be analytically or numerically defined, allowing the designer to use his insight to propose candidate designs. The design problem becomes one of determining the participation of each such function in defining the optimum airfoil. Examples are presented for two-dimensional airfoil design and are compared with previous results based on a polynomial representation of the airfoil shape. Four existing NACA airfoils are used as basic shapes. Solutions equivalent to previous results are achieved with a factor of more than 3 improvements in efficiency, while superior designs are demonstrated with an efficiency greater than 2 over previous methods. With this shape definition, the optimization process is shown to exploit the simplifying assumptions in the inviscid aerodynamic analysis used here, thus demonstrating the need to use more advanced aerodynamics for airfoil optimization.

  9. Transonic airfoil and wing design using Navier-Stokes codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, N. J.; Campbell, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    An iterative design method has been implemented into 2D and 3D Navier-Stokes codes for the design of airfoils or wings with given target pressure distributions. The method begins with the analysis of an initial geometry, and obtains the analysis pressure distributions of that geometry. The differences between analysis pressures and target pressures are used to drive geometry changes through the use of a streamline curvature method. This paper describes the procedure that makes the iterative design method work for Navier-Stokes codes. Examples of 2D airfoil design, and 3D wing design are included. It is demonstrated that the method is highly effective for airfoil or wing design at flow conditions where no substantial separation occurs. Problems encountered in the airfoil design with shock induced flow separations are discussed.

  10. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    , compatibility for the different airfoil family members, etc.) and with the ultimate objective that the airfoils will reduce the blade loads. In this paper the whole airfoil design process and the main characteristics of the airfoil family are described. Some force coefficients for the design Reynolds number are also presented. The new designed airfoils have been studied with computational calculations (panel method code and CFD) and also in a wind tunnel experimental campaign. Some of these results will be also presented in this paper.

  11. A computer program for the design and analysis of low-speed airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, R.; Somers, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    A conformal mapping method for the design of airfoils with prescribed velocity distribution characteristics, a panel method for the analysis of the potential flow about given airfoils, and a boundary layer method have been combined. With this combined method, airfoils with prescribed boundary layer characteristics can be designed and airfoils with prescribed shapes can be analyzed. All three methods are described briefly. The program and its input options are described. A complete listing is given as an appendix.

  12. Robust Airfoil Optimization in High Resolution Design Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Padula, Sharon L.

    2003-01-01

    The robust airfoil shape optimization is a direct method for drag reduction over a given range of operating conditions and has three advantages: (1) it prevents severe degradation in the off-design performance by using a smart descent direction in each optimization iteration, (2) it uses a large number of B-spline control points as design variables yet the resulting airfoil shape is fairly smooth, and (3) it allows the user to make a trade-off between the level of optimization and the amount of computing time consumed. The robust optimization method is demonstrated by solving a lift-constrained drag minimization problem for a two-dimensional airfoil in viscous flow with a large number of geometric design variables. Our experience with robust optimization indicates that our strategy produces reasonable airfoil shapes that are similar to the original airfoils, but these new shapes provide drag reduction over the specified range of Mach numbers. We have tested this strategy on a number of advanced airfoil models produced by knowledgeable aerodynamic design team members and found that our strategy produces airfoils better or equal to any designs produced by traditional design methods.

  13. Robust, optimal subsonic airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Method system, and product from application of the method, for design of a subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape and incorporating one or more constraints on the airfoil geometric parameters and flow characteristics. The resulting design is robust against variations in airfoil dimensions and local airfoil shape introduced in the airfoil manufacturing process. A perturbation procedure provides a class of airfoil shapes, beginning with an initial airfoil shape.

  14. An Approach to the Constrained Design of Natural Laminar Flow Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford E.

    1997-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integral turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the laminar flow toward the desired amount. An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  15. An approach to the constrained design of natural laminar flow airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Bradford Earl

    1995-01-01

    A design method has been developed by which an airfoil with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow can be designed, while maintaining other aerodynamic and geometric constraints. After obtaining the initial airfoil's pressure distribution at the design lift coefficient using an Euler solver coupled with an integml turbulent boundary layer method, the calculations from a laminar boundary layer solver are used by a stability analysis code to obtain estimates of the transition location (using N-Factors) for the starting airfoil. A new design method then calculates a target pressure distribution that will increase the larninar flow toward the desired amounl An airfoil design method is then iteratively used to design an airfoil that possesses that target pressure distribution. The new airfoil's boundary layer stability characteristics are determined, and this iterative process continues until an airfoil is designed that meets the laminar flow requirement and as many of the other constraints as possible.

  16. An assessment of airfoil design by numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.; Murman, E. M.; Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    A practical procedure for optimum design of aerodynamic shapes is demonstrated. The proposed procedure uses an optimization program based on the method of feasible directions coupled with an analysis program that uses a relaxation solution of the inviscid, transonic, small-disturbance equations. Results are presented for low-drag, nonlifting transonic airfoils. Extension of the method to lifting airfoils, other speed regimes, and to three dimensions if feasible.

  17. Inverse transonic airfoil design methods including boundary layer and viscous interaction effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    A body-fitted grid embedment technique applicable to inviscid transonic airfoil flow field analysis was developed and verified through a series of tests. Test cases used to verify the technique show that the accuracy of the solution was increased by grid embedding. This enhancement of the solution is especially true when small supercritical zones occur which cannot be adequately described using the main grid only. Results obtained with the SKANFP full potential program are considered with regard to the massive separated flow and high lift and the undesirable unrealistic 'bump' in the vicinity of the separation point due to a mismatch between the unseparated and separated pressure distributions. Techniques used to eliminate this feature are discussed.

  18. A hybrid algorithm for transonic airfoil and wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Smith, Leigh A.

    1987-01-01

    The present method for the design of transonic airfoils and wings employs a predictor/corrector approach in which an analysis code calculates the flowfield for an initial geometry, then modifies it on the basis of the difference between calculated and target pressures. This allows the design method to be straightforwardly coupled with any existing analysis code, as presently undertaken with several two- and three-dimensional potential flow codes. The results obtained indicate that the method is robust and accurate, even in the cases of airfoils with strongly supercritical flow and shocks. The design codes are noted to require computational resources typical of current pure-inverse methods.

  19. Automated CAD design for sculptured airfoil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. D.; Yeagley, S. R.

    1990-11-01

    The design of tightly tolerated sculptured surfaces such as those for airfoils requires a significant design effort in order to machine the tools to create these surfaces. Because of the quantity of numerical data required to describe the airfoil surfaces, a CAD approach is required. Although this approach will result in productivity gains, much larger gains can be achieved by automating the design process. This paper discusses an application which resulted in an eightfold improvement in productivity by automating the design process on the CAD system.

  20. Design of transonic airfoils and wings using a hybrid design algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Smith, Leigh A.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed for designing airfoils and wings at transonic speeds. It utilizes a hybrid design algorithm in an iterative predictor/corrector approach, alternating between analysis code and a design module. This method has been successfully applied to a variety of airfoil and wing design problems, including both transport and highly-swept fighter wing configurations. An efficient approach to viscous airfoild design and the effect of including static aeroelastic deflections in the wing design process are also illustrated.

  1. Airfoil design by numerical optimization using a minicomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.; Szelazek, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program developed for the automated design of low speed airfoils utilizes a generalized Joukowski method for aerodynamic analysis coupled with a conjugate gradient, penalty function, numerical optimization algorithm to give an efficient calculation technique for use with minicomputers. The program designs airfoils with a prescribed pressure distribution as well as those which minimize or maximize some aerodynamic force coefficient. At present the method is restricted to inviscid, incompressible flow. A typical design problem will execute in 4.5 hr on an HP 9830 minicomputer.

  2. Inverse boundary-layer technique for airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A description is presented of a technique for the optimization of airfoil pressure distributions using an interactive inverse boundary-layer program. This program allows the user to determine quickly a near-optimum subsonic pressure distribution which meets his requirements for lift, drag, and pitching moment at the desired flow conditions. The method employs an inverse turbulent boundary-layer scheme for definition of the turbulent recovery portion of the pressure distribution. Two levels of pressure-distribution architecture are used - a simple roof top for preliminary studies and a more complex four-region architecture for a more refined design. A technique is employed to avoid the specification of pressure distributions which result in unrealistic airfoils, that is, those with negative thickness. The program allows rapid evaluation of a designed pressure distribution off-design in Reynolds number, transition location, and angle of attack, and will compute an airfoil contour for the designed pressure distribution using linear theory.

  3. Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derkacs, Thomas (Inventor); Fetheroff, Charles W. (Inventor); Matay, Istvan M. (Inventor); Toth, Istvan J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Although the method and apparatus of the present invention can be utilized to apply either a uniform or a nonuniform covering of material over many different workpieces, the apparatus (20) is advantageously utilized to apply a thermal barrier covering (64) to an airfoil (22) which is used in a turbine engine. The airfoil is held by a gripper assembly (86) while a spray gun (24) is effective to apply the covering over the airfoil. When a portion of the covering has been applied, a sensor (28) is utilized to detect the thickness of the covering. A control apparatus (32) compares the thickness of the covering of material which has been applied with the desired thickness and is subsequently effective to regulate the operation of the spray gun to adaptively apply a covering of a desired thickness with an accuracy of at least plus or minus 0.0015 of an inch (1.5 mils) despite unanticipated process variations.

  4. Permeable wall boundary conditions for transonic airfoil design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, O.; van den Braembussche, R.

    This paper describes a method for the design of airfoils with prescribed Mach number or static pressure distribution along both the suction and pressure sides. The method consists of an iterative procedure, in which the final geometry is obtained through successive modifications of an existing shape. Each modification is computed by solving the Euler equations using permeable wall boundary conditions, in which the required Mach number distribution can be imposed on the airfoil wall. Since the classical slip condition is no longer imposed, the resulting flow is not tangent to the wall. A new geometry is created using this normal velocity component and a transpiration method.

  5. Design and analytical study of a rotor airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, L. U.

    1978-01-01

    An airfoil section for use on helicopter rotor blades was defined and analyzed by means of potential flow/boundary layer interaction and viscous transonic flow methods to meet as closely as possible a set of advanced airfoil design objectives. The design efforts showed that the first priority objectives, including selected low speed pitching moment, maximum lift and drag divergence requirements can be met, though marginally. The maximum lift requirement at M = 0.5 and most of the profile drag objectives cannot be met without some compromise of at least one of the higher order priorities.

  6. Design analysis of vertical wind turbine with airfoil variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Qaedy, T. Masykur Al; Nawawi, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    With an ever increasing electrical energy crisis occurring in the Banda Aceh City, it will be important to investigate alternative methods of generating power in ways different than fossil fuels. In fact, one of the biggest sources of energy in Aceh is wind energy. It can be harnessed not only by big corporations but also by individuals using Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). This paper presents a three-dimensional CFD analysis of the influence of airfoil design on performance of a Darrieus-type vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The main objective of this paper is to develop an airfoil design for NACA 63-series vertical axis wind turbine, for average wind velocity 2,5 m/s. To utilize both lift and drag force, some of designs of airfoil are analyzed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics solver such us Fluent. Simulation is performed for this airfoil at different angles of attach rearranging from -12°, -8°, -4°, 0°, 4°, 8°, and 12°. The analysis showed that the significant enhancement in value of lift coefficient for airfoil NACA 63-series is occurred for NACA 63-412.

  7. On the use of thick-airfoil theory to design airfoil families in which thickness and lift are varied independently

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    A method has been developed for designing families of airfoils in which the members of a family have the same basic type of pressure distribution but vary in thickness ratio or lift, or both. Thickness ratio and lift may be prescribed independently. The method which is based on the Theodorsen thick-airfoil theory permits moderate variations from the basic shape on which the family is based.

  8. Design of a shape adaptive airfoil actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy strip for airplane tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadeh, R.; Raissi Charmacani, K.; Tabesh, M.

    2011-04-01

    Of the factors that mainly affect the efficiency of the wing during a special flow regime, the shape of its airfoil cross section is the most significant. Airfoils are generally designed for a specific flight condition and, therefore, are not fully optimized in all flight conditions. It is very desirable to have an airfoil with the ability to change its shape based on the current regime. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators activate in response to changes in the temperature and can recover their original configuration after being deformed. This study presents the development of a method to control the shape of an airfoil using SMA actuators. To predict the thermomechanical behaviors of an SMA thin strip, 3D incremental formulation of the SMA constitutive model is implemented in FEA software package ABAQUS. The interactions between the airfoil structure and SMA thin strip actuator are investigated. Also, the aerodynamic performance of a standard airfoil with a plain flap is compared with an adaptive airfoil.

  9. Design of a subsonic airfoil with upstream blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'Inskii, N. B.; Mardanov, R. F.

    2007-10-01

    The problem is solved of designing a symmetric airfoil with upstream blowing opposite to subsonic irrotational steady flow of an inviscid incompressible fluid. The solution relies on Sedov’s idea of a stagnation region developing in the neighborhood of the stagnation point. An iterative solution process is developed, and examples of airfoils are constructed. The numerical results are analyzed, and conclusions are drawn about the effect of blowing parameters on the airfoil geometry and the resultant force acting on the airfoil.

  10. Design of transonic airfoil sections using a similarity theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the available methods for transonic airfoil and wing design indicates that the most powerful technique is the numerical optimization procedure. However, the computer time for this method is relatively large because of the amount of computation required in the searches during optimization. The optimization method requires that base and calibration solutions be computed to determine a minimum drag direction. The design space is then computationally searched in this direction; it is these searches that dominate the computation time. A recent similarity theory allows certain transonic flows to be calculated rapidly from the base and calibration solutions. In this paper the application of the similarity theory to design problems is examined with the object of at least partially eliminating the costly searches of the design optimization method. An example of an airfoil design is presented.

  11. Application of numerical optimization to the design of low speed airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.; Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1975-01-01

    A practical procedure for the optimum design of low-speed airfoils is demonstrated. The procedure uses an optimization program based on the method of feasible directions coupled with an aerodynamic analysis program that uses a relaxation solution of the inviscid, full potential equation. Results are presented for airfoils designed to have small adverse pressure gradients, high maximum lift, and low pitching moment.

  12. Figures of merit for airfoil/aircraft design integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, Mark D.; Somers, Dan M.

    1988-01-01

    Because the airfoil can so strongly impact other aspects of an aircraft configuration, it is important that the airfoil design process be integrated with that of the aircraft to achieve the best possible performance of a new flight vehicle. To aid in preliminary design efforts, several aerodynamic figures of merit are presented which facilitate the matching of the airfoil performance characteristics to those of the aircraft. These figures of merit are fairly general and can assist the airfoil design process for flight vehicles designed for maximum endurance, range, or ceiling. Although specifically applicable to vehicles for which the wing area is sized by some required minimum airspeed, the discussion is pertinent to all airfoil/aircraft matching situations and points the way for developing similar figures of merit to aid the airfoil/aircraft design process for any flight vehicle.

  13. Optimization of an Advanced Design Three-Element Airfoil at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John C.; Dominik, Chet J.

    1995-01-01

    New high-lift components have been designed for a three-element advanced high-lift research airfoil using a state-of-the-art computational method. The new components were designed with the aim to provide high maximum-lift values while maintaining attached flow on the single-segment flap at approach conditions. This three-element airfoil has been tested in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at chord Reynolds number up to 16 million. The performance of the NASA research airfoil is compared to a reference advanced high-lift research airfoil. Effects of Reynolds number on slat and flap rigging have been studied experimentally. The performance trend of this new high-lift design is comparable to that predicted by the computational method over much of the angle of attack range. Nevertheless, the method did not accurately predict the airfoil performance or the configuration-based trends near maximum lift.

  14. Control theory based airfoil design using the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony; Reuther, James

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using the potential flow equation with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. The goal of our present work is to extend the development to treat the Euler equations in two-dimensions by procedures that can readily be generalized to treat complex shapes in three-dimensions. Therefore, we have developed methods which can address airfoil design through either an analytic mapping or an arbitrary grid perturbation method applied to a finite volume discretization of the Euler equations. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented for both the inverse problem and drag minimization problem.

  15. TRANDESNF: A computer program for transonic airfoil design and analysis in nonuniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. F.; Lan, C. Edward

    1987-01-01

    The use of a transonic airfoil code for analysis, inverse design, and direct optimization of an airfoil immersed in propfan slipstream is described. A summary of the theoretical method, program capabilities, input format, output variables, and program execution are described. Input data of sample test cases and the corresponding output are given.

  16. Design of the LRP airfoil series using 2D CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahle, Frederik; Bak, Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.; Vronsky, Tomas; Gaudern, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the design and wind tunnel testing of a high-Reynolds number, high lift airfoil series designed for wind turbines. The airfoils were designed using direct gradient- based numerical multi-point optimization based on a Bezier parameterization of the shape, coupled to the 2D Navier-Stokes flow solver EllipSys2D. The resulting airfoils, the LRP2-30 and LRP2-36, achieve both higher operational lift coefficients and higher lift to drag ratios compared to the equivalent FFA-W3 airfoils.

  17. Airfoil design for variable RPM horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjoerck, Anders

    1990-01-01

    The design criteria for new airfoils for a variable speed horizontal axis wind turbine are described. The two series of airfoils developed are characterized by high design lift coefficients in order to achieve small blade chords, high lift drag ratios for the airfoil sections designed for the outer part of the blade, performance insensitivity to surface roughness, and a gentle stall at an angle of attack in order to reduce excessive loads. Each series consists of airfoils with varying thickness to chord ratios for different radial stations. Interpolation between the two series is possible.

  18. Transonic airfoil design for helicopter rotor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Jackson, B.

    1989-01-01

    Despite the fact that the flow over a rotor blade is strongly influenced by locally three-dimensional and unsteady effects, practical experience has always demonstrated that substantial improvements in the aerodynamic performance can be gained by improving the steady two-dimensional charateristics of the airfoil(s) employed. The two phenomena known to have great impact on the overall rotor performance are: (1) retreating blade stall with the associated large pressure drag, and (2) compressibility effects on the advancing blade leading to shock formation and the associated wave drag and boundary-layer separation losses. It was concluded that: optimization routines are a powerful tool for finding solutions to multiple design point problems; the optimization process must be guided by the judicious choice of geometric and aerodynamic constraints; optimization routines should be appropriately coupled to viscous, not inviscid, transonic flow solvers; hybrid design procedures in conjunction with optimization routines represent the most efficient approach for rotor airfroil design; unsteady effects resulting in the delay of lift and moment stall should be modeled using simple empirical relations; and inflight optimization of aerodynamic loads (e.g., use of variable rate blowing, flaps, etc.) can satisfy any number of requirements at design and off-design conditions.

  19. Profile Optimization Method for Robust Airfoil Shape Optimization in Viscous Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2003-01-01

    Simulation results obtained by using FUN2D for robust airfoil shape optimization in transonic viscous flow are included to show the potential of the profile optimization method for generating fairly smooth optimal airfoils with no off-design performance degradation.

  20. Variable-complexity optimization applied to airfoil design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thokala, Praveen; Martins, Joaquim R. R. A.

    2007-04-01

    Variable-complexity methods are applied to aerodynamic shape design problems with the objective of reducing the total computational cost of the optimization process. Two main strategies are employed: the use of different levels of fidelity in the analysis models (variable fidelity) and the use of different sets of design variables (variable parameterization). Variable-fidelity methods with three different types of corrections are implemented and applied to a set of two-dimensional airfoil optimization problems that use computational fluid dynamics for the analysis. Variable parameterization is also used to solve the same problems. Both strategies are shown to reduce the computational cost of the optimization.

  1. Hodograph design of lifting airfoils with high critical mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropinski, M. C. A.; Schwendeman, D. W.; Cole, J. D.

    1995-05-01

    We wish to construct airfoils that have the highest free-stream Mach number M ∞ for a given set of geometric constraints for which the flow is nowhere supersonic. Nonlifting airfoils which maximize M ∞ for a given thickness ratio δ are known to possess long sonic segments at their critical speed. To construct lifting airfoils, we proceed under the conjecture that the optimal airfoil satisfying a given set of constraints is the one possessing the longest possible arc length of sonic velocity. A boundary-value problem is formulated in the hodograph plane using transonic small-disturbance theory whose solution determines an airfoil with long sonic arcs. For small lift coefficients, the hodograph domain covers two Riemann sheets and a finite-difference method is used to solve the boundary-value problem on this domain. A numerical integration of the solution around the boundary yields an airfoil shape, and three examples are discussed. The performance of these airfoils is compared with standard airfoils having the same lift coefficient and δ, and it is shown that the calculated airfoils have a 6% 10% increase in critical M ∞.

  2. Design efficiency evaluation for transonic airfoil optimization - A case for Navier-Stokes design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. O.; Eyi, S.; Lee, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    A constrained-optimization design method which improves the aerodynamic performance of transonic airfoils is evaluated from a design-quality and design-efficiency viewpoint. Design efficiency is a measure of the performance improvement and the design time (CPU time). Total-airfoil design and upper-surface design are performed using the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with several grids, and are evaluated using the Navier-Stokes equations to determine the anticipated physical design response. Even though the cost of the Euler design is lower than Navier-Stokes design, the Navier-Stokes evaluation indicates that the Euler design does not necessarily improve the aerodynamic performance. Therefore, the design optimization should be based on an accurate flow simulation to achieve an actual performance improvement, and the design time is a secondary concern.

  3. Potential flow around two-dimensional airfoils using a singular integral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Yves; Wilson, Dennis

    1987-01-01

    The problem of potential flow around two-dimensional airfoils is solved by using a new singular integral method. The potential flow equations for incompressible potential flow are written in a singular integral equation. The equation is solved at N collocation points on the airfoil surface. A unique feature of this method is that the airfoil geometry is specified as an independent variable in the exact integral equation. Compared to other numerical methods, the present calculation procedure is much simpler and gives remarkable accuracy for many body shapes. An advantage of the present method is that it allows the inverse design calculation and the results are extremely accurate.

  4. A Constrainted Design Approach for NLF Airfoils by Coupling Inverse Design and Optimal Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L.; Gao, Y. W.; Qiao, Z. D.

    2011-09-01

    In present paper, a design method for natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils with a substantial amount of natural laminar flow on both surfaces by coupling inverse design method and optimal technique is developed. The N-factor method is used to design the target pressure distributions before pressure recovery region with desired transition locations while maintaining aerodynamics constraints. The pressure in recovery region is designed according to Stratford separation criteria to prevent the laminar separation. In order to improve the off-design performance in inverse design, a multi-point inverse design is performed. An optimal technique based on response surface methodology (RSM) is used to calculate the target airfoil shapes according to the designed target pressure distributions. The set of design points is selected to satisfy the D-optimality and the reduced quadratic polynomial RS models without the 2nd-order cross items are constructed to reduce the computational cost. The design cases indicated that by the coupling-method developed in present paper, the inverse design method can be used in multi-point design to improve the off-design performance and the airfoils designed have the desired transition locations and maintain the aerodynamics constraints while the thickness constraint is difficult to meet in this design procedure.

  5. Exploration in optimal design of an airfoil with a leading edge rotating cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Huang, Dian-Gui; Sun, Xiao-Jing; Wu, Guo-Qing

    2010-08-01

    Based on the theory of moving surface boundary layer control (MSBC), a concept of an airfoil having a rotating cylinder at the leading edge has been developed and experimentally proven to have good aerodynamic performance even at large angles of attack. Thus, this research aims to give guidance on optimizing the design of this kind of airfoil with high lift coefficients. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique, the CFD simulation results have been compared with the experimental results available in the literature, and then the SST two-equation model is selected as the appropriate turbulence model. At a given cylinder surface velocity ratio, the cylinder diameter d, the drop height of trailing edge δ and the curvatures of the pressure and suction surfaces of the airfoil are regarded as the optimal design parameters and the airfoil lift coefficient is considered as the optimization objective function. Therefore, using orthogonal optimization method, we herein develop a new design of airfoil favorable for having a rotating leading edge. It has been numerically proven that the resulting airfoil has good capability of achieving a substantially superior performance when compared to the airfoils of the prior art.

  6. Design and experimental results for the S805 airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, the S805, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  7. Design and experimental results for the S809 airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D M

    1997-01-01

    A 21-percent-thick, laminar-flow airfoil, the S809, for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  8. Aerodynamic airfoil design using the Euler equations based on the dynamic evolution method and the control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, YingYing; He, Feng; Shen, MengYu

    2011-04-01

    Based on the idea of adjoint method and the dynamic evolution method, a new optimum aerodynamic design technique is presented in this paper. It can be applied to the optimum problems with a large number of design variables and is time saving. The key of the new method lies in that the optimization process is regarded as an unsteady evolution, i.e., the optimization is executed, simultaneously with solving the unsteady flow governing equations and adjoint equations. Numerical examples for both the inverse problem and drag minimization using Euler equations have been presented, and the results show that the method presented in this paper is more efficient than the optimum methods based on the steady flow solution and the steady solution of adjoint equations.

  9. Design and experimental results for the S814 airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    A 24-percent-thick airfoil, the S814, for the root region of a horizontal-axis wind-turbine blade has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoil thickness have been satisfied. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement with the exception of maximum lift which is overpredicted. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the higher maximum lift and the lower profile drag of the S814 airfoil, thus confirming the achievement of the objectives.

  10. An approach to constrained aerodynamic design with application to airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    An approach was developed for incorporating flow and geometric constraints into the Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (DISC) design method. In this approach, an initial target pressure distribution is developed using a set of control points. The chordwise locations and pressure levels of these points are initially estimated either from empirical relationships and observed characteristics of pressure distributions for a given class of airfoils or by fitting the points to an existing pressure distribution. These values are then automatically adjusted during the design process to satisfy the flow and geometric constraints. The flow constraints currently available are lift, wave drag, pitching moment, pressure gradient, and local pressure levels. The geometric constraint options include maximum thickness, local thickness, leading-edge radius, and a 'glove' constraint involving inner and outer bounding surfaces. This design method was also extended to include the successive constraint release (SCR) approach to constrained minimization.

  11. Integrated design and analysis of advanced airfoil shapes for gas turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.A.; Rooney, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    An integral process in the mechanical design of gas turbine airfoils is the conversion of hot or running geometry into cold or as-manufactured geometry. New and advanced methods of design and analysis must be created that parallel new and technologically advanced turbine components. In particular, to achieve the high performance required of today's gas turbine engines, the industry is forced to design and manufacture increasingly complex airfoil shapes using advanced analysis and modeling techniques. This paper describes a method of integrating advanced, general purpose finite element analysis techniques in the mechanical design process.

  12. Design of a 3 kW wind turbine generator with thin airfoil blades

    SciTech Connect

    Ameku, Kazumasa; Nagai, Baku M.; Roy, Jitendro Nath

    2008-09-15

    Three blades of a 3 kW prototype wind turbine generator were designed with thin airfoil and a tip speed ratio of 3. The wind turbine has been controlled via two control methods: the variable pitch angle and by regulation of the field current of the generator and examined under real wind conditions. The characteristics of the thin airfoil, called ''Seven arcs thin airfoil'' named so because the airfoil is composed of seven circular arcs, are analyzed with the airfoil design and analysis program XFOIL. The thin airfoil blade is designed and calculated by blade element and momentum theory. The performance characteristics of the machine such as rotational speed, generator output as well as stability for wind speed changes are described. In the case of average wind speeds of 10 m/s and a maximum of 19 m/s, the automatically controlled wind turbine ran safely through rough wind conditions and showed an average generator output of 1105 W and a power coefficient 0.14. (author)

  13. Design and development of a facility for compressible dynamic stall studies of a rapidly pitching airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Carr, L. W.

    1989-01-01

    A facility for the study of dynamic stall of an airfoil undergoing a transient ramp-type pitching motion is described. The facility can produce pitch rates of 3600 deg/sec to an angle of attack of 60 deg by using a specially designed hydraulic drive with feedback control. The ramp motion generator can also generate arbitrary motion of the airfoil and thus can simulate an arbitrary aircraft maneuver. A unique airfoil support system allows unobstructed flow visualization including the complete airfoil contour, thus permitting the use of nonintrusive optical diagnostic methods for flow measurement close to the surface as well as simultaneous far-field measurements. Schlieren pictures obtained during the study reveal the instantaneous density gradients associated with dynamic stall, even under conditions of very low Mach numbers.

  14. Turbine airfoil to shroud attachment method

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X; Kulkarni, Anand A; James, Allister W; Wessell, Brian J; Gear, Paul J

    2014-12-23

    Bi-casting a platform (50) onto an end portion (42) of a turbine airfoil (31) after forming a coating of a fugitive material (56) on the end portion. After bi-casting the platform, the coating is dissolved and removed to relieve differential thermal shrinkage stress between the airfoil and platform. The thickness of the coating is varied around the end portion in proportion to varying amounts of local differential process shrinkage. The coating may be sprayed (76A, 76B) onto the end portion in opposite directions parallel to a chord line (41) of the airfoil or parallel to a mid-platform length (80) of the platform to form respective layers tapering in thickness from the leading (32) and trailing (34) edges along the suction side (36) of the airfoil.

  15. The design of an airfoil for a high-altitude, long-endurance remotely piloted vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, Mark D.; Somers, Dan M.

    1987-01-01

    Airfoil design efforts are studied. The importance of integrating airfoil and aircraft designs was demonstrated. Realistic airfoil data was provided to aid future high altitude, long endurance aircraft preliminary design. Test cases were developed for further validation of the Eppler program. Boundary layer, not pressure distribution or shape, was designed. Substantial improvement was achieved in vehicle performance through mission specific airfoil designed utilizing the multipoint capability of the Eppler program.

  16. Airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Ristau, Neil; Siden, Gunnar Leif

    2015-07-21

    An airfoil includes a leading edge, a trailing edge downstream from the leading edge, a pressure surface between the leading and trailing edges, and a suction surface between the leading and trailing edges and opposite the pressure surface. A first convex section on the suction surface decreases in curvature downstream from the leading edge, and a throat on the suction surface is downstream from the first convex section. A second convex section is on the suction surface downstream from the throat, and a first convex segment of the second convex section increases in curvature.

  17. Robust, Optimal Subsonic Airfoil Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2014-01-01

    A method has been developed to create an airfoil robust enough to operate satisfactorily in different environments. This method determines a robust, optimal, subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape, and imposes the necessary constraints on the design. Also, this method is flexible and extendible to a larger class of requirements and changes in constraints imposed.

  18. Control of flow separation in airfoil/wing design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gally, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    Existing aerodynamic design methods have generally concentrated on the optimization of airfoil or wing shapes to produce a minimum drag while satisfying some basic constraints such as lift, pitching moment, or thickness. Since the minimization of drag almost always precludes the existence of separated flow, the evaluation and validation of these design methods for their robustness and accuracy when separated flow is present has not been aggressively pursued. However, two new applications for these design tools may be expected to include separated flow and the issues of aerodynamic design with this feature must be addressed. The first application of the aerodynamic design tools is the design of airfoils or wings to provide an optimal performance over a wide range of flight conditions (multipoint design). While the definition of 'optimal performance' in the multipoint setting is currently being hashed out, it is recognized that given a wide enough range of flight conditions, it will not be possible to ensure a minimum drag constraint at all conditions, and in fact some amount of separated flow (presumably small) may have to be allowed at the more demanding flight conditions. Thus a multipoint design method must be tolerant of the existence of separated flow and may include some controls upon its extent. The second application is in the design of wings with extended high speed buffet boundaries of their flight envelopes. Buffet occurs on a wing when regions of flow separation have grown to the extent that their time varying pressures induce possible destructive effects upon the wing structure or adversely effect either the aircraft controllability or the passenger comfort. A conservative approach to the expansion of the buffet flight boundary is to simply expand the flight envelope of nonseparated flow under the assumption that buffet will also thus be alleviated. However, having the ability to design a wing with separated flow and thus to control the location, extent

  19. Tests of Airfoils Designed to Delay the Compressibility Burble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, John

    1939-01-01

    Development of airfoil sections suitable for high-speed applications has generally been difficult because little was known of the flow phenomenon that occurs at high speeds. A definite critical speed has been found at which serious detrimental flow changes occur that lead to serious losses in lift and large increases in drag. This flow phenomenon, called the compressibility burble, was originally a propeller problem, but with the development of higher speed aircraft serious consideration must be given to other parts of the airplane. Fundamental investigations of high-speed airflow phenomenon have provided new information. An important conclusion of this work has been the determination of the critical speed, that is, the speed at which the compressibility burble occurs. The critical speed was shown to be the translational velocity at which the sum of the translational velocity and the maximum local induced velocity at the surface of the airfoil or other body equals the local speed of sound. Obviously then higher critical speeds can be attained through the development of airfoils that have minimum induced velocity for any given value of the lift coefficient. Presumably, the highest critical speed will be attained by an airfoil that has uniform chordwise distribution of induced velocity or, in other words, a flat pressure distribution curve. The ideal airfoil for any given high-speed application is, then, that form which at its operating lift coefficient has uniform chordwise distribution of induced velocity. Accordingly, an analytical search for such airfoil forms has been conducted and these forms are now being investigated experimentally in the 23-inch high-speed wind tunnel. The first airfoils investigated showed marked improvement over those forms already available, not only as to critical speed buy also the drag at low speeds is decreased considerably. Because of the immediate marked improvement, it was considered desirable to extend the thickness and lift

  20. Application of two procedures for dual-point design of transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Campbell, Richard L.; Allison, Dennis O.

    1994-01-01

    Two dual-point design procedures were developed to reduce the objective function of a baseline airfoil at two design points. The first procedure to develop a redesigned airfoil used a weighted average of the shapes of two intermediate airfoils redesigned at each of the two design points. The second procedure used a weighted average of two pressure distributions obtained from an intermediate airfoil redesigned at each of the two design points. Each procedure was used to design a new airfoil with reduced wave drag at the cruise condition without increasing the wave drag or pitching moment at the climb condition. Two cycles of the airfoil shape-averaging procedure successfully designed a new airfoil that reduced the objective function and satisfied the constraints. One cycle of the target (desired) pressure-averaging procedure was used to design two new airfoils that reduced the objective function and came close to satisfying the constraints.

  1. A consistent design procedure for supercritical airfoils in free air and a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, V.; Malmuth, N. D.; Cole, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    A computational inverse procedure for transonic airfoils in which shapes are determined supporting prescribed pressure distributions is presented. The method uses the small disturbance equation and a consistent analysis-design differencing procedure at the airfoil surface. This avoids the intermediate analysis-design-analysis iterations. The effect of any openness at the trailing edge is taken onto account by adding an effective source term in the far field. The final results from a systematic expansion procedure which models the far field for solid, ideal slotted, and free jet tunnel walls are presented along with some design results for the associated boundary conditions and those for a free flight.

  2. Design considerations of advanced supercritical low drag suction airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, W.; Reed, H. L.; Dagenhart, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Supercritical low drag suction laminar flow airfoils were laid out for shock-free flow at design freestream Mach = 0.76, design lift coefficient = 0.58, and t/c = 0.13. The design goals were the minimization of suction laminarization problems and the assurance of shock-free flow at freestream Mach not greater than design freestream Mach (for design lift coefficient) as well as at lift coefficient not greater than design lift coefficient (for design freestream Mach); this involved limiting the height-to-length ratio of the supersonic zone at design to 0.35. High design freestream Mach numbers result with extensive supersonic flow (over 80% of the chord) on the upper surface, with a steep Stratford-type rear pressure rise with suction, as well as by carrying lift essentially in front- and rear-loaded regions of the airfoil with high static pressures on the carved out front and rear lower surface.

  3. Comparison of Evolutionary (Genetic) Algorithm and Adjoint Methods for Multi-Objective Viscous Airfoil Optimizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, T. H.; Nemec, M.; Holst, T.; Zingg, D. W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comparison between an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and an Adjoint-Gradient (AG) Method applied to a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for airfoil design is presented. Both approaches use a common function evaluation code, the steady-state explicit part of the code,ARC2D. The parameterization of the design space is a common B-spline approach for an airfoil surface, which together with a common griding approach, restricts the AG and EA to the same design space. Results are presented for a class of viscous transonic airfoils in which the optimization tradeoff between drag minimization as one objective and lift maximization as another, produces the multi-objective design space. Comparisons are made for efficiency, accuracy and design consistency.

  4. Subsonic natural-laminar-flow airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the development history of natural laminar-flow (NLF) airfoil profiles under guidance of an experimentally well-verified theoretical method for the design of airfoils suited to virtually all subcritical applications. This method, the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Program, contains a conformal-mapping method for airfoils having prescribed velocity-distribution characteristics, as well as a panel method for the analysis of potential flow about given airfoils and a boundary-layer method. Several of the NLF airfoils thus obtained are discussed.

  5. Advanced airfoil design empirically based transonic aircraft drag buildup technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, W. D., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    To systematically investigate the potential of advanced airfoils in advance preliminary design studies, empirical relationships were derived, based on available wind tunnel test data, through which total drag is determined recognizing all major aircraft geometric variables. This technique recognizes a single design lift coefficient and Mach number for each aircraft. Using this technique drag polars are derived for all Mach numbers up to MDesign + 0.05 and lift coefficients -0.40 to +0.20 from CLDesign.

  6. Low speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 17 percent thick airfoil section designed for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests have been conducted to determine the low-speed two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of a 17-percent-thick airfoil designed for general aviation applications (GA(W)-1). The results were compared with predictions based on a theoretical method for calculating the viscous flow about the airfoil. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.28. Reynolds numbers based on airfoil chord varied from 2.0 million to 20.0 million. Maximum section lift coefficients greater than 2.0 were obtained and section lift-drag ratio at a lift coefficient of 1.0 (climb condition) varied from about 65 to 85 as the Reynolds number increased from about 2.0 million to 6.0 million.

  7. Development of two supercritical airfoils with a thickness-to-chord ratio of 0.20 and design lift coefficients of 0.3 and 0.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernell, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    Two supercritical airfoils were developed specifically for application to span distributed loading cargo aircraft. These airfoils have a thickness-to-chord ratio of 0.20 and design lift coefficients of 0.3 and 0.4, and were derived by modifying a recently developed supercritical airfoil having a thickness-to-chord ratio of 0.18 and a design lift coefficient of 0.5. The aerodynamic characteristics were calculated using a theoretical method which computes the flow field about an airfoil having supercritical surface velocities.

  8. Summary of Airfoil Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Ira H; Von Doenhoff, Albert E; Stivers, Louis, Jr

    1945-01-01

    The historical development of NACA airfoils is briefly reviewed. New data are presented that permit the rapid calculation of the approximate pressure distributions for the older NACA four-digit and five-digit airfoils by the same methods used for the NACA 6-series airfoils. The general methods used to derive the basic thickness forms for NACA 6 and 7-series airfoils together with their corresponding pressure distributions are presented. Detail data necessary for the application of the airfoils to wing design are presented in supplementary figures placed at the end of the paper. The report includes an analysis of the lift, drag, pitching-moment, and critical-speed characteristics of the airfoils, together with a discussion of the effects of surface conditions. Available data on high-lift devices are presented. Problems associated with lateral-control devices, leading-edge air intakes, and interference are briefly discussed, together with aerodynamic problems of application. (author)

  9. An airfoil pitch apparatus-modeling and control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    The study of dynamic stall of rapidly pitching airfoils is being conducted at NASA Ames Research Center. Understanding this physical phenomenon will aid in improving the maneuverability of fighter aircraft as well as civilian aircraft. A wind tunnel device which can linearly pitch and control an airfoil with rapid dynamic response is needed for such tests. To develop a mechanism capable of high accelerations, an accurate model and control system is created. The model contains mathematical representations of the mechanical system, including mass, spring, and damping characteristics for each structural element, as well as coulomb friction and servovalve saturation. Electrical components, both digital and analog, linear and nonlinear, are simulated. The implementation of such a high-performance system requires detailed control design as well as state-of-the-art components. This paper describes the system model, states the system requirements, and presents results of its theoretical performance which maximizes the structural and hydraulic aspects of this system.

  10. An airfoil pitch apparatus-modeling and control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    The study of dynamic stall of rapidly pitching airfoils is being conducted at NASA Ames Research Center. Understanding this physical phenomenon will aid in improving the maneuverability of fighter aircraft as well as civilian aircraft. A wind tunnel device which can linearly pitch and control an airfoil with rapid dynamic reponse is needed for such tests. To develop a mechanism capable of high accelerations, an accurate model and control system is created. The model contains mathematical representations of the mechanical system, including mass, spring, and damping characteristics for each structural element, as well as coulomb friction and servovalve saturation. Electrical components, both digital and analog, linear and nonlinear, are simulated. The implementation of such a high-performance system requires detailed control design as well as state-of-the-art components. This paper describes the system model, states the system requirements, and presents results of its theoretical performance which maximizes the structural and hydraulic aspects of this system.

  11. An airfoil pitch apparatus-modeling and control design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    1989-03-01

    The study of dynamic stall of rapidly pitching airfoils is being conducted at NASA Ames Research Center. Understanding this physical phenomenon will aid in improving the maneuverability of fighter aircraft as well as civilian aircraft. A wind tunnel device which can linearly pitch and control an airfoil with rapid dynamic response is needed for such tests. To develop a mechanism capable of high accelerations, an accurate model and control system is created. The model contains mathematical representations of the mechanical system, including mass, spring, and damping characteristics for each structural element, as well as coulomb friction and servovalve saturation. Electrical components, both digital and analog, linear and nonlinear, are simulated. The implementation of such a high-performance system requires detailed control design as well as state-of-the-art components. This paper describes the system model, states the system requirements, and presents results of its theoretical performance which maximizes the structural and hydraulic aspects of this system.

  12. Design and wind tunnel evaluation of a symmetric airfoil series for large wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gregorek, G.M.

    1984-05-01

    Using the Eppler analytic design methodology, a family of symmetric airfoils with thickness to chord ratios of 0.21, 0.25, and 0.29 has been designed for applications to large wind turbines. The airfoil series, designed for Reynolds numbers above 4 x 10/sup 6/, has a contour that maintains its thickness to the 0.7 chord position, allowing use of a deep aft spar for structural integrity. Wind tunnel tests of the 21 percent thick airfoil conducted in The Ohio State University Airfoil Test Facilities at M = 0.25 and Re = 2, 4, and 8 x 10/sup 6/ showed good agreement with predicted surface pressures and lift and drag coefficients when the angle of attack was low and the Reynolds number was 8 x 10/sup 6/. At the lowest Reynolds number, both the measured lift curve slope and the maximum lift coefficient differ significantly from theory. In the post-stall region, agreement with theory and experiment is poor, at all Reynolds numbers, verifying the need for improved analytic methods in this important flow regime.

  13. Airfoil design: Finding the balance between design lift and structural stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Christian; Gaudern, Nicholas; Zahle, Frederik; Vronsky, Tomas

    2014-06-01

    When upscaling wind turbine blades there is an increasing need for high levels of structural efficiency. In this paper the relationships between the aerodynamic characteristics; design lift and lift-drag ratio; and the structural characteristics were investigated. Using a unified optimization setup, airfoils were designed with relative thicknesses between 18% and 36%, a structural box height of 85% of the relative thickness, and varying box widths in chordwise direction between 20% and 40% of the chord length. The results from these airfoil designs showed that for a given flapwise stiffness, the design lift coefficient increases if the box length reduces and at the same time the relative thickness increases. Even though the conclusions are specific to the airfoil design approach used, the study indicated that an increased design lift required slightly higher relative thickness compared to airfoils with lower design lift to maintain the flapwise stiffness. Also, the study indicated that the lift-drag ratio as a function of flapwise stiffness was relatively independent of the airfoil design with a tendency that the lift-drag ratio decreased for large box lengths. The above conclusions were supported by an analysis of the three airfoil families Riso-C2, DU and FFA, where the lift-drag ratio as a function of flapwise stiffness was decreasing, but relatively independent of the airfoil design, and the design lift coefficient was varying depending on the design philosophy. To make the analysis complete also design lift and lift- drag ratio as a function of edgewise and torsional stiffness were shown.

  14. A fast approach to designing airfoils from given pressure distribution in compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daripa, Prabir

    1987-01-01

    A new inverse method for aerodynamic design of airfols is presented for subcritical flows. The pressure distribution in this method can be prescribed as a function of the arc length of the as-yet unknown body. This inverse problem is shown to be mathematically equivalent to solving only one nonlinear boundary value problem subject to known Dirichlet data on the boundary. The solution to this problem determines the airfoil, the freestream Mach number, and the upstream flow direction. The existence of a solution to a given pressure distribution is discussed. The method is easy to implement and extremely efficient. A series of results for which comparisons are made with the known airfoils is presented.

  15. Design and Experimental Results for a Natural-Laminar-Flow Airfoil for General Aviation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    A natural-laminar-flow airfoil for general aviation applications, the NLF(1)-0416, was designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. The basic objective of combining the high maximum lift of the NASA low-speed airfoils with the low cruise drag of the NACA 6-series airfoils was achieved. The safety requirement that the maximum lift coefficient not be significantly affected with transition fixed near the leading edge was also met. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show excellent agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils, both laminar flow and turbulent flow, confirm the achievement of the basic objective.

  16. CFD Methods and Tools for Multi-Element Airfoil Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This lecture will discuss the computational tools currently available for high-lift multi-element airfoil analysis. It will present an overview of a number of different numerical approaches, their current capabilities, short-comings, and computational costs. The lecture will be limited to viscous methods, including inviscid/boundary layer coupling methods, and incompressible and compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes methods. Both structured and unstructured grid generation approaches will be presented. Two different structured grid procedures are outlined, one which uses multi-block patched grids, the other uses overset chimera grids. Turbulence and transition modeling will be discussed.

  17. The NASA Langley Laminar-Flow-Control (LFC) experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil: Design overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.; Harvey, William D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A large-chord, swept, supercritical, laminar-flow-control (LFC) airfoil was designed and constructed and is currently undergoing tests in the Langley 8 ft Transonic Pressure Tunnel. The experiment was directed toward evaluating the compatibility of LFC and supercritical airfoils, validating prediction techniques, and generating a data base for future transport airfoil design as part of NASA's ongoing research program to significantly reduce drag and increase aircraft efficiency. Unique features of the airfoil included a high design Mach number with shock free flow and boundary layer control by suction. Special requirements for the experiment included modifications to the wind tunnel to achieve the necessary flow quality and contouring of the test section walls to simulate free air flow about a swept model at transonic speeds. Design of the airfoil with a slotted suction surface, the suction system, and modifications to the tunnel to meet test requirements are discussed.

  18. Computer-aided roll pass design in rolling of airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgerman, N.; Lahoti, G. D.; Altan, T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes two computer-aided design (CAD) programs developed for modeling the shape rolling process for airfoil sections. The first program, SHPROL, uses a modular upper-bound method of analysis and predicts the lateral spread, elongation, and roll torque. The second program, ROLPAS, predicts the stresses, roll separating force, the roll torque and the details of metal flow by simulating the rolling process, using the slab method of analysis. ROLPAS is an interactive program; it offers graphic display capabilities and allows the user to interact with the computer via a keyboard, CRT, and a light pen. The accuracy of the computerized models was evaluated by (a) rolling a selected airfoil shape at room temperature from 1018 steel and isothermally at high temperature from Ti-6Al-4V, and (b) comparing the experimental results with computer predictions. The comparisons indicated that the CAD systems, described here, are useful for practical engineering purposes and can be utilized in roll pass design and analysis for airfoil and similar shapes.

  19. A computer program for the design and analysis of low-speed airfoils, supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, R.; Somers, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Three new options were incorporated into an existing computer program for the design and analysis of low speed airfoils. These options permit the analysis of airfoils having variable chord (variable geometry), a boundary layer displacement iteration, and the analysis of the effect of single roughness elements. All three options are described in detail and are included in the FORTRAN IV computer program.

  20. Synthesized airfoil data method for prediction of dynamic stall and unsteady airloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangwani, S. T.

    1983-01-01

    A detailed analysis of dynamic stall experiments has led to a set of relatively compact analytical expressions, called synthesized unsteady airfoil data, which accurately describe in the time-domain the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of stalled airfoils. An analytical research program was conducted to expand and improve this synthesized unsteady airfoil data method using additional available sets of unsteady airfoil data. The primary objectives were to reduce these data to synthesized form for use in rotor airload prediction analyses and to generalize the results. Unsteady drag data were synthesized which provided the basis for successful expansion of the formulation to include computation of the unsteady pressure drag of airfoils and rotor blades. Also, an improved prediction model for airfoil flow reattachment was incorporated in the method. Application of this improved unsteady aerodynamics model has resulted in an improved correlation between analytic predictions and measured full scale helicopter blade loads and stress data.

  1. Computation of unsteady viscous flows past oscillating airfoils using the CPI method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilmineau, E.; Queutey, P.

    Numerical solution of the incompressible two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, with the help of the CPI discretization, are presented for different airfoils. The strongly conservative equations are discretized with a finite volume method. The method uses a system of numerically generated curvilinear coordinates and re- tains the pressure and the cartesian velocity components as dependent variables on a non-staggered grid. Two flows around an airfoil are computed and compared to experimental results. First, the starting flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil oscillating at large incidences is investigated. Secondly, the turbulent flow past an AS 240 airfoil at a fixed incidence is studied.

  2. Improved methods of vibration analysis of pretwisted, airfoil blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1984-01-01

    Vibration analysis of pretwisted blades of asymmetric airfoil cross section is performed by using two mixed variational approaches. Numerical results obtained from these two methods are compared to those obtained from an improved finite difference method and also to those given by the ordinary finite difference method. The relative merits, convergence properties and accuracies of all four methods are studied and discussed. The effects of asymmetry and pretwist on natural frequencies and mode shapes are investigated. The improved finite difference method is shown to be far superior to the conventional finite difference method in several respects. Close lower bound solutions are provided by the improved finite difference method for untwisted blades with a relatively coarse mesh while the mixed methods have not indicated any specific bound.

  3. Summary of Airfoil Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stivers, Louis S.; Abbott, Ira H.; von Doenhoff, Albert E.

    1945-01-01

    Recent airfoil data for both flight and wind-tunnel tests have been collected and correlated insofar as possible. The flight data consist largely of drag measurements made by the wake-survey method. Most of the data on airfoil section characteristics were obtained in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel. Detail data necessary for the application of NACA 6-serles airfoils to wing design are presented in supplementary figures, together with recent data for the NACA 24-, 44-, and 230-series airfoils. The general methods used to derive the basic thickness forms for NACA 6- and 7-series airfoils and their corresponding pressure distributions are presented. Data and methods are given for rapidly obtaining the approximate pressure distributions for NACA four-digit, five-digit, 6-, and 7-series airfoils. The report includes an analysis of the lift, drag, pitching-moment, and critical-speed characteristics of the airfoils, together with a discussion of the effects of surface conditions. Available data on high-lift devices are presented. Problems associated with lateral-control devices, leading-edge air intakes, and interference are briefly discussed. The data indicate that the effects of surface condition on the lift and drag characteristics are at least as large as the effects of the airfoil shape and must be considered in airfoil selection and the prediction of wing characteristics. Airfoils permitting extensive laminar flow, such as the NACA 6-series airfoils, have much lower drag coefficients at high speed and cruising lift coefficients than earlier types-of airfoils if, and only if, the wing surfaces are sufficiently smooth and fair. The NACA 6-series airfoils also have favorable critical-speed characteristics and do not appear to present unusual problems associated with the application of high-lift and lateral-control devices. Much of the data given in the NACA Advance Confidential Report entitled "Preliminary Low-Drag-Airfoil and Flap Data from

  4. Method for forming a liquid cooled airfoil for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Grondahl, Clayton M.; Willmott, Leo C.; Muth, Myron C.

    1981-01-01

    A method for forming a liquid cooled airfoil for a gas turbine is disclosed. A plurality of holes are formed at spaced locations in an oversized airfoil blank. A pre-formed composite liquid coolant tube is bonded into each of the holes. The composite tube includes an inner member formed of an anti-corrosive material and an outer member formed of a material exhibiting a high degree of thermal conductivity. After the coolant tubes have been bonded to the airfoil blank, the airfoil blank is machined to a desired shape, such that a portion of the outer member of each of the composite tubes is contiguous with the outer surface of the machined airfoil blank. Finally, an external skin is bonded to the exposed outer surface of both the machined airfoil blank and the composite tubes.

  5. Natural laminar flow airfoil design considerations for winglets on low-speed airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Winglet airfoil section characteristics which significantly influence cruise performance and handling qualities of an airplane are discussed. A good winglet design requires an airfoil section with a low cruise drag coefficient, a high maximum lift coefficient, and a gradual and steady movement of the boundary layer transition location with angle of attack. The first design requirement provides a low crossover lift coefficient of airplane drag polars with winglets off and on. The other requirements prevent nonlinear changes in airplane lateral/directional stability and control characteristics. These requirements are considered in the design of a natural laminar flow airfoil section for winglet applications and chord Reynolds number of 1 to 4 million.

  6. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  7. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1996-10-08

    Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

  8. Unsteady Adjoint Approach for Design Optimization of Flapping Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Byung Joon; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the work for optimizing the propulsive efficiency of flapping airfoils, i.e., improving the thrust under constraining aerodynamic work during the flapping flights by changing their shape and trajectory of motion with the unsteady discrete adjoint approach. For unsteady problems, it is essential to properly resolving time scales of motion under consideration and it must be compatible with the objective sought after. We include both the instantaneous and time-averaged (periodic) formulations in this study. For the design optimization with shape parameters or motion parameters, the time-averaged objective function is found to be more useful, while the instantaneous one is more suitable for flow control. The instantaneous objective function is operationally straightforward. On the other hand, the time-averaged objective function requires additional steps in the adjoint approach; the unsteady discrete adjoint equations for a periodic flow must be reformulated and the corresponding system of equations solved iteratively. We compare the design results from shape and trajectory optimizations and investigate the physical relevance of design variables to the flapping motion at on- and off-design conditions.

  9. Experimental study of flow separation control on a low- Re airfoil using leading-edge protuberance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. M.; Wang, G. F.; Xu, J. Z.

    2014-04-01

    An experimental study of flow separation control on a low- Re c airfoil was presently investigated using a newly developed leading-edge protuberance method, motivated by the improvement in the hydrodynamics of the giant humpback whale through its pectoral flippers. Deploying this method, the control effectiveness of the airfoil aerodynamics was fully evaluated using a three-component force balance, leading to an effectively impaired stall phenomenon and great improvement in the performances within the wide post-stall angle range (22°-80°). To understand the flow physics behind, the vorticity field, velocity field and boundary layer flow field over the airfoil suction side were examined using a particle image velocimetry and an oil-flow surface visualization system. It was found that the leading-edge protuberance method, more like low-profile vortex generator, effectively modified the flow pattern of the airfoil boundary layer through the chordwise and spanwise evolutions of the interacting streamwise vortices generated by protuberances, where the separation of the turbulent boundary layer dominated within the stall region and the rather strong attachment of the laminar boundary layer still existed within the post-stall region. The characteristics to manipulate the flow separation mode of the original airfoil indicated the possibility to further optimize the control performance by reasonably designing the layout of the protuberances.

  10. Synthesized airfoil data method for prediction of dynamic stall and unsteady airloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangwani, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The synthesized unsteady airfoil data method, which accurately describes the unsteady aerodynamic characteristics of stalled airfoils in the time domain, is expanded and improved. Nine sets of unsteady drag data are synthesized, providing a basis for the successful expansion of the method to include the computation of unsteady pressure drag of airfoils and rotor blades. An improved prediction model for airfoil flow reattachment is incorporated into the method. Application of the model results in a better correlation of analytic predictions with measured full-scale helicopter blade loads and stress data. The results show that it is feasible to generalize the empirical parameters embedded in the method over a range of angles of attack, Mach number, airfoil shape, and sweep angle.

  11. An infrared technique for evaluating turbine airfoil cooling designs

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, P.C.; Rhodes, J.F.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental approach is used to evaluate turbine airfoil cooling designs for advanced gas turbine engine applications by incorporating double-wall film-cooled design features into large-scale flat plate specimens. An infrared (IR) imaging system is used to make detailed, two-dimensional steady-state measurements of flat plate surface temperature with spatial resolution on the order of 0.4 mm. The technique employs a cooled zinc selenide window transparent to infrared radiation and calibrates the IR temperature readings to reference thermocouples embedded in each specimen, yielding a surface temperature measurement accuracy of {+-} 4 C. With minimal thermocouple installation required, the flat plate/IR approach is cost effective, essentially nonintrusive, and produces abundant results quickly. Design concepts can proceed from art to part to data in a manner consistent with aggressive development schedules. The infrared technique is demonstrated here by considering the effect of film hole injection angle for a staggered array of film cooling holes integrated with a highly effective internal cooling pattern. Heated free stream air and room temperature cooling air are used to produce a nominal temperature ratio of 2 over a range of blowing ratios from 0.7 to 1.5. Results were obtained at hole angles of 90 and 30 deg for two different hole spacings and are presented in terms of overall cooling effectiveness.

  12. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  13. Summary of high-lift and control surface research on NASA general aviation airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Ostowari, C.

    1981-01-01

    Summary findings and bibliographical information are presented for airfoil and airfoil-related research conducted at Wichita State University during the past decade. Topics include flap, aileron, and spoiler design data for new airfoils, extensive flow measurements, modifications to older airfoils, new symmetrical sections and contributions to analytical methods for cases with partial separation.

  14. Applications of boundary vorticity dynamics to flow simulation, airfoil design, and flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fanglin

    This dissertation is dedicated to the study of applications of the boundary vorticity dynamics theory. The vorticity generation mechanism from solid boundaries is studied first. The development of a two-dimensional viscous solver and an airfoil inverse design tool is conducted next. Finally, a new flow control method called "BVF cutting" is introduced and tested. Various source terms of the vorticity generation rate, i.e., boundary vorticity flux (BVF), are studied based on the tangential momentum balance on a solid surface. The direct connection between BVF and aerodynamic forces is rederived. The constraint of BVF imposed by the vorticity conservation is formulated and clarified. Two aerodynamic tools are developed in terms of BVF: A numerical Navier-Stokes (N-S) solver for two-dimensional incompressible steady or unsteady flows by using streamfunction-vorticity variables, with the BVF as the Neumann boundary condition; and an inverse design tool to develop airfoils with improved performance, in which the BVF is used as the objective function in the Euler limit of a viscous flow. An extensive validation of the N-S solver is conducted, and examples of improved airfoils are given mainly for the purpose of enhancing their lift coefficients and delaying the stall angles of attack. By reexamining the flow separation in terms of BVF, two possible ways to implement the BVF cutting method are examined, one of which is proved very effective. Enlightened by these, the most idealized objective for flow control is found. A principle for the perfect controlled flow and a guideline to judge the effectiveness of a flow control is proposed.

  15. Design and fabrication of instrumented composite airfoils for a cryogenic wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Firth, George C.; Hollingsworth, William H., Jr.; Adderholdt, Bruce M.; Gibbens, Barry V.

    1990-01-01

    Two instrumented horizontal stabilizers and one instrumented vertical stabilizer were designed and fabricated for testing on the Pathfinder 1 (PF-1) Transport Model in the NASA Langley Research Center's National Transonic Facility (NTF). Two different designs were employed: the horizontal stabilizer utilized a metal spar and fiberglass overwrap and the vertical stabilizer was made of all fiberglass. All design requirements were met in terms of design loads, airfoil tolerances, surface finish, orifice hole quality, and proof-of-concept tests. Pressure tubing installation was found to be easier for these concepts as compared to methods used in conventional metallic models. Ease of repair was found to be a principal advantage in that some fabrication problems were overcome by reapplying fiberglass cloth and/or epoxy to damaged areas. Also, fabrication costs were judged to be lower when compared to the more conventional design fabrication costs.

  16. Some recent progress in transonic flow computation. [flow distribution, numerical optimization, and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Although the development of a finite difference relaxation procedure to solve the steady form of equations of motion gave birth to the study of computational transonic aerodynamics and considerable progress has been made using the small disturbance theory, no general analytical solution method yet exists for transonic flows that include three dimensional unsteady, and viscous effects. Two techniques are described which are useful in computational transonic aerodynamics applications. The finite volume method simplifies the application of boundary conditions without introducing the constriction associated with small disturbance theory. Governing equations are solved in a Cartesian coordinate system using a body-oriented and shock-oriented mesh network. Only the volume and surface normal directions of the volume elements must be known. The other method, configuration design by numerical optimization, can be used by aircraft designers to develop configurations that satisfy specific geometric performance constraints. Two examples of airfoil design by numerical optimization are presented.

  17. Numerical design of advanced multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathias, Donovan L.; Cummings, Russell M.

    1994-01-01

    The current study extends the application of computational fluid dynamics to three-dimensional high-lift systems. Structured, overset grids are used in conjunction with an incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver to investigate flow over a two-element high-lift configuration. The computations were run in a fully turbulent mode using the one-equation Baldwin-Barth turbulence model. The geometry consisted of an unswept wing which spanned a wind tunnel test section. Flows over full and half-span Fowler flap configurations were computed. Grid resolution issues were investigated in two dimensional studies of the flapped airfoil. Results of the full-span flap wing agreed well with experimental data and verified the method. Flow over the wing with the half-span was computed to investigate the details of the flow at the free edge of the flap. The results illustrated changes in flow streamlines, separation locations, and surface pressures due to the vortex shed from the flap edge.

  18. Design and test of a natural laminar flow/large Reynolds number airfoil with a high design cruise lift coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolesar, C. E.

    1987-01-01

    Research activity on an airfoil designed for a large airplane capable of very long endurance times at a low Mach number of 0.22 is examined. Airplane mission objectives and design optimization resulted in requirements for a very high design lift coefficient and a large amount of laminar flow at high Reynolds number to increase the lift/drag ratio and reduce the loiter lift coefficient. Natural laminar flow was selected instead of distributed mechanical suction for the measurement technique. A design lift coefficient of 1.5 was identified as the highest which could be achieved with a large extent of laminar flow. A single element airfoil was designed using an inverse boundary layer solution and inverse airfoil design computer codes to create an airfoil section that would achieve performance goals. The design process and results, including airfoil shape, pressure distributions, and aerodynamic characteristics are presented. A two dimensional wind tunnel model was constructed and tested in a NASA Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel which enabled testing at full scale design Reynolds number. A comparison is made between theoretical and measured results to establish accuracy and quality of the airfoil design technique.

  19. Design of a family of new advanced airfoils for low wind class turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    In order to maximize the ratio of energy capture and reduce the cost of energy, the selection of the airfoils to be used along the blade plays a crucial role. Despite the general usage of existing airfoils, more and more, families of airfoils specially tailored for specific applications are developed. The present research is focused on the design of a new family of airfoils to be used for the blade of one megawatt wind turbine working in low wind conditions. A hybrid optimization scheme has been implemented, combining together genetic and gradient based algorithms. Large part of the work is dedicated to present and discuss the requirements that needed to be satisfied in order to have a consistent family of geometries with high efficiency, high lift and good structural characteristics. For each airfoil, these characteristics are presented and compared to the ones of existing airfoils. Finally, the aerodynamic design of a new blade for low wind class turbine is illustrated and compared to a reference shape developed by using existing geometries. Due to higher lift performance, the results show a sensitive saving in chords, wetted area and so in loads in idling position.

  20. Computer-aided analysis and design of the shape rolling process for producing turbine engine airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahoti, G. D.; Akgerman, N.; Altan, T.

    1978-01-01

    Mild steel (AISI 1018) was selected as model cold-rolling material and Ti-6Al-4V and INCONEL 718 were selected as typical hot-rolling and cold-rolling alloys, respectively. The flow stress and workability of these alloys were characterized and friction factor at the roll/workpiece interface was determined at their respective working conditions by conducting ring tests. Computer-aided mathematical models for predicting metal flow and stresses, and for simulating the shape-rolling process were developed. These models utilize the upper-bound and the slab methods of analysis, and are capable of predicting the lateral spread, roll-separating force, roll torque and local stresses, strains and strain rates. This computer-aided design (CAD) system is also capable of simulating the actual rolling process and thereby designing roll-pass schedule in rolling of an airfoil or similar shape. The predictions from the CAD system were verified with respect to cold rolling of mild steel plates. The system is being applied to cold and hot isothermal rolling of an airfoil shape, and will be verified with respect to laboratory experiments under controlled conditions.

  1. Control theory based airfoil design for potential flow and a finite volume discretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, J.; Jameson, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for two-dimensional profiles in which the shape is determined by a conformal transformation from a unit circle, and the control is the mapping function. The goal of our present work is to develop a method which does not depend on conformal mapping, so that it can be extended to treat three-dimensional problems. Therefore, we have developed a method which can address arbitrary geometric shapes through the use of a finite volume method to discretize the potential flow equation. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented, where both target speed distributions and minimum drag are used as objective functions.

  2. Wind turbine soft airfoil control system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.E.

    1983-11-29

    An apparatus is disclosed for furling, unfurling, and controlling a flexible airfoil for use in connection with a wind turbine wheel, comprising a rotatably mounted spindle journaled at one of its ends (the head end) to the hub of a wind turbine wheel, and at its other end (the foot end) in a foot plate bracket adjacent the rim of the wheel. The bracket is attached to a diametral bracing cable, and a soft airfoil is furled on the spindle. The foot plate is rotatably mounted so that the spindle foot can swing through a small arc about a centerline defined by the outer end of the cable. A ''V''-shaped boom is rotatably secured to the foot plate and the bracing cable at its free ends such that the boom is pivotable with the spindle about a common axis spaced from the rotational axis of the spindle. A pulley is affixed to the outer, apex end of the boom. An outhaul line for furling and unfurling the soft airfoil is connected at one end to the clew of the soft airfoil, is threaded through the boom pulley, and its other end is secured to and wound about the spindle in a direction opposite the furling of the airfoil. A rotation means connected to the hub end of the spindle rotates the spindle, thus furling or unfurling the airfoil automatically by the self-winding/rewinding action of the outhaul line, thereby permitting rapid and precise adjustment of the soft airfoil in response to changing wind conditions. The upper end of the V-shaped boom pivots in a special connector assembly affixed to the intersection of the three major tension cables and provides precise adjustment of that intersection in three dimensions.

  3. Design and Experimental Results for the S827 Airfoil; Period of Performance: 1998--1999

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A 21%-thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoil, the S827, for the 75% blade radial station of 40- to 50-meter, stall-regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. The primary objective of restrained maximum lift has not been achieved, although the maximum lift is relatively insensitive to roughness, which meets the design goal. The airfoil exhibits a relatively docile stall, which meets the design goal. The primary objective of low profile drag has been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoil thickness have been satisfied. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results generally show good agreement with the exception of maximum lift, which is significantly underpredicted.

  4. Computer-aided analysis and design of the shape rolling process for producing turbine engine airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahoti, G. D.; Akgerman, N.; Altan, T.

    1978-01-01

    Mild steel (AISI 1018) was selected as model cold rolling material and Ti-6A1-4V and Inconel 718 were selected as typical hot rolling and cold rolling alloys, respectively. The flow stress and workability of these alloys were characterized and friction factor at the roll/workpiece interface was determined at their respective working conditions by conducting ring tests. Computer-aided mathematical models for predicting metal flow and stresses, and for simulating the shape rolling process were developed. These models utilized the upper bound and the slab methods of analysis, and were capable of predicting the lateral spread, roll separating force, roll torque, and local stresses, strains and strain rates. This computer-aided design system was also capable of simulating the actual rolling process, and thereby designing the roll pass schedule in rolling of an airfoil or a similar shape.

  5. Airfoil shape for flight at subsonic speeds. [design analysis and aerodynamic characteristics of the GAW-1 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, R. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An airfoil is examined that has an upper surface shaped to control flow accelerations and pressure distribution over the upper surface and to prevent separation of the boundary layer due to shock wave formulation at high subsonic speeds well above the critical Mach number. A highly cambered trailing edge section improves overall airfoil lifting efficiency. Diagrams illustrating supersonic flow and shock waves over the airfoil are shown.

  6. High-Lift Separated Flow About Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    TRANSEP Calculates flow field about low-speed single-element airfoil at high-angle-of-attack and high-lift conditions with massive boundary-layer separation. TRANSEP includes effects of weak viscous interactions and can be used for subsonic/transonic airfoil design and analysis. The approach used in TRANSEP is based on direct-inverse method and its ability to use either displacement surface or pressure as airfoil boundary condition.

  7. Design and true Reynolds number 2-D testing of an advanced technology airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaser, J. S.; Hallissy, J. B.; Campbell, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    A NASA-industry program has been conducted to determine the accuracy of available 2-D airfoil analysis procedures over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. The program also served to develop and demonstrate effective wind tunnel model designs for use in a cryogenic environment. A Lockheed design, CRYO 12X, supercritical, shockfree airfoil was configured using a continuous curvature analytical definition of the ordinates. Test results show a very close ordinate tolerance was necessary to realize the intended pressure distribution. Correlation of test with Korn-Garabedian 2-D analysis pressure data were generally good. GRUMFOIL analysis with a sidewall correction gave a better correlation.

  8. Design and Experimental Results for the S825 Airfoil; Period of Performance: 1998-1999

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A 17%-thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoil, the S825, for the 75% blade radial station of 20- to 40-meter, variable-speed and variable-pitch (toward feather), horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness and low-profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil exhibits a rapid, trailing-edge stall, which does not meet the design goal of a docile stall. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoil thickness have been satisfied. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results generally show good agreement.

  9. Inviscid analysis of two supercritical laminar-flow-control airfoils at design and off-design conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, D. O.

    1983-01-01

    Inviscid transonic flow results are provided at design and off design conditions for two supercritical laminar flow control airfoils. The newer airfoil, with its lower suction requirements for full chord laminar flow, has a higher design Mach number, steeper pressure gradients, a more positive pressure level in the forward region of the lower surface, and a recovery to a less positive pressure at the trailing edge. The two dimensional design Mach numbers for the two airfoils are 0.755 and 0.730 at a common design lift coefficient of 0.60, and their thickness to chord ratios are 0.131 and 0.135, respectively. Off design shock formation characteristics are similar for the two airfoils over a range of Mach numbers between 0.6 and 0.8 and lift coefficients from 0.4 to 0.7. The newer airfoil is similar to the one used in a large chord swept model experiment designed for the Langley 8 Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel.

  10. Multidisciplinary control design for a two-dimensional airfoil with jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Packard, Andy; Holt, Maurice

    Numerical simulation of a two-dimensional airfoil controlled by jets near the trailing edge is investigated. This simulation couples the Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes equations with Euler's equations of rigid-body motion and an active control system. Robust control design techniques were used to develop a controller for tracking altitude commands. Simulation of the controller with the coupled system showed good tracking performance for a step input command in altitude. However, the linear model was unable to capture the nonlinear nature of this system producing mild oscillations in the attitude, pitch rate, and vertical velocity of the airfoil.

  11. An Empirical Method Permitting Rapid Determination of the Area, Rate and Distribution of Water-Drop Impingement on an Airfoil of Arbitrary Section at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergrun, N. R.

    1951-01-01

    An empirical method for the determination of the area, rate, and distribution of water-drop impingement on airfoils of arbitrary section is presented. The procedure represents an initial step toward the development of a method which is generally applicable in the design of thermal ice-prevention equipment for airplane wing and tail surfaces. Results given by the proposed empirical method are expected to be sufficiently accurate for the purpose of heated-wing design, and can be obtained from a few numerical computations once the velocity distribution over the airfoil has been determined. The empirical method presented for incompressible flow is based on results of extensive water-drop. trajectory computations for five airfoil cases which consisted of 15-percent-thick airfoils encompassing a moderate lift-coefficient range. The differential equations pertaining to the paths of the drops were solved by a differential analyzer. The method developed for incompressible flow is extended to the calculation of area and rate of impingement on straight wings in subsonic compressible flow to indicate the probable effects of compressibility for airfoils at low subsonic Mach numbers.

  12. Design and experimental evaluation of a swept supercritical Laminar Flow Control (LFC) airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Harris, C. D.; Brooks, C. W.; Clukey, P. G.; Stack, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    A large chord swept supercritical laminar flow control (LFC) airfoil was designed, constructed, and tested in the NASA Langley 8-ft Transonic Pressure Tunnel (TPT). The LFC airfoil experiment was established to provide basic information concerning the design and compatibility of high-performance supercritical airfoils with suction boundary layer control achieved through discrete fine slots or porous surface concepts. It was aimed at validating prediction techniques and establishing a technology base for future transport designs and drag reduction. Good agreement was obtained between measured and theoretically designed shockless pressure distributions. Suction laminarization was maintained over an extensive supercritical zone up to high Reynolds numbers before transition gradually moved forward. Full-chord laminar flow was maintained on the upper and lower surfaces at M sub infinity = 0.82 up to R sub c is less than or equal to 12 x 10 to the 6th power. When accounting for both the suction and wake drag, the total drag could be reducted by at least one-half of that for an equivalent turbulent airfoil. Specific objectives for the LFC experiment are given.

  13. Design of a Slotted, Natural-Laminar-Flow Airfoil for Business-Jet Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A 14-percent-thick, slotted, natural-laminar-flow airfoil, the S204, for light business-jet applications has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The drag-divergence Mach number is predicted to be greater than 0.70.

  14. A direct-inverse method for transonic and separated flows about airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1990-01-01

    A direct-inverse technique and computer program called TAMSEP that can be used for the analysis of the flow about airfoils at subsonic and low transonic freestream velocities is presented. The method is based upon a direct-inverse nonconservative full potential inviscid method, a Thwaites laminar boundary layer technique, and the Barnwell turbulent momentum integral scheme; and it is formulated using Cartesian coordinates. Since the method utilizes inverse boundary conditions in regions of separated flow, it is suitable for predicting the flow field about airfoils having trailing edge separated flow under high lift conditions. Comparisons with experimental data indicate that the method should be a useful tool for applied aerodynamic analyses.

  15. A direct-inverse method for transonic and separated flows about airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    A direct-inverse technique and computer program called TAMSEP that can be sued for the analysis of the flow about airfoils at subsonic and low transonic freestream velocities is presented. The method is based upon a direct-inverse nonconservative full potential inviscid method, a Thwaites laminar boundary layer technique, and the Barnwell turbulent momentum integral scheme; and it is formulated using Cartesian coordinates. Since the method utilizes inverse boundary conditions in regions of separated flow, it is suitable for predicing the flowfield about airfoils having trailing edge separated flow under high lift conditions. Comparisons with experimental data indicate that the method should be a useful tool for applied aerodynamic analyses.

  16. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  17. Turbine airfoil manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kortovich, C.

    1995-12-31

    The specific goal of this program is to define manufacturing methods that will allow single crystal technology to be applied to complex-cored airfoils components for power generation applications. Tasks addressed include: alloy melt practice to reduce the sulfur content; improvement of casting process; core materials design; and grain orientation control.

  18. Turbine airfoil film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylton, Larry D.

    1986-10-01

    Emphasis is placed on developing more accurate analytical models for predicting turbine airfoil external heat transfer rates. Performance goals of new engines require highly refined, accurate design tools to meet durability requirements. In order to obtain improvements in analytical capabilities, programs are required which focus on enhancing analytical techniques through verification of new models by comparison with relevant experimental data. The objectives of the current program are to develop an analytical approach, based on boundary layer theory, for predicting the effects of airfoil film cooling on downstream heat transfer rates and to verify the resulting analytical method by comparison of predictions with hot cascade data obtained under this program.

  19. Profile design for an advanced-technology airfoil for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welte, D.

    1978-01-01

    A profile from the NASA General Aviation Whitcomb series and NACA profiles are used as a starting point in designing an advanced airfoil for general aviation aircraft. Potential theory pressure distribution calculations, together with boundary layer calculations, permit a decrease in the null moment and an optimization of the lift characteristics of the wing. Trailing edge flap design is also improved. Wind tunnel tests are used to compare the conventional profiles, the NASA profile, and the improved design.

  20. Optimization of Airfoil Design for Flow Control with Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Theodore; Corke, Thomas; Cooney, John

    2011-11-01

    Using computer simulations and design optimization methods, this research examines the implementation of active flow control devices on wind turbine blades. Through modifications to blade geometry in order to maximize the effectiveness of flow control devices, increases in aerodynamic performance and control of aerodynamic performance are expected. Due to this compliant flow, an increase in the power output of wind turbines is able to be realized with minimal modification and investment to existing turbine blades. This is achieved through dynamic lift control via virtual camber control. Methods using strategic flow separation near the trailing edge are analyzed to obtain desired aerodynamic performance. FLUENT is used to determine the aerodynamic performance of potential turbine blade design, and the post-processing uses optimization techniques to determine an optimal blade geometry and plasma actuator operating parameters. This work motivates the research and development of novel blade designs with flow control devices that will be tested at Notre Dame's Laboratory for Enhanced Wind Energy Design.

  1. A comparison of design variables for control theory based airfoil optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work in the area it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using either the potential flow or the Euler equations with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. We have also explored three-dimensional extensions of these formulations recently. The goal of our present work is to demonstrate the versatility of the control theory approach by designing airfoils using both Hicks-Henne functions and B-spline control points as design variables. The research also demonstrates that the parameterization of the design space is an open question in aerodynamic design.

  2. Multipoint inverse design of an infinite cascade of airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selig, M. S.

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes a method for the design of an infinite cascade in incompressible flow. The method is based on conformal mapping and does not allow for multipoint design. The cascade blade is to determined is divided into a number of segments. Over each segment, the velocity distribution is prescribed together with an inlet or outlet flow angle at which this velocity distributions is to be achieved. In this way multipoint design requirements can be met. It is necessary to satisfy several conditions that arise to guarantee compatibility with the inlet and outlet flow as well as closure of the cascade blade. Satisfaction of these conditions does not necessarily result in a cascade with all of the desired characteristucs. For example, the cascade blades may be bulbous or crossed. Through Newtonian iteration, however, the desired characteristics may be prescribed directly. Four examples will be illustrated to demonstrate the capability of the method.

  3. Experimental investigation of a 10-percent-thick helicopter rotor airfoil section designed with a viscous transonic analysis code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonan, K. W.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 6- by 28-Inch Transonic Tunnel to determine the two dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of a 10-percent-thick helicopter rotor airfoil at Mach numbers from 0.33 to 0.87 and respective Reynolds numbers from 4.9 x 10 to the 6th to 9.8 x 10 to the 6th. This airfoil, designated the RC-10(N)-1, was also investigated at Reynolds numbers from 3.0 x 10 to the 6th to 7.3 x 10 to the 6th at respective Mach numbers of 0.33 to 0.83 for comparison wit the SC 1095 (with tab) airfoil. The RC-10(N)-1 airfoil was designed by the use of a viscous transonic analysis code. The results of the investigation indicate that the RC-10(N)-1 airfoil met all the design goals. At a Reynolds number of about 9.4 x 10 to the 6th the drag divergence Mach number at zero normal-force coefficient was 0.815 with a corresponding pitching-moment coefficient of zero. The drag divergence Mach number at a normal-force coefficient of 0.9 and a Reynolds number of about 8.0 x 10 to the 6th was 0.61. The drag divergence Mach number of this new airfoil was higher than that of the SC 1095 airfoil at normal-force coefficients above 0.3. Measurements in the same wind tunnel at comparable Reynolds numbers indicated that the maximum normal-force coefficient of the RC-10(N)-1 airfoil was higher than that of the NACA 0012 airfoil for Mach numbers above about 0.35 and was about the same as that of the SC 1095 airfoil for Mach numbers up to 0.5.

  4. Design of the low-speed NLF(1)-0414F and the high-speed HSNLF(1)-0213 airfoils with high-lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeffrey K.; Watson-Viken, Sally A.; Pfenninger, Werner; Morgan, Harry L., Jr.; Campbell, Richard L.

    1987-01-01

    The design and testing of Natural Laminar Flow (NLF) airfoils is examined. The NLF airfoil was designed for low speed, having a low profile drag at high chord Reynolds numbers. The success of the low speed NLF airfoil sparked interest in a high speed NLF airfoil applied to a single engine business jet with an unswept wing. Work was also conducted on the two dimensional flap design. The airfoil was decambered by removing the aft loading, however, high design Mach numbers are possible by increasing the aft loading and reducing the camber overall on the airfoil. This approach would also allow for flatter acceleration regions which are more stabilizing for cross flow disturbances. Sweep could then be used to increase the design Mach number to a higher value also. There would be some degradation of high lift by decambering the airfoil overall, and this aspect would have to be considered in a final design.

  5. Experimental Optimization Methods for Multi-Element Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, Drew; Britcher, Colin P.

    1996-01-01

    A modern three element airfoil model with a remotely activated flap was used to investigate optimum flap testing position using an automated optimization algorithm in wind tunnel tests. Detailed results for lift coefficient versus flap vertical and horizontal position are presented for two angles of attack: 8 and 14 degrees. An on-line first order optimizer is demonstrated which automatically seeks the optimum lift as a function of flap position. Future work with off-line optimization techniques is introduced and aerodynamic hysteresis effects due to flap movement with flow on are discussed.

  6. Progress Towards Computational Method for Circulation Control Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Anders, S. G.

    2005-01-01

    The compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved for circulation control airfoil flows. Numerical solutions are computed with both structured and unstructured grid solvers. Several turbulence models are considered, including the Spalart-Allmaras model with and without curvature corrections, the shear stress transport model of Menter, and the k-enstrophy model. Circulation control flows with jet momentum coefficients of 0.03, 0.10, and 0.226 are considered. Comparisons are made between computed and experimental pressure distributions, velocity profiles, Reynolds stress profiles, and streamline patterns. Including curvature effects yields the closest agreement with the measured data.

  7. A finite element method for the computation of transonic flow past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, A.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element method for the computation of the transonic flow with shocks past airfoils is presented using the artificial viscosity concept for the local supersonic regime. Generally, the classic element types do not meet the accuracy requirements of advanced numerical aerodynamics requiring special attention to the choice of an appropriate element. A series of computed pressure distributions exhibits the usefulness of the method.

  8. An analysis method for multi-component airfoils in separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. M.; Duorak, F. A.; Maskew, B.

    1980-01-01

    The multi-component airfoil program (Langley-MCARF) for attached flow is modified to accept the free vortex sheet separation-flow model program (Analytical Methods, Inc.-CLMAX). The viscous effects are incorporated into the calculation by representing the boundary layer displacement thickness with an appropriate source distribution. The separation flow model incorporated into MCARF was applied to single component airfoils. Calculated pressure distributions for angles of attack up to the stall are in close agreement with experimental measurements. Even at higher angles of attack beyond the stall, correct trends of separation, decrease in lift coefficients, and increase in pitching moment coefficients are predicted.

  9. A method of estimating the aerodynamic effects of ordinary and split flaps of airfoils similar to the Clark Y

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, H A

    1936-01-01

    An empirical method is given for estimating the aerodynamic effect of ordinary and split flaps on airfoils similar to the Clark Y. The method is based on a series of charts that have been derived from an analysis of existing wind-tunnel data. Factors are included by which such variables as flap location, flap span, wing aspect ratio, and wing taper may be taken into account. A series of comparisons indicate that the method would be suitable for use in making preliminary performance calculations and in structural design.

  10. Langley airfoil-research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of past, present, and future airfoil research activities at the Langley Research Center is given. The immediate past and future occupy most of the discussion; however, past accomplishments and milestones going back to the early NACA years are dealt with in a broad-brush way to give a better perspective of current developments and programs. In addition to the historical perspective, a short description of the facilities which are now being used in the airfoil program is given. This is followed by a discussion of airfoil developments, advances in airfoil design and analysis tools (mostly those that have taken place over the past 5 or 6 years), and tunnel-wall-interference predictive methods and measurements. Future research requirements are treated.

  11. Airfoil design for Reynolds numbers between 50,000 and 500,000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, R.; Somers, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The design of airfoils for flows with Re of 50,000-500,000 requires consideration of laminar separation bubbles. A design approach is discussed which specifies the angle of attack at which the potential flow velocity is to be constant at each segment of the airfoil. The velocity gradient is controlled by introducing a pressure recovery function at the trailing edge. Boundary layer stability decreases with rising Re, although an upper Re value can be identified, below which the boundary layer will be stable. Adverse pressure gradients are associated with the shape parameter of the velocity profile, whose rise in value decreases stability. Transition displays similar relationships to the shape parameter. The most frequent feature of separation is the appearance of a separation bubble.

  12. The significance of wing end configuration in airfoil design for civil aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmer, H.

    1979-01-01

    Lift-dependent induced drag in commercial aviation aircraft is discussed, with emphasis on the necessary compromises between wing and configuration modifications which better lift performance and the weight gains accompanying such modifications. Triangular, rectangular and elliptical configurations for wing ends are considered; attention is also given to airfoil designs incorporating winglets. Water tunnel tests of several configurations are reported. In addition, applications of wing and modifications to advanced technology commercial aviation aircraft and the Airbus A-300 are mentioned.

  13. Application of Artificial Neural Networks to the Design of Turbomachinery Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan; Madavan, Nateri

    1997-01-01

    Artificial neural networks are widely used in engineering applications, such as control, pattern recognition, plant modeling and condition monitoring to name just a few. In this seminar we will explore the possibility of applying neural networks to aerodynamic design, in particular, the design of turbomachinery airfoils. The principle idea behind this effort is to represent the design space using a neural network (within some parameter limits), and then to employ an optimization procedure to search this space for a solution that exhibits optimal performance characteristics. Results obtained for design problems in two spatial dimensions will be presented.

  14. Calculated Low-Speed Steady and Time-Dependent Aerodynamic Derivatives for Some Airfoils Using a Discrete Vortex Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a collection of some results of four individual studies presenting calculated numerical values for airfoil aerodynamic stability derivatives in unseparated inviscid incompressible flow due separately to angle-of-attack, pitch rate, flap deflection, and airfoil camber using a discrete vortex method. Both steady conditions and oscillatory motion were considered. Variables include the number of vortices representing the airfoil, the pitch axis / moment center chordwise location, flap chord to airfoil chord ratio, and circular or parabolic arc camber. Comparisons with some experimental and other theoretical information are included. The calculated aerodynamic numerical results obtained using a limited number of vortices provided in each study compared favorably with thin airfoil theory predictions. Of particular interest are those aerodynamic results calculated herein (such as induced drag) that are not readily available elsewhere.

  15. The construction of airfoil pressure models by the plate method: Achievements, current research, technology development and potential applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    A method of constructing airfoils by inscribing pressure channels on the face of opposing plates, bonding them together to form one plate with integral channels, and contour machining this plate to form an airfoil model is described. The research and development program to develop the bonding technology is described as well as the construction and testing of an airfoil model. Sample aerodynamic data sets are presented and discussed. Also, work currently under way to produce thin airfoils with camber is presented. Samples of the aft section of a 6 percent airfoil with complete pressure instrumentation including the trailing edge are pictured and described. This technique is particularly useful in fabricating models for transonic cryogenic testing, but it should find application in a wide ange of model construction projects, as well as the fabrication of fuel injectors, space hardware, and other applications requiring advanced bonding technology and intricate fluid passages.

  16. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 13-percent-thick airfoil section designed for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.; Somers, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted to determine the low-speed section characteristics of a 13 percent-thick airfoil designed for general aviation applications. The results were compared with NACA 12 percent-thick sections and with the 17 percent-thick NASA airfoil. The tests were conducted ovar a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.35. Chord Reynolds numbers varied from about 2,000,000 to 9,000,000.

  17. Spline-Based Smoothing of Airfoil Curvatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Krist, S.

    2008-01-01

    Constrained fitting for airfoil curvature smoothing (CFACS) is a splinebased method of interpolating airfoil surface coordinates (and, concomitantly, airfoil thicknesses) between specified discrete design points so as to obtain smoothing of surface-curvature profiles in addition to basic smoothing of surfaces. CFACS was developed in recognition of the fact that the performance of a transonic airfoil is directly related to both the curvature profile and the smoothness of the airfoil surface. Older methods of interpolation of airfoil surfaces involve various compromises between smoothing of surfaces and exact fitting of surfaces to specified discrete design points. While some of the older methods take curvature profiles into account, they nevertheless sometimes yield unfavorable results, including curvature oscillations near end points and substantial deviations from desired leading-edge shapes. In CFACS as in most of the older methods, one seeks a compromise between smoothing and exact fitting. Unlike in the older methods, the airfoil surface is modified as little as possible from its original specified form and, instead, is smoothed in such a way that the curvature profile becomes a smooth fit of the curvature profile of the original airfoil specification. CFACS involves a combination of rigorous mathematical modeling and knowledge-based heuristics. Rigorous mathematical formulation provides assurance of removal of undesirable curvature oscillations with minimum modification of the airfoil geometry. Knowledge-based heuristics bridge the gap between theory and designers best practices. In CFACS, one of the measures of the deviation of an airfoil surface from smoothness is the sum of squares of the jumps in the third derivatives of a cubicspline interpolation of the airfoil data. This measure is incorporated into a formulation for minimizing an overall deviation- from-smoothness measure of the airfoil data within a specified fitting error tolerance. CFACS has been

  18. A users guide for A344: A program using a finite difference method to analyze transonic flow over oscillating airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weatherill, W. H.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1979-01-01

    The design and usage of a pilot program for calculating the pressure distributions over harmonically oscillating airfoils in transonic flow are described. The procedure used is based on separating the velocity potential into steady and unsteady parts and linearizing the resulting unsteady differential equations for small disturbances. The steady velocity potential which must be obtained from some other program, was required for input. The unsteady equation, as solved, is linear with spatially varying coefficients. Since sinusoidal motion was assumed, time was not a variable. The numerical solution was obtained through a finite difference formulation and either a line relaxation or an out of core direct solution method.

  19. Computational methods for aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Five methods to increase the computational efficiency of aerodynamic design using numerical optimization, by reducing the computer time required to perform gradient calculations, are examined. The most promising method consists of drastically reducing the size of the computational domain on which aerodynamic calculations are made during gradient calculations. Since a gradient calculation requires the solution of the flow about an airfoil whose geometry was slightly perturbed from a base airfoil, the flow about the base airfoil is used to determine boundary conditions on the reduced computational domain. This method worked well in subcritical flow.

  20. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 17-percent-thick medium speed airfoil designed for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beaseley, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the low speed two dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of a 17 percent thick medium speed airfoil (MS(1)-0317) designed for general aviation applications. The results were compared with data for the 17 percent thick low speed airfoil (LS(1)-0417) and the 13 percent thick medium speed airfoil (MS(1)-0313). Theoretical predictions of the drag rise characteristics of this airfoil are also provided. The tests were conducted in the Langley low turbulence pressure tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.32, a chord Reynolds number range from 2 million to 12 million, and an angle of attack range from about -8 to 20 deg.

  1. On the Design of Lifting Airfoils with High Critical Mach Number Using Full Potential Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropinski, M. C. A.

    We wish to construct airfoils that have the highest free-stream Mach number for a given set of geometric constraints for which the flow is nowhere supersonic. Nonlifting airfoils that maximize the critical Mach number for a given cross-sectional area are known to possess long sonic segments at their critical speed. To construct lifting airfoils, we proceed under the conjecture that an airfoil with a high value of has the longest possible arc length of sonic velocity over its upper and lower surface. In Kropinski etal. (1995) the lifting problem was tackled in transonic small-disturbance theory. In this paper we numerically construct lifting airfoils with high using the full potential theory and we show that these airfoils have significantly higher than some standard airfoils. We also construct airfoils with higher values of the lift coefficient, by relaxing the speed constraint on the lower surface of the airfoil to have a value less than sonic.

  2. TMF design considerations in turbine airfoils of advanced turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, C. G.; Zamrik, S. Y.; Adams, J. H.; Frani, N. E.

    A review of thermal-mechanicalfatigue (TMF) in advanced turbine engines is presented. The review includes examples of typical thermal-mechnical loadings encountered in the design of hot section blades and vanes. Specific issues related to TMF behavior are presented and the associated impact on component life analysis and design is discussed.

  3. Rapid convergence of airfoil design problems using progressive optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadone, A.; Grossman, B.

    An efficient formulation for the robust design optimization of compressible fluid flow problems is presented. The methodology has three essential ingredients: a highly accurate flow solver, robust and efficient design sensitivities from a discrete adjoint formulation based on a dissipative flow solver and progressive optimization, whereby a sequence of operations, containing a partially converged flow solution, followed by an adjoint solution followed by an optimization step is performed. Furthermore, the progressive optimization involves the use of progressively finer grids. The methodology is shown to be accurate, robust and highly efficient, with a converged design optimization produced in no more than the amount of computational work to perform from one to three flow analyses.

  4. NASA supercritical airfoils: A matrix of family-related airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA supercritical airfoil development program is summarized in a chronological fashion. Some of the airfoil design guidelines are discussed, and coordinates of a matrix of family related supercritical airfoils ranging from thicknesses of 2 to 18 percent and over a design lift coefficient range from 0 to 1.0 are presented.

  5. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  6. Angle-of-attack validation of a new zonal CFD method for airfoil simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, Sungyul; Summa, J. Michael; Strash, Daniel J.

    1990-01-01

    The angle-of-attack validation of a new concept suggested by Summa (1990) for coupling potential and viscous flow methods has been investigated for two-dimensional airfoil simulations. The fully coupled potential/Navier-Stokes code, ZAP2D (Zonal Aerodynamics Program 2D), has been used to compute the flow field around an NACA 0012 airfoil for a range of angles of attack up to stall at a Mach number of 0.3 and a Reynolds number of 3 million. ZAP2D calculation for various domain sizes from 25 to 0.12 chord lengths are compared with the ARC2D large domain solution as well as with experimental data.

  7. Boundary-layer receptivity and laminar-flow airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, Edward J.

    1987-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity examines the way in which external disturbances generate instability waves in boundary layers. Receptivity theory is complementary to stability theory, which studies the evolution of disturbances that are already present in the boundary layer. A transition prediction method which combines receptivity with linear stability theory would directly account for the influence of free-stream disturbances and also consider the characteristics of the boundary layer upstream of the neutral stability point. The current e sup N transition prediction methods require empirical correlations for the influence of environmental disturbances, and totally ignore the boundary layer characteristics upstream of the neutral stability point. The regions where boundary-layer receptivity occurs can be separated into two classes, one near the leading edges and the other at the downstream points where the boundary layer undergoes rapid streamwise adjustments. Analyses were developed for both types of regions, and parametric studies which examine the relative importance of different mechanisms were carried out. The work presented here has focused on the low Mach number case. Extensions to high subsonic and supersonic conditions are presently underway.

  8. A harmonic analysis method for unsteady transonic flow and its application to the flutter of airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, F. E.; Weatherill, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    A finite difference method for solving the unsteady transonic flow about harmonically oscillating wings is investigated. The procedure is based on separating the velocity potential into steady and unsteady parts and linearizing the resulting unsteady differential equation for small disturbances. The differential equation for the unsteady velocity potential is linear with spatially varying coefficients and with the time variable eliminated by assuming harmonic motion. A study is presented of the shock motion associated with an oscillating airfoil and its representation by the harmonic procedure. The effects of the shock motion and the resulting pressure pulse are shown to be included in the harmonic pressure distributions and the corresponding generalized forces. Analytical and experimental pressure distributions for the NACA 64A010 airfoil are compared for Mach numbers of 0.75, 0.80 and 0.842. A typical section, two-degree-of-freedom flutter analysis of a NACA 64A010 airfoil is performed. The results show a sharp transonic bucket in one case and abrupt changes in instability modes.

  9. Optimization and analysis of a CFJ-airfoil using adaptive meta-model based design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Michael D.

    Although strong potential for Co-Flow Jet (CFJ) flow separation control system has been demonstrated in existing literature, there has been little effort applied towards the optimization of the design for a given application. The high dimensional design space makes any optimization computationally intensive. This work presents the optimization of a CFJ airfoil as applied to a low Reynolds Number regimen using meta-model based design optimization (MBDO). The approach consists of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis coupled with a surrogate model derived using Kriging. A genetic algorithm (GA) is then used to perform optimization on the efficient surrogate model. MBDO was shown to be an effective and efficient approach to solving the CFJ design problem. The final solution set was found to decrease drag by 100% while increasing lift by 42%. When validated, the final solution was found to be within one standard deviation of the CFD model it was representing.

  10. Design and construction of 2 transonic airfoil models for tests in the NASA Langley C.3-M TCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechterle, G.; Ludewig, K. H.; Stanewsky, E.; Ray, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a NASA/DFVLR cooperation program two transonic airfoils were tested in the NASA Langley 0.3-m TCT. Model design and construction was carried out by DFVLR. The models designed and constructed performed extremely well under cryogenic conditions. Essentially no permanent changes in surface quality and geometric dimensions occurred during the tests. The aerodynamic results from the TCT tests which demonstrate the large sensitivity of the airfoil CAST 10-Z/DOAZ to Reynolds number changes compared well with results from other facilities at ambient temperatures.

  11. A recontoured, upper surface designed to increase the maximum lift coefficient of a modified NACA 65 (0.82) (9.9) airfoil section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    A recontoured upper surface was designed to increase the maximum lift coefficient of a modified NACA 65 (0.82)(9.9) airfoil section which was tested at Mach numbers of 0.3 and 0.4 and Reynolds numbers of 2.3x10(6) and 4.3x10(6). The original 6-series section was tested for comparison with the recontoured section. The recontoured profile was found to have a higher maximum lift coefficient at all test conditions than the original airfoil. The recontoured airfoil showed less drag and nearly the same pitching moment characteristics as the original 6-series airfoil at all test conditions. The improvements found for the recontoured airfoil of the present study are similar to those found during previous investigations of recontoured 6-series airfoils with less camber.

  12. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 13 percent thick medium speed airfoil designed for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the low speed, two dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of a 13percent thick medium speed airfoil designed for general aviation applications. The results were compared with data for the 13 percent thick low speed airfoil. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.32, a chord Reynolds number range from 2.0 x 10 to the 6th power to 12.0 x 10 to the 6th power, and an angle of attack frange from about -8 deg to 10 deg. The objective of retaining good high-lift low speed characteristics for an airfoil designed to have good medium speed cruise performance was achieved.

  13. Applications of a transonic wing design method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.; Smith, Leigh A.

    1989-01-01

    A method for designing wings and airfoils at transonic speeds using a predictor/corrector approach was developed. The procedure iterates between an aerodynamic code, which predicts the flow about a given geometry, and the design module, which compares the calculated and target pressure distributions and modifies the geometry using an algorithm that relates differences in pressure to a change in surface curvature. The modular nature of the design method makes it relatively simple to couple it to any analysis method. The iterative approach allows the design process and aerodynamic analysis to converge in parallel, significantly reducing the time required to reach a final design. Viscous and static aeroelastic effects can also be accounted for during the design or as a post-design correction. Results from several pilot design codes indicated that the method accurately reproduced pressure distributions as well as the coordinates of a given airfoil or wing by modifying an initial contour. The codes were applied to supercritical as well as conventional airfoils, forward- and aft-swept transport wings, and moderate-to-highly swept fighter wings. The design method was found to be robust and efficient, even for cases having fairly strong shocks.

  14. Comparison of Several Methods of Cyclic De-Icing of a Gas-Heated Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Vernon H.; Bowden, Dean T.

    1953-01-01

    Several methods of cyclic de-icing of a gas-heated airfoil were investigated to determine ice-removal characteristics and heating requirements. The cyclic de-icing system with a spanwise ice-free parting strip in the stagnation region and a constant-temperature gas-supply duct gave the quickest and most reliable ice removal. Heating requirements for the several methods of cyclic de-icing are compared, and the savings over continuous ice prevention are shown. Data are presented to show the relation of surface temperature, rate of surface heating, and heating time to the removal of ice.

  15. Options for Robust Airfoil Optimization under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Li, Wu

    2002-01-01

    A robust optimization method is developed to overcome point-optimization at the sampled design points. This method combines the best features from several preliminary methods proposed by the authors and their colleagues. The robust airfoil shape optimization is a direct method for drag reduction over a given range of operating conditions and has three advantages: (1) it prevents severe degradation in the off-design performance by using a smart descent direction in each optimization iteration, (2) it uses a large number of spline control points as design variables yet the resulting airfoil shape does not need to be smoothed, and (3) it allows the user to make a tradeoff between the level of optimization and the amount of computing time consumed. For illustration purposes, the robust optimization method is used to solve a lift-constrained drag minimization problem for a two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil in Euler flow with 20 geometric design variables.

  16. Vortex model for airfoil stall prediction using an interactive boundary-layer method

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, P.; Coiro, D.P.; Bertolucci, S.

    1995-09-01

    An interactive boundary-layer method is developed that is able to predict the aerodynamic performance of airfoils throughout the stall region. This has been achieved by taking into account the net vorticity of the flow in the turbulent separated region on the suction surface. This vorticity is modelled as an inviscid counterclockwise vortex located above the trailing edge, whose direction of rotation is justified by global conservation of angular momentum. An empirical law for the intensity of the vortex as a function of a dimensionless parameter based on flow conditions is presented. Excellent comparisons with measured lift and moment curves and pressure distributions are then presented and discussed.

  17. Computation of full-coverage film-cooled airfoil temperatures by two methods and comparison with high heat flux data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Yeh, F. C.; Austin, P. J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Two methods were used to calculate the heat flux to full-coverage film cooled airfoils and, subsequently, the airfoil wall temperatures. The calculated wall temperatures were compared to measured temperatures obtained in the Hot Section Facility operating at real engine conditions. Gas temperatures and pressures up to 1900 K and 18 atm with a Reynolds number up to 1.9 million were investigated. Heat flux was calculated by the convective heat transfer coefficient adiabatic wall method and by the superposition method which incorporates the film injection effects in the heat transfer coefficient. The results of the comparison indicate the first method can predict the experimental data reasonably well. However, superposition overpredicted the heat flux to the airfoil without a significant modification of the turbulent Prandtl number. The results suggest that additional research is required to model the physics of full-coverage film cooling where there is significant temperature/density differences between the gas and the coolant.

  18. Field panel method with grid stretching technique for solving transonic potential flow around arbitrary airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.-L.; Röttgermann, A.; Wagner, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Field Panel Method (FPM) with grid stretching technique, presented in this paper, was developed for solving transonic full potential flow around arbitrary airfoils at incidence. In this method, the total potential values are represented by boundary integrals together with a volume integral. The volume integral domain includes both inside and finite outside of the configuration and can be discretisized in a Cartesian grid which may penetrate into the configuration surface. Thus, we avoid the very difficult task of generating body-fitted grids around complex configurations. The boundary potential values are obtained by implementing a standard panel method (symmetrical singularity model), whereas the field potential values are estimated by solving the full potential equation (using AF3 scheme in a Cartesian grid) with approximate inner and proper outer boundary conditions. Furthermore, the grid stretching technique has been utilized that allows to capture the shock waves in a much better quality. It is also shown that both field grid and panel distribution have to be stretched at the same time. Results for transonic potential flows about NACA0012 and RAE2822 airfoils at different Mach numbers and incidences are obtained and compared with other numerical solutions. Great improvement in shock wave quality was achieved by using the present method.

  19. Quasi-simultaneous interaction method for solving 2D boundary layer flows over plates and airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2012-11-01

    This paper studies unsteady 2D boundary layer flows over dented plates and a NACA 0012 airfoil. An inviscid flow is assumed to exist outside the boundary layer and is solved iteratively with the boundary layer flow together with the interaction method until a matching solution is achieved. Hereto a quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied, in which the integral boundary layer equations are solved together with an interaction-law equation. The interaction-law equation is an approximation of the external flow and based on thin-airfoil theory. It is an algebraic relation between the velocity and displacement thickness. The interaction-law equation ensures that the eigenvalues of the system of equations do not have a sign change and that no singularities occur. Three numerical schemes are used to solve the boundary layer flow with the interaction method. These are: a standard scheme, a splitting method and a characteristics solver. All schemes use a finite difference discretization. The three schemes yield comparable results for the simulations carried out. The standard scheme is deviating most from the splitting and characteristics solvers. The results show that the eigenvalues remain positive, even in separation. As expected, the addition of the interaction-law equation prevents a sign change of the eigenvalues. The quasi-simultaneous interaction scheme is applicable to the three numerical schemes tested.

  20. Gust Acoustic Response of a Single Airfoil Using the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James (Technical Monitor); Wang, X. Y.; Chang, S. C.; Himansu, A.; Jorgenson, P. C. E.

    2003-01-01

    A 2D parallel Euler code based on the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method is validated by solving the benchmark problem I in Category 3 of the Third CAA Workshop. This problem concerns the acoustic field generated by the interaction of a convected harmonic vortical gust with a single airfoil. Three gust frequencies, two gust configurations, and three airfoil geometries are considered. Numerical results at both near and far fields are presented and compared with the analytical solutions, a frequency-domain solver GUST3D solutions, and a time-domain high-order Discontinuous Spectral Element Method (DSEM) solutions. It is shown that the CE/SE solutions agree well with the GUST3D solution for the lowest frequency, while there are discrepancies between CE/SE and GUST3D solutions for higher frequencies. However, the CE/SE solution is in good agreement with the DSEM solution for these higher frequencies. It demonstrates that the CE/SE method can produce accurate results of CAA problems involving complex geometries by using unstructured meshes.

  1. The Effects of the Critical Ice Accretion on Airfoil and Wing Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, Michael S.; Bragg, Michael B.; Saeed, Farooq

    1998-01-01

    In support of the NASA Lewis Modern Airfoils Ice Accretion Test Program, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign provided expertise in airfoil design and aerodynamic analysis to determine the aerodynamic effect of ice accretion on modern airfoil sections. The effort has concentrated on establishing a design/testing methodology for "hybrid airfoils" or "sub-scale airfoils," that is, airfoils having a full-scale leading edge together with a specially designed and foreshortened aft section. The basic approach of using a full-scale leading edge with a foreshortened aft section was considered to a limited extent over 40 years ago. However, it was believed that the range of application of the method had not been fully exploited. Thus a systematic study was being undertaken to investigate and explore the range of application of the method so as to determine its overall potential.

  2. Multiple element airfoils optimized for maximum lift coefficient.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Optimum airfoils in the sense of maximum lift coefficient are obtained for incompressible fluid flow at large Reynolds number. The maximum lift coefficient is achieved by requiring that the turbulent skin friction be zero in the pressure rise region on the airfoil upper surface. Under this constraint, the pressure distribution is optimized. The optimum pressure distribution is a function of Reynolds number and the trailing edge velocity. Geometries of those airfoils which will generate these optimum pressure distributions are obtained using a direct-iterative method which is developed in this study. This method can be used to design airfoils consisting of any number of elements. Numerical examples of one- and two-element airfoils are given. The maximum lift coefficients obtained range from 2 to 2.5.

  3. Preliminary Design and Evaluation of an Airfoil with Continuous Trailing-Edge Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Jinwei; Thornburgh, Robert P.; Kreshock, Andrew R.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Liu, Yi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary design and evaluation of an airfoil with active continuous trailing-edge flap (CTEF) as a potential rotorcraft active control device. The development of structural cross-section models of a continuous trailing-edge flap airfoil is described. The CTEF deformations with MFC actuation are predicted by NASTRAN and UM/VABS analyses. Good agreement is shown between the predictions from the two analyses. Approximately two degrees of CTEF deflection, defined as the rotation angle of the trailing edge, is achieved with the baseline MFC-PZT bender. The 2D aerodynamic characteristics of the continuous trailing-edge flap are evaluated using a CFD analysis. The aerodynamic efficiency of a continuous trailing-edge flap is compared to that of a conventional discrete trailing-edge flap (DTEF). It is found that the aerodynamic characteristics of a CTEF are equivalent to those of a conventional DTEF with the same deflection angle but with a smaller flap chord. A fluid structure interaction procedure is implemented to predict the deflection of the continuous trailingedge flap under aerodynamic pressure. The reductions in CTEF deflection are overall small when aerodynamic pressure is applied: 2.7% reduction is shown with a CTEF deflection angle of two degrees and at angle of attack of six degrees. In addition, newly developed MFC-PMN actuator is found to be a good supplement to MFC-PZT when applied as the bender outside layers. A mixed MFC-PZT and MFC-PMN bender generates 3% more CTEF deformation than an MFC-PZT only bender and 5% more than an MFC-PMN only bender under aerodynamic loads.

  4. Study of viscous flow about airfoils by the integro-differential method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J. C.; Sampath, S.

    1975-01-01

    An integro-differential method was used for numerically solving unsteady incompressible viscous flow problems. A computer program was prepared to solve the problem of an impulsively started 9% thick symmetric Joukowski airfoil at an angle of attack of 15 deg and a Reynolds number of 1000. Some of the results obtained for this problem were discussed and compared with related work completed previously. Two numerical procedures were used, an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) method and a Successive Line Relaxation (SLR) method. Generally, the ADI solution agrees well with the SLR solution and with previous results are stations away from the trailing edge. At the trailing edge station, the ADI solution differs substantially from previous results, while the vorticity profiles obtained from the SLR method there are in good qualitative agreement with previous results.

  5. A self-adaptive-grid method with application to airfoil flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakahashi, K.; Deiwert, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A self-adaptive-grid method is described that is suitable for multidimensional steady and unsteady computations. Based on variational principles, a spring analogy is used to redistribute grid points in an optimal sense to reduce the overall solution error. User-specified parameters, denoting both maximum and minimum permissible grid spacings, are used to define the all-important constants, thereby minimizing the empiricism and making the method self-adaptive. Operator splitting and one-sided controls for orthogonality and smoothness are used to make the method practical, robust, and efficient. Examples are included for both steady and unsteady viscous flow computations about airfoils in two dimensions, as well as for a steady inviscid flow computation and a one-dimensional case. These examples illustrate the precise control the user has with the self-adaptive method and demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy and quality of the solutions.

  6. Hierarchical development of three direct-design methods for two-dimensional axial-turbomachinery cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Korakianitis, T. )

    1993-04-01

    The direct and inverse blade-design iterations for the selection of isolated airfoils and gas turbine blade cascades are enormously reduced if the initial blade shape has performance characteristics near the desirable ones. This paper presents the hierarchical development of three direct blade-design methods of increasing utility for generating two-dimensional blade shapes. The methods can be used to generate inputs to the direct- or inverse-blade-design sequences for subsonic or supersonic airfoils for compressors and turbines, or isolated airfoils. The first method specifies the airfoil shapes with analytical polynomials. It shows that continuous curvature and continuous slope of curvature are necessary conditions to minimize the possibility of flow separation, and to lead to improved blade designs. The second method specifies the airfoil shapes with parametric fourth-order polynomials, which result in continuous-slope-of-curvature airfoils, with smooth Mach number and pressure distributions. This method is time consuming. The third method specifies the airfoil shapes by using a mixture of analytical polynomials and mapping the airfoil surfaces from a desirable curvature distribution. The third method provides blade surfaces with desirable performance in very few direct-design iterations. In all methods the geometry near the leading edge is specified by a thickness distribution added to a construction line, which eliminates the leading edge overspeed and laminar-separation regions. The blade-design methods presented in this paper can be used to improve the aerodynamic and heat transfer performance of turbomachinery cascades, and they can result in high-performance airfoils in very few iterations.

  7. Airfoil structure

    DOEpatents

    Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

    1998-01-13

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

  8. Airfoil structure

    DOEpatents

    Frey, Gary A.; Twardochleb, Christopher Z.

    1998-01-01

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

  9. Some new airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, R.

    1979-01-01

    A computer approach to the design and analysis of airfoils and some common problems concerning laminar separation bubbles at different lift coefficients are briefly discussed. Examples of application to ultralight airplanes, canards, and sailplanes with flaps are given.

  10. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  11. Design of a two-element airfoil in a range of angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abzalilov, D. F.

    2008-11-01

    A numerical-analytical solution of an inverse boundary-value problem of aerohydrodynamics is obtained for a two-element airfoil in the full formulation, based on the velocity distribution defined on the sought airfoil contours in a range of angles of attack. It is demonstrated that flow separation does not occur in the entire range considered for a specified non-separated velocity distribution on the upper surfaces at the maximum angle of attack and on the lower surface at the minimum angle of attack. An example of constructing a sectional airfoil is given; verification of the results obtained is performed with the use of the Fluent software package.

  12. CAS22 - FORTRAN program for fast design and analysis of shock-free airfoil cascades using fictitious-gas concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.; Sobieczky, H.

    1982-01-01

    A user-oriented computer program, CAS22, was developed that is applicable to aerodynamic analysis and transonic shock-free redesign of existing two-dimensional cascades of airfoils. This FORTRAN program can be used: (1) as an analysis code for full-potential, transonic, shocked or shock-free cascade flows; (2) as a design code for shock-free cascades that uses Sobieczky's fictitious-gas concept; and (3) as a shock-free design code followed automatically by the analysis in order to confirm that the newly obtained cascade shape provides for an entirely shock-free transonic flow field. A four-level boundary-conforming grid of an O type is generated. The shock-free design is performed by implementing Sobieczky's fictitious-gas concept of elliptic continuation from subsonic into supersonic flow domains. Recomputation inside each supersonic zone is performed by the method of characteristics in the rheograph plane by using isentropic gas relations. Besides converting existing cascade shapes with multiple shocked supersonic regions into shock-free cascades, CAS22 can also unchoke previously choked cascades and make them shock free.

  13. The SNL100-03 Blade: Design Studies with Flatback Airfoils for the Sandia 100-meter Blade.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Daniel; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-09-01

    A series of design studies were performed to inv estigate the effects of flatback airfoils on blade performance and weight for large blades using the Sandi a 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. As part of the study, the effects of varying the blade slenderness on blade structural performance was investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of blad e slenderness with respect to tip deflection, flap- wise & edge-wise fatigue resistance, panel buckling capacity, flutter speed, manufacturing labor content, blade total weight, and aerodynamic design load magn itude are quantified. Following these design studies, a final blade design (SNL100-03) was prod uced, which was based on a highly slender design using flatback airfoils. The SNL100-03 design with flatback airfoils has weight of 49 tons, which is about 16% decrease from its SNL100-02 predecessor that used conventional sharp trailing edge airfoils. Although not systematically optimized, the SNL100 -03 design study provides an assessment of and insight into the benefits of flatback airfoils for la rge blades as well as insights into the limits or negative consequences of high blade slenderness resulting from a highly slender SNL100-03 planform as was chosen in the final design definition. This docum ent also provides a description of the final SNL100-03 design definition and is intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-03, which are made publicly available. A summary of the major findings of the Sandia 100-meter blade development program, from the initial SNL100-00 baseline blade through the fourth SNL100-03 blade study, is provided. This summary includes the major findings and outcomes of blade d esign studies, pathways to mitigate the identified large blade design drivers, and tool development that were produced over the course of this five-year research program. A summary of large blade tec hnology needs and research opportunities is also presented.

  14. Analysis of a theoretically optimized transonic airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Burdges, K. P.; Shrewsbury, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical optimization was used in conjunction with an inviscid, full potential equation, transonic flow analysis computer code to design an upper surface contour for a conventional airfoil to improve its supercritical performance. The modified airfoil was tested in a compressible flow wind tunnel. The modified airfoil's performance was evaluated by comparison with test data for the baseline airfoil and for an airfoil developed by optimization of leading edge of the baseline airfoil. While the leading edge modification performed as expected, the upper surface re-design did not produce all of the expected performance improvements. Theoretical solutions computed using a full potential, transonic airfoil code corrected for viscosity were compared to experimental data for the baseline airfoil and the upper surface modification. These correlations showed that the theory predicted the aerodynamics of the baseline airfoil fairly well, but failed to accurately compute drag characteristics for the upper surface modification.

  15. Performance of NACA Eight-stage Axial-flow Compressor Designed on the Basis of Airfoil Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinnette, John T; Schey, Oscar W; King, J Austin

    1943-01-01

    The NACA has conducted an investigation to determine the performance that can be obtained from a multistage axial-flow compressor based on airfoil research. A theory was developed; an eight-stage axial-flow compressor was designed, constructed, and tested. The performance of the compressor was determined for speeds from 5000 to 14,000 r.p.m with varying air flow at each speed. Most of the tests were made with air at room temperature. The performance was determined in accordance with the Committee's recommended procedure for testing superchargers. The expected performance was obtained, showing that a multistage compressor of high efficiency can be designed by the application of airfoil theory.

  16. Roughness Based Crossflow Transition Control for a Swept Airfoil Design Relevant to Subsonic Transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Malik, Mujeeb R.; Eppink, Jenna; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Streett, Craig L.

    2010-01-01

    A high fidelity transition prediction methodology has been applied to a swept airfoil design at a Mach number of 0.75 and chord Reynolds number of approximately 17 million, with the dual goal of an assessment of the design for the implementation and testing of roughness based crossflow transition control and continued maturation of such methodology in the context of realistic aerodynamic configurations. Roughness based transition control involves controlled seeding of suitable, subdominant crossflow modes in order to weaken the growth of naturally occurring, linearly more unstable instability modes via a nonlinear modification of the mean boundary layer profiles. Therefore, a synthesis of receptivity, linear and nonlinear growth of crossflow disturbances, and high-frequency secondary instabilities becomes desirable to model this form of control. Because experimental data is currently unavailable for passive crossflow transition control for such high Reynolds number configurations, a holistic computational approach is used to assess the feasibility of roughness based control methodology. Potential challenges inherent to this control application as well as associated difficulties in modeling this form of control in a computational setting are highlighted. At high Reynolds numbers, a broad spectrum of stationary crossflow disturbances amplify and, while it may be possible to control a specific target mode using Discrete Roughness Elements (DREs), nonlinear interaction between the control and target modes may yield strong amplification of the difference mode that could have an adverse impact on the transition delay using spanwise periodic roughness elements.

  17. High-Lift Optimization Design Using Neural Networks on a Multi-Element Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenman, Roxana M.; Roth, Karlin R.; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The high-lift performance of a multi-element airfoil was optimized by using neural-net predictions that were trained using a computational data set. The numerical data was generated using a two-dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes algorithm with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Because it is difficult to predict maximum lift for high-lift systems, an empirically-based maximum lift criteria was used in this study to determine both the maximum lift and the angle at which it occurs. Multiple input, single output networks were trained using the NASA Ames variation of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for each of the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, drag, and moment). The artificial neural networks were integrated with a gradient-based optimizer. Using independent numerical simulations and experimental data for this high-lift configuration, it was shown that this design process successfully optimized flap deflection, gap, overlap, and angle of attack to maximize lift. Once the neural networks were trained and integrated with the optimizer, minimal additional computer resources were required to perform optimization runs with different initial conditions and parameters. Applying the neural networks within the high-lift rigging optimization process reduced the amount of computational time and resources by 83% compared with traditional gradient-based optimization procedures for multiple optimization runs.

  18. A frequency domain numerical method for airfoil broadband self-noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qidou; Joseph, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical approach, based in the frequency domain, for predicting the broadband self-noise radiation due to an airfoil situated in a smooth mean flow. Noise is generated by the interaction between the boundary layer turbulence on the airfoil surface and the airfoil trailing edge. Thin airfoil theory is used to deduce the unsteady blade loading. In this paper, the important difference with much of the previous work dealing with trailing edge noise is that the integration of the surface sources for computation of the radiated sound field is evaluated on the actual airfoil surface rather than in the mean-chord plane. The assumption of flat plate geometry in the calculation of radiation is therefore avoided. Moreover, the solution is valid in both near and far fields and reduces to the analytic solution due to Amiet when the airfoil collapses to a flat plate with large span, and the measurement point is taken to the far field. Predictions of the airfoil broadband self-noise radiation presented here are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the predictions obtained using the Brooks approach, which are based on a comprehensive database of experimental data. Also investigated in this paper is the effect on the broadband noise prediction of relaxing the 'frozen-gust' assumption, whereby the turbulence at each frequency comprises a continuous spectrum of streamwise wavenumber components. It is shown that making the frozen gust assumption yields an under-prediction of the noise spectrum by approximately 2dB compared with that obtained when this assumption is relaxed, with the largest occurring at high frequencies. This paper concludes with a comparison of the broadband noise directivity for a flat-plat, a NACA 0012 and a NACA 0024 airfoil at non-zero angle of attack. Differences of up to 20 dB are predicted, with the largest difference occurring at a radiation angle of zero degrees relative to the airfoil mean centre line.

  19. Design of airfoils providing the absence of separation in a compressible flow in a specified range of angles of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaeva, O. S.; Il'Inskii, N. B.

    2008-11-01

    A problem of modification of the classical airfoils that ensure the absence of separation in a subsonic ideal-gas flow in a specified range of angles of attack is solved by a numerical-analytical method based on the quasi-solution of inverse boundary-value problems of aerohydrodynamics and Kármán-Jiang formulas. Loitsyanskii’s criterion of the non-separated flow is used to determine the boundary-layer separation point.

  20. The role of airfoil geometry in minimizing the effect of insect contamination of laminar flow sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maresh, J. L.; Bragg, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    A method has been developed to predict the contamination of an airfoil by insects and the resultant performance penalty. Insect aerodynamics have been modeled and the impingement of insects on an airfoil are solved by calculating their trajectories. Upon impact, insect rupture and the resulting height of the debris is determined based on experimental data. A boundary layer analysis is performed to determine which insects cause boundary layer transition and the resultant drag penalty. A contaminated airfoil figure of merit is presented to be used to compare airfoil susceptibility. Results show that the insect contamination effects depend on accretion conditions, airfoil angle of attack and Reynolds number. The importance of the stagnation region to designing airfoils for minimum drag penalties is discussed.

  1. Effect of airfoil (trailing-edge) thickness on the numerical solution of panel methods based on the Dirichlet boundary condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yon, Steven; Katz, Joseph; Plotkin, Allen

    1992-01-01

    The practical limit of airfoil thickness ratio for which acceptable engineering results are obtainable with the Dirichlet boundary-condition-based numerical methods is investigated. This is done by studying the effect of thickness on the calculated pressure distribution near the trailing edge and by comparing the aerodynamic coefficients with available exact solutions. The first objective of this study, owing to the wide use of such computational methods, is to demonstrate the numerical symptoms that occur when the body or wing thickness approaches zero and to increase the awareness of potential users of these methods. Additionally, an effort is made to obtain the practical limits of the trailing-edge thickness where such problems will appear in the flow solution, and to propose some possible cures for very thin airfoils or those with cusped trailing edges.

  2. TRANSEP: A program for high lift separated flow about airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method and program called TRANSEP is presented that can be used for the analysis of the flow about a low speed airfoil under high lift, massive separation conditions. Since the present program is a modification of the direct-inverse TRANDES code, it can also be used for the design and analysis of transonic airfoils, including the effects of weak viscous interaction. Interactions on program usage, program modifications to convert TRANDES to TRANSEP, and sample cases and results are given.

  3. Advanced technology airfoil research, volume 2. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive review of airfoil research is presented. The major thrust of the research is in three areas: development of computational aerodynamic codes for airfoil analysis and design, development of experimental facilities and test techniques, and all types of airfoil applications.

  4. Discussion of test results in the design of laminar airfoils for competition gliders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrowski, J.; Skrzynski, S.; Litwinczyk, M.

    1980-01-01

    The deformation of flow in the boundary layer and the local separation of a laminar layer (laminar bubbles) from various airfoils were investigated. These phenomena were classified and their influence is discussed. Various aerodynamic characteristics are discussed and the principles for prescribing pressure distribution to attain a high value of c sub z max with a possibly low drag coefficient are described.

  5. High-flaps for natural laminar flow airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Harry L.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the NACA and NASA low-drag airfoil research is presented with particular emphasis given to the development of mechanical high-lift flap systems and their application to general aviation aircraft. These flap systems include split, plain, single-slotted, and double-slotted trailing-edge flaps plus slat and Krueger leading-edge devices. The recently developed continuous variable-camber high-lift mechanism is also described. The state-of-the-art of theoretical methods for the design and analysis of multi-component airfoils in two-dimensional subsonic flow is discussed, and a detailed description of the Langley MCARF (Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis Program) computer code is presented. The results of a recent effort to design a single- and double-slotted flap system for the NASA high speed natural laminar flow (HSNLF) (1)-0213 airfoil using the MCARF code are presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the code.

  6. NREL airfoil families for HAWTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangler, J. L.; Somers, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    The development of special-purpose airfoils for horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) began in 1984 as a joint effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), and Airfoils, Incorporated. Since that time seven airfoil families have been designed for various size rotors using the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code. A general performance requirement of the new airfoil families is that they exhibit a maximum lift coefficient (c(sub l,max)) which is relatively insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil families address the needs of stall-regulated, variable-pitch, and variable-rpm wind turbines. For stall-regulated rotors, better peak-power control is achieved through the design of tip airfoils that restrain the maximum lift coefficient. Restrained maximum lift coefficient allows the use of more swept disc area for a given generator size. Also, for stall-regulated rotors, tip airfoils with high thickness are used to accommodate overspeed control devices. For variable-pitch and variable-rpm rotors, tip airfoils having a high maximum lift coefficient lend themselves to lightweight blades with low solidity. Tip airfoils having low thickness result in less drag for blades having full-span pitch control. Annual energy improvements from the NREL airfoil families are projected to be 23% to 35% for stall-regulated turbines, 8% to 20% for variable-pitch turbines, and 8% to 10% for variable-rpm turbines. The improvement for stall-regulated turbines has been verified in field tests.

  7. NREL airfoil families for HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    The development of special-purpose airfoils for horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) began in 1984 as a joint effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), and Airfoils, Incorporated. Since that time nine airfoil families have been designed for various size rotors using the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code. A general performance requirement of the new airfoil families is that they exhibit a maximum lift coefficient (c{sub 1,max}) which is relatively insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil families address the needs of stall-regulated, variable-pitch, and variable-rpm wind turbines. For stall-regulated rotors, better peak-power control is achieved through the design of tip airfoils that restrain the maximum lift coefficient. Restrained maximum lift coefficient allows the use of more swept disc area for a given generator size. Also, for stall-regulated rotors, tip airfoils with high thickness are used to accommodate overspeed control devices. For variable-pitch and variable-rpm rotors, tip airfoils having a high maximum lift coefficient lend themselves to lightweight blades with low solidity. Tip airfoils having low thickness result in less drag for blades having full-span pitch control. Annual energy improvements from the NREL airfoil families are projected to be 23% to 35% for stall-regulated turbines, 8% to 20% for variable-pitch turbines, and 8% to 10% for variable-rpm turbines. The improvement for stall-regulated turbines has been verified in field tests.

  8. NREL airfoil families for HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J L; Somers, D M

    1995-01-01

    The development of special-purpose airfoils for horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) began in 1984 as a joint effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), and Airfoils, Incorporated. Since that time seven airfoil families have been designed for various size rotors using the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code. A general performance requirement of the new airfoil families is that they exhibit a maximum lift coefficient (c{sub l,max}) which is relatively insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil families address the needs of stall-regulated, variable-pitch, and variable-rpm wind turbines. For stall-regulated rotors, better peak-power control is achieved through the design of tip airfoils that restrain the maximum lift coefficient. Restrained maximum lift coefficient allows the use of more swept disc area for a given generator size. Also, for stall-regulated rotors, tip airfoils with high thickness are used to accommodate overspeed control devices. For variable-pitch and variable-rpm rotors, tip airfoils having a high maximum lift coefficient lend themselves to lightweight blades with low solidity. Tip airfoils having low thickness result in less drag for blades having full-span pitch control. Annual energy improvements from the NREL airfoil families are projected to be 23% to 35% for stall-regulated turbines, 8% to 20% for variable-pitch turbines, and 8% to 10% for variable-rpm turbines. The improvement for stall-regulated turbines has been verified in field tests.

  9. Prediction of high frequency gust response with airfoil thickness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysak, Peter D.; Capone, Dean E.; Jonson, Michael L.

    2013-05-01

    The unsteady lift forces that act on an airfoil in turbulent flow are an undesirable source of vibration and noise in many industrial applications. Methods to predict these forces have traditionally treated the airfoil as a flat plate. At higher frequencies, where the relevant turbulent length scales are comparable to the airfoil thickness, the flat plate approximation becomes invalid and results in overprediction of the unsteady force spectrum. This work provides an improved methodology for the prediction of the unsteady lift forces that accounts for the thickness of the airfoil. An analytical model was developed to calculate the response of the airfoil to high frequency gusts. The approach is based on a time-domain calculation with a sharp-edged gust and accounts for the distortion of the gust by the mean flow around the airfoil leading edge. The unsteady lift is calculated from a weighted integration of the gust vorticity, which makes the model relatively straightforward to implement and verify. For routine design calculations of turbulence-induced forces, a closed-form gust response thickness correction factor was developed for NACA 65 series airfoils.

  10. Comparative Study of Airfoil Flow Separation Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Nick; Kahouli, Waad; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    Airfoil flow separation impacts a multitude of applications including turbomachinery, wind turbines, and bio-inspired micro-aerial vehicles. In order to achieve maximum performance, some devices operate near the edge of flow separation, and others use dynamic flow separation advantageously. Numerous criteria exist for predicting the onset of airfoil flow separation. This talk presents a comparative study of a number of such criteria, with emphasis paid to speed and accuracy of the calculations. We evaluate the criteria using a two-dimensional unsteady vortex lattice method, which allows for rapid analysis (on the order of seconds instead of days for a full Navier-Stokes solution) and design of optimal airfoil geometry and kinematics. Furthermore, dynamic analyses permit evaluation of dynamic stall conditions for enhanced lift via leading edge vortex shedding, commonly present in small flapping-wing flyers such as the bumblebee and hummingbird.

  11. Evaluation of a research circulation control airfoil using Navier-Stokes methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrewsbury, George D.

    1987-01-01

    The compressible Reynolds time averaged Navier-Stokes equations were used to obtain solutions for flows about a two dimensional circulation control airfoil. The governing equations were written in conservation form for a body-fitted coordinate system and solved using an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) procedure. A modified algebraic eddy viscosity model was used to define the turbulent characteristics of the flow, including the wall jet flow over the Coanda surface at the trailing edge. Numerical results are compared to experimental data obtained for a research circulation control airfoil geometry. Excellent agreement with the experimental results was obtained.

  12. Controlling the secondary flow in a turbine cascade by three-dimensional airfoil design and endwall contouring

    SciTech Connect

    Duden, A.; Fottner, L.; Raab, I.

    1999-04-01

    A highly loaded turbine cascade has been redesigned with the objective to reduce the secondary flow by applying endwall contouring and three-dimensional airfoil design in the endwall regions. The overall loading and the axial area ratio of the cascade have been kept constant. With the tools of a three-dimensional design environment, a systematic study has been carried out regarding several features of the endwall pressure distribution and their influence on the secondary flow. Two optimized configurations have been investigated in a high-speed cascade wind tunnel. The flow field traverses showed improvements concerning the radial extent of the secondary flow and a decrease in secondary loss of 26%. Unfortunately this reduction was counterbalanced by increased profile losses and higher inlet losses due to increased blockage. The striking feature of the cascade with endwall contouring and three-dimensional airfoil design was a significant reduction of the exit flow angle deviations connected with the secondary flow. The predictions obtained by the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver TRACE{_}S showed a remarkable agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Reynolds and Mach number effects on multielement airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valarezo, Walter O.; Dominik, Chet J.; Mcghee, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to assess Reynolds and Mach number effects on a supercritical multielement airfoil. The airfoil is representative of the stall-critical station of an advanced transport wing design. The experimental work was conducted as part of a cooperative program between the Douglas Aircraft Company and the NASA LaRC to improve current knowledge of high-lift flows and to develop a validation database with practical geometries/conditions for emerging computational methods. This paper describes results obtained for both landing and takeoff multielement airfoils (four and three-element configurations) for a variety of Mach/Reynolds number combinations up to flight conditions. Effects on maximum lift are considered for the landing configurations and effects on both lift and drag are reported for the takeoff geometry. The present test results revealed considerable maximum lift effects on the three-element landing configuration for Reynolds number variations and significant Mach number effects on the four-element airfoil.

  14. Experimental transition and boundary-layer stability analysis for a slotted swept laminar flow control airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.; Harris, Charles D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A swept, supercritical laminar flow control (LFC) airfoil designated NASA SCLFC(1)-0513F was tested at subsonic and transonic speeds in the NASA Langley eight-foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. This paper examines Tollmien-Schlichting and crossflow disturbance amplification for this airfoil using the linear stability method. The design methodology using linear stability analysis is evaluated and the results of the incompressible and compressible methods are compared. Experimental data on the swept, supercritical LFC airfoil and reference wind tunnel and flight results are used to correlate and evaluate the N-factor method for transition prediction over a speed range M(infinity) from zero to one.

  15. Turbine airfoil to shround attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Christian X; Morrison, Jay A; James, Allister W; Snider, Raymond G; Eshak, Daniel M; Marra, John J; Wessell, Brian J

    2014-05-06

    A turbine airfoil (31) with an end portion (42) that tapers (44) toward the end (43) of the airfoil. A ridge (46) extends around the end portion. It has proximal (66) and distal (67) sides. A shroud platform (50) is bi-cast onto the end portion around the ridge without bonding. Cooling shrinks the platform into compression (62) on the end portion (42) of the airfoil. Gaps between the airfoil and platform are formed using a fugitive material (56) in the bi-casting stage. These gaps are designed in combination with the taper angle (44) to accommodate differential thermal expansion while maintaining a gas seal along the contact surfaces. The taper angle (44) may vary from lesser on the pressure side (36) to greater on the suction side (38) of the airfoil. A collar portion (52) of the platform provides sufficient contact area for connection stability.

  16. Large-scale aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils as tested in the variable density wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Anderson, Raymond F

    1931-01-01

    In order to give the large-scale characteristics of a variety of airfoils in a form which will be of maximum value, both for airplane design and for the study of airfoil characteristics, a collection has been made of the results of airfoil tests made at full-scale values of the reynolds number in the variable density wind tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. They have been corrected for tunnel wall interference and are presented not only in the conventional form but also in a form which facilitates the comparison of airfoils and from which corrections may be easily made to any aspect ratio. An example showing the method of correcting the results to a desired aspect ratio has been given for the convenience of designers. In addition, the data have been analyzed with a view to finding the variation of the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils with their thickness and camber.

  17. Airfoil shape for a turbine nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Patik, Joseph Francis; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A first-stage nozzle vane includes an airfoil having a profile according to Table I. The annulus profile of the hot gas path is defined in conjunction with the airfoil profile and the profile of the inner and outer walls by the Cartesian coordinate values given in Tables I and II, respectively. The airfoil is a three-dimensional bowed design, both in the airfoil body and in the trailing edge. The airfoil is steam and air-cooled by flowing cooling mediums through cavities extending in the vane between inner and outer walls.

  18. Stiffness characteristics of airfoils under pulse loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Kevin Eugene

    The turbomachinery industry continually struggles with the adverse effects of contact rubs between airfoils and casings. The key parameter controlling the severity of a given rub event is the contact load produced when the airfoil tips incur into the casing. These highly non-linear and transient forces are difficult to calculate and their effects on the static and rotating components are not well understood. To help provide this insight, experimental and analytical capabilities have been established and exercised through an alliance between GE Aviation and The Ohio State University Gas Turbine Laboratory. One of the early findings of the program is the influence of blade flexibility on the physics of rub events. The core focus of the work presented in this dissertation is to quantify the influence of airfoil flexibility through a novel modeling approach that is based on the relationship between applied force duration and maximum tip deflection. This relationship is initially established using a series of forward, non-linear and transient analyses in which simulated impulse rub loads are applied. This procedure, although effective, is highly inefficient and costly to conduct by requiring numerous explicit simulations. To alleviate this issue, a simplified model, named the pulse magnification model, is developed that only requires a modal analysis and a static analyses to fully describe how the airfoil stiffness changes with respect to load duration. Results from the pulse magnification model are compared to results from the full transient simulation method and to experimental results, providing sound verification for the use of the modeling approach. Furthermore, a unique and highly efficient method to model airfoil geometries was developed and is outlined in this dissertation. This method produces quality Finite Element airfoil definitions directly from a fully parameterized mathematical model. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by comparing modal

  19. Shockless airfoils with thicknesses of 20.6 and 20.7 percent chord analytically designed for a Mach number of 0.68 and a lift coefficient of 0.40

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    A 20.8 percent-thick airfoil shape was designed to have shockless inviscid flow at a Mach number of 0.68 and a lift coefficient of 0.40. In order to determine the actual airfoils which would yield this same shockless flow when viscous effects are included, boundary layer displacement thicknesses were subtracted from the inviscid shape for Reynolds numbers of 100 and 35 million. This process yielded airfoils with thicknesses of 20.7 and 20.6 percent, respectively. Subtraction of boundary layer displacement thicknesses for Reynolds numbers below 35 million yielded nonphysical airfoils, that is airfoils with negative thicknesses near tHe trailing edge. The pitching moment about the quarter-chord point at the design condition was -0.082 for the inviscid shape and, consequently, for both airfoils. Off-design calculations for the two airfoils were made using a computer program which provides for the interaction of the inviscid flow and boundary layer solutions. The pressure distributions of the airfoils were shockless for conditions from the design point to lower Mach numbers and lift coefficients. No boundary layer separation was predicted except in the last 3 percent chord on the upper surface.

  20. Transonic inviscid/turbulent airfoil flow simulations using a pressure based method with high order schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Gang; Davidson, Lars; Olsson, Erik

    This paper presents computations of transonic aerodynamic flow simulations using a pressure-based Euler/Navier-Stokes solver. In this work emphasis is focused on the implementation of higher-order schemes such as QUICK, LUDS and MUSCL. A new scheme CHARM is proposed for convection approximation. Inviscid flow simulations are carried out for the airfoil NACA 0012. The CHARM scheme gives better resolution for the present inviscid case. The turbulent flow computations are carried out for the airfoil RAE 2822. Good results were obtained using QUICK scheme for mean motion equation combined with the MUSCL scheme for k and ɛ equations. No unphysical oscillations were observed. The results also show that the second-order and thir-dorder schemes yielded a comparable accuracy compared with the experimental data.

  1. Mach number validation of a new zonal CFD method (ZAP2D) for airfoil simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strash, Daniel J.; Summa, Michael; Yoo, Sungyul

    1991-01-01

    A closed-loop overlapped velocity coupling procedure has been utilized to combine a two-dimensional potential-flow panel code and a Navier-Stokes code. The fully coupled two-zone code (ZAP2D) has been used to compute the flow past a NACA 0012 airfoil at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 0.84 near the two-dimensional airfoil C(lmax) point for a Reynolds number of 3 million. For these cases, the grid domain size can be reduced to 3 chord lengths with less than 3-percent loss in accuracy for freestream Mach numbers through 0.8. Earlier validation work with ZAP2D has demonstrated a reduction in the required Navier-Stokes computation time by a factor of 4 for subsonic Mach numbers. For this more challenging condition of high lift and Mach number, the saving in CPU time is reduced to a factor of 2.

  2. Airfoil and diffused cooling holes and method and apparatus for making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Vertz, R.J.; Mosavi, R.K.

    1988-08-09

    This patent describes a body shell for a gas-turbine airfoil and having one or more cooling holes between an inner surface and an outer surface, each of the one or more holes having a laser-drilled inner bore portion and an EDM-machined outer diffuser portion, whereby the inner bore portion has a surface roughness which substantially exceeds the surface roughness which substantially exceeds the surface roughness of the outer diffuser portion.

  3. Robust Airfoil Optimization to Achieve Consistent Drag Reduction Over a Mach Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Huyse, Luc; Padula, Sharon; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We prove mathematically that in order to avoid point-optimization at the sampled design points for multipoint airfoil optimization, the number of design points must be greater than the number of free-design variables. To overcome point-optimization at the sampled design points, a robust airfoil optimization method (called the profile optimization method) is developed and analyzed. This optimization method aims at a consistent drag reduction over a given Mach range and has three advantages: (a) it prevents severe degradation in the off-design performance by using a smart descent direction in each optimization iteration, (b) there is no random airfoil shape distortion for any iterate it generates, and (c) it allows a designer to make a trade-off between a truly optimized airfoil and the amount of computing time consumed. For illustration purposes, we use the profile optimization method to solve a lift-constrained drag minimization problem for 2-D airfoil in Euler flow with 20 free-design variables. A comparison with other airfoil optimization methods is also included.

  4. Preliminary Investigation of Certain Laminar-Flow Airfoils for Application at High Speeds and Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, E.N.; Abbott, Ira H.; von Doenhoff, A.E.

    1939-01-01

    In order to extend the useful range of Reynolds numbers of airfoils designed to take advantage of the extensive laminar boundary layers possible in an air stream of low turbulence, tests were made of the NACA 2412-34 and 1412-34 sections in the NACA low-turbulence tunnel. Although the possible extent of the laminar boundary layer on these airfoils is not so great as for specially designed laminar-flow airfoils, it is greater than that for conventional airfoils, and is sufficiently extensive so that at Reynolds numbers above 11,000,000 the laminar region is expected to be limited by the permissible 'Reynolds number run' and not by laminar separation as is the case with conventional airfoils. Drag measurements by the wake-survey method and pressure-distribution measurements were made at several lift coefficients through a range of Reynolds numbers up to 11,400,000. The drag scale-effect curve for the NACA 1412-34 is extrapolated to a Reynolds number of 30,000,000 on the basis of theoretical calculations of the skin friction. Comparable skin-friction calculations were made for the NACA 23012. The results indicate that, for certain applications at moderate values of the Reynolds number, the NACA 1412-34 and 2412-34 airfoils offer some advantages over such conventional airfoils as the NACA 23012. The possibility of maintaining a more extensive laminar boundary layer on these airfoils should result in a small drag reduction, and the absence of pressure peaks allows higher speeds to be reached before the compressibility burble is encountered. At lower Reynold numbers, below about 10,000,000, these airfoils have higher drags than airfoils designed to operate with very extensive laminar boundary layers.

  5. Solution of the two-dimensional Euler equations with generalized coordinate transformation using flux vector splitting. [for transonic airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, P. G.; Steger, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    An implicit finite difference code using flux vector splitting has been developed for solving the two-dimensional inviscid gas dynamics equations. The method is spatially second-order acurate, fully conservative, and uses body-conforming generalized coordinates for treating complex geometries. Numerical results have been obtained for transonic flow over a circular cylinder and airfoils. Steady results for a half cylinder (top and bottom symmetry-imposed) range from critical flow to a strong shock case with rotationally induced flow separation. Full cylinder solutions at freestream Mach number values of 0.5, however, show unsteady oscillation. A perturbation form of the method has also been developed and used to compute both fore and aft inviscid flow separation about a cylinder for a nonuniform incoming stream.

  6. Design philosophy of long range LFC transports with advanced supercritical LFC airfoils. [laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, Werner; Vemuru, Chandra S.

    1988-01-01

    The achievement of 70 percent laminar flow using modest boundary layer suction on the wings, empennage, nacelles, and struts of long-range LFC transports, combined with larger wing spans and lower span loadings, could make possible an unrefuelled range halfway around the world up to near sonic cruise speeds with large payloads. It is shown that supercritical LFC airfoils with undercut front and rear lower surfaces, an upper surface static pressure coefficient distribution with an extensive low supersonic flat rooftop, a far upstream supersonic pressure minimum, and a steep subsonic rear pressure rise with suction or a slotted cruise flap could alleviate sweep-induced crossflow and attachment-line boundary-layer instability. Wing-mounted superfans can reduce fuel consumption and engine tone noise.

  7. Composite airfoil assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-03-03

    A composite blade assembly for mounting on a turbine wheel includes a ceramic airfoil and an airfoil platform. The ceramic airfoil is formed with an airfoil portion, a blade shank portion and a blade dovetail tang. The metal platform includes a platform shank and a radially inner platform dovetail. The ceramic airfoil is captured within the metal platform, such that in use, the ceramic airfoil is held within the turbine wheel independent of the metal platform.

  8. Recent work on airfoil theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prandtl, L

    1940-01-01

    The basic ideas of a new method for treating the problem of the airfoil are presented, and a review is given of the problems thus far computed for incompressible and supersonic flows. Test results are reported for the airfoil of circular plan form and the results are shown to agree well with the theory. As a supplement, a theory based on the older methods is presented for the rectangular of small aspect ratio.

  9. An Efficient Inverse Aerodynamic Design Method For Subsonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milholen, William E., II

    2000-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics based design methods are maturing to the point that they are beginning to be used in the aircraft design process. Many design methods however have demonstrated deficiencies in the leading edge region of airfoil sections. The objective of the present research is to develop an efficient inverse design method which is valid in the leading edge region. The new design method is a streamline curvature method, and a new technique is presented for modeling the variation of the streamline curvature normal to the surface. The new design method allows the surface coordinates to move normal to the surface, and has been incorporated into the Constrained Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (CDISC) design method. The accuracy and efficiency of the design method is demonstrated using both two-dimensional and three-dimensional design cases.

  10. Leading-edge slat optimization for maximum airfoil lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, L. E.; Mcgowan, P. R.; Guest, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical procedure for determining the position (horizontal location, vertical location, and deflection) of a leading edge slat that maximizes the lift of multielement airfoils is presented. The structure of the flow field is calculated by iteratively coupling potential flow and boundary layer analysis. This aerodynamic calculation is combined with a constrained function minimization analysis to determine the position of a leading edge slat so that the suction peak on the nose of the main airfoil is minized. The slat position is constrained by the numerical procedure to ensure an attached boundary layer on the upper surface of the slat and to ensure negligible interaction between the slat wake and the boundary layer on the upper surface of the main airfoil. The highest angle attack at which this optimized slat position can maintain attached flow on the main airfoil defines the optimum slat position for maximum lift. The design method is demonstrated for an airfoil equipped with a leading-edge slat and a trailing edge, single-slotted flap. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data, obtained in the Ames 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel, to verify experimentally the predicted slat position for maximum lift. The experimentally optimized slat position is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction, indicating that the theoretical procedure is a feasible design method.

  11. Inverse design of super-elliptic cooling passages in coated turbine blade airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Martin, Thomas J.

    1994-04-01

    A highly accurate and reliable algorithm capable of performing automatic inverse design of coolant flow passage numbers, shapes, sizes, and locations inside coated solid objects has been developed. The use has the freedom to specify arbitrary temperatures and heat fluxes at the points on the outer surface of the object, and either temperatures or heat fluxes on the surfaces of the yet unknown coolant flow passages. The number of passages required could be guessed and the algorithm will automatically eliminate the unnecessary passages. The method allows even inexperienced designers to achieve an optimal configuration of coolant passages in a single computer run while satisfying user-specified manufacturing constraints that were incorporated via a barrier function method. The optimization algorithms used in this inverse design code were based on gradient search and on a modified Newton search. A simple method for escaping from local minima has been implemented that involves switching between two different formulations of the objective function. The optimal value of the gradient search parameter was found using a simple method of fitting a highly accurate spline through a set of points in the cost function/search parameter plane, and seeking out the value that will generate minimal error.

  12. Two-dimensional wind-tunnel tests of a NASA supercritical airfoil with various high-lift systems. Volume 1: Data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, E.; Zierten, T.; Mahal, A.

    1977-01-01

    High-lift systems for a NASA, 9.3%, method for calculating the viscous flow about two-dimensional multicomponent airfoils was evaluated by comparing its predictions with test data. High-lift systems derived from supercritical airfoils were compared in terms of performance to high-lift systems derived from conventional airfoils. The high-lift systems for the supercritical airfoil were designed to achieve maximum lift and consisted of: a single-slotted flap; a double-slotted flap and a leading-edge slat; and a triple-slotted flap and a leading-edge slat. Agreement between theoretical predictions and experimental results are also discussed.

  13. Applications of Laplace transform methods to airfoil motion and stability calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of generalized unsteady aerodynamic theory and presents a derivation of the generalized Possio integral equation. Numerical calculations resolve questions concerning subsonic indicial lift functions and demonstrate the generation of Kutta waves at high values of reduced frequency, subsonic Mach number, or both. The use of rational function approximations of unsteady aerodynamic loads in aeroelastic stability calculations is reviewed, and a reformulation of the matrix Pade approximation technique is given. Numerical examples of flutter boundary calculations for a wing which is to be flight tested are given. Finally, a simplified aerodynamic model of transonic flow is used to study the stability of an airfoil exposed to supersonic and subsonic flow regions.

  14. The further development of circulation control airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, N. J.

    1987-01-01

    The performance trends of circulation control airfoils are reviewed and observations are made as to where improvements in performance and expansion of the flight envelope may be feasible. A new analytically defined family of airfoils is suggested, all of which maintain the fore and aft symmetry required for stopped rotor application. It is important to recognize that any improvements in section capabilities may not be totally applicable to the present vehicle operation. It remains for the designers of the rotor system to reappraise the three dimensional operating environment in view of the different airfoil operating characteristics and for the airfoil definitions to be flexible while maintaining satisfactory levels of performance.

  15. An interactive boundary-layer approach to multielement airfoils at high lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1992-01-01

    A calculation method based on an interactive boundary-layer approach to multielement airfoils is described and is applied to three types of airfoil configurations with and without flap-wells in order to demonstrate the applicability of the method to general high-lift configurations. This method, well tested for single airfoils as a function of shape, angle of attack, and Reynolds number, is here shown to apply equally well to two-element airfoils and their wakes, to a flap-well region, and to a three-element arrangement which includes the effects of co-flowing regions, a flap well, and the wake of the elements. In addition to providing accurate representation of these flows, the method is general so that its extension to three-dimensional arrangements is likely to provide a practical, accurate and efficient tool to assist the design process.

  16. Leading-edge singularities in thin-airfoil theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    If the thin airfoil theory is applied to an airfoil having a rounded leading edge, a certain error will arise in the determination of the pressure distribution around the nose. It is shown that the evaluation of the drag of such a blunt nosed airfoil by the thin airfoil theory requires the addition of a leading edge force, analogous to the leading edge thrust of the lifting airfoil. The method of calculation is illustrated by application to: (1) The Joukowski airfoil in subsonic flow; and (2) the thin elliptic cone in supersonic flow. A general formula for the edge force is provided which is applicable to a variety of wing forms.

  17. The structure of separated flow regions occurring near the leading edge of airfoils, including transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The structure and behavior of the separation bubble including transition and the redeveloping boundary layer after reattachment over an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers was studied. The intent is to further the understanding of the complex flow phenomena so that analytic methods for predicting their formation and development can be improved. These analytic techniques have applications in the design and performance prediction of airfoils operating in the low Reynolds number flight regime.

  18. Aerodynamic design optimization by using a continuous adjoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, JiaQi; Xiong, JunTao; Liu, Feng

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents the fundamentals of a continuous adjoint method and the applications of this method to the aerodynamic design optimization of both external and internal flows. General formulation of the continuous adjoint equations and the corresponding boundary conditions are derived. With the adjoint method, the complete gradient information needed in the design optimization can be obtained by solving the governing flow equations and the corresponding adjoint equations only once for each cost function, regardless of the number of design parameters. An inverse design of airfoil is firstly performed to study the accuracy of the adjoint gradient and the effectiveness of the adjoint method as an inverse design method. Then the method is used to perform a series of single and multiple point design optimization problems involving the drag reduction of airfoil, wing, and wing-body configuration, and the aerodynamic performance improvement of turbine and compressor blade rows. The results demonstrate that the continuous adjoint method can efficiently and significantly improve the aerodynamic performance of the design in a shape optimization problem.

  19. S814 and S815 Airfoils: October 1991--July 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    Two thick laminar-flow airfoils for the root portion of a horizontal-axis wind turbine blade, the S814 and S815, have been designed and analyzed theoretically. For both airfoils, the primary objectives of high maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on pitching moment and airfoil thicknesses have been satisfied.

  20. Computer Aided Design of Advanced Turbine Airfoil Alloys for Industrial Gas Turbines in Coal Fired Environments

    SciTech Connect

    G.E. Fuchs

    2007-12-31

    Recent initiatives for fuel flexibility, increased efficiency and decreased emissions in power generating industrial gas turbines (IGT's), have highlighted the need for the development of techniques to produce large single crystal or columnar grained, directionally solidified Ni-base superalloy turbine blades and vanes. In order to address the technical difficulties of producing large single crystal components, a program has been initiated to, using computational materials science, better understand how alloy composition in potential IGT alloys and solidification conditions during processing, effect castability, defect formation and environmental resistance. This program will help to identify potential routes for the development of high strength, corrosion resistant airfoil/vane alloys, which would be a benefit to all IGT's, including small IGT's and even aerospace gas turbines. During the first year, collaboration with Siemens Power Corporation (SPC), Rolls-Royce, Howmet and Solar Turbines has identified and evaluated about 50 alloy compositions that are of interest for this potential application. In addition, alloy modifications to an existing alloy (CMSX-4) were also evaluated. Collaborating with SPC and using computational software at SPC to evaluate about 50 alloy compositions identified 5 candidate alloys for experimental evaluation. The results obtained from the experimentally determined phase transformation temperatures did not compare well to the calculated values in many cases. The effects of small additions of boundary strengtheners (i.e., C, B and N) to CMSX-4 were also examined. The calculated phase transformation temperatures were somewhat closer to the experimentally determined values than for the 5 candidate alloys, discussed above. The calculated partitioning coefficients were similar for all of the CMSX-4 alloys, similar to the experimentally determined segregation behavior. In general, it appears that computational materials science has become a

  1. High-order Method for Modeling of Aerodynamics of Flapping Wings: Airfoil-Gust Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Harish; Povitsky, Alex

    2011-11-01

    The use of Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) with flapping wing motion has received considerable attention in the recent years due to their great potential in military and commercial applications. A number of analytical, experimental, and computational studies have been performed to investigate the aerodynamic performance of MAV. However, most of these studies have been performed under idealized operating conditions. Hence, there is a lack of detailed knowledge on the operation of MAV in complex flow environments including flights in wind gust and near obstacles. The current numerical study investigates the performance of a rigid MAV in the presence of periodic gust for two different kinematic motions: plunge and pitch. Two-dimensional rigid airfoils are taken as prototypes of MAVs wings. The gust is assumed to be sinusoidal and modeled as a source term in the Navier-Stokes equations to avoid the implementation of special boundary conditions. The investigation showed a significant drop in the average lift force for the plunging motion in the presence of the gust compared to the pitching motion.

  2. Viscous Transonic Airfoil Workshop compendium of results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1987-01-01

    Results from the Viscous Transonic Airfoil Workshop held at the AIAA 25th Aerospace Sciences Meeting at Reno, NV in January 1987, are compared with each other and with experimental data. Test cases used in this workshop include attached and separated transonic flows for three different airfoils: the NACA 0012 airfoil, the RAE 2822 airfoil, and the Jones airfoil. A total of 23 sets of numerical results from 15 different author groups are included. The numerical methods used vary widely and include: 16 Navier-Stokes methods, 2 Euler/boundary-layer methods, and 5 full-potential/boundary-layer methods. The results indicate a high degree of sophistication among the numerical methods with generally good agreement between the various computed and experimental results for attached or moderately-separated cases. The agreement for cases with larger separation is only fair and suggests additional work is required in this area.

  3. Designing ROW Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Alan D.

    1996-01-01

    There are many aspects to consider when designing a Rosenbrock-Wanner-Wolfbrandt (ROW) method for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) solving initial value problems (IVP's). The process can be simplified by constructing ROW methods around good Runge-Kutta (RK) methods. The formulation of a new, simple, embedded, third-order, ROW method demonstrates this design approach.

  4. High fidelity numerical simulation of airfoil thickness and kinematics effects on flapping airfoil propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meilin; Wang, Z. J.; Hu, Hui

    2013-10-01

    High-fidelity numerical simulations with the spectral difference (SD) method are carried out to investigate the unsteady flow over a series of oscillating NACA 4-digit airfoils. Airfoil thickness and kinematics effects on the flapping airfoil propulsion are highlighted. It is confirmed that the aerodynamic performance of airfoils with different thickness can be very different under the same kinematics. Distinct evolutionary patterns of vortical structures are analyzed to unveil the underlying flow physics behind the diverse flow phenomena associated with different airfoil thickness and kinematics and reveal the synthetic effects of airfoil thickness and kinematics on the propulsive performance. Thickness effects at various reduced frequencies and Strouhal numbers for the same chord length based Reynolds number (=1200) are then discussed in detail. It is found that at relatively small Strouhal number (=0.3), for all types of airfoils with the combined pitching and plunging motion (pitch angle 20°, the pitch axis located at one third of chord length from the leading edge, pitch leading plunge by 75°), low reduced frequency (=1) is conducive for both the thrust production and propulsive efficiency. Moreover, relatively thin airfoils (e.g. NACA0006) can generate larger thrust and maintain higher propulsive efficiency than thick airfoils (e.g. NACA0030). However, with the same kinematics but at relatively large Strouhal number (=0.45), it is found that airfoils with different thickness exhibit diverse trend on thrust production and propulsive efficiency, especially at large reduced frequency (=3.5). Results on effects of airfoil thickness based Reynolds numbers indicate that relative thin airfoils show superior propulsion performance in the tested Reynolds number range. The evolution of leading edge vortices and the interaction between the leading and trailing edge vortices play key roles in flapping airfoil propulsive performance.

  5. The structure of separated flow regions occurring near the leading edge of airfoils - including transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Laser Doppler Velocimeter data, static pressure data, and smoke flow visualization data was obtained and analyzed to correlate with separation bubble data. The Eppler 387 airfoil was focused on at a chord Reynolds number of 100,000 and an angle of attack of 2 deg. Additional data was also obtained from the NACA 663-018 airfoil at a chord Reynolds number of 160,000 and an angle of attack of 12 deg. The structure and behavior of the transition separation bubble was documented along with the redeveloping boundary layer after reattachment over an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. The understanding of the complex flow phenomena was examined so that analytic methods for predicting their formation and development can be improved. These analytic techniques have applications in the design and performance prediction of airfoils operating in the low Reynolds number flight regime.

  6. Development of a database of aerodynamic information for wind turbine airfoil sections

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory staff (OSU/AARL) continue to develop a database of aerodynamic information for wind turbine airfoil sections. The purpose is to provide sufficient aerodynamic information, about various and different airfoil sections, to assist airfoil and rotor designers in efforts to improve wind turbine rotor efficiencies. Steady state and pitch oscillation data are taken in the OSU/AARL 3x5 subsonic wind tunnel, with and without model leading edge grit roughness. Each airfoil model is subjected to the same test matrix thereby allowing relative comparisons. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the testing methods, typical results, how the data can be accessed and used by the wind energy community, and future plans.

  7. Performance predictions of VAWTs with NLF airfoil blades

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, C.; Leclerc, C.; Paraschivoiu, I.

    1997-02-01

    The successful design of an efficient Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) can be obtained only when appropriate airfoil sections have been selected. Most VAWTs currently operating worldwide use blades of symmetrical NACA airfoil series. As these blades were designed for aviation applications, Sandia National Laboratories developed a family of airfoils specifically designed for VAWTs in order to decrease the Cost of Energy (COE) of the VAWT (Berg, 1990). Objectives formulated for the blade profile were: modest values of maximum lift coefficient, low drag at low angle of attack, high drag at high angle of attack, sharp stall, and low thickness-to-chord ratio. These features are similar to those of Natural Laminar Flow airfoils (NLF) and gave birth to the SNLA airfoil series. This technical brief illustrates the benefits and losses resulting from using NLF airfoils on VAWT blades. To achieve this goal, the streamtube model of Paraschivoiu (1988) is used to predict the performance of VAWTs equipped with blades of various airfoil shapes. The airfoil shapes considered are the conventional airfoils NACA 0018 and NACA 0021, and the SNLA 0018/50 airfoil designed at Sandia. Furthermore, the potential benefit of reducing the airfoil drag is clearly illustrated by the presentation of the individual contributions of lift and drag to power.

  8. AFSMO/AFSCL- AIRFOIL SMOOTHING AND SCALING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L

    1994-01-01

    Since its early beginnings, NASA has been actively involved in the design and testing of airfoil sections for a wide variety of applications. Recently a set of programs has been developed to smooth and scale arbitrary airfoil coordinates. The smoothing program, AFSMO, utilizes both least-squares polynomial and least-squares cubic-spline techniques to iteratively smooth the second derivatives of the y-axis airfoil coordinates with respect to a transformed x-axis system which unwraps the airfoil and stretches the nose and trailing-edge regions. The corresponding smooth airfoil coordinates are then determined by solving a tridiagonal matrix of simultaneous cubic-spline equations relating the y-axis coordinates and their corresponding second derivatives. The camber and thickness distribution of the smooth airfoil are also computed. The scaling program, AFSCL, may then be used to scale the thickness distribution generated by the smoothing program to a specified maximum thickness. Once the thickness distribution has been scaled, it is combined with the camber distribution to obtain the final scaled airfoil contour. The airfoil smoothing and scaling programs are written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and have been implemented on a CDC CYBER 170 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 70K (octal) of 60 bit words. Both programs generate plotted output via CALCOMP type plotting calls. These programs were developed in 1983.

  9. Two-dimensional wind-tunnel tests of a NASA supercritical airfoil with various high-lift systems. Volume 2: Test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, E.; Zierten, T.; Hahn, M.; Szpiro, E.; Mahal, A.

    1977-01-01

    Three high lift systems for a 9.3 percent blunt based, supercritical airfoil were designed, fabricated, and wind tunnel tested. A method for calculating the viscous flow about two dimensional multicomponent airfoils was evaluated by comparing its predictions with test data. A comparison of high lift systems derived from supercritical airfoils with high lift systems derived from conventional airfoils is presented. The high lift systems for the supercritical airfoil were designed to achieve maximum lift and consisted of: (1) a single slotted flap, (2) a double slotted flap and a leading edge slat, and (3) a triple slotted flap and a leading edge slat. Aerodynamic force and moment data and surface pressure data are presented for all configurations and boundary layer and wake profiles for the single slotted flap configuration. The wind-tunnel models, test facilities and instrumentation, and data reduction are described.

  10. Advanced Airfoils Boost Helicopter Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Carson Helicopters Inc. licensed the Langley RC4 series of airfoils in 1993 to develop a replacement main rotor blade for their Sikorsky S-61 helicopters. The company's fleet of S-61 helicopters has been rebuilt to include Langley's patented airfoil design, and the helicopters are now able to carry heavier loads and fly faster and farther, and the main rotor blades have twice the previous service life. In aerial firefighting, the performance-boosting airfoils have helped the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service control the spread of wildfires. In 2003, Carson Helicopters signed a contract with Ducommun AeroStructures Inc., to manufacture the composite blades for Carson Helicopters to sell

  11. Advanced technology airfoil research, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This compilation contains papers presented at the NASA Conference on Advanced Technology Airfoil Research held at Langley Research Center on March 7-9, 1978, which have unlimited distribution. This conference provided a comprehensive review of all NASA airfoil research, conducted in-house and under grant and contract. A broad spectrum of airfoil research outside of NASA was also reviewed. The major thrust of the technical sessions were in three areas: development of computational aerodynamic codes for airfoil analysis and design, development of experimental facilities and test techniques, and all types of airfoil applications.

  12. Porous airfoil and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwich, Peter M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A porous airfoil having venting cavities with contoured barrier walls, formed by a core piece, placed beneath a porous upper and lower surface area that stretches over the nominal chord of an airfoil is employed, to provide an airfoil configuration that becomes self-adaptive to very dissimilar flow conditions to thereby improve the lift and drag characteristics of the airfoil at both subcritical and supercritical conditions.

  13. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 13.1-percent-thick, high-lift airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivier, K. R.; Ormsbee, A. I.; Awker, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Low speed sectional characteristics of a high lift airfoil are studied and a comparison is made of those characteristics with the predictions of the theoretical methods used in the airfoil's design. The 13.1 percent-thick, UI-1720 airfoil was found to achieve the predicted maximum lift coefficient of nearly 2.0. No upper-surface, flow separation was found below the stall angle of attack of 16 degrees; it appeared that stall was due to an abrupt leading edge flow separation.

  14. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 13.1-percent-thick, high-lift airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivier, K. R.; Ormsbee, A. I.; Awker, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental study of the low-speed, sectional characteristics of a high-lift airfoil, and comparison of these characteristics with the predictions of the theoretical methods used in the airfoil's design. The 13.1% thick UI-1720 airfoil was found to achieve the predicted maximum lift coefficient of nearly 2.0. No upper-surface flow separation was found below the stall angle of attack of 16 deg; it appeared that stall was due to an abrupt leading-edge flow separation.

  15. Shape optimization of corrugated airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sambhav; Bhatt, Varun Dhananjay; Mittal, Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    The effect of corrugations on the aerodynamic performance of a Mueller C4 airfoil, placed at a 5° angle of attack and Re=10{,}000, is investigated. A stabilized finite element method is employed to solve the incompressible flow equations in two dimensions. A novel parameterization scheme is proposed that enables representation of corrugations on the surface of the airfoil, and their spontaneous appearance in the shape optimization loop, if indeed they improve aerodynamic performance. Computations are carried out for different location and number of corrugations, while holding their height fixed. The first corrugation causes an increase in lift and drag. Each of the later corrugations leads to a reduction in drag. Shape optimization of the Mueller C4 airfoil is carried out using various objective functions and optimization strategies, based on controlling airfoil thickness and camber. One of the optimal shapes leads to 50 % increase in lift coefficient and 23 % increase in aerodynamic efficiency compared to the Mueller C4 airfoil.

  16. Development of direct-inverse 3-D methods for applied transonic aerodynamic wing design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Leland A.

    1989-01-01

    Progress in the direct-inverse wing design method in curvilinear coordinates has been made. This includes the remedying of a spanwise oscillation problem and the assessment of grid skewness, viscous interaction, and the initial airfoil section on the final design. It was found that, in response to the spanwise oscillation problem that designing at every other spanwise station produced the best results for the cases presented, a smoothly varying grid is especially needed for the accurate design at the wing tip, the boundary layer displacement thicknesses must be included in a successful wing design, the design of high and medium aspect ratio wings is possible with this code, and the final airfoil section designed is fairly independent of the initial section.

  17. A coupled viscid-inviscid calculation method for the prediction of unsteady separated flows over an airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Im, B.J.; Oler, J.W.; Strickland, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    A coupled viscid-inviscid aerodynamic model ADAM2 (Advanced Dynamic Airfoil Model in 2 dimensions) is utilized to predict separated and unseparated flows over airfoils in steady and unsteady motion. Calculation results include pre- and post-stall pressure distributions, lift and drag, and trailing wake geometries for airfoils with a constant angle of attack, sinusoidally varying angle of attack, and constant rate pitching to large angles of attack. The principal difficulty yet to be overcome is the detailed representation of the viscid-inviscid interactions in the immediate vicinity of the boundary layer separation point. A persistent feed-back effect has been observed in which the presence of the separated wake surface causes the position of the boundary layer separation point to move progressively toward the leading edge. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Desirable airfoil characteristics for large variable-speed horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S.

    1997-08-01

    In an effort to define the desirable airfoil characteristics for large variable-speed wind turbines, a systematic study was performed using a series of airfoils designed to have similar aerodynamic properties, except for the amount of lift, which varied over a wide range. For several airfoil combinations, blade shapes were designed for a 750-kW wind turbine with a 48.8-m diameter rotor using the optimization code PROPGA together with PROPID, which is an inverse design method for horizontal-axis wind turbines. Roughness effects, including the consideration of dirty-blade performance in the blade-shape optimization process, were also considered and are discussed. The results and conclusions reveal practical design implications that should aid in the aerodynamic blade design of not only large but also other sizes of variable-speed wind turbines.

  19. Application of direct inverse analogy method (DIVA) and viscous design optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greff, E.; Forbrich, D.; Schwarten, H.

    1991-01-01

    A direct-inverse approach to the transonic design problem was presented in its initial state at the First International Conference on Inverse Design Concepts and Optimization in Engineering Sciences (ICIDES-1). Further applications of the direct inverse analogy (DIVA) method to the design of airfoils and incremental wing improvements and experimental verification are reported. First results of a new viscous design code also from the residual correction type with semi-inverse boundary layer coupling are compared with DIVA which may enhance the accuracy of trailing edge design for highly loaded airfoils. Finally, the capabilities of an optimization routine coupled with the two viscous full potential solvers are investigated in comparison to the inverse method.

  20. User's manual for ADAM (Advanced Dynamic Airfoil Model)

    SciTech Connect

    Oler, J.W.; Strickland, J.H.; Im, B.J.

    1987-06-01

    The computer code for an advanced dynamic airfoil model (ADAM) is described. The code is capable of calculating steady or unsteady flow over two-dimensional airfoils with allowances for boundary layer separation. Specific types of airfoil motions currently installed are steady rectilinear motion, impulsively started rectilinear motion, constant rate pitching, sinusoidal pitch oscillations, sinusoidal lateral plunging, and simulated Darrieus turbine motion. Other types of airfoil motion may be analyzed through simple modifications of a single subroutine. The code has a built-in capability to generate the geometric parameters for a cylinder, the NACA four-digit series of airfoils, and a NASA NLF-0416 laminar airfoil. Other types of airfoils are easily incorporated. The code ADAM is currently in a state of development. It is theoretically consistent and complete. However, further work is needed on the numerical implementation of the method.

  1. Advancements in adaptive aerodynamic technologies for airfoils and wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepson, Jeffrey Keith

    required for the airfoil-aircraft matching. Examples are presented to illustrate the flapped-airfoil design approach for a general aviation aircraft and the results are validated by comparison with results from post-design aircraft performance computations. Once the airfoil is designed to incorporate a TE flap, it is important to determine the most suitable flap angles along the wing for different flight conditions. The second part of this dissertation presents a method for determining the optimum flap angles to minimize drag based on pressures measured at select locations on the wing. Computational flow simulations using a panel method are used "in the loop" for demonstrating closed-loop control of the flaps. Examples in the paper show that the control algorithm is successful in correctly adapting the wing to achieve the target lift distributions for minimizing induced drag while adjusting the wing angle of attack for operation of the wing in the drag bucket. It is shown that the "sense-and-adapt" approach developed is capable of handling varying and unpredictable inflow conditions. Such a capability could be useful in adapting long-span flexible wings that may experience significant and unknown atmospheric inflow variations along the span. To further develop the "sense-and-adapt" approach, the method was tested experimentally in the third part of the research. The goal of the testing was to see if the same results found computationally can be obtained experimentally. The North Carolina State University subsonic wind tunnel was used for the wind tunnel tests. Results from the testing showed that the "sense-and-adapt" approach has the same performance experimentally as it did computationally. The research presented in this dissertation is a stepping stone towards further development of the concept, which includes modeling the system in the Simulink environment and flight experiments using uninhabited aerial vehicles.

  2. Trailing edge modifications for flatback airfoils.

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Daniel L.; van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    The adoption of blunt trailing edge airfoils (also called flatback airfoils) for the inboard region of large wind turbine blades has been proposed. Blunt trailing edge airfoils would not only provide a number of structural benefits, such as increased structural volume and ease of fabrication and handling, but they have also been found to improve the lift characteristics of thick airfoils. Therefore, the incorporation of blunt trailing edge airfoils would allow blade designers to more freely address the structural demands without having to sacrifice aerodynamic performance. These airfoils do have the disadvantage of generating high levels of drag as a result of the low-pressure steady or periodic flow in the near-wake of the blunt trailing edge. Although for rotors, the drag penalty appears secondary to the lift enhancement produced by the blunt trailing edge, high drag levels are of concern in terms of the negative effect on the torque and power generated by the rotor. Hence, devices are sought that mitigate the drag of these airfoils. This report summarizes the literature on bluff body vortex shedding and bluff body drag reduction devices and proposes four devices for further study in the wind tunnel.

  3. Aerodynamic Forces and Loadings on Symmetrical Circular-Arc Airfoils with Plain Leading-Edge and Plain Trailing-Edge Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, Jones F; Underwood, William J; Nuber, Robert J; Cheesman, Gail A

    1953-01-01

    An investigation has been made in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence tunnel and in the Langley two-dimensional low-pressure tunnel of 6- and 10-percent-thick symmetrical circular-arc airfoil sections at low Mach numbers and several Reynolds numbers. The airfoils were equipped with 0.15-chord plain leading-edge flaps and 0.20-chord plan trailing-edge flaps. The section lift and pitching-moment characteristics were determined for both airfoils with the flaps deflected individually and in combination. The section drag characteristics were obtained for the 6-percent-thick airfoil with the flaps partly deflected as low-drag-control flaps and for airfoils with the flaps neutral. Surface pressures were measured on the 6-percent-thick airfoil section with the flaps deflected either individually or in appropriate combination to furnish flap load and hinge-moment data applicable to the structural design of the airfoil. A generalized method is developed that permits the determination of the chordwise pressure distribution over sharp-edge airfoils with plain leading-edge flaps and plain trailing-edge flaps of arbitrary size and deflection.

  4. Advanced Technology Airfoil Research, volume 1, part 1. [conference on development of computational codes and test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive review of all NASA airfoil research, conducted both in-house and under grant and contract, as well as a broad spectrum of airfoil research outside of NASA is presented. Emphasis is placed on the development of computational aerodynamic codes for airfoil analysis and design, the development of experimental facilities and test techniques, and all types of airfoil applications.

  5. The calculation of flow over iced airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1988-01-01

    Progress toward the development of a method for predicting the flowfield of an iced airfoil is described and shown to offer the prospect of a priori calculations of the effects of ice accretion and roughness on airfoil performance. The approach is based on interaction of inviscid flow solutions obtained by a panel method and improved upon by a finite-difference boundary-layer method which, operating in an inverse mode, incorporates viscous effects including those associated with separated flows. Results are presented for smooth, rough and iced airfoils as a function of angle of attack. Those for smooth and rough airfoils confirm the accuracy of the method and its applicability to surfaces with roughness similar to that associated with insect deposition and some forms of ice. Two procedures have been developed to deal with large ice accretion and their performance is examined and shown to be appropriate to the engineering requirements.

  6. Airfoil self-noise and prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Pope, D. Stuart; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    A prediction method is developed for the self-generated noise of an airfoil blade encountering smooth flow. The prediction methods for the individual self-noise mechanisms are semiempirical and are based on previous theoretical studies and data obtained from tests of two- and three-dimensional airfoil blade sections. The self-noise mechanisms are due to specific boundary-layer phenomena, that is, the boundary-layer turbulence passing the trailing edge, separated-boundary-layer and stalled flow over an airfoil, vortex shedding due to laminar boundary layer instabilities, vortex shedding from blunt trailing edges, and the turbulent vortex flow existing near the tip of lifting blades. The predictions are compared successfully with published data from three self-noise studies of different airfoil shapes. An application of the prediction method is reported for a large scale-model helicopter rotor, and the predictions compared well with experimental broadband noise measurements. A computer code of the method is given.

  7. Optimization of Wind Turbine Airfoils/Blades and Wind Farm Layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaomin

    Shape optimization is widely used in the design of wind turbine blades. In this dissertation, a numerical optimization method called Genetic Algorithm (GA) is applied to address the shape optimization of wind turbine airfoils and blades. In recent years, the airfoil sections with blunt trailing edge (called flatback airfoils) have been proposed for the inboard regions of large wind-turbine blades because they provide several structural and aerodynamic performance advantages. The FX, DU and NACA 64 series airfoils are thick airfoils widely used for wind turbine blade application. They have several advantages in meeting the intrinsic requirements for wind turbines in terms of design point, off-design capabilities and structural properties. This research employ both single- and multi-objective genetic algorithms (SOGA and MOGA) for shape optimization of Flatback, FX, DU and NACA 64 series airfoils to achieve maximum lift and/or maximum lift to drag ratio. The commercially available software FLUENT is employed for calculation of the flow field using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in conjunction with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model and a three equation k-kl-o turbulence model. The optimization methodology is validated by an optimization study of subsonic and transonic airfoils (NACA0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils). In this dissertation, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750) and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given B and lambda and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated

  8. Self-sustained shock oscillations on airfoils at transonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H. K.

    2001-02-01

    Self-sustained shock wave oscillations on airfoils at transonic flow conditions are associated with the phenomenon of buffeting. The physical mechanisms of the periodic shock motion are not yet fully understood even though experiments performed over fifty years ago have demonstrated the presence of oscillatory shock waves on the airfoil surfaces at high subsonic speeds. The unsteady pressure fluctuations generated by the low-frequency large-amplitude shock motions are highly undesirable from the structural integrity and aircraft maneuverability point of view. For modern supercritical wing design with thick profiles, the shock-induced fluctuations are particularly severe and methods to reduce the shock wave amplitudes to lower values or even to delay the oscillations to higher Mach numbers or incidence angles will result in expanding the buffet boundary of the airfoil. This review begins with a recapitulation of the classical work on shock-induced bubble separation and trailing edge separation of a turbulent boundary layer. The characteristics of the unsteady pressure fluctuations are used to classify the types of shock-boundary layer interaction. The various modes of shock wave motion for different flow conditions and airfoil configurations are described. The buffet boundaries obtained using the standard trailing edge pressure divergence technique and an alternative approach of measuring the divergence of normal fluctuating forces are compared to show the equivalence. The mechanisms of self-sustained shock oscillations are discussed for symmetrical circular-arc airfoils at zero incidence and for supercritical airfoils at high incidence angles with fully separated flows. The properties of disturbances in the wake are examined from linear stability analysis of two-dimensional compressible flows. The advances in high-speed computing make predictions of buffeting flows possible. Navier-Stokes solvers and approximate boundary layer-inviscid flow interaction methods are

  9. Wind tunnel results of the high-speed NLF(1)-0213 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sewall, William G.; Mcghee, Robert J.; Hahne, David E.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate a natural laminar flow airfoil designed for the high speed jet aircraft in general aviation. The airfoil, designated as the High Speed Natural Laminar Flow (HSNLF)(1)-0213, was tested in two dimensional wind tunnels to investigate the performance of the basic airfoil shape. A three dimensional wing designed with this airfoil and a high lift flap system is also being evaluated with a full size, half span model.

  10. A statistical approach to the experimental evaluation of transonic turbine airfoils in a linear cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, M.L.; Gregory, B.A. ); Doughty, R.L.; Kiss, T.; Moses, H.L. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.)

    1993-07-01

    In aircraft engine design (and in other applications), small improvements in turbine efficiency may be significant. Since analytical tools for predicting transonic turbine losses are still being developed, experimental efforts are required to evaluate various designs, calibrate design methods, and validate CFD analysis tools. However, these experimental efforts must be very accurate to measure the performance differences to the levels required by the highly competitive aircraft engine market. Due to the sensitivity of transonic and supersonic flow fields, it is often difficult to obtain the desired level of accuracy. In this paper, a statistical approach is applied to the experimental evaluation of transonic turbine airfoils in the VPI and SU transonic cascade facility in order to quantify the differences between three different transonic turbine airfoils. This study determines whether the measured performance differences between the three different airfoils are statistically significant. This study also assesses the degree of confidence in the transonic cascade testing process at VPI and SU.

  11. Status of the special-purpose airfoil families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangler, J. L.; Somers, D. M.

    1987-12-01

    This work is directed at developing thin and thick airfoil families, for rotors with diameters of 10 to 30 m, that enhance energy output at low to medium wind speeds and provide more consistent operating characteristics with lower fatigue loads at high wind speeds. Performance is enhanced through the use of laminar flow, while more consistent rotor operating characteristics at high wind speeds are achieved by tailoring the airfoil such that the maximum lift coefficient C sub 1 max is largely independent of roughness effects. Using the Eppler airfoil design code, two thin and one thick airfoil family were designed; each family has a root, outboard, and tip airfoil. Two-dimensional wind-tunnel tests were conducted to verify the predicted performance characteristics for both a thin and thick outboard airfoil from these families. Atmospheric tests on full-scale wind turbines will complete the verification process.

  12. Status of the special-purpose airfoil families

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1987-12-01

    This work is directed at developing thin and thick airfoil families, for rotors with diameters of 10 to 30 m, that enhance energy output at low to medium wind speeds and provide more consistent operating characteristics with lower fatigue loads at high wind speeds. Performance is enhanced through the use of laminar flow, while more consistent rotor operating characteristics at high wind speeds are achieved by tailoring the airfoil such that the maximum lift coefficient C/sub 1,max/ is largely independent of roughness effects. Using the Eppler airfoil design code, two thin and one thick airfoil family were designed; each family has a root, outboard, and tip airfoil. Two-dimensional wind-tunnel tests were conducted to verify the predicted performance characteristics for both a thin and thick outboard airfoil from these families. Atmospheric tests on full-scale wind turbines will complete the verification process. 3 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Quiet airfoils for small and large wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan L.

    2012-06-12

    Thick airfoil families with desirable aerodynamic performance with minimal airfoil induced noise. The airfoil families are suitable for a variety of wind turbine designs and are particularly well-suited for use with horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) with constant or variable speed using pitch and/or stall control. In exemplary embodiments, a first family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with small wind turbines and second family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with very large machines, e.g., an airfoil defined for each of three blade radial stations or blade portions defined along the length of a blade. Each of the families is designed to provide a high maximum lift coefficient or high lift, to exhibit docile stalls, to be relatively insensitive to roughness, and to achieve a low profile drag.

  14. The NASA Langley laminar flow control airfoil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Pride, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    A large chord swept supercritical LFC airfoil has been constructed for NASA-Langley's research program to determine the compatibility of supercritical airfoils with suction laminarization and to establish a technology base for future transport designs. Features include a high design Mach number and shock-free flow, as well as the minimization of the laminarization suction through a choice of airfoil geometry and pressure distribution. Two suction surface concepts and a variety of hybrid suction concepts involving combinations of natural and forced laminar flow are to be investigated. The test facility has been modified to insure achievement of required flow quality and transonic interference-free flow over the yawed LFC airfoil.

  15. S904 and S905 Airfoils: May 1998--January 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A family of natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S904 and S905, for cooling-tower fans has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraint on the lift a zero angle of attack has not been satisfied. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoil thicknesses have essentially been satisfied. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls.

  16. S825 and S826 Airfoils: 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A family of airfoils, the S825 and S826, for 20- to 40-meter, variable-speed and variable-pitch (toward feather), horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moments and the airfoil thicknesses have been satisfied. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls.

  17. S829 Airfoil; Period of Performance: 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A 16%-thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoil, the S829, for the tip region of 20- to 40-meter-diameter, stall-regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoil thickness have been satisfied. The airfoil should exhibit a docile stall.

  18. Unsteady Aerodynamic Response of a Linear Cascade of Airfoils in Separated Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capece, Vincent R.; Ford, Christopher; Bone, Christopher; Li, Rui

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to investigate methods to modify the leading edge separation region, which could lead to an improvement in aeroelastic stability of advanced airfoil designs. The airfoil section used is representative of current low aspect ratio fan blade tip sections. The experimental potion of this study investigated separated zone boundary layer from removal through suction slots. Suction applied to a cavity in the vicinity of the separation onset point was found to be the most effective location. The computational study looked into the influence of front camber on flutter stability. To assess the influence of the change in airfoil shape on stability the work-per-cycle was evaluated for torsion mode oscillations. It was shown that the front camberline shape can be an important factor for stabilizing the predicted work-per-cycle and reducing the predicted extent of the separation zone. In addition, data analysis procedures are discussed for reducing data acquired in experiments that involve periodic unsteady data. This work was conducted in support of experiments being conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Flutter Cascade. The spectral block averaging method is presented. This method is shown to be able to account for variations in airfoil oscillation frequency that can occur in experiments that force oscillate the airfoils to simulate flutter.

  19. New airfoils for small horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S.

    1998-05-01

    In a continuing effort to enhance the performance of small wind energy systems, one root airfoil and three primary airfoils were specifically designed for small horizontal axis wind turbines. These airfoils are intended primarily for 1--5 kW variable-speed wind turbines for both conventional (tapered/twisted) or pultruded blades. The four airfoils were wind-tunnel tested at Reynolds numbers between 100,000 and 500,000. Tests with simulated leading-edge roughness were also conducted. The results indicate that small variable-speed wind turbines should benefit from the use of the new airfoils which provide enhanced lift-to-drag ratio performance as compared with previously existing airfoils.

  20. New airfoils for small horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    In a continuing effort to enhance the performance of small energy systems, one root airfoil and three primary airfoils were specifically designed for small horizontal axis wind turbines. These airfoils are intended primarily for 1-10 kW variable-speed wind turbines for both conventional (tapered/twisted) or pultruded blades. The four airfoils were wind-tunnel tested at Reynolds numbers between 100,000 and 500,000. Tests with simulated leading-edge roughness were also conducted. The results indicate that small variable-speed wind turbines should benefit from the use of the new airfoils which provide enhanced lift-to-drag ratio performance as compared with previously existing airfoils.

  1. Prediction of the Effect of Vortex Generators on Airfoil Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, F.; Bak, C.; Vronsky, T.

    2014-06-01

    Vortex Generators (VGs) are widely used by the wind turbine industry, to control the flow over blade sections. The present work describes a computational fluid dynamic procedure that can handle a geometrical resolved VG on an airfoil section. After describing the method, it is applied to two different airfoils at a Reynolds number of 3 million, the FFA- W3-301 and FFA-W3-360, respectively. The computations are compared with wind tunnel measurements from the Stuttgart Laminar Wind Tunnel with respect to lift and drag variation as function of angle of attack. Even though the method does not exactly capture the measured performance, it can be used to compare different VG setups qualitatively with respect to chord- wise position, inter and intra-spacing and inclination of the VGs already in the design phase.

  2. A Theory of Unstaggered Airfoil Cascades in Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurr, Robert A.; Allen, H. Julian

    1947-01-01

    By use of the methods of thin airfoil theory, which include effects of compressibility, rela.tio^as are developed which permit the rapid determination of the pressure distribution over an unstaggered cascade of airfoils of a given profile, and the determination of the profile shape necessary to yield a given pressure distribution for small chord gap ratios, For incompressible flow the results of the theory are compared with available examples obtained by the more exact method of conformal transformation. Although the theory is developed for small chord/gap ratios, these comparisons show that it may be extended to chord/gap ratios of order unity, at least for low speed flows. Choking of cascades, a phenomenon of particular importance in compressor design, is considered.

  3. Towards Robust Designs Via Multiple-Objective Optimization Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Man Mohan, Rai

    2006-01-01

    evolutionary method (DE) is first used to solve a relatively difficult problem in extended surface heat transfer wherein optimal fin geometries are obtained for different safe operating base temperatures. The objective of maximizing the safe operating base temperature range is in direct conflict with the objective of maximizing fin heat transfer. This problem is a good example of achieving robustness in the context of changing operating conditions. The evolutionary method is then used to design a turbine airfoil; the two objectives being reduced sensitivity of the pressure distribution to small changes in the airfoil shape and the maximization of the trailing edge wedge angle with the consequent increase in airfoil thickness and strength. This is a relevant example of achieving robustness to manufacturing tolerances and wear and tear in the presence of other objectives.

  4. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  5. Airfoil System for Cruising Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Liu, Tianshu (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An airfoil system includes an airfoil body and at least one flexible strip. The airfoil body has a top surface and a bottom surface, a chord length, a span, and a maximum thickness. Each flexible strip is attached along at least one edge thereof to either the top or bottom surface of the airfoil body. The flexible strip has a spanwise length that is a function of the airfoil body's span, a chordwise width that is a function of the airfoil body's chord length, and a thickness that is a function of the airfoil body's maximum thickness.

  6. Theory and Low-Order Modeling of Unsteady Airfoil Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Kiran

    Unsteady flow phenomena are prevalent in a wide range of problems in nature and engineering. These include, but are not limited to, aerodynamics of insect flight, dynamic stall in rotorcraft and wind turbines, leading-edge vortices in delta wings, micro-air vehicle (MAV) design, gust handling and flow control. The most significant characteristics of unsteady flows are rapid changes in the circulation of the airfoil, apparent-mass effects, flow separation and the leading-edge vortex (LEV) phenomenon. Although experimental techniques and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have enabled the detailed study of unsteady flows and their underlying features, a reliable and inexpensive loworder method for fast prediction and for use in control and design is still required. In this research, a low-order methodology based on physical principles rather than empirical fitting is proposed. The objective of such an approach is to enable insights into unsteady phenomena while developing approaches to model them. The basis of the low-order model developed here is unsteady thin-airfoil theory. A time-stepping approach is used to solve for the vorticity on an airfoil camberline, allowing for large amplitudes and nonplanar wakes. On comparing lift coefficients from this method against data from CFD and experiments for some unsteady test cases, it is seen that the method predicts well so long as LEV formation does not occur and flow over the airfoil is attached. The formation of leading-edge vortices (LEVs) in unsteady flows is initiated by flow separation and the formation of a shear layer at the airfoil's leading edge. This phenomenon has been observed to have both detrimental (dynamic stall in helicopters) and beneficial (high-lift flight in insects) effects. To predict the formation of LEVs in unsteady flows, a Leading Edge Suction Parameter (LESP) is proposed. This parameter is calculated from inviscid theory and is a measure of the suction at the airfoil's leading edge. It

  7. Propulsion by active and passive airfoil oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2013-11-01

    Oscillating airfoils have been the subject of much research both as a mechanism of propulsion in engineering devices as well as a model of understanding how fish, birds, and insects produce thrust and maneuvering forces. Additionally, the jet or wake generated by an oscillating airfoil exhibits a multitude of vortex patterns, which are an interesting study in their own right. We present PIV measurements of the vortex flow behind an airfoil undergoing controlled pitching oscillations at moderate Reynolds number. As a method of propulsion, oscillating foils have been found to be capable performers when undergoing both pitching and heaving motions [Anderson et al. 1998]. While an airfoil undergoing only pitching motion is a relatively inefficient propulsor, we examine the effect of adding passive dynamics to the system: for example, actuated pitching with a passive spring in the heave direction. Practically speaking, a mechanical system with such an arrangement has the potential to reduce the cost and complexity of an oscillating airfoil propulsor. To study an airfoil undergoing both active and passive motion, we employ our ``cyber-physical fluid dynamics'' technique [Mackowski & Williamson, 2011] to simulate the effects of passive dynamics in a physical experiment.

  8. Performance measurements of an airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, Robert J.; Walker, Betty S.

    1989-01-01

    Performance characteristics of an Eppler 387 airfoil using both direct (force) and indirect (pressure) measurement techniques have been obtained at Reynolds numbers from 60,000 to 460,000 in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. Lift, drag, and pitching-moment data were obtained from two internally-mounted strain-gage balances specifically designed for small aerodynamic loads. Comparisons of these results with data from a pressure model of an Eppler 387 airfoil are included. Drag data for both models using the wake traverse method are compared with the balance data. Oil flow visualization and surface mounted hot-film sensors were used to determine laminar-separation and turbulent-reattachment locations. Problems associated with obtaining accurate wind-tunnel data at low Reynolds numbers are discussed.

  9. S822 and S823 Airfoils: October 1992--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A family of thick airfoils for 3- to 10-meter, stall-regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines, the S822 and S823, has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moments and airfoil thicknesses have been satisfied.

  10. Development of drive mechanism for an oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sticht, Clifford D.

    1988-01-01

    The design and development of an in-draft wind tunnel test section which will be used to study the dynamic stall of airfoils oscillating in pitch is described. The hardware developed comprises a spanned airfoil between schleiren windows, a four bar linkage, flywheels, a drive system and a test section structure.

  11. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D; Wilson, Jr., Jack W.

    2010-11-02

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

  12. Wind tunnel test of the S814 thick root airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D.M.; Tangler, J.L.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of this wind-tunnel test was to verify the predictions of the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code for a very thick airfoil having a high maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to leading-edge roughness effects. The 24 percent thick S814 airfoil was designed with these characteristics to accommodate aerodynamic and structural considerations for the root region of a wind-turbine blade. In addition, the airfoil`s maximum lift-to-drag ratio was designed to occur at a high lift coefficient. To accomplish the objective, a two-dimensional wind tunnel test of the S814 thick root airfoil was conducted in January 1994 in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. Data were obtained with transition free and transition fixed for Reynolds numbers of 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 3.0 {times} 10{sup 6}. For the design Reynolds number of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 6}, the maximum lift coefficient with transition free is 1.32, which satisfies the design specification. However, this value is significantly lower than the predicted maximum lift coefficient of almost 1.6. With transition fixed at the leading edge, the maximum lift coefficient is 1.22. The small difference in maximum lift coefficient between the transition-free and transition-fixed conditions demonstrates the airfoil`s minimal sensitivity to roughness effects. The S814 root airfoil was designed to complement existing NREL low maximum-lift-coefficient tip-region airfoils for rotor blades 10 to 15 meters in length.

  13. Optimization of multi-element airfoils for maximum lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    Two theoretical methods are presented for optimizing multi-element airfoils to obtain maximum lift. The analyses assume that the shapes of the various high lift elements are fixed. The objective of the design procedures is then to determine the optimum location and/or deflection of the leading and trailing edge devices. The first analysis determines the optimum horizontal and vertical location and the deflection of a leading edge slat. The structure of the flow field is calculated by iteratively coupling potential flow and boundary layer analysis. This design procedure does not require that flow separation effects be modeled. The second analysis determines the slat and flap deflection required to maximize the lift of a three element airfoil. This approach requires that the effects of flow separation from one or more of the airfoil elements be taken into account. The theoretical results are in good agreement with results of a wind tunnel test used to corroborate the predicted optimum slat and flap positions.

  14. Wind tunnel tests of two airfoils for wind turbines operating at high reynolds numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Sommers, D.; Tangler, J.

    2000-06-29

    The objectives of this study were to verify the predictions of the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code for Reynolds numbers up to 6 x 106 and to acquire the section characteristics of two airfoils being considered for large, megawatt-size wind turbines. One airfoil, the S825, was designed to achieve a high maximum lift coefficient suitable for variable-speed machines. The other airfoil, the S827, was designed to achieve a low maximum lift coefficient suitable for stall-regulated machines. Both airfoils were tested in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) for smooth, fixed-transition, and rough surface conditions at Reynolds numbers of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 x 106. The results show the maximum lift coefficient of both airfoils is substantially underpredicted for Reynolds numbers over 3 x 106 and emphasized the difficulty of designing low-lift airfoils for high Reynolds numbers.

  15. Customized airfoils and their impact on VAWT cost of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Dale E.

    1990-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a family of airfoils specifically designed for use in the equatorial portion of a Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) blade. An airfoil of that family has been incorporated into the rotor blades of the DOE/Sandia 34-m diameter VAWT Test Bed. The airfoil and rotor design process is reviewed. Comparisons with data recently acquired from flow visualization tests and from the DOE/Sandia 34-m diameter VAWT Test Bed illustrate the success that was achieved in the design. The economic optimization model used in the design is described and used to evaluate the effect of modifications to the current Test Bed blade.

  16. Aerodynamic Characteristics of Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Hull, G F; Dryden, H L

    1925-01-01

    This report deals with an experimental investigation of the aerodynamical characteristics of airfoils at high speeds. Lift, drag, and center of pressure measurements were made on six airfoils of the type used by the air service in propeller design, at speeds ranging from 550 to 1,000 feet per second. The results show a definite limit to the speed at which airfoils may efficiently be used to produce lift, the lift coefficient decreasing and the drag coefficient increasing as the speed approaches the speed of sound. The change in lift coefficient is large for thick airfoil sections (camber ratio 0.14 to 0.20) and for high angles of attack. The change is not marked for thin sections (camber ratio 0.10) at low angles of attack, for the speed range employed. At high speeds the center of pressure moves back toward the trailing edge of the airfoil as the speed increases. The results indicate that the use of tip speeds approaching the speed of sound for propellers of customary design involves a serious loss in efficiency.

  17. Airfoil Vibration Dampers program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The Airfoil Vibration Damper program has consisted of an analysis phase and a testing phase. During the analysis phase, a state-of-the-art computer code was developed, which can be used to guide designers in the placement and sizing of friction dampers. The use of this computer code was demonstrated by performing representative analyses on turbine blades from the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) and High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The testing phase of the program consisted of performing friction damping tests on two different cantilever beams. Data from these tests provided an empirical check on the accuracy of the computer code developed in the analysis phase. Results of the analysis and testing showed that the computer code can accurately predict the performance of friction dampers. In addition, a valuable set of friction damping data was generated, which can be used to aid in the design of friction dampers, as well as provide benchmark test cases for future code developers.

  18. Implicit and Multigrid Method for Ideal Multigrid Convergence: Direct Numerical Simulation of Separated Flow Around NACA 0012 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chao-Qun; Shan, H.; Jiang, L.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical investigation of flow separation over a NACA 0012 airfoil at large angles of attack has been carried out. The numerical calculation is performed by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The second-order LU-SGS implicit scheme is applied for time integration. This scheme requires no tridiagonal inversion and is capable of being completely vectorized, provided the corresponding Jacobian matrices are properly selected. A fourth-order centered compact scheme is used for spatial derivatives. In order to reduce numerical oscillation, a sixth-order implicit filter is employed. Non-reflecting boundary conditions are imposed at the far-field and outlet boundaries to avoid possible non-physical wave reflection. Complex flow separation and vortex shedding phenomenon have been observed and discussed.

  19. The FEM-2 design method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, T. W.; Adams, L. M.; Mehrotra, P.; Vanrosendale, J.; Voigt, R. G.; Patrick, M.

    1983-01-01

    The FEM-2 parallel computer is designed using methods differing from those ordinarily employed in parallel computer design. The major distinguishing aspects are: (1) a top-down rather than bottom-up design process; (2) the design considers the entire system structure in terms of layers of virtual machines; and (3) each layer of virtual machine is defined formally during the design process. The result is a complete hardware/software system design. The basic design method is discussed and the advantages of the method are considered. A status report on the FEM-2 design is included.

  20. The application of the gradient-based adjoint multi-point optimization of single and double shock control bumps for transonic airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, K.; Nejati, A.; Chaharlang Kiani, K.; Taheri, R.

    2015-08-01

    A shock control bump (SCB) is a flow control method which uses local small deformations in a flexible wing surface to considerably reduce the strength of shock waves and the resulting wave drag in transonic flows. Most of the reported research is devoted to optimization in a single flow condition. Here, we have used a multi-point adjoint optimization scheme to optimize shape and location of the SCB. Practically, this introduces transonic airfoils equipped with the SCB which are simultaneously optimized for different off-design transonic flight conditions. Here, we use this optimization algorithm to enhance and optimize the performance of SCBs in two benchmark airfoils, i.e., RAE-2822 and NACA-64A010, over a wide range of off-design Mach numbers. All results are compared with the usual single-point optimization. We use numerical simulation of the turbulent viscous flow and a gradient-based adjoint algorithm to find the optimum location and shape of the SCB. We show that the application of SCBs may increase the aerodynamic performance of an RAE-2822 airfoil by 21.9 and by 22.8 % for a NACA-64A010 airfoil compared to the no-bump design in a particular flight condition. We have also investigated the simultaneous usage of two bumps for the upper and the lower surfaces of the airfoil. This has resulted in a 26.1 % improvement for the RAE-2822 compared to the clean airfoil in one flight condition.

  1. Reversible airfoils for stopped rotors in high speed flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemiec, Robert; Jacobellis, George; Gandhi, Farhan

    2014-10-01

    This study starts with the design of a reversible airfoil rib for stopped-rotor applications, where the sharp trailing-edge morphs into the rounded leading-edge, and vice-versa. A NACA0012 airfoil is approximated in a piecewise linear manner and straight, rigid outer profile links used to define the airfoil contour. The end points of the profile links connect to control links, each set on a central actuation rod via an offset. Chordwise motion of the actuation rod moves the control and the profile links and reverses the airfoil. The paper describes the design methodology and evolution of the final design, based on which two reversible airfoil ribs were fabricated and used to assemble a finite span reversible rotor/wing demonstrator. The profile links were connected by Aluminum strips running in the spanwise direction which provided stiffness as well as support for a pre-tensioned elastomeric skin. An inter-rib connector with a curved-front nose piece supports the leading-edge. The model functioned well and was able to reverse smoothly back-and-forth, on application and reversal of a voltage to the motor. Navier-Stokes CFD simulations (using the TURNS code) show that the drag coefficient of the reversible airfoil (which had a 13% maximum thickness due to the thickness of the profile links) was comparable to that of the NACA0013 airfoil. The drag of a 16% thick elliptical airfoil was, on average, about twice as large, while that of a NACA0012 in reverse flow was 4-5 times as large, even prior to stall. The maximum lift coefficient of the reversible airfoil was lower than the elliptical airfoil, but higher than the NACA0012 in reverse flow operation.

  2. Control of Stall Flow over Airfoil using Vortex Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L. S.; Qiao, Z. D.; Song, W. P.

    2011-09-01

    In order to carry out the experimental investigation on control of stall flow over airfoil, two forms of the vortex generator layouts were designed. Comparison for the experimental data with and without vortex generators has been carried out, and the attention are focused on effects of stall flow over airfoil with different vortex generators layout. Experiment shows that the stall flow over airfoil is suppressed evidently by the first and second categories vortex generators, and the maximum lift coefficient is increased dramatically. The control of stall flow over airfoil with the second category vortex generator is much better than the first category vortex generator, and the smaller the inclined angle of the vortex generator is, the better the control effects of stall flow over airfoil will be.

  3. The development of cambered airfoil sections having favorable lift characteristics at supercritical Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Donald J

    1949-01-01

    Several groups of new airfoil sections, designated as the NACA 8-series, are derived analytically to have lift characteristics at supercritical Mach numbers which are favorable in the sense that the abrupt loss of lift, characteristic of the usual airfoil section at Mach numbers above the critical, is avoided. Aerodynamic characteristics determined from two-dimensional wind-tunnel tests at Mach numbers up to approximately 0.9 are presented for each of the derived airfoils. Comparisons are made between the characteristics of these airfoils and the corresponding characteristics of representative NACA 6-series airfoils.

  4. Effects of Airfoil Thickness and Maximum Lift Coefficient on Roughness Sensitivity: 1997--1998

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A matrix of airfoils has been developed to determine the effects of airfoil thickness and the maximum lift to leading-edge roughness. The matrix consists of three natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S901, S902, and S903, for wind turbine applications. The airfoils have been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the Pennsylvania State University low-speed, low-turbulence wind tunnel. The effect of roughness on the maximum life increases with increasing airfoil thickness and decreases slightly with increasing maximum lift. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results generally show good agreement.

  5. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    2000-01-01

    Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

  6. Airfoils for wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    2000-05-30

    Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

  7. Aircraft digital control design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. D.; Parsons, E.; Tashker, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Variations in design methods for aircraft digital flight control are evaluated and compared. The methods fall into two categories; those where the design is done in the continuous domain (or s plane) and those where the design is done in the discrete domain (or z plane). Design method fidelity is evaluated by examining closed loop root movement and the frequency response of the discretely controlled continuous aircraft. It was found that all methods provided acceptable performance for sample rates greater than 10 cps except the uncompensated s plane design method which was acceptable above 20 cps. A design procedure based on optimal control methods was proposed that provided the best fidelity at very slow sample rates and required no design iterations for changing sample rates.

  8. Tailored airfoils for vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system costs-of-energy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  9. Tailored airfoils for Vertical Axis Wind Turbines*

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-08-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system cost-ofenergy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  10. Tailored airfoils for vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1984-11-01

    The evolution of a family of airfoil sections designed to be used as blade elements of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is described. This evolution consists of extensive computer simulation, wind tunnel testing and field testing. The process reveals that significant reductions in system costs-of-energy and increases in fatigue lifetime may be expected for VAWT systems using these blade elements.

  11. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2010-11-09

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of hook shaped struts each mounted within channels extending in a spanwise direction of the spar and the shell to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also fanning a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure. The hook struts have a hooked shaped end and a rounded shaped end in order to insert the struts into the spar.

  12. Study of design and analysis methods for transonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.

    1977-01-01

    An airfoil design program and a boundary layer analysis were developed. Boundary conditions were derived for ventilated transonic wind tunnels and performing transonic windtunnel wall calculations. A computational procedure for rotational transonic flow in engine inlet throats was formulated. Results and conclusions are summarized.

  13. Aerodynamics Investigation of Faceted Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolillo, Zachary G.

    The desire and demand to fly farther and faster has progressively integrated the concept of optimization with airfoil design, resulting in increasingly complex numerical tools pursuing efficiency often at diminishing returns; while the costs and difficulty associated with fabrication increases with design complexity. Such efficiencies may often be necessary due to the power density limitations of certain aircraft such as small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and micro air vehicles (MAVs). This research, however, focuses on reducing the complexity of airfoils for applications where aerodynamic performance is less important than the efficiency of manufacturing; in this case a Hybrid Projectile. By employing faceted sections to approximate traditional contoured wing sections it may be possible to expedite manufacturing and reduce costs. We applied this method to the development of a low Reynolds number, disposable Hybrid Projectile requiring a 4.5:1 glide ratio, resulting in a series of airfoils which are geometric approximations to highly contoured cross-sections called ShopFoils. This series of airfoils both numerically and experimentally perform within a 10% margin of the SD6060 airfoil at low Re. Additionally, flow visualization has been conducted to qualitatively determine what mechanisms, if any, are responsible for the similarity in performance between the faceted ShopFoil sections and the SD6060. The data obtained by these experiments did not conclusively reveal how the faceted surfaces may influence low Re flow but did indicate that the ShopFoil s did not maintain flow attachment at higher angles of attack than the SD6060. Two reasons are provided for the unexpected performance of the ShopFoil: one is related to downwash effects, which are suspected of placing the outer portion of the span at an effective angle of attack where the ShopFoils outperform the SD6060; the other is the influence of the tip vortex on separation near the wing tips, which possibly

  14. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Plasma Actuator Control of Modified Flat-back Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Benjamin; Corke, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Flat-back airfoil designs have been proposed for use on the inboard portion of large wind turbine blades because of their good structural characteristics. These structural characteristics are achieved by adding material to the aft portion of the airfoil while maintaining the camber of the origional airfoil shape. The result is a flat vertical trailing edge which increases the drag and noise produced by these airfoils. In order to improve the aerodynamic efficiency of these airfoils, the use of single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators was investigated experimentally and numerically. To accomplish this, a rounded trailing edge was added to traditional flat-back airfoil and plasma actuators were used symmetrically to control the flow separation casued by the blunt trailing edge. The actuators were used asymmetrically in order to vector the wake and increase the lift produced by the airfoil similar to adding camber.

  15. Multi-Element Airfoil System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Lockard, David P. (Inventor); McKenney, Martin J. (Inventor); Atherley, Raymond D. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-element airfoil system includes an airfoil element having a leading edge region and a skin element coupled to the airfoil element. A slat deployment system is coupled to the slat and the skin element, and is capable of deploying and retracting the slat and the skin element. The skin element substantially fills the lateral gap formed between the slat and the airfoil element when the slat is deployed. The system further includes an uncoupling device and a sensor to remove the skin element from the gap based on a critical angle-of-attack of the airfoil element. The system can alternatively comprise a trailing edge flap, where a skin element substantially fills the lateral gap between the flap and the trailing edge region of the airfoil element. In each case, the skin element fills a gap between the airfoil element and the deployed flap or slat to reduce airframe noise.

  16. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 16-percent-thick variable-geometry airfoil designed for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, R. W.; Noonan, K. W.; Mcghee, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of climb, cruise, and landing configurations. These tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.35, a chord Reynolds number range from 2.0 x 1 million to 20.0 x 1 million, and an angle-of-attack range from -8 deg to 20 deg. Results show that the maximum section lift coefficients increased in the Reynolds number range from 2.0 x 1 million to 9.0 x 1 million and reached values of approximately 2.1, 1.8, and 1.5 for the landing, climb, and cruise configurations, respectively. Stall characteristics, although of the trailing-edge type, were abrupt. The section lift-drag ratio of the climb configuration with fixed transition near the leading edge was about 78 at a lift coefficient of 0.9, a Mach number of 0.15, and a Reynolds number of 4.0 x 1 million. Design lift coefficients of 0.9 and 0.4 for the climb and cruise configurations were obtained at the same angle of attack, about 6 deg, as intended. Good agreement was obtained between experimental results and the predictions of a viscous, attached-flow theoretical method.

  17. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R. K.

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel test an orientation parameter for the slat airfoil is initially obtained. Further a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double-element airfoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using ANSYS CFX software. It is observed that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved.

  18. Optimization of natural laminar flow airfoils for high section lift-to-drag ratios in the lower Reynolds number range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, Werner; Vemuru, Chandra S.

    1989-01-01

    Relatively thin natural-laminar-flow airfoils were arranged optimally for different design lift coefficients in the wing chord Reynolds number ranges of 200,000-600,00 and 0.875 x 10 to the 6th to 2 x 10 to the 6th. The 9.5 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-010, the 7.9 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-012, the 10.4 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-015, and the 8.2 percent thick airfoil ASM-LRN-017 were designed for high lift-to-drag ratios using Drela's design and analysis.

  19. Grid Sensitivity and Aerodynamic Optimization of Generic Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, Ideen; Smith, Robert E.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to obtain the grid sensitivity with respect to design parameters for aerodynamic optimization. The procedure is advocating a novel (geometrical) parameterization using spline functions such as NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B- Splines) for defining the airfoil geometry. An interactive algebraic grid generation technique is employed to generate C-type grids around airfoils. The grid sensitivity of the domain with respect to geometric design parameters has been obtained by direct differentiation of the grid equations. A hybrid approach is proposed for more geometrically complex configurations such as a wing or fuselage. The aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients are obtained by direct differentiation of the compressible two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. An optimization package has been introduced into the algorithm in order to optimize the airfoil surface. Results demonstrate a substantially improved design due to maximized lift/drag ratio of the airfoil.

  20. Applications of a direct/iterative design method to complex transonic configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leigh Ann; Campbell, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    The current study explores the use of an automated direct/iterative design method for the reduction of drag in transport configurations, including configurations with engine nacelles. The method requires the user to choose a proper target-pressure distribution and then develops a corresponding airfoil section. The method can be applied to two-dimensional airfoil sections or to three-dimensional wings. The three cases that are presented show successful application of the method for reducing drag from various sources. The first two cases demonstrate the use of the method to reduce induced drag by designing to an elliptic span-load distribution and to reduce wave drag by decreasing the shock strength for a given lift. In the second case, a body-mounted nacelle is added and the method is successfully used to eliminate increases in wing drag associated with the nacelle addition by designing to an arbitrary pressure distribution as a result of the redesigning of a wing in combination with a given underwing nacelle to clean-wing, target-pressure distributions. These cases illustrate several possible uses of the method for reducing different types of drag. The magnitude of the obtainable drag reduction varies with the constraints of the problem and the configuration to be modified.

  1. Potential flow analysis of glaze ice accretions on an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaguli, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical/experimental study of the flow fields about an airfoil with leading edge glaze ice accretion shapes are presented. Tests were conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel to measure surface pressure distributions and boundary layer separation reattachment characteristics on a general aviation wing section to which was affixed wooden ice shapes which approximated typical glaze ice accretions. Comparisons were made with predicted pressure distributions using current airfoil analysis codes as well as the Bristow mixed analysis/design airfoil panel code. The Bristow code was also used to predict the separation reattachment dividing streamline by inputting the appropriate experimental surface pressure distribution.

  2. Wind tunnel testing of low-drag airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. Donald; Mcghee, R. J.; Harris, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented for the measured performance recently obtained on several airfoil concepts designed to achieve low drag by maintaining extensive regions of laminar flow without compromising high-lift performance. The wind tunnel results extend from subsonic to transonic speeds and include boundary-layer control through shaping and suction. The research was conducted in the NASA Langley 8-Ft Transonic Pressure Tunnel (TPT) and Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) which have been developed for testing such low-drag airfoils. Emphasis is placed on identifying some of the major factors influencing the anticipated performance of low-drag airfoils.

  3. Method of Estimating the Incompressible-flow Pressure Distribution of Compressor Blade Sections at Design Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, John R; Yacobi, Laura A

    1953-01-01

    A method was devised for estimating the incompressible-flow pressure distribution over compressor blade sections at design angle of attack. The theoretical incremental velocities due to camber and thickness of the section as an isolated airfoil are assumed proportional to the average passage velocity and are modified by empirically determined interference factors. Comparisons were made between estimated and test pressure distributions of NACA 65-series sections for typical conditions. Good agreement was obtained.

  4. Inverse transonic airfoil design methods including boundary layer and viscous interaction effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    This report covers the period 1 September 1983 to 31 January 1984. The primary task during this reporting period was the continued development of the massive separation model and computer code (SKANSEP). In particular, detailed investigations were conducted with the boundary layer displacement surface correction technique discovered near the end of the last reporting period. This report will present detailed results using this technique and show comparisons with experimental data.

  5. S833, S834, and S835 Airfoils: November 2001--November 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-08-01

    A family of quiet, thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S833, S834, and S835, for 1 - 3-meter-diameter, variable-speed/variable-pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls, which meet the design goal. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoils thicknesses have been satisfied.

  6. S830, S831, and S832 Airfoils: November 2001-November 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-08-01

    A family of quiet, thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S830, S831, and S832, for 40 - 50-meter-diameter, variable-speed/variable-pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, relatively insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls, which meet the design goal. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoils thicknesses have been satisfied.

  7. An airfoil for general aviation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, Michael S.; Maughmer, Mark D.; Somers, Dan M.

    1990-01-01

    A new airfoil, the NLF(1)-0115, has been recently designed at the NASA Langley Research Center for use in general-aviation applications. During the development of this airfoil, special emphasis was placed on experiences and observations gleaned from other successful general-aviation airfoils. For example, the flight lift-coefficient range is the same as that of the turbulent-flow NACA 23015 airfoil. Also, although beneficial for reducing drag and having large amounts of lift, the NLF(1)-0115 avoids the use of aft loading which can lead to large stick forces if utilized on portions of the wing having ailerons. Furthermore, not using aft loading eliminates the concern that the high pitching-moment coefficient generated by such airfoils can result in large trim drags if cruise flaps are not employed. The NASA NLF(1)-0115 has a thickness of 15 percent. It is designed primarily for general-aviation aircraft with wing loadings of 718 to 958 N/sq m (15 to 20 lb/sq ft). Low profile drag as a result of laminar flow is obtained over the range from c sub l = 0.1 and R = 9x10(exp 6) (the cruise condition) to c sub l = 0.6 and R = 4 x 10(exp 6) (the climb condition). While this airfoil can be used with flaps, it is designed to achieve c(sub l, max) = 1.5 at R = 2.6 x 10(exp 6) without flaps. The zero-lift pitching moment is held at c sub m sub o = 0.055. The hinge moment for a .20c aileron is fixed at a value equal to that of the NACA 63 sub 2-215 airfoil, c sub h = 0.00216. The loss in c (sub l, max) due to leading edge roughness, rain, or insects at R = 2.6 x 10 (exp 6) is 11 percent as compared with 14 percent for the NACA 23015.

  8. Improved design of subcritical and supercritical cascades using complex characteristics and boundary layer correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The method of complex characteristics and hodograph transformation for the design of shockless airfoils was extended to design supercritical cascades with high solidities and large inlet angles. This capability was achieved by introducing a conformal mapping of the hodograph domain onto an ellipse and expanding the solution in terms of Tchebycheff polynomials. A computer code was developd based on this idea. A number of airfoils designed with the code are presented. Various supercritical and subcritical compressor, turbine and propeller sections are shown. The lag-entrainment method for the calculation of a turbulent boundary layer was incorporated to the inviscid design code. The results of this calculation are shown for the airfoils described. The elliptic conformal transformation developed to map the hodograph domain onto an ellipse can be used to generate a conformal grid in the physical domain of a cascade of airfoils with open trailing edges with a single transformation. A grid generated with this transformation is shown for the Korn airfoil.

  9. Status of NASA advanced LFC airfoil high-lift study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applin, Z. T.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a high lift system for the NASA advanced LFC airfoil designed by Pfenninger is described. The high lift system consists of both leading and trailing edge flaps. A 3 meter semispan, 1 meter chord wing model using the above airfoil and high lift system is under construction and will be tested in the NASA Langley 4 by 7 meter tunnel. This model will have two separate full span leading edge flaps (0.10c and 0.12c) and one full span trailing edge flap (0.25c). The performance of this high lift system was predicted by the NASA two dimensional viscous multicomponent airfoil program. This program was also used to predict the characteristics of the LFC airfoils developed by the Douglas Aircraft Company and Lockheed-Georgia Aircraft Company.

  10. Aircraft digital control design methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tashker, M. G.; Powell, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations were conducted in two main areas: the first area is control system design, and the goals were to define the limits of 'digitized S-Plane design techniques' vs. sample rate, to show the results of a 'direct digital design technique', and to compare the two methods; the second area was to evaluate the roughness of autopilot designs parametrically versus sample rate. Goals of the first area were addressed by (1) an analysis of a 2nd order example using both design methods, (2) a linear analysis of the complete 737 aircraft with an autoland obtained using the digitized S-plane technique, (3) linear analysis of a high frequency 737 approximation with the autoland from a direct digital design technique, and (4) development of a simulation for evaluation of the autopilots with disturbances and nonlinearities included. Roughness evaluation was studied by defining an experiment to be carried out on the Langley motion simulator and coordinated with analysis at Stanford.

  11. Optimum Transonic Airfoils Based on the Euler Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iollo, Angelo; Salas, Manuel, D.

    1996-01-01

    We solve the problem of determining airfoils that approximate, in a least square sense, given surface pressure distributions in transonic flight regimes. The flow is modeled by means of the Euler equations and the solution procedure is an adjoint- based minimization algorithm that makes use of the inverse Theodorsen transform in order to parameterize the airfoil. Fast convergence to the optimal solution is obtained by means of the pseudo-time method. Results are obtained using three different pressure distributions for several free stream conditions. The airfoils obtained have given a trailing edge angle.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Airfoil Vibrations Induced by Compressible Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistauer, Miloslav; Kučera, Václav; Šimánek, Petr

    2010-09-01

    The paper is concerned with the numerical solution of interaction of compressible flow and a vibrating airfoil with two degrees of freedom, which can rotate around an elastic axis and oscillate in the vertical direction. Compressible flow is described by the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations written in the ALE form. This system is discretized by the semi-implicit discontinuous Galerkin finite element method (DGFEM) and coupled with the solution of ordinary differential equations describing the airfoil motion. Computational results showing the flow induced airfoil vibrations are presented.

  13. Analysis of viscous transonic flow over airfoil sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Dennis L.; Wu, Jiunn-Chi; Sankar, L. N.

    1987-01-01

    A full Navier-Stokes solver has been used to model transonic flow over three airfoil sections. The method uses a two-dimensional, implicit, conservative finite difference scheme for solving the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented as prescribed for the Viscous Transonic Airfoil Workshop to be held at the AIAA 25th Aerospace Sciences Meeting. The NACA 0012, RAE 2822 and Jones airfoils have been investigated for both attached and separated transonic flows. Predictions for pressure distributions, loads, skin friction coefficients, boundary layer displacement thickness and velocity profiles are included and compared with experimental data when possible. Overall, the results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  15. Reynolds number, thickness and camber effects on flapping airfoil propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, M. A.; Young, J.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2011-02-01

    The effect of varying airfoil thickness and camber on plunging and combined pitching and plunging airfoil propulsion at Reynolds number Re=200, 2000, 20 000 and 2×106 was studied by numerical simulations for fully laminar and fully turbulent flow regimes. The thickness study was performed on 2-D NACA symmetric airfoils with 6-50% thick sections undergoing pure plunging motion at reduced frequency k=2 and amplitudes h=0.25 and 0.5, and for combined pitching and plunging motion at k=2, h=0.5, phase ϕ=90°, pitch angle θo=15° and 30° and the pitch axis was located at 1/3 of chord from leading edge. At Re=200 for motions where positive thrust is generated, thin airfoils outperform thick airfoils. At higher Re significant gains could be achieved both in thrust generation and propulsive efficiency by using a thicker airfoil section for plunging and combined motion with low pitch amplitude. The camber study was performed on 2-D NACA airfoils with varying camber locations undergoing pure plunging motion at k=2, h=0.5 and Re=20 000. Little variation in thrust performance was found with camber. The underlying physics behind the alteration in propulsive performance between low and high Reynolds numbers has been explored by comparing viscous Navier-Stokes and inviscid panel method results. The role of leading edge vortices was found to be key to the observed performance variation.

  16. On the Theory of the Unsteady Motion of an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedov, L. I.

    1947-01-01

    The paper presents a systematical analysis of the problem of the determination of the unsteady motion about an airfoil moving in an infinite fluid that contains a system of vortices and the determination of the hydrodynamical forces acting on the airfoil. The hydrodynamical problem is reduced to the determination of the function f (xi) which transforms conformally the external region of the airfoil into the interior of a circle. The proposed methods of determining the irrotational motion of a fluid that is produced by any motion of the airfoil are especially simple and effective if the function f (xi) is rational. As an example the flow is determined for the case of an arbitrary motion of an airfoil of the Joukowsky type. The formulas obtained for the determination of the hydrodynamical forces by means of contour integration are similar to those given by S. Chaplygin. These formulas are used to determine the force acting on the airfoil in the cases where the unsteady motion is potential throughout and the circulation about the airfoil is constant and also when the fluid contains a system of vortices. A full discussion is given of the concept of virtual masses together with practical formulas for computing the virtual mass coefficients.

  17. Development of panel methods for subsonic analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two computer programs, developed for subsonic inviscid analysis and design are described. The first solves arbitrary mixed analysis design problems for multielement airfoils in two dimensional flow. The second calculates the pressure distribution for arbitrary lifting or nonlifting three dimensional configurations. In each program, inviscid flow is modelled by using distributed source doublet singularities on configuration surface panels. Numerical formulations and representative solutions are presented for the programs.

  18. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  19. Shape Changing Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Scoping of shape changing airfoil concepts including both aerodynamic analysis and materials-related technology assessment effort was performed. Three general categories of potential components were considered-fan blades, booster and compressor blades, and stator airfoils. Based on perceived contributions to improving engine efficiency, the fan blade was chosen as the primary application for a more detailed assessment. A high-level aerodynamic assessment using a GE90-90B Block 4 engine cycle and fan blade geometry indicates that blade camber changes of approximately +/-4deg would be sufficient to result in fan efficiency improvements nearing 1 percent. Constraints related to flight safety and failed mode operation suggest that use of the baseline blade shape with actuation to the optimum cruise condition during a portion of the cycle would be likely required. Application of these conditions to the QAT fan blade and engine cycle was estimated to result in an overall fan efficiency gain of 0.4 percent.

  20. Airfoil with nested cooling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Levengood, J.L.; Auxier, T.A.

    1988-06-28

    A turbine blade is described which consists of a root portion and wall means integral with the root portion defining an airfoil, the wall means including a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, joined together to define a forwardly located leading edge and rearwardly located trailing edge of the airfoil and spaced apart to define a spanwise and chordwise extending coolant cavity within the airfoil, and root portion including root passage means therethrough for receiving coolant fluid form outside the blade and for directing the fluid into the airfoil cavity.

  1. Experimental studies of the Eppler 61 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, T. F.; Mueller, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to document the effects of separation and transition on the performance of an airfoil designed for low Reynolds number operation are presented. Lift, drag and flow visualization data were obtained for the Eppler 61 airfoil section for chord Reynolds numbers from about 30,000 to over 200,000. Smoke flow visualization was employed to document the boundary layer behavior and was correlated with the Eppler airfoil design and analysis computer program. Laminar separation, transition and turbulent reattachment had significant effects on the performance of this airfoil.

  2. An Exploratory Investigation of a Slotted, Natural-Laminar-Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A 15-percent-thick, slotted, natural-laminar-flow (SNLF) airfoil, the S103, for general aviation applications has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moment and the airfoil thickness have been satisfied. The airfoil exhibits a rapid stall, which does not meet the design goal. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparison with the baseline, NASA NLF(1)-0215F airfoil confirms the achievement of the objectives.

  3. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  4. Buffeting of NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Dowell, Earl

    2014-11-01

    Buffeting is a fluid instability caused by flow separation or shock wave oscillations in the flow around a bluff body. Typically there is a dominant frequency of these flow oscillations called Strouhal or buffeting frequency. In prior work several researchers at Duke University have noted the analogy between the classic Von Karman Vortex Street behind a bluff body and the flow oscillations that occur for flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil at sufficiently large angle of attack. Lock-in is found for certain combinations of airfoil oscillation (pitching motion) frequencies and amplitudes when the frequency of the airfoil motion is sufficiently close to the buffeting frequency. The goal of this paper is to explore the flow around a static and an oscillating airfoil at high angle of attack by developing a method for computing buffet response. Simulation results are compared with experimental data. Conditions for the onset of buffeting and lock-in of a NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack are determined. Effects of several parameters on lift coefficient and flow response frequency are studied including Reynolds number, angle of attack and blockage ratio of the airfoil size to the wind tunnel dimensions. Also more detailed flow field characteristics are determined. For a static airfoil, a universal Strouhal number scaling has been found for angles of attack from 30° to 90°, where the flow around airfoil is fully separated. For an oscillating airfoil, conditions for lock-in are discussed. Differences between the lock-in case and the unlocked case are also studied. The second affiliation: Duke University.

  5. Stochastic Methods for Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelz, Richard B.; Ogot, Madara

    1998-01-01

    The global stochastic optimization method, simulated annealing (SA), was adapted and applied to various problems in aircraft design. The research was aimed at overcoming the problem of finding an optimal design in a space with multiple minima and roughness ubiquitous to numerically generated nonlinear objective functions. SA was modified to reduce the number of objective function evaluations for an optimal design, historically the main criticism of stochastic methods. SA was applied to many CFD/MDO problems including: low sonic-boom bodies, minimum drag on supersonic fore-bodies, minimum drag on supersonic aeroelastic fore-bodies, minimum drag on HSCT aeroelastic wings, FLOPS preliminary design code, another preliminary aircraft design study with vortex lattice aerodynamics, HSR complete aircraft aerodynamics. In every case, SA provided a simple, robust and reliable optimization method which found optimal designs in order 100 objective function evaluations. Perhaps most importantly, from this academic/industrial project, technology has been successfully transferred; this method is the method of choice for optimization problems at Northrop Grumman.

  6. An experimental study of a bio-inspired corrugated airfoil for micro air vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeffery T.; Hu, Hui

    2010-08-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of a bio-inspired corrugated airfoil compared with a smooth-surfaced airfoil and a flat plate at the chord Reynolds number of Re C = 58,000-125,000 to explore the potential applications of such bio-inspired corrugated airfoils for micro air vehicle designs. In addition to measuring the aerodynamic lift and drag forces acting on the tested airfoils, a digital particle image velocimetry system was used to conduct detailed flowfield measurements to quantify the transient behavior of vortex and turbulent flow structures around the airfoils. The measurement result revealed clearly that the corrugated airfoil has better performance over the smooth-surfaced airfoil and the flat plate in providing higher lift and preventing large-scale flow separation and airfoil stall at low Reynolds numbers (Re C < 100,000). While aerodynamic performance of the smooth-surfaced airfoil and the flat plate would vary considerably with the changing of the chord Reynolds numbers, the aerodynamic performance of the corrugated airfoil was found to be almost insensitive to the Reynolds numbers. The detailed flow field measurements were correlated with the aerodynamic force measurement data to elucidate underlying physics to improve our understanding about how and why the corrugation feature found in dragonfly wings holds aerodynamic advantages for low Reynolds number flight applications.

  7. The Determination of the Geometries of Multiple-Element Airfoils Optimized for Maximum Lift Coefficient. Ph.D. Thesis - Illinois Univ., Urbana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    Optimum airfoils in the sense of maximum lift coefficient are obtained by a newly developed method. The maximum lift coefficient is achieved by requiring that the turbulent skin friction be zero in the pressure rise region on the upper surface. Under this constraint, the pressure distribution is optimized. The optimum pressure distribution consists of a uniform stagnation pressure on the lower surface, a uniform minimum pressure on the upper surface immediately downstream of the front stagnation point followed by a Stratford zero skin friction pressure rise. When multiple-element airfoils are under consideration, this optimum pressure distribution appears on every element. The parameters used to specify the pressure distribution on each element are the Reynolds number and the normalized trailing edge velocity. The newly developed method of design computes the velocity distribution on a given airfoil and modifies the airfoil contour in a systematic manner until the desired velocity distribution is achieved. There are no limitations on how many elements the airfoil to be designed can have.

  8. Active Control of Flow Separation Over an Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravindran, S. S.

    1999-01-01

    Designing an aircraft without conventional control surfaces is of interest to aerospace community. In this direction, smart actuator devices such as synthetic jets have been proposed to provide aircraft maneuverability instead of control surfaces. In this article, a numerical study is performed to investigate the effects of unsteady suction and blowing on airfoils. The unsteady suction and blowing is introduced at the leading edge of the airfoil in the form of tangential jet. Numerical solutions are obtained using Reynolds-Averaged viscous compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Unsteady suction and blowing is investigated as a means of separation control to obtain lift on airfoils. The effect of blowing coefficients on lift and drag is investigated. The numerical simulations are compared with experiments from the Tel-Aviv University (TAU). These results indicate that unsteady suction and blowing can be used as a means of separation control to generate lift on airfoils.

  9. S827 and S828 Airfoils; Period of Performance: 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A family of thick, natural-laminar-flow airfoils, the S827 and S828, for 40- to 50-meter, stall -regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moments and the airfoil thicknesses have been satisfied. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls.

  10. Experimental verification of a new laminar airfoil: A project for the graduate program in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicks, Oran W.; Korkan, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Two reports on student activities to determine the properties of a new laminar airfoil which were delivered at a conference on soaring technology are presented. The papers discuss a wind tunnel investigation and analysis of the SM701 airfoil and verification of the SM701 airfoil aerodynamic charcteristics utilizing theoretical techniques. The papers are based on a combination of analytical design, hands-on model fabrication, wind tunnel calibration and testing, data acquisition and analysis, and comparison of test results and theory.

  11. A graphical method of determining pressure distribution in two-dimensional flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert T; Cohen, Doris

    1941-01-01

    By a generalization of the Joukowski method, a procedure is developed for effecting localized modifications of airfoil shapes and for determining graphically the resultant changes in the pressure distribution. The application of the procedure to the determination of the pressure distribution over airfoils of original design is demonstrated. Formulas for the lift, the moment, and the aerodynamic center are also given.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics of airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P.; Mcfadden, G.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that transonic flow is one of the fields where computational fluid dynamics turns out to be most effective. Codes for the design and analysis of supercritical airfoils and wings have become standard tools of the aircraft industry. The present investigation is concerned with mathematical models and theorems which account for some of the progress that has been made. The most successful aerodynamics codes are those for the analysis of flow at off-design conditions where weak shock waves appear. A major breakthrough was achieved by Murman and Cole (1971), who conceived of a retarded difference scheme which incorporates artificial viscosity to capture shocks in the supersonic zone. This concept has been used to develop codes for the analysis of transonic flow past a swept wing. Attention is given to the trailing edge and the boundary layer, entropy inequalities and wave drag, shockless airfoils, and the inverse swept wing code.

  13. Design method of supercavitating pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagin, V.; Likhachev, D.; Li, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    The problem of effective supercavitating (SC) pump is solved, and optimum load distribution along the radius of the blade is found taking into account clearance, degree of cavitation development, influence of finite number of blades, and centrifugal forces. Sufficient accuracy can be obtained using the equivalent flat SC-grid for design of any SC-mechanisms, applying the “grid effect” coefficient and substituting the skewed flow calculated for grids of flat plates with the infinite attached cavitation caverns. This article gives the universal design method and provides an example of SC-pump design.

  14. The Aerodynamic Characteristics of Full-Scale Propellers Having 2, 3, and 4 Blades of Clark Y and R.A.F. 6 Airfoil Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edwin P; Biermann, David

    1938-01-01

    Aerodynamic tests were made of seven full-scale 10-foot-diameter propellers of recent design comprising three groups. The first group was composed of three propellers having Clark y airfoil sections and the second group was composed of three propellers having R.A.F. 6 airfoil sections, the propellers of each group having 2, 3, and 4 blades. The third group was composed of two propellers, the 2-blade propeller taken from the second group and another propeller having the same airfoil section and number of blades but with the width and thickness 50 percent greater. The tests of these propellers reveal the effect of changes in solidity resulting either from increasing the number of blades or from increasing the blade width propeller design charts and methods of computing propeller thrust are included.

  15. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 14-percent-thick NASA phase 2 supercritical airfoil designed for a lift coefficient of 0.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. D.; Mcghee, R. J.; Allison, D. O.

    1980-01-01

    The low speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 14 percent thick supercritical airfoil are documented. The wind tunnel test was conducted in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. The effects of varying chord Reynolds number from 2,000,000 to 18,000,000 at a Mach number of 0.15 and the effects of varying Mach number from 0.10 to 0.32 at a Reynolds number of 6,000,000 are included.

  16. Tail Rotor Airfoils Stabilize Helicopters, Reduce Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Founded by former Ames Research Center engineer Jim Van Horn, Van Horn Aviation of Tempe, Arizona, built upon a Langley Research Center airfoil design to create a high performance aftermarket tail rotor for the popular Bell 206 helicopter. The highly durable rotor has a lifetime twice that of the original equipment manufacturer blade, reduces noise by 40 percent, and displays enhanced performance at high altitudes. These improvements benefit helicopter performance for law enforcement, military training, wildfire and pipeline patrols, and emergency medical services.

  17. Lift enhancing tabs for airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A tab deployable from the trailing edge of a main airfoil element forces flow onto a following airfoil element, such as a flap, to keep the flow attached and thus enhance lift. For aircraft wings with high lift systems that include leading edge slats, the slats may also be provided with tabs to turn the flow onto the following main element.

  18. Development of the spectral difference method and application in the numerical investigation of the separated and transitional flows over a low-Reynolds number airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying

    2011-12-01

    The development of the high-order accuracy spectral difference (SD) method on hexahedral mesh and its applications in aeroacoustic and aerodynamic problems are carried out in this work. Two absorbing boundary conditions, the absorbing sponge zone and the perfectly matched layer, are developed and implemented for the SD method discretizing the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids. The performance of both boundary conditions is evaluated and compared with the characteristic boundary condition for a variety of benchmark problems including vortex and acoustic wave propagations. The applications of the perfectly matched layer technique in the numerical simulations of unsteady problems with complex geometries are also presented to demonstrate its capability. Numerical simulations of the low-Reynolds number (Re = 104 ˜ 105) flows over a SD7003 airfoil at moderate incidences (<10°) are performed. A low-frequency convective instability is observed to dominate the spectrum near the leading edge and be responsible for the growth of the disturbance in the attached boundary layer. The characteristic frequency, the growth rate and the wave shape are investigated based on the numerical results. The growth of the low-frequency instability is not in agreement with parallel flow stability theory, nor with leading edge receptivity theory. And it has a higher growth rate than the Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) wave. The effects of the angle-of-attack (AoA), the Reynolds number and the airfoil geometry on the low-frequency instability are investigated and discussed. The mechanisms in the breakdown process are investigated and discussed. It is observed that the breakdown of the shedding vortices starts at approximately the location with the maximum negative streamwise flow velocity. And the reverse flow in the separation region directly triggers the generation of three dimensional disturbances and the streamwise vorticities. In addition, the secondary instability which

  19. Unsteady transonic flow control around an airfoil in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Md. Abdul; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, Mohammad; Mitsutake, Yuichi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Yu, Shen

    2016-04-01

    Transonic internal flow around an airfoil is associated with self-excited unsteady shock wave oscillation. This unsteady phenomenon generates buffet, high speed impulsive noise, non-synchronous vibration, high cycle fatigue failure and so on. Present study investigates the effectiveness of perforated cavity to control this unsteady flow field. The cavity has been incorporated on the airfoil surface. The degree of perforation of the cavity is kept constant as 30%. However, the number of openings (perforation) at the cavity upper wall has been varied. Results showed that this passive control reduces the strength of shock wave compared to that of baseline airfoil. As a result, the intensity of shock wave/boundary layer interaction and the root mean square (RMS) of pressure oscillation around the airfoil have been reduced with the control method.

  20. Technology for pressure-instrumented thin airfoil models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, David A.

    1988-01-01

    A novel method of airfoil model construction was developed. This Laminated Sheet technique uses 0.8 mm thick sheets of A286 containing a network of pre-formed channels which are vacuum brazed together to form the airfoil. A 6.25 percent model of the X29A canard, which has a 5 percent thick section, was built using this technique. The model contained a total of 96 pressure orifices, 56 in three chordwise rows on the upper surface and 37 in three similar rows on the lower surface. It was tested in the NASA Langley 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Unique aerodynamic data was obtained over the full range of temperature and pressure. Part of the data was at transonic Mach numbers and flight Reynolds number. A larger two dimensional model of the NACA 64a-105 airfoil section was also fabricated. Scale up presented some problems, but a testable airfoil was fabricated.

  1. Study of the TRAC Airfoil Table Computational System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Hong

    1999-01-01

    The report documents the study of the application of the TRAC airfoil table computational package (TRACFOIL) to the prediction of 2D airfoil force and moment data over a wide range of angle of attack and Mach number. The TRACFOIL generates the standard C-81 airfoil table for input into rotorcraft comprehensive codes such as CAM- RAD. The existing TRACFOIL computer package is successfully modified to run on Digital alpha workstations and on Cray-C90 supercomputers. A step-by-step instruction for using the package on both computer platforms is provided. Application of the newer version of TRACFOIL is made for two airfoil sections. The C-81 data obtained using the TRACFOIL method are compared with those of wind-tunnel data and results are presented.

  2. Peak power and blade loads on stall-regulated rotors as influenced by different airfoil families

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Tu, P.K.C.

    1988-08-01

    At the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), new airfoils have been developed to help improve the performance and economics of horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTS). The objective of this study was to compare the performance characteristics of one of these airfoil families to other commonly used airfoil series for a typical three-bladed, stall-regulated HAWT. The traditional airfoil series chosen for comparison with SERI's new thin airfoil family were the NACA 23XXX, NACA 44XX, and NASA LS(1). The Micon 110 wind turbine was chosen because it is a typical three-bladed, stall-regulated rigid rotor system. The performance characteristics of the different airfoil series were derived analytically using the Eppler airfoil design code in the analysis mode. On a relative basis, this approach to comparing airfoils was considered more accurate than using airfoil performance characteristics based on wind-tunnel test data. After generating the performance characteristics for each airfoil series, the subsequent rotor performance and blade loads were calculated using SERI's PROPSH computer code. Resulting annual energy output, which is dependent on the wind-speed distribution, was calculated using SERI's Systems Engineering and Analysis Computer Code (SEACC). The results of the study show that fixed-wing airfoils generally result in excessive peak power for stall regulated, rigid rotors. By operating the wind turbine at a less desirable blade pitch angle, peak power can be reduced at the expense of higher mean blade loads and lower annual energy output. In contrast, the thin airfoil family was designed to reduce peak power at optimum blade pitch to minimize blade loads and maximize annual energy output. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Multiple Solutions of Transonic Flow over NACA0012 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Juntao; Liu, Ya; Liu, Feng; Luo, Shijun; Zhao, Zijie; Ren, Xudong; Gao, Chao

    2012-11-01

    Multiple solutions of the small-disturbance potential equation and full potential equation were known for the NACA0012 airfoil in a certain range of transonic Mach numbers and at zero angle of attack. However the multiple solutions for this airfoil were not observed using Euler or Navier-Stokes equations under the above flow conditions. In the present work, both the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations and transonic wind tunnel experiments are performed under certain Reynolds numbers to further study the problem. The results of the two methods reveal that buffet appears in a narrow Mach number range where the potential flow methods predict multiple solutions. Boundary layer displacement thickness computed from URANS at the same flow condition is used to modify the geometry of the airfoil. Euler equations are then solved for the modified geometry. The results show that the addition of the boundary layer displacement thickness creates multiple solutions for the NACA0012 airfoil. Global linear stability analysis is also performed on the original and the modified airfoils. This shows a close relationship between the viscous unsteady shock buffet phenomenon of transonic airfoil flow and the existence of multiple solutions of the external inviscid flow. Postdoctoral Research Assistant.

  4. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    PubMed

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number. PMID:24116405

  5. Impact of Airfoils on Aerodynamic Optimization of Heavy Lift Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acree, Cecil W., Jr.; Martin Preston B.; Romander, Ethan A.

    2006-01-01

    Rotor airfoils were developed for two large tiltrotor designs, the Large Civil Tilt Rotor (LCTR) and the Military Heavy Tilt Rotor (MHTR). The LCTR was the most promising of several rotorcraft concepts produced by the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation. It was designed to carry 120 passengers for 1200 nm, with performance of 350 knots cruise at 30,000 ft altitude. A parallel design, the MHTR, had a notional mission of 40,000 Ib payload, 500 nm range, and 300 knots cruise at 4000 ft, 95 F. Both aircraft were sized by the RC code developed by the U. S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD). The rotors were then optimized using the CAMRAD II comprehensive analysis code. Rotor airfoils were designed for each aircraft, and their effects on performance analyzed by CAMRAD II. Airfoil design criteria are discussed for each rotor. Twist and taper optimization are presented in detail for each rotor, with discussions of performance improvements provided by the new airfoils, compared to current technology airfoils. Effects of stall delay and blade flexibility on performance are also included.

  6. Airfoil treatments for vertical axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has taken three airfoil related approaches to decreasing the cost of energy of vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) systems; airfoil sections designed specifically for VAWTs, vortex generators (VGs), and ''pumped spoiling.'' SNL's blade element airfoil section design effort has led to three promising natural laminar flow (NLF) sections. One section is presently being run on the SNL 17-m turbine. Increases in peak efficiency and more desirable dynamic stall regulation characteristics have been observed. Vane-type VGs were fitted on one DOE/Alcoa 100 kW VAWT. With approximately 12% of span having VGs, annual energy production increased by 5%. Pumped spoiling utilizes the centrifugal pumping capabilities of hollow blades. With the addition of small perforations in the surface of the blades and valves controlled by windspeed at the ends of each blade, lift spoiling jets may be generated inducing premature stall and permitting lower capacity, lower cost drivetrain components. SNL has demonstrated this concept on its 5-m turbine and has wind tunnel tested perforation geometries on one NLF section.

  7. Computer programs for smoothing and scaling airfoil coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed descriptions are given of the theoretical methods and associated computer codes of a program to smooth and a program to scale arbitrary airfoil coordinates. The smoothing program utilizes both least-squares polynomial and least-squares cubic spline techniques to smooth interatively the second derivatives of the y-axis airfoil coordinates with respect to a transformed x-axis system which unwraps the airfoil and stretches the nose and trailing-edge regions. The corresponding smooth airfoil coordinates are then determined by solving a tridiagonal matrix of simultaneous cubic-spline equations relating the y-axis coordinates and their corresponding second derivatives. A technique for computing the camber and thickness distribution of the smoothed airfoil is also discussed. The scaling program can then be used to scale the thickness distribution generated by the smoothing program to a specific maximum thickness which is then combined with the camber distribution to obtain the final scaled airfoil contour. Computer listings of the smoothing and scaling programs are included.

  8. Investigation of the two-element airfoil with flap structure for the vertical axis wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Li, C.

    2013-12-01

    The aerodynamic performance of Vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) is not as simple as its structure because of the large changing range of angle of attack. We have designed a new kind of two-element airfoil for VAWT on the basis of NACA0012. CFD calculation has been confirmed to have high accuracy by comparison with the experiment data and Xfoil result. The aerodynamic parameter of two-element airfoil has been acquired by CFD calculation in using the Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) turbulence model and the Simple scheme. The relationship between changings of angle of attack and flap's tilt angle has been found and quantified. The analysis will lay the foundation for further research on the control method for VAWT.

  9. S816, S817, and S818 Airfoils: October 1991--July1992

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    A family of thick laminar-flow airfoils for 30 to 40-meter horizontal-axis wind turbines, the S816, S817, and S818, has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moments and airfoil thicknesses have been satisfied.

  10. S819, S820, and S821 Airfoils: October 1992--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A family of thick airfoils for 10- to 20-meter, stall regulated, horizontal-axis wind turbines, the S819, S820, and S821, has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moments and airfoil thicknesses have been satisfied.

  11. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached.

  12. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1997-06-03

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly are disclosed including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached. 5 figs.

  13. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Dryden, H L

    1927-01-01

    This report deals with the pressure distribution over airfoils at high speeds, and describes an extension of an investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of certain airfoils which was presented in NACA Technical Report no. 207. The results presented in report no. 207 have been confirmed and extended to higher speeds through a more extensive and systematic series of tests. Observations were also made of the air flow near the surface of the airfoils, and the large changes in lift coefficients were shown to be associated with a sudden breaking away of the flow from the upper surface. The tests were made on models of 1-inch chord and comparison with the earlier measurements on models of 3-inch chord shows that the sudden change in the lift coefficient is due to compressibility and not to a change in the Reynolds number. The Reynolds number still has a large effect, however, on the drag coefficient. The pressure distribution observations furnish the propeller designer with data on the load distribution at high speeds, and also give a better picture of the air-flow changes.

  14. Nozzle airfoil having movable nozzle ribs

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane or airfoil structure is provided in which the nozzle ribs are connected to the side walls of the vane or airfoil in such a way that the ribs provide the requisite mechanical support between the concave side and convex side of the airfoil but are not locked in the radial direction of the assembly, longitudinally of the airfoil. The ribs may be bi-cast onto a preformed airfoil side wall structure or fastened to the airfoil by an interlocking slide connection and/or welding. By attaching the nozzle ribs to the nozzle airfoil metal in such a way that allows play longitudinally of the airfoil, the temperature difference induced radial thermal stresses at the nozzle airfoil/rib joint area are reduced while maintaining proper mechanical support of the nozzle side walls.

  15. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  16. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  17. Second Stage Turbine Bucket Airfoil.

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Liming; Ahmadi, Majid; Humanchuk, David John; Moretto, Nicholas; Delehanty, Richard Edward

    2003-05-06

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  18. Characterization of dynamic stall on 9-15 % thick airfoils using experiment and computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Phillip B.

    In recent years, the blade geometry on wind turbines and helicopters has been optimized for a particular span location. Unsteady flow phenomena like dynamic stall limit these designs and need to be better understood and correctly simulated. Currently, empirical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are used to simulate rotating wind turbine or helicopter blades, but each of these methods has limitations in predicting unsteady separated flows. To address these needs, the present work investigated oscillating airfoils over a range of conditions with an approach that provided fast, low-cost unsteady pressure data combined with a highly resolved flow field to better understand the physics of dynamic stall. An additional objective was to show how such data may be used to assess CFD simulations. This research has yielded interesting results showing characteristics of thin airfoil stall, leading edge stall, and trailing edge stall that were sorted and classified. Classification of the oscillating airfoil behavior with or without dynamic stall was performed using previous definitions for stall regime, separation characteristics, and other qualitative differences in stall pattern. After classifying the unsteady flow for each of the cases, comparison of experimental results and results obtained using an unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) solver was performed to assess the ability of the solver to produce the same unsteady effects. Although both experiment and computation produced similar flow features, the timing and magnitude of the features in the dynamic stall and re-attachment process of the pitching cycle exhibited some significant differences.

  19. Aerodynamics Characteristics of Multi-Element Airfoils at -90 Degrees Incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stremel, Paul M.; Schmitz, Fredric H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A developed method has been applied to calculate accurately the viscous flow about airfoils normal to the free-stream flow. This method has special application to the analysis of tilt rotor aircraft in the evaluation of download. In particular, the flow about an XV-15 airfoil with and without deflected leading and trailing edge flaps at -90 degrees incidence is evaluated. The multi-element aspect of the method provides for the evaluation of slotted flap configurations which may lead to decreased drag. The method solves for turbulent flow at flight Reynolds numbers. The flow about the XV-15 airfoil with and without flap deflections has been calculated and compared with experimental data at a Reynolds number of one million. The comparison between the calculated and measured pressure distributions are very good, thereby, verifying the method. The aerodynamic evaluation of multielement airfoils will be conducted to determine airfoil/flap configurations for reduced airfoil drag. Comparisons between the calculated lift, drag and pitching moment on the airfoil and the airfoil surface pressure will also be presented.

  20. Automated CFD for Generation of Airfoil Performance Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawn, Roger; Mayda, E. Q.; vamDam, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    A method of automated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been invented for the generation of performance tables for an object subject to fluid flow. The method is applicable to the generation of tables that summarize the effects of two-dimensional flows about airfoils and that are in a format known in the art as C81. (A C81 airfoil performance table is a text file that lists coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment of an airfoil as functions of angle of attack for a range of Mach numbers.) The method makes it possible to efficiently generate and tabulate data from simulations of flows for parameter values spanning all operational ranges of actual or potential interest. In so doing, the method also enables filling of gaps and resolution of inconsistencies in C81 tables generated previously from incomplete experimental data or from theoretical calculations that involved questionable assumptions.

  1. Numerical Solution of Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2014-03-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Navier-Stokes equations in 2D laminar compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil.

  2. Recent progress in the analysis of iced airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer; Chen, Hsun H.; Kaups, Kalle; Schimke, Sue

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on the analysis of iced airfoils and wings is described. Ice shapes for multielement airfoils and wings are computed using an extension of the LEWICE code that was developed for single airfoils. The aerodynamic properties of the iced wing are determined with an interactive scheme in which the solutions of the inviscid flow equations are obtained from a panel method and the solutions of the viscous flow equations are obtained from an inverse three-dimensional finite-difference boundary-layer method. A new interaction law is used to couple the inviscid and viscous flow solutions. The newly developed LEWICE multielement code is amplified to a high-lift configuration to calculate the ice shapes on the slat and on the main airfoil and on a four-element airfoil. The application of the LEWICE wing code to the calculation of ice shapes on a MS-317 swept wing shows good agreement with measurements. The interactive boundary-layer method is applied to a tapered iced wing in order to study the effect of icing on the aerodynamic properties of the wing at several angles of attack.

  3. A study of test section configuration for shock tube testing of transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Two methods are investigated for alleviating wall interference effects in a shock tube test section intended for testing two-dimensional transonic airfoils. The first method involves contouring the test section walls to match approximate streamlines in the flow. Contours are matched to each airfoil tested to produce results close to those obtained in a conventional wind tunnel. Data from a previous study and the present study for two different airfoils demonstrate that useful results are obtained in a shock tube using a test section with contoured walls. The second method involves use of a fixed-geometry slotted-wall test section to provide automatic flow compensation for various airfoils. The slotted-wall test section developed exhibited the desired performance characteristics in the approximate Mach number range 0.82 to 0.89, as evidenced by good agreement obtained between shock tube and wind tunnel results for several airfoil flows.

  4. An improved viscid/inviscid interaction procedure for transonic flow over airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnik, R. E.; Chow, R. R.; Mead, H. R.; Jameson, A.

    1985-01-01

    A new interacting boundary layer approach for computing the viscous transonic flow over airfoils is described. The theory includes a complete treatment of viscous interaction effects induced by the wake and accounts for normal pressure gradient effects across the boundary layer near trailing edges. The method is based on systematic expansions of the full Reynolds equation of turbulent flow in the limit of Reynolds numbers, Reynolds infinity. Procedures are developed for incorporating the local trailing edge solution into the numerical solution of the coupled full potential and integral boundary layer equations. Although the theory is strictly applicable to airfoils with cusped or nearly cusped trailing edges and to turbulent boundary layers that remain fully attached to the airfoil surface, the method was successfully applied to more general airfoils and to flows with small separation zones. Comparisons of theoretical solutions with wind tunnel data indicate the present method can accurately predict the section characteristics of airfoils including the absolute levels of drag.

  5. Drag reduction of a blunt trailing-edge airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Jonathon Paul

    Wind-tunnel experimentation and Reynolds-averaged Navier--Stokes simulations were used to analyze simple, static trailing-edge devices applied to an FB-3500-1750 airfoil, a 35% thick airfoil with a 17.5% chord blunt trailing edge, in order to mitigate base drag. The drag reduction devices investigated include Gurney-type tabs, splitter plates, base cavities, and offset cavities. The Gurney-type tabs consisted of small tabs, attached at the trailing edge and distributed along the span, extending above the upper and lower surfaces of the airfoil. The Gurney-type devices were determined to have little drag reduction capabilities for the FB-3500-1750 airfoil. Splitter plates, mounted to the center of the trailing edge, with lengths between 50% and 150% of the trailing-edge thickness and various plate angles (0° and +/-10° from perpendicular) were investigated and shown to influence the lift and drag characteristics of the baseline airfoil. Drag reductions of up to 50% were achieved with the addition of a splitter plate. The base cavity was created by adding two plates perpendicular to the trailing edge, extending from the upper and lower surfaces of the airfoil. The base cavity demonstrated possible drag reductions of 25%, but caused significant changes to lift, primarily due to the method of device implementation. The offset cavity, created by adding two splitter plates offset from the upper and lower surfaces by 25% of the trailing-edge thickness, was shown to improve on the drag reductions of the splitter plate, while also eliminating unsteady vortex shedding prior to airfoil stall.

  6. DISPLACEMENT BASED SEISMIC DESIGN METHODS.

    SciTech Connect

    HOFMAYER,C.MILLER,C.WANG,Y.COSTELLO,J.

    2003-07-15

    A research effort was undertaken to determine the need for any changes to USNRC's seismic regulatory practice to reflect the move, in the earthquake engineering community, toward using expected displacement rather than force (or stress) as the basis for assessing design adequacy. The research explored the extent to which displacement based seismic design methods, such as given in FEMA 273, could be useful for reviewing nuclear power stations. Two structures common to nuclear power plants were chosen to compare the results of the analysis models used. The first structure is a four-story frame structure with shear walls providing the primary lateral load system, referred herein as the shear wall model. The second structure is the turbine building of the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. The models were analyzed using both displacement based (pushover) analysis and nonlinear dynamic analysis. In addition, for the shear wall model an elastic analysis with ductility factors applied was also performed. The objectives of the work were to compare the results between the analyses, and to develop insights regarding the work that would be needed before the displacement based analysis methodology could be considered applicable to facilities licensed by the NRC. A summary of the research results, which were published in NUREGICR-6719 in July 2001, is presented in this paper.

  7. Acoustic radiation from lifting airfoils in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Hafiz M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Scott, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The far field acoustic radiation from a lifting airfoil in a three-dimensional gust is studied. The acoustic pressure is calculated using the Kirchhoff method, instead of using the classical acoustic analogy approach due to Lighthill. The pressure on the Kirchhoff surface is calculated using an existing numerical solution of the unsteady flow field. The far field acoustic pressure is calculated in terms of these values using Kirchhoff's formula. The method is validated against existing semi-analytical results for a flat plate. The method is then used to study the problem of an airfoil in a harmonic three-dimensional gust, for a wide range of Mach numbers. The effect of variation of the airfoil thickness and angle of attack on the acoustic far field is studied. The changes in the mechanism of sound generation and propagation due to the presence of steady loading and nonuniform mean flow are also studied.

  8. Acoustic radiation from lifting airfoils in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, Hafiz M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Scott, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The far field acoustic radiation from a lifting airfoil in a three-dimensional gust is studied. The acoustic pressure is calculated using the Kirchhoff method, instead of using the classical acoustic analogy approach due to Lighthill. The pressure on the Kirchhoff surface is calculated using an existing numerical solution of the unsteady flow field. The far field acoustic pressure is calculated in terms of these values using Kirchhoff's formula. The method is validated against existing semi-analytical results for a flat plate. The method is then used to study the problem of an airfoil in a harmonic three-dimensional gust, for a wide range of Mach numbers. The effect of variation of the airfoil thickness and angle of attack on the acoustic far field is studied. The changes in the mechanism of sound generation and propagation due to the presence of steady loading and non-uniform mean flow are also studied.

  9. The method of complex characteristics for design of transonic blade sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bledsoe, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of computational methods were developed to obtain shockless or near shockless flow past two-dimensional airfoils. The approach used was the method of complex characteristics, which determines smooth solutions to the transonic flow equations based on an input speed distribution. General results from fluid mechanics are presented. An account of the method of complex characteristics is given including a description of the particular spaces and coordinates, conformal transformations, and numerical procedures that are used. The operation of the computer program COMPRES is presented along with examples of blade sections designed with the code. A user manual is included with a glossary to provide additional information which may be helpful. The computer program in Fortran, including numerous comment cards is listed.

  10. The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil - Drag equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Harris, Charles D.; Harvey, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has designed a swept, supercritical airfoil incorporating Laminar Flow Control for testing at transonic speeds. Analytical expressions have been developed and an evaluation made of the experimental section drag, composed of suction drag and wake drag, using theoretical design information and experimental data. The analysis shows that, although the sweep-induced boundary-layer crossflow influence on the wake drag is too large to be ignored and there is not a practical method for evaluating these crossflow effects on the experimental wake data, the conventional unswept 2-D wake-drag computation used in the reduction of the experimental data is at worst 10 percent too high.

  11. Numerical modeling of aerodynamics of airfoils of micro air vehicles in gusty environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Harish

    The superior flight characteristics exhibited by birds and insects can be taken as a prototype of the most perfect form of flying machine ever created. The design of Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) which tries mimic the flight of birds and insects has generated a great deal of interest as the MAVs can be utilized for a number of commercial and military operations which is usually not easily accessible by manned motion. The size and speed of operation of a MAV results in low Reynolds number flight, way below the flying conditions of a conventional aircraft. The insensitivity to wind shear and gust is one of the required factors to be considered in the design of airfoil for MAVs. The stability of flight under wind shear is successfully accomplished in the flight of birds and insects, through the flapping motion of their wings. Numerous studies which attempt to model the flapping motion of the birds and insects have neglected the effect of wind gust on the stability of the motion. Also sudden change in flight conditions makes it important to have the ability to have an instantaneous change of the lift force without disturbing the stability of the MAV. In the current study, two dimensional rigid airfoil, undergoing flapping motion is studied numerically using a compressible Navier-Stokes solver discretized using high-order finite difference schemes. The high-order schemes in space and in time are needed to keep the numerical solution economic in terms of computer resources and to prevent vortices from smearing. The numerical grid required for the computations are generated using an inverse panel method for the streamfunction and potential function. This grid generating algorithm allows the creation of single-block orthogonal H-grids with ease of clustering anywhere in the domain and the easy resolution of boundary layers. The developed numerical algorithm has been validated successfully against benchmark problems in computational aeroacoustics (CAA), and unsteady viscous

  12. Reduction of airfoil trailing edge noise by trailing edge blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, T.; Erbslöh, S.; Carolus, T.

    2014-06-01

    The paper deals with airfoil trailing edge noise and its reduction by trailing edge blowing. A Somers S834 airfoil section which originally was designed for small wind turbines is investigated. To mimic realistic Reynolds numbers the boundary layer is tripped on pressure and suction side. The chordwise position of the blowing slot is varied. The acoustic sources, i.e. the unsteady flow quantities in the turbulent boundary layer in the vicinity of the trailing edge, are quantified for the airfoil without and with trailing edge blowing by means of a large eddy simulation and complementary measurements. Eventually the far field airfoil noise is measured by a two-microphone filtering and correlation and a 40 microphone array technique. Both, LES-prediction and measurements showed that a suitable blowing jet on the airfoil suction side is able to reduce significantly the turbulence intensity and the induced surface pressure fluctuations in the trailing edge region. As a consequence, trailing edge noise associated with a spectral hump around 500 Hz could be reduced by 3 dB. For that a jet velocity of 50% of the free field velocity was sufficient. The most favourable slot position was at 90% chord length.

  13. The Development of Cambered Airfoil Sections Having Favorable Lift Characteristics at Supercritical Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Donald J

    1948-01-01

    Several groups of new airfoil sections, designated as the NACA 8-series, are derived analytically to have lift characteristics at supercritical Mach numbers which are favorable in the sense that the abrupt loss of lift, characteristic of the usual airfoil section at Mach numbers above the critical, is avoided. Aerodynamic characteristics determined, from two-dimensional windtunnel tests at Mach numbers up to approximately 0.9 are presented for each of the derived airfoils. Comparisons are made between the characteristics of these airfoils and the corresponding characteristics of representative NPiCA 6-series airfoils. The experimental results confirm the design expectations in demonstrating for the NACA S-series airfoils either no variation, or an Increase from the low-speed design value, In the lift coefficient at a constant angle of attack with increasing Mach number above the critical. It was not found possible to improve the variation with Mach number of the slope of the lift curve for these airfoils above that for the NACA 6-series airfoils. The drag characteristics of the new airfoils are somewhat inferior to those of the NACA 6- series with respect to divergence with Mach number, but the pitching-moment characteristics are more favorable for the thinner new sections In demonstrating somewhat smaller variations of moment coefficient with both angle of attack and Mach number. The effect on the aero&ynamic characteristics at high Mach numbers of removing the cusp from the trailing-edge regions of two 10-percent-chord-thick NACA 6-series airfoils is determined to be negligible.

  14. Interaction of an Artificially Thickened Boundary Layer with a Vertically Mounted Pitching Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohman, Tristen; Smits, Alexander; Martinelli, Luigi

    2011-11-01

    Wind energy represents a large portion of the growing market in alternative energy technologies and the current landscape has been dominated by the more prevalent horizontal axis wind turbine. However, there are several advantages to the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) or Darrieus type design and yet there is much to be understood about how the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) affects their performance. In this study the ABL was simulated in a wind tunnel through the use of elliptical shaped vortex generators, a castellated wall, and floor roughness elements as described in the method of Counihan (1967) and then verified its validity by hot wire measurement of the mean velocity profile as well as the turbulence intensity. The motion of an blade element around a vertical axis is approximated through the use of a pitching airfoil. The wake of the airfoil is investigated through hot wire anemometry in both uniform flow and in the simulated boundary layer both at Re = 1 . 37 ×105 based on the chord of the airfoil. Sponsored by Hopewell Wind Power (Hong Kong) Limited.

  15. Passive control of a dynamically pitching wind turbine airfoil under aeroelastic conditions using a Gurney flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Magstadt, Andrew; Strike, John; Hind, Michael; Naughton, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    To reduce the cost of energy, wind turbine design has moved towards larger blades that are heavier and have lower relative structural stiffness compared to shorter blades. To address the lower blade stiffness, different flow control techniques have been considered. The Gurney flap, a small, low-cost and effective control method, is a promising control actuator. Wind tunnel testing has been performed on a DU97-W-300 10% flatback airfoil undergoing dynamic pitching relevant to flow conditions encountered by wind turbine blades. To mimic blade compliance, the airfoil is actively driven through a torsionally elastic element. Time-resolved surface pressure measurements have been acquired from which lift Cl and moment Cm coefficients were calculated. Changes in Cl and Cm in moderate and deep dynamic stall regimes for different Gurney flap heights were studied for different pitch drive conditions (amplitude and frequency). The results show the significant impact of compliance on the angle of attack (α) range experienced by the airfoil. Shifts in α range result in different hysteresis behavior in both Cl and Cm and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Gurney flap in modifying the aerodynamics of wind turbine blades experiencing dynamic pitching. This work supported by DOE and a gift from BP.

  16. Numerical simulations of the flow with the prescribed displacement of the airfoil and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řidký, V.; Šidlof, P.; Vlček, V.

    2013-04-01

    The work is devoted to comparing measured data with the results of numerical simulations. As mathematical model was used mathematical model whitout turbulence for incompressible flow In the experiment was observed the behavior of designed NACA0015 airfoil in airflow. For the numerical solution was used OpenFOAM computational package, this is open-source software based on finite volume method. In the numerical solution is prescribed displacement of the airfoil, which corresponds to the experiment. The velocity at a point close to the airfoil surface is compared with the experimental data obtained from interferographic measurements of the velocity field. Numerical solution is computed on a 3D mesh composed of about 1 million ortogonal hexahedron elements. The time step is limited by the Courant number. Parallel computations are run on supercomputers of the CIV at Technical University in Prague (HAL and FOX) and on a computer cluster of the Faculty of Mechatronics of Liberec (HYDRA). Run time is fixed at five periods, the results from the fifth periods and average value for all periods are then be compared with experiment.

  17. Wind-tunnel test of the S814 thick root airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D.M.; Tangler, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this wind-tunnel test was to verify the predictions of the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code for a very thick airfoil having a high maximum lift coefficient (c{sub 1,max} designed to be largely insensitive to leading edge roughness effects. The 24-percent-thick S814 airfoil was designed with these characteristics to accommodate aerodynamic and structural considerations for the root region of a wind-turbine blade. In addition, the airfoil`s maximum lift-to-drag ratio was designed to occur it a high lift coefficient. To accomplish the objective, a two-dimensional wind-tunnel test of the S814 thick root airfog was conducted in January 1994 in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory. Data were obtained for transition-free and transition-fixed conditions at Reynolds numbers of 0.7, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 3.0 {times} 10{sup 6}. For the design Reynolds numbers of 1.5 {times} l0{sup 6}, the transition-free c{sub 1,max} is 1.3 which satisfies the design specification. However, this value is significantly lower than the predicted c{sub 1,max} of almost l.6. With transition-fixed at the is 1.2. The difference in c{sub 1,max} between the transition-free and transition-fixed conditions demonstrates the airfoil`s minimal sensitivity to roughness effects. The S814 root airfoil was designed to complement existing NREL low c{sub 1,max} tip-region airfoils for rotor blades 10 to 15 meters in length.

  18. Pressure distribution over NACA 23012 airfoil with a slotted and a split flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Thomas A; Lowry, John G

    1941-01-01

    A pressure-distribution investigation has been conducted in the NACA 4 by 6-foot vertical wind tunnel to determine the air loads on an NACA 23012 airfoil in combination with a 25.66-percent-chord slotted flap and a 20-percent-chord split flap. Pressures were measured on both the upper and the lower surfaces of the main airfoil and the flaps for several angles of attack and at several flap settings. The data, presented as pressure diagrams and as graphs of the section coefficients for the flap alone and for the airfoil-flap combinations, are applicable to rib and flap design for a combination of a thick airfoil and a slotted or a split flap. The results of previous tests of a NACA 23012 airfoil with a slotted flap are compared with the present results.

  19. Aerodynamic characteristics of wings designed with a combined-theory method to cruise at a Mach number of 4.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    A wind-tunnel study was conducted to determine the capability of a method combining linear theory and shock-expansion theory to design optimum camber surfaces for wings that will fly at high-supersonic/low-hypersonic speeds. Three force models (a flat-plate reference wing and two cambered and twisted wings) were used to obtain aerodynamic lift, drag, and pitching-moment data. A fourth pressure-orifice model was used to obtain surface-pressure data. All four wing models had the same planform, airfoil section, and centerbody area distribution. The design Mach number was 4.5, but data were also obtained at Mach numbers of 3.5 and 4.0. Results of these tests indicated that the use of airfoil thickness as a theoretical optimum, camber-surface design constraint did not improve the aerodynamic efficiency or performance of a wing as compared with a wing that was designed with a zero-thickness airfoil (linear-theory) constraint.

  20. Ice Accretions on a Swept GLC-305 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Papadakis, Michael; Potapczuk, Mark; Addy, Harold; Sheldon, David; Giriunas, Julius

    2002-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain castings of ice accretions formed on a 28 deg. swept GLC-305 airfoil that is representative of a modern business aircraft wing. Because of the complexity of the casting process, the airfoil was designed with three removable leading edges covering the whole span. Ice accretions were obtained at six icing conditions. After the ice was accreted, the leading edges were detached from the airfoil and moved to a cold room. Molds of the ice accretions were obtained, and from them, urethane castings were fabricated. This experiment is the icing test of a two-part experiment to study the aerodynamic effects of ice accretions.

  1. Aerodynamic performance of an annular classical airfoil cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergsten, D. E.; Stauter, R. C.; Fleeter, S.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented for a series of experiments that were performed in a large-scale subsonic annular cascade facility that was specifically designed to provide three-dimensional aerodynamic data for the verification of numerical-calculation codes. In particular, the detailed three-dimensional aerodynamic performance of a classical flat-plate airfoil cascade is determined for angles of incidence of 0, 5, and 10 deg. The resulting data are analyzed and are correlated with predictions obtained from NASA's MERIDL and TSONIC numerical programs. It is found that: (1) at 0 and 5 deg, the airfoil surface data show a good correlation with the predictions; (2) at 10 deg, the data are in fair agreement with the numerical predictions; and (3) the two-dimensional Gaussian similarity relationship is appropriate for the wake velocity profiles in the mid-span region of the airfoil.

  2. Design of diffractive optical surfaces within the SMS design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes-Lopes, João.; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.

    2015-08-01

    The Simultaneous Multiple Surface (SMS) method was initially developed as a design method in Nonimaging Optics and later, the method was extended for designing Imaging Optics. We present the extension of the SMS method to design diffractive optical surfaces. This method involves the simultaneous calculation of N/2 diffractive surfaces, using the phase-shift properties of diffractive surfaces as an extra degree of freedom, such that N one-parameter wavefronts can be perfectly coupled. Moreover, the SMS method for diffractive surfaces is a direct method, i.e., it is not based in multi-parametric optimization techniques. Representative diffractive systems designed by the SMS method are presented.

  3. Drag Measurements at Transonic Speeds of NACA 65-009 Airfoils Mounted on a Freely Falling Body to Determine the Effects of Sweepback and Aspect Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, Charles W.; Thompson, Jim Rogers

    1947-01-01

    Drag measurements at transonic speeds on rectangular airfoils and on airfoils swept back 450 are reported. These airfoils, which were mounted on cylindrical test bodies, are part of a series being tested in free drops from high altitude to determine the effect of variation of basic airfoil parameters on airfoil drag characteristics at transonic speeds. These rectangular and swept-back airfoils had the same span, airfoil section (NACA 65-009), and chord perpendicular to the leading edge. The tests were made to compare the drag of rectangular and sweptback airfoils at a higher aspect ratio than had been used in a similar comparison reported previously. The results showed that the drag of the swept-back airfoil was less than 0.15 that of the rectangular airfoil at a Mach number of 1.00 and less than 0.30 that of the rectangular airfoil at a Mach number of 1.17. A comparison of these swept-back airfoils with similar airfoils of lower aspect ratio previously tested by the same method indicated that in the investigated speed range reduction in aspect ratio results in increased drag. In the highest part of the investigated speed range, however, the drag coefficient of the high-aspect-ratio swept-back airfoils showed a tendency to approach that of the lower-aspect-ratio swept-back airfoils. A similar comparison for the rectangular airfoils showed that delay in the drag rise and a reduction in drag at supercritical speeds can be realIzed through reduction in aspect ratio. These results confirm those reported in NACA ACR No. L5J16.

  4. A numerical method for relating two- and three-dimensional pressure distributions on transonic wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Van Der Velden, Alexander J. M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary design method for determining a wing's design pressure distribution and geometry based on airfoil normal Mach numbers and airfoil loading. In this method, the perturbation velocities in supercritical regions are computed from airfoil transonic normal Mach numbers and include the influence of local sweep, taper, and three-dimensional induced velocities, so that the appearance and strength of shocks can be expected to resemble those of the airfoil. The velocities in subcritical wing regions are scaled first with simple sweep theory, and then to achieve the desired load distribution. The method was applied to the design of an oblique flying wing, using a linear potential method. The required wing area could be reduced by 14 percent using this method rather than simple sweep theory.

  5. Aerodynamic performance of transonic and subsonic airfoils: Effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang

    The effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape on the aerodynamic performance of turbine airfoils are investigated in compressible, high speed flows. The University of Utah Transonic Wind Tunnel is employed for the experimental part of the study. Two different test sections are designed to produce Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, passage mass flow rates, and physical dimensions, which match values along turbine blades in operating engines: (i) a nonturning test section with a symmetric airfoil, and (ii) a cascade test section with a cambered turbine vane. The nonuniform, irregular, three-dimensional surface roughness is characterized using the equivalent sand grain roughness size. Changing the airfoil surface roughness condition has a substantial effect on wake profiles of total pressure loss coefficients, normalized Mach number, normalized kinetic energy, and on the normalized and dimensional magnitudes of Integrated Aerodynamic Losses produced by the airfoils. Comparisons with results for a symmetric airfoil and a cambered vane show that roughness has more substantial effects on losses produced by the symmetric airfoil than the cambered vane. Data are also provided that illustrate the larger loss magnitudes are generally present with flow turning and cambered airfoils, than with symmetric airfoils. Wake turbulence structure of symmetric airfoils and cambered vanes are also studied experimentally. The effects of surface roughness and freestream turbulence levels on wake distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and power spectral density profiles and vortex shedding frequencies are quantified one axial chord length downstream of the test airfoils. As the level of surface roughness increases, all wake profile quantities broaden significantly and nondimensional vortex shedding frequencies decrease. Wake profiles produced by the symmetric airfoil are more sensitive to variations of surface

  6. Validation of the CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W. Z.; Zhu, W. J.; Fischer, A.; Garcia, N. R.; Cheng, J. T.; Chen, J.; Madsen, J.

    2014-12-01

    The CQU-DTU-LN1 series of airfoils were designed with an objective of high lift and low noise emission. In the design process, the aerodynamic performance is obtained using XFOIL while noise emission is obtained with the BPM model. In this paper we present some validations of the designed CQU-DTU-LN118 airfoil by using wind tunnel measurements in the acoustic wind tunnel located at Virginia Tech and numerical computations with the inhouse Q3uic and EllipSys 2D/3D codes. To show the superiority of the new airfoils, comparisons with a NACA64618 airfoil are made. For the aerodynamic features, the designed Cl and Cl/Cd agrees well with the experiment and are in general higher than those of the NACA airfoil. For the acoustic features, the noise emission of the LN118 airfoil is compared with the acoustic measurements and that of the NACA airfoil. Comparisons show that the BPM model can predict correctly the noise changes.

  7. Airfoil deposition model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology to predict deposit evolution (deposition rate and subsequent flow of liquid deposits) as a function of fuel and air impurity content and relevant aerodynamic parameters for turbine airfoils is developed in this research. The spectrum of deposition conditions encountered in gas turbine operations includes the mechanisms of vapor deposition, small particle deposition with thermophoresis, and larger particle deposition with inertial effects. The focus is on using a simplified version of the comprehensive multicomponent vapor diffusion formalism to make deposition predictions for: (1) simple geometry collectors; and (2) gas turbine blade shapes, including both developing laminar and turbulent boundary layers. For the gas turbine blade the insights developed in previous programs are being combined with heat and mass transfer coefficient calculations using the STAN 5 boundary layer code to predict vapor deposition rates and corresponding liquid layer thicknesses on turbine blades. A computer program is being written which utilizes the local values of the calculated deposition rate and skin friction to calculate the increment in liquid condensate layer growth along a collector surface.

  8. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1995-01-01

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  9. Supercritical flow past a symmetrical bicircular arc airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Maurice; Yew, Khoy Chuah

    1989-01-01

    A numerical scheme is developed for computing steady supercritical flow about symmetrical airfoils, applying it to an ellipse for zero angle of attack. An algorithmic description of this new scheme is presented. Application to a symmetrical bicircular arc airfoil is also proposed. The flow field before the shock is region 1. For transonic flow, singularity can be avoided by integrating the resulting ordinary differential equations away from the body. Region 2 contains the shock which will be located by shock fitting techniques. The shock divides region 2 into supersonic and subsonic regions and there is no singularity problem in this case. The Method of Lines is used in this region and it is advantageous to integrate the resulting ordinary differential equation along the body for shock fitting. Coaxial coordinates have to be used for the bicircular arc airfoil so that boundary values on the airfoil body can be taken with one direction of the coaxial coordinates fixed. To avoid taking boundary values at + or - infinity in the coaxial co-ordinary system, approximate analytical representation of the flow field near the tips of the airfoil is proposed.

  10. Numerical solution of periodic vortical flows about a thin airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, James R.; Atassi, Hafiz M.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical method is developed for computing periodic, three-dimensional, vortical flows around isolated airfoils. The unsteady velocity is split into a vortical component which is a known function of the upstream flow conditions and the Lagrangian coordinates of the mean flow, and an irrotational field whose potential satisfies a nonconstant-coefficient, inhomogeneous, convective wave equation. Solutions for thin airfoils at zero degrees incidence to the mean flow are presented in this paper. Using an elliptic coordinate transformation, the computational domain is transformed into a rectangle. The Sommerfeld radiation condition is applied to the unsteady pressure on the grid line corresponding to the far field boundary. The results are compared with a Possio solver, and it is shown that for maximum accuracy the grid should depend on both the Mach number and reduced frequency. Finally, in order to assess the range of validity of the classical thin airfoil approximation, results for airfoils with zero thickness are compared with results for airfoils with small thickness.

  11. Numerical simulation of the process of airfoil icing in the presence of large supercooled water drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prykhodko, O. A.; Alekseyenko, S. V.

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a software package and related methodology that can be used to simulate the process of airfoil icing during flight in the presence of large supercooled liquid water drops in the oncoming airflow. The motion of a carrier medium is described using the Navier-Stokes equations for a compressible gas. The motion of water drops is described using an inertial model. The process of water deposition and its subsequent freezing on an airfoil surface are described by the method of control volumes based on the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for each element of the surface. The main results of simulations are presented for the icing of an NACA 0012 airfoil profile with "barrier" ice formation in the absence and presence of heating of the leading edge. The influence of the ice-growth thickness and position on the airfoil chord on the pattern of airflow and aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil is analyzed.

  12. Airfoil Section Characteristics as Affected by Variations of the Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Sherman, Albert

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation of a systematically chosen representative group of related airfoils conducted in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel over a wide range of Reynolds number extending well into the flight range. The tests were made to provide information from which the variations of airfoil section characteristics with changes in the Reynolds number could be inferred and methods of allowing for these variations in practice could be determined. This work is one phase of an extensive and general airfoil investigation being conducted in the variable-density tunnel and extends the previously published researches concerning airfoil characteristics as affected by variations in airfoil profile determined at a single value of the Reynolds number.

  13. Dynamic stall modeling and correlation with experimental data on airfoils and rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. G.; Blackwell, R. H.; Commerford, G. L.; Mirick, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    Two methods for modeling dynamic stall have been developed. The alpha, A, B method generates lift and pitching moments as functions of angle of attack and its first two time derivatives. The coefficients are derived from experimental data for oscillating airfoils. The Time Delay Method generates the coefficients from steady state airfoil characteristics and an associated time delay in stall beyond the steady state stall angle. Correlation with three types of test data shows that the alpha, A, B method is somewhat better for use in predicting helicopter rotor response in forward flight. Correlation with lift and moment hysteresis loops generated for oscillating airfoils was good for both models.

  14. SiC/SiC Leading Edge Turbine Airfoil Tested Under Simulated Gas Turbine Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Hatton, Kenneth S.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics have been proposed as component materials for use in gas turbine engine hot-sections. A high pressure burner rig was used to expose both a baseline metal airfoil and ceramic matrix composite leading edge airfoil to typical gas turbine conditions to comparatively evaluate the material response at high temperatures. To eliminate many of the concerns related to an entirely ceramic, rotating airfoil, this study has focused on equipping a stationary metal airfoil with a ceramic leading edge insert to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of such a configuration. Here, the idea was to allow the SiC/SiC composite to be integrated as the airfoil's leading edge, operating in a "free-floating" or unrestrained manner. and provide temperature relief to the metal blade underneath. The test included cycling the airfoils between simulated idle, lift, and cruise flight conditions. In addition, the airfoils were air-cooled, uniquely instrumented, and exposed to the same internal and external conditions, which included gas temperatures in excess of 1370 C (2500 F). Results show the leading edge insert remained structurally intact after 200 simulated flight cycles with only a slightly oxidized surface. The instrumentation clearly suggested a significant reduction (approximately 600 F) in internal metal temperatures as a result of the ceramic leading edge. The object of this testing was to validate the design and analysis done by Materials Research and Design of Rosemont, PA and to determine the feasibility of this design for the intended application.

  15. Review of freeform TIR collimator design methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talpur, Taimoor; Herkommer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Total internal reflection (TIR) collimators are essential illumination components providing high efficiency and uniformity in a compact geometry. Various illumination design methods have been developed for designing such collimators, including tailoring methods, design via optimization, the mapping and feedback method, and the simultaneous multiple surface (SMS) method. This paper provides an overview of the different methods and compares the performance of the methods along with their advantages and their limitations.

  16. Vortex scale of unsteady separation on a pitching airfoil.

    PubMed

    Fuchiwaki, Masaki; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2002-10-01

    The streaklines of unsteady separation on two kinds of pitching airfoils, the NACA65-0910 and a blunt trailing edge airfoil, were studied by dye flow visualization and by the Schlieren method. The latter visualized the discrete vortices shed from the leading edge. The results of these visualization studies allow a comparison between the dynamic behavior of the streakline of unsteady separation and that of the discrete vortices shed from the leading edge. The influence of the airfoil configuration on the flow characteristics was also examined. Furthermore, the scale of a discrete vortex forming the recirculation region was investigated. The non-dimensional pitching rate was k = 0.377, the angle of attack alpha(m) = 16 degrees and the pitching amplitude was fixed to A = +/-6 degrees for Re = 4.0 x 10(3) in this experiment. PMID:12495998

  17. Hook nozzle arrangement for supporting airfoil vanes

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1996-02-20

    A gas turbine engine`s nozzle structure includes a nozzle support ring, a plurality of shroud segments, and a plurality of airfoil vanes. The plurality of shroud segments are distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each airfoil vane is connected to a corresponding shroud segment so that the airfoil vanes are also distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each shroud segment has a hook engaging the nozzle support ring so that the shroud segments and corresponding airfoil vanes are supported by the nozzle support ring. The nozzle support ring, the shroud segments, and the airfoil vanes may be ceramic. 8 figs.

  18. Hook nozzle arrangement for supporting airfoil vanes

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A gas turbine engine's nozzle structure includes a nozzle support ring, a plurality of shroud segments, and a plurality of airfoil vanes. The plurality of shroud segments are distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each airfoil vane is connected to a corresponding shroud segment so that the airfoil vanes are also distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each shroud segment has a hook engaging the nozzle support ring so that the shroud segments and corresponding airfoil vanes are supported by the nozzle support ring. The nozzle support ring, the shroud segments, and the airfoil vanes may be ceramic.

  19. Aspects of Numerical Simulation of Circulation Control Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Anders, S. G.

    2005-01-01

    The mass-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for circulation control airfoils. Numerical solutions are computed with a multigrid method that uses an implicit approximate factorization smoother. The effects of flow conditions (e.g., free-stream Mach number, angle of attack, momentum coefficient) and mesh on the prediction of circulation control airfoil flows are considered. In addition, the impact of turbulence modeling, including curvature effects and modifications to reduce eddy viscosity levels in the wall jet (i.e., Coanda flow), is discussed. Computed pressure distributions are compared with available experimental data.

  20. Interactive-Boundary-Layer Computations For Oscillating Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.; Cebeci, T.; Jang, Hong-Ming

    1993-01-01

    Interactive-boundary-layer method developed for computations of steady flow, extended under assumption of quasi-steady flow, to computations of evolution of two-dimensional flow about oscillating airfoil under light-dynamic-stall conditions. Represents advance toward ability to compute unsteady flows at even greater angles of attack with solutions of equations normally used for description of boundary-layer flows on airfoils prior to stall. Important in practical studies of flow on blades of helicopter rotors, axial compressors, and turbines.

  1. Dynamic Stall Characteristics of Drooped Leading Edge Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Sahin, Mehmet; Gopal, Naveen

    2000-01-01

    Helicopters in high-speed forward flight usually experience large regions of dynamic stall over the retreating side of the rotor disk. The rapid variations in the lift and pitching moments associated with the stall process can result in vibratory loads, and can cause fatigue and failure of pitch links. In some instances, the large time lag between the aerodynamic forces and the blade motion can trigger stall flutter. A number of techniques for the alleviation of dynamic stall have been proposed and studied by researchers. Passive and active control techniques have both been explored. Passive techniques include the use of high solidity rotors that reduce the lift coefficients of individual blades, leading edge slots and leading edge slats. Active control techniques include steady and unsteady blowing, and dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE) airfoils. Considerable amount of experimental and numerical data has been collected on the effectiveness of these concepts. One concept that has not received as much attention is the drooped-leading edge airfoil idea. It has been observed in wind tunnel studies and flight tests that drooped leading edge airfoils can have a milder dynamic stall, with a significantly milder load hysteresis. Drooped leading edge airfoils may not, however, be suitable at other conditions, e.g. in hover, or in transonic flow. Work needs to be done on the analysis and design of drooped leading edge airfoils for efficient operation in a variety of flight regimes (hover, dynamic stall, and transonic flow). One concept that is worthy of investigation is the dynamically drooping airfoil, where the leading edge shape is changed roughly once-per-rev to mitigate the dynamic stall.

  2. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  3. Computational methods for stealth design

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, V.P. )

    1992-08-01

    A review is presented of the utilization of computer models for stealth design toward the ultimate goal of designing and fielding an aircraft that remains undetected at any altitude and any range. Attention is given to the advancements achieved in computational tools and their utilization. Consideration is given to the development of supercomputers for large-scale scientific computing and the development of high-fidelity, 3D, radar-signature-prediction tools for complex shapes with nonmetallic and radar-penetrable materials.

  4. Darrieus wind-turbine airfoil configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliore, P. G.; Fritschen, J. R.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose was to determine what aerodynamic performance improvement, if any, could be achieved by judiciously choosing the airfoil sections for Darrieus wind turbine blades. Ten different airfoils, having thickness to chord ratios of twelve, fifteen and eighteen percent, were investigated. Performance calculations indicated that the NACA 6-series airfoils yield peak power coefficients at least as great as the NACA. Furthermore, the power coefficient-tip speed ratio curves were broader and flatter for the 6-series airfoils. Sample calculations for an NACA 63 sub 2-015 airfoil showed an annual energy output increase of 17 to 27% depending upon rotor solidity, compared to an NACA 0015 airfoil. An attempt was made to account for the flow curvature effects associated with Darrieus turbines by transforming the NACA 63 sub 2-015 airfoil to an appropriate shape.

  5. Theoretical and Experimental Data for a Number of NACA 6A-Series Airfoil Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, Laurence K., Jr.

    1946-01-01

    The NACA 6A-series airfoil sections were designed to eliminate the trailing-edge cusp which is characteristic of the NACA 6-series sections. Theoretical data are presented for NACA 6A-series basic thickness forms having the position of minimum pressure at 30-, 40-, and 50-percent chord and with thickness ratios varying from 6 percent to 15 percent. Also presented are data for a mean line designed to maintain straight sides on the cambered sections. The experimental results of a two dimensional wind tunnel investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of five NACA 64A-series airfoil sections and two NACA 63A-series airfoil sections are presented. An analysis of these results, which were obtained at Reynolds numbers of 3 x 10(exp 6), 6 x 10(exp 6), and 9 x 10(exp 6), indicates that the section minimum drag and maximum lift characteristics of comparable NACA 6-series and 6A-series airfoil sections are essentially the same. The quarter-chord pitching-moment coefficients and angles of zero lift of NACA 6A-series airfoil sections are slightly more negative than those of corresponding NACA 6-series airfoil sections. The position of the aerodynamic center and the lift-curve slope of smooth NACA 6-series sections. The addition of standard leading-edge roughness causes the lift-curve slope of the newer sections to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness ratio.

  6. A two element laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  7. Study on the rotor design method for a small propeller-type wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Yusuke; Inagaki, Terumi

    2016-08-01

    Small propeller-type wind turbines have a low Reynolds number, limiting the number of usable airfoil materials. Thus, their design method is not sufficiently established, and their performance is often low. The ultimate goal of this research is to establish high-performance design guidelines and design methods for small propeller-type wind turbines. To that end, we designed two rotors: Rotor A, based on the rotor optimum design method from the blade element momentum theory, and Rotor B, in which the chord length of the tip is extended and the chord length distribution is linearized. We examined performance characteristics and flow fields of the two rotors through wind tunnel experiments and numerical analysis. Our results revealed that the maximum output tip speed ratio of Rotor B shifted lower than that of Rotor A, but the maximum output coefficient increased by approximately 38.7%. Rotors A and B experienced a large-scale separation on the hub side, which extended to the mean in Rotor A. This difference in separation had an impact on the significant decrease in Rotor A's output compared to the design value and the increase in Rotor B's output compared to Rotor A.

  8. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  9. Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Cotton, Barbara J.; Choo, Yung K.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Pennline, James A.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Schilling, Herbert W.; Slater, John W.; Burke, Kevin M.; Nolan, Gerald J.; Brown, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    SmaggIce version 1.2 is a computer program for preparing and analyzing iced airfoils. It includes interactive tools for (1) measuring ice-shape characteristics, (2) controlled smoothing of ice shapes, (3) curve discretization, (4) generation of artificial ice shapes, and (5) detection and correction of input errors. Measurements of ice shapes are essential for establishing relationships between characteristics of ice and effects of ice on airfoil performance. The shape-smoothing tool helps prepare ice shapes for use with already available grid-generation and computational-fluid-dynamics software for studying the aerodynamic effects of smoothed ice on airfoils. The artificial ice-shape generation tool supports parametric studies since ice-shape parameters can easily be controlled with the artificial ice. In such studies, artificial shapes generated by this program can supplement simulated ice obtained from icing research tunnels and real ice obtained from flight test under icing weather condition. SmaggIce also automatically detects geometry errors such as tangles or duplicate points in the boundary which may be introduced by digitization and provides tools to correct these. By use of interactive tools included in SmaggIce version 1.2, one can easily characterize ice shapes and prepare iced airfoils for grid generation and flow simulations.

  10. Pneumatic Spoiler Controls Airfoil Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D.; Krauss, T.

    1991-01-01

    Air ejection from leading edge of airfoil used for controlled decrease of lift. Pneumatic-spoiler principle developed for equalizing lift on helicopter rotor blades. Also used to enhance aerodynamic control of short-fuselage or rudderless aircraft such as "flying-wing" airplanes. Leading-edge injection increases maneuverability of such high-performance fixed-wing aircraft as fighters.

  11. The potential influence of rain on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The potential influence of heavy rain on airfoil performance is discussed. Experimental methods for evaluating rain effects are reviewed. Important scaling considerations for extrapolating model data are presented. It is shown that considerable additional effort, both analytical and experimental, is necessary to understand the degree of hazard associated with flight operations in rain.

  12. Computation of unsteady flows over airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekaterinaris, J. A.; Platzer, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    Two methods are described for calculating unsteady flows over rapidly pitching airfoils. The first method is based on an interactive scheme in which the inviscid flow is obtained by a panel method. The boundary layer flow is computed by an interactive method that makes use of the Hilbert integral to couple the solutions of the inviscid and viscous flow equations. The second method is based on the solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution of these equations is obtained with an approximately factorized numerical algorithm, and with single block or multiple grids which enable grid embedding to enhance the resolution at isolated flow regions. In addition, the attached flow region can be computed by the numerical solution of compressible boundary layer equations. Unsteady pressure distributions obtained with both methods are compared with available experimental data.

  13. Computational Methods in Nanostructure Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellesia, Giovanni; Lampoudi, Sotiria; Shea, Joan-Emma

    Self-assembling peptides can serve as building blocks for novel biomaterials. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations are a powerful means to probe the conformational space of these peptides. We discuss the theoretical foundations of this enhanced sampling method and its use in biomolecular simulations. We then apply this method to determine the monomeric conformations of the Alzheimer amyloid-β(12-28) peptide that can serve as initiation sites for aggregation.

  14. High Reynolds Number Configuration Development of a High-Lift Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valarezo, Walter O.; Dominik, Chet J.; Mcghee, Robert J.; Goodman, Wesley L.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to assess performance of a transport multielement airfoil at flight Reynolds numbers. The studies were performed at chord Reynolds numbers as high as 16 million in the NASA Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. Sidewall boundary-layer control to enforce flow two dimensionality was provided via an endplate suction system. The basic airfoil was an 11.55 percent thick supercritical airfoil representative of the stall critical station of a new-generation transport aircraft wing. The multielement airfoil was configured as a three-element airfoil with slat and flap chord ratios of 14.48 percent and 30 percent respectively. Testing focused on the development of landing configurations with high maximum lift capability and the assessment of Reynolds and Mach number effects. Also assessed were high-lift performance effects due to devices such as drooped spoilers and trailing-edge wedges. The present experimental studies revealed significant effects on high-lift airfoil performance due to Reynolds and Mach number variations and favorable lift increments at approach angles of attack due to the use of drooped spoilers or trailing-edge wedges. However, no substantial improvements in maximum lift capability were identified. A recently developed high performance single-segment flap was also tested and results indicated considerable improvements in lift and drag performance over existing airfoils. Additionally, it was found that this new flap shape at its optimum rigging was less sensitive to Reynolds number variations than previous designs.

  15. On the effect of leading edge blowing on circulation control airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    In the present context the term circulation control is used to denote a method of lift generation that utilizes tangential jet blowing over the upper surface of a rounded trailing edge airfoil to determine the location of the boundary layer separation points, thus setting an effective Kutta condition. At present little information exists on the flow structure generated by circulation control airfoils under leading edge blowing. Consequently, no theoretical methods exist to predict airfoil performance under such conditions. An experimental study of the flow field generated by a two dimensional circulation control airfoil under steady leading and trailing edge blowing was undertaken. The objective was to fundamentally understand the overall flow structure generated and its relation to airfoil performance. Flow visualization was performed to define the overall flow field structure. Measurements of the airfoil forces were also made to provide a correlation of the observed flow field structure to airfoil performance. Preliminary results are presented, specifically on the effect on the flow field structure of leading edge blowing, alone and in conjunction with trailing edge blowing.

  16. Design for validation, based on formal methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.

    1990-01-01

    Validation of ultra-reliable systems decomposes into two subproblems: (1) quantification of probability of system failure due to physical failure; (2) establishing that Design Errors are not present. Methods of design, testing, and analysis of ultra-reliable software are discussed. It is concluded that a design-for-validation based on formal methods is needed for the digital flight control systems problem, and also that formal methods will play a major role in the development of future high reliability digital systems.

  17. The Ultimate Flow Controlled Wind Turbine Blade Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Avraham; Dolgopyat, Danny; Friedland, Ori; Shig, Lior

    2015-11-01

    Active flow control is being studied as an enabling technology to enhance and maintain high efficiency of wind turbine blades also with contaminated surface and unsteady winds as well as at off-design operating conditions. The study is focused on a 25% thick airfoil (DU91-W2-250) suitable for the mid blade radius location. Initially a clean airfoil was fabricated and tested, as well as compared to XFoil predictions. From these experiments, the evolution of the separation location was identified. Five locations for installing active flow control actuators are available on this airfoil. It uses both Piezo fluidic (``Synthetic jets'') and the Suction and Oscillatory Blowing (SaOB) actuators. Then we evaluate both actuation concepts overall energy efficiency and efficacy in controlling boundary layer separation. Since efficient actuation is to be found at low amplitudes when placed close to separation location, distributed actuation is used. Following the completion of the baseline studies the study has focused on the airfoil instrumentation and extensive wind tunnel testing over a Reynolds number range of 0.2 to 1.5 Million. Sample results will be presented and outline for continued study will be discussed.

  18. Notes on the theoretical characteristics of two-dimensional supersonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivey, H Reese

    1947-01-01

    The shock expansion method of the NACA TN No. 1143 was used to determine the principal aerodynamic characteristics of two-dimensional supersonic airfoils. A discussion is given of the effect of thickness ratio, free-stream Mach number, angle of attack, camber, thickness distribution, and aileron deflection. The calculations indicated that the minimum drag of supersonic airfoils is obtained when the maximum thickness is behind the 0.50 chord. The center of pressure obtained for a symmetrical supersonic airfoil was found to be ahead of the 0.50 chord.

  19. Trends of Reynolds number effects on two-dimensional airfoil characteristics for helicopter rotor analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, G. K.; Johnson, W.

    1983-01-01

    The primary effects of Reynolds number on two dimensional airfoil characteristics are discussed. Results from an extensive literature search reveal the manner in which the minimum drag and maximum lift are affected by the Reynolds number. C sub d sub min and C sub l sub max are plotted versus Reynolds number for airfoils of various thickness and camber. From the trends observed in the airfoil data, universal scaling laws and easily implemented methods are developed to account for Reynolds number effects in helicopter rotor analyses.

  20. Thin airfoil theory based on approximate solution of the transonic flow equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, John R; Alksne, Alberta Y

    1957-01-01

    A method is presented for the approximate solution of the nonlinear equations transonic flow theory. Solutions are found for two-dimensional flows at a Mach number of 1 and for purely subsonic and purely supersonic flows. Results are obtained in closed analytic form for a large and significant class of nonlifting airfoils. At a Mach number of 1 general expressions are given for the pressure distribution on an airfoil of specified geometry and for the shape of an airfoil having a prescribed pressure distribution. Extensive comparisons are made with available data, particularly for a Mach number of 1, and with existing solutions.

  1. Thin airfoil theory based on approximate solution of the transonic flow equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, John R; Alksne, Alberta Y

    1958-01-01

    A method is presented for the approximate solution of the nonlinear equations of transonic flow theory. Solutions are found for two-dimensional flows at a Mach number of 1 and for purely subsonic and purely supersonic flows. Results are obtained in closed analytic form for a large and significant class of nonlifting airfoils. At a Mach number of 1 general expressions are given for the pressure distribution on an airfoil of specified geometry and for the shape of an airfoil having a prescribed pressure distribution. Extensive comparisons are made with available data, particularly for a Mach number of 1, and with existing solutions.

  2. A transonic-small-disturbance wing design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Pamela S.; Waggoner, Edgar G.; Campbell, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An automated transonic design code has been developed which modifies an initial airfoil or wing in order to generate a specified pressure distribution. The design method uses an iterative approach that alternates between a potential-flow analysis and a design algorithm that relates changes in surface pressure to changes in geometry. The analysis code solves an extended small-disturbance potential-flow equation and can model a fuselage, pylons, nacelles, and a winglet in addition to the wing. A two-dimensional option is available for airfoil analysis and design. Several two- and three-dimensional test cases illustrate the capabilities of the design code.

  3. Numerical analysis of bio-inspired corrugated airfoil at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha Protim; Rahman, Md. Masudur; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the aerodynamic performance of a bio-inspired corrugated airfoil at the chord Reynolds number of Rec=80,000 to explore the potential advantages of such airfoils at low Reynolds numbers. This study represents the transient nature of corrugated airfoils at low Reynolds number where flow is assumed to be laminar, unsteady, incompressible and two dimensional. The simulations include a sharp interface Cartesian grid based meshing employed with laminar viscous model. The flow field surrounding the corrugated airfoil has been analyzed using structured grid Finite Volume Method (FVM) based on Navier-Stokes equation. All parameters used in flow simulation are expressed in non-dimensional quantities for better understanding of flow behavior, regardless of dimensions or the fluid that is used. The simulated results revealed that the corrugated airfoil provides high lift with moderate drag and prevents large scale flow separation at higher angles of attack. This happens due to the negative shear drag produced by the recirculation zones which occurs in the valleys of the corrugated airfoils. The existence of small circulation bubbles sitting in the valleys prevents large scale flow separation thus increasing the aerodynamic performance of the corrugated airfoil.

  4. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  5. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-05-23

    A thick airfoil is described for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%--26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4--1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects. 3 Figs.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Chaotic Flow around Two-Dimensional Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonigan, Patrick; Wang, Qiqi; Nielsen, Eric; Diskin, Boris

    2015-11-01

    Computational methods for sensitivity analysis are invaluable tools for fluid dynamics research and engineering design. These methods are used in many applications, including aerodynamic shape optimization and adaptive grid refinement. However, traditional sensitivity analysis methods, including the adjoint method, break down when applied to long-time averaged quantities in chaotic fluid flow fields, such as high-fidelity turbulence simulations. This break down is due to the ``Butterfly Effect'' the high sensitivity of chaotic dynamical systems to the initial condition. A new sensitivity analysis method developed by the authors, Least Squares Shadowing (LSS), can compute useful and accurate gradients for quantities of interest in chaotic dynamical systems. LSS computes gradients using the ``shadow trajectory'', a phase space trajectory (or solution) for which perturbations to the flow field do not grow exponentially in time. To efficiently compute many gradients for one objective function, we use an adjoint version of LSS. This talk will briefly outline Least Squares Shadowing and demonstrate it on chaotic flow around a Two-Dimensional airfoil.

  7. Unsteady aerodynamics of conventional and supercritical airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. S.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1980-01-01

    The unsteady aerodynamics of a conventional and a supercritical airfoil are compared by examining measured chordwise unsteady pressure time-histories from four selected flow conditions. Although an oscillating supercritical airfoil excites more harmonics, the strength of the airfoil's shock wave is the more important parameter governing the complexity of the unsteady flow. Whether they are conventional or supercritical, airfoils that support weak shock waves induce unsteady loads that are qualitatively predictable with classical theories; flows with strong shock waves are sensitive to details of the shock-wave and boundary-layer interaction and cannot be adequately predicted.

  8. High Lift, Low Pitching Moment Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonan, Kevin W. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Two families of airfoil sections which can be used for helicopter/rotorcraft rotor blades or aircraft propellers of a particular shape are prepared. An airfoil of either family is one which could be produced by the combination of a camber line and a thickness distribution or a thickness distribution which is scaled from these. An airfoil of either family has a unique and improved aerodynamic performance. The airfoils of either family are intended for use as inboard sections of a helicopter rotor blade or an aircraft propeller.

  9. Wavy flow cooling concept for turbine airfoils

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2010-08-31

    An airfoil including an outer wall and a cooling cavity formed therein. The cooling cavity includes a leading edge flow channel located adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil and a trailing edge flow channel located adjacent a trailing edge of the airfoil. Each of the leading edge and trailing edge flow channels define respective first and second flow axes located between pressure and suction sides of the airfoil. A plurality of rib members are located within each of the flow channels, spaced along the flow axes, and alternately extending from opposing sides of the flow channels to define undulating flow paths through the flow channels.

  10. Parametric Investigation of a High-Lift Airfoil at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John C.; Dominik, Chet J.

    1997-01-01

    A new two-dimensional, three-element, advanced high-lift research airfoil has been tested in the NASA Langley Research Center s Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at a chord Reynolds number up to 1.6 x 107. The components of this high-lift airfoil have been designed using a incompressible computational code (INS2D). The design was to provide high maximum-lift values while maintaining attached flow on the single-segment flap at landing conditions. The performance of the new NASA research airfoil is compared to a similar reference high-lift airfoil. On the new high-lift airfoil the effects of Reynolds number on slat and flap rigging have been studied experimentally, as well as the Mach number effects. The performance trend of the high-lift design is comparable to that predicted by INS2D over much of the angle-of-attack range. However, the code did not accurately predict the airfoil performance or the configuration-based trends near maximum lift where the compressibility effect could play a major role.

  11. HTGR analytical methods and design verification

    SciTech Connect

    Neylan, A.J.; Northup, T.E.

    1982-05-01

    Analytical methods for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) include development, update, verification, documentation, and maintenance of all computer codes for HTGR design and analysis. This paper presents selected nuclear, structural mechanics, seismic, and systems analytical methods related to the HTGR core. This paper also reviews design verification tests in the reactor core, reactor internals, steam generator, and thermal barrier.

  12. The influence of laminar separation and transition on low Reynolds number airfoil hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study of the Lissaman 7769 and Miley MO6-13-128 airfoils at low chord Reynolds numbers is presented. Although both airfoils perform well near their design Reynolds number of about 600,000, they each produce a different type of hysteresis loop in the lift and drag forces when operated below chord Reynolds numbers of 300,000. The type of hysteresis loop was found to depend upon the relative location of laminar separation and transition. The influence of disturbance environment and experimental procedure on the low Reynolds number airfoil boundary layer behavior is also presented. The use of potential flow solutions to help predict how a given airfoil will behave at low Reynolds numbers is also discussed.

  13. Increasing prototype airfoil fabrication efficiency through the use of sectional molds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karges, Adam T.

    Airfoil development has always been important in the aeronautics industry. Current airfoil development techniques are being applied to design larger and more efficient wind turbine blades. To verify simulation results, a prototype blade must be built and tested. Current wing or blade structures are fabricated using traditional molding techniques. These large molds, particularly those used for wind turbine blades, can be fabricated from composite materials formed over a master shape. This process can be time and material intensive. This project develops techniques and methodology to build cavity molds using sectional pieces directly fabricated by computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling. A mold cavity was machined into tooling foam using CNC milling. This process allowed for mold creation without fabricating a master airfoil. Employment of several mold sections makes the machining process much easier and allows machine shops to produce larger, previously unfeasible, airfoil molds using limited machining length.

  14. Numerical simulation on the dynamical stall process of airfoils in transonic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, G.L.; Yang, Y.N.; Ye, Z.Y.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, a method is presented to simulate the dynamic stall process of airfoils in transonic flow. The flowfield around the oscillating airfoil is analyzed by solving the two-dimensional time averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. An implicit Lower-Upper-factorized algorithm is constructed in a body-fitted coordinate system. In the algorithm, an improved NND (Non-oscillatory, Non-free--parameter, Dissipative) scheme which is a kind of the TVD (Total Variation Diminishing) schemes is adopted. The computation grid is generated by an algebraic method. To save computation time, the grid is rigidly attached to the airfoil. The dynamic stall process is well simulated on NACA 0012 airfoil oscillating in pitch at a high incidence angle in a transonic flow. The pressure distributions and pressure contours at different moment are given to show the movement of shock wave and the change of pressure distributions.

  15. Nonlinear power flow feedback control for improved stability and performance of airfoil sections

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2013-09-03

    A computer-implemented method of determining the pitch stability of an airfoil system, comprising using a computer to numerically integrate a differential equation of motion that includes terms describing PID controller action. In one model, the differential equation characterizes the time-dependent response of the airfoil's pitch angle, .alpha.. The computer model calculates limit-cycles of the model, which represent the stability boundaries of the airfoil system. Once the stability boundary is known, feedback control can be implemented, by using, for example, a PID controller to control a feedback actuator. The method allows the PID controller gain constants, K.sub.I, K.sub.p, and K.sub.d, to be optimized. This permits operation closer to the stability boundaries, while preventing the physical apparatus from unintentionally crossing the stability boundaries. Operating closer to the stability boundaries permits greater power efficiencies to be extracted from the airfoil system.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Subscale Wind Turbine Rotor Inboard Airfoils at Low Reynolds Number

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, Myra L.; Maniaci, David Charles; Resor, Brian R.

    2015-04-01

    New blade designs are planned to support future research campaigns at the SWiFT facility in Lubbock, Texas. The sub-scale blades will reproduce specific aerodynamic characteristics of utility-scale rotors. Reynolds numbers for megawatt-, utility-scale rotors are generally above 2-8 million. The thickness of inboard airfoils for these large rotors are typically as high as 35-40%. The thickness and the proximity to three-dimensional flow of these airfoils present design and analysis challenges, even at the full scale. However, more than a decade of experience with the airfoils in numerical simulation, in the wind tunnel, and in the field has generated confidence in their performance. Reynolds number regimes for the sub-scale rotor are significantly lower for the inboard blade, ranging from 0.7 to 1 million. Performance of the thick airfoils in this regime is uncertain because of the lack of wind tunnel data and the inherent challenge associated with numerical simulations. This report documents efforts to determine the most capable analysis tools to support these simulations in an effort to improve understanding of the aerodynamic properties of thick airfoils in this Reynolds number regime. Numerical results from various codes of four airfoils are verified against previously published wind tunnel results where data at those Reynolds numbers are available. Results are then computed for other Reynolds numbers of interest.

  17. Impeller blade design method for centrifugal compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, W.; Kirschner, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The design of a centrifugal impeller with blades that are aerodynamically efficient, easy to manufacture, and mechanically sound is discussed. The blade design method described here satisfies the first two criteria and with a judicious choice of certain variables will also satisfy stress considerations. The blade shape is generated by specifying surface velocity distributions and consists of straight-line elements that connect points at hub and shroud. The method may be used to design radially elemented and backward-swept blades. The background, a brief account of the theory, and a sample design are described.

  18. Horizontal axis wind turbine post stall airfoil characteristics synthesization

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L. . Wind Energy Research Center); Ostowari, C. )

    1991-06-01

    Blade-element/momentum performance prediction codes are routinely used for wind turbine design and analysis. A weakness of these codes is their inability to consistently predict peak power upon which the machine structural design and cost are strongly dependent. The purpose of this study was to compare post-stall airfoil characteristics synthesization theory to a systematically acquired wind tunnel data set in which the effects of aspect ratio, airfoil thickness, and Reynolds number were investigated. The results of this comparison identified discrepancies between current theory and the wind tunnel data which could not be resolved. Other factors not previously investigated may account for these discrepancies and have a significant effect on peak power prediction. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  19. PROFILE: Airfoil Geometry Manipulation and Display. User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Leslie; Saunders, David

    1997-01-01

    This report provides user information for program PROFILE, an aerodynamics design utility for plotting, tabulating, and manipulating airfoil profiles. A dozen main functions are available. The theory and implementation details for two of the more complex options are also presented. These are the REFINE option, for smoothing curvature in selected regions while retaining or seeking some specified thickness ratio, and the OPTIMIZE option, which seeks a specified curvature distribution. Use of programs QPLOT and BPLOT is also described, since all of the plots provided by PROFILE (airfoil coordinates, curvature distributions, pressure distributions)) are achieved via the general-purpose QPLOT utility. BPLOT illustrates (again, via QPLOT) the shape functions used by two of PROFILE's options. These three utilities should be distributed as one package. They were designed and implemented for the Applied Aerodynamics Branch at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. They are all written in FORTRAN 77 and run on DEC and SGI systems under OpenVMS and IRIX.

  20. Horizontal axis wind turbine post stall airfoil characteristics synthesization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tangler, James L.; Ostowari, Cyrus

    1995-01-01

    Blade-element/momentum performance prediction codes are routinely used for wind turbine design and analysis. A weakness of these codes is their inability to consistently predict peak power upon which the machine structural design and cost are strongly dependent. The purpose of this study was to compare post-stall airfoil characteristics synthesization theory to a systematically acquired wind tunnel data set in which the effects of aspect ratio, airfoil thickness, and Reynolds number were investigated. The results of this comparison identified discrepancies between current theory and the wind tunnel data which could not be resolved. Other factors not previously investigated may account for these discrepancies and have a significant effect on peak power prediction.

  1. Single-stage experimental evaluation of tandem-airfoil rotor and stator blading for compressors. Part 5: Analysis and design of stages D and E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brent, J. A.; Cheatham, J. G.; Clemmons, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    A conventional and a tandem bladed stage were designed for a comparative experimental evaluation in a 0.8 hub/tip ratio single-stage compressor. Based on a preliminary design study, a radially constant work input distribution was selected for the rotor designs. Velocity diagrams and blade leading and trailing edge angles selected for the conventional rotor and stator were used in the design of the tandem blading. The effects of axial velocity ratio and secondary flow on turning were included in the selection of blade leading and trailing edge angles. Design values of rotor tip velocity and stage pressure ratio were 757 ft/sec and 1.26, respectively.

  2. Numerical Solution of Inviscid Compressible Steady Flows around the RAE 2822 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryštůfek, P.; Kozel, K.

    2015-05-01

    The article presents results of a numerical solution of subsonic, transonic and supersonic flows described by the system of Euler equations in 2D compressible flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. Authors used FVM multistage Runge-Kutta method to numerically solve the flows around the RAE 2822 airfoil. The results are compared with the solution using the software Ansys Fluent 15.0.7.

  3. Input description for Jameson's three-dimensional transonic airfoil analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Davis, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The input parameters are presented for a computer program which performs calculations for inviscid isentropic transonic flow over three dimensional airfoils with straight leading edges. The free stream Mach number is restricted only by the isentropic assumption. Weak shock waves are automatically located where they occur in the flow. The finite difference form of the full equation for the velocity potential is solved by the method of relaxation, after the flow exterior to the airfoil is mapped to the upper half plane.

  4. Model reduction methods for control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunipace, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    Several different model reduction methods are developed and detailed implementation information is provided for those methods. Command files to implement the model reduction methods in a proprietary control law analysis and design package are presented. A comparison and discussion of the various reduction techniques is included.

  5. Leading-Edge "Pop-Up" Spoiler For Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.; Lance, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    New concept places spoiler in leading edge of airfoil, hinged along its trailing edge, so airflow helps to deploy it and force it against mechanical stop. Deployed "pop-up" spoiler quickly eliminates almost all aerodynamic lift of stabilator. Designed to be added to leading edge of existing stabilator, without major rework. Though initial application to be on helicopter stabilators, equally applicable to wings or winglike components.

  6. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  7. Darrieus wind-turbine airfoil configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Migliore, P.G.; Fritschen, J.R.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what aerodynamic performance improvement, if any, could be achieved by judiciously choosing the airfoil sections for Darrieus wind turbine blades. Analysis was limited to machines using two blades of infinite aspect ratio, having rotor solidites from seven to twenty-one percent, and operating at maximum Reynolds numbers of approximately three million. Ten different airfoils, having thickness to chord ratios of twelve, fifteen and eighteen percent, were investigated. Performance calculations indicated that the NACA 6-series airfoils yield peak power coefficients at least as great as the NACA four-digit airfoils which have historically been chosen for Darrieus turbines. Furthermore, the power coefficient-tip speed ratio curves were broader and flatter for the 6-series airfoils. Sample calculations for an NACA 63/sub 2/-015 airfoil showed an annual energy output increase of 17 to 27% depending upon rotor solidity, compared to an NACA 0015 airfoil. An attempt was made to account for the flow curvature effects associated with Darrieus turbines by transforming the NACA 63/sub 2/-015 airfoil to an appropriate shape.

  8. Airfoil Dynamic Stall and Rotorcraft Maneuverability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    2000-01-01

    The loading of an airfoil during dynamic stall is examined in terms of the augmented lift and the associated penalties in pitching moment and drag. It is shown that once stall occurs and a leading-edge vortex is shed from the airfoil there is a unique relationship between the augmented lift, the negative pitching moment, and the increase in drag. This relationship, referred to here as the dynamic stall function, shows limited sensitivity to effects such as the airfoil section profile and Mach number, and appears to be independent of such parameters as Reynolds number, reduced frequency, and blade sweep. For single-element airfoils there is little that can be done to improve rotorcraft maneuverability except to provide good static C(l(max)) characteristics and the chord or blade number that is required to provide the necessary rotor thrust. However, multi-element airfoils or airfoils with variable geometry features can provide augmented lift in some cases that exceeds that available from a single-element airfoil. The dynamic stall function is shown to be a useful tool for the evaluation of both measured and calculated dynamic stall characteristics of single element, multi-element, and variable geometry airfoils.

  9. Measuring Lift with the Wright Airfoils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.; Soleymanloo, Arianne

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory or demonstration exercise, we mount a small airfoil with its long axis vertical at one end of a nearly frictionless rotating platform. Air from a leaf blower produces a sidewise lift force L on the airfoil and a drag force D in the direction of the air flow (Fig. 1). The rotating platform is kept in equilibrium by adding weights…

  10. Airfoil shape for flight at subsonic speeds

    DOEpatents

    Whitcomb, Richard T.

    1976-01-01

    An airfoil having an upper surface shaped to control flow accelerations and pressure distribution over the upper surface and to prevent separation of the boundary layer due to shock wave formulation at high subsonic speeds well above the critical Mach number. A highly cambered trailing edge section improves overall airfoil lifting efficiency.

  11. Effects of environmentally imposed roughness on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1987-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the effects of rain, insects, and ice on airfoil performance are examined. The extent to which the available information can be incorporated in a calculation method in terms of change of shape and surface roughness is discussed. The methods described are based on the interactive boundary procedure of Cebeci or on the thin layer Navier Stokes procedure developed at NASA. Cases presented show that extensive flow separation occurs on the rough surfaces.

  12. Effects of enviromentally imposed roughness on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1987-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the effects of rain, insects, and ice on airfoil performance are examined. The extent to which the available information can be incorporated in a calculation method in terms of change of shape and surface roughness is discussed. The methods described are based on the interactive boundary layer procedure of Cebeci or on the thin layer Navier Stokes procedure developed at NASA. Cases presented show that extensive flow separation occurs on the rough surfaces.

  13. Computation of subsonic flow around airfoil systems with multiple separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, K.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical method for computing the subsonic flow around multi-element airfoil systems was developed, allowing for flow separation at one or more elements. Besides multiple rear separation also sort bubbles on the upper surface and cove bubbles can approximately be taken into account. Also, compressibility effects for pure subsonic flow are approximately accounted for. After presentation the method is applied to several examples and improved in some details. Finally, the present limitations and desirable extensions are discussed.

  14. Progress in development of a Navier-Stokes solver for evaluation of iced airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, M. G.; Gerhart, P. M.

    1985-01-01

    A method is being developed for evaluation of the flow field behavior about an airfoil with significant ice accretion on the leading edge. The computer code, being evaluated for this purpose, solves the Navier-Stokes equations in a body-fitted curvilinear coordinate system. This requires the use of a grid generation code to transform the x-y coordinates of the physical space into xi-eta coordinates of the computational space. Evaluation of the suitability of these two codes for predicting iced airfoil performance is presently being carried out in anticipation of use in an overall icing analysis effort. Results of this evaluation to date indicate good correlation with known information on clean airfoils. Preliminary results for rime and glaze, iced airfoil shapes are also presented.

  15. Grid generation by elliptic partial differential equations for a tri-element Augmentor-Wing airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Two efforts to numerically simulate the flow about the Augmentor-Wing airfoil in the cruise configuration using the GRAPE elliptic partial differential equation grid generator algorithm are discussed. The Augmentor-Wing consists of a main airfoil with a slotted trailing edge for blowing and two smaller airfoils shrouding the blowing jet. The airfoil and the algorithm are described, and the application of GRAPE to an unsteady viscous flow simulation and a transonic full-potential approach is considered. The procedure involves dividing a complicated flow region into an arbitrary number of zones and ensuring continuity of grid lines, their slopes, and their point distributions across the zonal boundaries. The method for distributing the body-surface grid points is discussed.

  16. Interacting boundary-layer solutions for laminar separated flow past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, O. R.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the interacting laminar boundary layer equations are presented for two symmetric airfoils at zero incidence: the NACA 0012 and the NACA 66 sub 3-108 airfoils. The potential flow was computed using Carlson's code, and viscous interaction was treated following a Hilbert integral scheme due to Veldman. Effects of various grid parameters are studied, and pressure and skin friction distributions are compared at several Reynolds numbers. For the NACA 0012 airfoil, Reynolds number is varied from a value just below separation (R sub N = 3000) to a value for which extensive separation occurs (R sub N = 100,000). For the 66 sub 3-018 airfoil, results are given at intermediate values (R sub N - 10,000 and 40,000). The method fails to converge for greater values of Reynolds number, corresponding to the development of very thin well separated shear layers where transition to turbulence would occur naturally.

  17. SmaggIce 2.0: Additional Capabilities for Interactive Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreeger, Richard E.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Schilling, Herbert W.; Vickerman, Mary B.

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Modeling and Grid Generation for Iced Airfoils (SmaggIce) software toolkit has been extended to allow interactive grid generation for multi-element iced airfoils. The essential phases of an icing effects study include geometry preparation, block creation and grid generation. SmaggIce Version 2.0 now includes these main capabilities for both single and multi-element airfoils, plus an improved flow solver interface and a variety of additional tools to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of icing effects studies. An overview of these features is given, especially the new multi-element blocking strategy using the multiple wakes method. Examples are given which illustrate the capabilities of SmaggIce for conducting an icing effects study for both single and multi-element airfoils.

  18. Effect of a round airfoil nose on leading-edge suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. Edward; Su, Ingchung

    1987-01-01

    Kulfan (1979) assumed that the angle of attack for initial vortex separation on a slender wing with rounded leading edges could be obtained by equating the leading-edge suction (LES) and nose drag coefficients. In the present study, this assumption is examined and is shown to predict reasonably well the initial angle of attack at which laminar separation occurs near the airfoil nose. However, the assumption is shown to be slightly less accurate for thick or cambered airfoils. Attainable LES estimated by Kulfan's method seemed to agree well with that obtained from an airfoil aerodynamics code and experimental data on a NACA 64A009 airfoil at M = 0.4 and Re = 0.86 x 10 to the 6th.

  19. Analysis of the development of dynamic stall based on oscillating airfoil experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.; Mcalister, K. W.; Mccroskey, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of dynamic stall on airfoils oscillating in pitch were investigated by experimentally determining the viscous and inviscid characteristics of the airflow on the NACA 0012 airfoil and on several leading-edge modifications. The test parameters included a wide range of frequencies, Reynolds numbers, and amplitudes-of-oscillation. Three distinct types of separation development were observed within the boundary layer, each leading to classical dynamic stall. The NACA 0012 airfoil is shown to stall by the mechanism of abrupt turbulent leading-edge separation. A detailed step-by-step analysis of the events leading to dynamic stall, and of the results of the stall process, is presented for each of these three types of stall. Techniques for flow analysis in the dynamic stall environment are discussed. A method is presented that reduces most of the oscillating airfoil normal force and pitching-moment data to a single curve, independent of frequency or Reynolds number.

  20. Mixed Methods Research Designs in Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, William E.; Creswell, John W.; Clark, Vicki L. Plano; Petska, Kelly S.; Creswell, David J.

    2005-01-01

    With the increased popularity of qualitative research, researchers in counseling psychology are expanding their methodologies to include mixed methods designs. These designs involve the collection, analysis, and integration of quantitative and qualitative data in a single or multiphase study. This article presents an overview of mixed methods…