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Sample records for airfoil shape optimization

  1. Robust, Optimal Subsonic Airfoil Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2014-01-01

    A method has been developed to create an airfoil robust enough to operate satisfactorily in different environments. This method determines a robust, optimal, subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape, and imposes the necessary constraints on the design. Also, this method is flexible and extendible to a larger class of requirements and changes in constraints imposed.

  2. Robust, optimal subsonic airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Method system, and product from application of the method, for design of a subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape and incorporating one or more constraints on the airfoil geometric parameters and flow characteristics. The resulting design is robust against variations in airfoil dimensions and local airfoil shape introduced in the airfoil manufacturing process. A perturbation procedure provides a class of airfoil shapes, beginning with an initial airfoil shape.

  3. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  4. Performance Trades Study for Robust Airfoil Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Padula, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    From time to time, existing aircraft need to be redesigned for new missions with modified operating conditions such as required lift or cruise speed. This research is motivated by the needs of conceptual and preliminary design teams for smooth airfoil shapes that are similar to the baseline design but have improved drag performance over a range of flight conditions. The proposed modified profile optimization method (MPOM) modifies a large number of design variables to search for nonintuitive performance improvements, while avoiding off-design performance degradation. Given a good initial design, the MPOM generates fairly smooth airfoils that are better than the baseline without making drastic shape changes. Moreover, the MPOM allows users to gain valuable information by exploring performance trades over various design conditions. Four simulation cases of airfoil optimization in transonic viscous ow are included to demonstrate the usefulness of the MPOM as a performance trades study tool. Simulation results are obtained by solving fully turbulent Navier-Stokes equations and the corresponding discrete adjoint equations using an unstructured grid computational fluid dynamics code FUN2D.

  5. Shape Changing Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Scoping of shape changing airfoil concepts including both aerodynamic analysis and materials-related technology assessment effort was performed. Three general categories of potential components were considered-fan blades, booster and compressor blades, and stator airfoils. Based on perceived contributions to improving engine efficiency, the fan blade was chosen as the primary application for a more detailed assessment. A high-level aerodynamic assessment using a GE90-90B Block 4 engine cycle and fan blade geometry indicates that blade camber changes of approximately +/-4deg would be sufficient to result in fan efficiency improvements nearing 1 percent. Constraints related to flight safety and failed mode operation suggest that use of the baseline blade shape with actuation to the optimum cruise condition during a portion of the cycle would be likely required. Application of these conditions to the QAT fan blade and engine cycle was estimated to result in an overall fan efficiency gain of 0.4 percent.

  6. Free-form Airfoil Shape Optimization Under Uncertainty Using Maximum Expected Value and Second-order Second-moment Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huyse, Luc; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Free-form shape optimization of airfoils poses unexpected difficulties. Practical experience has indicated that a deterministic optimization for discrete operating conditions can result in dramatically inferior performance when the actual operating conditions are different from the - somewhat arbitrary - design values used for the optimization. Extensions to multi-point optimization have proven unable to adequately remedy this problem of "localized optimization" near the sampled operating conditions. This paper presents an intrinsically statistical approach and demonstrates how the shortcomings of multi-point optimization with respect to "localized optimization" can be overcome. The practical examples also reveal how the relative likelihood of each of the operating conditions is automatically taken into consideration during the optimization process. This is a key advantage over the use of multipoint methods.

  7. Options for Robust Airfoil Optimization under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Li, Wu

    2002-01-01

    A robust optimization method is developed to overcome point-optimization at the sampled design points. This method combines the best features from several preliminary methods proposed by the authors and their colleagues. The robust airfoil shape optimization is a direct method for drag reduction over a given range of operating conditions and has three advantages: (1) it prevents severe degradation in the off-design performance by using a smart descent direction in each optimization iteration, (2) it uses a large number of spline control points as design variables yet the resulting airfoil shape does not need to be smoothed, and (3) it allows the user to make a tradeoff between the level of optimization and the amount of computing time consumed. For illustration purposes, the robust optimization method is used to solve a lift-constrained drag minimization problem for a two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil in Euler flow with 20 geometric design variables.

  8. Design of a shape adaptive airfoil actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy strip for airplane tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadeh, R.; Raissi Charmacani, K.; Tabesh, M.

    2011-04-01

    Of the factors that mainly affect the efficiency of the wing during a special flow regime, the shape of its airfoil cross section is the most significant. Airfoils are generally designed for a specific flight condition and, therefore, are not fully optimized in all flight conditions. It is very desirable to have an airfoil with the ability to change its shape based on the current regime. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators activate in response to changes in the temperature and can recover their original configuration after being deformed. This study presents the development of a method to control the shape of an airfoil using SMA actuators. To predict the thermomechanical behaviors of an SMA thin strip, 3D incremental formulation of the SMA constitutive model is implemented in FEA software package ABAQUS. The interactions between the airfoil structure and SMA thin strip actuator are investigated. Also, the aerodynamic performance of a standard airfoil with a plain flap is compared with an adaptive airfoil.

  9. Airfoil shape for flight at subsonic speeds

    DOEpatents

    Whitcomb, Richard T.

    1976-01-01

    An airfoil having an upper surface shaped to control flow accelerations and pressure distribution over the upper surface and to prevent separation of the boundary layer due to shock wave formulation at high subsonic speeds well above the critical Mach number. A highly cambered trailing edge section improves overall airfoil lifting efficiency.

  10. Numerical Airfoil Optimization Using a Reduced Number of Design Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.; Hicks, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A method is presented for numerical airfoil optimization whereby a reduced number of design coordinates are used to define the airfoil shape. The approach is to define the airfoil as a linear combination of shapes. These basic shapes may be analytically or numerically defined, allowing the designer to use his insight to propose candidate designs. The design problem becomes one of determining the participation of each such function in defining the optimum airfoil. Examples are presented for two-dimensional airfoil design and are compared with previous results based on a polynomial representation of the airfoil shape. Four existing NACA airfoils are used as basic shapes. Solutions equivalent to previous results are achieved with a factor of more than 3 improvements in efficiency, while superior designs are demonstrated with an efficiency greater than 2 over previous methods. With this shape definition, the optimization process is shown to exploit the simplifying assumptions in the inviscid aerodynamic analysis used here, thus demonstrating the need to use more advanced aerodynamics for airfoil optimization.

  11. Analysis of a theoretically optimized transonic airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Burdges, K. P.; Shrewsbury, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical optimization was used in conjunction with an inviscid, full potential equation, transonic flow analysis computer code to design an upper surface contour for a conventional airfoil to improve its supercritical performance. The modified airfoil was tested in a compressible flow wind tunnel. The modified airfoil's performance was evaluated by comparison with test data for the baseline airfoil and for an airfoil developed by optimization of leading edge of the baseline airfoil. While the leading edge modification performed as expected, the upper surface re-design did not produce all of the expected performance improvements. Theoretical solutions computed using a full potential, transonic airfoil code corrected for viscosity were compared to experimental data for the baseline airfoil and the upper surface modification. These correlations showed that the theory predicted the aerodynamics of the baseline airfoil fairly well, but failed to accurately compute drag characteristics for the upper surface modification.

  12. Airfoil shape for a turbine bucket

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Susan Marie; By, Robert Romany; Tressler, Judd Dodge; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Sims, Calvin Levy

    2005-06-28

    Third stage turbine buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth Table I wherein X and Y values are in inches and the Z values are non-dimensional values from 0 to 0.938 convertible to Z distances in inches by multiplying the Z values by the height of the airfoil in inches. The X and Y values are distances which, when connected by smooth continuing arcs, define airfoil profile sections at each distance Z. The profile sections at each distance Z are joined smoothly to one another to form a complete airfoil shape. The X and Y distances may be scalable as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled up or scaled down airfoil section for the bucket. The nominal airfoil given by the X, Y and Z distances lies within an envelop of .+-.0.150 inches in directions normal to the surface of the airfoil.

  13. Design optimization of transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joh, C.-Y.; Grossman, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical optimization procedures were considered for the design of airfoils in transonic flow based on the transonic small disturbance (TSD) and Euler equations. A sequential approximation optimization technique was implemented with an accurate approximation of the wave drag based on the Nixon's coordinate straining approach. A modification of the Euler surface boundary conditions was implemented in order to efficiently compute design sensitivities without remeshing the grid. Two effective design procedures producing converged designs in approximately 10 global iterations were developed: interchanging the role of the objective function and constraint and the direct lift maximization with move limits which were fixed absolute values of the design variables.

  14. An assessment of airfoil design by numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.; Murman, E. M.; Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    A practical procedure for optimum design of aerodynamic shapes is demonstrated. The proposed procedure uses an optimization program based on the method of feasible directions coupled with an analysis program that uses a relaxation solution of the inviscid, transonic, small-disturbance equations. Results are presented for low-drag, nonlifting transonic airfoils. Extension of the method to lifting airfoils, other speed regimes, and to three dimensions if feasible.

  15. The Effect of Aerodynamic Evaluators on the Multi-Objective Optimization of Flatback Airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M.; Slew, K. Lee; Matida, E.

    2016-09-01

    With the long lengths of today's wind turbine rotor blades, there is a need to reduce the mass, thereby requiring stiffer airfoils, while maintaining the aerodynamic efficiency of the airfoils, particularly in the inboard region of the blade where structural demands are highest. Using a genetic algorithm, the multi-objective aero-structural optimization of 30% thick flatback airfoils was systematically performed for a variety of aerodynamic evaluators such as lift-to-drag ratio (Cl/Cd), torque (Ct), and torque-to-thrust ratio (Ct/Cn) to determine their influence on airfoil shape and performance. The airfoil optimized for Ct possessed a 4.8% thick trailing-edge, and a rather blunt leading-edge region which creates high levels of lift and correspondingly, drag. It's ability to maintain similar levels of lift and drag under forced transition conditions proved it's insensitivity to roughness. The airfoil optimized for Cl/Cd displayed relatively poor insensitivity to roughness due to the rather aft-located free transition points. The Ct/Cn optimized airfoil was found to have a very similar shape to that of the Cl/Cd airfoil, with a slightly more blunt leading-edge which aided in providing higher levels of lift and moderate insensitivity to roughness. The influence of the chosen aerodynamic evaluator under the specified conditions and constraints in the optimization of wind turbine airfoils is shown to have a direct impact on the airfoil shape and performance.

  16. An efficient algorithm for numerical airfoil optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1979-01-01

    A new optimization algorithm is presented. The method is based on sequential application of a second-order Taylor's series approximation to the airfoil characteristics. Compared to previous methods, design efficiency improvements of more than a factor of 2 are demonstrated. If multiple optimizations are performed, the efficiency improvements are more dramatic due to the ability of the technique to utilize existing data. The method is demonstrated by application to subsonic and transonic airfoil design but is a general optimization technique and is not limited to a particular application or aerodynamic analysis.

  17. Airfoil shape for a turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Patik, Joseph Francis; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A first-stage nozzle vane includes an airfoil having a profile according to Table I. The annulus profile of the hot gas path is defined in conjunction with the airfoil profile and the profile of the inner and outer walls by the Cartesian coordinate values given in Tables I and II, respectively. The airfoil is a three-dimensional bowed design, both in the airfoil body and in the trailing edge. The airfoil is steam and air-cooled by flowing cooling mediums through cavities extending in the vane between inner and outer walls.

  18. Plasma Flow Control Optimized Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voikov, Vladimir; Patel, Mehul

    2005-11-01

    Recent advances in flow control research have demonstrated that plasma actuators can be efficient in different aerodynamic applications, particularly in providing flight control without conventional moving surfaces. The concept involves the use of a laminar airfoil design that employs a separation ramp at the trailing edge that can be manipulated by a plasma actuator to control lift, similar to trailing-edge flaps. The advantages are lower drag by a combination of the laminar flow design, and elimination of parasitic drag associated with wing-flap junctions. This work involves numerical simulations and experiments on a HSNLF(1)-0213 airfoil. The numerical results are obtained using an unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes simulation that includes a model for the plasma actuators. The experiments are performed on a 2-D airfoil section that is mounted on a lift-drag force balance. The results demonstrate lift enhancement produced by the plasma actuator that is comparable to a plane flap. They also reveal an optimum actuator unsteady frequency that scales with the length of the separated region and local velocity, and is associated with the generation of a train of spanwise vortices. Other scaling including the effect of Reynolds number is presented.

  19. Compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Little, David A.; Pu, Zhengxiang

    2015-08-18

    A compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system for reducing a gap between a tip of a compressor airfoil and a radially adjacent component of a turbine engine is disclosed. The turbine engine may include ID and OD flowpath boundaries configured to minimize compressor airfoil tip clearances during turbine engine operation in cooperation with one or more clearance reduction systems that are configured to move the rotor assembly axially to reduce tip clearance. The configurations of the ID and OD flowpath boundaries enhance the effectiveness of the axial movement of the rotor assembly, which includes movement of the ID flowpath boundary. During operation of the turbine engine, the rotor assembly may be moved axially to increase the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  20. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine and compared to earlier methods. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  1. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  2. Approximation concepts for numerical airfoil optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1979-01-01

    An efficient algorithm for airfoil optimization is presented. The algorithm utilizes approximation concepts to reduce the number of aerodynamic analyses required to reach the optimum design. Examples are presented and compared with previous results. Optimization efficiency improvements of more than a factor of 2 are demonstrated. Improvements in efficiency are demonstrated when analysis data obtained in previous designs are utilized. The method is a general optimization procedure and is not limited to this application. The method is intended for application to a wide range of engineering design problems.

  3. Application of numerical optimization to the design of advanced supercritical airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. R.; Hicks, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    An application of numerical optimization to the design of advanced airfoils for transonic aircraft showed that low-drag sections can be developed for a given design Mach number without an accompanying drag increase at lower Mach numbers. This is achieved by imposing a constraint on the drag coefficient at an off-design Mach number while minimizing the drag coefficient at the design Mach number. This multiple design-point numerical optimization has been implemented with the use of airfoil shape functions which permit a wide range of attainable profiles during the optimization process. Analytical data for the starting airfoil shape, a single design-point optimized shape, and a double design-point optimized shape are presented. Experimental data obtained in the NASA Ames two-by two-foot wind tunnel are also presented and discussed.

  4. Two-Dimensional Grids About Airfoils and Other Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R.

    1982-01-01

    GRAPE computer program generates two-dimensional finite-difference grids about airfoils and other shapes by use of Poisson differential equation. GRAPE can be used with any boundary shape, even one specified by tabulated points and including limited number of sharp corners. Numerically stable and computationally fast, GRAPE provides aerodynamic analyst with efficient and consistant means of grid generation.

  5. Robust Airfoil Optimization to Achieve Consistent Drag Reduction Over a Mach Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Huyse, Luc; Padula, Sharon; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We prove mathematically that in order to avoid point-optimization at the sampled design points for multipoint airfoil optimization, the number of design points must be greater than the number of free-design variables. To overcome point-optimization at the sampled design points, a robust airfoil optimization method (called the profile optimization method) is developed and analyzed. This optimization method aims at a consistent drag reduction over a given Mach range and has three advantages: (a) it prevents severe degradation in the off-design performance by using a smart descent direction in each optimization iteration, (b) there is no random airfoil shape distortion for any iterate it generates, and (c) it allows a designer to make a trade-off between a truly optimized airfoil and the amount of computing time consumed. For illustration purposes, we use the profile optimization method to solve a lift-constrained drag minimization problem for 2-D airfoil in Euler flow with 20 free-design variables. A comparison with other airfoil optimization methods is also included.

  6. Optimization of Wind Turbine Airfoils/Blades and Wind Farm Layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaomin

    Shape optimization is widely used in the design of wind turbine blades. In this dissertation, a numerical optimization method called Genetic Algorithm (GA) is applied to address the shape optimization of wind turbine airfoils and blades. In recent years, the airfoil sections with blunt trailing edge (called flatback airfoils) have been proposed for the inboard regions of large wind-turbine blades because they provide several structural and aerodynamic performance advantages. The FX, DU and NACA 64 series airfoils are thick airfoils widely used for wind turbine blade application. They have several advantages in meeting the intrinsic requirements for wind turbines in terms of design point, off-design capabilities and structural properties. This research employ both single- and multi-objective genetic algorithms (SOGA and MOGA) for shape optimization of Flatback, FX, DU and NACA 64 series airfoils to achieve maximum lift and/or maximum lift to drag ratio. The commercially available software FLUENT is employed for calculation of the flow field using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations in conjunction with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model and a three equation k-kl-o turbulence model. The optimization methodology is validated by an optimization study of subsonic and transonic airfoils (NACA0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils). In this dissertation, we employ DU 91-W2-250, FX 66-S196-V1, NACA 64421, and Flat-back series of airfoils (FB-3500-0050, FB-3500-0875, and FB-3500-1750) and compare their performance with S809 airfoil used in NREL Phase II and III wind turbines; the lift and drag coefficient data for these airfoils sections are available. The output power of the turbine is calculated using these airfoil section blades for a given B and lambda and is compared with the original NREL Phase II and Phase III turbines using S809 airfoil section. It is shown that by a suitable choice of airfoil section of HAWT blade, the power generated

  7. General theory of airfoil sections having arbitrary shape or pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, H Julian

    1945-01-01

    In this report a theory of thin airfoils of small camber is developed which permits either the velocity distribution corresponding to a given airfoil shape, or the airfoil shape corresponding to a given velocity distribution to be calculated. The procedures to be employed in these calculations are outlined and illustrated with suitable examples.

  8. Multiple element airfoils optimized for maximum lift coefficient.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Optimum airfoils in the sense of maximum lift coefficient are obtained for incompressible fluid flow at large Reynolds number. The maximum lift coefficient is achieved by requiring that the turbulent skin friction be zero in the pressure rise region on the airfoil upper surface. Under this constraint, the pressure distribution is optimized. The optimum pressure distribution is a function of Reynolds number and the trailing edge velocity. Geometries of those airfoils which will generate these optimum pressure distributions are obtained using a direct-iterative method which is developed in this study. This method can be used to design airfoils consisting of any number of elements. Numerical examples of one- and two-element airfoils are given. The maximum lift coefficients obtained range from 2 to 2.5.

  9. Grid Sensitivity and Aerodynamic Optimization of Generic Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, Ideen; Smith, Robert E.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to obtain the grid sensitivity with respect to design parameters for aerodynamic optimization. The procedure is advocating a novel (geometrical) parameterization using spline functions such as NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B- Splines) for defining the airfoil geometry. An interactive algebraic grid generation technique is employed to generate C-type grids around airfoils. The grid sensitivity of the domain with respect to geometric design parameters has been obtained by direct differentiation of the grid equations. A hybrid approach is proposed for more geometrically complex configurations such as a wing or fuselage. The aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients are obtained by direct differentiation of the compressible two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. An optimization package has been introduced into the algorithm in order to optimize the airfoil surface. Results demonstrate a substantially improved design due to maximized lift/drag ratio of the airfoil.

  10. Unsteady Adjoint Approach for Design Optimization of Flapping Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Byung Joon; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the work for optimizing the propulsive efficiency of flapping airfoils, i.e., improving the thrust under constraining aerodynamic work during the flapping flights by changing their shape and trajectory of motion with the unsteady discrete adjoint approach. For unsteady problems, it is essential to properly resolving time scales of motion under consideration and it must be compatible with the objective sought after. We include both the instantaneous and time-averaged (periodic) formulations in this study. For the design optimization with shape parameters or motion parameters, the time-averaged objective function is found to be more useful, while the instantaneous one is more suitable for flow control. The instantaneous objective function is operationally straightforward. On the other hand, the time-averaged objective function requires additional steps in the adjoint approach; the unsteady discrete adjoint equations for a periodic flow must be reformulated and the corresponding system of equations solved iteratively. We compare the design results from shape and trajectory optimizations and investigate the physical relevance of design variables to the flapping motion at on- and off-design conditions.

  11. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.

  12. Airfoil design by numerical optimization using a minicomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.; Szelazek, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program developed for the automated design of low speed airfoils utilizes a generalized Joukowski method for aerodynamic analysis coupled with a conjugate gradient, penalty function, numerical optimization algorithm to give an efficient calculation technique for use with minicomputers. The program designs airfoils with a prescribed pressure distribution as well as those which minimize or maximize some aerodynamic force coefficient. At present the method is restricted to inviscid, incompressible flow. A typical design problem will execute in 4.5 hr on an HP 9830 minicomputer.

  13. Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derkacs, Thomas (Inventor); Fetheroff, Charles W. (Inventor); Matay, Istvan M. (Inventor); Toth, Istvan J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Although the method and apparatus of the present invention can be utilized to apply either a uniform or a nonuniform covering of material over many different workpieces, the apparatus (20) is advantageously utilized to apply a thermal barrier covering (64) to an airfoil (22) which is used in a turbine engine. The airfoil is held by a gripper assembly (86) while a spray gun (24) is effective to apply the covering over the airfoil. When a portion of the covering has been applied, a sensor (28) is utilized to detect the thickness of the covering. A control apparatus (32) compares the thickness of the covering of material which has been applied with the desired thickness and is subsequently effective to regulate the operation of the spray gun to adaptively apply a covering of a desired thickness with an accuracy of at least plus or minus 0.0015 of an inch (1.5 mils) despite unanticipated process variations.

  14. Application of numerical optimization to the design of supercritical airfoils without drag-creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.; Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1977-01-01

    Recent applications of numerical optimization to the design of advanced airfoils for transonic aircraft have shown that low-drag sections can be developed for a given design Mach number without an accompanying drag increase at lower Mach numbers. This is achieved by imposing a constraint on the drag coefficient at an off-design Mach number while the drag at the design Mach number is the objective function. Such a procedure doubles the computation time over that for single design-point problems, but the final result is worth the increased cost of computation. The ability to treat such multiple design-point problems by numerical optimization has been enhanced by the development of improved airfoil shape functions. Such functions permit a considerable increase in the range of profiles attainable during the optimization process.

  15. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using Hybridized Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2003-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses an evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution (DE) in conjunction with various hybridization strategies is described. DE is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Various hybridization strategies for DE are explored, including the use of neural networks as well as traditional local search methods. A Navier-Stokes solver is used to evaluate the various intermediate designs and provide inputs to the hybrid DE optimizer. The method is implemented on distributed parallel computers so that new designs can be obtained within reasonable turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. (The final paper will include at least one other aerodynamic design application). The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated.

  16. A Surrogate Approach to the Experimental Optimization of Multielement Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, John C.; Landman, Drew; Patera, Anthony T.

    1996-01-01

    The incorporation of experimental test data into the optimization process is accomplished through the use of Bayesian-validated surrogates. In the surrogate approach, a surrogate for the experiment (e.g., a response surface) serves in the optimization process. The validation step of the framework provides a qualitative assessment of the surrogate quality, and bounds the surrogate-for-experiment error on designs "near" surrogate-predicted optimal designs. The utility of the framework is demonstrated through its application to the experimental selection of the trailing edge ap position to achieve a design lift coefficient for a three-element airfoil.

  17. Experimental Optimization Methods for Multi-Element Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, Drew; Britcher, Colin P.

    1996-01-01

    A modern three element airfoil model with a remotely activated flap was used to investigate optimum flap testing position using an automated optimization algorithm in wind tunnel tests. Detailed results for lift coefficient versus flap vertical and horizontal position are presented for two angles of attack: 8 and 14 degrees. An on-line first order optimizer is demonstrated which automatically seeks the optimum lift as a function of flap position. Future work with off-line optimization techniques is introduced and aerodynamic hysteresis effects due to flap movement with flow on are discussed.

  18. Airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Ristau, Neil; Siden, Gunnar Leif

    2015-07-21

    An airfoil includes a leading edge, a trailing edge downstream from the leading edge, a pressure surface between the leading and trailing edges, and a suction surface between the leading and trailing edges and opposite the pressure surface. A first convex section on the suction surface decreases in curvature downstream from the leading edge, and a throat on the suction surface is downstream from the first convex section. A second convex section is on the suction surface downstream from the throat, and a first convex segment of the second convex section increases in curvature.

  19. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  20. Family of airfoil shapes for rotating blades. [for increased power efficiency and blade stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonan, K. W. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An airfoil which has particular application to the blade or blades of rotor aircraft such as helicopters and aircraft propellers is described. The airfoil thickness distribution and camber are shaped to maintain a near zero pitching moment coefficient over a wide range of lift coefficients and provide a zero pitching moment coefficient at section Mach numbers near 0.80 and to increase the drag divergence Mach number resulting in superior aircraft performance.

  1. Numerical computation of viscous flow about unconventional airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    A new two-dimensional computer code was developed to analyze the viscous flow around unconventional airfoils at various Mach numbers and angles of attack. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using an implicit, upwind, finite-volume scheme. Both laminar and turbulent flows can be computed. A new nonequilibrium turbulence closure model was developed for computing turbulent flows. This two-layer eddy viscosity model was motivated by the success of the Johnson-King model in separated flow regions. The influence of history effects are described by an ordinary differential equation developed from the turbulent kinetic energy equation. The performance of the present code was evaluated by solving the flow around three airfoils using the Reynolds time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Excellent results were obtained for both attached and separated flows about the NACA 0012 airfoil, the RAE 2822 airfoil, and the Integrated Technology A 153W airfoil. Based on the comparison of the numerical solutions with the available experimental data, it is concluded that the present code in conjunction with the new nonequilibrium turbulence model gives excellent results.

  2. The application of the gradient-based adjoint multi-point optimization of single and double shock control bumps for transonic airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, K.; Nejati, A.; Chaharlang Kiani, K.; Taheri, R.

    2016-07-01

    A shock control bump (SCB) is a flow control method that uses local small deformations in a flexible wing surface to considerably reduce the strength of shock waves and the resulting wave drag in transonic flows. Most of the reported research is devoted to optimization in a single flow condition. Here, we have used a multi-point adjoint optimization scheme to optimize shape and location of the SCB. Practically, this introduces transonic airfoils equipped with the SCB that are simultaneously optimized for different off-design transonic flight conditions. Here, we use this optimization algorithm to enhance and optimize the performance of SCBs in two benchmark airfoils, i.e., RAE-2822 and NACA-64-A010, over a wide range of off-design Mach numbers. All results are compared with the usual single-point optimization. We use numerical simulation of the turbulent viscous flow and a gradient-based adjoint algorithm to find the optimum location and shape of the SCB. We show that the application of SCBs may increase the aerodynamic performance of an RAE-2822 airfoil by 21.9 and by 22.8 % for a NACA-64-A010 airfoil compared to the no-bump design in a particular flight condition. We have also investigated the simultaneous usage of two bumps for the upper and the lower surfaces of the airfoil. This has resulted in a 26.1 % improvement for the RAE-2822 compared to the clean airfoil in one flight condition.

  3. Improved method for transonic airfoil design-by-optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, R. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An improved method for use of optimization techniques in transonic airfoil design is demonstrated. FLO6QNM incorporates a modified quasi-Newton optimization package, and is shown to be more reliable and efficient than the method developed previously at NASA-Ames, which used the COPES/CONMIN optimization program. The design codes are compared on a series of test cases with known solutions, and the effects of problem scaling, proximity of initial point to solution, and objective function precision are studied. In contrast to the older method, well-converged solutions are shown to be attainable in the context of engineering design using computational fluid dynamics tools, a new result. The improvements are due to better performance by the optimization routine and to the use of problem-adaptive finite difference step sizes for gradient evaluation.

  4. Aerodynamic shape optimization using preconditioned conjugate gradient methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to further improve upon the latest advancements made in aerodynamic shape optimization procedures, a systematic study is performed to examine several current solution methodologies as applied to various aspects of the optimization procedure. It is demonstrated that preconditioned conjugate gradient-like methodologies dramatically decrease the computational efforts required for such procedures. The design problem investigated is the shape optimization of the upper and lower surfaces of an initially symmetric (NACA-012) airfoil in inviscid transonic flow and at zero degree angle-of-attack. The complete surface shape is represented using a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial. The present optimization method then automatically obtains supercritical airfoil shapes over a variety of freestream Mach numbers. Furthermore, the best optimization strategy examined resulted in a factor of 8 decrease in computational time as well as a factor of 4 decrease in memory over the most efficient strategies in current use.

  5. The leading-edge stall of airfoils with various nose shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraljic, Matthew; Rusak, Zvi; Wang, Shixiao

    2015-11-01

    We study the inception of leading-edge stall on stationary, smooth thin airfoils with various nose shapes of the form xa (where 0 < a < 1 / 2) at low to moderately high chord Reynolds number flows. A reduced-order, multi-scale model problem is developed and solved using numerical simulations. The asymptotic theory demonstrates that a subsonic flow about a thin airfoil can be described in terms of an outer region, around most of the airfoil's chord, and an inner region, around the nose, that asymptotically match each other. The flow in the outer region is dominated by the classical thin airfoil theory. Scaled (magnified) coordinates and a modified (smaller) Reynolds number ReM are used to correctly account for the nonlinear behavior and extreme velocity changes in the inner region, where both the near-stagnation and high suction areas occur. The inner region problem is solved numerically to determine the inception of leading-edge stall on the nose. It is found that stall is delayed to higher angles of attack with the decrease of nose parameter a. Specifically, new airfoil shapes are proposed with increased stall angle at subsonic speeds and higher critical Mach numbers at transonic speeds.

  6. Application of numerical optimization to the design of low speed airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.; Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1975-01-01

    A practical procedure for the optimum design of low-speed airfoils is demonstrated. The procedure uses an optimization program based on the method of feasible directions coupled with an aerodynamic analysis program that uses a relaxation solution of the inviscid, full potential equation. Results are presented for airfoils designed to have small adverse pressure gradients, high maximum lift, and low pitching moment.

  7. Estimation of morphing airfoil shape and aerodynamic load using artificial hair sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Nathan S.; Su, Weihua; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape as well as the aerodynamic loads at all times. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this work, the hair sensor measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the hair sensor measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Various aerodynamic and geometrical properties approximated from the artificial hair sensor and artificial neural network system will be compared with the results of XFoil in order to validate the approximation approach.

  8. A Feasibility Study to Control Airfoil Shape Using THUNDER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; Moses, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the capabilities of a new out-of-plane displacement piezoelectric actuator called thin-layer composite-unimorph ferroelectric driver and sensor (THUNDER) to alter the upper surface geometry of a subscale airfoil to enhance performance under aerodynamic loading. Sixty test conditions, consisting of combinations of five angles of attack, four dc applied voltages, and three tunnel velocities, were studied in a tabletop wind tunnel. Results indicated that larger magnitudes of applied voltage produced larger wafer displacements. Wind-off displacements were also consistently larger than wind-on. Higher velocities produced larger displacements than lower velocities because of increased upper surface suction. Increased suction also resulted in larger displacements at higher angles of attack. Creep and hysteresis of the wafer, which were identified at each test condition, contributed to larger negative displacements for all negative applied voltages and larger positive displacements for the smaller positive applied voltage (+102 V). An elastic membrane used to hold the wafer to the upper surface hindered displacements at the larger positive applied voltage (+170 V). Both creep and hysteresis appeared bounded based on the analysis of several displacement cycles. These results show that THUNDER can be used to alter the camber of a small airfoil under aerodynamic loads.

  9. Aerodynamic performance of transonic and subsonic airfoils: Effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang

    The effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape on the aerodynamic performance of turbine airfoils are investigated in compressible, high speed flows. The University of Utah Transonic Wind Tunnel is employed for the experimental part of the study. Two different test sections are designed to produce Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, passage mass flow rates, and physical dimensions, which match values along turbine blades in operating engines: (i) a nonturning test section with a symmetric airfoil, and (ii) a cascade test section with a cambered turbine vane. The nonuniform, irregular, three-dimensional surface roughness is characterized using the equivalent sand grain roughness size. Changing the airfoil surface roughness condition has a substantial effect on wake profiles of total pressure loss coefficients, normalized Mach number, normalized kinetic energy, and on the normalized and dimensional magnitudes of Integrated Aerodynamic Losses produced by the airfoils. Comparisons with results for a symmetric airfoil and a cambered vane show that roughness has more substantial effects on losses produced by the symmetric airfoil than the cambered vane. Data are also provided that illustrate the larger loss magnitudes are generally present with flow turning and cambered airfoils, than with symmetric airfoils. Wake turbulence structure of symmetric airfoils and cambered vanes are also studied experimentally. The effects of surface roughness and freestream turbulence levels on wake distributions of mean velocity, turbulence intensity, and power spectral density profiles and vortex shedding frequencies are quantified one axial chord length downstream of the test airfoils. As the level of surface roughness increases, all wake profile quantities broaden significantly and nondimensional vortex shedding frequencies decrease. Wake profiles produced by the symmetric airfoil are more sensitive to variations of surface

  10. Aerodynamic shape optimization using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James

    1996-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape design has long persisted as a difficult scientific challenge due its highly nonlinear flow physics and daunting geometric complexity. However, with the emergence of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) it has become possible to make accurate predictions of flows which are not dominated by viscous effects. It is thus worthwhile to explore the extension of CFD methods for flow analysis to the treatment of aerodynamic shape design. Two new aerodynamic shape design methods are developed which combine existing CFD technology, optimal control theory, and numerical optimization techniques. Flow analysis methods for the potential flow equation and the Euler equations form the basis of the two respective design methods. In each case, optimal control theory is used to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which provides the necessary gradient information to a numerical optimization method much more efficiently then by conventional finite differencing. Each technique uses a quasi-Newton numerical optimization algorithm to drive an aerodynamic objective function toward a minimum. An analytic grid perturbation method is developed to modify body fitted meshes to accommodate shape changes during the design process. Both Hicks-Henne perturbation functions and B-spline control points are explored as suitable design variables. The new methods prove to be computationally efficient and robust, and can be used for practical airfoil design including geometric and aerodynamic constraints. Objective functions are chosen to allow both inverse design to a target pressure distribution and wave drag minimization. Several design cases are presented for each method illustrating its practicality and efficiency. These include non-lifting and lifting airfoils operating at both subsonic and transonic conditions.

  11. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization using an Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoist, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    A method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on an evolutionary algorithm approach is presented and demonstrated. Results are presented for a number of model problems to access the effect of algorithm parameters on convergence efficiency and reliability. A transonic viscous airfoil optimization problem-both single and two-objective variations is used as the basis for a preliminary comparison with an adjoint-gradient optimizer. The evolutionary algorithm is coupled with a transonic full potential flow solver and is used to optimize the inviscid flow about transonic wings including multi-objective and multi-discipline solutions that lead to the generation of pareto fronts. The results indicate that the evolutionary algorithm approach is easy to implement, flexible in application and extremely reliable.

  12. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization using an Evolutionary Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on an evolutionary algorithm approach is presented and demonstrated. Results are presented for a number of model problems to access the effect of algorithm parameters on convergence efficiency and reliability. A transonic viscous airfoil optimization problem, both single and two-objective variations, is used as the basis for a preliminary comparison with an adjoint-gradient optimizer. The evolutionary algorithm is coupled with a transonic full potential flow solver and is used to optimize the inviscid flow about transonic wings including multi-objective and multi-discipline solutions that lead to the generation of pareto fronts. The results indicate that the evolutionary algorithm approach is easy to implement, flexible in application and extremely reliable.

  13. Virtual Shaping of a Two-dimensional NACA 0015 Airfoil Using Synthetic Jet Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Fang-Jenq; Beeler, George B.

    2002-01-01

    The Aircraft Morphing Program at NASA Langley envisions an aircraft without conventional control surfaces. Instead of moving control surfaces, the vehicle control systems may be implemented with a combination of propulsive forces, micro surface effectors, and fluidic devices dynamically operated by an intelligent flight control system to provide aircraft maneuverability over each mission segment. As a part of this program, a two-dimensional NACA 0015 airfoil model was designed to test mild maneuvering capability of synthetic jets in a subsonic wind tunnel. The objective of the experiments is to assess the applicability of using unsteady suction and blowing to alter the aerodynamic shape of an airfoil with a purpose to enhance lift and/or to reduce drag. Synthetic jet actuation at different chordwise locations, different forcing frequencies and amplitudes, under different freestream velocities are investigated. The effect of virtual shape change is indicated by a localized increase of surface pressure in the neighborhood of synthetic jet actuation. That causes a negative lift to the airfoil with an upper surface actuation. When actuation is applied near the airfoil leading edge, it appears that the stagnation line is shifted inducing an effect similar to that caused by a small angle of attack to produce an overall lift change.

  14. Morphing-Based Shape Optimization in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Yannick; Men'Shov, Igor; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    In this paper, a Morphing-based Shape Optimization (MbSO) technique is presented for solving Optimum-Shape Design (OSD) problems in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The proposed method couples Free-Form Deformation (FFD) and Evolutionary Computation, and, as its name suggests, relies on the morphing of shape and computational domain, rather than direct shape parameterization. Advantages of the FFD approach compared to traditional parameterization are first discussed. Then, examples of shape and grid deformations by FFD are presented. Finally, the MbSO approach is illustrated and applied through an example: the design of an airfoil for a future Mars exploration airplane.

  15. Aerodynamic effects of simulated ice shapes on two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alansatan, Sait

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of simulated glaze ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance characteristics of two-dimensional airfoils and a swept finite tail. The two dimensional tests involved two NACA 0011 airfoils with chords of 24 and 12 inches. Glaze ice shapes computed with the LEWICE code that were representative of 22.5-min and 45-min ice accretions were simulated with spoilers, which were sized to approximate the horn heights of the LEWICE ice shapes. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and surface pressure coefficients were obtained for a range of test conditions. Test variables included Reynolds number, geometric scaling, control deflection and the key glaze ice features, which were horn height, horn angle, and horn location. For the three-dimensional tests, a 25%-scale business jet empennage (BJE) with a T-tail configuration was used to study the effect of ice shapes on the aerodynamic performance of a swept horizontal tail. Simulated glaze ice shapes included the LEWICE and spoiler ice shapes to represent 9-min and 22.5-min ice accretions. Additional test variables included Reynolds number and elevator deflection. Lift, drag, hinge moment coefficients as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained. The experimental results showed substantial degradation in aerodynamic performance of the airfoils and the swept horizontal tail due to the simulated ice shapes. For the two-dimensional airfoils, the largest aerodynamic penalties were obtained when the 3-in spoiler-ice, which was representative of 45-min glaze ice accretions, was set normal to the chord. Scale and Reynolds effects were not significant for lift and drag. However, pitching moments and pressure distributions showed great sensitivity to Reynolds number and geometric scaling. For the threedimensional study with the swept finite tail, the 22.5-min ice shapes resulted in greater aerodynamic performance degradation than the 9-min ice shapes. The addition of 24

  16. Computer-aided roll pass design in rolling of airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgerman, N.; Lahoti, G. D.; Altan, T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes two computer-aided design (CAD) programs developed for modeling the shape rolling process for airfoil sections. The first program, SHPROL, uses a modular upper-bound method of analysis and predicts the lateral spread, elongation, and roll torque. The second program, ROLPAS, predicts the stresses, roll separating force, the roll torque and the details of metal flow by simulating the rolling process, using the slab method of analysis. ROLPAS is an interactive program; it offers graphic display capabilities and allows the user to interact with the computer via a keyboard, CRT, and a light pen. The accuracy of the computerized models was evaluated by (a) rolling a selected airfoil shape at room temperature from 1018 steel and isothermally at high temperature from Ti-6Al-4V, and (b) comparing the experimental results with computer predictions. The comparisons indicated that the CAD systems, described here, are useful for practical engineering purposes and can be utilized in roll pass design and analysis for airfoil and similar shapes.

  17. A Two Element Laminar Flow Airfoil Optimized for Cruise. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  18. Shape optimization and CAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, John

    1990-01-01

    Structural optimization has attracted the attention since the days of Galileo. Olhoff and Taylor have produced an excellent overview of the classical research within this field. However, the interest in structural optimization has increased greatly during the last decade due to the advent of reliable general numerical analysis methods and the computer power necessary to use them efficiently. This has created the possibility of developing general numerical systems for shape optimization. Several authors, eg., Esping; Braibant & Fleury; Bennet & Botkin; Botkin, Yang, and Bennet; and Stanton have published practical and successful applications of general optimization systems. Ding and Homlein have produced extensive overviews of available systems. Furthermore, a number of commercial optimization systems based on well-established finite element codes have been introduced. Systems like ANSYS, IDEAS, OASIS, and NISAOPT are widely known examples. In parallel to this development, the technology of computer aided design (CAD) has gained a large influence on the design process of mechanical engineering. The CAD technology has already lived through a rapid development driven by the drastically growing capabilities of digital computers. However, the systems of today are still considered as being only the first generation of a long row of computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems. These systems to come will offer an integrated environment for design, analysis, and fabrication of products of almost any character. Thus, the CAD system could be regarded as simply a database for geometrical information equipped with a number of tools with the purpose of helping the user in the design process. Among these tools are facilities for structural analysis and optimization as well as present standard CAD features like drawing, modeling, and visualization tools. The state of the art of structural optimization is that a large amount of mathematical and mechanical techniques are

  19. Illustration of airfoil shape effect on forward-swept wing divergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    A static aeroelastic analysis is presented of the divergence of untapered wings with conventional and supercritical airfoil sections at sweep angles of zero and -15 deg. One bending and one torsion mode were employed for a uniform rectangular cantilevered beam with the elastic axis at midchord, and calculations were based on a two-dimensional differential equations formulation in the structural coordinate system and in simple strip theory. A minimum divergence speed in the transonic range is obtained which is associated with the rearward shift of the aerodynamic center, and a 17% difference in minimum divergence dynamic pressure is found between a supercritical and a conventional wing. It is noted that although the strip method employed allows the assessment of the sensitivity of airfoil shapes to divergence, three-dimensional transonic aerodynamic methods should be used to predict wing divergence characteristics.

  20. Controlled Aeroelastic Response and Airfoil Shaping Using Adaptive Materials and Integrated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program; the Actively Controlled Response of Buffet Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to Ascertain Characteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant rcductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. Th,e ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using Thin-Layer Composite-Uimorph Piezoelectric Driver and Sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  1. Wind tunnel evaluation of air-foil performance using simulated ice shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Zaguli, R. J.; Gregorek, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A two-phase wind tunnel test was conducted in the 6 by 9 foot Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Lewis Research Center to evaluate the effect of ice on the performance of a full scale general aviation wing. In the first IRT tests, rime and glaze shapes were carefully documented as functions of angle of attack and free stream conditions. Next, simulated ice shapes were constructed for two rime and two glaze shapes and used in the second IRT tunnel entry. The ice shapes and the clean airfoil were tapped to obtain surface pressures and a probe used to measure the wake characteristics. These data were recorded and processed, on-line, with a minicomputer/digital data acquisition system. The effect of both rime and glaze ice on the pressure distribution, Cl, Cd, and Cm are presented.

  2. Computer-aided analysis and design of the shape rolling process for producing turbine engine airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahoti, G. D.; Akgerman, N.; Altan, T.

    1978-01-01

    Mild steel (AISI 1018) was selected as model cold-rolling material and Ti-6Al-4V and INCONEL 718 were selected as typical hot-rolling and cold-rolling alloys, respectively. The flow stress and workability of these alloys were characterized and friction factor at the roll/workpiece interface was determined at their respective working conditions by conducting ring tests. Computer-aided mathematical models for predicting metal flow and stresses, and for simulating the shape-rolling process were developed. These models utilize the upper-bound and the slab methods of analysis, and are capable of predicting the lateral spread, roll-separating force, roll torque and local stresses, strains and strain rates. This computer-aided design (CAD) system is also capable of simulating the actual rolling process and thereby designing roll-pass schedule in rolling of an airfoil or similar shape. The predictions from the CAD system were verified with respect to cold rolling of mild steel plates. The system is being applied to cold and hot isothermal rolling of an airfoil shape, and will be verified with respect to laboratory experiments under controlled conditions.

  3. Ice shapes and the resulting drag increase for a NACA 0012 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.; Shaw, R. J.; Newton, J.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the ice shapes and resulting drag increases were measured in the NASA-Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. The measurements were made over a large range of conditions (e.g., airspeed and temperature, drop size and liquid water content of the cloud, and the angle of attack of the airfoil). The measured drag increase did not agree with the existing correlation. Additional results were given which are helpful in understanding the ice structure and the way it forms, and in improving the ice accretion modeling theories. There are data on the ice surface roughness, on the effect of the ice shape on the local droplet catch, and on the relative importance of various parts of the ice shape on the drag increase. Experimental repeatability is also discussed.

  4. Comparison of Evolutionary (Genetic) Algorithm and Adjoint Methods for Multi-Objective Viscous Airfoil Optimizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, T. H.; Nemec, M.; Holst, T.; Zingg, D. W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comparison between an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and an Adjoint-Gradient (AG) Method applied to a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for airfoil design is presented. Both approaches use a common function evaluation code, the steady-state explicit part of the code,ARC2D. The parameterization of the design space is a common B-spline approach for an airfoil surface, which together with a common griding approach, restricts the AG and EA to the same design space. Results are presented for a class of viscous transonic airfoils in which the optimization tradeoff between drag minimization as one objective and lift maximization as another, produces the multi-objective design space. Comparisons are made for efficiency, accuracy and design consistency.

  5. Computer-aided analysis and design of the shape rolling process for producing turbine engine airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahoti, G. D.; Akgerman, N.; Altan, T.

    1978-01-01

    Mild steel (AISI 1018) was selected as model cold rolling material and Ti-6A1-4V and Inconel 718 were selected as typical hot rolling and cold rolling alloys, respectively. The flow stress and workability of these alloys were characterized and friction factor at the roll/workpiece interface was determined at their respective working conditions by conducting ring tests. Computer-aided mathematical models for predicting metal flow and stresses, and for simulating the shape rolling process were developed. These models utilized the upper bound and the slab methods of analysis, and were capable of predicting the lateral spread, roll separating force, roll torque, and local stresses, strains and strain rates. This computer-aided design system was also capable of simulating the actual rolling process, and thereby designing the roll pass schedule in rolling of an airfoil or a similar shape.

  6. Optimal divergence-free inflow perturbations in flow over an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Sean; Blackburn, Hugh; Mao, Xuerui

    2013-11-01

    Linear transient growth analysis has identified various key mechanisms in transition due to free-stream turbulence in canonical flow open flow configurations (Durbin & Wu, 2007). In the present work, the role of inflow disturbances in promoting transition for flow over airfoil type geometries is examined. Using an optimal control based methodology, optimal divergence-free inflow perturbations for linear transient energy growth are computed for a NACA 0012 airfoil at 4° angle of attack. At various low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, the flow response to optimal two-dimensional inflow perturbations with varying streamwise length scale is analysed. The relationship between the flow physics induced by optimal inflow perturbations, optimal initial perturbations and leading linear instability modes is then examined. Durbin P & Wu X (2007), Transition beneath vortical disturbances, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 39: 107. Supported by Australian Research Council grant DP1094851.

  7. GRAPE- TWO-DIMENSIONAL GRIDS ABOUT AIRFOILS AND OTHER SHAPES BY THE USE OF POISSON'S EQUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to treat arbitrary boundary shapes is one of the most desirable characteristics of a method for generating grids, including those about airfoils. In a grid used for computing aerodynamic flow over an airfoil, or any other body shape, the surface of the body is usually treated as an inner boundary and often cannot be easily represented as an analytic function. The GRAPE computer program was developed to incorporate a method for generating two-dimensional finite-difference grids about airfoils and other shapes by the use of the Poisson differential equation. GRAPE can be used with any boundary shape, even one specified by tabulated points and including a limited number of sharp corners. The GRAPE program has been developed to be numerically stable and computationally fast. GRAPE can provide the aerodynamic analyst with an efficient and consistent means of grid generation. The GRAPE procedure generates a grid between an inner and an outer boundary by utilizing an iterative procedure to solve the Poisson differential equation subject to geometrical restraints. In this method, the inhomogeneous terms of the equation are automatically chosen such that two important effects are imposed on the grid. The first effect is control of the spacing between mesh points along mesh lines intersecting the boundaries. The second effect is control of the angles with which mesh lines intersect the boundaries. Along with the iterative solution to Poisson's equation, a technique of coarse-fine sequencing is employed to accelerate numerical convergence. GRAPE program control cards and input data are entered via the NAMELIST feature. Each variable has a default value such that user supplied data is kept to a minimum. Basic input data consists of the boundary specification, mesh point spacings on the boundaries, and mesh line angles at the boundaries. Output consists of a dataset containing the grid data and, if requested, a plot of the generated mesh. The GRAPE program is

  8. A method for predicting shock shapes and pressure distributions on two dimensional airfoils at large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaattari, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for determining shock envelopes and pressure distributions for two-dimensional airfoils at angles of attack sufficiently large to cause shock detachment and subsonic flow over the windward surface of the airfoil. Correlation functions obtained from exact solutions are used to relate the shock standoff distance at the stagnation and sonic points of the body through a suitable choice for the shock shape. The necessary correlation functions were obtained from perfect gas solutions but may be extended to any gas flow for which the normal shock-density ratio can be specified.

  9. Optimization of a synthetic jet actuator for flow control around an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazer, E.; Mirzaei, M.; Salami, E.; Ward, T. A.; Romli, F. I.; Kazi, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    This paper deals with the optimization of a synthetic jet actuator parameters in the control flow around the NACA0015 airfoil at two angles of attack: 13° (i.e. the stall angle of NACA0015) and 16° (i.e. the post stall angle of NACA0015) to maximize the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil. Synthetic jet actuator is a zero mass flux-active flow control device that alternately injects and removes fluid through a small slot at the input movement frequency of a diaphragm. The movement of the diaphragm and also the external flow around the airfoil were simulated using numerical approach. The objective of the optimization process function was maximum lift-drag ratio (L/D) and the optimization variables were jet frequency, length of the jet slot and jet location along the chord. The power coefficient of the jet was considered as a constraint. The response surface optimization method was employed to achieve the optimal parameters. The results showed that the actuator is more effective for post stall angles of attack that can lead to an enhancement of 66% in L/D.

  10. Lift Optimization Study of a Multi-Element Three-Segment Variable Camber Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a detailed computational high-lift study of the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system carried out to explore the best VCCTEF designs, in conjunction with a leading edge flap called the Variable Camber Krueger (VCK), for take-off and landing. For this purpose, a three-segment variable camber airfoil employed as a performance adaptive aeroelastic wing shaping control effector for a NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) in landing and take-off configurations is considered. The objective of the study is to define optimal high-lift VCCTEF settings and VCK settings/configurations. A total of 224 combinations of VCK settings/configurations and VCCTEF settings are considered for the inboard GTM wing, where the VCCTEFs are configured as a Fowler flap that forms a slot between the VCCTEF and the main wing. For the VCK settings of deflection angles of 55deg, 60deg and 65deg, 18, 19 and 19 vck configurations, respectively, were considered for each of the 4 different VCCTEF deflection settings. Different vck configurations were defined by varying the horizontal and vertical distance of the vck from the main wing. A computational investigation using a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver was carried out to complement a wind-tunnel experimental study covering three of these configurations with the goal of identifying the most optimal high-lift configurations. Four most optimal high-lift configurations, corresponding to each of the VCK deflection settings, have been identified out of all the different configurations considered in this study yielding the highest lift performance.

  11. Experimental Determination of Jet Boundary Corrections for Airfoil Tests in Four Open Wind Tunnel Jets of Different Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Harris, Thomas A

    1931-01-01

    This experimental investigation was conducted primarily for the purpose of obtaining a method of correcting to free air conditions the results of airfoil force tests in four open wind tunnel jets of different shapes. Tests were also made to determine whether the jet boundaries had any appreciable effect on the pitching moments of a complete airplane model. Satisfactory corrections for the effect of the boundaries of the various jets were obtained for all the airfoils tested, the span of the largest being 0.75 of the jet width. The corrections for angle of attack were, in general, larger than those for drag. The boundaries had no appreciable effect on the pitching moments of either the airfoils or the complete airplane model. Increasing turbulence appeared to increase the minimum drag and maximum lift and to decrease the pitching moment.

  12. A comparison of design variables for control theory based airfoil optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work in the area it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using either the potential flow or the Euler equations with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. We have also explored three-dimensional extensions of these formulations recently. The goal of our present work is to demonstrate the versatility of the control theory approach by designing airfoils using both Hicks-Henne functions and B-spline control points as design variables. The research also demonstrates that the parameterization of the design space is an open question in aerodynamic design.

  13. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of Three-Dimensional Ice Shapes on a NACA 23012 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, Garam; Oliden, Daniel; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2014-01-01

    The present study identifies a process for performing computational fluid dynamic calculations of the flow over full three-dimensional (3D) representations of complex ice shapes deposited on aircraft surfaces. Rime and glaze icing geometries formed on a NACA23012 airfoil were obtained during testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The ice shape geometries were scanned as a cloud of data points using a 3D laser scanner. The data point clouds were meshed using Geomagic software to create highly accurate models of the ice surface. The surface data was imported into Pointwise grid generation software to create the CFD surface and volume grids. It was determined that generating grids in Pointwise for complex 3D icing geometries was possible using various techniques that depended on the ice shape. Computations of the flow fields over these ice shapes were performed using the NASA National Combustion Code (NCC). Results for a rime ice shape for angle of attack conditions ranging from 0 to 10 degrees and for freestream Mach numbers of 0.10 and 0.18 are presented. For validation of the computational results, comparisons were made to test results from rapid-prototype models of the selected ice accretion shapes, obtained from a separate study in a subsonic wind tunnel at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The computational and experimental results were compared for values of pressure coefficient and lift. Initial results show fairly good agreement for rime ice accretion simulations across the range of conditions examined. The glaze ice results are promising but require some further examination.

  14. Computational Aerodynamic Analysis of Three-Dimensional Ice Shapes on a NACA 23012 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, GaRam; Oliden, Daniel; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2014-01-01

    The present study identifies a process for performing computational fluid dynamic calculations of the flow over full three-dimensional (3D) representations of complex ice shapes deposited on aircraft surfaces. Rime and glaze icing geometries formed on a NACA23012 airfoil were obtained during testing in the NASA Glenn Research Centers Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). The ice shape geometries were scanned as a cloud of data points using a 3D laser scanner. The data point clouds were meshed using Geomagic software to create highly accurate models of the ice surface. The surface data was imported into Pointwise grid generation software to create the CFD surface and volume grids. It was determined that generating grids in Pointwise for complex 3D icing geometries was possible using various techniques that depended on the ice shape. Computations of the flow fields over these ice shapes were performed using the NASA National Combustion Code (NCC). Results for a rime ice shape for angle of attack conditions ranging from 0 to 10 degrees and for freestream Mach numbers of 0.10 and 0.18 are presented. For validation of the computational results, comparisons were made to test results from rapid-prototype models of the selected ice accretion shapes, obtained from a separate study in a subsonic wind tunnel at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The computational and experimental results were compared for values of pressure coefficient and lift. Initial results show fairly good agreement for rime ice accretion simulations across the range of conditions examined. The glaze ice results are promising but require some further examination.

  15. High-Fidelity Aerodynamic Shape Optimization for Natural Laminar Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashad, Ramy

    To ensure the long-term sustainability of aviation, serious effort is underway to mitigate the escalating economic, environmental, and social concerns of the industry. Significant improvement to the energy efficiency of air transportation is required through the research and development of advanced and unconventional airframe and engine technologies. In the quest to reduce airframe drag, this thesis is concerned with the development and demonstration of an effective design tool for improving the aerodynamic efficiency of subsonic and transonic airfoils. The objective is to advance the state-of-the-art in high-fidelity aerodynamic shape optimization by incorporating and exploiting the phenomenon of laminar-turbulent transition in an efficient manner. A framework for the design and optimization of Natural Laminar Flow (NLF) airfoils is developed and demonstrated with transition prediction capable of accounting for the effects of Reynolds number, freestream turbulence intensity, Mach number, and pressure gradients. First, a two-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) flow solver has been extended to incorporate an iterative laminar-turbulent transition prediction methodology. The natural transition locations due to Tollmien-Schlichting instabilities are predicted using the simplified eN envelope method of Drela and Giles or, alternatively, the compressible form of the Arnal-Habiballah-Delcourt criterion. The boundary-layer properties are obtained directly from the Navier-Stokes flow solution, and the transition to turbulent flow is modeled using an intermittency function in conjunction with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The RANS solver is subsequently employed in a gradient-based sequential quadratic programming shape optimization framework. The laminar-turbulent transition criteria are tightly coupled into the objective and gradient evaluations. The gradients are obtained using a new augmented discrete-adjoint formulation for non-local transition

  16. Using High Resolution Design Spaces for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Padula, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    This paper explains why high resolution design spaces encourage traditional airfoil optimization algorithms to generate noisy shape modifications, which lead to inaccurate linear predictions of aerodynamic coefficients and potential failure of descent methods. By using auxiliary drag constraints for a simultaneous drag reduction at all design points and the least shape distortion to achieve the targeted drag reduction, an improved algorithm generates relatively smooth optimal airfoils with no severe off-design performance degradation over a range of flight conditions, in high resolution design spaces parameterized by cubic B-spline functions. Simulation results using FUN2D in Euler flows are included to show the capability of the robust aerodynamic shape optimization method over a range of flight conditions.

  17. Two-Dimensional Shape Optimization of Hypersonic Vehicles Considering Transonic Aerodynamic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Atsushi; Suzuki, Kojiro

    For the success of hypersonic vehicles, their shape must be optimized to achieve a high lift-to-drag ratio as well as a low aerodynamic heating rate in the hypersonic regime. In addition, the transonic lift-to-drag ratio must also be optimized to realize quick acceleration to the hypersonic cruise speed. The three-dimensional lift-to-drag ratio can be improved even by the two-dimensional section shape (i.e., airfoil) optimization in the region where the sweep back angle is small. Here, prior to three-dimensional shape optimization, a study is done to optimize airfoils of hypersonic vehicles based on these three parameters. At optimization, the hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio is maximized while the transonic lift-to-drag ratio and the aerodynamic heating rate are constrained. The optimum lift coefficient for hypersonic cruise at the maximum lift-to-drag ratio is investigated. The relation between the leading edge radius, which determines the aerodynamic heating rate, and the hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio is also investigated. Results show that to improve the hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, the airfoil thickness around the leading edge should be small as long as an appropriate compromise with the transonic lift-to-drag ratio is achieved. Results also show that the optimum lift coefficient for hypersonic cruise is much lower than that for typical supersonic vehicles. Small cruise lift coefficient suggests that the wing loading of a hypersonic vehicle should be small. The leading edge radius should be determined by a compromise between the hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio and leading edge heating. Airfoil optimization can provide an appropriate initial guess of the three-dimensional optimum shape. By using an appropriate initial guess, the computation time of the three-dimensional shape optimization is expected to be reduced.

  18. Airfoil-Shaped Fluid Flow Tool for Use in Making Differential Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A fluid flow tool includes an airfoil structure and a support arm. The airfoil structure's high-pressure side and low-pressure side are positioned in a conduit by the support arm coupled to the conduit. The high-pressure and low-pressure sides substantially face opposing walls of the conduit. At least one measurement port is formed in the airfoil structure at each of its high-pressure side and low-pressure side. A first manifold, formed in the airfoil structure and in fluid communication with each measurement port so-formed at the high-pressure side, extends through the airfoil structure and support arm to terminate and be accessible at the exterior wall of the conduit. A second manifold, formed in the airfoil structure and in fluid communication with each measurement port so-formed at the low-pressure side, extends through the airfoil structure and support arm to terminate and be accessible at the exterior wall of the conduit.

  19. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil optimized for maximum lift coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, G. J.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the two-dimensional characteristics of an airfoil optimized for maximum lift coefficient. The design maximum lift coefficient was 2.1 at a Reynolds number of 9.7 million. The airfoil with a smooth surface and with surface roughness was tested at angles of attack from 6 deg to 26 deg, Reynolds numbers (based on airfoil chord) from 2.0 million to 12.9 million, and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.35. The experimental results are compared with values predicted by theory. The experimental pressure distributions observed at angles of attack up to at least 12 deg were similar to the theoretical values except for a slight increase in the experimental upper-surface pressure coefficients forward of 26 percent chord and a more severe gradient just behind the minimum-pressure-coefficient location. The maximum lift coefficients were measured with the model surface smooth and, depending on test conditions, varied from 1.5 to 1.6 whereas the design value was 2.1.

  20. Shape optimization of peristaltic pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Shawn W.; Shelley, Michael J.

    2010-02-01

    Transport is a fundamental aspect of biology and peristaltic pumping is a fundamental mechanism to accomplish this; it is also important to many industrial processes. We present a variational method for optimizing the wave shape of a peristaltic pump. Specifically, we optimize the wave profile of a two dimensional channel containing a Navier-Stokes fluid with no assumption on the wave profile other than it is a traveling wave (e.g. we do not assume it is the graph of a function). Hence, this is an infinite-dimensional optimization problem. The optimization criteria consists of minimizing the input fluid power (due to the peristaltic wave) subject to constraints on the average flux of fluid and area of the channel. Sensitivities of the cost and constraints are computed variationally via shape differential calculus and we use a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method to find a solution of the first order KKT conditions. We also use a merit-function based line search in order to balance between decreasing the cost and keeping the constraints satisfied when updating the channel shape. Our numerical implementation uses a finite element method for computing a solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, adjoint equations, as well as for the SQP method when computing perturbations of the channel shape. The walls of the channel are deformed by an explicit front-tracking approach. In computing functional sensitivities with respect to shape, we use L2-type projections for computing boundary stresses and for geometric quantities such as the tangent field on the channel walls and the curvature; we show error estimates for the boundary stress and tangent field approximations. As a result, we find optimized shapes that are not obvious and have not been previously reported in the peristaltic pumping literature. Specifically, we see highly asymmetric wave shapes that are far from being sine waves. Many examples are shown for a range of fluxes and Reynolds numbers up to Re=500

  1. Optimal shapes for self-propelled swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros; van Rees, Wim; Gazzola, Mattia

    2011-11-01

    We optimize swimming shapes of three-dimensional self-propelled swimmers by combining the CMA- Evolution Strategy with a remeshed vortex method. We analyze the robustness of optimal shapes and discuss the near wake vortex dynamics for optimal speed and efficiency at Re=550. We also report preliminary results of optimal shapes and arrangements for multiple coordinated swimmers.

  2. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization using discrete sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization procedure based on discrete sensitivity analysis is extended to treat three-dimensional geometries. The function of sensitivity analysis is to directly couple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with numerical optimization techniques, which facilitates the construction of efficient direct-design methods. The development of a practical three-dimensional design procedures entails many challenges, such as: (1) the demand for significant efficiency improvements over current design methods; (2) a general and flexible three-dimensional surface representation; and (3) the efficient solution of very large systems of linear algebraic equations. It is demonstrated that each of these challenges is overcome by: (1) employing fully implicit (Newton) methods for the CFD analyses; (2) adopting a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of two- and three-dimensional surfaces; and (3) using preconditioned conjugate gradient-like linear system solvers. Whereas each of these extensions independently yields an improvement in computational efficiency, the combined effect of implementing all the extensions simultaneously results in a significant factor of 50 decrease in computational time and a factor of eight reduction in memory over the most efficient design strategies in current use. The new aerodynamic shape optimization procedure is demonstrated in the design of both two- and three-dimensional inviscid aerodynamic problems including a two-dimensional supersonic internal/external nozzle, two-dimensional transonic airfoils (resulting in supercritical shapes), three-dimensional transport wings, and three-dimensional supersonic delta wings. Each design application results in realistic and useful optimized shapes.

  3. Implementation of a multiblock sensitivity analysis method in numerical aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacasse, James M.

    1995-01-01

    A multiblock sensitivity analysis method is applied in a numerical aerodynamic shape optimization technique. The Sensitivity Analysis Domain Decomposition (SADD) scheme which is implemented in this study was developed to reduce the computer memory requirements resulting from the aerodynamic sensitivity analysis equations. Discrete sensitivity analysis offers the ability to compute quasi-analytical derivatives in a more efficient manner than traditional finite-difference methods, which tend to be computationally expensive and prone to inaccuracies. The direct optimization procedure couples CFD analysis based on the two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations with a gradient-based numerical optimization technique. The linking mechanism is the sensitivity equation derived from the CFD discretized flow equations, recast in adjoint form, and solved using direct matrix inversion techniques. This investigation is performed to demonstrate an aerodynamic shape optimization technique on a multiblock domain and its applicability to complex geometries. The objectives are accomplished by shape optimizing two aerodynamic configurations. First, the shape optimization of a transonic airfoil is performed to investigate the behavior of the method in highly nonlinear flows and the effect of different grid blocking strategies on the procedure. Secondly, shape optimization of a two-element configuration in subsonic flow is completed. Cases are presented for this configuration to demonstrate the effect of simultaneously reshaping interfering elements. The aerodynamic shape optimization is shown to produce supercritical type airfoils in the transonic flow from an initially symmetric airfoil. Multiblocking effects the path of optimization while providing similar results at the conclusion. Simultaneous reshaping of elements is shown to be more effective than individual element reshaping due to the inclusion of mutual interference effects.

  4. Suppression of vortex-shedding noise via derivative-free shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison L.; Wang, Meng; Dennis, J. E.; Moin, Parviz

    2004-10-01

    In this Letter we describe the application of a derivative-free optimization technique, the surrogate management framework (SMF), for designing the shape of an airfoil trailing edge which minimizes the noise of vortex shedding. Constraints on lift and drag are enforced within SMF using a filter. Several optimal shapes have been identified for the case of laminar vortex shedding with reasonable computational cost using several shape parameters, and results show a significant reduction in acoustic power. Physical mechanisms for noise reduction are discussed.

  5. Experimental Water Droplet Impingement Data on Airfoils, Simulated Ice Shapes, an Engine Inlet and a Finite Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Breer, M.; Craig, N.; Liu, X.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the water droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional aircraft surfaces. The experimental water droplet impingement data are used to validate particle trajectory analysis codes that are used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. The aircraft surface is covered with thin strips of blotter paper in areas of interest. The surface is then exposed to an airstream that contains a dyed-water spray cloud. The water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter paper strips by measuring the optical reflectance of each strip with an automated reflectometer. Experimental impingement efficiency data represented for a NLF (1)-0414 airfoil, a swept MS (1)-0317 airfoil, a Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model, two simulated ice shapes and a swept NACA 0012 wingtip. Analytical impingement efficiency data are also presented for the NLF (1)-0414 airfoil and the Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model.

  6. Application of multivariable search techniques to the optimization of airfoils in a low speed nonlinear inviscid flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Merz, A. W.

    1975-01-01

    Multivariable search techniques are applied to a particular class of airfoil optimization problems. These are the maximization of lift and the minimization of disturbance pressure magnitude in an inviscid nonlinear flow field. A variety of multivariable search techniques contained in an existing nonlinear optimization code, AESOP, are applied to this design problem. These techniques include elementary single parameter perturbation methods, organized search such as steepest-descent, quadratic, and Davidon methods, randomized procedures, and a generalized search acceleration technique. Airfoil design variables are seven in number and define perturbations to the profile of an existing NACA airfoil. The relative efficiency of the techniques are compared. It is shown that elementary one parameter at a time and random techniques compare favorably with organized searches in the class of problems considered. It is also shown that significant reductions in disturbance pressure magnitude can be made while retaining reasonable lift coefficient values at low free stream Mach numbers.

  7. Finding optimum airfoil shape to get maximum aerodynamic efficiency for a wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogukpinar, Haci; Bozkurt, Ismail

    2017-02-01

    In this study, aerodynamic performances of S-series wind turbine airfoil of S 825 are investigated to find optimum angle of attack. Aerodynamic performances calculations are carried out by utilization of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method withstand finite capacity approximation by using Reynolds-Averaged-Navier Stokes (RANS) theorem. The lift and pressure coefficients, lift to drag ratio of airfoil S 825 are analyzed with SST turbulence model then obtained results crosscheck with wind tunnel data to verify the precision of computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approximation. The comparison indicates that SST turbulence model used in this study can predict aerodynamics properties of wind blade.

  8. Analytical Investigation of Icing Limit for Diamond-Shaped Airfoil in Transonic and Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E.; Serafini, John S.

    1953-01-01

    Calculations have been made for the icing limit of a diamond airfoil at zero angle of attack in terms of the stream Mach number, stream temperature, and pressure altitude. The icing limit is defined as a wetted-surface temperature of 320 F and is related to the stream conditions by the method of Hardy. The results show that the point most likely to ice on the airfoil lies immediately behind the shoulder and is subject to possible icing at Mach numbers as high as 1.4.

  9. High-Lift Optimization Design Using Neural Networks on a Multi-Element Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenman, Roxana M.; Roth, Karlin R.; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The high-lift performance of a multi-element airfoil was optimized by using neural-net predictions that were trained using a computational data set. The numerical data was generated using a two-dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes algorithm with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Because it is difficult to predict maximum lift for high-lift systems, an empirically-based maximum lift criteria was used in this study to determine both the maximum lift and the angle at which it occurs. Multiple input, single output networks were trained using the NASA Ames variation of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for each of the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, drag, and moment). The artificial neural networks were integrated with a gradient-based optimizer. Using independent numerical simulations and experimental data for this high-lift configuration, it was shown that this design process successfully optimized flap deflection, gap, overlap, and angle of attack to maximize lift. Once the neural networks were trained and integrated with the optimizer, minimal additional computer resources were required to perform optimization runs with different initial conditions and parameters. Applying the neural networks within the high-lift rigging optimization process reduced the amount of computational time and resources by 83% compared with traditional gradient-based optimization procedures for multiple optimization runs.

  10. A computer program to generate two-dimensional grids about airfoils and other shapes by the use of Poisson's equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A method for generating two dimensional finite difference grids about airfoils and other shapes by the use of the Poisson differential equation is developed. The inhomogeneous terms are automatically chosen such that two important effects are imposed on the grid at both the inner and outer boundaries. The first effect is control of the spacing between mesh points along mesh lines intersecting the boundaries. The second effect is control of the angles with which mesh lines intersect the boundaries. A FORTRAN computer program has been written to use this method. A description of the program, a discussion of the control parameters, and a set of sample cases are included.

  11. Constrained Aeroacoustic Shape Optimization Using the Surrogate Management Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, Alison L.; Wang, Meng; Dennis, John E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reduction of noise generated by turbulent flow past the trailing-edge of a lifting surface is a challenge in many aeronautical and naval applications. Numerical predictions of trailing-edge noise necessitate the use of advanced simulation techniques such as large-eddy simulation (LES) in order to capture a wide range of turbulence scales which are the source of broadband noise. Aeroacoustic calculations of the flow over a model airfoil trailing edge using LES and aeroacoustic theory have been presented in Wang and Moin and were shown to agree favorably with experiments. The goal of the present work is to apply shape optimization to the trailing edge flow previously studied, in order to control aerodynamic noise.

  12. Additional flow field studies of the GA(W)-1 airfoil with 30-percent chord Fowler flap including slot-gap variations and cove shape modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Ostowari, C.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental measurements were made to determine the effects of slot gap opening and flap cove shape on flap and airfoil flow fields. Test model was the GA(W)-1 airfoil with 0.30c Fowler flap deflected 35 degrees. Tests were conducted with optimum, wide and narrow gaps, and with three cove shapes. Three test angles were selected, corresponding to pre-stall and post-stall conditions. Reynolds number was 2,200,000 and Mach number was 0.13. Force, surface pressure, total pressure, and split-film turbulence measurements were made. Results were compared with theory for those parameters for which theoretical values were available.

  13. Spline-Based Smoothing of Airfoil Curvatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Krist, S.

    2008-01-01

    Constrained fitting for airfoil curvature smoothing (CFACS) is a splinebased method of interpolating airfoil surface coordinates (and, concomitantly, airfoil thicknesses) between specified discrete design points so as to obtain smoothing of surface-curvature profiles in addition to basic smoothing of surfaces. CFACS was developed in recognition of the fact that the performance of a transonic airfoil is directly related to both the curvature profile and the smoothness of the airfoil surface. Older methods of interpolation of airfoil surfaces involve various compromises between smoothing of surfaces and exact fitting of surfaces to specified discrete design points. While some of the older methods take curvature profiles into account, they nevertheless sometimes yield unfavorable results, including curvature oscillations near end points and substantial deviations from desired leading-edge shapes. In CFACS as in most of the older methods, one seeks a compromise between smoothing and exact fitting. Unlike in the older methods, the airfoil surface is modified as little as possible from its original specified form and, instead, is smoothed in such a way that the curvature profile becomes a smooth fit of the curvature profile of the original airfoil specification. CFACS involves a combination of rigorous mathematical modeling and knowledge-based heuristics. Rigorous mathematical formulation provides assurance of removal of undesirable curvature oscillations with minimum modification of the airfoil geometry. Knowledge-based heuristics bridge the gap between theory and designers best practices. In CFACS, one of the measures of the deviation of an airfoil surface from smoothness is the sum of squares of the jumps in the third derivatives of a cubicspline interpolation of the airfoil data. This measure is incorporated into a formulation for minimizing an overall deviation- from-smoothness measure of the airfoil data within a specified fitting error tolerance. CFACS has been

  14. Modern Airfoil Ice Accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Sheldon, David W.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents results from the first icing tests performed in the Modem Airfoils program. Two airfoils have been subjected to icing tests in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Both airfoils were two dimensional airfoils; one was representative of a commercial transport airfoil while the other was representative of a business jet airfoil. The icing test conditions were selected from the FAR Appendix C envelopes. Effects on aerodynamic performance are presented including the effects of varying amounts of glaze ice as well as the effects of approximately the same amounts of glaze, mixed, and rime ice. Actual ice shapes obtained in these tests are also presented for these cases. In addition, comparisons are shown between ice shapes from the tests and ice shapes predicted by the computer code, LEWICE for similar conditions. Significant results from the tests are that relatively small amounts of ice can have nearly as much effect on airfoil lift coefficient as much greater amounts of ice and that glaze ice usually has a more detrimental effect than either rime or mixed ice. LEWICE predictions of ice shapes, in general, compared reasonably well with ice shapes obtained in the IRT, although differences in details of the ice shapes were observed.

  15. Transient Growth Theory Prediction of Optimal Placing of Passive and Active Flow Control Devices for Separation Delay in LPT Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumin, Anatoli; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the non-modal growth of perturbations in a boundary layer in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient is presented. The analysis is based on PSE equations for an incompressible fluid. Examples with Falkner-Skan profiles indicate that a favorable pressure gradient decreases the non-modal growth while an unfavorable pressure gradient leads to an increase of the amplification. It is suggested that the transient growth mechanism be utilized to choose optimal parameters of tripping elements on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. As an example, a boundary layer flow with a streamwise pressure gradient corresponding to the pressure distribution over a LPT airfoil is considered. It is shown that there is an optimal spacing of the tripping elements and that the transient growth effect depends on the starting point. At very low Reynolds numbers, there is a possibility to enhance the transient energy growth by means of wall cooling.

  16. On Improving Efficiency of Differential Evolution for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2004-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been provEn effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Although DE offers several advantages over traditional optimization approaches, its use in applications such as aerodynamic shape optimization where the objective function evaluations are computationally expensive is limited by the large number of function evaluations often required. In this paper various approaches for improving the efficiency of DE are reviewed and discussed. Several approaches that have proven effective for other evolutionary algorithms are modified and implemented in a DE-based aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses a Navier-Stokes solver for the objective function evaluations. Parallelization techniques on distributed computers are used to reduce turnaround times. Results are presented for standard test optimization problems and for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil. The efficiency improvements achieved by the different approaches are evaluated and compared.

  17. Optimization of the poro-serrated trailing edges for airfoil broadband noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Chong, Tze Pei; Dubois, Elisa

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an aeroacoustic investigation of a NACA0012 airfoil with a number of poro-serrated trailing edge devices that contain porous materials of various air flow resistances at the gaps between adjacent members of the serrated-sawtooth trailing edge. The main objective of this work is to determine whether multiple-mechanisms on the broadband noise reduction can co-exist on a poro-serrated trailing edge. When the sawtooth gaps are filled with porous material of low-flow resistivity, the vortex shedding tone at low-frequency could not be completely suppressed at high-velocity, but a reasonably good broadband noise reduction can be achieved at high-frequency. When the sawtooth gaps are filled with porous material of very high-flow resistivity, no vortex shedding tone is present, but the serration effect on the broadband noise reduction becomes less effective. An optimal choice of the flow resistivity for a poro-serrated configuration has been identified, where it can surpass the conventional serrated trailing edge of the same geometry by achieving a further 1.5 dB reduction in the broadband noise while completely suppressing the vortex shedding tone. A weakened turbulent boundary layer noise scattering at the poro-serrated trailing edge is reflected by the lower-turbulence intensity at the near wake centreline across the whole spanwise wavelength of the sawtooth.

  18. Effect of trailing edge shape on the separated flow characteristics around an airfoil at low Reynolds number: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomareis, Nikitas; Papadakis, George

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the flow field around a NACA 0012 airfoil at Reynolds number 50 000 and angle of attack 5° with 3 different trailing edge shapes (straight, blunt, and serrated) have been performed. Both time-averaged flow characteristics and the most dominant flow structures and their frequencies are investigated using the dynamic mode decomposition method. It is shown that for the straight trailing edge airfoil, this method can capture the fundamental as well as the subharmonic of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that develops naturally in the separating shear layer. The fundamental frequency matches well with relevant data in the literature. The blunt trailing edge results in periodic vortex shedding, with frequency close to the subharmonic of the natural shear layer frequency. The shedding, resulting from a global instability, has an upstream effect and forces the separating shear layer. Due to forcing, the shear layer frequency locks onto the shedding frequency while the natural frequency (and its subharmonic) is suppressed. The presence of serrations in the trailing edge creates a spanwise pressure gradient, which is responsible for the development of a secondary flow pattern in the spanwise direction. This pattern affects the mean flow in the near wake. It can explain an unexpected observation, namely, that the velocity deficit downstream of a trough is smaller than the deficit after a protrusion. Furthermore, the insertion of serrations attenuates the energy of vortex shedding by de-correlating the spanwise coherence of the vortices. This results in weaker forcing of the separating shear layer, and both the subharmonics of the natural frequency and the shedding frequency appear in the spectra.

  19. On Improving Efficiency of Differential Evolution for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.

    2004-01-01

    Differential Evolution (DE) is a simple and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems. Although DE offers several advantages over traditional optimization approaches, its use in applications such as aerodynamic shape optimization where the objective function evaluations are computationally expensive is limited by the large number of function evaluations often required. In this paper various approaches for improving the efficiency of DE are reviewed and discussed. These approaches are implemented in a DE-based aerodynamic shape optimization method that uses a Navier-Stokes solver for the objective function evaluations. Parallelization techniques on distributed computers are used to reduce turnaround times. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil. The efficiency improvements achieved by the different approaches are evaluated and compared.

  20. Structural shape optimization in multidisciplinary system synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1988-01-01

    Structural shape optimization couples with other discipline optimization in the design of complex engineering systems. For instance, the wing structural weight and elastic deformations couple to aerodynamic loads and aircraft performance through drag. This coupling makes structural shape optimization a subtask in the overall vehicle synthesis. Decomposition methods for optimization and sensitivity analysis allow the specialized disciplinary methods to be used while the disciplines are temporarily decoupled, after which the interdisciplinary couplings are restored at the system level. Application of decomposition methods to structures-aerodynamics coupling in aircraft is outlined and illustrated with a numerical example of a transport aircraft. It is concluded that these methods may integrate structural and aerodynamic shape optimizations with the unified objective of the maximum aircraft performance.

  1. Shape Optimization of Swimming Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, J.; Hosoi, A.E.

    2005-03-01

    The swimming behavior of a flexible sheet which moves by propagating deformation waves along its body was first studied by G. I. Taylor in 1951. In addition to being of theoretical interest, this problem serves as a useful model of the locomotion of gastropods and various micro-organisms. Although the mechanics of swimming via wave propagation has been studied extensively, relatively little work has been done to define or describe optimal swimming by this mechanism.We carry out this objective for a sheet that is separated from a rigid substrate by a thin film of viscous Newtonian fluid. Using a lubrication approximation to model the dynamics, we derive the relevant Euler-Lagrange equations to optimize swimming speed and efficiency. The optimization equations are solved numerically using two different schemes: a limited memory BFGS method that uses cubic splines to represent the wave profile, and a multi-shooting Runge-Kutta approach that uses the Levenberg-Marquardt method to vary the parameters of the equations until the constraints are satisfied. The former approach is less efficient but generalizes nicely to the non-lubrication setting. For each optimization problem we obtain a one parameter family of solutions that becomes singular in a self-similar fashion as the parameter approaches a critical value. We explore the validity of the lubrication approximation near this singular limit by monitoring higher order corrections to the zeroth order theory and by comparing the results with finite element solutions of the full Stokes equations.

  2. Summary of Airfoil Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stivers, Louis S.; Abbott, Ira H.; von Doenhoff, Albert E.

    1945-01-01

    Recent airfoil data for both flight and wind-tunnel tests have been collected and correlated insofar as possible. The flight data consist largely of drag measurements made by the wake-survey method. Most of the data on airfoil section characteristics were obtained in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel. Detail data necessary for the application of NACA 6-serles airfoils to wing design are presented in supplementary figures, together with recent data for the NACA 24-, 44-, and 230-series airfoils. The general methods used to derive the basic thickness forms for NACA 6- and 7-series airfoils and their corresponding pressure distributions are presented. Data and methods are given for rapidly obtaining the approximate pressure distributions for NACA four-digit, five-digit, 6-, and 7-series airfoils. The report includes an analysis of the lift, drag, pitching-moment, and critical-speed characteristics of the airfoils, together with a discussion of the effects of surface conditions. Available data on high-lift devices are presented. Problems associated with lateral-control devices, leading-edge air intakes, and interference are briefly discussed. The data indicate that the effects of surface condition on the lift and drag characteristics are at least as large as the effects of the airfoil shape and must be considered in airfoil selection and the prediction of wing characteristics. Airfoils permitting extensive laminar flow, such as the NACA 6-series airfoils, have much lower drag coefficients at high speed and cruising lift coefficients than earlier types-of airfoils if, and only if, the wing surfaces are sufficiently smooth and fair. The NACA 6-series airfoils also have favorable critical-speed characteristics and do not appear to present unusual problems associated with the application of high-lift and lateral-control devices. Much of the data given in the NACA Advance Confidential Report entitled "Preliminary Low-Drag-Airfoil and Flap Data from

  3. Investigation to optimize the passive shock wave/boundary layer control for supercritical airfoil drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Dyer, R.

    1984-01-01

    The passive shock wave/boundary layer control for reducing the drag of 14%-thick supercritical airfoil was investigated in the 3 in. x 15.4 in. RPI Transonic Wind Tunnel with and without the top wall insert at transonic Mach numbers. Top wall insert was installed to increase the flow Mach number to 0.90 with the model mounted on the test section bottom wall. Various porous surfaces with a cavity underneath were positioned on the area of the airfoil where the shock wave occurs. The higher pressure behind the shock wave circulates flow through the cavity to the lower pressure ahead of the shock wave. The effects from this circulation prevent boundary layer separation and enthropy increase hrough the shock wave. The static pressure distributions over the airfoil, the wake impact pressure survey for determining the profile drag and the Schlieren photographs for porous surfaces are presented and compared with the results for solid surface airfoil. With a 2.8% uniform porosity the normal shock wave for the solid surface was changed to a lambda shock wave, and the wake impact pressure data indicate a drag coefficient reduction as much as 45% lower than for the solid surface airfoil at high transonic Mach numbers.

  4. Aerodynamic shape optimization via discrete adjoint formulation using Euler equations on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Bijoyendra

    A methodology for aerodynamic shape optimization on two-dimensional unstructured grids using Euler equations is presented. The sensitivity derivatives are obtained using the discrete adjoint formulation. The Euler equations are solved using a fully implicit, upwind, cell-vertex, median-dual finite volume scheme. Roe's upwind flux-difference-splitting scheme is used to determine the inviscid fluxes. To enable discontinuities to be captured without oscillations, limiters are used at the reconstruction stage. The derivation of the accurate discretization of the flux Jacobians due to the conserved variables and the entire mesh required for the costate equation is developed and its efficient accumulation algorithm on an edge-based loop is implemented and documented. Exact linearization of Roe's approximate Riemann solver is incorporated into the aerodynamic analysis as well as the sensitivity analysis. Higher-order discretization is achieved by including all distance-one and -two terms due to the reconstruction and the limiter, although the limiter is not linearized. Two-dimensional body conforming grid movement strategy and grid sensitivity are obtained by considering the grid to be a system of interconnected springs. Arbitrary airfoil geometries are obtained using an algorithm for generalized von Mises airfoils with finite trailing edges. An incremental iterative formulation is used to solve the large sparse linear systems of equations obtained from the sensitivity analysis. The discrete linear systems obtained from the equations governing the flow and those from the sensitivity analysis are solved iteratively using the preconditioned GMRES (Generalized Minimum Residual) algorithm. For the optimization process, a constrained nonlinear programming package which uses a sequential quadratic programming algorithm is used. This study presents the process of analytically obtaining the exact discrete sensitivity derivatives and computationally cost-effective algorithms to

  5. Large and Small Droplet Impingement Data on Airfoils and Two Simulated Ice Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, Michael; Wong, See-Cheuk; Rachman, Arief; Hung, Kuohsing E.; Vu, Giao T.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    2007-01-01

    Water droplet impingement data were obtained at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) for four wings and one wing with two simulated ice shapes. The wings tested include three 36-in. chord wings (MS(1)-317, GLC-305, and a NACA 652-415) and a 57-in. chord Twin Otter horizontal tail section. The simulated ice shapes were 22.5- and 45-min glaze ice shapes for the Twin Otter horizontal tail section generated using the LEWICE 2.2 ice accretion program. The impingement experiments were performed with spray clouds having median volumetric diameters of 11, 21, 79, 137, and 168 mm. Comparisons to the experimental data were generated which showed good agreement for the clean wings and ice shapes at lower drop sizes. For larger drop sizes LEWICE 2.2 over predicted the collection efficiencies due to droplet splashing effects which were not modeled in the program. Also for the more complex glaze ice shapes interpolation errors resulted in the over prediction of collection efficiencies in cove and shadow regions of ice shapes.

  6. Airfoil-shaped extension-twist-coupled composite star-beams for rotor blade tip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadev, Sthanu

    airfoil. An ABAQUS based finite element approach is employed to obtain a first characterization of the integral blade tip pitch response to changes in axial load and torque.

  7. Airfoil structure

    DOEpatents

    Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

    1998-01-13

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

  8. Airfoil structure

    DOEpatents

    Frey, Gary A.; Twardochleb, Christopher Z.

    1998-01-01

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

  9. Error estimation and structural shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaoguang

    This work is concerned with three topics: error estimation, data smoothing process and the structural shape optimization design and analysis. In particular, the superconvergent stress recovery technique, the dual kriging B-spline curve and surface fittings, the development and the implementation of a novel node-based numerical shape optimization package are addressed. Concept and new technique of accurate stress recovery are developed and applied in finding the lateral buckling parameters of plate structures. Some useful conclusions are made for the finite element Reissner-Mindlin plate solutions. The powerful dual kriging B-spline fitting technique is reviewed and a set of new compact formulations are developed. This data smoothing method is then applied in accurately recovering curves and surfaces. The new node-based shape optimization method is based on the consideration that the critical stress and displacement constraints are generally located along or near the structural boundary. The method puts the maximum weights on the selected boundary nodes, referred to as the design points, so that the time-consuming sensitivity analysis is related to the perturbation of only these nodes. The method also allows large shape changes to achieve the optimal shape. The design variables are specified as the moving magnitudes for the prescribed design points that are always located at the structural boundary. Theories, implementations and applications are presented for various modules by which the package is constructed. Especially, techniques involving finite element error estimation, adaptive mesh generation, design sensitivity analysis, and data smoothing are emphasized.

  10. Improving the efficiency of aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay; Eleshaky, Mohamed E.

    1994-01-01

    The computational efficiency of an aerodynamic shape optimization procedure that is based on discrete sensitivity analysis is increased through the implementation of two improvements. The first improvement involves replacing a grid-point-based approach for surface representation with a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of the surface. Explicit analytical expressions for the grid sensitivity terms are developed for both approaches. The second improvement proposes the use of Newton's method in lieu of an alternating direction implicit methodology to calculate the highly converged flow solutions that are required to compute the sensitivity coefficients. The modified design procedure is demonstrated by optimizing the shape of an internal-external nozzle configuration. Practically identical optimization results are obtained that are independent of the method used to represent the surface. A substantial factor of 8 decrease in computational time for the optimization process is achieved by implementing both of the design procedure improvements.

  11. Aerodynamic shape optimization of wing and wing-body configurations using control theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for wing and wing-body design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for airfoils and wings in which the shape and the surrounding body-fitted mesh are both generated analytically, and the control is the mapping function. Recently, the method has been implemented for both potential flows and flows governed by the Euler equations using an alternative formulation which employs numerically generated grids, so that it can more easily be extended to treat general configurations. Here results are presented both for the optimization of a swept wing using an analytic mapping, and for the optimization of wing and wing-body configurations using a general mesh.

  12. Shape optimization techniques for musical instrument design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique, Luis; Antunes, Jose; Carvalho, Joao S.

    2002-11-01

    The design of musical instruments is still mostly based on empirical knowledge and costly experimentation. One interesting improvement is the shape optimization of resonating components, given a number of constraints (allowed parameter ranges, shape smoothness, etc.), so that vibrations occur at specified modal frequencies. Each admissible geometrical configuration generates an error between computed eigenfrequencies and the target set. Typically, error surfaces present many local minima, corresponding to suboptimal designs. This difficulty can be overcome using global optimization techniques, such as simulated annealing. However these methods are greedy, concerning the number of function evaluations required. Thus, the computational effort can be unacceptable if complex problems, such as bell optimization, are tackled. Those issues are addressed in this paper, and a method for improving optimization procedures is proposed. Instead of using the local geometric parameters as searched variables, the system geometry is modeled in terms of truncated series of orthogonal space-funcitons, and optimization is performed on their amplitude coefficients. Fourier series and orthogonal polynomials are typical such functions. This technique reduces considerably the number of searched variables, and has a potential for significant computational savings in complex problems. It is illustrated by optimizing the shapes of both current and uncommon marimba bars.

  13. Airfoils for wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    2000-05-30

    Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

  14. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    2000-01-01

    Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

  15. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2010-11-09

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of hook shaped struts each mounted within channels extending in a spanwise direction of the spar and the shell to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also fanning a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure. The hook struts have a hooked shaped end and a rounded shaped end in order to insert the struts into the spar.

  16. Shape optimization of tibial prosthesis components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1993-01-01

    NASA technology and optimal design methodologies originally developed for the optimization of composite structures (engine blades) are adapted and applied to the optimization of orthopaedic knee implants. A method is developed enabling the shape tailoring of the tibial components of a total knee replacement implant for optimal interaction within the environment of the tibia. The shape of the implant components are optimized such that the stresses in the bone are favorably controlled to minimize bone degradation, to improve the mechanical integrity of the implant/interface/bone system, and to prevent failures of the implant components. A pilot tailoring system is developed and the feasibility of the concept is demonstrated and evaluated. The methodology and evolution of the existing aerospace technology from which this pilot optimization code was developed is also presented and discussed. Both symmetric and unsymmetric in-plane loading conditions are investigated. The results of the optimization process indicate a trend toward wider and tapered posts as well as thicker backing trays. Unique component geometries were obtained for the different load cases.

  17. Design of advanced airfoil for stall-regulated wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, F.; Coiro, D. P.; Bizzarrini, N.; Calise, G.

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, all the modern MW-class wind turbines make use of pitch control to optimize the rotor performance and control the turbine. However, for kW-range machines, stall-regulated solutions are still attractive and largely used for their simplicity and robustness. On the design phase, the aerodynamics plays a crucial role, especially concerning the selection/design of the necessary airfoils. This is because the airfoil performance should guarantee high wind turbine performance, but also the needed machine control capabilities. In the present work, the design of a new airfoil dedicated for stall machines is discussed. The design strategy makes use of numerical optimization scheme where a gradient-based algorithm is coupled with XFOIL code and an original Bezier-curves-based parameterization to describe the airfoil shape. The performances of the new airfoil are compared in free and fixed transition conditions. In addition, the performance of the rotor is analysed comparing the impact of the new geometry with alternative candidates. The results show that the new airfoil offers better performance and control than existing candidates do.

  18. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  19. Rapid Parameterization Schemes for Aircraft Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    A rapid shape parameterization tool called PROTEUS is developed for aircraft shape optimization. This tool can be applied directly to any aircraft geometry that has been defined in PLOT3D format, with the restriction that each aircraft component must be defined by only one data block. PROTEUS has eight types of parameterization schemes: planform, wing surface, twist, body surface, body scaling, body camber line, shifting/scaling, and linear morphing. These parametric schemes can be applied to two types of components: wing-type surfaces (e.g., wing, canard, horizontal tail, vertical tail, and pylon) and body-type surfaces (e.g., fuselage, pod, and nacelle). These schemes permit the easy setup of commonly used shape modification methods, and each customized parametric scheme can be applied to the same type of component for any configuration. This paper explains the mathematics for these parametric schemes and uses two supersonic configurations to demonstrate the application of these schemes.

  20. The Determination of the Geometries of Multiple-Element Airfoils Optimized for Maximum Lift Coefficient. Ph.D. Thesis - Illinois Univ., Urbana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    Optimum airfoils in the sense of maximum lift coefficient are obtained by a newly developed method. The maximum lift coefficient is achieved by requiring that the turbulent skin friction be zero in the pressure rise region on the upper surface. Under this constraint, the pressure distribution is optimized. The optimum pressure distribution consists of a uniform stagnation pressure on the lower surface, a uniform minimum pressure on the upper surface immediately downstream of the front stagnation point followed by a Stratford zero skin friction pressure rise. When multiple-element airfoils are under consideration, this optimum pressure distribution appears on every element. The parameters used to specify the pressure distribution on each element are the Reynolds number and the normalized trailing edge velocity. The newly developed method of design computes the velocity distribution on a given airfoil and modifies the airfoil contour in a systematic manner until the desired velocity distribution is achieved. There are no limitations on how many elements the airfoil to be designed can have.

  1. Aerodynamic shape optimization of arbitrary hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sheffer, Scott G.

    1991-01-01

    A new method was developed to optimize, in terms of aerodynamic wave drag minimization, arbitrary (nonaxisymmetric) hypersonic vehicles in modified Newtonian flow, while maintaining the initial volume and length of the vehicle. This new method uses either a surface fitted Fourier series to represent the vehicle's geometry or an independent point motion algorithm. In either case, the coefficients of the Fourier series or the spatial locations of the points defining each cross section were varied and a numerical optimization algorithm based on a quasi-Newton gradient search concept was used to determine the new optimal configuration. Results indicate a significant decrease in aerodynamic wave drag for simple and complex geometries at relatively low CPU costs. In the case of a cone, the results agreed well with known analytical optimum ogive shapes. The procedure is capable of accepting more complex flow field analysis codes.

  2. An experimental mapping of the flow field behind a glaze ice shape on a NACA 0012 airfoil. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spring, Samuel A.

    1988-01-01

    The flow field about a NACA 0012 airfoil with a simulated glaze ice shape was studied. Split hot-film anemometry was used to measure the streamwise velocity component in the upper and lower separation bubbles aft of the glaze ice horns. Velocity profiles were presented as well as the boundary layer momentum and displacement thickness distributions through the bubbles. Data were presented at angles of attack of 0, 2 and 4 deg and clearly showed the large region of reverse flow. A detailed discussion of split hot-film acquisition and data reduction, and possible sources of error has been included.

  3. Shape Optimization by Bayesian-Validated Computer-Simulation Surrogates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patera, Anthony T.

    1997-01-01

    A nonparametric-validated, surrogate approach to optimization has been applied to the computational optimization of eddy-promoter heat exchangers and to the experimental optimization of a multielement airfoil. In addition to the baseline surrogate framework, a surrogate-Pareto framework has been applied to the two-criteria, eddy-promoter design problem. The Pareto analysis improves the predictability of the surrogate results, preserves generality, and provides a means to rapidly determine design trade-offs. Significant contributions have been made in the geometric description used for the eddy-promoter inclusions as well as to the surrogate framework itself. A level-set based, geometric description has been developed to define the shape of the eddy-promoter inclusions. The level-set technique allows for topology changes (from single-body,eddy-promoter configurations to two-body configurations) without requiring any additional logic. The continuity of the output responses for input variations that cross the boundary between topologies has been demonstrated. Input-output continuity is required for the straightforward application of surrogate techniques in which simplified, interpolative models are fitted through a construction set of data. The surrogate framework developed previously has been extended in a number of ways. First, the formulation for a general, two-output, two-performance metric problem is presented. Surrogates are constructed and validated for the outputs. The performance metrics can be functions of both outputs, as well as explicitly of the inputs, and serve to characterize the design preferences. By segregating the outputs and the performance metrics, an additional level of flexibility is provided to the designer. The validated outputs can be used in future design studies and the error estimates provided by the output validation step still apply, and require no additional appeals to the expensive analysis. Second, a candidate-based a posteriori

  4. Parametric geometric model and shape optimization of an underwater glider with blended-wing-body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chunya; Song, Baowei; Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Underwater glider, as a new kind of autonomous underwater vehicles, has many merits such as long-range, extended-duration and low costs. The shape of underwater glider is an important factor in determining the hydrodynamic efficiency. In this paper, a high lift to drag ratio configuration, the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB), is used to design a small civilian under water glider. In the parametric geometric model of the BWB underwater glider, the planform is defined with Bezier curve and linear line, and the section is defined with symmetrical airfoil NACA 0012. Computational investigations are carried out to study the hydrodynamic performance of the glider using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code Fluent. The Kriging-based genetic algorithm, called Efficient Global Optimization (EGO), is applied to hydrodynamic design optimization. The result demonstrates that the BWB underwater glider has excellent hydrodynamic performance, and the lift to drag ratio of initial design is increased by 7% in the EGO process.

  5. Shape optimization: Good looks and acoustics too!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Antonio, Peter; Cox, Trevor J.; Haas, Steve

    2003-04-01

    One of the challenges in the architectural acoustic design of museums and other public spaces is to develop contemporary scattering surfaces that complement contemporary architecture in the way that statuary, coffered ceilings, columns, and relief ornamentation complemented classic architecture. Often acoustic surfaces satisfy the acoustics, but may or may not satisfy the aesthetics. One approach that has been successful employs a combination of boundary element and multidimensional optimization techniques. The architect supplies the desired shape motif and the acoustician supplies the acoustical performance requirements. The optimization program then provides an Arcousthetic surface, which simultaneously satisfies the architecture, the acoustics, and the aesthetics. The program can be used with diffusive or diffsorptive surfaces. Photos of installations using these acoustic tools and a description of the design of the National Museum of the American Indian will also be presented to illustrate the usefulness of these devices and their impact on architectural acoustics.

  6. Iced-airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Broeren, A. P.; Blumenthal, L. A.

    2005-07-01

    Past research on airfoil aerodynamics in icing are reviewed. This review emphasizes the time period after the 1978 NASA Lewis workshop that initiated the modern icing research program at NASA and the current period after the 1994 ATR accident where aerodynamics research has been more aircraft safety focused. Research pre-1978 is also briefly reviewed. Following this review, our current knowledge of iced airfoil aerodynamics is presented from a flowfield-physics perspective. This article identifies four classes of ice accretions: roughness, horn ice, streamwise ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. For each class, the key flowfield features such as flowfield separation and reattachment are discussed and how these contribute to the known aerodynamic effects of these ice shapes. Finally Reynolds number and Mach number effects on iced-airfoil aerodynamics are summarized.

  7. Hydrodynamic optimality of ribbon fin shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, Rahul; Maciver, Malcolm; Patankar, Neelesh

    2011-11-01

    The primary mode of propulsion in gymnotiform and balistiform swimmers is via the undulation of anal and/or dorsal fins, commonly referred to as ribbon fins, attached to a more or less rigid body. Ribbon fins usually have a convex shape as opposed to a rectangular or concave profile. In this work we investigate if there is a hydrodynamic basis underlying this observation. Fully resolved fluid dynamics computations are performed to calculate the mechanical cost of transport (COT) as a measure of swimming efficiency of the fin. We find that the ribbon fin of a black ghost knifefish has lower COT compared to a hypothetical rectangular ribbon fin. In order to quantify this difference in COT between the two fin shapes, we obtain scaling for COT in terms of various parameters which affect the swimming performance of the fin. Using scaling arguments we address the question of how a convex profile, commonly observed in gymnotiform and balistiform swimmers, is optimal compared to rectangular or concave shapes. NSF support is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. First-Order Model Management With Variable-Fidelity Physics Applied to Multi-Element Airfoil Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, N. M.; Nielsen, E. J.; Lewis, R. M.; Anderson, W. K.

    2000-01-01

    First-order approximation and model management is a methodology for a systematic use of variable-fidelity models or approximations in optimization. The intent of model management is to attain convergence to high-fidelity solutions with minimal expense in high-fidelity computations. The savings in terms of computationally intensive evaluations depends on the ability of the available lower-fidelity model or a suite of models to predict the improvement trends for the high-fidelity problem, Variable-fidelity models can be represented by data-fitting approximations, variable-resolution models. variable-convergence models. or variable physical fidelity models. The present work considers the use of variable-fidelity physics models. We demonstrate the performance of model management on an aerodynamic optimization of a multi-element airfoil designed to operate in the transonic regime. Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations represent the high-fidelity model, while the Euler equations represent the low-fidelity model. An unstructured mesh-based analysis code FUN2D evaluates functions and sensitivity derivatives for both models. Model management for the present demonstration problem yields fivefold savings in terms of high-fidelity evaluations compared to optimization done with high-fidelity computations alone.

  9. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  10. Optimization of lens shape for autostereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ping; An, Shu; Ma, Jianshe

    2016-10-01

    The three-dimensional(3D) displays based on binocular parallax have drawn increasingly interests. The light splitting element, which presents separate images to the viewer's left and right eyes, plays an important part in the auto-stereoscopic display. Lenticular lenses are widely used as the light splitting elements. However, the crosstalk resulted from the unsatisfied splitting may reduce the 3D experience. It was determined that the most suitable cross sectional shape for lenticular lenses is elliptical. Firstly, the formula of the surface is derived based on the ellipse expression and the requirement of the 3D display system, that is y2+0.5651x2 - 303.4768=0. Secondly, one axial source and 4 off-axial sources placed at the heights of 2.5mm, 5mm, 7.5mm and 8mm are used to analyze the beam splitting quality of the cylindrical and elliptical lens element, respectively. The spot of elliptical lens is smaller which means a better beam splitting quality. Thirdly, Monte Carlo Non-Sequential Ray tracing algorithm is used to simulate the luminance distribution on the viewing plane, the narrower width of vertical stripes means that the aberration is suppressed. Finally, the shape of elliptical can reduce the processing difficulty with the 10μm minimum step width. In a word, the optimization of the surface has a significant effect on the improvement of stereoscopic depth and the reduction of ghost images.

  11. Supersonic wing and wing-body shape optimization using an adjoint formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for wing and wing-body design of supersonic configurations. The work represents an extension of our earlier research in which control theory is used to devise a design procedure that significantly reduces the computational cost by employing an adjoint equation. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used toeviseransonic design methods for airfoils and wings in which the shape and the surrounding body-fitted mesh are both generated analytically, and the control is the mapping function. The method has also been implemented for both transonic potential flows and transonic flows governed by the Euler equations using an alternative formulation which employs numerically generated grids, so that it can treat more general configurations. Here results are presented for three-dimensional design cases subject to supersonic flows governed by the Euler equation.

  12. Transonic single-mode flutter and buffet of a low aspect ratio wing having a subsonic airfoil shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Transonic flutter and buffet results obtained from wind-tunnel tests of a low aspect ratio semispan wing model are presented. The tests were conducted to investigate potential transonic aeroelastic problems of vehicles having subsonic airfoil sections. The model employed NACA 00XX-64 airfoil sections in the streamwise direction and had a 14 deg leading edge sweep angle. Aspect ratio, and average thickness were 4.0, 0.35, and 8 percent, respectively. The model was tested at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.95 at angles of attack from 0 deg to 15 deg. Two zero lift flutter conditions were found that involved essentially single normal mode vibrations. With boundary layer trips on the model, flutter occurred in a narrow Mach number range centered at about Mach 0.90. The frequency and motion of this flutter were like that of the first normal mode vibration. With the trips removed flutter occurred at a slightly high Mach number but in a mode strongly resembling that of the second normal mode.

  13. A Preconditioning Method for Shape Optimization Governed by the Euler Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arian, Eyal; Vatsa, Veer N.

    1998-01-01

    We consider a classical aerodynamic shape optimization problem subject to the compressible Euler flow equations. The gradient of the cost functional with respect to the shape variables is derived with the adjoint method at the continuous level. The Hessian (second order derivative of the cost functional with respect to the shape variables) is approximated also at the continuous level, as first introduced by Arian and Ta'asan (1996). The approximation of the Hessian is used to approximate the Newton step which is essential to accelerate the numerical solution of the optimization problem. The design space is discretized in the maximum dimension, i.e., the location of each point on the intersection of the computational mesh with the airfoil is taken to be an independent design variable. We give numerical examples for 86 design variables in two different flow speeds and achieve an order of magnitude reduction in the cost functional at a computational effort of a full solution of the analysis partial differential equation (PDE).

  14. A viscous-inviscid interactive procedure for rotational flow in cascades of two dimensional airfoils of arbitrary shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    A viscous-inviscid interactive calculation procedure is developed for application to flow in cascades of two-dimensional airfoils. This procedure has essentially three components. First, a numerical solution of the Eulers equations which can accommodate an arbitrarily specified cascade geometry of the cascade. A method of grid generation has been used which relics in part on a succession of conformal mappings. Second, a viscous solution for use in boundary layers and wake regions was programmed. Finally, an interactive scheme which takes the form of a source-sink distribution along the blade surface and wake centerline is employed. Results were obtained with this procedure for several cascade flow situations, and some comparisons with experiment are presented.

  15. Dose-shaping using targeted sparse optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, George A.; Ruan, Dan

    2013-07-15

    distribution than conventional objective functions. In particular, E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-optimized plans for the pancreas case and head-and-neck case exhibited substantially improved sparing of the spinal cord and parotid glands, respectively, while maintaining or improving sparing for other OARs and markedly improving PTV homogeneity. Plan deliverability for E{sub tot}{sup sparse}-optimized plans was shown to be better than their associated clinical plans, according to the two-dimensional modulation index.Conclusions: These results suggest that our formulation may be used to improve dose-shaping and OAR-sparing for complicated disease sites, such as the pancreas or head and neck. Furthermore, our objective function and constraints are linear and constitute a linear program, which converges to the global minimum quickly, and can be easily implemented in treatment planning software. Thus, the authors expect fast translation of our method to the clinic where it may have a positive impact on plan quality for challenging disease sites.

  16. Generalized multi-point inverse airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, Michael S.; Maughmer, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    In a rather general sense, inverse airfoil design can be taken to mean the problem of specifying a desired set of airfoil characteristics, such as the airfoil maximum thickness ratio, pitching moment, part of the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development, etc., then from this information determine the corresponding airfoil shape. This paper presents a method which approaches the design problem from this perspective. In particular, the airfoil is divided into segments along which, together with the design conditions, either the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development may be prescribed. In addition to these local desired distributions, single parameters like the airfoil thickness can be specified. The problem of finding the airfoil shape is determined by coupling an incompressible, inviscid, inverse airfoil design method with a direct integral boundary-layer analysis method and solving the resulting nonlinear equations via a multidimensional Newton iteration technique. The approach is fast and easily allows for interactive design. It is also flexible and could be adapted to solving compressible, inverse airfoil design problems.

  17. Control theory based airfoil design using the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Antony; Reuther, James

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In our previous work it was shown that control theory could be employed to devise effective optimization procedures for two-dimensional profiles by using the potential flow equation with either a conformal mapping or a general coordinate system. The goal of our present work is to extend the development to treat the Euler equations in two-dimensions by procedures that can readily be generalized to treat complex shapes in three-dimensions. Therefore, we have developed methods which can address airfoil design through either an analytic mapping or an arbitrary grid perturbation method applied to a finite volume discretization of the Euler equations. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented for both the inverse problem and drag minimization problem.

  18. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  19. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1996-10-08

    Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

  20. Composite airfoil assembly

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-03-03

    A composite blade assembly for mounting on a turbine wheel includes a ceramic airfoil and an airfoil platform. The ceramic airfoil is formed with an airfoil portion, a blade shank portion and a blade dovetail tang. The metal platform includes a platform shank and a radially inner platform dovetail. The ceramic airfoil is captured within the metal platform, such that in use, the ceramic airfoil is held within the turbine wheel independent of the metal platform.

  1. Ice Accretions on Modern Airfoils Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The Icing Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field initiated and conducted the Modern Airfoils Ice Accretions project to identify ice shapes and determine their effects on the aerodynamic performance of aircraft, particularly on lift and drag. Previous aircraft ice shape and performance documentation focused on a few, older airfoils. This permitted more basic studies of the ice accretion process to be undertaken. However, having established both a working data base of ice shapes and the capability to predict these shapes for basic airfoils, questions arose about how ice might accrete differently on airfoils more representative of those being designed and flown on various aircraft today. Similarly, information about how these ice shapes would affect aerodynamic performance was needed.

  2. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Based on Free-form Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a free-form deformation technique suitable for aerodynamic shape optimization. Because the proposed technique is independent of grid topology, we can treat structured and unstructured computational fluid dynamics grids in the same manner. The proposed technique is an alternative shape parameterization technique to a trivariate volume technique. It retains the flexibility and freedom of trivariate volumes for CFD shape optimization, but it uses a bivariate surface representation. This reduces the number of design variables by an order of magnitude, and it provides much better control for surface shape changes. The proposed technique is simple, compact, and efficient. The analytical sensitivity derivatives are independent of the design variables and are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. The paper includes the complete formulation and aerodynamics shape optimization results.

  3. Aerodynamic Shape Sensitivity Analysis and Design Optimization of Complex Configurations Using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured grid approach to aerodynamic shape sensitivity analysis and design optimization has been developed and is extended to model geometrically complex configurations. The advantage of unstructured grids (when compared with a structured-grid approach) is their inherent ability to discretize irregularly shaped domains with greater efficiency and less effort. Hence, this approach is ideally suited for geometrically complex configurations of practical interest. In this work the nonlinear Euler equations are solved using an upwind, cell-centered, finite-volume scheme. The discrete, linearized systems which result from this scheme are solved iteratively by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient-like algorithm known as GMRES for the two-dimensional geometry and a Gauss-Seidel algorithm for the three-dimensional; similar procedures are used to solve the accompanying linear aerodynamic sensitivity equations in incremental iterative form. As shown, this particular form of the sensitivity equation makes large-scale gradient-based aerodynamic optimization possible by taking advantage of memory efficient methods to construct exact Jacobian matrix-vector products. Simple parameterization techniques are utilized for demonstrative purposes. Once the surface has been deformed, the unstructured grid is adapted by considering the mesh as a system of interconnected springs. Grid sensitivities are obtained by differentiating the surface parameterization and the grid adaptation algorithms with ADIFOR (which is an advanced automatic-differentiation software tool). To demonstrate the ability of this procedure to analyze and design complex configurations of practical interest, the sensitivity analysis and shape optimization has been performed for a two-dimensional high-lift multielement airfoil and for a three-dimensional Boeing 747-200 aircraft.

  4. Laminar-flow airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An airfoil having a fore airfoil element, an aft airfoil element, and a slot region in between them. These elements induce laminar flow over substantially all of the fore airfoil element and also provide for laminar flow in at least a portion of the slot region. The method of the invention is one for inducing natural laminar flow over an airfoil. In the method, a fore airfoil element, having a leading and trailing edge, and an aft airfoil element define a slot region. Natural laminar flow is induced over substantially all of the fore airfoil element, by inducing the pressures on both surfaces of the fore airfoil element to decrease to a location proximate the trailing edge of the fore airfoil element using pressures created by the aft airfoil element.

  5. Shape optimization of the modular press body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabiszczak, Stanisław

    2016-12-01

    A paper contains an optimization algorithm of cross-sectional dimensions of a modular press body for the minimum mass criterion. Parameters of the wall thickness and the angle of their inclination relative to the base of section are assumed as the decision variables. The overall dimensions are treated as a constant. The optimal values of parameters were calculated using numerical method of the tool Solver in the program Microsoft Excel. The results of the optimization procedure helped reduce body weight by 27% while maintaining the required rigidity of the body.

  6. Center for Shape Optimization and Material Layout

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    that eventually participate in the optimal layout for non -self-adjoint problems . Currently, these microstructures are worked out numerically [6...the fourth order problem arising in the theory of plates. 1.2 The Fourth Order Problems Direct Approach in the Optimal Design of Plates. The state of... constraint set. In fact, the constraint set is not only nonlinear, its also non -smooth, and even non - convex . Worst of all, we do not even have an analytic

  7. Topology and boundary shape optimization as an integrated design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendsoe, Martin Philip; Rodrigues, Helder Carrico

    1990-01-01

    The optimal topology of a two dimensional linear elastic body can be computed by regarding the body as a domain of the plane with a high density of material. Such an optimal topology can then be used as the basis for a shape optimization method that computes the optimal form of the boundary curves of the body. This results in an efficient and reliable design tool, which can be implemented via common FEM mesh generator and CAD type input-output facilities.

  8. Design of a family of new advanced airfoils for low wind class turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    In order to maximize the ratio of energy capture and reduce the cost of energy, the selection of the airfoils to be used along the blade plays a crucial role. Despite the general usage of existing airfoils, more and more, families of airfoils specially tailored for specific applications are developed. The present research is focused on the design of a new family of airfoils to be used for the blade of one megawatt wind turbine working in low wind conditions. A hybrid optimization scheme has been implemented, combining together genetic and gradient based algorithms. Large part of the work is dedicated to present and discuss the requirements that needed to be satisfied in order to have a consistent family of geometries with high efficiency, high lift and good structural characteristics. For each airfoil, these characteristics are presented and compared to the ones of existing airfoils. Finally, the aerodynamic design of a new blade for low wind class turbine is illustrated and compared to a reference shape developed by using existing geometries. Due to higher lift performance, the results show a sensitive saving in chords, wetted area and so in loads in idling position.

  9. Shape Optimization of Cochlear Implant Electrode Array Using Genetic Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Shape Optimization of Cochlear Implant Electrode Array using Genetic Algorithms Charles T.M. Choi, Ph.D., senior member, IEEE Department of...c.t.choi@ieee.org Abstract−Finite element analysis is used to compute the current distribution of the human cochlea during cochlear implant electrical...stimulation. Genetic algorithms are then applied in conjunction with the finite element analysis to optimize the shape of cochlear implant electrode array

  10. Shape-Measure Method for Introducing the Nearly Optimal Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    elements. The problem is to find the optimal domain approximately for a given functional that is involved with the solution of a linear or nonlinear...elliptic equation with a boundary condition over a domain. The Shape-Measure method, in Cartesian coordinates will be used to find the nearly optimal...domain by using the embedding method. Then the Shape-Measure method will be applied to find the best domain approximately. An example will be given.

  11. Supercritical Flow Past Symmetrical Airfoils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    about quasi-elliptic airfoil sections. The method was later extended by Boerstoel [1967] to present a catalog of solutions for certain body shapes. Bauer...Lecture Notes in Economics and Mathematical Systems, Springer- Verlag, New York, 1972. Boerstoel , J. W., "A Survey of Symmetrical Transonic Potential

  12. Shape optimization for contact problems based on isogeometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Benjamin; Ulbrich, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    We consider the shape optimization for mechanical connectors. To avoid the gap between the representation in CAD systems and the finite element simulation used by mathematical optimization, we choose an isogeometric approach for the solution of the contact problem within the optimization method. This leads to a shape optimization problem governed by an elastic contact problem. We handle the contact conditions using the mortar method and solve the resulting contact problem with a semismooth Newton method. The optimization problem is nonconvex and nonsmooth due to the contact conditions. To reduce the number of simulations, we use a derivative based optimization method. With the adjoint approach the design derivatives can be calculated efficiently. The resulting optimization problem is solved with a modified Bundle Trust Region algorithm.

  13. Optimal Shape Design of a Plane Diffuser in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokhyun; Choi, Haecheon

    2000-11-01

    Stratford (1959) experimentally designed an optimal shape of plane diffuser for maximum pressure recovery by having zero skin friction throughout the region of pressure rise. In the present study, we apply an algorithm of optimal shape design developed by Pironneau (1973, 1974) and Cabuk & Modi (1992) to a diffuser in turbulent flow, and show that maintaining zero skin friction in the pressure-rise region is an optimal condition for maximum pressure recovery at the diffuser exit. For turbulence model, we use the k-ɛ-v^2-f model by Durbin (1995) which is known to accurately predict flow with separation. Our results with this model agree well with the previous experimental and LES results for a diffuser shape tested by Obi et al. (1993). From this initial shape, an optimal diffuser shape for maximum pressure recovery is obtained through an iterative procedure. The optimal diffuser has indeed zero skin friction throughout the pressure-rise region, and thus there is no separation in the flow. For the optimal diffuser shape obtained, an LES is being conducted to investigate the turbulence characteristics near the zero-skin-friction wall. A preliminary result of LES will also be presented.

  14. Optimal control design of pulse shapes as analytic functions.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Thomas E; Gershenzon, Naum I

    2010-06-01

    Representing NMR pulse shapes by analytic functions is widely employed in procedures for optimizing performance. Insights concerning pulse dynamics can be applied to the choice of appropriate functions that target specific performance criteria, focusing the solution search and reducing the space of possible pulse shapes that must be considered to a manageable level. Optimal control theory can accommodate significantly larger parameter spaces and has been able to tackle problems of much larger scope than more traditional optimization methods. However, its numerically generated pulses, as currently constructed, do not readily incorporate the capabilities of particular functional forms, and the pulses are not guaranteed to vary smoothly in time, which can be a problem for faithful implementation on older hardware. An optimal control methodology is derived for generating pulse shapes as simple parameterized functions. It combines the benefits of analytic and numerical protocols in a single powerful algorithm that both complements and enhances existing optimization strategies.

  15. Design optimization of rod shaped IPMC actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, S. A.; Mead, B.; Yun, H.; Yim, W.; Kim, K. J.

    2013-04-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are some of the most well-known electro-active polymers. This is due to their large deformation provided a relatively low voltage source. IPMCs have been acknowledged as a potential candidate for biomedical applications such as cardiac catheters and surgical probes; however, there is still no existing mass manufacturing of IPMCs. This study intends to provide a theoretical framework which could be used to design practical purpose IPMCs depending on the end users interest. By explicitly coupling electrostatics, transport phenomenon, and solid mechanics, design optimization is conducted on a simulation in order to provide conceptual motivation for future designs. Utilizing a multi-physics analysis approach on a three dimensional cylinder and tube type IPMC provides physically accurate results for time dependent end effector displacement given a voltage source. Simulations are conducted with the finite element method and are also validated with empirical evidences. Having an in-depth understanding of the physical coupling provides optimal design parameters that cannot be altered from a standard electro-mechanical coupling. These parameters are altered in order to determine optimal designs for end-effector displacement, maximum force, and improved mobility with limited voltage magnitude. Design alterations are conducted on the electrode patterns in order to provide greater mobility, electrode size for efficient bending, and Nafion diameter for improved force. The results of this study will provide optimal design parameters of the IPMC for different applications.

  16. Determination of Optimal Blank Shape by Radius Vector Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Bo; Park, Jong Kyu; Kim, Yang Soo

    2004-06-01

    A new method of optimal blank shape design for stampings of arbitrary shapes has been proposed. Similar to the sensitivity method, a past work of the present author, the basic nature of this method is iterative modification of an undeformed blank shape by adjusting the nodal positions at the boundary of the blank, until the final shape satisfies a target shape. The main difference from the sensitivity method is that both shape error measure and blank shape modification is done along the normal to a boundary direction in the current method instead of nodal moving direction as in the sensitivity method. Even though the sensitivity method has been proven to be excellent through experiment, huge computational effort is still a problem since the method requires a couple of deformation process analyses per each design stage. Differently from the sensitivity method, the present radius vector method requires only a single deformation analysis per each design step and it can handle an extraordinary motion due to a rigid-body rotation during forming. Drawings of L-shaped cup and wheel housing have been chosen as the examples to verify the present method. In every cases the optimal blank shapes have been obtained after a few times of modification. Through the investigation, the present method, which incorporates normal to boundary is found to be an excellent, or better than the sensitivity method, which incorporates moving direction, for the optimal blank design.

  17. Optimal embedding for shape indexing in medical image databases.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoning; Tagare, Hemant D; Fulbright, Robert K; Long, Rodney; Antani, Sameer

    2010-06-01

    This paper addresses the problem of indexing shapes in medical image databases. Shapes of organs are often indicative of disease, making shape similarity queries important in medical image databases. Mathematically, shapes with landmarks belong to shape spaces which are curved manifolds with a well defined metric. The challenge in shape indexing is to index data in such curved spaces. One natural indexing scheme is to use metric trees, but metric trees are prone to inefficiency. This paper proposes a more efficient alternative. We show that it is possible to optimally embed finite sets of shapes in shape space into a Euclidean space. After embedding, classical coordinate-based trees can be used for efficient shape retrieval. The embedding proposed in the paper is optimal in the sense that it least distorts the partial Procrustes shape distance. The proposed indexing technique is used to retrieve images by vertebral shape from the NHANES II database of cervical and lumbar spine X-ray images maintained at the National Library of Medicine. Vertebral shape strongly correlates with the presence of osteophytes, and shape similarity retrieval is proposed as a tool for retrieval by osteophyte presence and severity. Experimental results included in the paper evaluate (1) the usefulness of shape similarity as a proxy for osteophytes, (2) the computational and disk access efficiency of the new indexing scheme, (3) the relative performance of indexing with embedding to the performance of indexing without embedding, and (4) the computational cost of indexing using the proposed embedding versus the cost of an alternate embedding. The experimental results clearly show the relevance of shape indexing and the advantage of using the proposed embedding.

  18. Aerothermodynamic shape optimization of hypersonic blunt bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyi, Sinan; Yumuşak, Mine

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a reliable and efficient design tool that can be used in hypersonic flows. The flow analysis is based on the axisymmetric Euler/Navier-Stokes and finite-rate chemical reaction equations. The equations are coupled simultaneously and solved implicitly using Newton's method. The Jacobian matrix is evaluated analytically. A gradient-based numerical optimization is used. The adjoint method is utilized for sensitivity calculations. The objective of the design is to generate a hypersonic blunt geometry that produces the minimum drag with low aerodynamic heating. Bezier curves are used for geometry parameterization. The performances of the design optimization method are demonstrated for different hypersonic flow conditions.

  19. Multi-objective optimization shapes ecological variation.

    PubMed

    Kaitaniemi, Pekka; Scheiner, Annette; Klemola, Tero; Ruohomäki, Kai

    2012-02-22

    Ecological systems contain a huge amount of quantitative variation between and within species and locations, which makes it difficult to obtain unambiguous verification of theoretical predictions. Ordinary experiments consider just a few explanatory factors and are prone to providing oversimplified answers because they ignore the complexity of the factors that underlie variation. We used multi-objective optimization (MO) for a mechanistic analysis of the potential ecological and evolutionary causes and consequences of variation in the life-history traits of a species of moth. Optimal life-history solutions were sought for environmental conditions where different life stages of the moth were subject to predation and other known fitness-reducing factors in a manner that was dependent on the duration of these life stages and on variable mortality rates. We found that multi-objective optimal solutions to these conditions that the moths regularly experience explained most of the life-history variation within this species. Our results demonstrate that variation can have a causal interpretation even for organisms under steady conditions. The results suggest that weather and species interactions can act as underlying causes of variation, and MO acts as a corresponding adaptive mechanism that maintains variation in the traits of organisms.

  20. Optimal shapes of axisymmetric bodies penetrating into soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, V. L.; Linnik, E. Yu.; Tarasova, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the shapes of axisymmetric bodies with minimum drag and maximum depth of penetration into the plastic soils. Optimal shapes of bodies of revolution of given length and cross-sectional radius with generatrices represented by line segments are obtained by a modified method of local variations. The problem is solved using a binomial quadratic model of local interaction, including inertial and strength terms containing constant and Coulomb frictions. The drag forces and the penetration depth of cones and the obtained bodies of optimal shape are determined at different penetration velocities.

  1. Induced charge electro osmotic mixer: Obstacle shape optimization

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mranal; Yeung, Anthony; Nandakumar, K.

    2009-01-01

    Efficient mixing is difficult to achieve in miniaturized devices due to the nature of low Reynolds number flow. Mixing can be intentionally induced, however, if conducting or nonconducting obstacles are embedded within the microchannel. In the case of conducting obstacles, vortices can be generated in the vicinity of the obstacle due to induced charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) which enhances mixing of different streams: the obstacle shape affects the induced zeta potential on the conducting surface, which in turn influences the flow profile near the obstacle. This study deals with optimization of the geometric shape of a conducting obstacle for the purpose of micromixing. The obstacle boundary is parametrically represented by nonuniform rational B-spline curves. The optimal obstacle shape, which maximizes the mixing for given operating conditions, is found using genetic algorithms. Various case studies at different operating conditions demonstrated that the near right triangle shape provides optimal mixing in the ICEO flow dominant regime, whereas rectangular shape is the optimal shape in diffusion dominant regime. The tradeoff between mixing and transport is examined for symmetric and nonsymmetric obstacle shapes. PMID:19693348

  2. A sensitivity equation approach to shape optimization in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borggaard, Jeff; Burns, John

    1994-01-01

    A sensitivity equation method to shape optimization problems is applied. An algorithm is developed and tested on a problem of designing optimal forebody simulators for a 2D, inviscid supersonic flow. The algorithm uses a BFGS/Trust Region optimization scheme with sensitivities computed by numerically approximating the linear partial differential equations that determine the flow sensitivities. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the method.

  3. Optimal Mass Transport for Shape Matching and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n2) to O(n). For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach. PMID:26440265

  4. Optimal mass transport for shape matching and comparison.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-11-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n(2)) to O(n) . For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach.

  5. Constrained Multipoint Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using an Adjoint Formulation and Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Saunders, David

    1997-01-01

    An aerodynamic shape optimization method that treats the design of complex aircraft configurations subject to high fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD), geometric constraints and multiple design points is described. The design process will be greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and distributed memory computer architectures. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods. The resulting problem is implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on a higher order CFD method. In order to facilitate the integration of these high fidelity CFD approaches into future multi-disciplinary optimization (NW) applications, new methods must be developed which are capable of simultaneously addressing complex geometries, multiple objective functions, and geometric design constraints. In our earlier studies, we coupled the adjoint based design formulations with unconstrained optimization algorithms and showed that the approach was effective for the aerodynamic design of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations. In many of the results presented in these earlier works, geometric constraints were satisfied either by a projection into feasible space or by posing the design space parameterization such that it automatically satisfied constraints. Furthermore, with the exception of reference 9 where the second author initially explored the use of multipoint design in conjunction with adjoint formulations, our earlier works have focused on single point design efforts. Here we demonstrate that the same methodology may be extended to treat

  6. Shape optimization of a sodium cooled fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Damien; Allaire, Grégoire; Pantz, Olivier; Pozin, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    Traditional designs of sodium cooled fast reactors have a positive sodium expansion feedback. During a loss of flow transient without scram, sodium heating and boiling thus insert a positive reactivity and prevents the power from decreasing. Recent studies led at CEA, AREVA and EDF show that cores with complex geometries can feature a very low or even a negative sodium void worth.(1, 2) Usual optimization methods for core conception are based on a parametric description of a given core design(3).(4) New core concepts and shapes can then only be found by hand. Shape optimization methods have proven very efficient in the conception of optimal structures under thermal or mechanical constraints.(5, 6) First studies show that these methods could be applied to sodium cooled core conception.(7) In this paper, a shape optimization method is applied to the conception of a sodium cooled fast reactor core with low sodium void worth. An objective function to be minimized is defined. It includes the reactivity change induced by a 1% sodium density decrease. The optimization variable is a displacement field changing the core geometry from one shape to another. Additionally, a parametric optimization of the plutonium content distribution of the core is made, so as to ensure that the core is kept critical, and that the power shape is flat enough. The final shape obtained must then be adjusted to a get realistic core layout. Its caracteristics can be checked with reference neutronic codes such as ERANOS. Thanks to this method, new shapes of reactor cores could be inferred, and lead to new design ideas.

  7. Multiple piece turbine engine airfoil with a structural spar

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.

    2011-10-11

    A multiple piece turbine airfoil having an outer shell with an airfoil tip that is attached to a root with an internal structural spar is disclosed. The root may be formed from first and second sections that include an internal cavity configured to receive and secure the one or more components forming the generally elongated airfoil. The internal structural spar may be attached to an airfoil tip and place the generally elongated airfoil in compression. The configuration enables each component to be formed from different materials to reduce the cost of the materials and to optimize the choice of material for each component.

  8. On the optimal shape of magnetic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadêlha, Hermes

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic actuation of elasto-magnetic devices has long been proposed as a simple way to propel fluid and achieve locomotion in environments dominated by viscous forces. Under the action of an oscillating magnetic field, a permanent magnet, when attached to an elastic tail, is able to generate bending waves and sufficient thrust for propulsion. We study the hydrodynamical effects of the magnetic head geometry using a geometrically exact formulation for the elastic tail elastohydrodynamics.We show that the spherical head geometry fails to take full advantage of the propulsive potential from the flexible tail. Nevertheless, while elongated prolate spheroids demonstrate a superior swimming performance, this is still regulated by the nature of the imposed magnetic field. Interestingly, the highest swimming speed is observed when the magnitude of the magnetic field is weak due to delays between the orientation of the magnetic moment and the oscillating magnetic field. This allows the stored elastic energy from the deformed tail to relax during the phase lag between the imposed magnetic field and the swimmer's magnetic moment, favouring in this way the net propulsion. In particular, this result suggests the existence of optimal magnetic actuations that are non-smooth, and even discontinuous in time, in order to fully explore the propulsive potential associated with the relaxation dynamics of periodically deformed elastic filaments.

  9. Modeling and Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Pennline, James A.; Schilling, Herbert W.

    2007-01-01

    SmaggIce Version 2.0 is a software toolkit for geometric modeling and grid generation for two-dimensional, singleand multi-element, clean and iced airfoils. A previous version of SmaggIce was described in Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 8 (August 2004), page 32. To recapitulate: Ice shapes make it difficult to generate quality grids around airfoils, yet these grids are essential for predicting ice-induced complex flow. This software efficiently creates high-quality structured grids with tools that are uniquely tailored for various ice shapes. SmaggIce Version 2.0 significantly enhances the previous version primarily by adding the capability to generate grids for multi-element airfoils. This version of the software is an important step in streamlining the aeronautical analysis of ice airfoils using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The user may prepare the ice shape, define the flow domain, decompose it into blocks, generate grids, modify/divide/merge blocks, and control grid density and smoothness. All these steps may be performed efficiently even for the difficult glaze and rime ice shapes. Providing the means to generate highly controlled grids near rough ice, the software includes the creation of a wrap-around block (called the "viscous sublayer block"), which is a thin, C-type block around the wake line and iced airfoil. For multi-element airfoils, the software makes use of grids that wrap around and fill in the areas between the viscous sub-layer blocks for all elements that make up the airfoil. A scripting feature records the history of interactive steps, which can be edited and replayed later to produce other grids. Using this version of SmaggIce, ice shape handling and grid generation can become a practical engineering process, rather than a laborious research effort.

  10. PROFILE: Airfoil Geometry Manipulation and Display. User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Leslie; Saunders, David

    1997-01-01

    This report provides user information for program PROFILE, an aerodynamics design utility for plotting, tabulating, and manipulating airfoil profiles. A dozen main functions are available. The theory and implementation details for two of the more complex options are also presented. These are the REFINE option, for smoothing curvature in selected regions while retaining or seeking some specified thickness ratio, and the OPTIMIZE option, which seeks a specified curvature distribution. Use of programs QPLOT and BPLOT is also described, since all of the plots provided by PROFILE (airfoil coordinates, curvature distributions, pressure distributions)) are achieved via the general-purpose QPLOT utility. BPLOT illustrates (again, via QPLOT) the shape functions used by two of PROFILE's options. These three utilities should be distributed as one package. They were designed and implemented for the Applied Aerodynamics Branch at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. They are all written in FORTRAN 77 and run on DEC and SGI systems under OpenVMS and IRIX.

  11. On Shape Optimization for an Evolution Coupled System

    SciTech Connect

    Leugering, G.; Novotny, A. A. Perla Menzala, G.

    2011-12-15

    A shape optimization problem in three spatial dimensions for an elasto-dynamic piezoelectric body coupled to an acoustic chamber is introduced. Well-posedness of the problem is established and first order necessary optimality conditions are derived in the framework of the boundary variation technique. In particular, the existence of the shape gradient for an integral shape functional is obtained, as well as its regularity, sufficient for applications e.g. in modern loudspeaker technologies. The shape gradients are given by functions supported on the moving boundaries. The paper extends results obtained by the authors in (Math. Methods Appl. Sci. 33(17):2118-2131, 2010) where a similar problem was treated without acoustic coupling.

  12. Improving the Hydrodynamic Performance of Diffuser Vanes via Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Tushar; Dorney, Daniel J.; Haftka, Raphael T.; Shyy, Wei

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a diffuser in a pump stage depends on its configuration and placement within the stage. The influence of vane shape on the hydrodynamic performance of a diffuser has been studied. The goal of this effort has been to improve the performance of a pump stage by optimizing the shape of the diffuser vanes. The shape of the vanes was defined using Bezier curves and circular arcs. Surrogate model based tools were used to identify regions of the vane that have a strong influence on its performance. Optimization of the vane shape, in the absence of manufacturing, and stress constraints, led to a nearly nine percent reduction in the total pressure losses compared to the baseline design by reducing the extent of the base separation.

  13. Shape optimization for a composite crack-length sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, R.; Ramasamy, M.

    1992-01-01

    Techniques for improving the sensitivity of a carbon powder-polymer composite continuous crack-length sensor are examined. These conductive polymeric sensors can be used as crack-length gages, the shape of which can be varied in certain ways to improve their sensitivity. It is concluded that the gages with optimized or tapered shape are capable of overcoming the principal disadvantage of rectangular gages, i.e., poor sensitivity at small crack length.

  14. Shape optimization of rigid inclusions for elastic plates with cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, Viktor

    2016-06-01

    In the paper, we consider an optimal control problem of finding the most safe rigid inclusion shapes in elastic plates with cracks from the viewpoint of the Griffith rupture criterion. We make use of a general Kirchhoff-Love plate model with both vertical and horizontal displacements, and nonpenetration conditions are fulfilled on the crack faces. The dependence of the first derivative of the energy functional with respect to the crack length on regular shape perturbations of the rigid inclusion is analyzed. It is shown that there exists a solution of the optimal control problem.

  15. Optimized input shaping for a single flexible robot link

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.G.; Stokes, D.; Starr, G.; Robinett, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper will discuss the design of an input shaped open-loop control for a single flexible robot link. The authors develop the equations of motion, including the first flexible mode shape and the actuator dynamics. Additional content includes the hardware system identification iterative runs used to update the model. Optimized input shaped commands for the flexible robot link to produce a rest-to-rest, residual vibration-free, 90 degree maneuver are developed. Correlation between both experimental and analytical results of the 90{degree} slew, using two different identification models, are reviewed.

  16. Shape design sensitivity analysis and optimal design of structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kyung K.

    1987-01-01

    The material derivative concept of continuum mechanics and an adjoint variable method of design sensitivity analysis are used to relate variations in structural shape to measures of structural performance. A domain method of shape design sensitivity analysis is used to best utilize the basic character of the finite element method that gives accurate information not on the boundary but in the domain. Implementation of shape design sensitivty analysis using finite element computer codes is discussed. Recent numerical results are used to demonstrate the accuracy obtainable using the method. Result of design sensitivity analysis is used to carry out design optimization of a built-up structure.

  17. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Supersonic Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Jameson, Antony

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the application of a control theory-based aerodynamic shape optimization method to the problem of supersonic aircraft design. The design process is greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and a parallel implementation on distributed memory computers. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods. The resulting problem is then implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) Standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on higher order computational fluid dynamics methods (CFD). In our earlier studies, the serial implementation of this design method was shown to be effective for the optimization of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations using both the potential equation and the Euler equations. In our most recent paper, the Euler method was extended to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. Furthermore, during the same conference, we also presented preliminary results demonstrating that this basic methodology could be ported to distributed memory parallel computing architectures. In this paper, our concern will be to demonstrate that the combined power of these new technologies can be used routinely in an industrial design environment by applying it to the case study of the design of typical supersonic transport configurations. A particular difficulty of this test case is posed by the propulsion/airframe integration.

  18. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Supersonic Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Alonso, Juan Jose; Rimlinger, Mark J.; Jameson, Antony

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the application of a control theory-based aerodynamic shape optimization method to the problem of supersonic aircraft design. The design process is greatly accelerated through the use of both control theory and a parallel implementation on distributed memory computers. Control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations whose solution allows for the evaluation of design gradient information at a fraction of the computational cost required by previous design methods (13, 12, 44, 38). The resulting problem is then implemented on parallel distributed memory architectures using a domain decomposition approach, an optimized communication schedule, and the MPI (Message Passing Interface) Standard for portability and efficiency. The final result achieves very rapid aerodynamic design based on higher order computational fluid dynamics methods (CFD). In our earlier studies, the serial implementation of this design method (19, 20, 21, 23, 39, 25, 40, 41, 42, 43, 9) was shown to be effective for the optimization of airfoils, wings, wing-bodies, and complex aircraft configurations using both the potential equation and the Euler equations (39, 25). In our most recent paper, the Euler method was extended to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. Furthermore, during the same conference, we also presented preliminary results demonstrating that the basic methodology could be ported to distributed memory parallel computing architectures [241. In this paper, our concem will be to demonstrate that the combined power of these new technologies can be used routinely in an industrial design environment by applying it to the case study of the design of typical supersonic transport configurations. A particular difficulty of this test case is posed by the propulsion/airframe integration.

  19. Optimal Heat Collection Element Shapes for Parabolic Trough Concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C

    2007-11-15

    For nearly 150 years, the cross section of the heat collection tubes used at the focus of parabolic trough solar concentrators has been circular. This type of tube is obviously simple and easily fabricated, but it is not optimal. It is shown in this article that the optimal shape, assuming a perfect parabolic figure for the concentrating mirror, is instead oblong, and is approximately given by a pair of facing parabolic segments.

  20. Transonic Wing Shape Optimization Using a Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A method for aerodynamic shape optimization based on a genetic algorithm approach is demonstrated. The algorithm is coupled with a transonic full potential flow solver and is used to optimize the flow about transonic wings including multi-objective solutions that lead to the generation of pareto fronts. The results indicate that the genetic algorithm is easy to implement, flexible in application and extremely reliable.

  1. Optimal shape and motion of undulatory swimming organisms.

    PubMed

    Tokić, Grgur; Yue, Dick K P

    2012-08-07

    Undulatory swimming animals exhibit diverse ranges of body shapes and motion patterns and are often considered as having superior locomotory performance. The extent to which morphological traits of swimming animals have evolved owing to primarily locomotion considerations is, however, not clear. To shed some light on that question, we present here the optimal shape and motion of undulatory swimming organisms obtained by optimizing locomotive performance measures within the framework of a combined hydrodynamical, structural and novel muscular model. We develop a muscular model for periodic muscle contraction which provides relevant kinematic and energetic quantities required to describe swimming. Using an evolutionary algorithm, we performed a multi-objective optimization for achieving maximum sustained swimming speed U and minimum cost of transport (COT)--two conflicting locomotive performance measures that have been conjectured as likely to increase fitness for survival. Starting from an initial population of random characteristics, our results show that, for a range of size scales, fish-like body shapes and motion indeed emerge when U and COT are optimized. Inherent boundary-layer-dependent allometric scaling between body mass and kinematic and energetic quantities of the optimal populations is observed. The trade-off between U and COT affects the geometry, kinematics and energetics of swimming organisms. Our results are corroborated by empirical data from swimming animals over nine orders of magnitude in size, supporting the notion that optimizing U and COT could be the driving force of evolution in many species.

  2. Transonic airfoil analysis and design in nonuniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. F.; Lan, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    A nonuniform transonic airfoil code is developed for applications in analysis, inverse design and direct optimization involving an airfoil immersed in propfan slipstream. Problems concerning the numerical stability, convergence, divergence and solution oscillations are discussed. The code is validated by comparing with some known results in incompressible flow. A parametric investigation indicates that the airfoil lift-drag ratio can be increased by decreasing the thickness ratio. A better performance can be achieved if the airfoil is located below the slipstream center. Airfoil characteristics designed by the inverse method and a direct optimization are compared. The airfoil designed with the method of direct optimization exhibits better characteristics and achieves a gain of 22 percent in lift-drag ratio with a reduction of 4 percent in thickness.

  3. Constrained Aeroacoustic Shape Optimization Using the Surrogate Management Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    412 A. L. Marsden, M. Wang & J. E. Dennis, Jr. rum for collaboration, as well as Charles Audet and Petros Koumoutsakos for valuable discussions...2003 Optimal aeroa- coustic shape design using the surrogate management framework. Submitted for review. MARSDEN, A. L., WANG, M. & KOUMOUTSAKOS , P

  4. Optimal Aeroacoustic Shape Design Using the Surrogate Management Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-09

    wish to thank the IMA for providing a forum for collaboration, as well as Charles Audet and Petros Koumoutsakos for valuable discussions. The authors...17] N. Hansen, D. Mller, and P. Koumoutsakos . Reducing the time complexity of the derandomized evolution strategy with covariance matrix adaptation...P. Koumoutsakos . Optimal aeroacoustic shape design using approximation modeling. Annual Research Briefs, Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford

  5. Elliptical Cavity Shape Optimization for Acceleration and HOM Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang; Robert Rimmer; Genfa Wu

    2005-05-01

    We report a survey of center cell shapes developed for Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) multi-cell cavities for different projects. Using a set of normalized parameters, we compare the designs for different frequencies and particle velocities for the fundamental mode. Using dispersion curves of High Order Modes (HOM) (frequency verse phase advance) calculated by MAFIA for a single cell, we further optimize the cavity shape to avoid a light cone line crossing at the dangerous resonance frequencies determined by the beam bunch structure and eliminate the trapped (or high R/Q) modes with a low group velocity. We developed this formulation to optimize a 5-cell, 750MHz cavity shape, with good real-estate accelerating gradient and a strong HOM damping waveguide structure for the JLab 1MW ERL-FEL project.

  6. Optimal Shapes of Surface Slip Driven Self-Propelled Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilfan, Andrej

    2012-09-01

    We study the efficiency of self-propelled swimmers at low Reynolds numbers, assuming that the local energetic cost of maintaining a propulsive surface slip velocity is proportional to the square of that velocity. We determine numerically the optimal shape of a swimmer such that the total power is minimal while maintaining the volume and the swimming speed. The resulting shape depends strongly on the allowed maximum curvature. When sufficient curvature is allowed the optimal swimmer exhibits two protrusions along the symmetry axis. The results show that prolate swimmers such as Paramecium have an efficiency that is ˜20% higher than that of a spherical body, whereas some microorganisms have shapes that allow even higher efficiency.

  7. A free boundary approach to shape optimization problems

    PubMed Central

    Bucur, D.; Velichkov, B.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of shape optimization problems involving the spectrum of the Laplace operator, such as isoperimetric inequalities, has known in recent years a series of interesting developments essentially as a consequence of the infusion of free boundary techniques. The main focus of this paper is to show how the analysis of a general shape optimization problem of spectral type can be reduced to the analysis of particular free boundary problems. In this survey article, we give an overview of some very recent technical tools, the so-called shape sub- and supersolutions, and show how to use them for the minimization of spectral functionals involving the eigenvalues of the Dirichlet Laplacian, under a volume constraint. PMID:26261362

  8. A free boundary approach to shape optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Bucur, D; Velichkov, B

    2015-09-13

    The analysis of shape optimization problems involving the spectrum of the Laplace operator, such as isoperimetric inequalities, has known in recent years a series of interesting developments essentially as a consequence of the infusion of free boundary techniques. The main focus of this paper is to show how the analysis of a general shape optimization problem of spectral type can be reduced to the analysis of particular free boundary problems. In this survey article, we give an overview of some very recent technical tools, the so-called shape sub- and supersolutions, and show how to use them for the minimization of spectral functionals involving the eigenvalues of the Dirichlet Laplacian, under a volume constraint.

  9. Design and test of a natural laminar flow/large Reynolds number airfoil with a high design cruise lift coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolesar, C. E.

    1987-01-01

    Research activity on an airfoil designed for a large airplane capable of very long endurance times at a low Mach number of 0.22 is examined. Airplane mission objectives and design optimization resulted in requirements for a very high design lift coefficient and a large amount of laminar flow at high Reynolds number to increase the lift/drag ratio and reduce the loiter lift coefficient. Natural laminar flow was selected instead of distributed mechanical suction for the measurement technique. A design lift coefficient of 1.5 was identified as the highest which could be achieved with a large extent of laminar flow. A single element airfoil was designed using an inverse boundary layer solution and inverse airfoil design computer codes to create an airfoil section that would achieve performance goals. The design process and results, including airfoil shape, pressure distributions, and aerodynamic characteristics are presented. A two dimensional wind tunnel model was constructed and tested in a NASA Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel which enabled testing at full scale design Reynolds number. A comparison is made between theoretical and measured results to establish accuracy and quality of the airfoil design technique.

  10. Unsteady Airloads on Airfoils in Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2014-11-01

    This work gives insight into the influence of airfoil characteristics on unsteady airloads for rotor applications where local airfoil sections may operate at high and/or reverse flow angles of attack. Two-dimensional wind tunnel experiments have been performed on four airfoil sections to investigate the effects of thickness, camber, and trailing edge shape on unsteady airloads (lift, pressure drag, and pitching moment). These model rotor blades were tested through 360 deg of incidence for 104 <=Re <=106 . Unsteady pressure transducers were mounted on the airfoil surface to measure the high frequency, dynamic pressure variations. The temporal evolution of chordwise pressure distributions and resulting airloads is quantified for each airfoil in each of the three unsteady wake regimes present in reverse flow. Specifically, the influence of the formation, growth, and shedding of vortices on the surface pressure distribution is quantified and compared between airfoils with a sharp geometric trailing edge and those with a blunt geometric trailing edge. These findings are integral to mitigation of rotor blade vibrations for applications where airfoil sections are subjected to reverse flow, such as high-speed helicopters and tidal turbines.

  11. Improving the efficiency of aerodynamic shape optimization procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay; Eleshaky, Mohamed E.

    1992-01-01

    The computational efficiency of an aerodynamic shape optimization procedure which is based on discrete sensitivity analysis is increased through the implementation of two improvements. The first improvement involves replacing a grid point-based approach for surface representation with a Bezier-Bernstein polynomial parameterization of the surface. Explicit analytical expressions for the grid sensitivity terms are developed for both approaches. The second improvement proposes the use of Newton's method in lieu of an alternating direction implicit (ADI) methodology to calculate the highly converged flow solutions which are required to compute the sensitivity coefficients. The modified design procedure is demonstrated by optimizing the shape of an internal-external nozzle configuration. A substantial factor of 8 decrease in computational time for the optimization process was achieved by implementing both of the design improvements.

  12. Genetic Algorithms Applied to Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    2004-01-01

    A genetic algorithm approach suitable for solving multi-objective optimization problems is described and evaluated using a series of aerodynamic shape optimization problems. Several new features including two variations of a binning selection algorithm and a gene-space transformation procedure are included. The genetic algorithm is suitable for finding pareto optimal solutions in search spaces that are defined by any number of genes and that contain any number of local extrema. A new masking array capability is included allowing any gene or gene subset to be eliminated as decision variables from the design space. This allows determination of the effect of a single gene or gene subset on the pareto optimal solution. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm optimization approach is flexible in application and reliable. The binning selection algorithms generally provide pareto front quality enhancements and moderate convergence efficiency improvements for most of the problems solved.

  13. Viscous Thin Airfoil Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    the elliptic cross section is considered to be more representative of the NACA 64A010 airfoil with boundary layer displacement thickness added on than...section and the flat plate airfoil with Kutta condition. The experimental results are for the NACA 64A010 airfoil at M = 0.5 and Reynolds number between...practice for actual airfoils. The experimental data shown in Fig. 3.5 are for the NACA 4 and 5 digit series airfoils (Ref. 17). The lift curve slope is

  14. Simplified dragonfly airfoil aerodynamics at Reynolds numbers below 8000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, David-Elie; Seifert, Avraham

    2009-07-01

    Effective aerodynamics at Reynolds numbers lower than 10 000 is of great technological interest and a fundamental scientific challenge. The current study covers a Reynolds number range of 2000-8000. At these Reynolds numbers, natural insect flight could provide inspiration for technology development. Insect wings are commonly characterized by corrugated airfoils. In particular, the airfoil of the dragonfly, which is able to glide, can be used for two-dimensional aerodynamic study of fixed rigid wings. In this study, a simplified dragonfly airfoil is numerically analyzed in a steady free-stream flow. The aerodynamic performance (such as mean and fluctuating lift and drag), are first compared to a "traditional" low Reynolds number airfoil: the Eppler-E61. The numerical results demonstrate superior performances of the corrugated airfoil. A series of low-speed wind and water tunnel experiments were performed on the corrugated airfoil, to validate the numerical results. The findings indicate quantitative agreement with the mean wake velocity profiles and shedding frequencies while validating the two dimensionality of the flow. A flow physics numerical study was performed in order to understand the underlying mechanism of corrugated airfoils at these Reynolds numbers. Airfoil shapes based on the flow field characteristics of the corrugated airfoil were built and analyzed. Their performances were compared to those of the corrugated airfoil, stressing the advantages of the latter. It was found that the flow which separates from the corrugations and forms spanwise vortices intermittently reattaches to the aft-upper arc region of the airfoil. This mechanism is responsible for the relatively low intensity of the vortices in the airfoil wake, reducing the drag and increasing the flight performances of this kind of corrugated airfoil as compared to traditional low Reynolds number airfoils such as the Eppler E-61.

  15. Optimization of bow shape for a non ballast water ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van He, Ngo; Ikeda, Yoshiho

    2013-09-01

    In this research, a commercial CFD code "Fluent" was applied to optimization of bulbous bow shape for a non ballast water ships (NBS). The ship was developed at the Laboratory of the authors in Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. At first, accuracy of the CFD code was validated by comparing the CFD results with experimental results at towing tank of Osaka Prefecture University. In the optimizing process, the resistances acting on ships in calm water and in regular head waves were defined as the object function. Following features of bulbous bow shapes were considered as design parameters: volume of bulbous bow, height of its volume center, angle of bow bottom, and length of bulbous bow. When referring to the computed results given by the CFD like resistance, pressure and wave pattern made by ships in calm water and in waves, an optimal bow shape for ships was discovered by comparing the results in the series of bow shapes. In the computation on waves, the ship is in fully captured condition because shorter waves, λ/ L pp <0.6, are assumed.

  16. Laboratory transferability of optimally shaped laser pulses for quantum control

    SciTech Connect

    Moore Tibbetts, Katharine; Xing, Xi; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-02-21

    Optimal control experiments can readily identify effective shaped laser pulses, or “photonic reagents,” that achieve a wide variety of objectives. An important additional practical desire is for photonic reagent prescriptions to produce good, if not optimal, objective yields when transferred to a different system or laboratory. Building on general experience in chemistry, the hope is that transferred photonic reagent prescriptions may remain functional even though all features of a shaped pulse profile at the sample typically cannot be reproduced exactly. As a specific example, we assess the potential for transferring optimal photonic reagents for the objective of optimizing a ratio of photoproduct ions from a family of halomethanes through three related experiments. First, applying the same set of photonic reagents with systematically varying second- and third-order chirp on both laser systems generated similar shapes of the associated control landscape (i.e., relation between the objective yield and the variables describing the photonic reagents). Second, optimal photonic reagents obtained from the first laser system were found to still produce near optimal yields on the second laser system. Third, transferring a collection of photonic reagents optimized on the first laser system to the second laser system reproduced systematic trends in photoproduct yields upon interaction with the homologous chemical family. These three transfers of photonic reagents are demonstrated to be successful upon paying reasonable attention to overall laser system characteristics. The ability to transfer photonic reagents from one laser system to another is analogous to well-established utilitarian operating procedures with traditional chemical reagents. The practical implications of the present results for experimental quantum control are discussed.

  17. Shape optimization methods locating layer interfaces in geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Simin; Wellmann, Florian; Marquart, Gabriele; Clauser, Christoph; Herty, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Subsurface structures have a strong influence on fluid flow and heat transport in geothermal systems. We examine whether the position of an interface between two units within a geothermal system with different petrophysical properties can be detected based on measured temperature-depth profiles. We use a shape optimization method for a level set function and combine it with the calculation of an adjoint variable on basis of the heat transport equation. The level set follows a Hamilton-Jacobi equation where the zero level set represents the position of the boundary. Starting from an initial guess, the position is iteratively adjusted during model optimization. Instead of directly computing the gradient of an objective function, we compute an adjoint temperature. The method is very efficient and requires only one forward simulation. The adjoint variable is then used in combination with the simulated temperature field to iteratively update the level set function to a new position until a shape convergence is obtained. The method was tested to determine the interface position in a set of two-layer models with differently shaped interfaces. Specifically, we investigated how advective heat transport affects the identification of the boundary. We generated synthetic observation data of temperatures in two boreholes in the model and used this data for shape optimization. First results are encouraging as we could identify the location of simple interfaces. Furthermore, our simulations suggest that advective heat transport often helps to detect the interface better. However, challenges remain, particularly if the shape of the interface becomes too complex or the dip of a layer is very steep. Currently, we are investigating these issues in more detail, for example addressing questions of number and position of boreholes with temperature measurements required for optimal interface identification.

  18. Airfoil self-noise and prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Pope, D. Stuart; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    A prediction method is developed for the self-generated noise of an airfoil blade encountering smooth flow. The prediction methods for the individual self-noise mechanisms are semiempirical and are based on previous theoretical studies and data obtained from tests of two- and three-dimensional airfoil blade sections. The self-noise mechanisms are due to specific boundary-layer phenomena, that is, the boundary-layer turbulence passing the trailing edge, separated-boundary-layer and stalled flow over an airfoil, vortex shedding due to laminar boundary layer instabilities, vortex shedding from blunt trailing edges, and the turbulent vortex flow existing near the tip of lifting blades. The predictions are compared successfully with published data from three self-noise studies of different airfoil shapes. An application of the prediction method is reported for a large scale-model helicopter rotor, and the predictions compared well with experimental broadband noise measurements. A computer code of the method is given.

  19. Genetic Algorithms Applied to Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    2005-01-01

    A genetic algorithm approach suitable for solving multi-objective problems is described and evaluated using a series of aerodynamic shape optimization problems. Several new features including two variations of a binning selection algorithm and a gene-space transformation procedure are included. The genetic algorithm is suitable for finding Pareto optimal solutions in search spaces that are defined by any number of genes and that contain any number of local extrema. A new masking array capability is included allowing any gene or gene subset to be eliminated as decision variables from the design space. This allows determination of the effect of a single gene or gene subset on the Pareto optimal solution. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm optimization approach is flexible in application and reliable. The binning selection algorithms generally provide Pareto front quality enhancements and moderate convergence efficiency improvements for most of the problems solved.

  20. Aerostructural Shape and Topology Optimization of Aircraft Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kai

    A series of novel algorithms for performing aerostructural shape and topology optimization are introduced and applied to the design of aircraft wings. An isoparametric level set method is developed for performing topology optimization of wings and other non-rectangular structures that must be modeled using a non-uniform, body-fitted mesh. The shape sensitivities are mapped to computational space using the transformation defined by the Jacobian of the isoparametric finite elements. The mapped sensitivities are then passed to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, which is solved on a uniform Cartesian grid. The method is derived for several objective functions including mass, compliance, and global von Mises stress. The results are compared with SIMP results for several two-dimensional benchmark problems. The method is also demonstrated on a three-dimensional wingbox structure subject to fixed loading. It is shown that the isoparametric level set method is competitive with the SIMP method in terms of the final objective value as well as computation time. In a separate problem, the SIMP formulation is used to optimize the structural topology of a wingbox as part of a larger MDO framework. Here, topology optimization is combined with aerodynamic shape optimization, using a monolithic MDO architecture that includes aerostructural coupling. The aerodynamic loads are modeled using a three-dimensional panel method, and the structural analysis makes use of linear, isoparametric, hexahedral elements. The aerodynamic shape is parameterized via a set of twist variables representing the jig twist angle at equally spaced locations along the span of the wing. The sensitivities are determined analytically using a coupled adjoint method. The wing is optimized for minimum drag subject to a compliance constraint taken from a 2 g maneuver condition. The results from the MDO algorithm are compared with those of a sequential optimization procedure in order to quantify the benefits of the MDO

  1. Flow simulation and shape optimization for aircraft design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Norbert; Gauger, Nicolas R.; Brezillon, Joel; Dwight, Richard; Fazzolari, Antonio; Vollmer, Daniel; Becker, Klaus; Barnewitz, Holger; Schulz, Volker; Hazra, Subhendu

    2007-06-01

    Within the framework of the German aerospace research program, the CFD project MEGADESIGN was initiated. The main goal of the project is the development of efficient numerical methods for shape design and optimization. In order to meet the requirements of industrial implementations a co-operative effort has been set up which involves the German aircraft industry, the DLR, several universities and some small enterprises specialized in numerical optimization. This paper outlines the planned activities within MEGADESIGN, the status at the beginning of the project and it presents some early results achieved in the project.

  2. Optimization strategy to find shapes of soliton molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, S.; Rohrmann, Ph.; Hause, A.; Mitschke, F.

    2014-07-01

    Frequently, a certain solution of a nonlinear wave equation is of interest, but no analytic form is known, and one must work with approximations. We introduce a search strategy to find solutions of the propagation of soliton molecules in a dispersion-managed optical fiber and to determine their shape with some precision. The strategy compares shapes before and after propagation and invokes an optimization routine to minimize the difference. The scheme is designed to be implemented in an experiment so that all fiber parameters are taken into account. Here, we present a full numerical study and a verification of convergence; we validate the method with cases of known solutions. We also compare the performance of two optimization procedures, the Nelder-Mead simplex method and a genetic algorithm.

  3. Geometric constraints for shape and topology optimization in architectural design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapogny, Charles; Faure, Alexis; Michailidis, Georgios; Allaire, Grégoire; Couvelas, Agnes; Estevez, Rafael

    2017-02-01

    This work proposes a shape and topology optimization framework oriented towards conceptual architectural design. A particular emphasis is put on the possibility for the user to interfere on the optimization process by supplying information about his personal taste. More precisely, we formulate three novel constraints on the geometry of shapes; while the first two are mainly related to aesthetics, the third one may also be used to handle several fabrication issues that are of special interest in the device of civil structures. The common mathematical ingredient to all three models is the signed distance function to a domain, and its sensitivity analysis with respect to perturbations of this domain; in the present work, this material is extended to the case where the ambient space is equipped with an anisotropic metric tensor. Numerical examples are discussed in two and three space dimensions.

  4. Recent developments in equivalent plate modeling for wing shape optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1993-01-01

    A new technique for structural modeling of airplane wings is presented taking transverse shear effects into account. The kinematic assumptions of first order shear deformation plate theory in combination with numerical analysis based on simple polynomials which define geometry, construction and displacement approximations lead to analytical expressions for elements of the stiffness and mass matrices and load vector. Contributions from the cover skins, spar and rib caps and spar and rib webs are included as well as concentrated springs and concentrated masses. Limitations of current equivalent plate wing modeling techniques based on classical plate theory are discussed, and the improved accuracy of the new equivalent plate technique is demonstrated through comparison to finite element analysis and test results. Analytical derivatives of stiffness, mass and load terms with respect to wing shape lead to analytic sensitivities of displacements, stresses and natural modes with respect to planform shape and depth distribution. This makes the new capability an effective structural tool for wing shape optimization.

  5. An analytical study for the design of advanced rotor airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical study has been conducted to design and evaluate two airfoils for helicopter rotors. The best basic shape, designed with a transonic hodograph design method, was modified to meet subsonic criteria. One airfoil had an additional constraint for low pitching-moment at the transonic design point. Airfoil characteristics were predicted. Results of a comparative analysis of helicopter performance indicate that the new airfoils will produce reduced rotor power requirements compared to the NACA 0012. The hodograph design method, written in CDC Algol, is listed and described.

  6. Advancements in adaptive aerodynamic technologies for airfoils and wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepson, Jeffrey Keith

    Although aircraft operate over a wide range of flight conditions, current fixed-geometry aircraft are optimized for only a few of these conditions. By altering the shape of the aircraft, adaptive aerodynamics can be used to increase the safety and performance of an aircraft by tailoring the aircraft for multiple flight conditions. Of the various shape adaptation concepts currently being studied, the use of multiple trailing-edge flaps along the span of a wing offers a relatively high possibility of being incorporated on aircraft in the near future. Multiple trailing-edge flaps allow for effective spanwise camber adaptation with resulting drag benefits over a large speed range and load alleviation at high-g conditions. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on the development of this concept of using trailing-edge flaps to tailor an aircraft for multiple flight conditions. One of the major tasks involved in implementing trailing-edge flaps is in designing the airfoil to incorporate the flap. The first part of this dissertation presents a design formulation that incorporates aircraft performance considerations in the inverse design of low-speed laminar-flow adaptive airfoils with trailing-edge cruise flaps. The benefit of using adaptive airfoils is that the size of the low-drag region of the drag polar can be effectively increased without increasing the maximum thickness of the airfoil. Two aircraft performance parameters are considered: level-flight maximum speed and maximum range. It is shown that the lift coefficients for the lower and upper corners of the airfoil low-drag range can be appropriately adjusted to tailor the airfoil for these two aircraft performance parameters. The design problem is posed as a part of a multidimensional Newton iteration in an existing conformal-mapping based inverse design code, PROFOIL. This formulation automatically adjusts the lift coefficients for the corners of the low-drag range for a given flap deflection as

  7. Application of two procedures for dual-point design of transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Campbell, Richard L.; Allison, Dennis O.

    1994-01-01

    Two dual-point design procedures were developed to reduce the objective function of a baseline airfoil at two design points. The first procedure to develop a redesigned airfoil used a weighted average of the shapes of two intermediate airfoils redesigned at each of the two design points. The second procedure used a weighted average of two pressure distributions obtained from an intermediate airfoil redesigned at each of the two design points. Each procedure was used to design a new airfoil with reduced wave drag at the cruise condition without increasing the wave drag or pitching moment at the climb condition. Two cycles of the airfoil shape-averaging procedure successfully designed a new airfoil that reduced the objective function and satisfied the constraints. One cycle of the target (desired) pressure-averaging procedure was used to design two new airfoils that reduced the objective function and came close to satisfying the constraints.

  8. Optimized pulse shapes for a resonator-induced phase gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Andrew W.; Gambetta, Jay M.

    2015-03-01

    The resonator-induced phase gate is a multiqubit controlled-phase gate for fixed-frequency superconducting qubits. Through off-resonant driving of a bus resonator, statically coupled qubits acquire a state-dependent phase. However, photon loss leads to dephasing during the gate, and any residual entanglement between the resonator and qubits after the gate leads to decoherence. Here we consider how to shape the drive pulse to minimize these unwanted effects. First, we review how the gate's entangling and dephasing rates depend on the system parameters and validate closed-form solutions against direct numerical solution of a master equation. Next, we propose spline pulse shapes that reduce residual qubit-bus entanglement, are robust to imprecise knowledge of the resonator shift, and can be shortened by using higher-degree polynomials. Finally, we present a procedure that optimizes over the subspace of pulses that leave the resonator unpopulated. This finds shaped drive pulses that further reduce the gate duration. Assuming realistic parameters, we exhibit shaped pulses that have the potential to realize ˜212 ns spline pulse gates and ˜120 ns optimized gates with ˜6 ×10-4 average gate infidelity. These examples do not represent fundamental limits of the gate and, in principle, even shorter gates may be achievable.

  9. Optimal shape of entrances for a frictionless nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belin, Christophe; Joly, Laurent; Detcheverry, François

    2016-09-01

    The nearly frictionless flow of water in narrow carbon nanotubes is a genuine nanofluidic phenomenon with many prospects of applications in membrane technology. When inner dissipation is vanishing, the limiting factor to high flux lies in the viscous dissipation occurring at the tube mouth. As shown by Gravelle et al. [Gravelle, Joly, Detcheverry, Ybert, Cottin-Bizonne, and Bocquet, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110, 16367 (2013), 10.1073/pnas.1306447110], these so-called end effects can be reduced by adding a conical entrance. In this work, we take a step further and search for the optimal entrance shape. We use finite element calculations to compute the hydrodynamic resistance of a frictionless tube with superellipse-shaped entrances and propose an approximate analytical model. If perfect slip applies on its wall, an optimal entrance which is only 10 tube radii in length is sufficient to reduce end effects by an order of magnitude, a performance almost three times better than the optimal cone. In the case of partial slip, the resistance decreases with the entrance length before reaching a plateau at an optimal length controlled by liquid-solid slip. Our results are discussed in connection with biological and artificial systems.

  10. Wind tunnel results of the high-speed NLF(1)-0213 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sewall, William G.; Mcghee, Robert J.; Hahne, David E.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate a natural laminar flow airfoil designed for the high speed jet aircraft in general aviation. The airfoil, designated as the High Speed Natural Laminar Flow (HSNLF)(1)-0213, was tested in two dimensional wind tunnels to investigate the performance of the basic airfoil shape. A three dimensional wing designed with this airfoil and a high lift flap system is also being evaluated with a full size, half span model.

  11. A computer program for the design and analysis of low-speed airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, R.; Somers, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    A conformal mapping method for the design of airfoils with prescribed velocity distribution characteristics, a panel method for the analysis of the potential flow about given airfoils, and a boundary layer method have been combined. With this combined method, airfoils with prescribed boundary layer characteristics can be designed and airfoils with prescribed shapes can be analyzed. All three methods are described briefly. The program and its input options are described. A complete listing is given as an appendix.

  12. In-Space Radiator Shape Optimization using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Patrick V.; Kittredge, Ken; Tinker, Michael; SanSoucie, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will require the development of more advanced in-space radiators. These radiators should be highly efficient and lightweight, deployable heat rejection systems. Typical radiators for in-space heat mitigation commonly comprise a substantial portion of the total vehicle mass. A small mass savings of even 5-10% can greatly improve vehicle performance. The objective of this paper is to present the development of detailed tools for the analysis and design of in-space radiators using evolutionary computation techniques. The optimality criterion is defined as a two-dimensional radiator with a shape demonstrating the smallest mass for the greatest overall heat transfer, thus the end result is a set of highly functional radiator designs. This cross-disciplinary work combines topology optimization and thermal analysis design by means of a genetic algorithm The proposed design tool consists of the following steps; design parameterization based on the exterior boundary of the radiator, objective function definition (mass minimization and heat loss maximization), objective function evaluation via finite element analysis (thermal radiation analysis) and optimization based on evolutionary algorithms. The radiator design problem is defined as follows: the input force is a driving temperature and the output reaction is heat loss. Appropriate modeling of the space environment is added to capture its effect on the radiator. The design parameters chosen for this radiator shape optimization problem fall into two classes, variable height along the width of the radiator and a spline curve defining the -material boundary of the radiator. The implementation of multiple design parameter schemes allows the user to have more confidence in the radiator optimization tool upon demonstration of convergence between the two design parameter schemes. This tool easily allows the user to manipulate the driving temperature regions thus permitting detailed design of in

  13. Simultaneous beam sampling and aperture shape optimization for SPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, Masoud; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Ye, Yinyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital linear accelerators, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle, can be optimized simultaneously. SPORT promises to deliver remarkable radiation dose distributions in an efficient manner, yet there exists no optimization algorithm for its implementation. The purpose of this work is to develop an algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: The authors build a mathematical model with the fundamental station point parameters as the decision variables. To solve the resulting large-scale optimization problem, the authors devise an effective algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques: column generation, subgradient method, and pattern search. Column generation adds the most beneficial stations sequentially until the plan quality improvement saturates and provides a good starting point for the subsequent optimization. It also adds the new stations during the algorithm if beneficial. For each update resulted from column generation, the subgradient method improves the selected stations locally by reshaping the apertures and updating the beam angles toward a descent subgradient direction. The algorithm continues to improve the selected stations locally and globally by a pattern search algorithm to explore the part of search space not reachable by the subgradient method. By combining these three techniques together, all plausible combinations of station parameters are searched efficiently to yield the optimal solution. Results: A SPORT optimization framework with seamlessly integration of three complementary algorithms, column generation, subgradient method, and pattern search, was established. The proposed technique was applied to two previously treated clinical cases: a head and

  14. Summary of Airfoil Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Ira H; Von Doenhoff, Albert E; Stivers, Louis, Jr

    1945-01-01

    The historical development of NACA airfoils is briefly reviewed. New data are presented that permit the rapid calculation of the approximate pressure distributions for the older NACA four-digit and five-digit airfoils by the same methods used for the NACA 6-series airfoils. The general methods used to derive the basic thickness forms for NACA 6 and 7-series airfoils together with their corresponding pressure distributions are presented. Detail data necessary for the application of the airfoils to wing design are presented in supplementary figures placed at the end of the paper. The report includes an analysis of the lift, drag, pitching-moment, and critical-speed characteristics of the airfoils, together with a discussion of the effects of surface conditions. Available data on high-lift devices are presented. Problems associated with lateral-control devices, leading-edge air intakes, and interference are briefly discussed, together with aerodynamic problems of application. (author)

  15. Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a multidisciplinary shape parameterization approach. The approach consists of two basic concepts: (1) parameterizing the shape perturbations rather than the geometry itself and (2) performing the shape deformation by means of the soft object animation algorithms used in computer graphics. Because the formulation presented in this paper is independent of grid topology, we can treat computational fluid dynamics and finite element grids in a similar manner. The proposed approach is simple, compact, and efficient. Also, the analytical sensitivity derivatives are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. This algorithm is suitable for low-fidelity (e.g., linear aerodynamics and equivalent laminated plate structures) and high-fidelity (e.g., nonlinear computational fluid dynamics and detailed finite element modeling analysis tools. This paper contains the implementation details of parameterizing for planform, twist, dihedral, thickness, camber, and free-form surface. Results are presented for a multidisciplinary design optimization application consisting of nonlinear computational fluid dynamics, detailed computational structural mechanics, and a simple performance module.

  16. Low speed airfoil study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    Airfoil geometries were developed for low speed high lift applications, such as general aviation aircraft, propellers and helicopter rotors. The primary effort was to determine the extent to which the application of turbulent boundary layer separation criteria, plus manipulation of other input parameters, specifically trailing edging velocity ratio, could be utilized to achieve high C sub Lmax airfoils with relatively low drag at C sub Lmax. Both single-element and double-element airfoils were considered. Wind tunnel testing of some airfoils was included.

  17. Optimizing water permeability through the hourglass shape of aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Gravelle, Simon; Joly, Laurent; Detcheverry, François; Ybert, Christophe; Cottin-Bizonne, Cécile; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitous aquaporin channels are able to conduct water across cell membranes, combining the seemingly antagonist functions of a very high selectivity with a remarkable permeability. Whereas molecular details are obvious keys to perform these tasks, the overall efficiency of transport in such nanopores is also strongly limited by viscous dissipation arising at the connection between the nanoconstriction and the nearby bulk reservoirs. In this contribution, we focus on these so-called entrance effects and specifically examine whether the characteristic hourglass shape of aquaporins may arise from a geometrical optimum for such hydrodynamic dissipation. Using a combination of finite-element calculations and analytical modeling, we show that conical entrances with suitable opening angle can indeed provide a large increase of the overall channel permeability. Moreover, the optimal opening angles that maximize the permeability are found to compare well with the angles measured in a large variety of aquaporins. This suggests that the hourglass shape of aquaporins could be the result of a natural selection process toward optimal hydrodynamic transport. Finally, in a biomimetic perspective, these results provide guidelines to design artificial nanopores with optimal performances. PMID:24067650

  18. Optimization of an idealized Y-Shaped Extracardiac Fontan Baffle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiguang; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Mohan Reddy, V.; Marsden, Alison

    2008-11-01

    Research has showed that vascular geometries can significantly impact hemodynamic performance, particularly in pediatric cardiology, where anatomy varies from one patient to another. In this study we optimize a newly proposed design for the Fontan procedure, a surgery used to treat single ventricle heart patients. The current Fontan procedure connects the inferior vena cava (IVC) to the pulmonary arteries (PA's) via a straight Gore-Tex tube, forming a T-shaped junction. In the Y-graft design, the IVC is connected to the left and right PAs by two branches. Initial studies on the Y-graft design showed an increase in efficiency and improvement in flow distribution compared to traditional designs in a single patient-specific model. We now optimize an idealized Y-graft model to refine the design prior to patient testing. A derivate-free optimization algorithm using Kriging surrogate functions and mesh adaptive direct search is coupled to a 3-D finite element Navier-Stokes solver. We will present optimization results for rest and exercise conditions and examine the influence of energy efficiency, wall shear stress, pulsatile flow, and flow distribution on the optimal design.

  19. Multiobjective muffler shape optimization with hybrid acoustics modeling.

    PubMed

    Airaksinen, Tuomas; Heikkola, Erkki

    2011-09-01

    This paper considers the combined use of a hybrid numerical method for the modeling of acoustic mufflers and a genetic algorithm for multiobjective optimization. The hybrid numerical method provides accurate modeling of sound propagation in uniform waveguides with non-uniform obstructions. It is based on coupling a wave based modal solution in the uniform sections of the waveguide to a finite element solution in the non-uniform component. Finite element method provides flexible modeling of complicated geometries, varying material parameters, and boundary conditions, while the wave based solution leads to accurate treatment of non-reflecting boundaries and straightforward computation of the transmission loss (TL) of the muffler. The goal of optimization is to maximize TL at multiple frequency ranges simultaneously by adjusting chosen shape parameters of the muffler. This task is formulated as a multiobjective optimization problem with the objectives depending on the solution of the simulation model. NSGA-II genetic algorithm is used for solving the multiobjective optimization problem. Genetic algorithms can be easily combined with different simulation methods, and they are not sensitive to the smoothness properties of the objective functions. Numerical experiments demonstrate the accuracy and feasibility of the model-based optimization method in muffler design.

  20. Optimization of Pulse Shape Discrimination of PROSPECT Liquid Scintillator Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ke; Prospect Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    PROSPECT, A Precision Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment, will use a segmented Li-6 doped liquid scintillator detector for precision measurement of the reactor anti-neutrino spectrum at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. PROSPECT also searches for very short baseline neutrino oscillation, an indication of the existence of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. Pulse shape analysis of the prompt anti-neutino signal and delayed neutron capture on Li-6 signal will greatly suppress background sources such as fast neutrons and accidental coincidence of gammas. In this talk, I will discuss different pulse shape parameters used in PROSPECT prototype detectors and multivariate optimization of event selection cuts based on those parameters.

  1. Unsteady Newton-Busemann flow theory. I - Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.; Tobak, M.

    1981-01-01

    Newtonian flow theory for unsteady flow at very high Mach numbers is completed by the addition of a centrifugal force correction to the impact pressures. The correction term is the unsteady counterpart of Busemann's centrifugal force correction to impact pressures in steady flow. For airfoils of arbitary shape, exact formulas for the unsteady pressure and stiffness and damping-in-pitch derivatives are obtained in closed form, which require only numerical quadratures of terms involving the airfoil shape. They are applicable to airfoils of arbitrary thickness having sharp or blunt leading edges. For wedges and thin airfoils these formulas are greatly simplified, and it is proved that the pitching motions of thin airfoils of convex shape and of wedges of arbitrary thickness are always dynamically stable according to Newton-Busemann theory. Leading-edge bluntness is shown to have a favorable effect on the dynamic stability; on the other hand, airfoils of concave shape tend toward dynamic instability over a range of axis positions if the surface curvature exceeds a certain limit. As a byproduct, it is also shown that a pressure formula recently given by Barron and Mandl for unsteady Newtonian flow over a pitching power-law shaped airfoil is erroneous and that their conclusion regarding the effect of pivot position on the dynamic stability is misleading.

  2. Numerical investigation of multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Russell M.

    1993-01-01

    The flow over multi-element airfoils with flat-plate lift-enhancing tabs was numerically investigated. Tabs ranging in height from 0.25 percent to 1.25 percent of the reference airfoil chord were studied near the trailing edge of the main-element. This two-dimensional numerical simulation employed an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on a structured, embedded grid topology. New grid refinements were used to improve the accuracy of the solution near the overlapping grid boundaries. The effects of various tabs were studied at a constant Reynolds number on a two-element airfoil with a slotted flap. Both computed and measured results indicated that a tab in the main-element cove improved the maximum lift and lift-to-drag ratio relative to the baseline airfoil without a tab. Computed streamlines revealed that the additional turning caused by the tab may reduce the amount of separated flow on the flap. A three-element airfoil was also studied over a range of Reynolds numbers. For the optimized flap rigging, the computed and measured Reynolds number effects were similar. When the flap was moved from the optimum position, numerical results indicated that a tab may help to reoptimize the airfoil to within 1 percent of the optimum flap case.

  3. Simulation of a Controlled Airfoil with Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Holt, Maurice; Packard, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a two-dimensional airfoil, controlled by an applied moment in pitch and an airfoil controlled by jets, were investigated. These simulations couple the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and Euler's equations of rigid body motion, with an active control system. Controllers for both systems were designed to track altitude commands and were evaluated by simulating a closed-loop altitude step response using the coupled system. The airfoil controlled by a pitching moment used an optimal state feedback controller. A closed-loop simulation, of the airfoil with an applied moment, showed that the trajectories compared very well with quasi-steady aerodynamic theory, providing a measure of validation. The airfoil with jets used a controller designed by robust control methods. A linear plant model for this system was identified using open-loop data generated by the nonlinear coupled system. A closed-loop simulation of the airfoil with jets, showed good tracking of an altitude command. This simulation also showed oscillations in the control input as a result of dynamics not accounted for in the control design. This research work demonstrates how computational fluid dynamics, coupled with rigid body dynamics, and a control law can be used to prototype control systems in problematic nonlinear flight regimes.

  4. Three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization of supersonic delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgreen, Greg W.; Baysal, Oktay

    1994-01-01

    A recently developed three-dimensional aerodynamic shape optimization procedure AeSOP(sub 3D) is described. This procedure incorporates some of the most promising concepts from the area of computational aerodynamic analysis and design, specifically, discrete sensitivity analysis, a fully implicit 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methodology, and 3D Bezier-Bernstein surface parameterizations. The new procedure is demonstrated in the preliminary design of supersonic delta wings. Starting from a symmetric clipped delta wing geometry, a Mach 1.62 asymmetric delta wing and two Mach 1. 5 cranked delta wings were designed subject to various aerodynamic and geometric constraints.

  5. Thinking Inside the Box: The Optimal Filling of Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Carolyn; Andersaon, Joshua; Huber, Greg; Glotzer, Sharon

    2013-03-01

    We introduce a new spatial partitioning problem called filling, which combines aspects of traditional packing and covering problems from mathematical physics. Filling involves the optimal placement of overlapping objects lying entirely inside an arbitrary shape so as to cover the most interior volume. In n-dimensional space, if the objects are polydisperse n-balls, we show that solutions correspond to sets of maximal n-balls. We investigate the mathematical space of filling solutions and provide a heuristic for finding the optimal filling solutions for polygons filled with disks of varying radii. We consider the properties of ideal distributions of N disks as N approaches infinity. We discuss applications of filling to such problems as tumor irradiation, designing wave fronts and wireless networks, minimal information representations of complex shapes, and molecular modeling of nanoparticles and colloids. S. C. G. and C. L. P. were supported by the DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-02ER46000. S. C. G. and J. A. A. were supported by the DOD/AD(R&E) under Grant No. N00244-09-1-0062.

  6. Shape optimization of multi-chamber cross-flow mufflers by SA optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Min-Chie; Chang, Ying-Chun

    2008-05-01

    It is essential when searching for an efficient acoustical mechanism to have an optimally shaped muffler designed specially for the constrained space found in today's plants. Because the research work of optimally shaped straight silencers in conjunction with multi-chamber cross-flow perforated ducts is rarely addressed, this paper will not only analyze the sound transmission loss (STL) of three kinds of cross-flow perforated mufflers but also will analyze the optimal design shape within a limited space. In this paper, the four-pole system matrix used in evaluating acoustic performance is derived by using the decoupled numerical method. Moreover, a simulated annealing (SA) algorithm, a robust scheme in searching for the global optimum by imitating the softening process of metal, has been adopted during shape optimization. To reassure SA's correctness, the STL's maximization of three kinds of muffles with respect to one-tone and dual-tone noise is exemplified. Furthermore, the optimization of mufflers with respect to an octave-band fan noise by the simulated algorithm has been introduced and fully discussed. Before the SA operation can be carried out, an accuracy check of the mathematical model with respect to cross-flow perforated mufflers has to be performed by Munjal's analytical data and experimental data. The optimal result in eliminating broadband noise reveals that the cross-flow perforated muffler with more chambers is far superior at noise reduction than a muffler with fewer chambers. Consequently, the approach used for the optimal design of noise elimination proposed in this study is certainly easy and efficient.

  7. Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a multidisciplinary shape parameterization approach. The approach consists of two basic concepts: (1) parameterizing the shape perturbations rather than the geometry itself and (2) performing the shape deformation by means of the soft object animation algorithms used in computer graphics. Because the formulation presented in this paper is independent of grid topology, we can treat computational fluid dynamics and finite element grids in the same manner. The proposed approach is simple, compact, and efficient. Also, the analytical sensitivity derivatives are easily computed for use in a gradient-based optimization. This algorithm is suitable for low-fidelity (e.g., linear aerodynamics and equivalent laminate plate structures) and high-fidelity (e.g., nonlinear computational fluid dynamics and detailed finite element modeling) analysis tools. This paper contains the implementation details of parameterizing for planform, twist, dihedral, thickness, camber, and free-form surface. Results are presented for a multidisciplinary application consisting of nonlinear computational fluid dynamics, detailed computational structural mechanics, and a simple performance module.

  8. Approximate method of designing a two-element airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abzalilov, D. F.; Mardanov, R. F.

    2011-09-01

    An approximate method is proposed for designing a two-element airfoil. The method is based on reducing an inverse boundary-value problem in a doubly connected domain to a problem in a singly connected domain located on a multisheet Riemann surface. The essence of the method is replacement of channels between the airfoil elements by channels of flow suction and blowing. The shape of these channels asymptotically tends to the annular shape of channels passing to infinity on the second sheet of the Riemann surface. The proposed method can be extended to designing multielement airfoils.

  9. Potential flow analysis of glaze ice accretions on an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaguli, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical/experimental study of the flow fields about an airfoil with leading edge glaze ice accretion shapes are presented. Tests were conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel to measure surface pressure distributions and boundary layer separation reattachment characteristics on a general aviation wing section to which was affixed wooden ice shapes which approximated typical glaze ice accretions. Comparisons were made with predicted pressure distributions using current airfoil analysis codes as well as the Bristow mixed analysis/design airfoil panel code. The Bristow code was also used to predict the separation reattachment dividing streamline by inputting the appropriate experimental surface pressure distribution.

  10. Regulating the vibratory motion of beams using shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsikadelis, J. T.; Tsiatas, G. C.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, shape optimization is used to regulate the vibrations of an Euler-Bernoulli beam having constant material volume. This is achieved by varying appropriately the beam cross-section and thus its stiffness and mass properties along its length, so that the beam vibrates with its minimum, maximum or a prescribed eigenfrequency as well as with the minimum or maximum difference between two successive eigenfrequencies. The problem is reduced to a nonlinear optimization problem under equality and inequality constraints as well as specified lower and upper bounds. The evaluation of the objective function requires the solution of the free vibration problem of a beam with variable mass and stiffness properties. This problem is solved using the analog equation method (AEM) for hyperbolic differential equations with variable coefficients. Besides its accuracy, this method overcomes the shortcoming of a FEM solution, which would require resizing of the elements and re-computation of their stiffness and mass properties during the optimization process. Certain example problems are presented, which illustrate the method and demonstrate its efficiency.

  11. Uncertainty Quantification for Airfoil Icing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGennaro, Anthony Matteo

    Ensuring the safety of airplane flight in icing conditions is an important and active arena of research in the aerospace community. Notwithstanding the research, development, and legislation aimed at certifying airplanes for safe operation, an analysis of the effects of icing uncertainties on certification quantities of interest is generally lacking. The central objective of this thesis is to examine and analyze problems in airfoil ice accretion from the standpoint of uncertainty quantification. We focus on three distinct areas: user-informed, data-driven, and computational uncertainty quantification. In the user-informed approach to uncertainty quantification, we discuss important canonical icing classifications and show how these categories can be modeled using a few shape parameters. We then investigate the statistical effects of these parameters. In the data-driven approach, we build statistical models of airfoil ice shapes from databases of actual ice shapes, and quantify the effects of these parameters. Finally, in the computational approach, we investigate the effects of uncertainty in the physics of the ice accretion process, by perturbing the input to an in-house numerical ice accretion code that we develop in this thesis.

  12. Shape optimized headers and methods of manufacture thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, Ian James

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed herein is a shape optimized header comprising a shell that is operative for collecting a fluid; wherein an internal diameter and/or a wall thickness of the shell vary with a change in pressure and/or a change in a fluid flow rate in the shell; and tubes; wherein the tubes are in communication with the shell and are operative to transfer fluid into the shell. Disclosed herein is a method comprising fixedly attaching tubes to a shell; wherein the shell is operative for collecting a fluid; wherein an internal diameter and/or a wall thickness of the shell vary with a change in pressure and/or a change in a fluid flow rate in the shell; and wherein the tubes are in communication with the shell and are operative to transfer fluid into the shell.

  13. Shape optimization of an accommodative intra-ocular lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouve, François; Hanna, Khalil

    2005-03-01

    Cataract surgery consists in replacing the clouded or opacified crystalline lens by an Intra-Ocular Lens (IOL) having the same mean dioptrical power. Clear vision is then achieved at a given distance and glasses are needed in many situations. A new kind of IOL, potentially accommodative, is proposed. Its design is based on the deep understanding of the accommodation mechanism and on the mathematical modeling and the numerical simulation of the IOL's comportment in vivo. A preliminary version of this IOL is now commercialized by the company HumanOptics under the name '1CU'. In a second phase, shape optimization techniques equipped with strong mechanical and physiological constraints, are used to enhance the IOL performance and build a new design. To cite this article: F. Jouve, K. Hanna, C. R. Mecanique 333 (2005).

  14. Airfoil deposition model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology to predict deposit evolution (deposition rate and subsequent flow of liquid deposits) as a function of fuel and air impurity content and relevant aerodynamic parameters for turbine airfoils is developed in this research. The spectrum of deposition conditions encountered in gas turbine operations includes the mechanisms of vapor deposition, small particle deposition with thermophoresis, and larger particle deposition with inertial effects. The focus is on using a simplified version of the comprehensive multicomponent vapor diffusion formalism to make deposition predictions for: (1) simple geometry collectors; and (2) gas turbine blade shapes, including both developing laminar and turbulent boundary layers. For the gas turbine blade the insights developed in previous programs are being combined with heat and mass transfer coefficient calculations using the STAN 5 boundary layer code to predict vapor deposition rates and corresponding liquid layer thicknesses on turbine blades. A computer program is being written which utilizes the local values of the calculated deposition rate and skin friction to calculate the increment in liquid condensate layer growth along a collector surface.

  15. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D; Wilson, Jr., Jack W.

    2010-11-02

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

  16. Shaped optimal control pulses for increased excitation bandwidth in EPR.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Philipp E; Zhang, Yun; Endeward, Burkhard; Gershernzon, Naum; Skinner, Thomas E; Glaser, Steffen J; Prisner, Thomas F

    2012-05-01

    A 1 ns resolution pulse shaping unit has been developed for pulsed EPR spectroscopy to enable 14-bit amplitude and phase modulation. Shaped broadband excitation pulses designed using optimal control theory (OCT) have been tested with this device at X-band frequency (9 GHz). FT-EPR experiments on organic radicals in solution have been performed with the new pulses, designed for uniform excitation over a significantly increased bandwidth compared to a classical rectangular π/2 pulse of the same B(1) amplitude. The concept of a dead-time compensated prefocused pulse has been introduced to EPR with a self-refocusing of 200 ns after the end of the pulse. Echo-like refocused signals have been recorded and compared to the performance of a classical Hahn-echo sequence. The impulse response function of the microwave setup has been measured and incorporated into the algorithm for designing OCT pulses, resulting in further significant improvements in performance. Experimental limitations and potential new applications of OCT pulses in EPR spectroscopy will be discussed.

  17. Shaping Diffraction-Grating Grooves to Optimize Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backlund, John; Wilson, Daniel; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Maker, Paul; Muller, Richard

    2008-01-01

    A method of shaping diffraction-grating grooves to optimize the spectral efficiency, spectral range, and image quality of a spectral imaging instrument is under development. The method is based on the use of an advanced design algorithm to determine the possibly complex shape of grooves needed to obtain a desired efficiency-versus-wavelength response (see figure). Then electron- beam fabrication techniques are used to realize the required groove shape. The method could be used, for example, to make the spectral efficiency of the grating in a given wavelength range proportional to the inverse of the spectral efficiency of a photodetector array so that the overall spectral efficiency of the combination of the grating and the photodetector array would be flat. The method has thus far been applied to one-dimensional gratings only, but in principle, it is also applicable to two-dimensional gratings. The algorithm involves calculations in the spatial-frequency domain. The spatial-frequency spectrum of a grating is represented as a diffraction-order spectral-peak-width function multiplied by an efficiency function for a single grating groove. This representation affords computational efficiency and accuracy by making it possible to consider only the response from one grating groove (one period of the grating), instead of from the whole grating area, in determining the response from the entire grating. This combination of efficiency and accuracy is crucial for future extensions of the algorithm to two-dimensional designs and to designs in which polarization must also be taken into account. The algorithm begins with the definition of target values of relative efficiency that represent the desired spectral response of the grating in certain spectral frequencies calculated from the diffraction order and wavelength. The grating period is divided into a number of cells - typically, 100. The phase contribution from each cell is determined from the phase of the incident

  18. Analysis and optimization of bellows with general shape

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, B.K.; Park, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    Bellows are commonly used in piping systems to absorb expansion and contraction in order to reduce stress. They have widespread applications which include industrial and chemical plants, fossil and nuclear power systems, heating and cooling systems, and vehicle exhaust systems. A bellows is a component in piping systems which absorbs mechanical deformation with flexibility. Its geometry is an axially symmetric shell which consists of two toroidal shells and one annular plate or conical shell. In order to analyze the bellows, this study presents the finite element analysis using a conical frustum shell element. A finite element analysis program is developed to analyze various bellows. The formula for calculating the natural frequency of bellows is made by the simple beam theory. The formula for fatigue life is also derived by experiments. A shape optimal design problem is formulated using multiple objective optimization. The multiple objective functions are transformed to a scalar function with weighting factors. The stiffness, strength, and specified stiffness are considered as the multiple objective function. The formulation has inequality constraints imposed on the natural frequencies, the fatigue limit, and the manufacturing conditions. Geometric parameters of bellows are the design variables. The recursive quadratic programming algorithm is utilized to solve the problem.

  19. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  20. Proposal of a new plane shape of an opera house-optimized by genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotehama, Takuya; Ando, Yoichi; Tani, Akinori; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    The horseshoe-shaped theater has been the main shape from historical circumstances. However, from acoustical points of view, the rationality of the peculiar plane shape is not yet verified more than historical refinement. In this study, in order to make the theater shape more acoustically excellent, optimization for temporal and spatial factors in the theory of the subjective preference was made using genetic algorithms (GAs) by operating the positions of side walls. Results reconfirm that the plane shape of the optimized theater is a leaf shape, which has been verified to be acoustically rational in a concert hall. And, further possible shapes are also offered.

  1. Tests of related forward-camber airfoils in the variable-density wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Pinkerton, Robert M; Greenberg, Harry

    1937-01-01

    A recent investigation of numerous related airfoils indicated that positions of camber forward of the usual location resulted in an increase of the maximum lift. As an extension of this investigation, a series of forward-camber airfoils has been developed, the members of which show airfoil characteristics superior to those of the airfoils previously investigated. The primary object of this report is to present fully corrected results for airfoils in the useful range of shapes. With the data thus made available, an airplane designer may intelligently choose the best possible airfoil-section shape for a given application and may predict to a reasonable degree the aerodynamic characteristics to be expected in flight from the section shape chosen.

  2. Comparative Study of Airfoil Flow Separation Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Nick; Kahouli, Waad; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    Airfoil flow separation impacts a multitude of applications including turbomachinery, wind turbines, and bio-inspired micro-aerial vehicles. In order to achieve maximum performance, some devices operate near the edge of flow separation, and others use dynamic flow separation advantageously. Numerous criteria exist for predicting the onset of airfoil flow separation. This talk presents a comparative study of a number of such criteria, with emphasis paid to speed and accuracy of the calculations. We evaluate the criteria using a two-dimensional unsteady vortex lattice method, which allows for rapid analysis (on the order of seconds instead of days for a full Navier-Stokes solution) and design of optimal airfoil geometry and kinematics. Furthermore, dynamic analyses permit evaluation of dynamic stall conditions for enhanced lift via leading edge vortex shedding, commonly present in small flapping-wing flyers such as the bumblebee and hummingbird.

  3. Wind tunnel testing of low-drag airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. Donald; Mcghee, R. J.; Harris, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented for the measured performance recently obtained on several airfoil concepts designed to achieve low drag by maintaining extensive regions of laminar flow without compromising high-lift performance. The wind tunnel results extend from subsonic to transonic speeds and include boundary-layer control through shaping and suction. The research was conducted in the NASA Langley 8-Ft Transonic Pressure Tunnel (TPT) and Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) which have been developed for testing such low-drag airfoils. Emphasis is placed on identifying some of the major factors influencing the anticipated performance of low-drag airfoils.

  4. Second-order subsonic airfoil theory including edge effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1956-01-01

    Several recent advances in plane subsonic flow theory are combined into a unified second-order theory for airfoil sections of arbitrary shape. The solution is reached in three steps: the incompressible result is found by integration, it is converted into the corresponding subsonic compressible result by means of the second-order compressibility rule, and it is rendered uniformly valid near stagnation points by further rules. Solutions for a number of airfoils are given and are compared with the results of other theories and of experiment. A straight-forward computing scheme is outlined for calculating the surface velocities and pressures on any airfoil at any angle of attack

  5. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  6. Stability-Constrained Aerodynamic Shape Optimization with Applications to Flying Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Charles Alexander

    A set of techniques is developed that allows the incorporation of flight dynamics metrics as an additional discipline in a high-fidelity aerodynamic optimization. Specifically, techniques for including static stability constraints and handling qualities constraints in a high-fidelity aerodynamic optimization are demonstrated. These constraints are developed from stability derivative information calculated using high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Two techniques are explored for computing the stability derivatives from CFD. One technique uses an automatic differentiation adjoint technique (ADjoint) to efficiently and accurately compute a full set of static and dynamic stability derivatives from a single steady solution. The other technique uses a linear regression method to compute the stability derivatives from a quasi-unsteady time-spectral CFD solution, allowing for the computation of static, dynamic and transient stability derivatives. Based on the characteristics of the two methods, the time-spectral technique is selected for further development, incorporated into an optimization framework, and used to conduct stability-constrained aerodynamic optimization. This stability-constrained optimization framework is then used to conduct an optimization study of a flying wing configuration. This study shows that stability constraints have a significant impact on the optimal design of flying wings and that, while static stability constraints can often be satisfied by modifying the airfoil profiles of the wing, dynamic stability constraints can require a significant change in the planform of the aircraft in order for the constraints to be satisfied.

  7. NASA supercritical airfoils: A matrix of family-related airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA supercritical airfoil development program is summarized in a chronological fashion. Some of the airfoil design guidelines are discussed, and coordinates of a matrix of family related supercritical airfoils ranging from thicknesses of 2 to 18 percent and over a design lift coefficient range from 0 to 1.0 are presented.

  8. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  9. On the use of consistent approximations in the solution of semi-infinite optimization, optimal control, and shape optimization problems

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, E.

    1994-12-31

    Unlike the situation with most other problems, the concept of a solution to an optimization problem is not unique, since it includes global solutions, local solutions, and stationary points. Earlier definitions of a consistent approximation to an optimization problem were in terms of properties that ensured that the global minimizers of the approximating problems (as well as uniformly strict local minimizers) converge only to global minimizers (local minimizers) of the original problems. Our definition of a consistent approximation addresses the properties not only of global and local solutions of the approximating problems, but also of their stationary points. Hence we always consider a pair, consisting of an optimization problem and its optimality function, (P, {theta}), with the zeros of the optimality function being the stationary points of P. We define consistency of approximating problem-optimality function pairs, (P{sub N}, {theta}{sub N}) to (P, {theta}), in terms of the epigraphical convergence of the P{sub N} to P, and the hypographical convergence of the optimality functions {theta}{sub N} to {theta}. As a companion to the characterization of consistent approximations, we will present two types of {open_quotes}diagonalization{close_quotes} techniques for using consistent approximations and {open_quotes}hot starts{close_quotes} in obtaining an approximate solution of the original problems. The first is a {open_quotes}filter{close_quotes} type technique, similar to that used in conjunction with penalty functions, the second one is an adaptive discretization technique with nicer convergence properties. We will illustrate the use of our concept of consistent approximations with examples from semi-infinite optimization, optimal control, and shape optimization.

  10. TAIR- TRANSONIC AIRFOIL ANALYSIS COMPUTER CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, F. C.

    1994-01-01

    The Transonic Airfoil analysis computer code, TAIR, was developed to employ a fast, fully implicit algorithm to solve the conservative full-potential equation for the steady transonic flow field about an arbitrary airfoil immersed in a subsonic free stream. The full-potential formulation is considered exact under the assumptions of irrotational, isentropic, and inviscid flow. These assumptions are valid for a wide range of practical transonic flows typical of modern aircraft cruise conditions. The primary features of TAIR include: a new fully implicit iteration scheme which is typically many times faster than classical successive line overrelaxation algorithms; a new, reliable artifical density spatial differencing scheme treating the conservative form of the full-potential equation; and a numerical mapping procedure capable of generating curvilinear, body-fitted finite-difference grids about arbitrary airfoil geometries. Three aspects emphasized during the development of the TAIR code were reliability, simplicity, and speed. The reliability of TAIR comes from two sources: the new algorithm employed and the implementation of effective convergence monitoring logic. TAIR achieves ease of use by employing a "default mode" that greatly simplifies code operation, especially by inexperienced users, and many useful options including: several airfoil-geometry input options, flexible user controls over program output, and a multiple solution capability. The speed of the TAIR code is attributed to the new algorithm and the manner in which it has been implemented. Input to the TAIR program consists of airfoil coordinates, aerodynamic and flow-field convergence parameters, and geometric and grid convergence parameters. The airfoil coordinates for many airfoil shapes can be generated in TAIR from just a few input parameters. Most of the other input parameters have default values which allow the user to run an analysis in the default mode by specifing only a few input parameters

  11. Optimization of the shapes of obstacles in jet-separation flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monakhov, V. N.; Gubkina, E. V.

    2007-05-01

    The model of an ideal incompressible fluid is used to study the solvability of optimal control problems for the shape of a nozzle which discharges free-boundary fluid flow with and without accounting for gravity (internal aerodynamics) and shape optimization problems for an obstacle with jet separation (external aerodynamics). The qualitative properties of such flows are studied.

  12. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  13. Turbine airfoil film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Larry D.

    1986-01-01

    Emphasis is placed on developing more accurate analytical models for predicting turbine airfoil external heat transfer rates. Performance goals of new engines require highly refined, accurate design tools to meet durability requirements. In order to obtain improvements in analytical capabilities, programs are required which focus on enhancing analytical techniques through verification of new models by comparison with relevant experimental data. The objectives of the current program are to develop an analytical approach, based on boundary layer theory, for predicting the effects of airfoil film cooling on downstream heat transfer rates and to verify the resulting analytical method by comparison of predictions with hot cascade data obtained under this program.

  14. Transonic airfoil codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Computer codes for the design and analysis of transonic airfoils are considered. The design code relies on the method of complex characteristics in the hodograph plane to construct shockless airfoil. The analysis code uses artificial viscosity to calculate flows with weak shock waves at off-design conditions. Comparisons with experiments show that an excellent simulation of two dimensional wind tunnel tests is obtained. The codes have been widely adopted by the aircraft industry as a tool for the development of supercritical wing technology.

  15. Optimizing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by genetic algorithm controlled pulse shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenlong; Sokolov, Alexei

    2010-10-01

    The hybrid coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) has been successful applied to fast chemical sensitive detections. As the development of femto-second pulse shaping techniques, it is of great interest to find the optimum pulse shapes for CARS. The optimum pulse shapes should minimize the non-resonant four wave mixing (NRFWM) background and maximize the CARS signal. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to make a heuristic searching for optimized pulse shapes, which give the best signal the background ratio. The GA is shown to be able to rediscover the hybrid CARS scheme and find optimized pulse shapes for customized applications by itself.

  16. The S415 and S418 Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 4.) This characteristic is related to the...edge with increasing (decreasing) lift coefficient. This feature results in a leading-edge shape that produces a suction peak at higher lift...should look like sketch 3. Sketch 3 1Director, Institute for Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart, Germany, 1974–1985.5 No suction

  17. Transonic airfoil and axial flow rotary machine

    DOEpatents

    Nagai, Naonori; Iwatani, Junji

    2015-09-01

    Sectional profiles close to a tip 124 and a part between a midportion 125 and a hub 123 are shifted to the upstream of an operating fluid flow in a sweep direction. Accordingly, an S shape is formed in which the tip 124 and the part between the midportion 125 and the hub 123 protrude. As a result, it is possible reduce various losses due to shook, waves, thereby forming a transonic airfoil having an excellent aerodynamic characteristic.

  18. Multi-Element Airfoil System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Lockard, David P. (Inventor); McKenney, Martin J. (Inventor); Atherley, Raymond D. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-element airfoil system includes an airfoil element having a leading edge region and a skin element coupled to the airfoil element. A slat deployment system is coupled to the slat and the skin element, and is capable of deploying and retracting the slat and the skin element. The skin element substantially fills the lateral gap formed between the slat and the airfoil element when the slat is deployed. The system further includes an uncoupling device and a sensor to remove the skin element from the gap based on a critical angle-of-attack of the airfoil element. The system can alternatively comprise a trailing edge flap, where a skin element substantially fills the lateral gap between the flap and the trailing edge region of the airfoil element. In each case, the skin element fills a gap between the airfoil element and the deployed flap or slat to reduce airframe noise.

  19. Airfoil Design and Rotorcraft Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between global performance of a typical helicopter and the airfoil environment, as represented by the airfoil angles of attack and Mach number, has been examined using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. A general correspondence is observed between global performance parameters, such as rotor L/D, and airfoil performance parameters, such as airfoil L/D, the drag bucket boundaries, and the divergence Mach number. Effects of design parameters such as blade twist and rotor speed variation have been examined and, in most cases, improvements observed in global performance are also observed in terms of airfoil performance. The relations observed between global Performance and the airfoil environment suggests that the emphasis in airfoil design should be for good L/D, while the maximum lift coefficient performance is less important.

  20. Control theory based airfoil design for potential flow and a finite volume discretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, J.; Jameson, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for airfoil design. In previous studies it was shown that control theory could be used to devise an effective optimization procedure for two-dimensional profiles in which the shape is determined by a conformal transformation from a unit circle, and the control is the mapping function. The goal of our present work is to develop a method which does not depend on conformal mapping, so that it can be extended to treat three-dimensional problems. Therefore, we have developed a method which can address arbitrary geometric shapes through the use of a finite volume method to discretize the potential flow equation. Here the control law serves to provide computationally inexpensive gradient information to a standard numerical optimization method. Results are presented, where both target speed distributions and minimum drag are used as objective functions.

  1. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  2. Inverse airfoil design procedure using a multigrid Navier-Stokes method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, J. B.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Modified Garabedian McFadden (MGM) design procedure was incorporated into an existing 2-D multigrid Navier-Stokes airfoil analysis method. The resulting design method is an iterative procedure based on a residual correction algorithm and permits the automated design of airfoil sections with prescribed surface pressure distributions. The new design method, Multigrid Modified Garabedian McFadden (MG-MGM), is demonstrated for several different transonic pressure distributions obtained from both symmetric and cambered airfoil shapes. The airfoil profiles generated with the MG-MGM code are compared to the original configurations to assess the capabilities of the inverse design method.

  3. Compilation of Information on the Transonic Attachment of Flows at the Leading Edges of Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Walter F; Landrum, Emma Jean

    1958-01-01

    Schlieren photographs have been compiled of the two-dimensional flow at transonic speeds past 37 airfoils. These airfoils have variously shaped profiles, and some are related in thickness and camber. The data for these airfoils were analyzed to provide basic information on the flow changes involved and to determine factors affecting transonic-flow attachment, which is a transition from separated to unseparated flow at the leading edges of two-dimensional airfoils at fixed angles as the subsonic Mach number is increased.

  4. Feasibility of using Hybrid Wavelet Collocation - Brinkman Penalization Method for Shape and Topology Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.; Gazzola, Mattia; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2009-11-01

    In this talk we discuss preliminary results for the use of hybrid wavelet collocation - Brinkman penalization approach for shape and topology optimization of fluid flows. Adaptive wavelet collocation method tackles the problem of efficiently resolving a fluid flow on a dynamically adaptive computational grid in complex geometries (where grid resolution varies both in space and time time), while Brinkman volume penalization allows easy variation of flow geometry without using body-fitted meshes by simply changing the shape of the penalization region. The use of Brinkman volume penalization approach allow seamless transition from shape to topology optimization by combining it with level set approach and increasing the size of the optimization space. The approach is demonstrated for shape optimization of a variety of fluid flows by optimizing single cost function (time averaged Drag coefficient) using covariance matrix adaptation (CMA) evolutionary algorithm.

  5. Optimized Shapes of Ocsillating Resonators for Generating High-Amplitude Pressure Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiao-Fan; Finkbeiner, Joshua; Daniels, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the resonator geometry strongly influences the resonant frequencies of an acoustical resonator and the generated nonlinear standing pressure waveform. Maximizing the ratio of maximum to minimum gas pressure at an end of an oscillating resonator by optimizing the cavity contour is investigated numerically. A quasi-Newton type scheme is used to find optimized axisymmetric resonator shapes to achieve the maximum pressure compression ratio. The acoustical field is solved using a one-dimensional model, and the resonance frequency shift and hysteresis effects are obtained through an automation scheme based on continuation methods. Results are presented from optimizing cone, horn-cone, and cosine resonator geometries. Significant performance improvement is found in the optimized shapes over others previously published. Different optimized shapes are found when starting with different initial guesses, indicating multiple local extrema. The numerical model is validated by comparing with the experimental results of a horn-cone shaped resonator.

  6. Surface effects on shape and topology optimization of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanthakumar, S. S.; Valizadeh, Navid; Park, Harold S.; Rabczuk, Timon

    2015-07-01

    We present a computational method for the optimization of nanostructures, where our specific interest is in capturing and elucidating surface stress and surface elastic effects on the optimal nanodesign. XFEM is used to solve the nanomechanical boundary value problem, which involves a discontinuity in the strain field and the presence of surface effects along the interface. The boundary of the nano-structure is implicitly represented by a level set function, which is considered as the design variable in the optimization process. Two objective functions, minimizing the total potential energy of a nanostructure subjected to a material volume constraint and minimizing the least square error compared to a target displacement, are chosen for the numerical examples. We present results of optimal topologies of a nanobeam subject to cantilever and fixed boundary conditions. The numerical examples demonstrate the importance of size and aspect ratio in determining how surface effects impact the optimized topology of nanobeams.

  7. Method for forming a liquid cooled airfoil for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Grondahl, Clayton M.; Willmott, Leo C.; Muth, Myron C.

    1981-01-01

    A method for forming a liquid cooled airfoil for a gas turbine is disclosed. A plurality of holes are formed at spaced locations in an oversized airfoil blank. A pre-formed composite liquid coolant tube is bonded into each of the holes. The composite tube includes an inner member formed of an anti-corrosive material and an outer member formed of a material exhibiting a high degree of thermal conductivity. After the coolant tubes have been bonded to the airfoil blank, the airfoil blank is machined to a desired shape, such that a portion of the outer member of each of the composite tubes is contiguous with the outer surface of the machined airfoil blank. Finally, an external skin is bonded to the exposed outer surface of both the machined airfoil blank and the composite tubes.

  8. An investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of a new general aviation airfoil in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorek, G. M.; Hoffmann, M. J.; Weislogel, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    A low speed airfoil, the GA(W)-2, - a 13% thickness to chord ratio airfoil was evaluated. The wing of a Beech Sundowner was modified at by adding balsa ribs and covered with aluminum skin, to alter the existing airfoil shape to that of the GA(W)-2 airfoil. The aircraft was flown in a flight test program that gathered wing surface pressures and wake data from which the lift drag, and pitching moment of the airfoil could be determined. After the base line performance of the airfoil was measured, the drag due to surface irregularities such as steps, rivets and surface waviness was determined. The potential reduction of drag through the use of surface coatings such as KAPTON was also investigated.

  9. Vapor deposition on doublet airfoil substrates: Control of coating thickness and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Zhao, Hengbei; Wadley, Haydn N. G.

    2015-11-15

    Gas jet assisted vapor deposition processes for depositing coatings are conducted at higher pressures than conventional physical vapor deposition methods, and have shown promise for coating complex shaped substrates including those with non-line-of-sight (NLS) regions on their surface. These regions typically receive vapor atoms at a lower rate and with a wider incident angular distribution than substrate regions in line-of-sight (LS) of the vapor source. To investigate the coating of such substrates, the thickness and microstructure variation along the inner (curved) surfaces of a model doublet airfoil containing both LS and NLS regions has been investigated. Results from atomistic simulations and experiments confirm that the coating's thickness is thinner in flux-shadowed regions than in other regions for all the coating processes investigated. They also indicated that the coatings columnar microstructure and pore volume fraction vary with surface location through the LS to NLS transition zone. A substrate rotation strategy for optimizing the thickness over the entire doublet airfoil surface was investigated, and led to the identification of a process that resulted in only small variation of coating thickness, columnar growth angle, and pore volume fraction on all doublet airfoil surfaces.

  10. Geometric optimal design of a magneto-rheological brake considering different shapes for the brake envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Lang, V. T.; Nguyen, N. D.; Choi, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    When designing a magneto-rheological brake (MRB), it is well known that the shape of the brake envelope significantly affects the performance characteristics of the brake. In this study, different shapes for the MR brake envelope, such as rectangular, polygonal or spline shape, are considered and the most suitable shape identified. MRBs with different envelope shapes are introduced followed by the derivation of the braking torque based on Bingham-plastic behavior of the magneto-rheological fluid (MRF). Optimization of the design of the MRB with different envelope shapes is then done. The optimization problem is to find the optimal value for the significant geometric dimensions of the MRB that can produce a certain required braking torque while the brake mass is minimized. A finite element analysis integrated with an optimization tool is employed to obtain optimal solutions for the MRBs. From the results, the most suitable shape for the brake envelope is identified and discussed with the reduction of mass. In addition, the results of the analysis are compared with the experimental results to verify the proposed optimal design characteristics.

  11. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2014-10-15

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  12. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  13. Recent progress in the analysis of iced airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer; Chen, Hsun H.; Kaups, Kalle; Schimke, Sue

    1992-01-01

    Recent work on the analysis of iced airfoils and wings is described. Ice shapes for multielement airfoils and wings are computed using an extension of the LEWICE code that was developed for single airfoils. The aerodynamic properties of the iced wing are determined with an interactive scheme in which the solutions of the inviscid flow equations are obtained from a panel method and the solutions of the viscous flow equations are obtained from an inverse three-dimensional finite-difference boundary-layer method. A new interaction law is used to couple the inviscid and viscous flow solutions. The newly developed LEWICE multielement code is amplified to a high-lift configuration to calculate the ice shapes on the slat and on the main airfoil and on a four-element airfoil. The application of the LEWICE wing code to the calculation of ice shapes on a MS-317 swept wing shows good agreement with measurements. The interactive boundary-layer method is applied to a tapered iced wing in order to study the effect of icing on the aerodynamic properties of the wing at several angles of attack.

  14. Optimal Performance of Buildings Isolated By Shape-Memory-Alloy-Rubber-Bearing (SMARB) Under Random Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumanta; Mishra, Sudib K.

    2014-05-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)-based bearing has been proposed recently for improved base isolation by optimal choice of its transformation strength. Presently, superior performances of the Shape-Memory-Alloy-Rubber-Bearing (SMARB) over the elastomeric bearing are established in mitigating seismic vibration under constraint on maximum isolator displacement. The optimal transformation strengths are proposed through constrained optimization based on stochastic responses. Numerical simulation reveals that Lead Rubber Bearings (LRB) either fails to provide feasible parameters or leads to large floor acceleration, compromising the isolation efficiency. Contrarily, optimal SMARB can efficiently enforce such constraint without greatly affecting the isolation efficiency. Evidence of robustness of SMARB over LRB is also established.

  15. SU-E-T-295: Simultaneous Beam Sampling and Aperture Shape Optimization for Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT)

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, M; Li, R; Xing, L; Ye, Y; Boyd, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital LINACs, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, (such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle) are optimized altogether. SPORT promises to deliver unprecedented radiation dose distributions efficiently, yet there does not exist any optimization algorithm to implement it. The purpose of this work is to propose an optimization algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: We build a mathematical model whose variables are beam angles (including non-coplanar and/or even nonisocentric beams) and aperture shapes. To solve the resulting large scale optimization problem, we devise an exact, convergent and fast optimization algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques named column generation, gradient method, and pattern search. Column generation is used to find a good set of aperture shapes as an initial solution by adding apertures sequentially. Then we apply the gradient method to iteratively improve the current solution by reshaping the aperture shapes and updating the beam angles toward the gradient. Algorithm continues by pattern search method to explore the part of the search space that cannot be reached by the gradient method. Results: The proposed technique is applied to a series of patient cases and significantly improves the plan quality. In a head-and-neck case, for example, the left parotid gland mean-dose, brainstem max-dose, spinal cord max-dose, and mandible mean-dose are reduced by 10%, 7%, 24% and 12% respectively, compared to the conventional VMAT plan while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Conclusion: Combined use of column generation, gradient search and pattern search algorithms provide an effective way to optimize simultaneously the large collection of station parameters and significantly improves

  16. Multi-objective aerodynamic shape optimization of small livestock trailers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkeson, C. A.; Toropov, V. V.; Thompson, H. M.; Wilson, M. C. T.; Foxley, N. A.; Gaskell, P. H.

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a formal optimization study of the design of small livestock trailers, within which the majority of animals are transported to market in the UK. The benefits of employing a headboard fairing to reduce aerodynamic drag without compromising the ventilation of the animals' microclimate are investigated using a multi-stage process involving computational fluid dynamics (CFD), optimal Latin hypercube (OLH) design of experiments (DoE) and moving least squares (MLS) metamodels. Fairings are parameterized in terms of three design variables and CFD solutions are obtained at 50 permutations of design variables. Both global and local search methods are employed to locate the global minimum from metamodels of the objective functions and a Pareto front is generated. The importance of carefully selecting an objective function is demonstrated and optimal fairing designs, offering drag reductions in excess of 5% without compromising animal ventilation, are presented.

  17. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim; Dunhill, Tony

    2015-03-01

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described.

  18. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim; Dunhill, Tony

    2015-03-31

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described.

  19. Co-Optimization of Blunt Body Shapes for Moving Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, James L. (Inventor); Garcia, Joseph A (Inventor); Kinney, David J. (Inventor); Bowles, Jeffrey V (Inventor); Mansour, Nagi N (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and associated system for multi-disciplinary optimization of various parameters associated with a space vehicle that experiences aerocapture and atmospheric entry in a specified atmosphere. In one embodiment, simultaneous maximization of a ratio of landed payload to vehicle atmospheric entry mass, maximization of fluid flow distance before flow separation from vehicle, and minimization of heat transfer to the vehicle are performed with respect to vehicle surface geometric parameters, and aerostructure and aerothermal vehicle response for the vehicle moving along a specified trajectory. A Pareto Optimal set of superior performance parameters is identified.

  20. Rime ice accretion and its effect on airfoil performance. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    A methodology was developed to predict the growth of rime ice, and the resulting aerodynamic penalty on unprotected, subcritical, airfoil surfaces. The system of equations governing the trajectory of a water droplet in the airfoil flowfield is developed and a numerical solution is obtained to predict the mass flux of super cooled water droplets freezing on impact. A rime ice shape is predicted. The effect of time on the ice growth is modeled by a time-stepping procedure where the flowfield and droplet mass flux are updated periodically through the ice accretion process. Two similarity parameters, the trajectory similarity parameter and accumulation parameter, are found to govern the accretion of rime ice. In addition, an analytical solution is presented for Langmuir's classical modified inertia parameter. The aerodynamic evaluation of the effect of the ice accretion on airfoil performance is determined using an existing airfoil analysis code with empirical corrections. The change in maximum lift coefficient is found from an analysis of the new iced airfoil shape. The drag correction needed due to the severe surface roughness is formulated from existing iced airfoil and rough airfoil data. A small scale wind tunnel test was conducted to determine the change in airfoil performance due to a simulated rime ice shape.

  1. Three-Dimensional Viscous Alternating Direction Implicit Algorithm and Strategies for Shape Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    A gradient-based shape optimization based on quasi-analytical sensitivities has been extended for practical three-dimensional aerodynamic applications. The flow analysis has been rendered by a fully implicit, finite-volume formulation of the Euler and Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes (TLNS) equations. Initially, the viscous laminar flow analysis for a wing has been compared with an independent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code which has been extensively validated. The new procedure has been demonstrated in the design of a cranked arrow wing at Mach 2.4 with coarse- and fine-grid based computations performed with Euler and TLNS equations. The influence of the initial constraints on the geometry and aerodynamics of the optimized shape has been explored. Various final shapes generated for an identical initial problem formulation but with different optimization path options (coarse or fine grid, Euler or TLNS), have been aerodynamically evaluated via a common fine-grid TLNS-based analysis. The initial constraint conditions show significant bearing on the optimization results. Also, the results demonstrate that to produce an aerodynamically efficient design, it is imperative to include the viscous physics in the optimization procedure with the proper resolution. Based upon the present results, to better utilize the scarce computational resources, it is recommended that, a number of viscous coarse grid cases using either a preconditioned bi-conjugate gradient (PbCG) or an alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) method, should initially be employed to improve the optimization problem definition, the design space and initial shape. Optimized shapes should subsequently be analyzed using a high fidelity (viscous with fine-grid resolution) flow analysis to evaluate their true performance potential. Finally, a viscous fine-grid-based shape optimization should be conducted, using an ADI method, to accurately obtain the final optimized shape.

  2. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending on a set of design parameters including the depth of targeting (up to 50 mm from the magnet) and direction of force required. A method for assembling arrays in practice is considered, quantifying the difficulty of assembly and suggesting a means for easing this difficulty without a significant compromise to the applied field or force. Finite element simulations of in vitro magnetic retention experiments were run to demonstrate the capability of a subset of arrays to retain magnetic microparticles against flow. The results suggest that, depending on the choice of array, a useful proportion of particles (more than 10% ) could be retained at flow velocities up to 100 mm s-1 or to depths as far as 50 mm from the magnet. Finally, the optimization routine was used to generate a design for a Halbach array optimized to deliver magnetic force to a depth of 50 mm inside the brain.

  3. Optimal pulse shaping for coherent control by the penalty algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hai; Dussault, Jean-Pièrre; Bandrauk, André D.

    1994-04-01

    We use penalty methods coupled with unitary exponential operator methods to solve the optimal control problem for molecular time-dependent Schrödinger equations involving laser pulse excitations. A stable numerical algorithm is presented which propagates directly from initial states to given final states. Results are reported for an analytically solvable model for the complete inversion of a three-state system.

  4. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of Complex Aircraft Configurations via an Adjoint Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuther, James; Jameson, Antony; Farmer, James; Martinelli, Luigi; Saunders, David

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the implementation of optimization techniques based on control theory for complex aircraft configurations. Here control theory is employed to derive the adjoint differential equations, the solution of which allows for a drastic reduction in computational costs over previous design methods (13, 12, 43, 38). In our earlier studies (19, 20, 22, 23, 39, 25, 40, 41, 42) it was shown that this method could be used to devise effective optimization procedures for airfoils, wings and wing-bodies subject to either analytic or arbitrary meshes. Design formulations for both potential flows and flows governed by the Euler equations have been demonstrated, showing that such methods can be devised for various governing equations (39, 25). In our most recent works (40, 42) the method was extended to treat wing-body configurations with a large number of mesh points, verifying that significant computational savings can be gained for practical design problems. In this paper the method is extended for the Euler equations to treat complete aircraft configurations via a new multiblock implementation. New elements include a multiblock-multigrid flow solver, a multiblock-multigrid adjoint solver, and a multiblock mesh perturbation scheme. Two design examples are presented in which the new method is used for the wing redesign of a transonic business jet.

  5. TRANDESNF: A computer program for transonic airfoil design and analysis in nonuniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. F.; Lan, C. Edward

    1987-01-01

    The use of a transonic airfoil code for analysis, inverse design, and direct optimization of an airfoil immersed in propfan slipstream is described. A summary of the theoretical method, program capabilities, input format, output variables, and program execution are described. Input data of sample test cases and the corresponding output are given.

  6. Optimal segmentation of pupillometric images for estimating pupil shape parameters.

    PubMed

    De Santis, A; Iacoviello, D

    2006-12-01

    The problem of determining the pupil morphological parameters from pupillometric data is considered. These characteristics are of great interest for non-invasive early diagnosis of the central nervous system response to environmental stimuli of different nature, in subjects suffering some typical diseases such as diabetes, Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, drug and alcohol addiction. Pupil geometrical features such as diameter, area, centroid coordinates, are estimated by a procedure based on an image segmentation algorithm. It exploits the level set formulation of the variational problem related to the segmentation. A discrete set up of this problem that admits a unique optimal solution is proposed: an arbitrary initial curve is evolved towards the optimal segmentation boundary by a difference equation; therefore no numerical approximation schemes are needed, as required in the equivalent continuum formulation usually adopted in the relevant literature.

  7. NREL airfoil families for HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    The development of special-purpose airfoils for horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) began in 1984 as a joint effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), and Airfoils, Incorporated. Since that time nine airfoil families have been designed for various size rotors using the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code. A general performance requirement of the new airfoil families is that they exhibit a maximum lift coefficient (c{sub 1,max}) which is relatively insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil families address the needs of stall-regulated, variable-pitch, and variable-rpm wind turbines. For stall-regulated rotors, better peak-power control is achieved through the design of tip airfoils that restrain the maximum lift coefficient. Restrained maximum lift coefficient allows the use of more swept disc area for a given generator size. Also, for stall-regulated rotors, tip airfoils with high thickness are used to accommodate overspeed control devices. For variable-pitch and variable-rpm rotors, tip airfoils having a high maximum lift coefficient lend themselves to lightweight blades with low solidity. Tip airfoils having low thickness result in less drag for blades having full-span pitch control. Annual energy improvements from the NREL airfoil families are projected to be 23% to 35% for stall-regulated turbines, 8% to 20% for variable-pitch turbines, and 8% to 10% for variable-rpm turbines. The improvement for stall-regulated turbines has been verified in field tests.

  8. NREL airfoil families for HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J L; Somers, D M

    1995-01-01

    The development of special-purpose airfoils for horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) began in 1984 as a joint effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), and Airfoils, Incorporated. Since that time seven airfoil families have been designed for various size rotors using the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code. A general performance requirement of the new airfoil families is that they exhibit a maximum lift coefficient (c{sub l,max}) which is relatively insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil families address the needs of stall-regulated, variable-pitch, and variable-rpm wind turbines. For stall-regulated rotors, better peak-power control is achieved through the design of tip airfoils that restrain the maximum lift coefficient. Restrained maximum lift coefficient allows the use of more swept disc area for a given generator size. Also, for stall-regulated rotors, tip airfoils with high thickness are used to accommodate overspeed control devices. For variable-pitch and variable-rpm rotors, tip airfoils having a high maximum lift coefficient lend themselves to lightweight blades with low solidity. Tip airfoils having low thickness result in less drag for blades having full-span pitch control. Annual energy improvements from the NREL airfoil families are projected to be 23% to 35% for stall-regulated turbines, 8% to 20% for variable-pitch turbines, and 8% to 10% for variable-rpm turbines. The improvement for stall-regulated turbines has been verified in field tests.

  9. Wind-tunnel test results of airfoil modifications for the EA-6B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sewall, W. G.; Mcghee, R. J.; Ferris, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests have been conducted (to determine the effects on airfoil performance for several airfoil modifications) for the EA-6B Wing Improvement Program. The modifications consist of contour changes to the leading-edge slat and trailing-edge flap to provide a higher low-speed maximum lift with no high-speed cruise-drag penalty. Airfoil sections from the 28- and 76-percent span stations were selected as baseline shapes with the major testing devoted to the inboard airfoil section (28-percent span station). The airfoil modifications increased the low-speed maximum lift coefficient between 20 and 35 percent over test conditions of 3 to 14 million chord Reynolds number and 0.14 to 0.34 Mach number. At the high-speed test conditions of 0.4 to 0.80 Mach number and 10 million chord Reynolds number, the modified airfoils had either matched or had lower drag coefficients for all normal-force coefficients above 0.2 as compared to the baseline airfoil. At normal-force coefficients less than 0.2, the baseline (original) airfoil had lower drag coefficients than any of the modified airfoils.

  10. Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Rubén D.; Arango, Carlos A.; Reyes, Andrés

    2015-09-28

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function using genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology, we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions.

  11. Analytical optimal pulse shapes obtained with the aid of genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Rubén D.; Arango, Carlos A.; Reyes, Andrés

    2015-09-01

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function using genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology, we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions.

  12. Effect of Local Junction Losses in the Optimization of T-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    T-shaped channels are extensively used in flow distribution applications such as irrigation, chemical dispersion, gas pipelines and space heating and cooling. The geometry of T-shaped channels can be optimized to reduce the overall pressure drop in stem and branch sections. Results of such optimizations are in the form of geometric parameters such as the length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. The traditional approach of this optimization accounts for the pressure drop across the stem and branch sections, however, ignores the pressure drop in the T-junction. In this paper, we conduct geometry optimization while including the effect of local junction losses in laminar flows. From the results, we are able to identify a non-dimensional parameter that can be used to predict the optimal geometric configurations. This parameter can also be used to identify the conditions in which the local junction losses can be ignored during the optimization.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Surface and Volumetric Cooling using Optimal T- and Y-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    The T- and Y-shaped flow channels can be optimized for reduced pressure drop and pumping power. The results of the optimization are in the form of geometric parameters such as length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. While these flow channels are optimized for minimum pressure drop, they can also be used for surface and volumetric cooling applications such as heat exchangers, air conditioning and electronics cooling. In this paper, we studied the heat transfer characteristics of multiple T- and Y-shaped flow channel configurations using numerical simulations. All configurations are subjected to same pumping power and heat generation constraints and their heat transfer performance is studied.

  14. Vehicle Hull Shape Optimization for Minimum Weight Under Blast Loading

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    cellular   automata  (HCA).   Numerical  results  demonstrate  that  convergent  designs  based  on  trigonometric  functions...consider the solution of a problem with no envelope constraints, this work explores heuristic alternatives: inverted profile and hybrid cellular automata ...formal  optimization  techniques  such   as  sequential  quadratic  programing  (SQP)  and  hybrid   cellular  

  15. Lift enhancing tabs for airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A tab deployable from the trailing edge of a main airfoil element forces flow onto a following airfoil element, such as a flap, to keep the flow attached and thus enhance lift. For aircraft wings with high lift systems that include leading edge slats, the slats may also be provided with tabs to turn the flow onto the following main element.

  16. Optimal Shape Design in Heat Transfer Based on Body-Fitted Grid Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohebbi, Farzad; Sellier, Mathieu

    2013-04-01

    This paper deals with an inverse steady-state heat transfer problem. We develop in this work a new numerical methodology to infer the shape a heated body should have for the temperature distribution on part of its boundary to match a prescribed one. This new numerical methodology solves this shape optimization problem using body-fitted grid generation to map the unknown optimal shape onto a fixed computational domain. This mapping enables a simple discretization of the Heat Equation using finite differences and allows us to remesh the physical domain, which varies at each optimization iteration. A novel aspect of this work is the sensitivity analysis, which is expressed explicitly in the fixed computational domain. This allows a very efficient evaluation of the sensitivities. The Conjugate Gradient method is used to minimize the objective function and this work proposes an efficient redistribution method to maintain the quality of the mesh throughout the optimization procedure.

  17. Turbine airfoil to shround attachment

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X; Morrison, Jay A; James, Allister W; Snider, Raymond G; Eshak, Daniel M; Marra, John J; Wessell, Brian J

    2014-05-06

    A turbine airfoil (31) with an end portion (42) that tapers (44) toward the end (43) of the airfoil. A ridge (46) extends around the end portion. It has proximal (66) and distal (67) sides. A shroud platform (50) is bi-cast onto the end portion around the ridge without bonding. Cooling shrinks the platform into compression (62) on the end portion (42) of the airfoil. Gaps between the airfoil and platform are formed using a fugitive material (56) in the bi-casting stage. These gaps are designed in combination with the taper angle (44) to accommodate differential thermal expansion while maintaining a gas seal along the contact surfaces. The taper angle (44) may vary from lesser on the pressure side (36) to greater on the suction side (38) of the airfoil. A collar portion (52) of the platform provides sufficient contact area for connection stability.

  18. Laplacian networks: Growth, local symmetry, and shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devauchelle, O.; Szymczak, P.; Pecelerowicz, M.; Cohen, Y.; Seybold, H. J.; Rothman, D. H.

    2017-03-01

    Inspired by river networks and other structures formed by Laplacian growth, we use the Loewner equation to investigate the growth of a network of thin fingers in a diffusion field. We first review previous contributions to illustrate how this formalism reduces the network's expansion to three rules, which respectively govern the velocity, the direction, and the nucleation of its growing branches. This framework allows us to establish the mathematical equivalence between three formulations of the direction rule, namely geodesic growth, growth that maintains local symmetry, and growth that maximizes flux into tips for a given amount of growth. Surprisingly, we find that this growth rule may result in a network different from the static configuration that optimizes flux into tips.

  19. Optimization of Compton Source Performance through Electron Beam Shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2016-09-26

    We investigate a novel scheme for significantly increasing the brightness of x-ray light sources based on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) - scattering laser pulses off relativistic electron beams. The brightness of ICS sources is limited by the electron beam quality since electrons traveling at different angles, and/or having different energies, produce photons with different energies. Therefore, the spectral brightness of the source is defined by the 6d electron phase space shape and size, as well as laser beam parameters. The peak brightness of the ICS source can be maximized then if the electron phase space is transformed in a way so that all electrons scatter off the x-ray photons of same frequency in the same direction, arriving to the observer at the same time. We describe the x-ray photon beam quality through the Wigner function (6d photon phase space distribution) and derive it for the ICS source when the electron and laser rms matrices are arbitrary.

  20. Optimization of compton source performance through electron beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2017-03-01

    We investigate a novel scheme for significantly increasing the brightness of x-ray light sources based on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) - scattering laser pulses off relativistic electron beams. The brightness of ICS sources is limited by the electron beam quality, since electrons traveling at different angles, and/or having different energies, produce photons with different energies. Therefore, the spectral brightness of the source is defined by the 6D electron phase space shape and size, as well as laser beam parameters. The peak brightness of the ICS source can be maximized, then, if the electron phase space is transformed in a way such that all electrons scatter off the x-ray photons of same frequency in the same direction, arriving to the observer at the same time. We describe the x-ray photon beam quality through the Wigner function (6D photon phase space distribution), and derive it for the ICS source when the electron and laser rms matrices are arbitrary.

  1. Adjoint analyses of enhanced solidification for shape optimization in conjugate heat transfer problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Kinoshita, Hidenori; Suzuki, Yuji

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, an adjoint-based shape-optimization method has been developed for designing extended heat transfer surfaces in conjugate heat transfer problems. Here we specifically consider heat conduction-dominated solidification problem under different thermal boundary conditions: (i) the isothermal condition, and (ii) the conjugate condition with thermal coupling between the solidified liquid and the solid wall inside the domain bounded by the extended heat transfer surface. In the present shape-optimization scheme, extended heat transfer surfaces are successively refined in a local way based on the variational information of a cost functional with respect to the shape modification. In the computation of the developed scheme, a meshless method is employed for dealing with the complex boundary shape. For high-resolution analyses with boundary-fitted node arrangement, we have introduced a bubble-mesh method combined with a high-efficiency algorithm for searching neighboring bubbles within a cut-off distance. The present technique can be easily applied to convection problems including high Reynolds number flow. We demonstrate, for the isothermal boundary condition, that the present optimization leads to tree-like fin shapes, which achieve the temperature field with global similarity for different initial fin shapes. We will also show the computational results for the conjugate condition, which would regularize the present optimization due to the fin-efficiency effect.

  2. Correction of linear-array lidar intensity data using an optimal beam shaping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Yuanqing; Yang, Xingyu; Zhang, Bingqing; Li, Fenfang

    2016-08-01

    The linear-array lidar has been recently developed and applied for its superiority of vertically non-scanning, large field of view, high sensitivity and high precision. The beam shaper is the key component for the linear-array detection. However, the traditional beam shaping approaches can hardly satisfy our requirement for obtaining unbiased and complete backscattered intensity data. The required beam distribution should roughly be oblate U-shaped rather than Gaussian or uniform. Thus, an optimal beam shaping approach is proposed in this paper. By employing a pair of conical lenses and a cylindrical lens behind the beam expander, the expanded Gaussian laser was shaped to a line-shaped beam whose intensity distribution is more consistent with the required distribution. To provide a better fit to the requirement, off-axis method is adopted. The design of the optimal beam shaping module is mathematically explained and the experimental verification of the module performance is also presented in this paper. The experimental results indicate that the optimal beam shaping approach can effectively correct the intensity image and provide ~30% gain of detection area over traditional approach, thus improving the imaging quality of linear-array lidar.

  3. LES tests on airfoil trailing edge serration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, a large number of acoustic simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with different Trailing Edge Serrations (TES). The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) acoustic analogy is used for noise prediction at trailing edge. The acoustic solver is running on the platform of our in-house incompressible flow solver EllipSys3D. The flow solution is first obtained from the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), the acoustic part is then carried out based on the instantaneous hydrodynamic pressure and velocity field. To obtain the time history data of sound pressure, the flow quantities are integrated around the airfoil surface through the FWH approach. For all the simulations, the chord based Reynolds number is around 1.5x106. In the test matrix, the effects from angle of attack, the TE flap angle, the length/width of the TES are investigated. Even though the airfoil under investigation is already optimized for low noise emission, most numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments show that the noise level is further decreased by adding the TES device.

  4. Transient operation and shape optimization of a single PEM fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng; Ordonez, Juan C.; Vargas, Jose V. C.; Gardolinski, Jose E. F.; Gomes, Maria A. B.

    Geometric design, including the internal structure and external shape, considerably affect the thermal, fluid, and electrochemical characteristics of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which determine the polarization curves as well as the thermal and power inertias. Shape optimization is a natural alternative to improve the fuel cell performance and make fuel cells more attractive for power generation. This paper investigates the internal and external structure effects on the fuel cell steady and transient operation with consideration of stoichiometric ratios, pumping power, and working temperature limits. The maximal steady state net power output and the fuel cell start-up time under a step-changed current load characterize the fuel cell steady and transient performance respectively. The one-dimensional PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) thermal model introduced in a previous work [J.V.C. Vargas, J.C. Ordonez, A. Bejan, Constructal flow structure for a PEM fuel cell, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 47 (2004) 4177-4193] is amended to simulate the fuel cell transient start-up process. The shape optimization consists of the internal and external PEMFC structure optimization. The internal optimization focuses on the optimal allocation of fuel cell compartment thicknesses. The external optimization process seeks the PEM fuel cell optimal external aspect ratios. These two levels of optimizations pursue the optimal geometric design with quick response to the step loads and large power densities. Appropriate dimensionless groups are identified and the numerical results are presented in dimensionless charts for general engineering design. The universality of the general optimal shape found is also discussed.

  5. Shape optimization of a pressure vessel under plastic flow, plastic instability, weight and fatigue life criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Abdi, R.; Touratier, M.; Convert, P.; Lalanne, B.

    1994-06-01

    The structural shape optimization of a complex shell under complex criteria is presented. The shell is one of various cases of a turboshaft, and optimization criteria are associated with the cost, the technology, and above all the working conditions for the turboshaft. Optimization criteria involved are of course the weight of the structure, but also the plastic flow, plastic instability and fatigue life. The fatigue life criterion is an extension to the three-dimensional state of the one-dimensional Lemaitre-Chaboche rule, taking into account the elasto-plastic Neuber correction. All computations have been made with the ANSYS finite element program in which an optimization module exists.

  6. Optimal shapes of surface-slip driven self-propelled swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilfan, Andrej; Osterman, Natan

    2012-11-01

    If one defines the swimming efficiency of a microorganism as the power needed to move it against viscous drag, divided by the total dissipated power, one usually finds values no better than 1%. In order to find out how close this is to the theoretically achievable optimum, we first introduced a new efficiency measure at the level of a single cilium or an infinite ciliated surface and numerically determined the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. In the following we also determined the optimal shape of a swimmer such that the total power is minimal while maintaining the volume and the swimming speed. The resulting shape depends strongly on the allowed maximum curvature. When sufficient curvature is allowed the optimal swimmer exhibits two protrusions along the symmetry axis. The results show that prolate swimmers such as Paramecium have an efficiency that is ~ 20% higher than that of a spherical body, whereas some microorganisms have shapes that allow even higher efficiency.

  7. Shape optimization and characterization of polysaccharide beads prepared by ionotropic gelation.

    PubMed

    Smrdel, Polona; Bogataj, Marija; Zega, Anamarija; Planinsek, Odon; Mrhar, Ales

    2008-03-01

    The shape of drug loaded polysaccharide beads produced by ionotropic gelation has been optimized, with the aim of producing spherical beads suitable for further technological operations, such as coating. The optimization was performed on a model system sodium alginate/theophylline by inclusion of various fillers. Incorporation of excipients markedly influenced the morphological characteristics of the beads. The undesired irregular shape of beads caused by incorporation of the drug could only be improved by incorporating a combination of polycarbophil (PK) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The spherical shape of these beads was stabilized mechanically by numerous air bubbles trapped inside the beads, which prevented the collapse of the beads during drying. The optimized method was shown to be applicable to a target system of pectin and an anti-inflammatory drug, LK-423.

  8. Optimization of the heating surface shape in the contact melting problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomin, Sergei A.; Cheng, Shangmo

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of contact melting by the migrating heat source with an arbitrary shaped isothermal heating surface is presented. After the substantiated simplification, the governing equations are transformed to the convenient equations for engineering calculations relationships. Analytical solutions are used for numerical prediction of optimal shape of the heating surface. The problem is investigated for the constant and for temperature dependent physical properties of the melt.

  9. Lift enhancement of an airfoil using a Gurney flap and vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storms, Bruce L.; Jang, Cory S.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a low-speed wind tunnel test are presented for a single-element airfoil incorporating two lift-enhancing devices, namely a Gurney flap and vortex generators. The former consists of a small plate, on the order of one to two percent of the airfoil chord in height, located at the trailing edge perpendicular to the pressure side of the airfoil. The later consist of commercially-available, wishbone-shaped vortex generators. The test was conducted in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-foot Wind Tunnel with a full-span NACA 4412 airfoil. Measurements of surface pressure distributions and wake profiles were made to determine the lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients for the various airfoil configurations. The results indicate that the addition of a Gurney flap increased the maximum lift coefficient from 1.49 up to 1.96.

  10. Investigation of the Kline-Fogleman airfoil section for rotor blade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumsdaine, E.; Johnson, W. S.; Fletcher, L. M.; Peach, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a wedgeshaped airfoil with sharp leading edge and a spanwise step were conducted. The airfoil was tested with variations of the following parameters: (1) Reynolds number, (2) step location, (3) step shape, (4) apex angle, and (5) with the step on either the upper or lower surface. The results are compared with a flat plate and with wedge airfoils without a step having the same aspect ratio. Water table tests were conducted for flow visualization and it was determined that the flow separates from the upper surface at low angles of attack. The wind tunnel tests show that the lift/drag ratio of the airfoil is lower than for a flat plate and the pressure data show that the airfoil derives its lift in the same manner as a flat plate.

  11. Tooth shape optimization of brushless permanent magnet motors for reducing torque ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Liang-Yi; Tsai, Mi-Ching

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents a tooth shape optimization method based on a generic algorithm to reduce the torque ripple of brushless permanent magnet motors under two different magnetization directions. The analysis of this design method mainly focuses on magnetic saturation and cogging torque and the computation of the optimization process is based on an equivalent magnetic network circuit. The simulation results, obtained from the finite element analysis, are used to confirm the accuracy and performance. Finite element analysis results from different tooth shapes are compared to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1997-06-03

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly are disclosed including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached. 5 figs.

  13. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached.

  14. Two-dimensional poroelastic acoustical foam shape design for absorption coefficient maximization by topology optimization method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong Seok; Kim, Yoon Young; Kim, Jung Soo; Kang, Yeon June

    2008-04-01

    Optimal shape design of a two-dimensional poroelastic acoustical foam is formulated as a topology optimization problem. For a poroelastic acoustical system consisting of an air region and a poroelastic foam region, two different physical regions are continuously changed in an iterative design process. To automatically account for the moving interfaces between two regions, we propose a new unified model to analyze the whole poroelastic acoustical foam system with one set of governing equations; Biot's equations are modified with a material property interpolation from a topology optimization method. With the unified analysis model, we carry out two-dimensional optimal shape design of a poroelastic acoustical foam by a gradient-based topology optimization setting. The specific objective is the maximization of the absorption coefficient in low and middle ranges of frequencies with different amounts of a poroelastic material. The performances of the obtained shapes are compared with those of well-known wedge shapes, and the improvement of absorption is physically interpreted.

  15. Computational Optimization of a Natural Laminar Flow Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshom, Fletcher

    2012-01-01

    Computational optimization of a natural laminar flow experimental wing glove that is mounted on a business jet is presented and discussed. The process of designing a laminar flow wing glove starts with creating a two-dimensional optimized airfoil and then lofting it into a three-dimensional wing glove section. The airfoil design process does not consider the three dimensional flow effects such as cross flow due wing sweep as well as engine and body interference. Therefore, once an initial glove geometry is created from the airfoil, the three dimensional wing glove has to be optimized to ensure that the desired extent of laminar flow is maintained over the entire glove. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver with a coupled boundary layer code was used as the main tool in the design and optimization process of the three-dimensional glove shape. The optimization process uses the Class-Shape-Transformation method to perturb the geometry with geometric constraints that allow for a 2-in clearance from the main wing. The three-dimensional glove shape was optimized with the objective of having a spanwise uniform pressure distribution that matches the optimized two-dimensional pressure distribution as closely as possible. Results show that with the appropriate inputs, the optimizer is able to match the two dimensional pressure distributions practically across the entire span of the wing glove. This allows for the experiment to have a much higher probability of having a large extent of natural laminar flow in flight.

  16. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using A Real-Number-Encoded Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2001-01-01

    A new method for aerodynamic shape optimization using a genetic algorithm with real number encoding is presented. The algorithm is used to optimize three different problems, a simple hill climbing problem, a quasi-one-dimensional nozzle problem using an Euler equation solver and a three-dimensional transonic wing problem using a nonlinear potential solver. Results indicate that the genetic algorithm is easy to implement and extremely reliable, being relatively insensitive to design space noise.

  17. Airfoil gust response and the sound produced by airifoil-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amiet, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contributes to the understanding of the noise generation process of an airfoil encountering an unsteady upwash. By using a fast Fourier transform together with accurate airfoil response functions, the lift-time waveform for an airfoil encountering a delta function gust (the indicial function) is calculated for a flat plate airfoil in a compressible flow. This shows the interesting property that the lift is constant until the generated acoustic wave reaches the trailing edge. Expressions are given for the magnitude of this constant and for the pressure distribution on the airfoil during this time interval. The case of an airfoil cutting through a line vortex is also analyzed. The pressure-time waveform in the far field is closely related to the left-time waveform for the above problem of an airfoil entering a delta function gust. The effects of varying the relevant parameters in the problem are studied, including the observed position, the core diameter of the vortex, the vortex orientation and the airfoil span. The far field sound varies significantly with observer position, illustrating the importance of non-compactness effects. Increasing the viscous core diameter tends to smooth the pressure-time waveform. For small viscous core radius and infinite span, changing the vortex orientation changes only the amplitude of the pressure-time waveform, and not the shape.

  18. Theoretical and experimental study of a new method for prediction of profile drag of airfoil sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, S. H.; Lilley, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies are described which were conducted for the purpose of developing a new generalized method for the prediction of profile drag of single component airfoil sections with sharp trailing edges. This method aims at solution for the flow in the wake from the airfoil trailing edge to the large distance in the downstream direction; the profile drag of the given airfoil section can then easily be obtained from the momentum balance once the shape of velocity profile at a large distance from the airfoil trailing edge has been computed. Computer program subroutines have been developed for the computation of the profile drag and flow in the airfoil wake on CDC6600 computer. The required inputs to the computer program consist of free stream conditions and the characteristics of the boundary layers at the airfoil trailing edge or at the point of incipient separation in the neighborhood of airfoil trailing edge. The method described is quite generalized and hence can be extended to the solution of the profile drag for multi-component airfoil sections.

  19. Shape Optimization of Supersonic Turbines Using Response Surface and Neural Network Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papila, Nilay; Shyy, Wei; Griffin, Lisa W.; Dorney, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Turbine performance directly affects engine specific impulse, thrust-to-weight ratio, and cost in a rocket propulsion system. A global optimization framework combining the radial basis neural network (RBNN) and the polynomial-based response surface method (RSM) is constructed for shape optimization of a supersonic turbine. Based on the optimized preliminary design, shape optimization is performed for the first vane and blade of a 2-stage supersonic turbine, involving O(10) design variables. The design of experiment approach is adopted to reduce the data size needed by the optimization task. It is demonstrated that a major merit of the global optimization approach is that it enables one to adaptively revise the design space to perform multiple optimization cycles. This benefit is realized when an optimal design approaches the boundary of a pre-defined design space. Furthermore, by inspecting the influence of each design variable, one can also gain insight into the existence of multiple design choices and select the optimum design based on other factors such as stress and materials considerations.

  20. Nozzle airfoil having movable nozzle ribs

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane or airfoil structure is provided in which the nozzle ribs are connected to the side walls of the vane or airfoil in such a way that the ribs provide the requisite mechanical support between the concave side and convex side of the airfoil but are not locked in the radial direction of the assembly, longitudinally of the airfoil. The ribs may be bi-cast onto a preformed airfoil side wall structure or fastened to the airfoil by an interlocking slide connection and/or welding. By attaching the nozzle ribs to the nozzle airfoil metal in such a way that allows play longitudinally of the airfoil, the temperature difference induced radial thermal stresses at the nozzle airfoil/rib joint area are reduced while maintaining proper mechanical support of the nozzle side walls.

  1. Thick airfoil designs for the root of the 10MW INNWIND.EU wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu≁oz, A.; Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of the “INNWIND.EU” project is to investigate and demonstrate innovative designs for 10-20MW offshore wind turbines and their key components, such as lightweight rotors. In this context, the present paper describes the development of two new airfoils for the blade root region. From the structural point of view, the root is the region in charge of transmitting all the loads of the blade to the hub. Thus, it is very important to include airfoils with adequate structural properties in this region. The present article makes use of high-thickness and blunt trailing edge airfoils to improve the structural characteristics of the airfoils used to build this blade region. CENER's (National Renewable Energy Center of Spain) airfoil design tool uses the airfoil software XFOIL to compute the aerodynamic characteristics of the designed airfoils. That software is based on panel methods which show some problems with the calculation of airfoils with thickness bigger than 35% and with blunt trailing edge. This drawback has been overcome with the development of an empirical correction for XFOIL lift and drag prediction based on airfoil experiments. From the aerodynamic point of view, thick airfoils are known to be very sensitive to surface contamination or turbulent inflow conditions. Consequently, the design optimization takes into account the aerodynamic torque in both clean and contaminated conditions. Two airfoils have been designed aiming to improve the structural and the aerodynamic behaviour of the blade in clean and contaminated conditions. This improvement has been corroborated with Blade Element Momentum (BEM) computations.

  2. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  3. Second Stage Turbine Bucket Airfoil.

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Liming; Ahmadi, Majid; Humanchuk, David John; Moretto, Nicholas; Delehanty, Richard Edward

    2003-05-06

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  4. Numerical design of shockless airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to indicate and briefly discuss only the most significant achievements of the research. The most successful contribution from the contract was the code for two dimensional analysis of airfoils in transonic flow.

  5. Caustic and its use in designing optimal absorber shapes for 2D concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, Harald; Spirkl, Wolfgang

    1995-08-01

    The caustic of a set of edge rays is defined as the set of intersection points of adjacent edge rays. For a body having a smooth differentiable contour, the caustic of its edge rays coincides with the contour of the body. Therefore one would assume that by calculating the caustic of the edge rays as they are produced by a 2D concentrator such as a trough, the optimal shape for the absorber, e.g. the minimal surface absorber capable of intercepting all rays, should also coincide with the shape of the caustic. We show that this conjecture is not valid in general, but only if the caustic indeed forms a closed smooth curve. For parabolic trough systems, the caustic intersects and forms closed domains for half rim angles of around 60 degrees and 120 degrees. In both cases the contour is not smooth. Therefore the optimal shape is not given by the domain enclosed by the caustic. We present a general recipe of how to construct minimum surface absorbers for given caustics in 2D and apply this to the case of trough parabolic concentrators. We show practical absorber shapes for parabolic troughs with various rim angles. The optimal contour depends discontinuously on the rim angle. The area of the optimum shape for a rim angle of 90 degrees is 0.72 of the area of the smallest cylindric absorber capable of intersecting all rays.

  6. Forging tool shape optimization using pseudo inverse approach and adaptive incremental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halouani, A.; Meng, F. J.; Li, Y. M.; Labergère, C.; Abbès, B.; Lafon, P.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a simplified finite element method called "Pseudo Inverse Approach" (PIA) for tool shape design and optimization in multi-step cold forging processes. The approach is based on the knowledge of the final part shape. Some intermediate configurations are introduced and corrected by using a free surface method to consider the deformation paths without contact treatment. A robust direct algorithm of plasticity is implemented by using the equivalent stress notion and tensile curve. Numerical tests have shown that the PIA is very fast compared to the incremental approach. The PIA is used in an optimization procedure to automatically design the shapes of the preform tools. Our objective is to find the optimal preforms which minimize the equivalent plastic strain and punch force. The preform shapes are defined by B-Spline curves. A simulated annealing algorithm is adopted for the optimization procedure. The forging results obtained by the PIA are compared to those obtained by the incremental approach to show the efficiency and accuracy of the PIA.

  7. Inverse boundary-layer technique for airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A description is presented of a technique for the optimization of airfoil pressure distributions using an interactive inverse boundary-layer program. This program allows the user to determine quickly a near-optimum subsonic pressure distribution which meets his requirements for lift, drag, and pitching moment at the desired flow conditions. The method employs an inverse turbulent boundary-layer scheme for definition of the turbulent recovery portion of the pressure distribution. Two levels of pressure-distribution architecture are used - a simple roof top for preliminary studies and a more complex four-region architecture for a more refined design. A technique is employed to avoid the specification of pressure distributions which result in unrealistic airfoils, that is, those with negative thickness. The program allows rapid evaluation of a designed pressure distribution off-design in Reynolds number, transition location, and angle of attack, and will compute an airfoil contour for the designed pressure distribution using linear theory.

  8. Three-dimensional canard-wing shape optimization in aircraft cruise and maneuver environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Silva, B. M. E.; Carmichael, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a numerical technique for canard-wing shape optimization at two operating conditions. For purposes of simplicity, a mean surface wing paneling code is employed for the aerodynamic calculations. The optimization procedures are based on the method of feasible directions. The shape functions for describing the thickness, camber, and twist are based on polynomial representations. The primary design requirements imposed restrictions on the canard and wing volumes and on the lift coefficients at the operating conditions. Results indicate that significant improvements in minimum drag and lift-to-drag ratio are possible with reasonable aircraft geometries. Calculations were done for supersonic speeds with Mach numbers ranging from 1 to 6. Planforms were mainly of a delta shape with aspect ratio of 1.

  9. Optimal ligand descriptor for pocket recognition based on the Beta-shape.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Kwan; Won, Chung-In; Cha, Jehyun; Lee, Kichun; Kim, Deok-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Structure-based virtual screening is one of the most important and common computational methods for the identification of predicted hit at the beginning of drug discovery. Pocket recognition and definition is frequently a prerequisite of structure-based virtual screening, reducing the search space of the predicted protein-ligand complex. In this paper, we present an optimal ligand shape descriptor for a pocket recognition algorithm based on the beta-shape, which is a derivative structure of the Voronoi diagram of atoms. We investigate six candidates for a shape descriptor for a ligand using statistical analysis: the minimum enclosing sphere, three measures from the principal component analysis of atoms, the van der Waals volume, and the beta-shape volume. Among them, the van der Waals volume of a ligand is the optimal shape descriptor for pocket recognition and best tunes the pocket recognition algorithm based on the beta-shape for efficient virtual screening. The performance of the proposed algorithm is verified by a benchmark test.

  10. Efficient Gradient-Based Shape Optimization Methodology Using Inviscid/Viscous CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    The formerly developed preconditioned-biconjugate-gradient (PBCG) solvers for the analysis and the sensitivity equations had resulted in very large error reductions per iteration; quadratic convergence was achieved whenever the solution entered the domain of attraction to the root. Its memory requirement was also lower as compared to a direct inversion solver. However, this memory requirement was high enough to preclude the realistic, high grid-density design of a practical 3D geometry. This limitation served as the impetus to the first-year activity (March 9, 1995 to March 8, 1996). Therefore, the major activity for this period was the development of the low-memory methodology for the discrete-sensitivity-based shape optimization. This was accomplished by solving all the resulting sets of equations using an alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) approach. The results indicated that shape optimization problems which required large numbers of grid points could be resolved with a gradient-based approach. Therefore, to better utilize the computational resources, it was recommended that a number of coarse grid cases, using the PBCG method, should initially be conducted to better define the optimization problem and the design space, and obtain an improved initial shape. Subsequently, a fine grid shape optimization, which necessitates using the ADI method, should be conducted to accurately obtain the final optimized shape. The other activity during this period was the interaction with the members of the Aerodynamic and Aeroacoustic Methods Branch of Langley Research Center during one stage of their investigation to develop an adjoint-variable sensitivity method using the viscous flow equations. This method had algorithmic similarities to the variational sensitivity methods and the control-theory approach. However, unlike the prior studies, it was considered for the three-dimensional, viscous flow equations. The major accomplishment in the second period of this project

  11. A Numerical Methodology for Aerodynamic Shape Optimization in Turbulent Flow Enabling Large Geometric Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osusky, Lana Maria

    The increase in the availability and power of computational resources over the last fifteen years has contributed to the development of many different types of numerical optimization methods and created a large area of research focussed on numerical aerodynamic shape optimization and, more recently, high-fidelity multidisciplinary optimization. Numerical optimization provides dramatic savings when designing new aerodynamic configurations, as it allows the designer to focus more on the development of a well-posed design problem rather than on performing an exhaustive search of the design space via the traditional cut-and-try approach, which is expensive and time-consuming. It also reduces the dependence on the designer's experience and intuition, which can potentially lead to more optimal designs. Numerical optimization methods are particularly attractive when designing novel, unconventional aircraft for which the designer has no pre-existing studies or experiences from which to draw; these methods have the potential to discover new designs that might never have been arrived at without optimization. This work presents an extension of an efficient gradient-based numerical aerodynamic shape optimization algorithm to enable optimization in turbulent flow. The algorithm includes an integrated geometry parameterization and mesh movement scheme, an efficient parallel Newton-Krylov-Schur algorithm for solving the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, which are fully coupled with the one-equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model, and a discrete-adjoint gradient evaluation. In order to develop an efficient methodology for optimization in turbulent flows, the viscous and turbulent terms in the ii governing equations were linearized by hand. Additionally, a set of mesh refinement tools was introduced in order to obtain both an acceptable control volume mesh and a sufficiently refined computational mesh from an initial coarse mesh. A series of drag minimization

  12. Shape optimization of pulsatile ventricular assist devices using FSI to minimize thrombotic risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. C.; Marsden, A. L.; Bazilevs, Y.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we perform shape optimization of a pediatric pulsatile ventricular assist device (PVAD). The device simulation is carried out using fluid-structure interaction (FSI) modeling techniques within a computational framework that combines FEM for fluid mechanics and isogeometric analysis for structural mechanics modeling. The PVAD FSI simulations are performed under realistic conditions (i.e., flow speeds, pressure levels, boundary conditions, etc.), and account for the interaction of air, blood, and a thin structural membrane separating the two fluid subdomains. The shape optimization study is designed to reduce thrombotic risk, a major clinical problem in PVADs. Thrombotic risk is quantified in terms of particle residence time in the device blood chamber. Methods to compute particle residence time in the context of moving spatial domains are presented in a companion paper published in the same issue (Comput Mech, doi: 10.1007/s00466-013-0931-y, 2013). The surrogate management framework, a derivative-free pattern search optimization method that relies on surrogates for increased efficiency, is employed in this work. For the optimization study shown here, particle residence time is used to define a suitable cost or objective function, while four adjustable design optimization parameters are used to define the device geometry. The FSI-based optimization framework is implemented in a parallel computing environment, and deployed with minimal user intervention. Using five SEARCH/ POLL steps the optimization scheme identifies a PVAD design with significantly better throughput efficiency than the original device.

  13. Stacking sequence and shape optimization of laminated composite plates via a level-set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaire, G.; Delgado, G.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the optimal design of composite laminates by allowing a variable stacking sequence and in-plane shape of each ply. In order to optimize both variables we rely on a decomposition technique which aggregates the constraints into one unique constraint margin function. Thanks to this approach, an exactly equivalent bi-level optimization problem is established. This problem is made up of an inner level represented by the combinatorial optimization of the stacking sequence and an outer level represented by the topology and geometry optimization of each ply. We propose for the stacking sequence optimization an outer approximation method which iteratively solves a set of mixed integer linear problems associated to the evaluation of the constraint margin function. For the topology optimization of each ply, we lean on the level set method for the description of the interfaces and the Hadamard method for boundary variations by means of the computation of the shape gradient. Numerical experiments are performed on an aeronautic test case where the weight is minimized subject to different mechanical constraints, namely compliance, reserve factor and buckling load.

  14. Optimal input shaping for Fisher identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenberger, Michael J.

    This dissertation examines the fundamental challenge of optimally shaping input trajectories to maximize parameter identifiability of control-oriented lithium-ion battery models. Identifiability is a property from information theory that determines the solvability of parameter estimation for mathematical models using input-output measurements. This dissertation creates a framework that exploits the Fisher information metric to quantify the level of battery parameter identifiability, optimizes this metric through input shaping, and facilitates faster and more accurate estimation. The popularity of lithium-ion batteries is growing significantly in the energy storage domain, especially for stationary and transportation applications. While these cells have excellent power and energy densities, they are plagued with safety and lifespan concerns. These concerns are often resolved in the industry through conservative current and voltage operating limits, which reduce the overall performance and still lack robustness in detecting catastrophic failure modes. New advances in automotive battery management systems mitigate these challenges through the incorporation of model-based control to increase performance, safety, and lifespan. To achieve these goals, model-based control requires accurate parameterization of the battery model. While many groups in the literature study a variety of methods to perform battery parameter estimation, a fundamental issue of poor parameter identifiability remains apparent for lithium-ion battery models. This fundamental challenge of battery identifiability is studied extensively in the literature, and some groups are even approaching the problem of improving the ability to estimate the model parameters. The first approach is to add additional sensors to the battery to gain more information that is used for estimation. The other main approach is to shape the input trajectories to increase the amount of information that can be gained from input

  15. Adaptive feature selection using v-shaped binary particle swarm optimization

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongbin; Zhou, Xiurong

    2017-01-01

    Feature selection is an important preprocessing method in machine learning and data mining. This process can be used not only to reduce the amount of data to be analyzed but also to build models with stronger interpretability based on fewer features. Traditional feature selection methods evaluate the dependency and redundancy of features separately, which leads to a lack of measurement of their combined effect. Moreover, a greedy search considers only the optimization of the current round and thus cannot be a global search. To evaluate the combined effect of different subsets in the entire feature space, an adaptive feature selection method based on V-shaped binary particle swarm optimization is proposed. In this method, the fitness function is constructed using the correlation information entropy. Feature subsets are regarded as individuals in a population, and the feature space is searched using V-shaped binary particle swarm optimization. The above procedure overcomes the hard constraint on the number of features, enables the combined evaluation of each subset as a whole, and improves the search ability of conventional binary particle swarm optimization. The proposed algorithm is an adaptive method with respect to the number of feature subsets. The experimental results show the advantages of optimizing the feature subsets using the V-shaped transfer function and confirm the effectiveness and efficiency of the feature subsets obtained under different classifiers. PMID:28358850

  16. Overview of Sensitivity Analysis and Shape Optimization for Complex Aerodynamic Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., III; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.; Newman, Perry A.; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of some of the more recent advances in steady aerodynamic shape-design sensitivity analysis and optimization, based on advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The focus here is on those methods particularly well-suited to the study of geometrically complex configurations and their potentially complex associated flow physics. When nonlinear state equations are considered in the optimization process, difficulties are found in the application of sensitivity analysis. Some techniques for circumventing such difficulties are currently being explored and are included here. Attention is directed to methods that utilize automatic differentiation to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for both complex configurations and complex flow physics. Various examples of shape-design sensitivity analysis for unstructured-grid CFD algorithms are demonstrated for different formulations of the sensitivity equations. Finally, the use of advanced, unstructured-grid CFDs in multidisciplinary analyses and multidisciplinary sensitivity analyses within future optimization processes is recommended and encouraged.

  17. Overview of Sensitivity Analysis and Shape Optimization for Complex Aerodynamic Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Perry A.; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of some of the more recent advances in steady aerodynamic shape-design sensitivity analysis and optimization, based on advanced computational fluid dynamics. The focus here is on those methods particularly well- suited to the study of geometrically complex configurations and their potentially complex associated flow physics. When nonlinear state equations are considered in the optimization process, difficulties are found in the application of sensitivity analysis. Some techniques for circumventing such difficulties are currently being explored and are included here. Attention is directed to methods that utilize automatic differentiation to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for both complex configurations and complex flow physics. Various examples of shape-design sensitivity analysis for unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics algorithms are demonstrated for different formulations of the sensitivity equations. Finally, the use of advanced, unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics in multidisciplinary analyses and multidisciplinary sensitivity analyses within future optimization processes is recommended and encouraged.

  18. Shape optimization of the diffuser blade of an axial blood pump by computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lailai; Zhang, Xiwen; Yao, Zhaohui

    2010-03-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been a viable and effective way to predict hydraulic performance, flow field, and shear stress distribution within a blood pump. We developed an axial blood pump with CFD and carried out a CFD-based shape optimization of the diffuser blade to enhance pressure output and diminish backflow in the impeller-diffuser connecting region at a fixed design point. Our optimization combined a computer-aided design package, a mesh generator, and a CFD solver in an automation environment with process integration and optimization software. A genetic optimization algorithm was employed to find the pareto-optimal designs from which we could make trade-off decisions. Finally, a set of representative designs was analyzed and compared on the basis of the energy equation. The role of the inlet angle of the diffuser blade was analyzed, accompanied by its relationship with pressure output and backflow in the impeller-diffuser connecting region.

  19. Optimized shape semantic graph representation for object understanding and recognition in point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yinghui; Meng, Weiliang; Zhang, Xiaopeng

    2016-10-01

    To understand and recognize the three-dimensional (3-D) objects represented as point cloud data, we use an optimized shape semantic graph (SSG) to describe 3-D objects. Based on the decomposed components of an object, the boundary surface of different components and the topology of components, the SSG gives a semantic description that is consistent with human vision perception. The similarity measurement of the SSG for different objects is effective for distinguishing the type of object and finding the most similar one. Experiments using a shape database show that the SSG is valuable for capturing the components of the objects and the corresponding relations between them. The SSG is not only suitable for an object without any loops but also appropriate for an object with loops to represent the shape and the topology. Moreover, a two-step progressive similarity measurement strategy is proposed to effectively improve the recognition rate in the shape database containing point-sample data.

  20. Shape optimization of axisymmetric solids with the finite cell method using a fixed grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liang; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Zhu, Ji-Hong; Xu, Zhao; Cai, Shou-Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a design procedure extending the B-spline based finite cell method into shape optimization is developed for axisymmetric solids involving the centrifugal force effect. We first replace the traditional conforming mesh in the finite element method with structured cells that are fixed during the whole design process with a view to avoid the sophisticated re-meshing and eventual mesh distortion. Then, B-spline shape functions are further implemented to yield a high-order continuity field along the cell boundary in stress analysis. By means of the implicit description of the shape boundary, stress sensitivity is analytically derived with respect to shape design variables. Finally, we illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed protocol by several numerical test cases as well as a whole design procedure carried out on an aeronautic turbine disk.

  1. Control of flow separation in airfoil/wing design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gally, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    Existing aerodynamic design methods have generally concentrated on the optimization of airfoil or wing shapes to produce a minimum drag while satisfying some basic constraints such as lift, pitching moment, or thickness. Since the minimization of drag almost always precludes the existence of separated flow, the evaluation and validation of these design methods for their robustness and accuracy when separated flow is present has not been aggressively pursued. However, two new applications for these design tools may be expected to include separated flow and the issues of aerodynamic design with this feature must be addressed. The first application of the aerodynamic design tools is the design of airfoils or wings to provide an optimal performance over a wide range of flight conditions (multipoint design). While the definition of 'optimal performance' in the multipoint setting is currently being hashed out, it is recognized that given a wide enough range of flight conditions, it will not be possible to ensure a minimum drag constraint at all conditions, and in fact some amount of separated flow (presumably small) may have to be allowed at the more demanding flight conditions. Thus a multipoint design method must be tolerant of the existence of separated flow and may include some controls upon its extent. The second application is in the design of wings with extended high speed buffet boundaries of their flight envelopes. Buffet occurs on a wing when regions of flow separation have grown to the extent that their time varying pressures induce possible destructive effects upon the wing structure or adversely effect either the aircraft controllability or the passenger comfort. A conservative approach to the expansion of the buffet flight boundary is to simply expand the flight envelope of nonseparated flow under the assumption that buffet will also thus be alleviated. However, having the ability to design a wing with separated flow and thus to control the location, extent

  2. Thin airfoil theory based on approximate solution of the transonic flow equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, John R; Alksne, Alberta Y

    1958-01-01

    A method is presented for the approximate solution of the nonlinear equations of transonic flow theory. Solutions are found for two-dimensional flows at a Mach number of 1 and for purely subsonic and purely supersonic flows. Results are obtained in closed analytic form for a large and significant class of nonlifting airfoils. At a Mach number of 1 general expressions are given for the pressure distribution on an airfoil of specified geometry and for the shape of an airfoil having a prescribed pressure distribution. Extensive comparisons are made with available data, particularly for a Mach number of 1, and with existing solutions.

  3. Thin airfoil theory based on approximate solution of the transonic flow equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, John R; Alksne, Alberta Y

    1957-01-01

    A method is presented for the approximate solution of the nonlinear equations transonic flow theory. Solutions are found for two-dimensional flows at a Mach number of 1 and for purely subsonic and purely supersonic flows. Results are obtained in closed analytic form for a large and significant class of nonlifting airfoils. At a Mach number of 1 general expressions are given for the pressure distribution on an airfoil of specified geometry and for the shape of an airfoil having a prescribed pressure distribution. Extensive comparisons are made with available data, particularly for a Mach number of 1, and with existing solutions.

  4. Shape optimization of three-dimensional stamped and solid automotive components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botkin, M. E.; Yang, R.-J.; Bennett, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The shape optimization of realistic, 3-D automotive components is discussed. The integration of the major parts of the total process: modeling, mesh generation, finite element and sensitivity analysis, and optimization are stressed. Stamped components and solid components are treated separately. For stamped parts a highly automated capability was developed. The problem description is based upon a parameterized boundary design element concept for the definition of the geometry. Automatic triangulation and adaptive mesh refinement are used to provide an automated analysis capability which requires only boundary data and takes into account sensitivity of the solution accuracy to boundary shape. For solid components a general extension of the 2-D boundary design element concept has not been achieved. In this case, the parameterized surface shape is provided using a generic modeling concept based upon isoparametric mapping patches which also serves as the mesh generator. Emphasis is placed upon the coupling of optimization with a commercially available finite element program. To do this it is necessary to modularize the program architecture and obtain shape design sensitivities using the material derivative approach so that only boundary solution data is needed.

  5. Generalizing Murray's law: An optimization principle for fluidic networks of arbitrary shape and scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, David; Patronis, Alexander; Holland, David M.; Lockerby, Duncan A.

    2015-11-01

    Murray's law states that the volumetric flow rate is proportional to the cube of the radius in a cylindrical channel optimized to require the minimum work to drive and maintain the fluid. However, application of this principle to the biomimetic design of micro/nano fabricated networks requires optimization of channels with arbitrary cross-sectional shape (not just circular) and smaller than is valid for Murray's original assumptions. We present a generalized law for symmetric branching that (a) is valid for any cross-sectional shape, providing that the shape is constant through the network; (b) is valid for slip flow and plug flow occurring at very small scales; and (c) is valid for networks with a constant depth, which is often a requirement for lab-on-a-chip fabrication procedures. By considering limits of the generalized law, we show that the optimum daughter-parent area ratio Γ, for symmetric branching into N daughter channels of any constant cross-sectional shape, is Γ=N-2 /3 for large-scale channels, and Γ=N-4 /5 for channels with a characteristic length scale much smaller than the slip length. Our analytical results are verified by comparison with a numerical optimization of a two-level network model based on flow rate data obtained from a variety of sources, including Navier-Stokes slip calculations, kinetic theory data, and stochastic particle simulations.

  6. Control of flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil with a micro-riblet film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.-J.; Jang, Y.-G.

    2005-07-01

    The flow structure of the wake behind a NACA 0012 airfoil covered with a V-shaped micro-riblet film (hereafter, MRF) has been investigated experimentally. The results were compared with the corresponding results from an identical airfoil covered with a smooth polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film of the same thickness. The drag force acting on each airfoil, as well as the spatial distributions of turbulence statistics in the near wake behind each airfoil, were measured for Reynolds numbers (calculated based on the chord length, C=75mm) ranging from Re=1.03×104 to 5.14×104. At Re=1.54×104 (U0=3 m/s), the drag force on the MRF-covered airfoil was about 6.6% lower than that on the smooth airfoil. In contrast, at the higher Reynolds number of Re=4.62×104 (U0=9 m/s), application of the MRF increased the drag force by about 9.8%. To determine the spatial distributions of turbulence intensity, including the mean velocity, turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy, 500 instantaneous velocity fields of the wake behind each airfoil were measured using a 2-frame PIV technique and ensemble averaged. For the case of drag reduction (Re=1.54×104), the near wake behind the MRF-covered airfoil had a shorter vortex formation region and higher vertical velocity component compared with that behind the smooth airfoil. At the downstream end of vortex formation region, the Reynolds shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy for the MRF-covered airfoil were similar or slightly larger than for the smooth airfoil. Smoke-wire flow visualization showed that the presence of the MRF on the airfoil surface caused the smoke filaments to become thinner and to be separated by a smaller lateral spacing, indicating suppression of spanwise movement. For the drag-increasing case (Re=4.62×104), the presence of MRF grooves on the airfoil seemed to increase the vertical velocity component and decrease the height of the large-scale streamwise vortices, which interacted actively. This active

  7. Initial billet and forging dies shape optimization: Application on an axisymetrical forging with a hammer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanjuan; Labergere, Carl; Lafon, Pascal

    2011-05-01

    In metal forming process, the forging die design is the most important step for products quality control. Reasonable dies shape can not only reduce raw material cost but also improving material flow and eliminating defects. The main objective of this paper is to obtain some optimal parameters of the initial billet and forging dies shape according to the simulation results of a two-step metal forming process (platting step and forging step). To develop this metal forming process optimization system several numerical tools are required: geometric modelling (CATIA V5™), FEM analysis (ABAQUS®), work-flow control and optimization computation (MODEFRONTIER®). This study is done in three stages: simulating the two-step metal forming process, building surrogate meta-models to relate response and variables and optimizing the process by using advanced optimization algorithms. In this paper, a two-step axisymmetric metal forming project was studied as an example. By using our simulation model, we get 581 correct real simulation results totally. According to all these real values, we build the surrogate meta-models and obtain Pareto points for a two-objective optimization process. The choice of a solution in all Pareto points will be done by the engineer who can choose his best values according to their criterions of project.

  8. Dynamic Stall Characteristics of Drooped Leading Edge Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Sahin, Mehmet; Gopal, Naveen

    2000-01-01

    Helicopters in high-speed forward flight usually experience large regions of dynamic stall over the retreating side of the rotor disk. The rapid variations in the lift and pitching moments associated with the stall process can result in vibratory loads, and can cause fatigue and failure of pitch links. In some instances, the large time lag between the aerodynamic forces and the blade motion can trigger stall flutter. A number of techniques for the alleviation of dynamic stall have been proposed and studied by researchers. Passive and active control techniques have both been explored. Passive techniques include the use of high solidity rotors that reduce the lift coefficients of individual blades, leading edge slots and leading edge slats. Active control techniques include steady and unsteady blowing, and dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE) airfoils. Considerable amount of experimental and numerical data has been collected on the effectiveness of these concepts. One concept that has not received as much attention is the drooped-leading edge airfoil idea. It has been observed in wind tunnel studies and flight tests that drooped leading edge airfoils can have a milder dynamic stall, with a significantly milder load hysteresis. Drooped leading edge airfoils may not, however, be suitable at other conditions, e.g. in hover, or in transonic flow. Work needs to be done on the analysis and design of drooped leading edge airfoils for efficient operation in a variety of flight regimes (hover, dynamic stall, and transonic flow). One concept that is worthy of investigation is the dynamically drooping airfoil, where the leading edge shape is changed roughly once-per-rev to mitigate the dynamic stall.

  9. Multi-objective shape optimization of runner blade for Kaplan turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, A.; Chirkov, D.; Lyutov, A.; Chemy, S.; Skorospelov, V.; Pylev, I.

    2014-03-01

    Automatic runner shape optimization based on extensive CFD analysis proved to be a useful design tool in hydraulic turbomachinery. Previously the authors developed an efficient method for Francis runner optimization. It was successfully applied to the design of several runners with different specific speeds. In present work this method is extended to the task of a Kaplan runner optimization. Despite of relatively simpler blade shape, Kaplan turbines have several features, complicating the optimization problem. First, Kaplan turbines normally operate in a wide range of discharges, thus CFD analysis of each variant of the runner should be carried out for several operation points. Next, due to a high specific speed, draft tube losses have a great impact on the overall turbine efficiency, and thus should be accurately evaluated. Then, the flow in blade tip and hub clearances significantly affects the velocity profile behind the runner and draft tube behavior. All these features are accounted in the present optimization technique. Parameterization of runner blade surface using 24 geometrical parameters is described in details. For each variant of runner geometry steady state three-dimensional turbulent flow computations are carried out in the domain, including wicket gate, runner, draft tube, blade tip and hub clearances. The objectives are maximization of efficiency in best efficiency and high discharge operation points, with simultaneous minimization of cavitation area on the suction side of the blade. Multiobjective genetic algorithm is used for the solution of optimization problem, requiring the analysis of several thousands of runner variants. The method is applied to optimization of runner shape for several Kaplan turbines with different heads.

  10. Optimal design at inner core of the shaped pyramidal truss structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Uk; Yang, Dong-Yol

    2013-12-16

    Sandwich material is a type of composite material with lightweight, high strength, good dynamic properties and high bending stiffness-to-weight ratio. This can be found well such structures in the nature (for example, internal structure of bones, plants, etc.). New trend which prefers eco-friendly products and energy efficiency is emerging in industries recently. Demand for materials with high strength and light weight is also increasing. In line with these trends, researches about manufacturing methods of sandwich material have been actively conducted. In this study, a sandwich structure named as “Shaped Pyramidal Truss Structure” is proposed to improve mechanical strength and to apply a manufacturing process suitable for massive production. The new sandwich structure was designed to enhance compressive strength by changing the cross-sectional shape at the central portion of the core. As the next step, optimization of the shape was required. Optimization technique used here was the SZGA(Successive Zooming Genetic Algorithm), which is one of GA(Genetic Algorithm) methods gradually reducing the area of design variable. The objective function was defined as moment of inertia of the cross-sectional shape of the strut. The control points of cubic Bezier curve, which was assumed to be the shape of the cross section, were used as design variables. By using FEM simulation, it was found that the structure exhibited superior mechanical properties compared to the simple design of the prior art.

  11. Optical tracking of contrast medium bolus to optimize bolus shape and timing in dynamic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisa, Fabian; Brauweiler, Robert; Peetz, Alexander; Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Kalender, Willi A.

    2012-05-01

    One of the biggest challenges in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is the optimal synchronization of scan start and duration with contrast medium administration in order to optimize image contrast and to reduce the amount of contrast medium. We present a new optically based approach, which was developed to investigate and optimize bolus timing and shape. The time-concentration curve of an intravenously injected test bolus of a dye is measured in peripheral vessels with an optical sensor prior to the diagnostic CT scan. The curves can be used to assess bolus shapes as a function of injection protocols and to determine contrast medium arrival times. Preliminary results for phantom and animal experiments showed the expected linear behavior between dye concentration and absorption. The kinetics of the dye was compared to iodinated contrast medium and was found to be in good agreement. The contrast enhancement curves were reliably detected in three mice with individual bolus shapes and delay times of 2.1, 3.5 and 6.1 s, respectively. The optical sensor appears to be a promising approach to optimize injection protocols and contrast enhancement timing and is applicable to all modalities without implying any additional radiation dose. Clinical tests are still necessary.

  12. Three-Dimensional Optimal Shape Design in Heat Transfer Based on Body-fitted Grid Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohebbi, Farzad; Sellier, Mathieu

    2013-10-01

    This paper is concerned with an optimal shape design (shape optimization) problem in heat transfer. As an inverse steady-state heat transfer problem, given a body locally heated by a specified heat flux and exposed to convective heat transfer on parts of its boundary, the aim is to find the optimal shape of this body such that the temperature is constant on a desired subset of its boundary. The numerical method to achieve this aim consists of a three-dimensional elliptic grid generation technique to generate a mesh over the body and solve for a heat conduction equation. This paper describes a novel sensitivity analysis scheme to compute the sensitivity of the temperatures to variation of grid node positions and the conjugate gradient method (CGM) is used as an optimization algorithm to minimize the difference between the computed temperature on the boundary and desired temperature. The elliptic grid generation technique allows us to map the physical domain (body) onto a fixed computational domain and to discretize the heat conduction equation using the finite difference method (FDM).

  13. A theoretical analysis of an optimal chainring shape to maximize crank power during isokinetic pedaling.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Jeffery W; Neptune, Richard R

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have sought to improve cycling performance by altering various aspects of the pedaling motion using novel crank-pedal mechanisms and non-circular chainrings. However, most designs have been based on empirical data and very few have provided significant improvements in cycling performance. The purpose of this study was to use a theoretical framework that included a detailed musculoskeletal model driven by individual muscle actuators, forward dynamic simulations and design optimization to determine if cycling performance (i.e., maximal power output) could be improved by optimizing the chainring shape to maximize average crank power during isokinetic pedaling conditions. The optimization identified a consistent non-circular chainring shape at pedaling rates of 60, 90 and 120 rpm with an average eccentricity of 1.29 that increased crank power by an average of 2.9% compared to a conventional circular chainring. The increase in average crank power was the result of the optimal chainrings slowing down the crank velocity during the downstroke (power phase) to allow muscles to generate power longer and produce more external work. The data also showed that chainrings with higher eccentricity increased negative muscle work following the power phase due to muscle activation-deactivation dynamics. Thus, the chainring shape that maximized average crank power balanced these competing demands by providing enough eccentricity to increase the external work generated by muscles during the power phase while minimizing negative work during the subsequent recovery phase.

  14. A genetic algorithm based multi-objective shape optimization scheme for cementless femoral implant.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Souptick; Gupta, Sanjay; Kumar Pratihar, Dilip

    2015-03-01

    The shape and geometry of femoral implant influence implant-induced periprosthetic bone resorption and implant-bone interface stresses, which are potential causes of aseptic loosening in cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA). Development of a shape optimization scheme is necessary to achieve a trade-off between these two conflicting objectives. The objective of this study was to develop a novel multi-objective custom-based shape optimization scheme for cementless femoral implant by integrating finite element (FE) analysis and a multi-objective genetic algorithm (GA). The FE model of a proximal femur was based on a subject-specific CT-scan dataset. Eighteen parameters describing the nature of four key sections of the implant were identified as design variables. Two objective functions, one based on implant-bone interface failure criterion, and the other based on resorbed proximal bone mass fraction (BMF), were formulated. The results predicted by the two objective functions were found to be contradictory; a reduction in the proximal bone resorption was accompanied by a greater chance of interface failure. The resorbed proximal BMF was found to be between 23% and 27% for the trade-off geometries as compared to ∼39% for a generic implant. Moreover, the overall chances of interface failure have been minimized for the optimal designs, compared to the generic implant. The adaptive bone remodeling was also found to be minimal for the optimally designed implants and, further with remodeling, the chances of interface debonding increased only marginally.

  15. Study on methods of shape optimization and design of membrane mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Su; Tan, Fanjiao; Wang, Dawei

    2016-10-01

    Based on the Karman's equation for circular thin plate and Qian's theory of membrane, the membrane mirror forming theory model is established. The effect of the high order disturbance for the shape of the membrane mirror is reduced by the way of variable thickness, so that the shape of the membrane is parabolic. The finite element method is used to verify the theory of the membrane mirror forming model. But the analysis results are not easy to convergence due to the flexibility characteristics of the membrane. So the reasonable solution parameters are necessary to ensure the correction of the finite element analysis result. The results show that the deviation between the finite element analysis and the theoretical results is small. The uniform thickness deviation is 0.73%, and the variable thickness deviation is 1.30%, thus the validity of the theoretical model is guaranteed. Then the membrane mirror design and optimization method is established on the basis of the theoretical model. Compare the theoretical surface and the optical design surface, and set the minimum root mean square error between the theoretical and the optical design surface as the optimization goal. The original shape and the surface shape control parameters of the membrane are optimized by using genetic algorithm. Finally, get the optimization model which can be used to optimize membrane mirror with any diameter. The genetic algorithm was used to optimize the thickness, boundary condition and the uniform loads. The result of membrane mirror accuracy is λ/4(λ=10um), which indicates that this membrane mirror can be applied in the infrared wavelength range for imaging. The main optimizing parameters are the variable thickness of the membrane, the boundary conditions and the surface loads. Finally, the optimization result of the membrane is the RMS<λ/4(λ=10μm), which indicates that the membrane can be used to long-wave infrared optical system. Based on the theory of mechanics of materials, this

  16. PATH OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF A SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY ACTUATED CATHETER FOR ENDOCARDIAL RADIOFREQUENCY ABLATION

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Jennifer H.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a real-time path optimization and control strategy for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuated cardiac ablation catheters, potentially enabling the creation of more precise lesions with reduced procedure times and improved patient outcomes. Catheter tip locations and orientations are optimized using parallel genetic algorithms to produce continuous ablation paths with near normal tissue contact through physician-specified points. A nonlinear multivariable control strategy is presented to compensate for SMA hysteresis, bandwidth limitations, and coupling between system inputs. Simulated and experimental results demonstrate efficient generation of ablation paths and optimal reference trajectories. Closed-loop control of the SMA-actuated catheter along optimized ablation paths is validated experimentally. PMID:25684857

  17. A Newton-Krylov Approach to Aerodynamic Shape Optimization in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Timothy Man-Ming

    A Newton-Krylov algorithm is presented for aerodynamic shape optimization in three dimensions using the Euler equations. An inexact-Newton method is used in the flow solver, a discrete-adjoint method to compute the gradient, and the quasi-Newton optimizer to find the optimum. A Krylov subspace method with approximate-Schur preconditioning is used to solve both the flow equation and the adjoint equation. Basis spline surfaces are used to parameterize the geometry, and a fast algebraic algorithm is used for grid movement. Accurate discrete- adjoint gradients can be obtained in approximately one-fourth the time required for a converged flow solution. Single- and multi-point lift-constrained drag minimization optimization cases are presented for wing design at transonic speeds. In all cases, the optimizer is able to efficiently decrease the objective function and gradient for problems with hundreds of design variables.

  18. Dome Shape Optimization of Composite Pressure Vessels Based on Rational B-Spline Curve and Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaeesefat, Abbas

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for shape optimization of composite pressure vessels head. The shape factor which is defined as the ratio of internal volume to weight of the vessel is used as an objective function. Design constrains consist of the geometrical limitations, winding conditions, and Tsai-Wu failure criterion. The geometry of dome shape is defined by a B-spline rational curve. By altering the weights of control points, depth of dome, and winding angle, the dome shape is changed. The proposed algorithm uses genetic algorithm and finite element analysis to optimize the design parameters. The algorithm is applied on a CNG pressure vessel and the results show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently define the optimal dome shape. This algorithm is general and can be used for general shape optimization.

  19. Airfoil Vibration Dampers program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The Airfoil Vibration Damper program has consisted of an analysis phase and a testing phase. During the analysis phase, a state-of-the-art computer code was developed, which can be used to guide designers in the placement and sizing of friction dampers. The use of this computer code was demonstrated by performing representative analyses on turbine blades from the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) and High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The testing phase of the program consisted of performing friction damping tests on two different cantilever beams. Data from these tests provided an empirical check on the accuracy of the computer code developed in the analysis phase. Results of the analysis and testing showed that the computer code can accurately predict the performance of friction dampers. In addition, a valuable set of friction damping data was generated, which can be used to aid in the design of friction dampers, as well as provide benchmark test cases for future code developers.

  20. A supercritical airfoil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateer, G. G.; Seegmiller, H. L.; Hand, L. A.; Szodruck, J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to provide a comprehensive data base for the validation of numerical simulations. The objective of the present paper is to provide a tabulation of the experimental data. The data were obtained in the two-dimensional, transonic flowfield surrounding a supercritical airfoil. A variety of flows were studied in which the boundary layer at the trailing edge of the model was either attached or separated. Unsteady flows were avoided by controlling the Mach number and angle of attack. Surface pressures were measured on both the model and wind tunnel walls, and the flowfield surrounding the model was documented using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Although wall interference could not be completely eliminated, its effect was minimized by employing the following techniques. Sidewall boundary layers were reduced by aspiration, and upper and lower walls were contoured to accommodate the flow around the model and the boundary-layer growth on the tunnel walls. A data base with minimal interference from a tunnel with solid walls provides an ideal basis for evaluating the development of codes for the transonic speed range because the codes can include the wall boundary conditions more precisely than interference connections can be made to the data sets.

  1. Optimal Viscosity and Particle Shape of Hyaluronic Acid Filler as a Scaffold for Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Yeol; Namgoong, Sik; Han, Seung-Kyu; Won, Chang-Hoon; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    The authors previously reported that cultured human fibroblasts suspended in a hyaluronic acid filler can produce human dermal matrices with extended in vivo stability in animal and clinical studies. The present study was undertaken to determine the optimal viscosity and particle shape of hyaluronic acid filler as a scaffold for cultured human dermal fibroblasts to enhance the maximal viability of injected cells. The fibroblasts were suspended in either 1 of 3 hyaluronic acid viscosities at 2 different particle shapes. The viscosities used in this study were low (600,000-800,000 centipoises), moderate (2,000,000-4,000,000 centipoises), and high (8,000,000-12,000,000 centipoises). The particle shape was evaluated by testing round and irregular shapes. The fibroblast mixed bioimplants were injected into the back of individual athymic nude mice. The levels of type I collagen were measured using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) and immunohistochemical staining at 16 weeks after the injections. Results of FACS demonstrated that the mean cell ratio with human collagens in the moderate viscosity group was greater than those of control, low, and high viscosity groups. An immunohistochemical study showed similar results. The moderate viscosity group demonstrated the highest positive staining of human collagens. However, there were no significant differences between groups of irregular and round shape particles. A hyaluronic acid bioimplant with moderate viscosity is superior to that with low or high viscosity in the viability for human fibroblasts. However, the particle shape does not influence the viability of the fibroblasts.

  2. Shape Optimization of A Turbine-99 Draft Tube Using Design-by-Morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sahuck; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Marcus, Philip; Gutzwiller, David; Demeulenaere, Alain; Jiang, Chiyu

    2016-11-01

    We have found the "optimal" shape of a turbine-99 draft tube that maximizes its pressure recovery factor using a new design method called design-by- morphing. In design-by- morphing, new draft tubes are created by morphing multiple baseline draft tubes with different weights. The surfaces of baseline draft tubes are approximated by a summation of spectral coefficients multiplied by spectral basis functions. Then, a morphed draft tube is produced by computing a new set of spectral coefficients which are a weighted average of the spectral coefficients of the baseline draft tubes. The "optimal" draft tube is obtained by finding the weights such that the mean pressure recovery factor is maximized. After optimization is carried out using design-by- morphing, the high static pressure region is significantly reduced, and the flow is smoother and more uniform than it was in any of the baseline turbine-99 draft tubes. The optimal draft tube shows a 10.9% improvement over the turbine-99 draft tube. We have applied this method to trains and to aircrafts, and have reduced the drag and the drag-to-lift ratio by 13.2% and 23.1%, respectively. We believe that this optimization method is applicable to many engineering applications in which the performance of an object depends on its shape.

  3. Complexity and simplicity of optimal control theory pulses shaped for controlling vibrational qubits.

    PubMed

    Shyshlov, Dmytro; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-11-21

    In the context of molecular quantum computation the optimal control theory (OCT) is used to obtain shaped laser pulses for high-fidelity control of vibrational qubits. Optimization is done in time domain and the OCT algorithm varies values of electric field in each time step independently, tuning hundreds of thousands of parameters to find one optimal solution. Such flexibility is not available in experiments, where pulse shaping is done in frequency domain and the number of "tuning knobs" is much smaller. The question of possible experimental interpretations of theoretically found OCT solutions arises. In this work we analyze very accurate optimal pulse that we obtained for implementing quantum gate CNOT for the two-qubit system encoded into the exited vibrational states of thiophosgene molecule. Next, we try to alter this pulse by reducing the number of available frequency channels and intentionally introducing systematic and random errors (in frequency domain, by modifying the values of amplitudes and phases of different frequency components). We conclude that a very limited number of frequency components (only 32 in the model of thiophosgene) are really necessary for accurate control of the vibrational two-qubit system, and such pulses can be readily constructed using OCT. If the amplitude and phase errors of different frequency components do not exceed ±3% of the optimal values, one can still achieve accurate transformations of the vibrational two-qubit system, with gate fidelity of CNOT exceeding 0.99.

  4. Adjoint Algorithm for CAD-Based Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Adjoint solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape optimization. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (geometric parameters that control the shape). More recently, emerging adjoint applications focus on the analysis problem, where the adjoint solution is used to drive mesh adaptation, as well as to provide estimates of functional error bounds and corrections. The attractive feature of this approach is that the mesh-adaptation procedure targets a specific functional, thereby localizing the mesh refinement and reducing computational cost. Our focus is on the development of adjoint-based optimization techniques for a Cartesian method with embedded boundaries.12 In contrast t o implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume mesh. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin et developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the Euler equations. In both approaches, a boundary condition is introduced to approximate the effects of the evolving surface shape that results in accurate gradient computation. Central to automated shape optimization algorithms is the issue of geometry modeling and control. The need to optimize complex, "real-life" geometry provides a strong incentive for the use of parametric-CAD systems within the optimization procedure. In previous work, we presented

  5. Shaping the joint spectrum of down-converted photons through optimized custom poling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosseva, Annamaria; Cincio, Łukasz; Brańczyk, Agata M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a scheme for engineering the joint spectrum of photon pairs created via spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Our method relies on customizing the poling configuration of a quasi-phase-matched crystal. We use simulated annealing to find an optimized poling configuration which allows almost arbitrary shaping of the crystal's phase-matching function. This has direct application in the creation of pure single photons—currently one of the most important goals of single-photon quantum optics. We describe the general algorithm and provide code, written in C++, that outputs an optimized poling configuration given specific experimental parameters.

  6. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1995-01-01

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  7. Advanced technology airfoil research, volume 2. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive review of airfoil research is presented. The major thrust of the research is in three areas: development of computational aerodynamic codes for airfoil analysis and design, development of experimental facilities and test techniques, and all types of airfoil applications.

  8. A study of shape optimization on the metallic nanoparticles for thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiwei; Huang, Xiaodong; Li, Qing; Xie, Yi Min

    2013-10-29

    The shape of metallic nanoparticles used to enhance the performance of thin-film solar cells is described by Gielis' superformula and optimized by an evolutionary algorithm. As a result, we have found a lens-like nanoparticle capable of improving the short circuit current density to 19.93 mA/cm2. Compared with a two-scale nanospherical configuration recently reported to synthesize the merits of large and small spheres into a single structure, the optimized nanoparticle enables the solar cell to achieve a further 7.75% improvement in the current density and is much more fabrication friendly due to its simple shape and tolerance to geometrical distortions.

  9. A study of shape optimization on the metallic nanoparticles for thin-film solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The shape of metallic nanoparticles used to enhance the performance of thin-film solar cells is described by Gielis' superformula and optimized by an evolutionary algorithm. As a result, we have found a lens-like nanoparticle capable of improving the short circuit current density to 19.93 mA/cm2. Compared with a two-scale nanospherical configuration recently reported to synthesize the merits of large and small spheres into a single structure, the optimized nanoparticle enables the solar cell to achieve a further 7.75% improvement in the current density and is much more fabrication friendly due to its simple shape and tolerance to geometrical distortions. PMID:24168131

  10. Limits to optimization: fluid dynamics, adhesive strength and the evolution of shape in limpet shells.

    PubMed

    Denny, M W

    2000-09-01

    Limpets are commonly found on wave-swept rocky shores, where they may be subjected to water velocities in excess of 20 m s(-1). These extreme flows can impose large forces (lift and drag), challenging the animal's ability to adhere to the substratum. It is commonly thought that the conical shape of limpet shells has evolved in part to reduce these hydrodynamic forces while providing a large aperture for adhesion. This study documents how lift and drag actually vary with the shape of limpet-like models and uses these data to explore the potential of hydrodynamic forces to serve as a selective factor in the evolution of limpet shell morphology. At a low ratio of shell height to shell radius, lift is the dominant force, while at high ratios of height to radius drag is dominant. The risk of dislodgment is minimized when the ratio of height to radius is 1.06 and the apex is in the center of the shell. Real limpets are seldom optimally shaped, however, with a typical height-to-radius ratio of 0.68 and an apex well anterior of the shell's center. The disparity between the actual and the hydrodynamically optimal shape of shells may be due to the high tenacity of limpets' adhesive system. Most limpets adhere to the substratum so strongly that they are unlikely to be dislodged by lift or drag regardless of the shape of their shell. The evolution of a tenacious adhesion system (perhaps in response to predation) has thus preempted selection for a hydrodynamically optimal shell, allowing the shell to respond to alternative selective factors.

  11. Joint optimization of segmentation and shape prior from level-set-based statistical shape model, and its application to the automated segmentation of abdominal organs.

    PubMed

    Saito, Atsushi; Nawano, Shigeru; Shimizu, Akinobu

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study is to provide a theoretical framework for accurately optimizing the segmentation energy considering all of the possible shapes generated from the level-set-based statistical shape model (SSM). The proposed algorithm solves the well-known open problem, in which a shape prior may not be optimal in terms of an objective functional that needs to be minimized during segmentation. The algorithm allows the selection of an optimal shape prior from among all possible shapes generated from an SSM by conducting a branch-and-bound search over an eigenshape space. The proposed algorithm does not require predefined shape templates or the construction of a hierarchical clustering tree before graph-cut segmentation. It jointly optimizes an objective functional in terms of both the shape prior and segmentation labeling, and finds an optimal solution by considering all possible shapes generated from an SSM. We apply the proposed algorithm to both pancreas and spleen segmentation using multiphase computed tomography volumes, and we compare the results obtained with those produced by a conventional algorithm employing a branch-and-bound search over a search tree of predefined shapes, which were sampled discretely from an SSM. The proposed algorithm significantly improves the segmentation performance in terms of the Jaccard index and Dice similarity index. In addition, we compare the results with the state-of-the-art multiple abdominal organs segmentation algorithm, and confirmed that the performances of both algorithms are comparable to each other. We discuss the high computational efficiency of the proposed algorithm, which was determined experimentally using a normalized number of traversed nodes in a search tree, and the extensibility of the proposed algorithm to other SSMs or energy functionals.

  12. Elastically Shaped Wing Optimization and Aircraft Concept for Improved Cruise Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Trinh, Khanh; Reynolds, Kevin; Kless, James; Aftosmis, Michael; Urnes, James, Sr.; Ippolito, Corey

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study conducted tn 2010 by the NASA Innovation Fund Award project entitled "Elastically Shaped Future Air Vehicle Concept". The study presents three themes in support of meeting national and global aviation challenges of reducing fuel burn for present and future aviation systems. The first theme addresses the drag reduction goal through innovative vehicle configurations via non-planar wing optimization. Two wing candidate concepts have been identified from the wing optimization: a drooped wing shape and an inflected wing shape. The drooped wing shape is a truly biologically inspired wing concept that mimics a seagull wing and could achieve about 5% to 6% drag reduction, which is aerodynamically significant. From a practical perspective, this concept would require new radical changes to the current aircraft development capabilities for new vehicles with futuristic-looking wings such as this concept. The inflected wing concepts could achieve between 3% to 4% drag reduction. While the drag reduction benefit may be less, the inflected-wing concept could have a near-term impact since this concept could be developed within the current aircraft development capabilities. The second theme addresses the drag reduction goal through a new concept of elastic wing shaping control. By aeroelastically tailoring the wing shape with active control to maintain optimal aerodynamics, a significant drag reduction benefit could be realized. A significant reduction in fuel burn for long-range cruise from elastic wing shaping control could be realized. To realize the potential of the elastic wing shaping control concept, the third theme emerges that addresses the drag reduction goal through a new aerodynamic control effector called a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap. Conventional aerodynamic control surfaces are discrete independent surfaces that cause geometric discontinuities at the trailing edge region. These discontinuities promote

  13. Optimal Shape for Forces and Moments on a Multi-Element Hydrofoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Hydrofoil DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This paper is part of the following report: TITLE: International...Michigan, 5-8 August 2007 Optimal Shape for Forces and Moments on a Multi-Element Hydrofoil Yu-Tai Lee1, Vineet Ahuja 2, Ashvin Hosangadi 2 and Michael...forces and The Tab Assisted Control (TAC) foil used for moments acting on the hydrofoil with adequate underwater control surfaces, shown in Fig. la, was

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Chaotic Flow around Two-Dimensional Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blonigan, Patrick; Wang, Qiqi; Nielsen, Eric; Diskin, Boris

    2015-11-01

    Computational methods for sensitivity analysis are invaluable tools for fluid dynamics research and engineering design. These methods are used in many applications, including aerodynamic shape optimization and adaptive grid refinement. However, traditional sensitivity analysis methods, including the adjoint method, break down when applied to long-time averaged quantities in chaotic fluid flow fields, such as high-fidelity turbulence simulations. This break down is due to the ``Butterfly Effect'' the high sensitivity of chaotic dynamical systems to the initial condition. A new sensitivity analysis method developed by the authors, Least Squares Shadowing (LSS), can compute useful and accurate gradients for quantities of interest in chaotic dynamical systems. LSS computes gradients using the ``shadow trajectory'', a phase space trajectory (or solution) for which perturbations to the flow field do not grow exponentially in time. To efficiently compute many gradients for one objective function, we use an adjoint version of LSS. This talk will briefly outline Least Squares Shadowing and demonstrate it on chaotic flow around a Two-Dimensional airfoil.

  15. Trajectory Design Employing Convex Optimization for Landing on Irregularly Shaped Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin M.; Lu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Mission proposals that land spacecraft on asteroids are becoming increasingly popular. However, in order to have a successful mission the spacecraft must reliably and softly land at the intended landing site with pinpoint precision. The problem under investigation is how to design a propellant optimal powered descent trajectory that can be quickly computed onboard the spacecraft, without interaction from the ground control. The propellant optimal control problem in this work is to determine the optimal finite thrust vector to land the spacecraft at a specified location, in the presence of a highly nonlinear gravity field, subject to various mission and operational constraints. The proposed solution uses convex optimization, a gravity model with higher fidelity than Newtonian, and an iterative solution process for a fixed final time problem. In addition, a second optimization method is wrapped around the convex optimization problem to determine the optimal flight time that yields the lowest propellant usage over all flight times. Gravity models designed for irregularly shaped asteroids are investigated. Success of the algorithm is demonstrated by designing powered descent trajectories for the elongated binary asteroid Castalia.

  16. Muscle force regulates bone shaping for optimal load-bearing capacity during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sharir, Amnon; Stern, Tomer; Rot, Chagai; Shahar, Ron; Zelzer, Elazar

    2011-08-01

    The vertebrate skeleton consists of over 200 individual bones, each with its own unique shape, size and function. We study the role of intrauterine muscle-induced mechanical loads in determining the three-dimensional morphology of developing bones. Analysis of the force-generating capacity of intrauterine muscles in mice revealed that developing bones are subjected to significant and progressively increasing mechanical challenges. To evaluate the effect of intrauterine loads on bone morphogenesis and the contribution of the emerging shape to the ability of bones to withstand these loads, we monitored structural and mineral changes during development. Using daily micro-CT scans of appendicular long bones we identify a developmental program, which we term preferential bone growth, that determines the specific circumferential shape of each bone by employing asymmetric mineral deposition and transient cortical thickening. Finite element analysis demonstrates that the resulting bone structure has optimal load-bearing capacity. To test the hypothesis that muscle forces regulate preferential bone growth in utero, we examine this process in a mouse strain (mdg) that lacks muscle contractions. In the absence of mechanical loads, the stereotypical circumferential outline of each bone is lost, leading to the development of mechanically inferior bones. This study identifies muscle force regulation of preferential bone growth as the module that shapes the circumferential outline of bones and, consequently, optimizes their load-bearing capacity during development. Our findings invoke a common mechanism that permits the formation of different circumferential outlines in different bones.

  17. Optimal elastomeric scaffold leaflet shape for pulmonary heart valve leaflet replacement.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Bayoumi, Ahmed S; Chen, Peter; Hobson, Christopher M; Wagner, William R; Mayer, John E; Sacks, Michael S

    2013-02-22

    Surgical replacement of the pulmonary valve (PV) is a common treatment option for congenital pulmonary valve defects. Engineered tissue approaches to develop novel PV replacements are intrinsically complex, and will require methodical approaches for their development. Single leaflet replacement utilizing an ovine model is an attractive approach in that candidate materials can be evaluated under valve level stresses in blood contact without the confounding effects of a particular valve design. In the present study an approach for optimal leaflet shape design based on finite element (FE) simulation of a mechanically anisotropic, elastomeric scaffold for PV replacement is presented. The scaffold was modeled as an orthotropic hyperelastic material using a generalized Fung-type constitutive model. The optimal shape of the fully loaded PV replacement leaflet was systematically determined by minimizing the difference between the deformed shape obtained from FE simulation and an ex-vivo microCT scan of a native ovine PV leaflet. Effects of material anisotropy, dimensional changes of PV root, and fiber orientation on the resulting leaflet deformation were investigated. In-situ validation demonstrated that the approach could guide the design of the leaflet shape for PV replacement surgery.

  18. Optimal Elastomeric Scaffold Leaflet Shape for Pulmonary Heart Valve Leaflet Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rong; Bayoumi, Ahmed S.; Chen, Peter; Hobson, Christopher M.; Wagner, William R.; Mayer, John E.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Surgical replacement of the pulmonary valve (PV) is a common treatment option for congenital pulmonary valve defects. Engineered tissue approaches to develop novel PV replacements are intrinsically complex, and will require methodical approaches for their development. Single leaflet replacement utilizing an ovine model is an attractive approach in that candidate materials can be evaluated under valve level stresses in blood contact without the confounding effects of a particular valve design. In the present study an approach for optimal leaflet shape design based on finite element (FE) simulation of a mechanically anisotropic, elastomeric scaffold for PV replacement is presented. The scaffold was modeled as an orthotropic hyperelastic material using a generalized Fung-type constitutive model. The optimal shape of the fully loaded PV replacement leaflet was systematically determined by minimizing the difference between the deformed shape obtained from FE simulation and an ex-vivo microCT scan of a native ovine PV leaflet. Effects of material anisotropy, dimensional changes of PV root, and fiber orientation on the resulting leaflet deformation were investigated. In-situ validation demonstrated that the approach could guide the design of the leaflet shape for PV replacement surgery. PMID:23294966

  19. Robotic U-shaped assembly line balancing using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukund Nilakantan, J.; Ponnambalam, S. G.

    2016-02-01

    Automation in an assembly line can be achieved using robots. In robotic U-shaped assembly line balancing (RUALB), robots are assigned to workstations to perform the assembly tasks on a U-shaped assembly line. The robots are expected to perform multiple tasks, because of their capabilities. U-shaped assembly line problems are derived from traditional assembly line problems and are relatively new. Tasks are assigned to the workstations when either all of their predecessors or all of their successors have already been assigned to workstations. The objective function considered in this article is to maximize the cycle time of the assembly line, which in turn helps to maximize the production rate of the assembly line. RUALB aims at the optimal assignment of tasks to the workstations and selection of the best fit robot to the workstations in a manner such that the cycle time is minimized. To solve this problem, a particle swarm optimization algorithm embedded with a heuristic allocation (consecutive) procedure is proposed. The consecutive heuristic is used to allocate the tasks to the workstation and to assign a best fit robot to that workstation. The proposed algorithm is evaluated using a wide variety of data sets. The results indicate that robotic U-shaped assembly lines perform better than robotic straight assembly lines in terms of cycle time.

  20. Gradient-Based Aerodynamic Shape Optimization Using ADI Method for Large-Scale Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Mohagna J.; Baysal, Oktay

    1997-01-01

    A gradient-based shape optimization methodology, that is intended for practical three-dimensional aerodynamic applications, has been developed. It is based on the quasi-analytical sensitivities. The flow analysis is rendered by a fully implicit, finite volume formulation of the Euler equations.The aerodynamic sensitivity equation is solved using the alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) algorithm for memory efficiency. A flexible wing geometry model, that is based on surface parameterization and platform schedules, is utilized. The present methodology and its components have been tested via several comparisons. Initially, the flow analysis for for a wing is compared with those obtained using an unfactored, preconditioned conjugate gradient approach (PCG), and an extensively validated CFD code. Then, the sensitivities computed with the present method have been compared with those obtained using the finite-difference and the PCG approaches. Effects of grid refinement and convergence tolerance on the analysis and shape optimization have been explored. Finally the new procedure has been demonstrated in the design of a cranked arrow wing at Mach 2.4. Despite the expected increase in the computational time, the results indicate that shape optimization, which require large numbers of grid points can be resolved with a gradient-based approach.

  1. Under-Track CFD-Based Shape Optimization for a Low-Boom Demonstrator Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintzer, Mathias; Ordaz, Irian; Fenbert, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed outer mold line shaping of a Mach 1.6, demonstrator-sized low-boom concept is presented. Cruise trim is incorporated a priori as part of the shaping objective, using an equivalent-area-based approach. Design work is performed using a gradient-driven optimization framework that incorporates a three-dimensional, nonlinear flow solver, a parametric geometry modeler, and sensitivities derived using the adjoint method. The shaping effort is focused on reducing the under-track sonic boom level using an inverse design approach, while simultaneously satisfying the trim requirement. Conceptual-level geometric constraints are incorporated in the optimization process, including the internal layout of fuel tanks, landing gear, engine, and crew station. Details of the model parameterization and design process are documented for both flow-through and powered states, and the performance of these optimized vehicles presented in terms of inviscid L/D, trim state, pressures in the near-field and at the ground, and predicted sonic boom loudness.

  2. Shape optimization of the total scattering cross section for cylindrical scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsson, Per; Rylander, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    We propose and test a gradient-based shape optimization algorithm for the total scattering cross section of infinitely long cylinders, by means of changing the shape of the cylinder's cross section. On the basis of the optical theorem, we derive sensitivity expressions for both dielectric and metal cylinders given an incident plane wave, where the wave vector is perpendicular to the cylinder axis. Both the transverse electric (TE) case and the transverse magnetic case are considered. The sensitivity expressions are based on the continuum form of Maxwell's equations, and they provide the sensitivity with respect to an arbitrary number of shape parameters in terms of the field solution of the original scattering problem and an adjoint scattering problem. These results are used to construct a gradient-based optimization algorithm that we exploit for the reduction of the total scattering cross section in the TE case for metal cylinders, e.g., struts used in reflector antennas. We present optimized cross sections that are oblong in the direction of the incident wave vector, and some of these designs feature corrugations that are parallel to the cylinder axis. We show designs with asymmetric cross sections that yield a low monostatic scattering cross section for certain directions in combination with a low total scattering cross section, which can be used to reduce the noise temperature contributions from the upper strut in an inverted Y tripod reflector antenna.

  3. The Optimization of a Shaped-Charge Design Using Parallel Computers

    SciTech Connect

    GARDNER,DAVID R.; VAUGHAN,COURTENAY T.

    1999-11-01

    Current supercomputers use large parallel arrays of tightly coupled processors to achieve levels of performance far surpassing conventional vector supercomputers. Shock-wave physics codes have been developed for these new supercomputers at Sandia National Laboratories and elsewhere. These parallel codes run fast enough on many simulations to consider using them to study the effects of varying design parameters on the performance of models of conventional munitions and other complex systems. Such studies maybe directed by optimization software to improve the performance of the modeled system. Using a shaped-charge jet design as an archetypal test case and the CTH parallel shock-wave physics code controlled by the Dakota optimization software, we explored the use of automatic optimization tools to optimize the design for conventional munitions. We used a scheme in which a lower resolution computational mesh was used to identify candidate optimal solutions and then these were verified using a higher resolution mesh. We identified three optimal solutions for the model and a region of the design domain where the jet tip speed is nearly optimal, indicating the possibility of a robust design. Based on this study we identified some of the difficulties in using high-fidelity models with optimization software to develop improved designs. These include developing robust algorithms for the objective function and constraints and mitigating the effects of numerical noise in them. We conclude that optimization software running high-fidelity models of physical systems using parallel shock wave physics codes to find improved designs can be a valuable tool for designers. While current state of algorithm and software development does not permit routine, ''black box'' optimization of designs, the effort involved in using the existing tools may well be worth the improvement achieved in designs.

  4. The impact of uncertainty on shape optimization of idealized bypass graft models in unsteady flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Sethuraman; Marsden, Alison L.

    2010-12-01

    It is well known that the fluid mechanics of bypass grafts impacts biomechanical responses and is linked to intimal thickening and plaque deposition on the vessel wall. In spite of this, quantitative information about the fluid mechanics is not currently incorporated into surgical planning and bypass graft design. In this work, we use a derivative-free optimization technique for performing systematic design of bypass grafts. The optimization method is coupled to a three-dimensional pulsatile Navier-Stokes solver. We systematically account for inevitable uncertainties that arise in cardiovascular simulations, owing to noise in medical image data, variable physiologic conditions, and surgical implementation. Uncertainties in the simulation input parameters as well as shape design variables are accounted for using the adaptive stochastic collocation technique. The derivative-free optimization framework is coupled with a stochastic response surface technique to make the problem computationally tractable. Two idealized numerical examples, an end-to-side anastomosis, and a bypass graft around a stenosis, demonstrate that accounting for uncertainty significantly changes the optimal graft design. Results show that small changes in the design variables from their optimal values should be accounted for in surgical planning. Changes in the downstream (distal) graft angle resulted in greater sensitivity of the wall-shear stress compared to changes in the upstream (proximal) angle. The impact of cost function choice on the optimal solution was explored. Additionally, this work represents the first use of the stochastic surrogate management framework method for robust shape optimization in a fully three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes design problem.

  5. Interactive Inverse Design Optimization of Fuselage Shape for Low-Boom Supersonic Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wu; Shields, Elwood; Le, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces a tool called BOSS (Boom Optimization using Smoothest Shape modifications). BOSS utilizes interactive inverse design optimization to develop a fuselage shape that yields a low-boom aircraft configuration. A fundamental reason for developing BOSS is the need to generate feasible low-boom conceptual designs that are appropriate for further refinement using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based preliminary design methods. BOSS was not developed to provide a numerical solution to the inverse design problem. Instead, BOSS was intended to help designers find the right configuration among an infinite number of possible configurations that are equally good using any numerical figure of merit. BOSS uses the smoothest shape modification strategy for modifying the fuselage radius distribution at 100 or more longitudinal locations to find a smooth fuselage shape that reduces the discrepancies between the design and target equivalent area distributions over any specified range of effective distance. For any given supersonic concept (with wing, fuselage, nacelles, tails, and/or canards), a designer can examine the differences between the design and target equivalent areas, decide which part of the design equivalent area curve needs to be modified, choose a desirable rate for the reduction of the discrepancies over the specified range, and select a parameter for smoothness control of the fuselage shape. BOSS will then generate a fuselage shape based on the designer's inputs in a matter of seconds. Using BOSS, within a few hours, a designer can either generate a realistic fuselage shape that yields a supersonic configuration with a low-boom ground signature or quickly eliminate any configuration that cannot achieve low-boom characteristics with fuselage shaping alone. A conceptual design case study is documented to demonstrate how BOSS can be used to develop a low-boom supersonic concept from a low-drag supersonic concept. The paper also contains a study

  6. Operationally optimal vertex-based shape coding with arbitrary direction edge encoding structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhongyuan; Zhu, Junhuan; Luo, Jiebo

    2014-07-01

    The intention of shape coding in the MPEG-4 is to improve the coding efficiency as well as to facilitate the object-oriented applications, such as shape-based object recognition and retrieval. These require both efficient shape compression and effective shape description. Although these two issues have been intensively investigated in data compression and pattern recognition fields separately, it remains an open problem when both objectives need to be considered together. To achieve high coding gain, the operational rate-distortion optimal framework can be applied, but the direction restriction of the traditional eight-direction edge encoding structure reduces its compression efficiency and description effectiveness. We present two arbitrary direction edge encoding structures to relax this direction restriction. They consist of a sector number, a short component, and a long component, which represent both the direction and the magnitude information of an encoding edge. Experiments on both shape coding and hand gesture recognition validate that our structures can reduce a large number of encoding vertices and save up to 48.9% bits. Besides, the object contours are effectively described and suitable for the object-oriented applications.

  7. Hook nozzle arrangement for supporting airfoil vanes

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A gas turbine engine's nozzle structure includes a nozzle support ring, a plurality of shroud segments, and a plurality of airfoil vanes. The plurality of shroud segments are distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each airfoil vane is connected to a corresponding shroud segment so that the airfoil vanes are also distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each shroud segment has a hook engaging the nozzle support ring so that the shroud segments and corresponding airfoil vanes are supported by the nozzle support ring. The nozzle support ring, the shroud segments, and the airfoil vanes may be ceramic.

  8. Aerodynamic Shape Optimization of a Dual-Stream Supersonic Plug Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Gray, Justin S.; Park, Michael A.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2015-01-01

    Aerodynamic shape optimization was performed on an isolated axisymmetric plug nozzle sized for a supersonic business jet. The dual-stream concept was tailored to attenuate nearfield pressure disturbances without compromising nozzle performance. Adjoint-based anisotropic mesh refinement was applied to resolve nearfield compression and expansion features in the baseline viscous grid. Deformed versions of the adapted grid were used for subsequent adjoint-driven shape optimization. For design, a nonlinear gradient-based optimizer was coupled to the discrete adjoint formulation of the Reynolds-averaged Navier- Stokes equations. All nozzle surfaces were parameterized using 3rd order B-spline interpolants and perturbed axisymmetrically via free-form deformation. Geometry deformations were performed using 20 design variables shared between the outer cowl, shroud and centerbody nozzle surfaces. Interior volume grid deformation during design was accomplished using linear elastic mesh morphing. The nozzle optimization was performed at a design cruise speed of Mach 1.6, assuming core and bypass pressure ratios of 6.19 and 3.24, respectively. Ambient flight conditions at design were commensurate with 45,000-ft standard day atmosphere.

  9. Optimization of ultra-fast interactions using laser pulse temporal shaping controlled by a deterministic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan-Sosa, M.; Portilla, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Moreno, L.; Ruiz de la Cruz, A.; Solis, J.

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond laser pulse temporal shaping techniques have led to important advances in different research fields like photochemistry, laser physics, non-linear optics, biology, or materials processing. This success is partly related to the use of optimal control algorithms. Due to the high dimensionality of the solution and control spaces, evolutionary algorithms are extensively applied and, among them, genetic ones have reached the status of a standard adaptive strategy. Still, their use is normally accompanied by a reduction of the problem complexity by different modalities of parameterization of the spectral phase. Exploiting Rabitz and co-authors' ideas about the topology of quantum landscapes, in this work we analyze the optimization of two different problems under a deterministic approach, using a multiple one-dimensional search (MODS) algorithm. In the first case we explore the determination of the optimal phase mask required for generating arbitrary temporal pulse shapes and compare the performance of the MODS algorithm to the standard iterative Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. Based on the good performance achieved, the same method has been applied for optimizing two-photon absorption starting from temporally broadened laser pulses, or from laser pulses temporally and spectrally distorted by non-linear absorption in air, obtaining similarly good results which confirm the validity of the deterministic search approach.

  10. Optimization of ultra-fast interactions using laser pulse temporal shaping controlled by a deterministic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan-Sosa, M.; Portilla, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J.; Moreno, L.; Ruiz de la Cruz, A.; Solis, J.

    2013-04-01

    Femtosecond laser pulse temporal shaping techniques have led to important advances in different research fields like photochemistry, laser physics, non-linear optics, biology, or materials processing. This success is partly related to the use of optimal control algorithms. Due to the high dimensionality of the solution and control spaces, evolutionary algorithms are extensively applied and, among them, genetic ones have reached the status of a standard adaptive strategy. Still, their use is normally accompanied by a reduction of the problem complexity by different modalities of parameterization of the spectral phase. Exploiting Rabitz and co-authors' ideas about the topology of quantum landscapes, in this work we analyze the optimization of two different problems under a deterministic approach, using a multiple one-dimensional search (MODS) algorithm. In the first case we explore the determination of the optimal phase mask required for generating arbitrary temporal pulse shapes and compare the performance of the MODS algorithm to the standard iterative Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. Based on the good performance achieved, the same method has been applied for optimizing two-photon absorption starting from temporally broadened laser pulses, or from laser pulses temporally and spectrally distorted by non-linear absorption in air, obtaining similarly good results which confirm the validity of the deterministic search approach.

  11. Characteristic analysis and shape optimal design of a ring-type traveling wave ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Jong-Suk; Yi, Kyung-Pyo; Chung, Tae-Kyung; Jung, Hyun-Kyo

    2013-07-01

    The contact mechanism should be analyzed for an estimation of the performance of a traveling wave ultra-sonic motor (TWUSM), because the operation of this type of motor depends on the frictional force between the rotor and the stator. However, the nonlinearity of the contact mechanism of the TWUSM makes it difficult to proposed a proper contact model, a characteristic analysis method and an optimal design method. To address these problems, a characteristic analysis and optimal design method using a cylindrical dynamic contact model (CDCM), an analytical method, a numerical method and an evolutionary strategy algorithm (ESA) is proposed in this research. The feasibility and usefulness of the proposed characteristic analysis and optimal design method are verified through experimental data. Furthermore, the importance of the shape of the teeth and the reason for the improvement of motor performances by the chamfering at the teeth are proposed and verified in this paper.

  12. Process Optimization for Suppressing Cracks in Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Al2O3 Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, F. Y.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, S.; Ma, G. Y.; Zhang, B.

    2017-03-01

    Direct additive manufacturing of ceramics (DAMC) without binders is a promising technique for rapidly fabricating high-purity components with good performance. Nevertheless, cracks are easily generated during fabrication as a result of the high intrinsic brittleness of ceramics and the great temperature gradients. Therefore, optimizing the DAMC process is a challenge. In this study, direct fabrication of Al2O3 single-bead wall structures are conducted with a laser engineered net shaping (LENS) system. A new process optimization method for suppressing cracks is proposed based on analytical models, and then the influence of process parameters on crack number is discussed experimentally. The results indicate that the crack number decreases obviously with the increase of scanning speed. Single-bead wall specimens without cracks are successfully fabricated by the optimized process.

  13. Effects of enviromentally imposed roughness on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1987-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the effects of rain, insects, and ice on airfoil performance are examined. The extent to which the available information can be incorporated in a calculation method in terms of change of shape and surface roughness is discussed. The methods described are based on the interactive boundary layer procedure of Cebeci or on the thin layer Navier Stokes procedure developed at NASA. Cases presented show that extensive flow separation occurs on the rough surfaces.

  14. Effects of environmentally imposed roughness on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1987-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the effects of rain, insects, and ice on airfoil performance are examined. The extent to which the available information can be incorporated in a calculation method in terms of change of shape and surface roughness is discussed. The methods described are based on the interactive boundary procedure of Cebeci or on the thin layer Navier Stokes procedure developed at NASA. Cases presented show that extensive flow separation occurs on the rough surfaces.

  15. Location optimization of a long T-shaped acoustic resonator array in noise control of enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ganghua; Cheng, Li

    2009-11-01

    Acoustic resonators are widely used in various noise control applications. In the pursuit of better performance and broad band control, multiple resonators or a resonator array are usually needed. The interaction among resonators significantly impacts on the control performance and leads to the requirement for a systematic design tool to determine their locations. In this work, simulated annealing (SA) algorithm is employed to optimize the locations of a set of long T-shaped acoustic resonators (TARs) for noise control inside an enclosure. Multiple optimal configurations are shown to exist. The control performance in terms of sound pressure level reduction, however, seems to be independent of the initial resonator-locations. Optimal solutions obtained from the SA approach are shown to outperform other existing methods for a TAR array design. Numerical simulations are systematically verified by experiments. Optimal locations are then synthesized, leading to a set of criteria, applicable to the present configuration, to guide engineering applications. It is concluded that the proposed optimization approach provides a systematic and effective tool to optimize the locations of TARs in noise control inside enclosures.

  16. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  17. Pneumatic Spoiler Controls Airfoil Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D.; Krauss, T.

    1991-01-01

    Air ejection from leading edge of airfoil used for controlled decrease of lift. Pneumatic-spoiler principle developed for equalizing lift on helicopter rotor blades. Also used to enhance aerodynamic control of short-fuselage or rudderless aircraft such as "flying-wing" airplanes. Leading-edge injection increases maneuverability of such high-performance fixed-wing aircraft as fighters.

  18. Multidisciplinary Optimization Approach for Design and Operation of Constrained and Complex-shaped Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae Young

    The design of a small satellite is challenging since they are constrained by mass, volume, and power. To mitigate these constraint effects, designers adopt deployable configurations on the spacecraft that result in an interesting and difficult optimization problem. The resulting optimization problem is challenging due to the computational complexity caused by the large number of design variables and the model complexity created by the deployables. Adding to these complexities, there is a lack of integration of the design optimization systems into operational optimization, and the utility maximization of spacecraft in orbit. The developed methodology enables satellite Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) that is extendable to on-orbit operation. Optimization of on-orbit operations is possible with MDO since the model predictive controller developed in this dissertation guarantees the achievement of the on-ground design behavior in orbit. To enable the design optimization of highly constrained and complex-shaped space systems, the spherical coordinate analysis technique, called the "Attitude Sphere", is extended and merged with an additional engineering tools like OpenGL. OpenGL's graphic acceleration facilitates the accurate estimation of the shadow-degraded photovoltaic cell area. This technique is applied to the design optimization of the satellite Electric Power System (EPS) and the design result shows that the amount of photovoltaic power generation can be increased more than 9%. Based on this initial methodology, the goal of this effort is extended from Single Discipline Optimization to Multidisciplinary Optimization, which includes the design and also operation of the EPS, Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS), and communication system. The geometry optimization satisfies the conditions of the ground development phase; however, the operation optimization may not be as successful as expected in orbit due to disturbances. To address this issue

  19. Shape optimization of radiant enclosures with specular-diffuse surfaces by means of a random search and gradient minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukolaine, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    A technique of the shape optimization of radiant enclosures with specular-diffuse surfaces is proposed. The shape optimization problem is formulated as an operator equation of the first kind with respect to a surface to be optimized. The operator equation is reduced to a minimization problem for a least-squares objective shape functional. The minimization problem is solved by a combination of the pure random (or blind) search (the simplest stochastic minimization method) and the conjugate gradient method. The random search is used to find a starting point for the gradient method. The latter needs the gradient of the objective functional. The shape gradient of the objective functional is derived by means of the shape sensitivity analysis and the adjoint problem method. Eventually, the shape gradient is obtained as a result of solving the direct and adjoint problems. If a surface to be optimized is given by a finite number of parameters, then the objective functional becomes a function in a finite-dimensional space and the shape gradient becomes an ordinary gradient. Numerical examples of the shape optimization of "two-dimensional" radiant enclosures with polyhedral specular or specular-diffuse surfaces are given.

  20. Simultaneous power and beam-shape optimization of an OPSL resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Sauer, Sebastian; Garlich, Torsten; Seelert, Wolf; Brecher, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In the assembly of optical resonators of optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSL), the highly reflective resonator mirror is the most crucial component. In previous cooperation, Coherent and Fraunhofer IPT have developed a robust active alignment strategy to optimize the output power of the OPSL resonator using search strategies for finding the laser threshold as well as hill-climbing algorithms for maximizing the output power. Beam-shape as well as the laser mode have major influence on the quality and the duration of subsequent beam-shaping and fiber-coupling steps. Therefore, the alignment algorithm optimizing the output power has been extended recently by simultaneous image processing for ensuring a Gaussian beam as the result of alignment. The paper describes the enhanced approach of automated alignment by additionally scanning along the optical resonator and subsequently evaluating and optimizing the roundness of the beam as well as minimizing the beam radius through twisting and tilting of the mirror. A quality metric combining these measures is defined substituting an M² measurement. The paper also describes the approach for automated assembly including the measuring setup, micromanipulation and dispensing devices.

  1. Packing Optimization of Sorbent Bed Containing Dissimilar and Irregular Shaped Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Nathan; Guttromson, Jayleen; Piowaty, Hailey

    2011-01-01

    The Fire Cartridge is a packed bed air filter with two different and separate layers of media designed to provide respiratory protection from combustion products after a fire event on the International Space Station (ISS). The first layer of media is a carbon monoxide catalyst and the second layer of media is universal carbon. During development of Fire Cartridge prototypes, the two media beds were noticed to have shifted inside the cartridge. The movement of media within the cartridge can cause mixing of the bed layers, air voids, and channeling, which could cause preferential air flow and allow contaminants to pass through without removal. An optimally packed bed mitigates these risks and ensures effective removal of contaminants from the air. In order to optimally pack each layer, vertical, horizontal, and orbital agitations were investigated and a packed bulk density was calculated for each method. Packed bulk density must be calculated for each media type to accommodate variations in particle size, shape, and density. Additionally, the optimal vibration parameters must be re-evaluated for each batch of media due to variations in particle size distribution between batches. For this application it was determined that orbital vibrations achieve an optimal pack density and the two media layers can be packed by the same method. Another finding was media with a larger size distribution of particles achieve an optimal bed pack easier than media with a smaller size distribution of particles.

  2. Efficient algorithms for future aircraft design: Contributions to aerodynamic shape optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicken, Jason Edward

    Advances in numerical optimization have raised the possibility that efficient and novel aircraft configurations may be "discovered" by an algorithm. To begin exploring this possibility, a fast and robust set of tools for aerodynamic shape optimization is developed. Parameterization and mesh-movement are integrated to accommodate large changes in the geometry. This integrated approach uses a coarse B-spline control grid to represent the geometry and move the computational mesh; consequently, the mesh-movement algorithm is two to three orders faster than a node-based linear elasticity approach, without compromising mesh quality. Aerodynamic analysis is performed using a flow solver for the Euler equations. The governing equations are discretized using summation-by-parts finite-difference operators and simultaneous approximation terms, which permit C0 mesh continuity at block interfaces. The discretization results in a set of nonlinear algebraic equations, which are solved using an efficient parallel Newton-Krylov-Schur strategy. A gradient-based optimization algorithm is adopted. The gradient is evaluated using adjoint variables for the flow and mesh equations in a sequential approach. The flow adjoint equations are solved using a novel variant of the Krylov solver GCROT. This variant of GCROT is flexible to take advantage of non-stationary preconditioners and is shown to outperform restarted flexible GMRES. The aerodynamic optimizer is applied to several studies of induced-drag minimization. An elliptical lift distribution is recovered by varying spanwise twist, thereby validating the algorithm. Planform optimization based on the Euler equations produces a nonelliptical lift distribution, in contrast with the predictions of lifting-line theory. A study of spanwise vertical shape optimization confirms that a winglet-up configuration is more efficient than a winglet-down configuration. A split-tip geometry is used to explore nonlinear wake-wing interactions: the

  3. Finite element modeling and optimization of tube-shaped ultrasonic motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchilloux, Philippe; Cagatay, Serra; Uchino, Kenji; Koc, Burhanettin

    2003-08-01

    Recent developments in ultrasonic motor design have demonstrated that small size tube-shaped motors could be fabricated at low cost. Motors with diameters between 15 and 2.5mm have been fabricated and tested. The performance evaluation of these motors is still in progress, but have already shown promising results: the smallest ones exhibit no-load speeds in the range of 70rad/s and blocked torques close to 0.9mN×m. In this paper, we review the operating principle of these devices and several implementation examples. Then, we show how the finite element method (ATILA) can be used, in combination with genetic optimization procedures, to design tube-shaped motors in various dimensions and for different performance objectives. Several design examples are presented and discussed.

  4. Energy-Optimal Electrical-Stimulation Pulses Shaped by the Least-Action Principle

    PubMed Central

    Krouchev, Nedialko I.; Danner, Simon M.; Vinet, Alain; Rattay, Frank; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) devices interact with excitable neural tissue toward eliciting action potentials (AP’s) by specific current patterns. Low-energy ES prevents tissue damage and loss of specificity. Hence to identify optimal stimulation-current waveforms is a relevant problem, whose solution may have significant impact on the related medical (e.g. minimized side-effects) and engineering (e.g. maximized battery-life) efficiency. This has typically been addressed by simulation (of a given excitable-tissue model) and iterative numerical optimization with hard discontinuous constraints - e.g. AP’s are all-or-none phenomena. Such approach is computationally expensive, while the solution is uncertain - e.g. may converge to local-only energy-minima and be model-specific. We exploit the Least-Action Principle (LAP). First, we derive in closed form the general template of the membrane-potential’s temporal trajectory, which minimizes the ES energy integral over time and over any space-clamp ionic current model. From the given model we then obtain the specific energy-efficient current waveform, which is demonstrated to be globally optimal. The solution is model-independent by construction. We illustrate the approach by a broad set of example situations with some of the most popular ionic current models from the literature. The proposed approach may result in the significant improvement of solution efficiency: cumbersome and uncertain iteration is replaced by a single quadrature of a system of ordinary differential equations. The approach is further validated by enabling a general comparison to the conventional simulation and optimization results from the literature, including one of our own, based on finite-horizon optimal control. Applying the LAP also resulted in a number of general ES optimality principles. One such succinct observation is that ES with long pulse durations is much more sensitive to the pulse’s shape whereas a rectangular pulse is most

  5. Energy-optimal electrical-stimulation pulses shaped by the Least-Action Principle.

    PubMed

    Krouchev, Nedialko I; Danner, Simon M; Vinet, Alain; Rattay, Frank; Sawan, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) devices interact with excitable neural tissue toward eliciting action potentials (AP's) by specific current patterns. Low-energy ES prevents tissue damage and loss of specificity. Hence to identify optimal stimulation-current waveforms is a relevant problem, whose solution may have significant impact on the related medical (e.g. minimized side-effects) and engineering (e.g. maximized battery-life) efficiency. This has typically been addressed by simulation (of a given excitable-tissue model) and iterative numerical optimization with hard discontinuous constraints--e.g. AP's are all-or-none phenomena. Such approach is computationally expensive, while the solution is uncertain--e.g. may converge to local-only energy-minima and be model-specific. We exploit the Least-Action Principle (LAP). First, we derive in closed form the general template of the membrane-potential's temporal trajectory, which minimizes the ES energy integral over time and over any space-clamp ionic current model. From the given model we then obtain the specific energy-efficient current waveform, which is demonstrated to be globally optimal. The solution is model-independent by construction. We illustrate the approach by a broad set of example situations with some of the most popular ionic current models from the literature. The proposed approach may result in the significant improvement of solution efficiency: cumbersome and uncertain iteration is replaced by a single quadrature of a system of ordinary differential equations. The approach is further validated by enabling a general comparison to the conventional simulation and optimization results from the literature, including one of our own, based on finite-horizon optimal control. Applying the LAP also resulted in a number of general ES optimality principles. One such succinct observation is that ES with long pulse durations is much more sensitive to the pulse's shape whereas a rectangular pulse is most frequently

  6. Modeling biological fluorescence emission spectra using Lorentz line shapes and nonlinear optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nation, Paul D.; Howard, A. Q.; Webb, Lincoln J.

    2007-08-01

    Using the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear optimization algorithm and a series of Lorentzian line shapes, the fluorescence emission spectra from BG (Bacillus globigii) bacteria can be accurately modeled. This method allows data from both laboratory and field sources to model the return signal from biological aerosols using a typical LIF (lidar induced fluorescence) system. The variables found through this procedure match individual fluorescence components within the biological material and therefore have a physically meaningful interpretation. The use of this method also removes the need to calculate phase angles needed in autoregressive all-pole models.

  7. Sonic boom minimization through vehicle shape optimization and probabilistic acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallabhandi, Sriram

    Sonic boom annoyance is an important technical showstopper for commercial supersonic aircraft operations. It has been proposed that aircraft can be shaped to alleviate sonic boom. Choosing the right aircraft shape reflecting the design requirements is a fundamental and most important step that is usually over simplified in the conceptual stages of design by resorting to a qualitative selection of a baseline configuration based on historical designs and designer's perspective. Final aircraft designs are attempted by minor shape modifications to this baseline configuration. This procedure may not yield large improvements in the objectives, especially when the baseline is chosen without a rigorous analysis procedure. Traditional analyses and implementations tend to have a complex algorithmic flow, tight coupling between tools used and computational limitations. Some of these shortcomings are overcome in this study and a diverse mix of tools is seamlessly integrated to provide a simple, yet powerful and automatic procedure for sonic boom minimization. A shape optimization procedure for supersonic aircraft design using better geometry generation and improved analysis tools has been successfully demonstrated. The geometry engine provides dynamic reconfiguration and efficient manipulation of various components to yield unstructured watertight geometries. The architecture supports an assimilation of different components and allows configuration changes to be made quickly and efficiently because changes are localized to each component. It also enables an automatic way to combine linear and non-linear analyses tools. It has been shown in this study that varying atmospheric conditions could have a huge impact on the sonic boom annoyance metrics and a quick way of obtaining probability estimates of relevant metrics was demonstrated. The well-accepted theoretical sonic boom minimization equations are generalized to a new form and the relevant equations are derived to yield

  8. Hull-form optimization of a container ship based on bell-shaped modification function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hee Jong

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, a hydrodynamic hull-form optimization algorithm for a container ship was presented in terms of the minimum wave-making resistance. Bell-shaped modification functions were developed to modify the original hull-form and a sequential quadratic programming algorithm was used as an optimizer. The wave-making resistance as an objective function was obtained by the Rankine source panel method in which non-linear free surface conditions and the trim and sinkage of the ship were fully taken into account. Numerical computation was performed to investigate the validity and effectiveness of the proposed hull-form modification algorithm for the container carrier. The computational results were validated by comparing them with the experimental data.

  9. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  10. Aerodynamic shape optimization of a HSCT type configuration with improved surface definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Almuttil M.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1994-01-01

    Two distinct parametrization procedures of generating free-form surfaces to represent aerospace vehicles are presented. The first procedure is the representation using spline functions such as nonuniform rational b-splines (NURBS) and the second is a novel (geometrical) parametrization using solutions to a suitably chosen partial differential equation. The main idea is to develop a surface which is more versatile and can be used in an optimization process. Unstructured volume grid is generated by an advancing front algorithm and solutions obtained using an Euler solver. Grid sensitivity with respect to surface design parameters and aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients based on potential flow is obtained using an automatic differentiator precompiler software tool. Aerodynamic shape optimization of a complete aircraft with twenty four design variables is performed. High speed civil transport aircraft (HSCT) configurations are targeted to demonstrate the process.

  11. Multi-objective shape and material optimization of composite structures including damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    A multi-objective optimal design methodology is developed for light-weight, low cost composite structures of improved dynamic performance. The design objectives include minimization of resonance amplitudes (or maximization of modal damping), weight, and material cost. The design vector includes micromechanics, laminate, and structural shape parameters. Performance constraints are imposed on static displacements, dynamic amplitudes, and natural frequencies. The effects of damping on the dynamics of composite structures are incorporated. Preliminary applications on a cantilever composite beam illustrated that only the proposed multi-objective optimization, as opposed to single objective functions, simultaneously improved all objectives. The significance of composite damping in the design of advanced composite structures was also demonstrated, indicating the design methods based on undamped dynamics may fail to improve the dynamic performance near resonances.

  12. Shaping femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectra using optimal control theory.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Soroosh; Schreiber, Michael; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2008-04-21

    Optimal control theory is used to tailor laser pulses which enhance a femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectrum in a certain frequency range. For this aim the optimal control theory has to be applied to a target state distributed in time. Explicit control mechanisms are given for shaping either the Stokes or the probe pulse in the four-wave mixing process. A simple molecule for which highly accurate potential energy surfaces are available, namely molecular iodine, is used to test the procedure. This approach of controlling vibrational motion and delivering higher intensities to certain frequency ranges might also be important for the improvement of CARS microscopy.

  13. Multi-objective shape and material optimization of composite structures including damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    A multi-objective optimal design methodology is developed for light-weight, low-cost composite structures of improved dynamic performance. The design objectives include minimization of resonance amplitudes (or maximization of modal damping), weight, and material cost. The design vector includes micromechanics, laminate, and structural shape parameters. Performance constraints are imposed on static displacements, dynamic amplitudes, and natural frequencies. The effects of damping on the dynamics of composite structures are incorporated. Preliminary applications on a cantilever composite beam illustrated that only the proposed multi-objective optimization, as opposed to single objective functions, simultaneously improved all objectives. The significance of composite damping in the design of advanced composite structures was also demonstrated, indicating that design methods based on undamped dynamics may fail to improve the dynamic performance near resonances.

  14. Shape and Topology Optimization in Stokes Flow with a Phase Field Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Garcke, Harald Hecht, Claudia

    2016-02-15

    In this paper we introduce a new formulation for shape optimization problems in fluids in a diffuse interface setting that can in particular handle topological changes. By adding the Ginzburg–Landau energy as a regularization to the objective functional and relaxing the non-permeability outside the fluid region by introducing a porous medium approach we hence obtain a phase field problem where the existence of a minimizer can be guaranteed. This problem is additionally related to a sharp interface problem, where the permeability of the non-fluid region is zero. In both the sharp and the diffuse interface setting we can derive necessary optimality conditions using only the natural regularity of the minimizers. We also pass to the limit in the first order conditions.

  15. Blade design trade-offs using low-lift airfoils for stall-regulated HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S.; Tangler, J.L.

    1999-11-01

    A systematic blade design study was conducted to explore the trade-offs in using low-lift airfoils for a 750-kilowatt stall-regulated wind turbine. Tip-region airfoils having a maximum-lift coefficient ranging from 0.7--1.2 were considered in this study, with the main objective of identifying the practical lower limit for the maximum-life coefficient. Blades were optimized for both maximum annual energy production and minimum cost of energy using a method that takes into account aerodynamic and structural considerations. The results indicate that the effect of the maximum-lift coefficient on the cost of energy is small with a slight advantage to the highest maximum lift coefficient airfoils for the tip-region of the blade become more desirable as machine size increases, provided the airfoils yield acceptable stall characteristics. The conclusions are applicable to large wind turbines that use passive or active stall to regulate peak power.

  16. Nonlinear power flow feedback control for improved stability and performance of airfoil sections

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2013-09-03

    A computer-implemented method of determining the pitch stability of an airfoil system, comprising using a computer to numerically integrate a differential equation of motion that includes terms describing PID controller action. In one model, the differential equation characterizes the time-dependent response of the airfoil's pitch angle, .alpha.. The computer model calculates limit-cycles of the model, which represent the stability boundaries of the airfoil system. Once the stability boundary is known, feedback control can be implemented, by using, for example, a PID controller to control a feedback actuator. The method allows the PID controller gain constants, K.sub.I, K.sub.p, and K.sub.d, to be optimized. This permits operation closer to the stability boundaries, while preventing the physical apparatus from unintentionally crossing the stability boundaries. Operating closer to the stability boundaries permits greater power efficiencies to be extracted from the airfoil system.

  17. Shape optimization of a sheet swimming over a thin liquid layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, J.; Hosoi, A.E.

    2008-12-10

    Motivated by the propulsion mechanisms adopted by gastropods, annelids and other invertebrates, we consider shape optimization of a flexible sheet that moves by propagating deformation waves along its body. The self-propelled sheet is separated from a rigid substrate by a thin layer of viscous Newtonian fluid. We use a lubrication approximation to model the dynamics and derive the relevant Euler-Lagrange equations to simultaneously optimize swimming speed, efficiency and fluid loss. We find that as the parameters controlling these quantities approach critical values, the optimal solutions become singular in a self-similar fashion and sometimes leave the realm of validity of the lubrication model. We explore these singular limits by computing higher order corrections to the zeroth order theory and find that wave profiles that develop cusp-like singularities are appropriately penalized, yielding non-singular optimal solutions. These corrections are themselves validated by comparison with finite element solutions of the full Stokes equations, and, to the extent possible, using recent rigorous a-priori error bounds.

  18. High-fidelity global optimization of shape design by dimensionality reduction, metamodels and deterministic particle swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Diez, Matteo; Kandasamy, Manivannan; Zhang, Zhiguo; Campana, Emilio F.; Stern, Frederick

    2015-04-01

    Advances in high-fidelity shape optimization for industrial problems are presented, based on geometric variability assessment and design-space dimensionality reduction by Karhunen-Loève expansion, metamodels and deterministic particle swarm optimization (PSO). Hull-form optimization is performed for resistance reduction of the high-speed Delft catamaran, advancing in calm water at a given speed, and free to sink and trim. Two feasible sets (A and B) are assessed, using different geometric constraints. Dimensionality reduction for 95% confidence is applied to high-dimensional free-form deformation. Metamodels are trained by design of experiments with URANS; multiple deterministic PSOs achieve a resistance reduction of 9.63% for A and 6.89% for B. Deterministic PSO is found to be effective and efficient, as shown by comparison with stochastic PSO. The optimum for A has the best overall performance over a wide range of speed. Compared with earlier optimization, the present studies provide an additional resistance reduction of 6.6% at 1/10 of the computational cost.

  19. Parametric weight evaluation of joined wings by structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, Hirokazu; Shyu, Albert T.; Wolkovitch, Julian

    1988-01-01

    Joined-wing aircraft employ tandem wings having positive and negative sweep and dihedral, arranged to form diamond shapes in both plan and front views. An optimization method was applied to study the effects of joined-wing geometry parameters on structural weight. The lightest wings were obtained by increasing dihedral and taper ratio, decreasing sweep and span, increasing fraction of airfoil chord occupied by structural box, and locating the joint inboard of the front wing tip.

  20. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  1. Thin oblique airfoils at supersonic speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jone, Robert T

    1946-01-01

    The well-known methods of thin-airfoil theory have been extended to oblique or sweptback airfoils of finite aspect ratio moving at supersonic speeds. The cases considered thus far are symmetrical airfoils at zero lift having plan forms bounded by straight lines. Because of the conical form of the elementary flow fields, the results are comparable in simplicity to the results of the two-dimensional thin-airfoil theory for subsonic speeds. In the case of untapered airfoils swept back behind the Mach cone the pressure distribution at the center section is similar to that given by the Ackeret theory for a straight airfoil. With increasing distance from the center section the distribution approaches the form given by the subsonic-flow theory. The pressure drag is concentrated chiefly at the center section and for long wings a slight negative drag may appear on outboard sections. (author)

  2. A Theory of Unstaggered Airfoil Cascades in Compressible Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurr, Robert A.; Allen, H. Julian

    1947-01-01

    By use of the methods of thin airfoil theory, which include effects of compressibility, rela.tio^as are developed which permit the rapid determination of the pressure distribution over an unstaggered cascade of airfoils of a given profile, and the determination of the profile shape necessary to yield a given pressure distribution for small chord gap ratios, For incompressible flow the results of the theory are compared with available examples obtained by the more exact method of conformal transformation. Although the theory is developed for small chord/gap ratios, these comparisons show that it may be extended to chord/gap ratios of order unity, at least for low speed flows. Choking of cascades, a phenomenon of particular importance in compressor design, is considered.

  3. A theory of unstaggered airfoil cascades in compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spurr, Robert A; Allen, H Julian

    1947-01-01

    By use of the methods of thin airfoil theory, which include effects of compressibility, relations are developed which permit the rapid determination of the pressure distribution over an unstaggered cascade of airfoils of a given profile, and the determination of the profile shape necessary to yield a given pressure distribution for small chord/gap ratios. For incompressible flow the results of the theory are compared with available examples obtained by the more exact method of conformal transformation. Although the theory is developed for small chord/gap ratios, these comparisons show that it may be extended to chord/gap ratios of order unity, at least for low-speed flows. Choking cascades, a phenomenon of particular importance in compressor design, is considered.

  4. Modeling and optimization of shape change in shell spatial cross-sections under superplastic moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumachenko, E. N.

    2008-08-01

    The necessity to develop and optimize new technological processes of gas moulding of shells under the superplasticity conditions, which ensure large elongation and complexity of the shape of end items, makes the specialists in the field of mathematical simulation to pose and solve problems of constant improvement of the imitation models. Because of a large number of "embedded" nonlinearities (the physical properties of the material, friction, and unknown boundaries), the solution of such problems requires large computer resources, high qualification of designers, and large amount of labor. In the present paper, we consider the problems of express analysis of pattern change of spatial shells on the basis of estimation of the behavior of their critical cross-sections. We solve problems of moulding of titan shells (made of VT6 alloy) in a matrix of complicated shape. We theoretically and experimentally justify the methods for predicting and constructing the optimal technological processes of shell deformation under conditions close to superplasticity by using the 2.5D designing procedures.

  5. Mitigation of Adverse Effects Caused by Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions Through Optimal Wall Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, May-Fun; Lee, Byung Joon

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the adverse effects of shock wave boundary layer interactions in high speed inlets include reduced total pressure recovery and highly distorted flow at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP). This paper presents a design method for flow control which creates perturbations in geometry. These perturbations are tailored to change the flow structures in order to minimize shock wave boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) inside supersonic inlets. Optimizing the shape of two dimensional micro-size bumps is shown to be a very effective flow control method for two-dimensional SWBLI. In investigating the three dimensional SWBLI, a square duct is employed as a baseline. To investigate the mechanism whereby the geometric elements of the baseline, i.e. the bottom wall, the sidewall and the corner, exert influence on the flow's aerodynamic characteristics, each element is studied and optimized separately. It is found that arrays of micro-size bumps on the bottom wall of the duct have little effect in improving total pressure recovery though they are useful in suppressing the incipient separation in three-dimensional problems. Shaping sidewall geometry is effective in re-distributing flow on the side wall and results in a less distorted flow at the exit. Subsequently, a near 50% reduction in distortion is achieved. A simple change in corner geometry resulted in a 2.4% improvement in total pressure recovery.

  6. Equivalent Plate Structural Modeling for Wing Shape Optimization Including Transverse Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1994-01-01

    A new technique for structural modeling of airplane wings is presented taking transverse shear effects into account. The kinematic assumptions of first-order shear deformation plate theory In combination with numerical analysis, where simple polynomials are used to define geometry, construction, and displacement approximations, lead to analytical expressions for elements of the stiffness and mass matrices and load vector. Contributions from the cover skins, spar and rib caps, and spar and rib webs are included as well as concentrated springs and concentrated masses. Limitations of wing modeling techniques based on classical plate theory are discussed, and the Improved accuracy of the new equivalent plate technique is demonstrated through comparison with finite element analysis and test results. Expressions for analytical derivatives of stiffness, mass, and load terms with respect to wing shape are given. Based on these, it is possible to obtain analytic sensitivities of displacements, stresses, and natural frequencies with respect to planform shape and depth distribution. This makes the new capability an effective structural tool for wing shape optimization.

  7. Equivalent plate structural modeling for wing shape optimization including transverse shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1994-01-01

    A new technique for structural modeling of airplanes wings is presented taking transverse shear effects into account. The kinematic assumptions of first-order shear deformation plate theory in combination with numerical analysis, where simple polynomials are used to define geometry, construction, and displacement approximations, lead to analytical expressions for elements of the stiffness and mass matrices and load vector. Contributions from the cover skins, spar and rib caps, and spar and rib webs are included as well as concentrated springs and concentrated masses. Limitations of wing modeling techniques based on classical plate theory are discussed, and the improved accuracy of the new equivalent plate technique is demonstrated through comparison with finite element analysis and test results. Expressions for analytical derivatives of stiffness, mass, and load terms with respect to wing shape are given. Based on these, it is possible to obtain analytic sensitivities of displacements, stresses, and natural frequencies with respect to planform shape and depth distribution. This makes the new capability an effective structural tool for wing shape optimization.

  8. Experimental optimization of wing shape for a hummingbird-like flapping wing micro air vehicle.

    PubMed

    Nan, Yanghai; Karásek, Matěj; Lalami, Mohamed Esseghir; Preumont, André

    2017-03-06

    Flapping wing micro air vehicles (MAVs) take inspiration from natural fliers, such as insects and hummingbirds. Existing designs manage to mimic the wing motion of natural fliers to a certain extent; nevertheless, differences will always exist due to completely different building blocks of biological and man-made systems. The same holds true for the design of the wings themselves, as biological and engineering materials differ significantly. This paper presents results of experimental optimization of wing shape of a flexible wing for a hummingbird-sized flapping wing MAV. During the experiments we varied the wing 'slackness' (defined by a camber angle), the wing shape (determined by the aspect and taper ratios) and the surface area. Apart from the generated lift, we also evaluated the overall power efficiency of the flapping wing MAV achieved with the various wing design. The results indicate that especially the camber angle and aspect ratio have a critical impact on the force production and efficiency. The best performance was obtained with a wing of trapezoidal shape with a straight leading edge and an aspect ratio of 9.3, both parameters being very similar to a typical hummingbird wing. Finally, the wing performance was demonstrated by a lift-off of a 17.2 g flapping wing robot.

  9. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-05-23

    A thick airfoil is described for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%--26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4--1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects. 3 Figs.

  10. Boundary-layer stability and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeffrey K.

    1986-01-01

    Several different natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils have been analyzed for stability of the laminar boundary layer using linear stability codes. The NLF airfoils analyzed come from three different design conditions: incompressible; compressible with no sweep; and compressible with sweep. Some of the design problems are discussed, concentrating on those problems associated with keeping the boundary layer laminar. Also, there is a discussion on how a linear stability analysis was effectively used to improve the design for some of the airfoils.

  11. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  12. Evaluation of a stalled airfoil analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Stalled Airfoil Analysis Program (SAAP) is a computer code for predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil up to, and beyond, stall. SAAP is presently evaluated through comparisons with experiments and with two other theoretical methods over an extensive range of airfoils and Reynolds number conditions. SAAP modeled drag more accurately than either of the other methods, and at angles of attack below stall yielded a smoother lift variation with angle of attack.

  13. Using potential flow theory and conformal mapping technique to measure pressure differential on airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mughal, Umair Najeeb

    2017-01-01

    Flow around an airfoil to calculate pressure co-efficient variations at different relative velocities have always been an important/basic part of Aerodynamic Study. Potential flow theory is used to study flow behavior on rankine half body, non-rotating cylinder and rotating cylinder as it is more trackable. Falkan-Skan Similarity Solution is taken to simulate the flow behavior on wedge. However, to use potential flow theory on usable airfoils the author have used conformal mapping to show a relation between realistic airfoil shapes and the knowledge gained from flow about cylinders. This method can further be used in the designing of an airfoil section. The author has used Joukowski Tranform to generate the flow around airfoils of various geometries and then utilized Kutta condition to force the stagnation point at the trailing edge. Co-efficient of pressure over the entire airfoil surface were calculated and corrected using Karman-Tsien compressibility correction equations. On the basis of this, the location of the ports to install the flush measurement system is suggested.

  14. Compressibility effects on dynamic stall of airfoils undergoing rapid transient pitching motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Platzer, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The research was carried out in the Compressible Dynamic Stall Facility, CDSF, at the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory (FML) of NASA Ames Research Center. The facility can produce realistic nondimensional pitch rates experienced by fighter aircraft, which on model scale could be as high as 3600/sec. Nonintrusive optical techniques were used for the measurements. The highlight of the effort was the development of a new real time interferometry method known as Point Diffraction Interferometry - PDI, for use in unsteady separated flows. This can yield instantaneous flow density information (and hence pressure distributions in isentropic flows) over the airfoil. A key finding is that the dynamic stall vortex forms just as the airfoil leading edge separation bubble opens-up. A major result is the observation and quantification of multiple shocks over the airfoil near the leading edge. A quantitative analysis of the PDI images shows that pitching airfoils produce larger suction peaks than steady airfoils at the same Mach number prior to stall. The peak suction level reached just before stall develops is the same at all unsteady rates and decreases with increase in Mach number. The suction is lost once the dynamic stall vortex or vortical structure begins to convect. Based on the knowledge gained from this preliminary analysis of the data, efforts to control dynamic stall were initiated. The focus of this work was to arrive at a dynamically changing leading edge shape that produces only 'acceptable' airfoil pressure distributions over a large angle of attack range.

  15. Aerodynamic shape optimization directed toward a supersonic transport using sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay

    1995-01-01

    This investigation was conducted from March 1994 to August 1995, primarily, to extend and implement the previously developed aerodynamic design optimization methodologies for the problems related to a supersonic transport design. These methods had demonstrated promise to improve the designs (more specifically, the shape) of aerodynamic surfaces, by coupling optimization algorithms (OA) with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithms via sensitivity analyses (SA) with surface definition methods from Computer Aided Design (CAD). The present extensions of this method and their supersonic implementations have produced wing section designs, delta wing designs, cranked-delta wing designs, and nacelle designs, all of which have been reported in the open literature. Despite the fact that these configurations were highly simplified to be of any practical or commercial use, they served the algorithmic and proof-of-concept objectives of the study very well. The primary cause for the configurational simplifications, other than the usual simplify-to-study the fundamentals reason, were the premature closing of the project. Only after the first of the originally intended three-year term, both the funds and the computer resources supporting the project were abruptly cut due to their severe shortages at the funding agency. Nonetheless, it was shown that the extended methodologies could be viable options in optimizing the design of not only an isolated single-component configuration, but also a multiple-component configuration in supersonic and viscous flow. This allowed designing with the mutual interference of the components being one of the constraints all along the evolution of the shapes.

  16. Inverse transonic airfoil design including viscous interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique was developed for the analysis of specified transonic airfoils or for the design of airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution, including the effect of weak viscous interaction. The method uses the full potential equation, a stretched Cartesian coordinate system, and the Nash-MacDonald turbulent boundary layer method. Comparisons with experimental data for typical transonic airfoils show excellent agreement. An example shows the application of the method to design a thick aft-cambered airfoil, and the effects of viscous interaction on its performance are discussed.

  17. Transonic airfoil flowfield analysis using Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    A numerical technique for analyzing transonic airfoils is presented. The method employs the basic features of Jameson's iterative solution for the full potential equation, except that Cartesian coordinates are used rather than a grid which fits the airfoil, such as the conformal circle-plane or 'sheared parabolic' coordinates which were used previously. Comparison with previous results shows that it is not necessary to match the computational grid to the airfoil surface, and that accurate results can be obtained with a Cartesian grid for lifting supercritical airfoils.

  18. Wavy flow cooling concept for turbine airfoils

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2010-08-31

    An airfoil including an outer wall and a cooling cavity formed therein. The cooling cavity includes a leading edge flow channel located adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil and a trailing edge flow channel located adjacent a trailing edge of the airfoil. Each of the leading edge and trailing edge flow channels define respective first and second flow axes located between pressure and suction sides of the airfoil. A plurality of rib members are located within each of the flow channels, spaced along the flow axes, and alternately extending from opposing sides of the flow channels to define undulating flow paths through the flow channels.

  19. Schooling behavior of heaving flexible airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Sunghyuk; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    The schooling behavior of rigid and flexible NACA0017 airfoils in the heaving motion is experimentally explored in a merry-go-round equipment. The airfoil was attached to the end of a horizontal support bar whose other end was connected to the freely rotating vertical axis. The axis was forced to undergo a sinusoidal motion in the vertical direction to make a pure heaving motion of the airfoils in the frequency range of 0.5 to 5 Hz. The propulsion due to the heaving airfoils is expressed by a horizontally rotating speed of the support bar. This experimental setup is simulating infinite schooling situations of airfoils in an in-phase heaving motion with the streamwise distance d. The ratio of the distance to the chord length d/ c was determined by the number of airfoils (1 <= n <= 8) . The rotational frequency F according to the heaving frequency f was measured with different experimental parameters. The schooling number S = f /(nF), representing the number of heaving oscillations between each airfoil, was introduced to explain the schooling behavior of the airfoils. The effects of the flexibility, d/ c and f on the propulsive performance were examined with the schooling behavior of the airfoils. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  20. Numerical results of the shape optimization problem for the insulation barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salač, Petr

    2016-12-01

    The contribution deals with the numerical results for the shape optimization problem of the system mould, glass piece, plunger, insulation barrier and plunger cavity used in glass forming industry, which was formulated in details at AMEE'15. We used the software FreeFem++ to compute the numerical example for the real vase made from lead crystal glassware of the height 267 [mm] and of the mass 1, 55 [kg]. The plunger and the mould were made from steal, the insulation barrier was made from Murpec with the coefficient of thermal conductivity k = 2, 5 [W/m.K] and the coefficient of heat-transfer between the mould and the environment was chosen to be α = 14 [W/m2.K]. The cooling was implemented by the volume V = 10 [l/min] of water with the temperature 15°C at the entrance and the temperature 100°C at the exit. The results of the numerical optimization to required target temperature 800°C of the outward plunger surface together with the distribution of temperatures on the interface between the plunger and heat source before and after the optimization process are presented.

  1. Plasma Profile and Shape Optimization for the Advanced Tokamak Power Plant, ARIES-AT

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Kessel; T.K. Mau; S.C. Jardin; and F. Najmabadi

    2001-06-05

    An advanced tokamak plasma configuration is developed based on equilibrium, ideal-MHD stability, bootstrap current analysis, vertical stability and control, and poloidal-field coil analysis. The plasma boundaries used in the analysis are forced to coincide with the 99% flux surface from the free-boundary equilibrium. Using an accurate bootstrap current model and external current-drive profiles from ray-tracing calculations in combination with optimized pressure profiles, beta(subscript N) values above 7.0 have been obtained. The minimum current drive requirement is found to lie at a lower beta(subscript N) of 5.4. The external kink mode is stabilized by a tungsten shell located at 0.33 times the minor radius and a feedback system. Plasma shape optimization has led to an elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.9 at the separatrix. Vertical stability could be achieved by a combination of tungsten shells located at 0.33 times the minor radius and feedback control coils located behind the shield. The poloidal-field coils were optimized in location and current, providing a maximum coil current of 8.6 MA. These developments have led to a simultaneous reduction in the power plant major radius and toroidal field.

  2. Experimental Investigation of a 2D Supercritical Circulation-Control Airfoil Using Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Allan, Brian G.

    2006-01-01

    Recent efforts in extreme short takeoff and landing aircraft configurations have renewed the interest in circulation control wing design and optimization. The key to accurately designing and optimizing these configurations rests in the modeling of the complex physics of these flows. This paper will highlight the physics of the stagnation and separation regions on two typical circulation control airfoil sections.

  3. Icing Test Results on an Advanced Two-Dimensional High-Lift Multi-Element Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jaiwon; Wilcox, Peter; Chin, Vincent; Sheldon, David

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study has been conducted to investigate ice accretions on a high-lift, multi-element airfoil in the Icing Research Tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The airfoil is representative of an advanced transport wing design. The experimental work was conducted as part of a cooperative program between McDonnell Douglas Aerospace and the NASA Lewis Research Center to improve current understanding of ice accretion characteristics on the multi-element airfoil. The experimental effort also provided ice shapes for future aerodynamic tests at flight Reynolds numbers to ascertain high-lift performance effects. Ice shapes documented for a landing configuration over a variety of icing conditions are presented along with analyses.

  4. Wind-tunnel investigation of effects of trailing-edge geometry on a NASA supercritical airfoil section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. D.

    1971-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests have been conducted at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 0.81 to determine the effects of trailing-edge geometry on the aerodynamic characteristics of a NASA supercritical airfoil shape. Variations in trailing-edge thicknesses from 0 to 1.5 percent of the chord and a cavity in the trailing edge were investigated with airfoils with maximum thicknesses of 10 and 11 percent of the chord.

  5. Two-dimensional cascade test of a highly loaded, low-solidity, tandem airfoil turbine rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, J. F.; Stabe, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A tip region section of a low-solidity tandem airfoil blade for a turbine rotor was tested in a two-dimensional cascade tunnel at solidities of 0.736 and 0.912. Blade surface static pressures and blade exit total and static pressure and flow angle were surveyed. Blade surface velocities, wake shapes, and kinetic energy losses were analyzed and compared with values for 1.852 solidity tandem airfoil blading.

  6. Boundary-Layer Separation Control under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions using Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    transition. Gad-el-Hak provides a review of various techniques for flow control in general and Volino discusses recent studies on separation control under low-pressure-turbine conditions utilizing passive as well as active devices. As pointed out by Volino, passive devices optimized for separation control at low Reynolds numbers tend to increase losses at high Reynolds numbers, Active devices have the attractive feature that they can be utilized only in operational regimes where they are needed and when turned off would not affect the flow. The focus in the present paper is an experimental Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modem low-pressure-turbine airfoil ('Pak-B'). The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) Gee-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface- flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control. of active separation control using glow discharge plasma actuators.

  7. Improved Hierarchical Optimization-Based Classification of Hyperspectral Images Using Shape Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarabalka, Yuliya; Tilton, James C.

    2012-01-01

    A new spectral-spatial method for classification of hyperspectral images is proposed. The HSegClas method is based on the integration of probabilistic classification and shape analysis within the hierarchical step-wise optimization algorithm. First, probabilistic support vector machines classification is applied. Then, at each iteration two neighboring regions with the smallest Dissimilarity Criterion (DC) are merged, and classification probabilities are recomputed. The important contribution of this work consists in estimating a DC between regions as a function of statistical, classification and geometrical (area and rectangularity) features. Experimental results are presented on a 102-band ROSIS image of the Center of Pavia, Italy. The developed approach yields more accurate classification results when compared to previously proposed methods.

  8. A unified free-form representation applied to the shape optimization of the hohlraum with octahedral 6 laser entrance holes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao E-mail: scmyking-2008@163.com; Li, Haiyan; Jing, Longfei E-mail: scmyking-2008@163.com; Huang, Tianxuan

    2016-01-15

    The hohlraum is very crucial for indirect laser driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. Usually, its shape is designed as sphere, cylinder, or rugby with some kind of fixed functions, such as ellipse or parabola. Recently, a spherical hohlraum with octahedral 6 laser entrance holes (LEHs) has been presented with high flux symmetry [Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014); 21, 052704 (2014)]. However, there is only one shape parameter, i.e., the hohlraum to capsule radius ratio, being optimized. In this paper, we build the hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs with a unified free-form representation, in which, by varying additional shape parameters: (1) available hohlraum shapes can be uniformly and accurately represented, (2) it can be used to understand why the spherical hohlraum has higher flux symmetry, (3) it allows us to obtain a feasible shape design field satisfying flux symmetry constraints, and (4) a synthetically optimized hohlraum can be obtained with a tradeoff of flux symmetry and other hohlraum performance. Finally, the hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs is modeled, analyzed, and then optimized based on the unified free-form representation. The results show that a feasible shape design field with flux asymmetry no more than 1% can be obtained, and over the feasible design field, the spherical hohlraum is validated to have the highest flux symmetry, and a synthetically optimal hohlraum can be found with closing flux symmetry but larger volume between laser spots and centrally located capsule.

  9. Analytic Sensitivities for Shape Optimization in Equivalent Plate Structural Wing Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1994-01-01

    Equivalent plate modeling techniques based on Ritz analysis with simple polynomials prove to be efficient tools for structural modeling of wings in the preliminary design stage. Accuracy problems are encountered, however, when these models are used to obtain finite difference behavior sensitivities with respect to planform shape. The accuracy problems are associated with the poor numerical conditioning of static and eigenvalue equations. As higher-order polynomials are being used to Improve the analysis itself, the more sensitive is the finite difference derivative to the step size used. This article describes a formulation of wing equivalent plate modeling in which it is simple to obtain analytic, explicit expressions for stiffness and mass matrix elements without the need to perform numerical integration. This formulation leads naturally to analytic expressions for the derivatives of displacements, stresses, and natural frequencies with respect to shape design variables. This article examines the accuracy of finite difference derivatives compared with the analytic derivatives, and shows that In some cases it is impossible to obtain any information of value by finite differences. Analytic sensitivities, in this case, are still sufficiently accurate for design optimization.

  10. Interpolation of longitudinal shape and image data via optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liang-Jia; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Longitudinal analysis of medical imaging data has become central to the study of many disorders. Unfortunately, various constraints (study design, patient availability, technological limitations) restrict the acquisition of data to only a few time points, limiting the study of continuous disease/treatment progression. Having the ability to produce a sensible time interpolation of the data can lead to improved analysis, such as intuitive visualizations of anatomical changes, or the creation of more samples to improve statistical analysis. In this work, we model interpolation of medical image data, in particular shape data, using the theory of optimal mass transport (OMT), which can construct a continuous transition from two time points while preserving "mass" (e.g., image intensity, shape volume) during the transition. The theory even allows a short extrapolation in time and may help predict short-term treatment impact or disease progression on anatomical structure. We apply the proposed method to the hippocampus-amygdala complex in schizophrenia, the heart in atrial fibrillation, and full head MR images in traumatic brain injury.

  11. Preliminary Assessment of Optimal Longitudinal-Mode Control for Drag Reduction through Distributed Aeroelastic Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Corey; Nguyen, Nhan; Lohn, Jason; Dolan, John

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of advanced lightweight materials is resulting in a new generation of lighter, flexible, more-efficient airframes that are enabling concepts for active aeroelastic wing-shape control to achieve greater flight efficiency and increased safety margins. These elastically shaped aircraft concepts require non-traditional methods for large-scale multi-objective flight control that simultaneously seek to gain aerodynamic efficiency in terms of drag reduction while performing traditional command-tracking tasks as part of a complete guidance and navigation solution. This paper presents results from a preliminary study of a notional multi-objective control law for an aeroelastic flexible-wing aircraft controlled through distributed continuous leading and trailing edge control surface actuators. This preliminary study develops and analyzes a multi-objective control law derived from optimal linear quadratic methods on a longitudinal vehicle dynamics model with coupled aeroelastic dynamics. The controller tracks commanded attack-angle while minimizing drag and controlling wing twist and bend. This paper presents an overview of the elastic aircraft concept, outlines the coupled vehicle model, presents the preliminary control law formulation and implementation, presents results from simulation, provides analysis, and concludes by identifying possible future areas for research

  12. Unsteady Aerodynamic Response of a Linear Cascade of Airfoils in Separated Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capece, Vincent R.; Ford, Christopher; Bone, Christopher; Li, Rui

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to investigate methods to modify the leading edge separation region, which could lead to an improvement in aeroelastic stability of advanced airfoil designs. The airfoil section used is representative of current low aspect ratio fan blade tip sections. The experimental potion of this study investigated separated zone boundary layer from removal through suction slots. Suction applied to a cavity in the vicinity of the separation onset point was found to be the most effective location. The computational study looked into the influence of front camber on flutter stability. To assess the influence of the change in airfoil shape on stability the work-per-cycle was evaluated for torsion mode oscillations. It was shown that the front camberline shape can be an important factor for stabilizing the predicted work-per-cycle and reducing the predicted extent of the separation zone. In addition, data analysis procedures are discussed for reducing data acquired in experiments that involve periodic unsteady data. This work was conducted in support of experiments being conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Flutter Cascade. The spectral block averaging method is presented. This method is shown to be able to account for variations in airfoil oscillation frequency that can occur in experiments that force oscillate the airfoils to simulate flutter.

  13. Prediction of Film Cooling on Gas Turbine Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis tool has been developed in order to study the effect of film cooling on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of actual turbine airfoils. An existing code (Arnone et al., 1991) has been modified for the purpose. The code is an explicit, multigrid, cell-centered, finite volume code with an algebraic turbulence model. Eigenvalue scaled artificial dissipation and variable-coefficient implicit residual smoothing are used with a full-multigrid technique. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion (Mayle, 1991) is used. The effects of film cooling have been incorporated into the code in the form of appropriate boundary conditions at the hole locations on the airfoil surface. Each hole exit is represented by several control volumes, thus providing an ability to study the effect of hole shape on the film-cooling characteristics. Comparison is fair with near mid-span experimental data for four and nine rows of cooling holes, five on the shower head, and two rows each on the pressure and suction surfaces. The computations, however, show a strong spanwise variation of the heat transfer coefficient on the airfoil surface, specially with shower-head cooling.

  14. Propulsion of a flapping and oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I E

    1937-01-01

    Formulas are given for the propelling or drag force experience in a uniform air stream by an airfoil or an airfoil-aileron combination, oscillating in any of three degrees of freedom; vertical flapping, torsional oscillations about a fixed axis parallel to the span, and angular oscillations of the aileron about a hinge.

  15. AFSMO/AFSCL- AIRFOIL SMOOTHING AND SCALING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L

    1994-01-01

    Since its early beginnings, NASA has been actively involved in the design and testing of airfoil sections for a wide variety of applications. Recently a set of programs has been developed to smooth and scale arbitrary airfoil coordinates. The smoothing program, AFSMO, utilizes both least-squares polynomial and least-squares cubic-spline techniques to iteratively smooth the second derivatives of the y-axis airfoil coordinates with respect to a transformed x-axis system which unwraps the airfoil and stretches the nose and trailing-edge regions. The corresponding smooth airfoil coordinates are then determined by solving a tridiagonal matrix of simultaneous cubic-spline equations relating the y-axis coordinates and their corresponding second derivatives. The camber and thickness distribution of the smooth airfoil are also computed. The scaling program, AFSCL, may then be used to scale the thickness distribution generated by the smoothing program to a specified maximum thickness. Once the thickness distribution has been scaled, it is combined with the camber distribution to obtain the final scaled airfoil contour. The airfoil smoothing and scaling programs are written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and have been implemented on a CDC CYBER 170 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 70K (octal) of 60 bit words. Both programs generate plotted output via CALCOMP type plotting calls. These programs were developed in 1983.

  16. Airfoil Dynamic Stall and Rotorcraft Maneuverability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    2000-01-01

    The loading of an airfoil during dynamic stall is examined in terms of the augmented lift and the associated penalties in pitching moment and drag. It is shown that once stall occurs and a leading-edge vortex is shed from the airfoil there is a unique relationship between the augmented lift, the negative pitching moment, and the increase in drag. This relationship, referred to here as the dynamic stall function, shows limited sensitivity to effects such as the airfoil section profile and Mach number, and appears to be independent of such parameters as Reynolds number, reduced frequency, and blade sweep. For single-element airfoils there is little that can be done to improve rotorcraft maneuverability except to provide good static C(l(max)) characteristics and the chord or blade number that is required to provide the necessary rotor thrust. However, multi-element airfoils or airfoils with variable geometry features can provide augmented lift in some cases that exceeds that available from a single-element airfoil. The dynamic stall function is shown to be a useful tool for the evaluation of both measured and calculated dynamic stall characteristics of single element, multi-element, and variable geometry airfoils.

  17. Measuring Lift with the Wright Airfoils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.; Soleymanloo, Arianne

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory or demonstration exercise, we mount a small airfoil with its long axis vertical at one end of a nearly frictionless rotating platform. Air from a leaf blower produces a sidewise lift force L on the airfoil and a drag force D in the direction of the air flow (Fig. 1). The rotating platform is kept in equilibrium by adding weights…

  18. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  19. Design optimization study of a shape memory alloy active needle for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Konh, Bardia; Honarvar, Mohammad; Hutapea, Parsaoran

    2015-05-01

    Majority of cancer interventions today are performed percutaneously using needle-based procedures, i.e. through the skin and soft tissue. The difficulty in most of these procedures is to attain a precise navigation through tissue reaching target locations. To overcome this challenge, active needles have been proposed recently where actuation forces from shape memory alloys (SMAs) are utilized to assist the maneuverability and accuracy of surgical needles. In the first part of this study, actuation capability of SMA wires was studied. The complex response of SMAs was investigated via a MATLAB implementation of the Brinson model and verified via experimental tests. The isothermal stress-strain curves of SMAs were simulated and defined as a material model in finite element analysis (FEA). The FEA was validated experimentally with developed prototypes. In the second part of this study, the active needle design was optimized using genetic algorithm aiming its maximum flexibility. Design parameters influencing the steerability include the needle's diameter, wire diameter, pre-strain and its offset from the needle. A simplified model was presented to decrease the computation time in iterative analyses. Integration of the SMA characteristics with the automated optimization schemes described in this study led to an improved design of the active needle.

  20. Experimental investigation of the flowfield of an oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1992-01-01

    The flowfield of an airfoil oscillated periodically over a wide range of reduced frequencies, 0 less than or = k less than or = 1.6 is studied experimentally at chord Reynolds numbers of R sub c = 22,000 and 44,000. The NACA0012 airfoil is pitched sinusoidally about one quarter chord between angles of attack (alpha) of 5 and 25 degrees. Detailed flow visualization and phase averaged vorticity measurements are carried out for k = 0.2 to document the evolution and the shedding of the dynamic stall vortex (DSV). In addition to the DSV, an intense vortex of opposite sign originates from the trailing edge just when the DSV is shed. After being shed into the wake, the two together take the shape of a large 'mushroom' while being convected away from the airfoil. The unsteady circulation around the airfoil and, therefore, the time varying component of the lift is estimated in a novel way from the shed vorticity flux and is found to be in good agreement with the lift variation reported by others. The delay in the shedding of the DSV with increasing k, as observed by previous researchers, is documented for the full range of k. The DSV, for example, is shed nearly at the maximum alpha of 25 degrees at k = 0.2, but is shed at the minimum alpha of 5 degrees at k = 0.8. At low k, the flowfield appears quasi-steady and the bluff body shedding corresponding to the maximum alpha (25 degrees) dominates the unsteady fluctuations in the wake.

  1. Experimental investigation of the flowfield of an oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1992-01-01

    The flow field of an airfoil oscillated periodically over a wide range of reduced frequencies, 0 less than k less than 1.6, is studied experimentally at chord Reynolds numbers of R sub c = 22,000 and 44,000. The NACA0012 airfoil is pitched sinusoidally about one quarter chord between alpha of 5 deg and 25 deg. Detailed flow visualization and phase averaged vorticity measurements are carried out for k = 0.2 to document the evolution and the shedding of the dynamic stall vortex (DSV). In addition to the DSV, an intense vortex of opposite sign originates from the trailing edge just when the DSV is shed. After being shed into the wake, the two together take the shape of a large 'mushroom' while being convected away from the airfoil. The unsteady circulation around the airfoil and, therefore, the time varying component of the lift is estimated in a novel way from the shed vorticity flux and is found to be in good agreement with the lift variation reported by others. The delay in the shedding of the DSV with increasing k, as observed by previous researchers, is documented for the full range of k. The DSV, for example, is shed nearly at the maximum alpha of 25 deg at k = 0.2, but is shed at the minimum alpha of 5 deg at k = 0.8. At low k, the flowfield appears quasi-steady and the bluff body shedding corresponding to the maximum alpha (25 deg) dominates the unsteady fluctuations in the wake.

  2. Sonic boom focusing prediction and delta wing shape optimization for boom mitigation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasdeo, Nitin

    nose angle and dihedral angle on mitigating the sonic-boom ground signature. Optimal shape design for low sonic boom ground signature and least degradation of aerodynamic performance are the main goals of the present work. Response surface methodology is used for carrying out wing shape optimization. Far-field computations are carried out to predict the sonic boom signature on the ground using the full-potential code and the Thomas ray code.

  3. Airfoil flutter model suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Wilmer H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A wind tunnel suspension system for testing flutter models under various loads and at various angles of attack is described. The invention comprises a mounting bracket assembly affixing the suspension system to the wind tunnel, a drag-link assembly and a compound spring arrangement comprises a plunge spring working in opposition to a compressive spring so as to provide a high stiffness to trim out steady state loads and simultaneously a low stiffness to dynamic loads. By this arrangement an airfoil may be tested for oscillatory response in both plunge and pitch modes while being held under high lifting loads in a wind tunnel.

  4. Optimal size, shape, and control design in dynamics of planar frame structures under large displacements and rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gams, M.; Saje, M.; Planinc, I.; Kegl, M.

    2010-01-01

    Size, shape, and drive optimization procedures are combined with an energy-conserving time-integration scheme for the dynamic analysis of planar geometrically non-linear frame structures undergoing large overall motions. The solution method is based on the finite-element formulation, employing the classical displacement-based planar beam finite elements described in an inertial frame. Finite axial, bending, and shear strains are taken into account. If the system is conservative, the energy and momenta conservation in the discrete system during motion is guaranteed. Size, shape, and drive design variables are introduced into the model. Shape parameterization is achieved by the design element technique, using Bezier patches. The sensitivity analysis is performed by the discrete approach and the analytical direct differentiation method. A gradient-based optimization method, using an automatically adjustable convex approximation technique, is employed. The efficiency and the applicability of the approach are demonstrated via numerical examples. The shape and the driving function of a load-moving robot arm are optimized to reduce oscillations in its final position. The shape of a steel frame is optimized to reduce oscillations after an idealized ground motion jerk.

  5. Leading edge embedded fan airfoil concept -- A new powered high lift technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Nhan Huu

    A new powered-lift airfoil concept called Leading Edge Embedded Fan (LEEF) is proposed for Extremely Short Take-Off and Landing (ESTOL) and Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) applications. The LEEF airfoil concept is a powered-lift airfoil concept capable of generating thrust and very high lift-coefficient at extreme angles-of attack (AoA). It is designed to activate only at the take-off and landing phases, similar to conventional flaps or slats, allowing the aircraft to operate efficiently at cruise in its conventional configuration. The LEEF concept consists of placing a crossflow fan (CFF) along the leading-edge (LE) of the wing, and the housing is designed to alter the airfoil shape between take-off/landing and cruise configurations with ease. The unique rectangular cross section of the crossflow fan allows for its ease of integration into a conventional subsonic wing. This technology is developed for ESTOL aircraft applications and is most effectively applied to General Aviation (GA) aircraft. Another potential area of application for LEEF is tiltrotor aircraft. Unlike existing powered high-lift systems, the LEEF airfoil uses a local high-pressure air source from cross-flow fans, does not require ducting, and is able to be deployed using distributed electric power systems throughout the wing. In addition to distributed lift augmentation, the LEEF system can provide additional thrust during takeoff and landing operation to supplement the primary cruise propulsion system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a conventional airfoil/wing using the NACA 63-3-418 section, commonly used in GA, and a LEEF airfoil/wing embedded into the same airfoil section were carried out to evaluate the advantages of and the costs associated with implementing the LEEF concept. Computational results show that significant lift and augmented thrust are available during LEEF operation while requiring only moderate fan power

  6. NASA low- and medium-speed airfoil development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.; Whitcomb, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The status of NASA low and medium speed airfoil research is discussed. Effects of airfoil thickness-chord ratios varying from 9 percent to 21 percent on the section characteristics for a design lift coefficient of 0.40 are presented for the initial low speed family of airfoils. Also, modifications to the 17-percent low-speed airfoil to reduce the pitching-moment coefficient and to the 21-percent low speed airfoil results are shown for two new medium speed airfoils with thickness ratios of 13 percent and 17 percent and design-lift coefficients of 0.30. Applications of NASA-developed airfoils to general aviation aircraft are summarized.

  7. The S407, S409, and S410 Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    coefficient at point B is not as low as at point A, unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is...feature results in a leading-edge shape that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that transition on the upper surface...like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which allows some laminar

  8. A Rapid Distortion Theory modified turbulence spectra for semi-analytical airfoil noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Leandro D.; Christophe, Julien; Schram, Christophe; Desmet, Wim

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes an implementation of the Rapid Distortion Theory, for the prediction of the noise resulting from the interaction of an airfoil with incoming turbulence. In the framework of the semi-analytical modeling strategy known as Amiet's theory, this interaction mechanism is treated in a linearized form where the airfoil thickness, camber and angle of attack are assumed negligible, leading to a frozen turbulence description of the incident gust. Important semi-analytical developments have been proposed in the literature to improve the modeling of the gust-airfoil interaction accounting for parallel and skewed gusts, non-rectangular linearized airfoil shapes or blade tip effects. This work is rather focused on the investigation of the distortion of turbulence that occurs in the vicinity of the airfoil leading edge, compared with Rapid Distortion Theory, where main results are briefly reminded in this paper. The main contribution of this work is a detailed experimental investigation of the evolution of turbulent quantities relevant to noise production, performed in the close vicinity of the airfoil leading edge subjected to grid turbulence, by means of stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements. The results indicate that the distortion effects are concentrated in a narrow region close to the stagnation point of the leading edge, with dimension of the order of its radius of curvature. Additionally, it is shown that the turbulence intensity grows significantly as the flow approaches the airfoil leading-edge. Based on those results, a modified turbulence spectrum is proposed to describe the incoming turbulence in Amiet's theory. The sound predictions show a significantly better match with acoustic measurements than using the original turbulence model.

  9. In-flight measurement of ice growth on an airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Mcknight, Robert C.; Humes, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Results of preliminary tests to measure ice growth on an airfoil during flight icing conditions are presented. Ultrasonic pulse echo measurements of ice thickness are obtained from an array of eight ultrasonic transducers mounted flush with the leading edge of the airfoil. These thickness measurements are used to document the evolution of the ice shape during the encounter in the form of successive ice profiles. Results from 3 research flights are presented and discussed. The accuracy of the ultrasonic measurements is found to be within 0.5 mm of mechanical and stereo photograph measurements of the ice accretion.

  10. Effectiveness of spoilers on the GA(W)-1 airfoil with a high performance Fowler flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Two-dimensional wind-tunnel tests were conducted to determine effectiveness of spoilers applied to the GA(W)-1 airfoil. Tests of several spoiler configurations show adequate control effectiveness with flap nested. It is found that providing a vent path allowing lower surface air to escape to the upper surface as the spoiler opens alleviates control reversal and hysteresis tendencies. Spoiler cross-sectional shape variations generally have a modest influence on control characteristics. A series of comparative tests of vortex generators applied to the (GA-W)-1 airfoil show that triangular planform vortex generators are superior to square planform vortex generators of the same span.

  11. On the plane potential flow past a lattice of arbitrary airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I E

    1944-01-01

    The two-dimensional, incompressible potential flow past a lattice of airfoils of arbitrary shape is investigated theoretically. The problem is treated by usual methods of conformal mapping in several stages, one stage corresponding to the mapping of the framework of the arbitrary line lattice and another significant stage corresponding to the Theodorsen method for the mapping of the arbitrary single wing profile into a circle. A particular feature in the theoretical treatment is the special handling of the regions at an infinite distance in front of and behind the lattice. Expressions are given for evaluation of the velocity and pressure distribution at the airfoil boundary. An illustrative numerical example is included.

  12. Ice Accretions and Icing Effects for Modern Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Icing tests were conducted to document ice shapes formed on three different two-dimensional airfoils and to study the effects of the accreted ice on aerodynamic performance. The models tested were representative of airfoil designs in current use for each of the commercial transport, business jet, and general aviation categories of aircraft. The models were subjected to a range of icing conditions in an icing wind tunnel. The conditions were selected primarily from the Federal Aviation Administration's Federal Aviation Regulations 25 Appendix C atmospheric icing conditions. A few large droplet icing conditions were included. To verify the aerodynamic performance measurements, molds were made of selected ice shapes formed in the icing tunnel. Castings of the ice were made from the molds and placed on a model in a dry, low-turbulence wind tunnel where precision aerodynamic performance measurements were made. Documentation of all the ice shapes and the aerodynamic performance measurements made during the icing tunnel tests is included in this report. Results from the dry, low-turbulence wind tunnel tests are also presented.

  13. Trailing edge modifications for flatback airfoils.

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Daniel L.; van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    The adoption of blunt trailing edge airfoils (also called flatback airfoils) for the inboard region of large wind turbine blades has been proposed. Blunt trailing edge airfoils would not only provide a number of structural benefits, such as increased structural volume and ease of fabrication and handling, but they have also been found to improve the lift characteristics of thick airfoils. Therefore, the incorporation of blunt trailing edge airfoils would allow blade designers to more freely address the structural demands without having to sacrifice aerodynamic performance. These airfoils do have the disadvantage of generating high levels of drag as a result of the low-pressure steady or periodic flow in the near-wake of the blunt trailing edge. Although for rotors, the drag penalty appears secondary to the lift enhancement produced by the blunt trailing edge, high drag levels are of concern in terms of the negative effect on the torque and power generated by the rotor. Hence, devices are sought that mitigate the drag of these airfoils. This report summarizes the literature on bluff body vortex shedding and bluff body drag reduction devices and proposes four devices for further study in the wind tunnel.

  14. Prediction of airfoil stall using Navier-Stokes equations in streamline coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, D. H.; Sohn, C. H.; Oh, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes procedure to calculate the flow about an airfoil at incidence was developed. The parabolized equations are solved in the streamline coordinates generated for an arbitrary airfoil shape using conformal mapping. A modified k-epsilon turbulence model is applied in the entire domain, but the eddy viscosity in the laminar region is suppressed artificially to simulate the region correctly. The procedure was applied to airfoils at various angles of attack, and the results are quite satisfactory for both laminar and turbulent flows. It is shown that the present choice of the coordinate system reduces the error due to numerical diffusion, and that the lift is accurately predicted for a wide range of incidence.

  15. A Wind Tunnel Study of Icing Effects on a Business Jet Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Broeren, Andy P.; Zoeckler, Joesph G.; Lee, Sam

    2003-01-01

    Aerodynamic wind tunnel tests were conducted to study the effects of various ice accretions on the aerodynamic performance of a 36-inch chord, two-dimensional business jet airfoil. Eight different ice shape configurations were tested. Four were castings made from molds of ice shapes accreted in an icing wind tunnel. Two were made using computationally smoothed tracings of two of the ice shapes accreted in the icing tunnel. These smoothed profiles were then extended in the spanwise direction to form a two-dimensional ice shape. The final two configurations were formed by applying grit to the smoothed ice shapes. The ice shapes resulted in as much as 48% reduction in maximum lift coefficient from that of the clean airfoil. Large increases in drag and changes in pitching moment were also observed. The castings and their corresponding smoothed counterparts yielded similar results. Little change in performance was observed with the addition of grit to the smoothed ice shapes. Changes in the Reynolds number (from 3 x 10(exp 6) to 10.5 x 10(exp 6) and Mach number (from 0.12 to 0.28) did not significantly affect the iced-airfoil performance coefficients.

  16. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  17. Shape Optimization for Drag Reduction in Linked Bodies using Evolution Strategies and the Hybrid Wavelet Collocation - Brinkman Penalization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Oleg V.; Gazzola, Mattia; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2010-11-01

    In this talk we discuss preliminary results for the use of hybrid wavelet collocation - Brinkman penalization approach for shape optimization for drag reduction in flows past linked bodies. This optimization relies on Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method along with the Brinkman penalization technique and the Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES). Adaptive wavelet collocation method tackles the problem of efficiently resolving a fluid flow on a dynamically adaptive computational grid, while a level set approach is used to describe the body shape and the Brinkman volume penalization allows for an easy variation of flow geometry without requiring body-fitted meshes. We perform 2D simulations of linked bodies in order to investigate whether flat geometries are optimal for drag reduction. In order to accelerate the costly cost function evaluations we exploit the inherent parallelism of ES and we extend the CMA-ES implementation to a multi-host framework. This framework allows for an easy distribution of the cost function evaluations across several parallel architectures and it is not limited to only one computing facility. The resulting optimal shapes are geometrically consistent with the shapes that have been obtained in the pioneering wind tunnel experiments for drag reduction using Evolution Strategies by Ingo Rechenberg.

  18. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Burlon, A A; Kreiner, A J; Valda, A A; Minsky, D M

    2004-11-01

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon, and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases.

  19. Optimizing Ni-Ti-based shape memory alloys for ferroic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, A.; Frenzel, J.; Schmidt, M.; Maaß, B.; Seelecke, S.; Schütze, A.; Eggeler, G.

    Due to their large latent heats, pseudoelastic Ni-Ti-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) are attractive candidate materials for ferroic cooling, where elementary solid-state processes like martensitic transformations yield the required heat effects. The present work aims for a chemical and microstructural optimization of Ni-Ti for ferroic cooling. A large number of Ni-Ti-based alloy compositions were evaluated in terms of phase transformation temperatures, latent heats, mechanical hysteresis widths and functional stability. The aim was to identify material states with superior properties for ferroic cooling. Different material states were prepared by arc melting, various heat treatments and thermo-mechanical processing. The cooling performance of selected materials was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry, uniaxial tensile loading/unloading, and by using a specially designed ferroic cooling demonstrator setup. A Ni45Ti47.25Cu5V2.75 SMA was identified as a potential candidate material for ferroic cooling. This material combines extremely stable pseudoelasticity at room temperature and a very low hysteresis width. The ferroic cooling efficiency of this material is four times higher than in the case of binary Ni-Ti.

  20. Development and implementation of a coupled computational muscle force optimization bone shape adaptation modeling method.

    PubMed

    Florio, C S

    2015-04-01

    Improved methods to analyze and compare the muscle-based influences that drive bone strength adaptation can aid in the understanding of the wide array of experimental observations about the effectiveness of various mechanical countermeasures to losses in bone strength that result from age, disuse, and reduced gravity environments. The coupling of gradient-based and gradientless numerical optimization routines with finite element methods in this work results in a modeling technique that determines the individual magnitudes of the muscle forces acting in a multisegment musculoskeletal system and predicts the improvement in the stress state uniformity and, therefore, strength, of a targeted bone through simulated local cortical material accretion and resorption. With a performance-based stopping criteria, no experimentally based or system-based parameters, and designed to include the direct and indirect effects of muscles attached to the targeted bone as well as to its neighbors, shape and strength alterations resulting from a wide range of boundary conditions can be consistently quantified. As demonstrated in a representative parametric study, the developed technique effectively provides a clearer foundation for the study of the relationships between muscle forces and the induced changes in bone strength. Its use can lead to the better control of such adaptive phenomena.

  1. Mechanical properties identification and design optimization of nitinol shape memory alloy microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, M.; Hamedi, M.; Salmani Nohouji, H.; Arghavani, J.

    2014-02-01

    Microactuators are essential elements of MEMS and are widely used in these devices. Microgrippers, micropositioners, microfixtures, micropumps and microvalves are well-known applications of microstructures. In this paper, the design optimization of shape memory alloy microactuators is discussed. Four different configurations of microactuator with variable geometrical parameters, generating different levels of displacement and force, are designed and analysed. In order to determine the optimum values of parameters for each microactuator, statistical design of experiments (DOE) is used. For this purpose, the Souza et al constitutive model (1988 Eur. J. Mech. A 17 789-806) is adapted for use in finite element analysis software. Mechanical properties of the SMA are identified by performing experimental tests on Ti-49.8%Ni. Finally, the specific energy of each microactuator is determined using the calibrated model and regression analysis. Moreover, the characteristic curve of each microactuator is obtained and with this virtual tool one can choose a microactuator with the desired force and displacement. The methodology discussed in this paper can be used as a reference to design appropriate microactuators for different MEMS applications producing various ranges of displacement and force.

  2. Optimal Inlet Shape Design of N2B Hybrid Wing Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyoungjin; Liou, Meng-Sing

    2012-01-01

    The N2B hybrid wing body aircraft was conceptually designed to meet environmental and performance goals for the N+2 generation transport set by the Subsonic Fixed Wing project of NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program. In the present study, flow simulations are conducted around the N2B configuration by a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver using unstructured meshes. Boundary conditions at engine fan face and nozzle exhaust planes are provided by the NPSS thermodynamic engine cycle model. The flow simulations reveal challenging design issues arising from boundary layer ingestion offset inlet and airframe-propulsion integration. Adjoint-based optimal designs are then conducted for the inlet shape to minimize the airframe drag force and flow distortion at fan faces. Design surfaces are parameterized by NURBS, and the cowl lip geometry is modified by a spring analogy approach. By the drag minimization design, flow separation on the cowl surfaces are almost removed, and shock wave strength got remarkably reduced. For the distortion minimization design, a circumferential distortion indicator DPCP(sub avg) is adopted as the design objective and diffuser bottom and side wall surfaces are perturbed for the design. The distortion minimization results in a 12.5 % reduction in the objective function.

  3. Optimization of group delay response of (apodized) tapered fiber Bragg grating by shaping taper transition and apodization window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowski, Konrad; Jedrzejewski, Kazimierz; Osuch, Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    This article presents implementation of the Simulated Annealing (SA) algorithm for tapered fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs) design. Particularly, together with well-known Coupled Mode Theory (CMT) and Transfer Matrix Method (TMM) the algorithm optimizes the group delay response of TFBG, by simultaneous shaping of both apodization function and tapered fiber transition profile. Prior to the optimization process, numerical model for TFBG design has been validated. Preliminary results reveal great potential of the SA-based approach and with proper definition of the design criteria may be even applied for optimization of the spectral properties of TFBGs.

  4. Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Optimization of the Streamlined Shape of High-Speed Trains Based on the Kriging Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gang; Liang, Xifeng; Yao, Shuanbao; Chen, Dawei

    2017-01-01

    Minimizing the aerodynamic drag and the lift of the train coach remains a key issue for high-speed trains. With the development of computing technology and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the engineering field, CFD has been successfully applied to the design process of high-speed trains. However, developing a new streamlined shape for high-speed trains with excellent aerodynamic performance requires huge computational costs. Furthermore, relationships between multiple design variables and the aerodynamic loads are seldom obtained. In the present study, the Kriging surrogate model is used to perform a multi-objective optimization of the streamlined shape of high-speed trains, where the drag and the lift of the train coach are the optimization objectives. To improve the prediction accuracy of the Kriging model, the cross-validation method is used to construct the optimal Kriging model. The optimization results show that the two objectives are efficiently optimized, indicating that the optimization strategy used in the present study can greatly improve the optimization efficiency and meet the engineering requirements. PMID:28129365

  5. Multi-Objective Aerodynamic Optimization of the Streamlined Shape of High-Speed Trains Based on the Kriging Model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Liang, Xifeng; Yao, Shuanbao; Chen, Dawei; Li, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    Minimizing the aerodynamic drag and the lift of the train coach remains a key issue for high-speed trains. With the development of computing technology and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the engineering field, CFD has been successfully applied to the design process of high-speed trains. However, developing a new streamlined shape for high-speed trains with excellent aerodynamic performance requires huge computational costs. Furthermore, relationships between multiple design variables and the aerodynamic loads are seldom obtained. In the present study, the Kriging surrogate model is used to perform a multi-objective optimization of the streamlined shape of high-speed trains, where the drag and the lift of the train coach are the optimization objectives. To improve the prediction accuracy of the Kriging model, the cross-validation method is used to construct the optimal Kriging model. The optimization results show that the two objectives are efficiently optimized, indicating that the optimization strategy used in the present study can greatly improve the optimization efficiency and meet the engineering requirements.

  6. Upper-surface modifications for C sub l max improvement of selected NASA 6-series airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szelazek, C. A.; Hicks, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    The thickness of the upper surface of 64 airfoils was increased from the leading edge to the position of maximum thickness. The modifications were generated using a numerical optimization routine coupled with an aerodynamic analysis code. The type of modification presented can be used for aircraft design or for the retrofit of current aircraft to improve the stall characteristics and climb performance. The coordinates of the modified airfoils are presented with plots of the forward 45% of the profiles and pressure distributions for both the modified and unmodified sections at an angle of attack of 14 degrees.

  7. Low speed airfoil design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, R.; Somers, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    A low speed airfoil design and analysis program was developed which contains several unique features. In the design mode, the velocity distribution is not specified for one but many different angles of attack. Several iteration options are included which allow the trailing edge angle to be specified while other parameters are iterated. For airfoil analysis, a panel method is available which uses third-order panels having parabolic vorticity distributions. The flow condition is satisfied at the end points of the panels. Both sharp and blunt trailing edges can be analyzed. The integral boundary layer method with its laminar separation bubble analog, empirical transition criterion, and precise turbulent boundary layer equations compares very favorably with other methods, both integral and finite difference. Comparisons with experiment for several airfoils over a very wide Reynolds number range are discussed. Applications to high lift airfoil design are also demonstrated.

  8. Second-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; By, Robert Romany; Sims, Calvin L.; Hyde, Susan Marie

    2002-01-01

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X and Y values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket. The second-stage wheel has sixty buckets.

  9. Third-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Pirolla, Peter Paul; Siden, Gunnar Leif; Humanchuk, David John; Brassfield, Steven Robert; Wilson, Paul Stuart

    2002-01-01

    The third-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  10. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils with Fowler Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Anderson, Walter B

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests made of a Clark y airfoil with a Clark y Fowler flap and of an NACA 23012 airfoil with NACA Fowler flaps. Some of the tests were made in the 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel and others in the 5-foot vertical wind tunnel. The pressures were measured on the upper and lower surfaces at one chord section both on the main airfoils and on the flaps for several angles of attack with the flaps located at the maximum-lift settings. A test installation was used in which the model was mounted in the wind tunnel between large end planes so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. The data are given in the form of pressure-distribution diagrams and as plots of calculated coefficients for the airfoil-and-flap combinations and for the flaps alone.

  11. Turbine airfoil to shroud attachment method

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Christian X; Kulkarni, Anand A; James, Allister W; Wessell, Brian J; Gear, Paul J

    2014-12-23

    Bi-casting a platform (50) onto an end portion (42) of a turbine airfoil (31) after forming a coating of a fugitive material (56) on the end portion. After bi-casting the platform, the coating is dissolved and removed to relieve differential thermal shrinkage stress between the airfoil and platform. The thickness of the coating is varied around the end portion in proportion to varying amounts of local differential process shrinkage. The coating may be sprayed (76A, 76B) onto the end portion in opposite directions parallel to a chord line (41) of the airfoil or parallel to a mid-platform length (80) of the platform to form respective layers tapering in thickness from the leading (32) and trailing (34) edges along the suction side (36) of the airfoil.

  12. Airfoil for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George [Palm City, FL

    2011-01-18

    An airfoil is provided for a gas turbine comprising an outer structure comprising a first wall, an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced relative to the first wall such that a cooling gap is defined between at least portions of the first and second walls, and seal structure provided within the cooling gap between the first and second walls for separating the cooling gap into first and second cooling fluid impingement gaps. An inner surface of the second wall may define an inner cavity. The inner structure may further comprise a separating member for separating the inner cavity of the inner structure into a cooling fluid supply cavity and a cooling fluid collector cavity. The second wall may comprise at least one first impingement passage, at least one second impingement passage, and at least one bleed passage.

  13. Transonic airfoil design using Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique for designing transonic airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution (the inverse problem) is presented. The method employs the basic features of Jameson's iterative solution for the full potential equation, except that inverse boundary conditions and Cartesian coordinates are used. The method is a direct-inverse approach that controls trailing-edge closure. Examples show the application of the method to design aft-cambered and other airfoils specifically for transonic flight.

  14. Transonic Airfoils with a Given Pressure Distribution,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    erovse sidst necesosar mod Ideatify b lock mmb)L An inverse design procedure for airfoils, based on hodograph techniques, has been developed. For...w L-:- " " -- - r- L i -- _ 9 ABSTRACT An inverse design procedure for airfoils, based on hodograph tech...generated in the hodograph plane by Nieuwand,5 Bauer, Garabedian and Korn,6 Boerstoel and Huizing,7 and Sobieczky.8 More recently, the development of

  15. Unsteady Pressure Distributions on Airfoils in Cascade.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    of thin airfoil theory has been used by Henderson (-ftj’ and Bruce (1-7-)’to derive expressions for the unsteady response which includes the cascade...model in conjunction with the assumptions of thin airfoil theory has been used by Henderson (16) and Bruce (17) to derive expressions for the unsteady...effect, that is, a sharp change in the unsteady lift when the disturbance wavelength equals the blade spacing. Bruce (19) further extends this theory to

  16. Atmospheric performance of the special-purpose Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) thin-airfoil family

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J; Smith, B; Jager, D; Olsen, T

    1990-09-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), in cooperation with SeaWest Energy Group, has completed extensive atmospheric testing of the special-purpose SERI thin-airfoil family during the 1990 wind season. The purpose of this test program was to experimentally verify the predicted performance characteristics of the thin-airfoil family on a geometrically optimized blade, and to compare it to original-equipment blades under atmospheric wind conditions. The tests were run on two identical Micon 65/13 horizontal-axis wind turbines installed side-by-side in a wind farm. The thin-airfoil family 7.96 m blades were installed on one turbine, and AeroStar 7.41 m blades were installed on the other. This paper presents final performance results of the side-by-side comparative field test for both clean and dirty blade conditions. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Customized airfoils and their impact on VAWT (Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine) cost of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a family of airfoils specifically designed for use in the equatorial portion of a Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) blade. An airfoil of that family has been incorporated into the rotor blades of the DOE/Sandia 34-m diameter VAWT Test Bed. The airfoil and rotor design process is reviewed. Comparisons with data recently acquired from flow visualization tests and from the DOE/Sandia 34-m diameter VAWT Test Bed illustrate the success that was achieved in the design. The economic optimization model used in the design is described and used to evaluate the effect of modifications to the current Test Bed blade. 1 tab., 11 figs., 13 refs.

  18. A Computational Approach to Model Vascular Adaptation During Chronic Hemodialysis: Shape Optimization as a Substitute for Growth Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S. M. Javid; Boghosian, Michael; Cassel, Kevin; Hammes, Mary

    2015-11-01

    End-stage-renal disease patients depend on successful long-term hemodialysis via vascular access, commonly facilitated via a Brachiocephalic Fistula (BCF). The primary cause of BCF failure is Cephalic Arch Stenosis (CAS). It is believed that low Wall Shear Stress (WSS) regions, which occur because of the high flow rates through the natural bend in the cephalic vein, create hemodynamic circumstances that trigger the onset and development of Intimal Hyperplasia (IH) and subsequent CAS. IH is hypothesized to be a natural effort to reshape the vessel, aiming to bring the WSS values back to a physiologically acceptable range. We seek to explore the correlation between regions of low WSS and subsequent IH and CAS in patient-specific geometries. By utilizing a shape optimization framework, a method is proposed to predict cardiovascular adaptation that could potentially be an alternative to vascular growth and remodeling. Based on an objective functional that seeks to alter the vessel shape in such a way as to readjust the WSS to be within the normal physiological range, CFD and shape optimization are then coupled to investigate whether the optimal shape evolution is correlated with actual patient-specific geometries thereafter. Supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK90769).

  19. Propulsion by active and passive airfoil oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2013-11-01

    Oscillating airfoils have been the subject of much research both as a mechanism of propulsion in engineering devices as well as a model of understanding how fish, birds, and insects produce thrust and maneuvering forces. Additionally, the jet or wake generated by an oscillating airfoil exhibits a multitude of vortex patterns, which are an interesting study in their own right. We present PIV measurements of the vortex flow behind an airfoil undergoing controlled pitching oscillations at moderate Reynolds number. As a method of propulsion, oscillating foils have been found to be capable performers when undergoing both pitching and heaving motions [Anderson et al. 1998]. While an airfoil undergoing only pitching motion is a relatively inefficient propulsor, we examine the effect of adding passive dynamics to the system: for example, actuated pitching with a passive spring in the heave direction. Practically speaking, a mechanical system with such an arrangement has the potential to reduce the cost and complexity of an oscillating airfoil propulsor. To study an airfoil undergoing both active and passive motion, we employ our ``cyber-physical fluid dynamics'' technique [Mackowski & Williamson, 2011] to simulate the effects of passive dynamics in a physical experiment.

  20. Isolated and cascade airfoils with prescribed velocity distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Jerison, Meyer

    1947-01-01

    An exact solution of the problem of designing an airfoil with a prescribed velocity distribution on the suction surface in a given uniform flow of an incompressible perfect fluid is obtained by replacing the boundary of the airfoil by vortices. By this device, a method of solution is developed that is applicable both to isolated airfoils and to airfoils in cascade. The conformal transformation of the designed airfoil into a circle can then be obtained and the velocity distribution at any angle of attack computed. Numerical illustrations of the method are given for the airfoil in cascade.