Science.gov

Sample records for airfoil suction surface

  1. Experimental Study of the Effects of Finite Surface Disturbances and Angle of Attack on the Laminar Boundary Layer of an NACA 64A010 Airfoil with Area Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzberg, Milton A; Braslow, Albert L

    1952-01-01

    A Langley low-turbulence wind-tunnel investigation of a porous NACA 64A010 airfoil section has been made to determine the effectiveness of area suction in maintaining full-chord laminar flow behind finite disturbances and at angles of attacks other than 0 degrees. Aero suction resulted in only a small increase in the size of a finite disturbance required to cause premature boundary-layer transition as compared with that for the airfoil without suction. Combined wake and suction drags lower than the drag of the plain airfoil were obtained through a range of low lift coefficient by the use of area suction.

  2. Airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Ristau, Neil; Siden, Gunnar Leif

    2015-07-21

    An airfoil includes a leading edge, a trailing edge downstream from the leading edge, a pressure surface between the leading and trailing edges, and a suction surface between the leading and trailing edges and opposite the pressure surface. A first convex section on the suction surface decreases in curvature downstream from the leading edge, and a throat on the suction surface is downstream from the first convex section. A second convex section is on the suction surface downstream from the throat, and a first convex segment of the second convex section increases in curvature.

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Area Suction for the Control of the Laminar Boundary Layer on an NACA 64a010 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braslow, Albert L; Burrows, Dale L; Tetervin, Neal; Visconti, Fioravante

    1951-01-01

    A low-turbulence wind-tunnel investigation was made of an NACA 64a010 airfoil having a porous surface to determine the reduction in section total-drag coefficient that might be obtained at large Reynolds numbers by the use of suction to produce continuous inflow through the surface of the airfoil (area suction). In addition to the experimental investigation, a related theoretical analysis was made to provide a basis of comparison for the test results.

  4. Investigation of viscous/inviscid interaction in transonic flow over airfoils with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vemuru, C. S.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1988-01-01

    The viscous/inviscid interaction over transonic airfoils with and without suction is studied. The streamline angle at the edge of the boundary layer is used to couple the viscous and inviscid flows. The potential flow equations are solved for the inviscid flow field. In the shock region, the Euler equations are solved using the method of integral relations. For this, the potential flow solution is used as the initial and boundary conditions. An integral method is used to solve the laminar boundary-layer equations. Since both methods are integral methods, a continuous interaction is allowed between the outer inviscid flow region and the inner viscous flow region. To avoid the Goldstein singularity near the separation point the laminar boundary-layer equations are derived in an inverse form to obtain solution for the flows with small separations. The displacement thickness distribution is specified instead of the usual pressure distribution to solve the boundry-layer equations. The Euler equations are solved for the inviscid flow using the finite volume technique and the coupling is achieved by a surface transpiration model. A method is developed to apply a minimum amount of suction that is required to have an attached flow on the airfoil. The turbulent boundary layer equations are derived using the bi-logarithmic wall law for mass transfer. The results are found to be in good agreement with available experimental data and with the results of other computational methods.

  5. Modeling the increase in aerodynamic efficiency for a thick (37.5% chord) airfoil with slot suction in vortex cells with allowance for the compressibility effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Sudakov, A. G.; Ermakov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Reynolds equations closed using the Menter shear-stress-transfer model modified with allowance for the curvature of flow lines have been numerically solved using multiblock computational technologies. The obtained solution has been used to analyze subsonic flow past a thick (37.5% chord) airfoil with slot suction in circular vortex cells intended for the Ecology and Progress (Ekologiya i Progress, EKIP) aircraft project in comparison to a distributed (from the central body surface) suction at fixed values of the total volume flow rate (0.02121) and Reynolds number (105) in a range of Mach numbers from 0 to 0.4. This analysis revealed a significant (up to tenfold) decrease in the bow drag (determined with allowance for the energy losses) and a large (by an order of magnitude) increase in the aerodynamic efficiency of the thick airfoil containing vortex cells with slot suction, which reached up to 160.

  6. Aerodynamic performance of transonic and subsonic airfoils: Effects of surface roughness, turbulence intensity, Mach number, and streamline curvature-airfoil shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiang

    roughness and freestream turbulence, compared with data from the cambered vane airfoil. Stanton numbers, skin friction coefficients, aerodynamic losses, and Reynolds analogy behavior are numerically predicted for a turbine vane using the FLUENT with a k-epsilon RNG model to show the effects of Mach number, mainstream turbulence level, and surface roughness. Comparisons with wake aerodynamic loss experimental data are made. Numerically predicted skin friction coefficients and Stanton numbers are also used to deduce Reynolds analogy behavior on the vane suction and pressure sides.

  7. The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil: Suction coefficient analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Harris, Charles D.; Harvey, William D.

    1991-01-01

    A swept supercritical wing incorporating laminar flow control at transonic flow conditions was designed and tested. The definition of an experimental suction coefficient and a derivation of the compressible and incompressible formulas for the computation of the coefficient from measurable quantities is presented. The suction flow coefficient in the highest velocity nozzles is shown to be overpredicted by as much as 12 percent through the use of an incompressible formula. However, the overprediction on the computed value of suction drag when some of the suction nozzles were operating in the compressible flow regime is evaluated and found to be at most 6 percent at design conditions.

  8. Control of the Periodic Turbulent Flow over a Semicircular Airfoil with the Use of the Slot Suction of the Air from a Circular Vortex Cell at Small Angles of Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. I.; Baranov, P. A.; Sudakov, A. G.; Usachev, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    It is shown that, in the case where, into the back wall of a semicircular airfoil with an angle of attack of 5°, a vortex cell of diameter 0.2 in fractions of the airfoil chord is built in and the mean-mass rate of slot suction of the air from this cell is larger than 0.15 of the incident-flow velocity, the pattern of the turbulent flow over the airfoil is transformed, and, at an optimum suction rate of 0.75, the lift coefficient of the airfoil reaches a maximum value of the order of 1.7 at an aerodynamic efficiency of 10.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of Surface Pressure Fluctuations on a Stalled Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lele, Sanjiva; Kocheemoolayil, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    The surface pressure fluctuations beneath the separated flow over a turbine blade are believed to be responsible for a phenomenon known as Other Amplitude Modulation (OAM) of wind turbine noise. Developing the capability to predict stall noise from first-principles is a pacing item within the context of critically evaluating this conjecture. We summarize the progress made towards using large eddy simulations to predict stall noise. Successful prediction of pressure fluctuations on the airfoil surface beneath the suction side boundary layer is demonstrated in the near-stall and post-stall regimes. Previously unavailable two-point statistics necessary for characterizing the surface pressure fluctuations more completely are documented. The simulation results indicate that the space-time characteristics of pressure fluctuations on the airfoil surface change drastically in the near-stall and post-stall regimes. The changes are not simple enough to be accounted for by straight-forward scaling laws. The eddies responsible for surface pressure fluctuations and hence far-field noise are significantly more coherent across the span of the airfoil in the post-stall regime relative to the more canonical attached configurations.

  10. Isolated and cascade airfoils with prescribed velocity distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Arthur W; Jerison, Meyer

    1947-01-01

    An exact solution of the problem of designing an airfoil with a prescribed velocity distribution on the suction surface in a given uniform flow of an incompressible perfect fluid is obtained by replacing the boundary of the airfoil by vortices. By this device, a method of solution is developed that is applicable both to isolated airfoils and to airfoils in cascade. The conformal transformation of the designed airfoil into a circle can then be obtained and the velocity distribution at any angle of attack computed. Numerical illustrations of the method are given for the airfoil in cascade.

  11. Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derkacs, Thomas (Inventor); Fetheroff, Charles W. (Inventor); Matay, Istvan M. (Inventor); Toth, Istvan J. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Although the method and apparatus of the present invention can be utilized to apply either a uniform or a nonuniform covering of material over many different workpieces, the apparatus (20) is advantageously utilized to apply a thermal barrier covering (64) to an airfoil (22) which is used in a turbine engine. The airfoil is held by a gripper assembly (86) while a spray gun (24) is effective to apply the covering over the airfoil. When a portion of the covering has been applied, a sensor (28) is utilized to detect the thickness of the covering. A control apparatus (32) compares the thickness of the covering of material which has been applied with the desired thickness and is subsequently effective to regulate the operation of the spray gun to adaptively apply a covering of a desired thickness with an accuracy of at least plus or minus 0.0015 of an inch (1.5 mils) despite unanticipated process variations.

  12. Global surface pressure measurements of static and dynamic stall on a wind turbine airfoil at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disotell, Kevin J.; Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Gregory, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Recognizing the need for global surface measurement techniques to characterize the time-varying, three-dimensional loading encountered on rotating wind turbine blades, fast-responding pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) has been evaluated for resolving unsteady aerodynamic effects in incompressible flow. Results of a study aimed at demonstrating the laser-based, single-shot PSP technique on a low Reynolds number wind turbine airfoil in static and dynamic stall are reported. PSP was applied to the suction side of a Delft DU97-W-300 airfoil (maximum thickness-to-chord ratio of 30 %) at a chord Reynolds number of 225,000 in the University of Wyoming open-return wind tunnel. Static and dynamic stall behaviors are presented using instantaneous and phase-averaged global pressure maps. In particular, a three-dimensional pressure topology driven by a stall cell pattern is detected near the maximum lift condition on the steady airfoil. Trends in the PSP-measured pressure topology on the steady airfoil were confirmed using surface oil visualization. The dynamic stall case was characterized by a sinusoidal pitching motion with mean angle of 15.7°, amplitude of 11.2°, and reduced frequency of 0.106 based on semichord. PSP images were acquired at selected phase positions, capturing the breakdown of nominally two-dimensional flow near lift stall, development of post-stall suction near the trailing edge, and a highly three-dimensional topology as the flow reattaches. Structural patterns in the surface pressure topologies are considered from the analysis of the individual PSP snapshots, enabled by a laser-based excitation system that achieves sufficient signal-to-noise ratio in the single-shot images. The PSP results are found to be in general agreement with observations about the steady and unsteady stall characteristics expected for the airfoil.

  13. Two experimental supercritical laminar-flow-control swept-wing airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Dennis O.; Dagenhart, J. Ray

    1987-01-01

    Two supercritical laminar-flow-control airfoils were designed for a large-chord swept-wing experiment in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel where suction was provided through most of the model surface for boundary-layer control. The first airfoil was derived from an existing full-chord laminar airfoil by extending the trailing edge and making changes in the two lower-surface concave regions. The second airfoil differed from the first one in that it was designed for testing without suction in the forward concave region of the lower surface. Differences between the first airfoil and the one from which it was derived as well as between the first and second airfoils are discussed. Airfoil coordinates and predicted pressure distributions for the design normal Mach number of 0.755 and section lift coefficient of 0.55 are given for the three airfoils.

  14. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2013-09-17

    A serpentine coolant flow path (54A-54G) formed by inner walls (50, 52) in a cavity (49) between pressure and suction side walls (22, 24) of a turbine airfoil (20A). A coolant flow (58) enters (56) an end of the airfoil, flows into a span-wise channel (54A), then flows forward (54B) over the inner surface of the pressure side wall, then turns behind the leading edge (26), and flows back along a forward part of the suction side wall, then follows a loop (54E) forward and back around an inner wall (52), then flows along an intermediate part of the suction side wall, then flows into an aft channel (54G) between the pressure and suction side walls, then exits the trailing edge (28). This provides cooling matched to the heating topography of the airfoil, minimizes differential thermal expansion, revives the coolant, and minimizes the flow volume needed.

  15. Turbine airfoil to shround attachment

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X; Morrison, Jay A; James, Allister W; Snider, Raymond G; Eshak, Daniel M; Marra, John J; Wessell, Brian J

    2014-05-06

    A turbine airfoil (31) with an end portion (42) that tapers (44) toward the end (43) of the airfoil. A ridge (46) extends around the end portion. It has proximal (66) and distal (67) sides. A shroud platform (50) is bi-cast onto the end portion around the ridge without bonding. Cooling shrinks the platform into compression (62) on the end portion (42) of the airfoil. Gaps between the airfoil and platform are formed using a fugitive material (56) in the bi-casting stage. These gaps are designed in combination with the taper angle (44) to accommodate differential thermal expansion while maintaining a gas seal along the contact surfaces. The taper angle (44) may vary from lesser on the pressure side (36) to greater on the suction side (38) of the airfoil. A collar portion (52) of the platform provides sufficient contact area for connection stability.

  16. The measurement of boundary layers on a compressor blade in cascade. II - Suction surface boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Steven; Zierke, William C.

    1987-01-01

    A one-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) has been used to measure the two-dimensional, periodic flow field about a double circular arc, compressor blade in cascade. Eleven boundary layer profiles were taken on both the pressure and suction surfaces of the blade, and two were taken in the near wake. In this part of the study, the LDV system is described and the suction surface flow field is documented. The suction surface profiles appear to separate both at the leading edge and again somewhat beyond midchord; the leading edge separation apparently reattaches by 2.6 percent chord.

  17. The NASA Langley Laminar-Flow-Control (LFC) experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil: Design overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.; Harvey, William D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A large-chord, swept, supercritical, laminar-flow-control (LFC) airfoil was designed and constructed and is currently undergoing tests in the Langley 8 ft Transonic Pressure Tunnel. The experiment was directed toward evaluating the compatibility of LFC and supercritical airfoils, validating prediction techniques, and generating a data base for future transport airfoil design as part of NASA's ongoing research program to significantly reduce drag and increase aircraft efficiency. Unique features of the airfoil included a high design Mach number with shock free flow and boundary layer control by suction. Special requirements for the experiment included modifications to the wind tunnel to achieve the necessary flow quality and contouring of the test section walls to simulate free air flow about a swept model at transonic speeds. Design of the airfoil with a slotted suction surface, the suction system, and modifications to the tunnel to meet test requirements are discussed.

  18. The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil: Evaluation of initial perforated configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Clukey, Patricia G.; Stack, John P.

    1992-01-01

    The initial evaluation of a large-chord, swept, supercritical airfoil incorporating an active laminar-flow-control (LFC) suction system with a perforated upper surface is documented in a chronological manner, and the deficiencies in the suction capability of the perforated panels as designed are described. The experiment was conducted in the Langley 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. Also included is an evaluation of the influence of the proximity of the tunnel liner to the upper surface of the airfoil pressure distribution.

  19. Airfoil-shaped micro-mixers for reducing fouling on membrane surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K; Altman, Susan J; Clem, Paul G; Hibbs, Michael; Cook, Adam W

    2012-10-23

    An array of airfoil-shaped micro-mixers that enhances fluid mixing within permeable membrane channels, such as used in reverse-osmosis filtration units, while minimizing additional pressure drop. The enhanced mixing reduces fouling of the membrane surfaces. The airfoil-shaped micro-mixer can also be coated with or comprised of biofouling-resistant (biocidal/germicidal) ingredients.

  20. Approximate method of designing a two-element airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abzalilov, D. F.; Mardanov, R. F.

    2011-09-01

    An approximate method is proposed for designing a two-element airfoil. The method is based on reducing an inverse boundary-value problem in a doubly connected domain to a problem in a singly connected domain located on a multisheet Riemann surface. The essence of the method is replacement of channels between the airfoil elements by channels of flow suction and blowing. The shape of these channels asymptotically tends to the annular shape of channels passing to infinity on the second sheet of the Riemann surface. The proposed method can be extended to designing multielement airfoils.

  1. Design and Experimental Results for the S415 Airfoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 8.) This... suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that transition on the upper surface will occur very near the leading edge. Thus, the...pressure distribution should look like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a moderately adverse pressure

  2. Design and Experimental Results for the S411 Airfoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 8...produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that tran- sition on the upper surface will occur very near the leading edge. Thus...like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which allows some laminar

  3. Design and Experimental Results for the S406 Airfoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    point B is not as low as at point A, unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly...in a leading edge that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that transition on the upper surface will occur very near...3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which allows some laminar flow

  4. Some observations of surface pressures and the near wake of a blunt trailing edge airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digumarthi, R. V.; Koutsoyannis, S. P.; Karamcheti, K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments with a truncated and untruncated airfoils of profiles NACA 640A10, were carried out in subsonic wind tunnels in a velocity range of 19m/s to 54m/s corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 200,000 to 468,000 based on the chord. Airfoil spanned the test section to achieve two dimensionality of the model. Velocity measurements, pressure measurements, and vortex shedding in the wake were measured using a hotwire and pressure transducers. The measured chordwise static pressure distribution on the smooth trailing edge airfoil along the midspan plane, agreed with the theoretical results calculated on the basis of the potential flow for that airfoil. Boundary layer profiles measured in the midspan plane, behind the maximum thickness of the airfoil show no separation of the flow. Spanwise distribution of the measured static pressure on the upper surface of the airfoil shows uniformity for both configurations with and without the boundary layer trip. This uniformity of pressure distribution and separation indicates that the flow on the airfoil was uniform and two dimensional in character.

  5. Integrated axial and tangential serpentine cooling circuit in a turbine airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J; Dalton, John P

    2015-05-05

    A continuous serpentine cooling circuit forming a progression of radial passages (44, 45, 46, 47A, 48A) between pressure and suction side walls (52, 54) in a MID region of a turbine airfoil (24). The circuit progresses first axially, then tangentially, ending in a last radial passage (48A) adjacent to the suction side (54) and not adjacent to the pressure side (52). The passages of the axial progression (44, 45, 46) may be adjacent to both the pressure and suction side walls of the airfoil. The next to last radial passage (47A) may be adjacent to the pressure side wall and not adjacent to the suction side wall. The last two radial passages (47A, 48A) may be longer along the pressure and suction side walls respectively than they are in a width direction, providing increased direct cooling surface area on the interiors of these hot walls.

  6. Laminar-flow airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Dan M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An airfoil having a fore airfoil element, an aft airfoil element, and a slot region in between them. These elements induce laminar flow over substantially all of the fore airfoil element and also provide for laminar flow in at least a portion of the slot region. The method of the invention is one for inducing natural laminar flow over an airfoil. In the method, a fore airfoil element, having a leading and trailing edge, and an aft airfoil element define a slot region. Natural laminar flow is induced over substantially all of the fore airfoil element, by inducing the pressures on both surfaces of the fore airfoil element to decrease to a location proximate the trailing edge of the fore airfoil element using pressures created by the aft airfoil element.

  7. Numerical and Analytical Study of Nonlinear Effects of Transonic Flow Past a Wing Airfoil in Oscillation of its Surface Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aul'chenko, S. M.; Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    The present work is devoted to a criterial analysis and mathematical modeling of the influence of forced oscillations of surface elements of a wing airfoil on the shock-wave structure of transonic flow past it. Parameters that govern the regimes of interaction of the oscillatory motion of airfoil sections with the breakdown compression shock have been established. The qualitative and quantitative influence of these parameters on the wave resistance of the airfoil has been investigated.

  8. Turbine airfoil fabricated from tapered extrusions

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J

    2013-07-16

    An airfoil (30) and fabrication process for turbine blades with cooling channels (26). Tapered tubes (32A-32D) are bonded together in a parallel sequence, forming a leading edge (21), a trailing edge (22), and pressure and suction side walls (23, 24) connected by internal ribs (25). The tapered tubes may be extruded without camber to simplify the extrusion process, then bonded along matching surfaces (34), forming a non-cambered airfoil (28), which may be cambered in a hot forming process and cut (48) to length. The tubes may have tapered walls that are thinner at the blade tip (T1) than at the base (T2), reducing mass. A cap (50) may be attached to the blade tip. A mounting lug (58) may be forged (60) on the airfoil base and then machined, completing the blade for mounting in a turbine rotor disk.

  9. Upper-surface modifications for C sub l max improvement of selected NASA 6-series airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szelazek, C. A.; Hicks, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    The thickness of the upper surface of 64 airfoils was increased from the leading edge to the position of maximum thickness. The modifications were generated using a numerical optimization routine coupled with an aerodynamic analysis code. The type of modification presented can be used for aircraft design or for the retrofit of current aircraft to improve the stall characteristics and climb performance. The coordinates of the modified airfoils are presented with plots of the forward 45% of the profiles and pressure distributions for both the modified and unmodified sections at an angle of attack of 14 degrees.

  10. Study of laminar boundary layer instability noise study on a controlled diffusion airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Prateek; Sanjose, Marlene; Moreau, Stephane

    2016-11-01

    Detailed experimental study has been carried out on a Controlled Diffusion (CD) airfoil at 5° angle of attack and at chord based Reynolds number of 1 . 5 ×105 . All the measurements were done in an open-jet anechoic wind tunnel. The airfoil mock-up is held between two side plates, to keep the flow two-dimensional. PIV measurements have been performed in the wake and on the boundary layer of the airfoil. Pressure sensor probes on the airfoil were used to detect mean airfoil loading and remote microphone probes were used to measure unsteady pressure fluctuations on the surface of the airfoil. Furthermore the far field acoustic pressure was measured using an 1/2 inch ICP microphone. The results confirm very later transition of a laminar boundary layer to a turbulent boundary layer on the suction side of the airfoil. The process of transition of laminar to turbulent boundary layer comprises of turbulent reattachment of a separated shear layer. The pressure side of the boundary layer is found to be laminar and stable. Therefore tonal noise generated is attributed to events on suction side of the airfoil. The flow transition and emission of tones are further investigated in detail thanks to the complementary DNS study.

  11. An experimental investigation on the surface water transport process over an airfoil by using a digital image projection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wei, Tian; Hu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, an experimental investigation was conducted to characterize the transient behavior of the surface water film and rivulet flows driven by boundary layer airflows over a NACA0012 airfoil in order to elucidate underlying physics of the important micro-physical processes pertinent to aircraft icing phenomena. A digital image projection (DIP) technique was developed to quantitatively measure the film thickness distribution of the surface water film/rivulet flows over the airfoil at different test conditions. The time-resolved DIP measurements reveal that micro-sized water droplets carried by the oncoming airflow impinged onto the airfoil surface, mainly in the region near the airfoil leading edge. After impingement, the water droplets formed thin water film that runs back over the airfoil surface, driven by the boundary layer airflow. As the water film advanced downstream, the contact line was found to bugle locally and developed into isolated water rivulets further downstream. The front lobes of the rivulets quickly advanced along the airfoil and then shed from the airfoil trailing edge, resulting in isolated water transport channels over the airfoil surface. The water channels were responsible for transporting the water mass impinging at the airfoil leading edge. Additionally, the transition location of the surface water transport process from film flows to rivulet flows was found to occur further upstream with increasing velocity of the oncoming airflow. The thickness of the water film/rivulet flows was found to increase monotonically with the increasing distance away from the airfoil leading edge. The runback velocity of the water rivulets was found to increase rapidly with the increasing airflow velocity, while the rivulet width and the gap between the neighboring rivulets decreased as the airflow velocity increased.

  12. An application of active surface heating for augmenting lift and reducing drag of an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Badavi, Forooz F.; Noonan, Kevin W.

    1988-01-01

    Application of active control to separated flow on the RC(6)-08 airfoil at high angle of attack by localized surface heating is numerically simulated by integrating the compressible 2-D nonlinear Navier-Stokes equation solver. Active control is simulated by local modification of the temperature boundary condition over a narrow strip of the upper surface of the airfoil. Both mean and perturbed profiles are favorably altered when excited with the same natural frequency of the shear layer by moderate surface heating for both laminar and turbulent separation. The shear layer is found to be very sensitive to localized surface heating in the vicinity of the separation point. The excitation field at the surface sufficiently altered both the local as well as the global circulation to cause a significant increase in lift and reduction in drag.

  13. Control of the boundary layer separation about an airfoil by active surface heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Badavi, Forooz F.; Noonan, Kevin W.

    1988-01-01

    Application of active control to separated flow on the RC(6)-08 airfoil at high angle of attack by localized surface heating is numerically simulated by integrating the compressible two-dimensional nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations solver. Active control is simulated by local modification of the temperature boundary condition over a narrow strip on the upper surface of the airfoil. Both mean and perturbed profiles are favorably altered when excited with the same natural frequency of the shear layer by moderate surface heating for both laminar and turbulent separation. The shear layer is found to be very sensitive to localized surface heating in the vicinity of the separation point. The excitation field at the surface sufficiently altered both the local as well as the global circulation to cause a significant increase in lift and reduction in drag.

  14. Characterization of the Effect of Wing Surface Instrumentation on UAV Airfoil Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently proposed flight research at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) has prompted study into the aerodynamic effects of modifications made to the surfaces of laminar airfoils. The research is focused on the high-aspect ratio, laminar-flow type wings commonly found on UAVs and other aircraft with a high endurance requirement. A broad range of instrumentation possibilities, such as structural, pressure, and temperature sensing devices may require the alteration of the airfoil outer mold line as part of the installation process. This study attempts to characterize the effect of installing this additiona1 instrumentation on key airfoil performance factors, such as transition location, lift and drag curves, and stall point. In particular, the general case of an airfoil that is channeled in the spanwise direction is considered, and the impact on key performance characteristics is assessed. Particular attention is focused on exploring the limits of channel depth and low-Reynolds number on performance and stall characteristics. To quantify the effect of increased skin friction due to premature transition caused by protruding or recessed instrumentation, two simplified, conservative scenarios are used to consider two potential sources of diaturbance: A) that leading edge alterations would cause linearly expanding areas (triangles) of turbulent flow on both surfaces of the wing upstream of the natural transition point, and B) that a channel or bump on the upper surface would trip turbulent flow across the whole upper surface upstream of the natural transition point. A potentially more important consideration than the skin friction drag increment is the change in overall airfoil performance due to the installation of instrumentation along most of the wingspan. To quantify this effect, 2D CFD simulations of the flow over a representative mid-span airfoil section were conducted in order to assess the change in lift and drag curves for the airfoil in the presence of

  15. The S407, S409, and S410 Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    coefficient at point B is not as low as at point A, unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is...feature results in a leading-edge shape that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that transition on the upper surface...like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction peak exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which allows some laminar

  16. A semi-empirical airfoil stall noise model based on surface pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Madsen, Helge Aa.; Fischer, Andreas; Bak, Christian

    2017-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental study of airfoil stall and the modelling of stall noise. Using pressure taps and high-frequency surface pressure microphones flush-mounted on airfoils measured in wind tunnels and on an operating wind turbine blade, the characteristics of stall are analyzed. This study shows that the main quantities of interest, namely convection velocity, spatial correlation and surface pressure spectra, can be scaled highlighting the universal nature of stall independently of airfoil shapes and flow conditions, although within a certain range of experimental conditions. Two main regimes for the scaling of the correlation lengths and the surface pressure spectra, depending on the Reynolds number of the flow, can be distinguished. These results are used to develop a model for the surface pressure spectra within the detached flow region valid for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1 ×106 to 6 ×106. Subsequently, this model is used to derive a model for stall noise. Modelled noise spectra are compared with experimental data measured in anechoic wind tunnels with reasonably satisfactory agreement.

  17. Wind-Tunnel Investigation of Control-Surface Characteristics. 15 - Various Contour Modifications of a 0.30-Airfoil-Chord Plain Flap on an NACA 66(215)-014 Airfoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-12-01

    a plain flap on a low —drag airfoil were not • • .•ü;.V;.:-’ ;•»**;’•.••••<«**. •’ .•• V-:.--^i* -I’-••»•’*;w .-•; ’.••.<• % •v — i f...thick low —drag airfoil and on 9— and 15—percent- thick conventional airfoils. Other modifications have included the use of a...airplanes require the use of airfoil sections with low peak pressures, such as low —drag sec- tions, for tail surfaces to

  18. Numerical Study of Ram Air Airfoils and Upper Surface Bleed-Air Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-16

    of ram -air parachute systems to complement the design and analysis of new and existing airdrop systems. In this paper an unsteady numerical study of...two-dimensional, rigid, ram -air sections with an array of upper surface bleed-air actuators is presented. Aerodynamic forces and lift-to-drag ratios of...a modified Clark-Y ram -air airfoil are calculated from unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations, using the Kestrel and Cobalt flow

  19. The S411, S412, and S413 Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    not as low as at point A, unlike the polars of many laminar-flow airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant...in a leading edge that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which ensures that tran- sition on the upper surface will occur very near...This concept allows a wide low-drag range to be achieved and increases the loading in the leading-edge region. The forward loading serves to balance

  20. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric lavage; Stomach pumping; Nasogastric tube suction; Bowel obstruction - suction ... A tube is inserted through your nose or mouth, down the food pipe (esophagus), and into the stomach. Your ...

  1. Goertler instability in compressible boundary layers along curved surfaces with suction and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N.; Verma, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The Goertler instability of the laminar compressible boundary layer flows along concave surfaces is investigated. The linearized disturbance equations for the three-dimensional, counter-rotating streamwise vortices in two-dimensional boundary layers are presented in an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate. The basic approximation of the disturbance equations, that includes the effect of the growth of the boundary layer, is considered and solved numerically. The effect of compressibility on critical stability limits, growth rates, and amplitude ratios of the vortices is evaluated for a range of Mach numbers for 0 to 5. The effect of wall cooling and suction of the boundary layer on the development of Goertler vortices is investigated for different Mach numbers.

  2. An Experimental Investigation of Unsteady Surface Pressure on an Airfoil in Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mish, Patrick F.; Devenport, William J.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of fluctuating surface pressure were made on a NACA 0015 airfoil immersed in grid generated turbulence. The airfoil model has a 2 ft chord and spans the 6 ft Virginia Tech Stability Wind Tunnel test section. Two grids were used to investigate the effects of turbulence length scale on the surface pressure response. A large grid which produced turbulence with an integral scale 13% of the chord and a smaller grid which produced turbulence with an integral scale 1.3% of the chord. Measurements were performed at angles of attack, alpha from 0 to 20 . An array of microphones mounted subsurface was used to measure the unsteady surface pressure. The goal of this measurement was to characterize the effects of angle of attack on the inviscid response. Lift spectra calculated from pressure measurements at each angle of attack revealed two distinct interaction regions; for omega(sub r) = omega b / U(sub infinity) is less than 10 a reduction in unsteady lift of up to 7 decibels (dB) occurs while an increase occurs for omega(sub r) is greater than 10 as the angle of attack is increased. The reduction in unsteady lift at low omega(sub r) with increasing angle of attack is a result that has never before been shown either experimentally or theoretically. The source of the reduction in lift spectral level appears to be closely related to the distortion of inflow turbulence based on analysis of surface pressure spanwise correlation length scales. Furthermore, while the distortion of the inflow appears to be critical in this experiment, this effect does not seem to be significant in larger integral scale (relative to the chord) flows based on the previous experimental work of McKeough suggesting the airfoils size relative to the inflow integral scale is critical in defining how the airfoil will respond under variation of angle of attack. A prediction scheme is developed that correctly accounts for the effects of distortion when the inflow integral scale is small relative

  3. Instability and Transition of Flow at, and Near, an Attachment-Line: Including Control by Surface Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A.; Poll, D. I. A.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments have been performed on an untapered, swept cylinder model in the Cranfield College of Aeronautics 8 ft x 6 ft low-speed wind tunnel to investigate the effect of surface transpiration on the process of relaminarization in the attachment-line boundary layer. Suction coefficients for complete suppression of turbulence were determined as a function of Reynolds number and spanwise distance. The effect of attachment-line suction on the spanwise propagation of gross disturbances emanating from the fuselage-wing junction region was also studied. Finally, the effect of blowing on a laminar attachment-line boundary layer was also considered and excellent agreement was achieved with previous studies.

  4. Heat transfer coefficient measurements on the pressure surface of a transonic airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodzwa, Paul M.; Eaton, John K.

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents steady-state recovery temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the pressure surface of a modern, highly cambered transonic airfoil. These measurements were collected with a peak Mach number of 1.5 and a maximum turbulence intensity of 30%. We used a single passage model to simulate the idealized two-dimensional flow path between rotor blades in a modern transonic turbine. This set up offered a simpler construction than a linear cascade, yet produced an equivalent flow condition. We performed validated high accuracy (±0.2°C) surface temperature measurements using wide-band thermochromic liquid crystals allowing separate measurements of the previously listed parameters with the same heat transfer surface. We achieved maximum heat transfer coefficient uncertainties that were equivalent to similar investigations (±10%). Two key observations are the heat transfer coefficient along the aft portion of the airfoil is sensitive to the surface heat flux and is highly insensitive to the level of freestream turbulence. Possible explanations for these observations are discussed.

  5. An Experimental Study on Active Flow Control Using Synthetic Jet Actuators over S809 Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul, M.; Uzol, O.; Akmandor, I. S.

    2014-06-01

    This study investigates the effect of periodic excitation from individually controlled synthetic jet actuators on the dynamics of the flow within the separation and re-attachment regions of the boundary layer over the suction surface of a 2D model wing that has S809 airfoil profile. Experiments are performed in METUWIND's C3 open-loop suction type wind tunnel that has a 1 m × 1 m cross-section test section. The synthetic jet array on the wing consists of three individually controlled actuators driven by piezoelectric diaphragms located at 28% chord location near the mid-span of the wing. In the first part of the study, surface pressure, Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements are performed over the suction surface of the airfoil to determine the size and characteristics of the separated shear layer and the re-attachment region, i.e. the laminar separation bubble, at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack and with no flow control as a baseline case. For the controlled case, CTA measurements are carried out under the same inlet conditions at various streamwise locations along the suction surface of the airfoil to investigate the effect of the synthetic jet on the boundary layer properties. During the controlled case experiments, the synthetic jet actuators are driven with a sinusoidal frequency of 1.45 kHz and 300Vp-p. Results of this study show that periodic excitation from the synthetic jet actuators eliminates the laminar separation bubble formed over the suction surface of the airfoil at 2.3x105 Reynolds number at zero angle of attack.

  6. Summary of Airfoil Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Ira H; Von Doenhoff, Albert E; Stivers, Louis, Jr

    1945-01-01

    The historical development of NACA airfoils is briefly reviewed. New data are presented that permit the rapid calculation of the approximate pressure distributions for the older NACA four-digit and five-digit airfoils by the same methods used for the NACA 6-series airfoils. The general methods used to derive the basic thickness forms for NACA 6 and 7-series airfoils together with their corresponding pressure distributions are presented. Detail data necessary for the application of the airfoils to wing design are presented in supplementary figures placed at the end of the paper. The report includes an analysis of the lift, drag, pitching-moment, and critical-speed characteristics of the airfoils, together with a discussion of the effects of surface conditions. Available data on high-lift devices are presented. Problems associated with lateral-control devices, leading-edge air intakes, and interference are briefly discussed, together with aerodynamic problems of application. (author)

  7. A recontoured, upper surface designed to increase the maximum lift coefficient of a modified NACA 65 (0.82) (9.9) airfoil section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    A recontoured upper surface was designed to increase the maximum lift coefficient of a modified NACA 65 (0.82)(9.9) airfoil section which was tested at Mach numbers of 0.3 and 0.4 and Reynolds numbers of 2.3x10(6) and 4.3x10(6). The original 6-series section was tested for comparison with the recontoured section. The recontoured profile was found to have a higher maximum lift coefficient at all test conditions than the original airfoil. The recontoured airfoil showed less drag and nearly the same pitching moment characteristics as the original 6-series airfoil at all test conditions. The improvements found for the recontoured airfoil of the present study are similar to those found during previous investigations of recontoured 6-series airfoils with less camber.

  8. Wavy flow cooling concept for turbine airfoils

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2010-08-31

    An airfoil including an outer wall and a cooling cavity formed therein. The cooling cavity includes a leading edge flow channel located adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil and a trailing edge flow channel located adjacent a trailing edge of the airfoil. Each of the leading edge and trailing edge flow channels define respective first and second flow axes located between pressure and suction sides of the airfoil. A plurality of rib members are located within each of the flow channels, spaced along the flow axes, and alternately extending from opposing sides of the flow channels to define undulating flow paths through the flow channels.

  9. Improvements in surface singularity analysis and design methods. [applicable to airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    The coupling of the combined source vortex distribution of Green's potential flow function with contemporary numerical techniques is shown to provide accurate, efficient, and stable solutions to subsonic inviscid analysis and design problems for multi-element airfoils. The analysis problem is solved by direct calculation of the surface singularity distribution required to satisfy the flow tangency boundary condition. The design or inverse problem is solved by an iteration process. In this process, the geometry and the associated pressure distribution are iterated until the pressure distribution most nearly corresponding to the prescribed design distribution is obtained. Typically, five iteration cycles are required for convergence. A description of the analysis and design method is presented, along with supporting examples.

  10. Summary of Airfoil Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stivers, Louis S.; Abbott, Ira H.; von Doenhoff, Albert E.

    1945-01-01

    Recent airfoil data for both flight and wind-tunnel tests have been collected and correlated insofar as possible. The flight data consist largely of drag measurements made by the wake-survey method. Most of the data on airfoil section characteristics were obtained in the Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel. Detail data necessary for the application of NACA 6-serles airfoils to wing design are presented in supplementary figures, together with recent data for the NACA 24-, 44-, and 230-series airfoils. The general methods used to derive the basic thickness forms for NACA 6- and 7-series airfoils and their corresponding pressure distributions are presented. Data and methods are given for rapidly obtaining the approximate pressure distributions for NACA four-digit, five-digit, 6-, and 7-series airfoils. The report includes an analysis of the lift, drag, pitching-moment, and critical-speed characteristics of the airfoils, together with a discussion of the effects of surface conditions. Available data on high-lift devices are presented. Problems associated with lateral-control devices, leading-edge air intakes, and interference are briefly discussed. The data indicate that the effects of surface condition on the lift and drag characteristics are at least as large as the effects of the airfoil shape and must be considered in airfoil selection and the prediction of wing characteristics. Airfoils permitting extensive laminar flow, such as the NACA 6-series airfoils, have much lower drag coefficients at high speed and cruising lift coefficients than earlier types-of airfoils if, and only if, the wing surfaces are sufficiently smooth and fair. The NACA 6-series airfoils also have favorable critical-speed characteristics and do not appear to present unusual problems associated with the application of high-lift and lateral-control devices. Much of the data given in the NACA Advance Confidential Report entitled "Preliminary Low-Drag-Airfoil and Flap Data from

  11. A two dimensional study of rotor/airfoil interaction in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chyang S.

    1988-01-01

    A two dimensional model for the chordwise flow near the wing tip of the tilt rotor in hover is presented. The airfoil is represented by vortex panels and the rotor is modeled by doublet panels. The rotor slipstream and the airfoil wake are simulated by free point vortices. Calculations on a 20 percent thick elliptical airfoil under a uniform rotor inflow are performed. Variations on rotor size, spacing between the rotor and the airfoil, ground effect, and the influence upper surface blowing in download reduction are analyzed. Rotor size has only a minor influence on download when it is small. Increase of the rotor/airfoil spacing causes a gradual decrease on download. Proximity to the ground effectively reduces the download and makes the wake unsteady. The surface blowing changes the whole flow structure and significantly reduces the download within the assumption of a potential solution. Improvement on the present model is recommended to estimate the wall jets induced suction on the airfoil lower surface.

  12. Vertical axis wind turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij Vasiljevich

    2012-12-18

    A vertical axis wind turbine airfoil is described. The wind turbine airfoil can include a leading edge, a trailing edge, an upper curved surface, a lower curved surface, and a centerline running between the upper surface and the lower surface and from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The airfoil can be configured so that the distance between the centerline and the upper surface is the same as the distance between the centerline and the lower surface at all points along the length of the airfoil. A plurality of such airfoils can be included in a vertical axis wind turbine. These airfoils can be vertically disposed and can rotate about a vertical axis.

  13. Analysis of a theoretically optimized transonic airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Burdges, K. P.; Shrewsbury, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    Numerical optimization was used in conjunction with an inviscid, full potential equation, transonic flow analysis computer code to design an upper surface contour for a conventional airfoil to improve its supercritical performance. The modified airfoil was tested in a compressible flow wind tunnel. The modified airfoil's performance was evaluated by comparison with test data for the baseline airfoil and for an airfoil developed by optimization of leading edge of the baseline airfoil. While the leading edge modification performed as expected, the upper surface re-design did not produce all of the expected performance improvements. Theoretical solutions computed using a full potential, transonic airfoil code corrected for viscosity were compared to experimental data for the baseline airfoil and the upper surface modification. These correlations showed that the theory predicted the aerodynamics of the baseline airfoil fairly well, but failed to accurately compute drag characteristics for the upper surface modification.

  14. Airfoil structure

    DOEpatents

    Frey, G.A.; Twardochleb, C.Z.

    1998-01-13

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally ``C`` configuration of the airfoil. The generally ``C`` configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion. 6 figs.

  15. Airfoil structure

    DOEpatents

    Frey, Gary A.; Twardochleb, Christopher Z.

    1998-01-01

    Past airfoil configurations have been used to improve aerodynamic performance and engine efficiencies. The present airfoil configuration further increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress within the airfoil itself. The airfoil includes a chord and a span. Each of the chord and the span has a bow being summed to form a generally "C" configuration of the airfoil. The generally "C" configuration includes a compound bow in which internal stresses resulting from a thermal temperature gradient are reduced. The structural configuration reduces internal stresses resulting from thermal expansion.

  16. The NASA Langley Laminar-Flow-Control Experiment on a Swept Supercritical Airfoil: Basic Results for Slotted Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Clukey, Patricia G.; Stack, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of Mach number and Reynolds number on the experimental surface pressure distributions and transition patterns for a large chord, swept supercritical airfoil incorporating an active Laminar Flow Control suction system with spanwise slots are presented. The experiment was conducted in the Langley 8 foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. Also included is a discussion of the influence of model/tunnel liner interactions on the airfoil pressure distribution. Mach number was varied from 0.40 to 0.82 at two chord Reynolds numbers, 10 and 20 x 1,000,000, and Reynolds number was varied from 10 to 20 x 1,000,000 at the design Mach number.

  17. Multi-pass cooling for turbine airfoils

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2011-06-28

    An airfoil for a turbine vane of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil includes an outer wall having pressure and suction sides, and a radially extending cooling cavity located between the pressure and suction sides. A plurality of partitions extend radially through the cooling cavity to define a plurality of interconnected cooling channels located at successive chordal locations through the cooling cavity. The cooling channels define a serpentine flow path extending in the chordal direction. Further, the cooling channels include a plurality of interconnected chambers and the chambers define a serpentine path extending in the radial direction within the serpentine path extending in the chordal direction.

  18. Intermittent Behavior of the Separated Boundary Layer along the Suction Surface of a Low Pressure Turbine Blade under Periodic Unsteady Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeztuerk, B; Schobeiri, M. T.; Ashpis, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The paper experimentally and theoretically studies the effects of periodic unsteady wake flow and aerodynamic characteristics on boundary layer development, separation and re-attachment along the suction surface of a low pressure turbine blade. The experiments were carried out at Reynolds number of 110,000 (based on suction surface length and exit velocity). For one steady and two different unsteady inlet flow conditions with the corresponding passing frequencies, intermittency behaviors were experimentally and theoretically investigated. The current investigation attempts to extend the intermittency unsteady boundary layer transition model developed in previously to the LPT cases, where separation occurs on the suction surface at a low Reynolds number. The results of the unsteady boundary layer measurements and the intermittency analysis were presented in the ensemble-averaged and contour plot forms. The analysis of the boundary layer experimental data with the flow separation, confirms the universal character of the relative intermittency function which is described by a Gausssian function.

  19. Aeroelastic dynamic response and control of an airfoil section with control surface nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Daochun; Guo, Shijun; Xiang, Jinwu

    2010-10-01

    Nonlinearities in aircraft mechanisms are inevitable, especially in the control system. It is necessary to investigate the effects of them on the dynamic response and control performance of aeroelastic system. In this paper, based on the state-dependent Riccati equation method, a state feedback suboptimal control law is derived for aeroelastic response and flutter suppression of a three degree-of-freedom typical airfoil section. With the control law designed, nonlinear effects of freeplay in the control surface and time delay between the control input and actuator are investigated by numerical approach. A cubic nonlinearity in pitch degree is adopted to prevent the aeroelastic responses from divergence when the flow velocity exceeds the critical flutter speed. For the system with a freeplay, the responses of both open- and closed-loop systems are determined with Runge-Kutta algorithm in conjunction with Henon's method. This method is used to locate the switching points accurately and efficiently as the system moves from one subdomain into another. The simulation results show that the freeplay leads to a forward phase response and a slight increase of flutter speed of the closed-loop system. The effect of freeplay on the aeroelastic response decreases as the flow velocity increases. The time delay between the control input and actuator may impair control performance and cause high-frequency motion and quasi-periodic vibration.

  20. Recent advances in laser triangulation-based measurement of airfoil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hageniers, Omer L.

    1995-01-01

    The measurement of aircraft jet engine turbine and compressor blades requires a high degree of accuracy. This paper will address the development and performance attributes of a noncontact electro-optical gaging system specifically designed to meet the airfoil dimensional measurement requirements inherent in turbine and compressor blade manufacture and repair. The system described consists of the following key components: a high accuracy, dual channel, laser based optical sensor, a four degree of freedom mechanical manipulator system and a computer based operator interface. Measurement modes of the system include point by point data gathering at rates up to 3 points per second and an 'on-the-fly' mode where points can be gathered at data rates up to 20 points per second at surface scanning speeds of up to 1 inch per second. Overall system accuracy is +/- 0.0005 inches in a configuration that is useable in the blade manufacturing area. The systems ability to input design data from CAD data bases and output measurement data in a CAD compatible data format is discussed.

  1. The S415 and S418 Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    airfoils where the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 4.) This characteristic is related to the...edge with increasing (decreasing) lift coefficient. This feature results in a leading-edge shape that produces a suction peak at higher lift...should look like sketch 3. Sketch 3 1Director, Institute for Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics, University of Stuttgart, Germany, 1974–1985.5 No suction

  2. Manipulation of Leading-Edge Vortex Evolution by Applied Suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, James; Akkala, James

    2016-11-01

    The generation and shedding of vortices from unsteady maneuvering bodies can be characterized within a framework of vorticity transport, accounting for the effects of multiple sources and sinks of vorticity on the overall circulation of the vortex system. On a maneuvering wing, the diffusive flux of secondary vorticity from the surface is a critical contributor to the strength and dynamics of the leading-edge vortex, suggesting that flow control strategies targeting the manipulation of the secondary vorticity flux and the secondary vortex may provide an effective means of manipulating vortex development. Suction has been applied in the vicinity of the secondary vortex during the downstroke of a periodically-plunging flat-plate airfoil, and the flow evolution and aerodynamic loads are compared to the baseline case in which suction is not applied. Observation of the resulting surface pressure distribution and flow evolution suggest that the secondary flux of vorticity and the evolution of the flow field can be altered subject to appropriate position of the suction ports relative to the developing vortex structures, and at a specific temporal window in the development of the vortex. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant Number FA9550-16-1-0107 and NSF EPSCoR Grant Number EPS1101284.

  3. Effects of surface roughness and vortex generators on the LS(1)-0417MOD airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Reuss, R.L.; Hoffman, M.J.; Gregorek, G.M.

    1995-12-01

    An 18-inch constant-chord model of the LS(l)-0417MOD airfoil section was tested under two dimensional steady state conditions ate University 7{times}10 Subsonic Wind Tunnel. The objective was to document section lift and moment characteristics model and air flow conditions. Surface pressure data was acquired at {minus}60{degrees} through + 230{degrees} geometric angles of attack, at a nominal 1 million Reynolds number. Cases with and without leading edge grit roughness were investigated. The leading edge mulated blade conditions in the field. Additionally, surface pressure data were acquired for Reynolds numbers of 1.5 and 2.0 million, with and without leading edge grit roughness; the angle of attack was limited to a {minus}20{degrees} to 40{degrees} range. In general, results showed lift curve slope sensitivities to Reynolds number and roughness. The maximum lift coefficient was reduced as much as 29% by leading edge roughness. Moment coefficient showed little sensitivity to roughness beyond 50{degrees} angle of attack, but the expected decambering effect of a thicker boundary layer with roughness did show at lower angles. Tests were also conducted with vortex generators located at the 30% chord location on the upper surface only, at 1 and 1.5 million Reynolds numbers, with and without leading edge grit roughness. In general, with leading edge grit roughness applied, the vortex generators restored 85 percent of the baseline level of maximum lift coefficient but with a more sudden stall break and at a higher angle of attack than the baseline.

  4. A Feasibility Study to Control Airfoil Shape Using THUNDER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; Moses, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the capabilities of a new out-of-plane displacement piezoelectric actuator called thin-layer composite-unimorph ferroelectric driver and sensor (THUNDER) to alter the upper surface geometry of a subscale airfoil to enhance performance under aerodynamic loading. Sixty test conditions, consisting of combinations of five angles of attack, four dc applied voltages, and three tunnel velocities, were studied in a tabletop wind tunnel. Results indicated that larger magnitudes of applied voltage produced larger wafer displacements. Wind-off displacements were also consistently larger than wind-on. Higher velocities produced larger displacements than lower velocities because of increased upper surface suction. Increased suction also resulted in larger displacements at higher angles of attack. Creep and hysteresis of the wafer, which were identified at each test condition, contributed to larger negative displacements for all negative applied voltages and larger positive displacements for the smaller positive applied voltage (+102 V). An elastic membrane used to hold the wafer to the upper surface hindered displacements at the larger positive applied voltage (+170 V). Both creep and hysteresis appeared bounded based on the analysis of several displacement cycles. These results show that THUNDER can be used to alter the camber of a small airfoil under aerodynamic loads.

  5. Instability and Transition of Flow at, and Near, an Attachment-line - Including Control by Surface Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A.

    1996-01-01

    Advances in aviation during and following the Second World War led to an enormous improvement in the performance of aircraft. The push for enhanced efficiency brought cruise speeds into the transonic range, where the associated drag rise due to the appearance of shock-waves became a limiting factor. Wing sweep was adopted to delay the onset of this drag rise, but with this development came several new and unforeseen problems. Preliminary theoretical work assumed that the boundary layer transition characteristics of a swept wing would be subject to the independence principle, so the chordwise transition position could be predicted from two-dimensional work Gas turbine development has now reached a point where additional increases in efficiency are both difficult and expensive to achieve. Consequently, aircraft manufacturers are looking elsewhere for ways to reduce Direct Operating Costs (DOC's) or increase military performance. The attention of industry is currently focusing on Hybrid Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) as a possible method of reducing DOC's for civil aircraft. Following this study and discussions with NASA Langley and Boeing a different series of questions have been addressed in the present work. There are five areas of interest: Relaminarisation of the attachment-line boundary layer when the value of R exceeds 600. The effects of large suction levels on transition in the attachment-line boundary layer (ie critical oversuction). The transition characteristics of a relaminarised attachment-line flow which encounters a non-porous surface. The effect of attachment-line suction on the spanwise propagation of gross disturbances emanating from the wing-fuselage junction. The attachment-line transition caused by surface blowing.

  6. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-10-28

    A serpentine coolant flow path is formed by inner walls in a cavity between pressure and suction side walls of a turbine airfoil, the cavity partitioned by one or more transverse partitions into a plurality of continuous serpentine cooling flow streams each having a respective coolant inlet.

  7. Prediction of Film Cooling on Gas Turbine Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1994-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes analysis tool has been developed in order to study the effect of film cooling on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of actual turbine airfoils. An existing code (Arnone et al., 1991) has been modified for the purpose. The code is an explicit, multigrid, cell-centered, finite volume code with an algebraic turbulence model. Eigenvalue scaled artificial dissipation and variable-coefficient implicit residual smoothing are used with a full-multigrid technique. Moreover, Mayle's transition criterion (Mayle, 1991) is used. The effects of film cooling have been incorporated into the code in the form of appropriate boundary conditions at the hole locations on the airfoil surface. Each hole exit is represented by several control volumes, thus providing an ability to study the effect of hole shape on the film-cooling characteristics. Comparison is fair with near mid-span experimental data for four and nine rows of cooling holes, five on the shower head, and two rows each on the pressure and suction surfaces. The computations, however, show a strong spanwise variation of the heat transfer coefficient on the airfoil surface, specially with shower-head cooling.

  8. Control of unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.

    1995-01-01

    An effort to understand and control the unsteady separated flow associated with the dynamic stall of airfoils was funded for three years through the NASA cooperative agreement program. As part of this effort a substantial data base was compiled detailing the effects various parameters have on the development of the dynamic stall flow field. Parameters studied include Mach number, pitch rate, and pitch history, as well as Reynolds number (through two different model chord lengths) and the condition of the boundary layer at the leading edge of the airfoil (through application of surface roughness). It was found for free stream Mach numbers as low as 0.4 that a region of supersonic flow forms on the leading edge of the suction surface of the airfoil at moderate angles of attack. The shocks which form in this supersonic region induce boundary-layer separation and advance the dynamic stall process. Under such conditions a supercritical airfoil profile is called for to produce a flow field having a weaker leading-edge pressure gradient and no leading-edge shocks. An airfoil having an adaptive-geometry, or dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE), is under development as a unique active flow-control device. The DDLE, formed of carbon-fiber composite and fiberglass, can be flexed between a NACA 0012 profile and a supercritical profile in a controllable fashion while the airfoil is executing an angle-of-attack pitch-up maneuver. The dynamic stall data were recorded using point diffraction interferometry (PDI), a noninvasive measurement technique. A new high-speed cinematography system was developed for recording interferometric images. The system is capable of phase-locking with the pitching airfoil motion for real-time documentation of the development of the dynamic stall flow field. Computer-aided image analysis algorithms were developed for fast and accurate reduction of the images, improving interpretation of the results.

  9. Characteristics of merging shear layers and turbulent wakes of a multi-element airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adair, Desmond; Horne, W. Clifton

    1988-01-01

    Flow characteristics in the vicinity of the trailing edge of a single-slotted airfoil flap are presented and analyzed. The experimental arrangement consisted of a NACA 4412 airfoil equipped with a NACA 4415 flap whose angle of deflection was 21.8 deg. The flow remained attached over the model surfaces except in the vicinity of the flap trailing edge where a small region of boundary-layer separation extended over the aft 7 percent of flap chord. The flow was complicated by the presence of a strong, initially inviscid jet emanating from the slot between airfoil and flap, and a gradual merging of the main airfoil wake and flap suction-side boundary layer. Downstream of the flap, the airfoil and flap wakes fully merged to form an asymmetrical curved wake. The airfoil configuration was tested at an angle of attack of 8.2 deg, at a Mach number of 0.09, and a chord based Reynolds number of 1.8 x 10 to the 6th power in the Ames Research Center 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. Surface pressure measurements were made on the airfoil and flap and on the wind tunnel roof and floor. It was estimated that the wall interference increased the C sub L by 7 percent and decreased the C sub M by 4.5 percent. Velocity characteristics were quantified using hot-wire anemometry in regions of flow with preferred direction and low turbulence intensity. A 3-D laser velocimeter was used in regions of flow recirculation and relatively high turbulence intensity.

  10. An analysis of the crossover between local and massive separation on airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, M.; Carter, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    Massive separation on airfoils operating at high Reynolds number is an important problem to the aerodynamicist, since its onset generally determines the limiting performance of an airfoil, and it can lead to serious problems related to aircraft control as well as turbomachinery operation. The phenomenon of crossover between local separation and massive separation on realistic airfoil geometries induced by airfoil thickness is investigated for low speed (incompressible) flow. The problem is studied both for the asymptotic limit of infinite Reynolds number using triple-deck theory, and for finite Reynolds number using interacting boundary-layer theory. Numerical results are presented which follow the evolution of the flow as it develops from a mildly separated state to one dominated by the massively separated flow structure as the thickness of the airfoil geometry is systematically increased. The effect of turbulence upon the evolution of the flow is considered, and the impact is significant, with the principal effect being the suppression of the onset of separation. Finally, the effect of surface suction and injection for boundary-layer control is considered. The approach which was developed provides a valuable tool for the analysis of boundary-layer separation up to and beyond stall. Another important conclusion is that interacting boundary-layer theory provides an efficient tool for the analysis of the effect of turbulence and boundary-layer control upon separated vicsous flow.

  11. Virtual Shaping of a Two-dimensional NACA 0015 Airfoil Using Synthetic Jet Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Fang-Jenq; Beeler, George B.

    2002-01-01

    The Aircraft Morphing Program at NASA Langley envisions an aircraft without conventional control surfaces. Instead of moving control surfaces, the vehicle control systems may be implemented with a combination of propulsive forces, micro surface effectors, and fluidic devices dynamically operated by an intelligent flight control system to provide aircraft maneuverability over each mission segment. As a part of this program, a two-dimensional NACA 0015 airfoil model was designed to test mild maneuvering capability of synthetic jets in a subsonic wind tunnel. The objective of the experiments is to assess the applicability of using unsteady suction and blowing to alter the aerodynamic shape of an airfoil with a purpose to enhance lift and/or to reduce drag. Synthetic jet actuation at different chordwise locations, different forcing frequencies and amplitudes, under different freestream velocities are investigated. The effect of virtual shape change is indicated by a localized increase of surface pressure in the neighborhood of synthetic jet actuation. That causes a negative lift to the airfoil with an upper surface actuation. When actuation is applied near the airfoil leading edge, it appears that the stagnation line is shifted inducing an effect similar to that caused by a small angle of attack to produce an overall lift change.

  12. Airfoils for wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    2000-05-30

    Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

  13. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    2000-01-01

    Airfoils for the tip and mid-span regions of a wind turbine blade have upper surface and lower surface shapes and contours between a leading edge and a trailing edge that minimize roughness effects of the airfoil and provide maximum lift coefficients that are largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil in one embodiment is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen to seventeen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 2,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.4 to 1.5. In another embodiment, the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a thickness in a range of about fourteen percent to sixteen percent, a Reynolds number in a range of about 1,500,000 to 3,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 0.7 to 1.5. Another embodiment of the airfoil is shaped and contoured to have a Reynolds in a range of about 1,500,000 to 4,000,000, and a maximum lift coefficient in a range of about 1.0 to 1.5.

  14. Method for maintaining precise suction strip porosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, Frank H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to a masking method generally and, more particularly to a method of masking perforated titanium sheets having laminar control suction strips. As illustrated in the drawings, a nonaerodynamic surface of a perforated sheet has alternating suction strip areas and bonding land areas. Suction strip tapes overlie the bonding land areas during application of a masking material to an upper surface of the suction strip tapes. Prior to bonding the perforated sheet to a composite structure, the bonding land tapes are removed. The entire opposite aerodynamic surface is masked with tape before bonding. This invention provides a precise control of suction strip porosities by ensuring that no chemicals penetrate the suction strip areas during bonding.

  15. Turbine airfoil to shroud attachment method

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Christian X; Kulkarni, Anand A; James, Allister W; Wessell, Brian J; Gear, Paul J

    2014-12-23

    Bi-casting a platform (50) onto an end portion (42) of a turbine airfoil (31) after forming a coating of a fugitive material (56) on the end portion. After bi-casting the platform, the coating is dissolved and removed to relieve differential thermal shrinkage stress between the airfoil and platform. The thickness of the coating is varied around the end portion in proportion to varying amounts of local differential process shrinkage. The coating may be sprayed (76A, 76B) onto the end portion in opposite directions parallel to a chord line (41) of the airfoil or parallel to a mid-platform length (80) of the platform to form respective layers tapering in thickness from the leading (32) and trailing (34) edges along the suction side (36) of the airfoil.

  16. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil by Distributed Bleed Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2013-11-01

    The aerodynamic forces and moments on a dynamically pitching 2-D airfoil model are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using distributed active bleed. Bleed flow on the suction surface downstream of the leading edge is driven by pressure differences across the airfoil and is regulated by low-power louver actuators. The bleed interacts with cross flows to effect time-dependent variations of the vorticity flux and thereby alters the local flow attachment, resulting in significant changes in pre- and post-stall lift and pitching moment (over 50% increase in baseline post-stall lift). The flow field over the airfoil is measured using high-speed (2000 fps) PIV, resolving the dynamics and characteristic time-scales of production and advection of vorticity concentrations that are associated with transient variations in the aerodynamic forces and moments. In particular, it is shown that the actuation improves the lift hysteresis and pitch stability during the oscillatory pitching by altering the evolution of the dynamic stall vortex and the ensuing flow attachment during the downstroke. Supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  17. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  18. Turbine airfoil with controlled area cooling arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, George

    2010-04-27

    A gas turbine airfoil (10) includes a serpentine cooling path (32) with a plurality of channels (34,42,44) fluidly interconnected by a plurality of turns (38,40) for cooling the airfoil wall material. A splitter component (50) is positioned within at least one of the channels to bifurcate the channel into a pressure-side channel (46) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the pressure side (24) and a suction-side channel (48) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the suction side (26) longitudinally downstream of an intermediate height (52). The cross-sectional area of the pressure-side channel (46) and suction-side channel (48) are thereby controlled in spite of an increasing cross-sectional area of the airfoil along its longitudinal length, ensuring a sufficiently high mach number to provide a desired degree of cooling throughout the entire length of the airfoil.

  19. Analysis of the surface load and radiated sound of a vibrating airfoil with application to the experiment of Brooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    A method is developed for calculating the surface load and radiated sound from a vibrating surface in a compressible viscous fluid. The method is applied to a thin two-dimensional elliptic cross-section. For large values of the viscous diffusion parameter, the surface load tends to an elliptic distribution in agreement with the results of inviscid theory when edge pressure continuity is enforced. For thin surfaces, the surface load is insensitive to variations in the thickness ratio. A three-dimensional spectral technique is developed to calculate the inviscid surface load and radiated sound from a thin vibrating airfoil. The inviscid theory predicts the correct form of the far field sound pressure and its phase. The actual levels are somewhat sensitive to the choice of theoretical spanwise surface pressure mode but are in better agreement with the experiment than the surface pressure. The comparison of theoretical and experimental surface pressure indicates that the viscous theory, used to validate the inviscid theory, is either inadequate or there is a source of experimental error.

  20. A Quantitative Investigation of Surface Roughness Effects on Airfoil Boundary Layer Transition Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeby, Todd Daniel

    An investigation of the impact of subcritical leading edge distributed roughness elements on airfoil boundary layer transition location has been undertaken using infrared thermography. In particular, a quantitative approach to boundary layer transition location detection using a differential energy balance method was implemented using a heating pad to produce constant heat flux. This was performed on a S809 airfoil model at Re c = 0.75 and 1.0 x 106, using roughness elements of height k/c = 3.75, 4.25 and 5.00 x 10 --4, pattern densities of 2 to 10 %, and roughness locations of 1 to 6 % chord. Turbulator tape of height k/c = 6.67 x 10--4 was also examined. Results indicate significant impact on transition for all roughness cases, and a more pronounced influence of roughness density as compared to roughness element height. The phenomenon of early laminar bubble collapse was also found to occur for some roughness configurations. The quantitative method used was found to be an effective means for automated transition location determination.

  1. Design philosophy of long range LFC transports with advanced supercritical LFC airfoils. [laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, Werner; Vemuru, Chandra S.

    1988-01-01

    The achievement of 70 percent laminar flow using modest boundary layer suction on the wings, empennage, nacelles, and struts of long-range LFC transports, combined with larger wing spans and lower span loadings, could make possible an unrefuelled range halfway around the world up to near sonic cruise speeds with large payloads. It is shown that supercritical LFC airfoils with undercut front and rear lower surfaces, an upper surface static pressure coefficient distribution with an extensive low supersonic flat rooftop, a far upstream supersonic pressure minimum, and a steep subsonic rear pressure rise with suction or a slotted cruise flap could alleviate sweep-induced crossflow and attachment-line boundary-layer instability. Wing-mounted superfans can reduce fuel consumption and engine tone noise.

  2. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, J.E.; Norton, P.F.

    1997-06-03

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly are disclosed including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached. 5 figs.

  3. Airfoil nozzle and shroud assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1997-01-01

    An airfoil and nozzle assembly including an outer shroud having a plurality of vane members attached to an inner surface and having a cantilevered end. The assembly further includes a inner shroud being formed by a plurality of segments. Each of the segments having a first end and a second end and having a recess positioned in each of the ends. The cantilevered end of the vane member being positioned in the recess. The airfoil and nozzle assembly being made from a material having a lower rate of thermal expansion than that of the components to which the airfoil and nozzle assembly is attached.

  4. Leading edge embedded fan airfoil concept -- A new powered high lift technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Nhan Huu

    input. The CFD results show that airfoil circulation control is achieved by the varying the CFF intake flow rate and the momentum of the CFF exhaust jet (e.g. through airfoil AoA or fan rotational speed). The presence of the CFF has the effect of moving the stagnation point on the airfoil pressure surface from the CFF airfoil LE region near the CFF to as far back as the airfoil trailing edge. At high AoA operation, LE flow separation on the airfoil suction surface is delayed by flow entrainment of the high-energy jet leaving the CFF. Detailed analysis of the flow field through the crossflow fan and its housing were carried out to understand its fluid-dynamics behavior, and it is found that the airfoil geometry acts as inlet guide vanes to the crossflow fan as the angle-of-attack is varied, thus introducing pre-swirl or co-swirl into the first stage of the crossflow fan. An experimental study of the LEEF concept confirmed that the concept works and it is robust. Finally, as application examples, the LEEF technology is applied to a Remote Control model and to a generic tiltrotor aircraft similar in characteristics to DARPA's Aerial Reconfigurable Embedded System. These aircraft configurations were analyzed using 2D and 3D CFD.

  5. Passive Boundary Layer Separation Control on a NACA2415 Airfoil at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Agastya; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    The design and analysis of a passive flow control system for a NACA2415 airfoil is undertaken. There exists a vast body of knowledge on airfoil boundary layer control with the use of controlled mass flux, but there is little work investigating passive mass flux-based methods. A simple duct system that uses the upper surface pressure gradient to force blowing near the leading edge and suction near the trailing edge is proposed and evaluated. 2D RANS analyses at Rec 1 . 27 ×106 were used to generate potential configurations for experimental tests. Initial computational results suggest drag reductions of approximately 2 - 7 % as well as lift increases of 4 - 5 % at α = 10 .0° and α = 12 .5° . A carbon composite-aluminum structure model that implements the most effective configurations, according to the CFD predictions, has been designed and fabricated. Experiments are being performed to evaluate the CFD results and the feasibility the duct system.

  6. An experimental study of airfoil instability tonal noise with trailing edge serrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Tze Pei; Joseph, Phillip F.

    2013-11-01

    sequentially, which is the condition for a ladder jump to occur. Lower amplification factor A for the T-S waves, which can result in a radiation of lower noise levels for the broadband hump peak at fs. This phenomenon will proportionally reduce the noise level difference for fn and fn+1, thus making an identification of a ladder jump event more difficult. Finally, we believe that the tone noise generated in this experimental study is of genuine tones of an isolated airfoil. This can be supported by the fact that, when considering either a straight trailing edge or a serrated trailing edge, the overall airfoil geometry at the same angle of attack is still retained and the wind tunnel setup and locations of the laboratory equipment, which could potentially become an anchor point for the acoustic feedback loop, are exactly the same. However, the straight S0 and serrated S2" trailing edges have been shown to produce systematically different spectral characteristics, especially in the forms of tonal rungs, which can be predicted accurately by the original and slightly modified acoustic feedback Model A respectively. In summary, the trailing edge serration is a useful device for the suppression of airfoil instability self-noise. For greater control effectiveness, however, the laminar separation bubble must be situated within the serration region of the trailing edge. This connection imposes restrictions on the angle of attack and velocity over which trailing edge serrations are effective. The feedback loop structure about the wake noise source and the suction surface of the airfoil in Model B is ignored in the present case. This assumption should be reasonably valid given that, in our previous study [3], we cannot identify any significant role of the boundary layer flow at the suction surface in contributing the instability tonal noise radiation across a wide range of Reynolds numbers.

  7. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1996-01-01

    Airfoils for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length.

  8. Airfoils for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1996-10-08

    Airfoils are disclosed for the blade of a wind turbine wherein each airfoil is characterized by a thickness in a range from 16%-24% and a maximum lift coefficient designed to be largely insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoils include a family of airfoils for a blade 15 to 25 meters in length, a family of airfoils for a blade 1 to 5 meters in length, and a family of airfoils for a blade 5 to 10 meters in length. 10 figs.

  9. Composite airfoil assembly

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-03-03

    A composite blade assembly for mounting on a turbine wheel includes a ceramic airfoil and an airfoil platform. The ceramic airfoil is formed with an airfoil portion, a blade shank portion and a blade dovetail tang. The metal platform includes a platform shank and a radially inner platform dovetail. The ceramic airfoil is captured within the metal platform, such that in use, the ceramic airfoil is held within the turbine wheel independent of the metal platform.

  10. Effect of Reynolds Number and Periodic Unsteady Wake Flow Condition on Boundary Layer Development, Separation, and Intermittency Behavior Along the Suction Surface of a Low Pressure Turbine Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, M. T.; Ozturk, B.; Ashpis, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The paper experimentally studies the effects of periodic unsteady wake flow and different Reynolds numbers on boundary layer development, separation and re-attachment along the suction surface of a low pressure turbine blade. The experimental investigations were performed on a large scale, subsonic unsteady turbine cascade research facility at Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL) of Texas A&M University. The experiments were carried out at Reynolds numbers of 110,000 and 150,000 (based on suction surface length and exit velocity). One steady and two different unsteady inlet flow conditions with the corresponding passing frequencies, wake velocities, and turbulence intensities were investigated. The reduced frequencies chosen cover the operating range of LP turbines. In addition to the unsteady boundary layer measurements, surface pressure measurements were performed. The inception, onset, and the extent of the separation bubble information collected from the pressure measurements were compared with the hot wire measurements. The results presented in ensemble-averaged, and the contour plot forms help to understand the physics of the separation phenomenon under periodic unsteady wake flow and different Reynolds number. It was found that the suction surface displayed a strong separation bubble for these three different reduced frequencies. For each condition, the locations defining the separation bubble were determined carefully analyzing and examining the pressure and mean velocity profile data. The location of the boundary layer separation was dependent of the Reynolds number. It is observed that starting point of the separation bubble and the re-attachment point move further downstream by increasing Reynolds number from 110,000 to 150,000. Also, the size of the separation bubble is smaller when compared to that for Re=110,000.

  11. Wind tunnel testing of low-drag airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. Donald; Mcghee, R. J.; Harris, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented for the measured performance recently obtained on several airfoil concepts designed to achieve low drag by maintaining extensive regions of laminar flow without compromising high-lift performance. The wind tunnel results extend from subsonic to transonic speeds and include boundary-layer control through shaping and suction. The research was conducted in the NASA Langley 8-Ft Transonic Pressure Tunnel (TPT) and Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) which have been developed for testing such low-drag airfoils. Emphasis is placed on identifying some of the major factors influencing the anticipated performance of low-drag airfoils.

  12. Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-04-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  13. Airfoil shape for flight at subsonic speeds

    DOEpatents

    Whitcomb, Richard T.

    1976-01-01

    An airfoil having an upper surface shaped to control flow accelerations and pressure distribution over the upper surface and to prevent separation of the boundary layer due to shock wave formulation at high subsonic speeds well above the critical Mach number. A highly cambered trailing edge section improves overall airfoil lifting efficiency.

  14. Cold-air aerodynamic study in a two-dimensional cascade of a turbine stator blade with suction-surface film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. B.; Helon, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    The effect on aerodynamic performance of a single row of spanwise-spaced coolant holes located at four positions chordwise along the suction surface was investigated. In addition, multiple-row data were obtained. The data are presented in terms of primary efficiency, coolant-to-primary-flow percentage, and coolant pressure ratio. Primary efficiencies of multirow blade configurations compare satisfactorily with that calculated from the single-row efficiency increments. At any given coolant flow percentage, the efficiency was about the same for all row locations. For a given coolant pressure, the efficiency varied by as much as 1 percent, depending on the row location.

  15. Transonic airfoil flowfield analysis using Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    A numerical technique for analyzing transonic airfoils is presented. The method employs the basic features of Jameson's iterative solution for the full potential equation, except that Cartesian coordinates are used rather than a grid which fits the airfoil, such as the conformal circle-plane or 'sheared parabolic' coordinates which were used previously. Comparison with previous results shows that it is not necessary to match the computational grid to the airfoil surface, and that accurate results can be obtained with a Cartesian grid for lifting supercritical airfoils.

  16. Airfoil for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2011-05-24

    An airfoil is provided for a turbine of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil comprises: an outer structure comprising a first wall including a leading edge, a trailing edge, a pressure side, and a suction side; an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced from the first wall and at least one intermediate wall; and structure extending between the first and second walls so as to define first and second gaps between the first and second walls. The second wall and the at least one intermediate wall define at least one pressure side supply cavity and at least one suction side supply cavity. The second wall may include at least one first opening near the leading edge of the first wall. The first opening may extend from the at least one pressure side supply cavity to the first gap. The second wall may further comprise at least one second opening near the trailing edge of the outer structure. The second opening may extend from the at least one suction side supply cavity to the second gap. The first wall may comprise at least one first exit opening extending from the first gap through the pressure side of the first wall and at least one second exit opening extending from the second gap through the suction side of the second wall.

  17. Cooled airfoil in a turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Vitt, Paul H; Kemp, David A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2015-04-21

    An airfoil in a gas turbine engine includes an outer wall and an inner wall. The outer wall includes a leading edge, a trailing edge opposed from the leading edge in a chordal direction, a pressure side, and a suction side. The inner wall is coupled to the outer wall at a single chordal location and includes portions spaced from the pressure and suction sides of the outer wall so as to form first and second gaps between the inner wall and the respective pressure and suction sides. The inner wall defines a chamber therein and includes openings that provide fluid communication between the respective gaps and the chamber. The gaps receive cooling fluid that provides cooling to the outer wall as it flows through the gaps. The cooling fluid, after traversing at least substantial portions of the gaps, passes into the chamber through the openings in the inner wall.

  18. Simulated-airline-service flight tests of laminar-flow control with perforated-surface suction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.; Braslow, Albert L.

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness and practicality of candidate leading edge systems for suction laminar flow control transport airplanes were investigated in a flight test program utilizing a modified JetStar airplane. The leading edge region imposes the most severe conditions on systems required for any type of laminar flow control. Tests of the leading edge systems, therefore, provided definitive results as to the feasibility of active laminar flow control on airplanes. The test airplane was operated under commercial transport operating procedures from various commercial airports and at various seasons of the year.

  19. Assessment of dual-point drag reduction for an executive-jet modified airfoil section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Dennis O.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents aerodynamic characteristics and pressure distributions for an executive-jet modified airfoil and discusses drag reduction relative to a baseline airfoil for two cruise design points. A modified airfoil was tested in the adaptive-wall test section of the NASA Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT) for Mach numbers ranging from 0.250 to 0.780 and chord Reynolds numbers ranging from 3.0 x 10(exp 6) to 18.0 x 10(exp 6). The angle of attack was varied from minus 2 degrees to almost 10 degrees. Boundary-layer transition was fixed at 5 percent of chord on both the upper and lower surfaces of the model for most of the test. The two design Mach numbers were 0.654 and 0.735, chord Reynolds numbers were 4.5 x 10(exp 6) and 8.9 x 10(exp 6), and normal-force coefficients were 0.98 and 0.51. Test data are presented graphically as integrated force and moment coefficients and chordwise pressure distributions. The maximum normal-force coefficient decreases with increasing Mach number. At a constant normal-force coefficient in the linear region, as Mach number increases an increase occurs in the slope of normal-force coefficient versus angle of attack, negative pitching-moment coefficient, and drag coefficient. With increasing Reynolds number at a constant normal-force coefficient, the pitching-moment coefficient becomes more negative and the drag coefficient decreases. The pressure distributions reveal that when present, separation begins at the trailing edge as angle of attack is increased. The modified airfoil, which is designed with pitching moment and geometric constraints relative to the baseline airfoil, achieved drag reductions for both design points (12 and 22 counts). The drag reductions are associated with stronger suction pressures in the first 10 percent of the upper surface and weakened shock waves.

  20. Combined effects of suction/injection and wall surface curvature on natural convection flow in a vertical micro-porous annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, B. K.; Aina, B.; Muhammad, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates analytically the hydrodynamic and thermal behaviour of a fully developed natural convection flow in a vertical micro-porous-annulus (MPA) taking into account the velocity slip and temperature jump at the outer surface of inner porous cylinder and inner surface of outer porous cylinder. A closed — form solution is presented for velocity, temperature, volume flow rate, skin friction and rate of heat transfer expressed as a Nusselt number. The influence of each governing parameter on hydrodynamic and thermal behaviour is discussed with the aid of graphs. During the course of investigation, it is found that as suction/injection on the cylinder walls increases, the fluid velocity and temperature is enhanced. In addition, it is observed that wall surface curvature has a significant effect on flow and thermal characteristics.

  1. Use of a liquid-crystal, heater-element composite for quantitative, high-resolution heat transfer coefficients on a turbine airfoil, including turbulence and surface roughness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, Steven A.; Russell, Louis M.; Torres, Felix J.

    1987-01-01

    Local heat transfer coefficients were measured along the midchord of a three-times-size turbine vane airfoil in a static cascade operated at roon temperature over a range of Reynolds numbers. The test surface consisted of a composite of commercially available materials: a Mylar sheet with a layer of cholestric liquid crystals, which change color with temperature, and a heater made of a polyester sheet coated with vapor-deposited gold, which produces uniform heat flux. After the initial selection and calibration of the composite sheet, accurate, quantitative, and continuous heat transfer coefficients were mapped over the airfoil surface. Tests were conducted at two free-stream turbulence intensities: 0.6 percent, which is typical of wind tunnels; and 10 percent, which is typical of real engine conditions. In addition to a smooth airfoil, the effects of local leading-edge sand roughness were also examined for a value greater than the critical roughness. The local heat transfer coefficients are presented for both free-stream turbulence intensities for inlet Reynolds numbers from 1.20 to 5.55 x 10 to the 5th power. Comparisons are also made with analytical values of heat transfer coefficients obtained from the STAN5 boundary layer code.

  2. Use of a liquid-crystal, heater-element composite for quantitative, high-resolution heat transfer coefficients on a turbine airfoil, including turbulence and surface roughness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippensteele, Steven A.; Russell, Louis M.; Torres, Felix J.

    1987-05-01

    Local heat transfer coefficients were measured along the midchord of a three-times-size turbine vane airfoil in a static cascade operated at roon temperature over a range of Reynolds numbers. The test surface consisted of a composite of commercially available materials: a Mylar sheet with a layer of cholestric liquid crystals, which change color with temperature, and a heater made of a polyester sheet coated with vapor-deposited gold, which produces uniform heat flux. After the initial selection and calibration of the composite sheet, accurate, quantitative, and continuous heat transfer coefficients were mapped over the airfoil surface. Tests were conducted at two free-stream turbulence intensities: 0.6 percent, which is typical of wind tunnels; and 10 percent, which is typical of real engine conditions. In addition to a smooth airfoil, the effects of local leading-edge sand roughness were also examined for a value greater than the critical roughness. The local heat transfer coefficients are presented for both free-stream turbulence intensities for inlet Reynolds numbers from 1.20 to 5.55 x 10 to the 5th power. Comparisons are also made with analytical values of heat transfer coefficients obtained from the STAN5 boundary layer code.

  3. Hydroponic Feed With Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, William M.; Brown, Christopher S.; Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    Placing nutrient solution under suction increases growth. Foam plug seals growing stem of plant, making it possible to maintain suction in nutrient liquid around roots. Jar wrapped in black tape to keep out light. Potential use in terrestrial applications in arid climates or in labor-intensive agricultural situations.

  4. Flow Control on Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoils Using Vortex Generator Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.; Kartuzova, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Motivation - Higher loading on Low-Pressure Turbine (LPT) airfoils: Reduce airfoil count, weight, cost. Increase efficiency, and Limited by suction side separation. Growing understanding of transition, separation, wake effects: Improved models. Take advantage of wakes. Higher lift airfoils in use. Further loading increases may require flow control: Passive: trips, dimples, etc. Active: plasma actuators, vortex generator jets (VGJs). Can increased loading offset higher losses on high lift airfoils. Objectives: Advance knowledge of boundary layer separation and transition under LPT conditions. Demonstrate, improve understanding of separation control with pulsed VGJs. Produce detailed experimental data base. Test and develop computational models.

  5. Spline-Based Smoothing of Airfoil Curvatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Krist, S.

    2008-01-01

    Constrained fitting for airfoil curvature smoothing (CFACS) is a splinebased method of interpolating airfoil surface coordinates (and, concomitantly, airfoil thicknesses) between specified discrete design points so as to obtain smoothing of surface-curvature profiles in addition to basic smoothing of surfaces. CFACS was developed in recognition of the fact that the performance of a transonic airfoil is directly related to both the curvature profile and the smoothness of the airfoil surface. Older methods of interpolation of airfoil surfaces involve various compromises between smoothing of surfaces and exact fitting of surfaces to specified discrete design points. While some of the older methods take curvature profiles into account, they nevertheless sometimes yield unfavorable results, including curvature oscillations near end points and substantial deviations from desired leading-edge shapes. In CFACS as in most of the older methods, one seeks a compromise between smoothing and exact fitting. Unlike in the older methods, the airfoil surface is modified as little as possible from its original specified form and, instead, is smoothed in such a way that the curvature profile becomes a smooth fit of the curvature profile of the original airfoil specification. CFACS involves a combination of rigorous mathematical modeling and knowledge-based heuristics. Rigorous mathematical formulation provides assurance of removal of undesirable curvature oscillations with minimum modification of the airfoil geometry. Knowledge-based heuristics bridge the gap between theory and designers best practices. In CFACS, one of the measures of the deviation of an airfoil surface from smoothness is the sum of squares of the jumps in the third derivatives of a cubicspline interpolation of the airfoil data. This measure is incorporated into a formulation for minimizing an overall deviation- from-smoothness measure of the airfoil data within a specified fitting error tolerance. CFACS has been

  6. Robust, optimal subsonic airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Method system, and product from application of the method, for design of a subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape and incorporating one or more constraints on the airfoil geometric parameters and flow characteristics. The resulting design is robust against variations in airfoil dimensions and local airfoil shape introduced in the airfoil manufacturing process. A perturbation procedure provides a class of airfoil shapes, beginning with an initial airfoil shape.

  7. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  8. Unsteady three-dimensional marginal separation caused by surface-mounted obstacles and/or local suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Stefan; Kluwick, Alfred

    2004-09-01

    Earlier investigations of steady two-dimensional marginally separated laminar boundary layers have shown that the non-dimensional wall shear (or equivalently the negative non-dimensional perturbation displacement thickness) is governed by a nonlinear integro-differential equation. This equation contains a single controlling parameter Gamma characterizing, for example, the angle of attack of a slender airfoil and has the important property that (real) solutions exist up to a critical value Gamma_c of Gamma only. Here we investigate three-dimensional unsteady perturbations of an incompressible steady two-dimensional marginally separated laminar boundary layer with special emphasis on the flow behaviour near Gamma_c. Specifically, it is shown that the integro differential equation which governs these disturbances if Gamma_c {-} Gamma {=} O(1) reduces to a nonlinear partial differential equation known as the Fisher equation as Gamma approaches the critical value Gamma_c. This in turn leads to a significant simplification of the problem allowing, among other things, a systematic study of devices used in boundary-layer control and an analytical investigation of the conditions leading to the formation of finite-time singularities which have been observed in earlier numerical studies of unsteady two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in the vicinity of a line of symmetry. Also, it is found that it is possible to construct exact solutions which describe waves of constant form travelling in the spanwise direction. These waves may contain singularities which can be interpreted as vortex sheets. The existence of these solutions strongly suggests that solutions of the Fisher equation which lead to finite-time blow-up may be extended beyond the blow-up time, thereby generating moving singularities which can be interpreted as vortical structures qualitatively similar to those emerging in direct numerical simulations of near critical (i.e. transitional) laminar separation

  9. Effects of Leading Edge Defect on the Aerodynamic and Flow Characteristics of an S809 Airfoil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiaojing; Hu, Ruifeng; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    nearly remain unchanged. In dynamic stall, leading edge defect imposes a greater influence on the aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil than steady conditions. By increasing in defect length, it is found that the separated area becomes more intense and moves forward along the suction surface. Conclusions Leading edge defect has significant influence on the aerodynamic and flow characteristics of the airfoil, which will reach a stable status with enough large defect size. The leading edge separation bubble, circulation in the defect cavity and intense tailing edge vortex are the main features of flow around defective airfoils. PMID:27658310

  10. Viscous Thin Airfoil Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    the elliptic cross section is considered to be more representative of the NACA 64A010 airfoil with boundary layer displacement thickness added on than...section and the flat plate airfoil with Kutta condition. The experimental results are for the NACA 64A010 airfoil at M = 0.5 and Reynolds number between...practice for actual airfoils. The experimental data shown in Fig. 3.5 are for the NACA 4 and 5 digit series airfoils (Ref. 17). The lift curve slope is

  11. Unsteady Airloads on Airfoils in Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2014-11-01

    This work gives insight into the influence of airfoil characteristics on unsteady airloads for rotor applications where local airfoil sections may operate at high and/or reverse flow angles of attack. Two-dimensional wind tunnel experiments have been performed on four airfoil sections to investigate the effects of thickness, camber, and trailing edge shape on unsteady airloads (lift, pressure drag, and pitching moment). These model rotor blades were tested through 360 deg of incidence for 104 <=Re <=106 . Unsteady pressure transducers were mounted on the airfoil surface to measure the high frequency, dynamic pressure variations. The temporal evolution of chordwise pressure distributions and resulting airloads is quantified for each airfoil in each of the three unsteady wake regimes present in reverse flow. Specifically, the influence of the formation, growth, and shedding of vortices on the surface pressure distribution is quantified and compared between airfoils with a sharp geometric trailing edge and those with a blunt geometric trailing edge. These findings are integral to mitigation of rotor blade vibrations for applications where airfoil sections are subjected to reverse flow, such as high-speed helicopters and tidal turbines.

  12. Linearized propulsion theory of flapping airfoils revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Feria, R.

    2016-12-01

    A vortical impulse theory is used to compute the thrust force of a plunging and pitching airfoil in forward flight at high Reynolds numbers within the framework of linear potential flow theory. The result is significantly different from the classical one of Garrick, which considered only two effects, the leading-edge suction and the projection in the flight direction of the pressure force on the airfoil. By taking into account the complete vorticity distribution on the airfoil and the wake the mean thrust coefficient contains, in addition to the pressure force projection term, a new term that generalizes the leading-edge suction term in Garrick's theory. This term depends on Theodorsen function C (k ) and on a new complex function C1(k ) of the reduced frequency k . The main qualitative difference with Garrick's theory is that the propulsive efficiency, or ratio of the mean thrust power and the mean input power required to drive the airfoil, tends to zero as the reduced frequency increases to infinity (as k-1), in contrast to Garrick's propulsive efficiency that tends to a constant (1 /2 ). Consequently, for pure pitching and combined pitching and plunging motions, the maximum of the propulsive efficiency is not reached as k →∞ like in Garrick's theory, but at a finite value of the reduced frequency that depends on the remaining nondimensional parameters. The present analytical results are in good agreement, for small amplitude oscillations, with numerical results from unsteady panel methods, and with experimental data and numerical results from the Navier-Stokes equations, except for small reduced frequencies where viscous effects are obviously important.

  13. Method of producing suction manifolds for automobile engines

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, M.; Shimizu, Y.

    1984-05-29

    A method of producing suction manifolds for automobile engines is disclosed. In forming an exhaust gas re-circulating pipe passage integrally with a suction manifold for re-circulating exhaust gases from the engine to the suction manifold, a curved pipe of aluminum having a high-temperature resistant film formed on its surface is molded into a manifold of aluminum alloy at a suitable place on the latter.

  14. Four-wall turbine airfoil with thermal strain control for reduced cycle fatigue

    DOEpatents

    Cambell, Christian X

    2013-09-17

    A turbine airfoil (20B) with a thermal expansion control mechanism that increases the airfoil camber (60, 61) under operational heating. The airfoil has four-wall geometry, including pressure side outer and inner walls (26, 28B), and suction side outer and inner walls (32, 34B). It has near-wall cooling channels (31F, 31A, 33F, 33A) between the outer and inner walls. A cooling fluid flow pattern (50C, 50W, 50H) in the airfoil causes the pressure side inner wall (28B) to increase in curvature under operational heating. The pressure side inner wall (28B) is thicker than walls (26, 34B) that oppose it in camber deformation, so it dominates them in collaboration with the suction side outer wall (32), and the airfoil camber increases. This reduces and relocates a maximum stress area (47) from the suction side outer wall (32) to the suction side inner wall (34B, 72) and the pressure side outer wall (26).

  15. Airfoil shape for a turbine bucket

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Susan Marie; By, Robert Romany; Tressler, Judd Dodge; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Sims, Calvin Levy

    2005-06-28

    Third stage turbine buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth Table I wherein X and Y values are in inches and the Z values are non-dimensional values from 0 to 0.938 convertible to Z distances in inches by multiplying the Z values by the height of the airfoil in inches. The X and Y values are distances which, when connected by smooth continuing arcs, define airfoil profile sections at each distance Z. The profile sections at each distance Z are joined smoothly to one another to form a complete airfoil shape. The X and Y distances may be scalable as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled up or scaled down airfoil section for the bucket. The nominal airfoil given by the X, Y and Z distances lies within an envelop of .+-.0.150 inches in directions normal to the surface of the airfoil.

  16. An investigation on the effect of second-order additional thickness distributions to the upper surface of an NACA 64 sub 1-212 airfoil. [using flow equations and a CDC 7600 digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hague, D. S.; Merz, A. W.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a CDC 7600 digital computer to determine the effects of additional thickness distributions to the upper surface of an NACA 64 sub 1 - 212 airfoil. Additional thickness distributions employed were in the form of two second-order polynomial arcs which have a specified thickness at a given chordwise location. The forward arc disappears at the airfoil leading edge, the aft arc disappears at the airfoil trailing edge. At the juncture of the two arcs, x = x, continuity of slope is maintained. The effect of varying the maximum additional thickness and its chordwise location on airfoil lift coefficient, pitching moment, and pressure distribution was investigated. Results were obtained at a Mach number of 0.2 with an angle-of-attack of 6 degrees on the basic NACA 64 sub 1 - 212 airfoil, and all calculations employ the full potential flow equations for two dimensional flow. The relaxation method of Jameson was employed for solution of the potential flow equations.

  17. An investigation on the effect of second-order additional thickness distributions to the upper surface of an NACA 64-206 airfoil. [using flow equations and a CDC 7600 digital computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merz, A. W.; Hague, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a CDC 7600 digital computer to determine the effects of additional thickness distributions to the upper surface of an NACA 64-206 airfoil. Additional thickness distributions employed were in the form of two second-order polynomial arcs which have a specified thickness at a given chordwise location. The forward arc disappears at the airfoil leading edge, the aft arc disappears at the airfoil trailing edge. At the juncture of the two arcs, x = x, continuity of slope is maintained. The effect of varying the maximum additional thickness and its chordwise location on airfoil lift coefficient, pitching moment, and pressure distribution was investigated. Results were obtained at a Mach number of 0.2 with an angle-of-attack of 6 degrees on the basic NACA 64-206 airfoil, and all calculations employ the full potential flow equations for two dimensional flow. The relaxation method of Jameson was employed for solution of the potential flow equations.

  18. Compressibility effects on dynamic stall of airfoils undergoing rapid transient pitching motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Platzer, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    The research was carried out in the Compressible Dynamic Stall Facility, CDSF, at the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory (FML) of NASA Ames Research Center. The facility can produce realistic nondimensional pitch rates experienced by fighter aircraft, which on model scale could be as high as 3600/sec. Nonintrusive optical techniques were used for the measurements. The highlight of the effort was the development of a new real time interferometry method known as Point Diffraction Interferometry - PDI, for use in unsteady separated flows. This can yield instantaneous flow density information (and hence pressure distributions in isentropic flows) over the airfoil. A key finding is that the dynamic stall vortex forms just as the airfoil leading edge separation bubble opens-up. A major result is the observation and quantification of multiple shocks over the airfoil near the leading edge. A quantitative analysis of the PDI images shows that pitching airfoils produce larger suction peaks than steady airfoils at the same Mach number prior to stall. The peak suction level reached just before stall develops is the same at all unsteady rates and decreases with increase in Mach number. The suction is lost once the dynamic stall vortex or vortical structure begins to convect. Based on the knowledge gained from this preliminary analysis of the data, efforts to control dynamic stall were initiated. The focus of this work was to arrive at a dynamically changing leading edge shape that produces only 'acceptable' airfoil pressure distributions over a large angle of attack range.

  19. Combined Influence of Hall Current and Soret Effect on Chemically Reacting Magnetomicropolar Fluid Flow from Radiative Rotating Vertical Surface with Variable Suction in Slip-Flow Regime.

    PubMed

    Jain, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    An analysis study is presented to study the effects of Hall current and Soret effect on unsteady hydromagnetic natural convection of a micropolar fluid in a rotating frame of reference with slip-flow regime. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to the porous surface which absorbs the micropolar fluid with variable suction velocity. The effects of heat absorption, chemical reaction, and thermal radiation are discussed and for this Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in energy equation. The entire system rotates with uniform angular velocity Ω about an axis normal to the plate. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equations are solved by perturbation techniques. In order to get physical insight, the numerical results of translational velocity, microrotation, fluid temperature, and species concentration for different physical parameters entering into the analysis are discussed and explained graphically. Also, the results of the skin-friction coefficient, the couple stress coefficient, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number are discussed with the help of figures for various values of flow pertinent flow parameters.

  20. Combined Influence of Hall Current and Soret Effect on Chemically Reacting Magnetomicropolar Fluid Flow from Radiative Rotating Vertical Surface with Variable Suction in Slip-Flow Regime

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    An analysis study is presented to study the effects of Hall current and Soret effect on unsteady hydromagnetic natural convection of a micropolar fluid in a rotating frame of reference with slip-flow regime. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to the porous surface which absorbs the micropolar fluid with variable suction velocity. The effects of heat absorption, chemical reaction, and thermal radiation are discussed and for this Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in energy equation. The entire system rotates with uniform angular velocity Ω about an axis normal to the plate. The nonlinear coupled partial differential equations are solved by perturbation techniques. In order to get physical insight, the numerical results of translational velocity, microrotation, fluid temperature, and species concentration for different physical parameters entering into the analysis are discussed and explained graphically. Also, the results of the skin-friction coefficient, the couple stress coefficient, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number are discussed with the help of figures for various values of flow pertinent flow parameters. PMID:27350957

  1. Investigation of low-speed turbulent separated flow around airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadcock, Alan J.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a low-speed wind tunnel experiment to measure the flowfield around a two-dimensional airfoil operating close to maximum lift. Boundary layer separation occurs on the upper surface at x/c=0.85. A three-component laser velocimeter, coupled with a computer-controlled data acquisition system, was used to obtain three orthogonal mean velocity components and three components of the Reynolds stress tensor in both the boundary layer and wake of the airfoil. Pressure distributions on the airfoil, skin friction distribution on the upper surface of the airfoil, and integral properties of the airfoil boudary layer are also documented. In addition to these near-field flow properties, static pressure distributions, both upstream and downstream from the airfoil and on the walls of the wind tunnel, are also presented.

  2. Low speed airfoil study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    Airfoil geometries were developed for low speed high lift applications, such as general aviation aircraft, propellers and helicopter rotors. The primary effort was to determine the extent to which the application of turbulent boundary layer separation criteria, plus manipulation of other input parameters, specifically trailing edging velocity ratio, could be utilized to achieve high C sub Lmax airfoils with relatively low drag at C sub Lmax. Both single-element and double-element airfoils were considered. Wind tunnel testing of some airfoils was included.

  3. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils with Fowler Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Anderson, Walter B

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests made of a Clark y airfoil with a Clark y Fowler flap and of an NACA 23012 airfoil with NACA Fowler flaps. Some of the tests were made in the 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel and others in the 5-foot vertical wind tunnel. The pressures were measured on the upper and lower surfaces at one chord section both on the main airfoils and on the flaps for several angles of attack with the flaps located at the maximum-lift settings. A test installation was used in which the model was mounted in the wind tunnel between large end planes so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. The data are given in the form of pressure-distribution diagrams and as plots of calculated coefficients for the airfoil-and-flap combinations and for the flaps alone.

  4. Linearized propulsion theory of flapping airfoils revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2016-11-01

    A vortical impulse theory is used to compute the thrust of a plunging and pitching airfoil in forward flight within the framework of linear potential flow theory. The result is significantly different from the classical one of Garrick that considered the leading-edge suction and the projection in the flight direction of the pressure force. By taking into account the complete vorticity distribution on the airfoil and the wake the mean thrust coefficient contains a new term that generalizes the leading-edge suction term and depends on Theodorsen function C (k) and on a new complex function C1 (k) of the reduced frequency k. The main qualitative difference with Garrick's theory is that the propulsive efficiency tends to zero as the reduced frequency increases to infinity (as 1 / k), in contrast to Garrick's efficiency that tends to a constant (1 / 2). Consequently, for pure pitching and combined pitching and plunging motions, the maximum of the propulsive efficiency is not reached as k -> ∞ like in Garrick's theory, but at a finite value of the reduced frequency that depends on the remaining non-dimensional parameters. The present analytical results are in good agreement with experimental data and numerical results for small amplitude oscillations. Supported by the Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad of Spain Grant No. DPI2013-40479-P.

  5. Airfoil, platform, and cooling passage measurements on a rotating transonic high-pressure turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickol, Jeremy B.

    An experiment was performed at The Ohio State University Gas Turbine Laboratory for a film-cooled high-pressure turbine stage operating at design-corrected conditions, with variable rotor and aft purge cooling flow rates. Several distinct experimental programs are combined into one experiment and their results are presented. Pressure and temperature measurements in the internal cooling passages that feed the airfoil film cooling are used as boundary conditions in a model that calculates cooling flow rates and blowing ratio out of each individual film cooling hole. The cooling holes on the suction side choke at even the lowest levels of film cooling, ejecting more than twice the coolant as the holes on the pressure side. However, the blowing ratios are very close due to the freestream massflux on the suction side also being almost twice as great. The highest local blowing ratios actually occur close to the airfoil stagnation point as a result of the low freestream massflux conditions. The choking of suction side cooling holes also results in the majority of any additional coolant added to the blade flowing out through the leading edge and pressure side rows. A second focus of this dissertation is the heat transfer on the rotor airfoil, which features uncooled blades and blades with three different shapes of film cooling hole: cylindrical, diffusing fan shape, and a new advanced shape. Shaped cooling holes have previously shown immense promise on simpler geometries, but experimental results for a rotating turbine have not previously been published in the open literature. Significant improvement from the uncooled case is observed for all shapes of cooling holes, but the improvement from the round to more advanced shapes is seen to be relatively minor. The reduction in relative effectiveness is likely due to the engine-representative secondary flow field interfering with the cooling flow mechanics in the freestream, and may also be caused by shocks and other

  6. Propagations of fluctuations and flow separation on an unsteadily loaded airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenney, Andrew; Lewalle, Jacques

    2014-11-01

    We analyze pressure data from 18 taps located along the surface of a DU-96-W180 airfoil in bothand steady flow conditions. The conditions were set to mimic the flow conditions experienced by a wind turbine blade under unsteady loading to test and to quantify the effects of several flow control schemes. Here we are interested in the propagation of fluctuations along the pressure and suction sides, particularly in relation to the fluctuating separation point. An unsteady phase of the incoming fluctuations is defined using Morlet wavelets, and phase-conditioned cross-correlations are calculated. Using wavelet-based pattern recognition, individual events in the pressure data are identified with several different algorithms utilizing both the original time series pressure signals and their corresponding scalograms. The data analyzed in this study was collected by G. Wang in the Skytop anechoic chamber at Syracuse University in the spring of 2013; the work of Zhe Bai on this data is also acknowledged.

  7. Development and testing of airfoils for high-altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drela, Mark (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Specific tasks included airfoil design; study of airfoil constraints on pullout maneuver; selection of tail airfoils; examination of wing twist; test section instrumentation and layout; and integrated airfoil/heat-exchanger tests. In the course of designing the airfoil, specifically for the APEX test vehicle, extensive studies were made over the Mach and Reynolds number ranges of interest. It is intended to be representative of airfoils required for lightweight aircraft operating at extreme altitudes, which is the primary research objective of the APEX program. Also considered were thickness, pitching moment, and off-design behavior. The maximum ceiling parameter M(exp 2)C(sub L) value achievable by the Apex-16 airfoil was found to be a strong constraint on the pullout maneuver. The NACA 1410 and 2410 airfoils (inverted) were identified as good candidates for the tail, with predictable behavior at low Reynolds numbers and good tolerance to flap deflections. With regards to wing twist, it was decided that a simple flat wing was a reasonable compromise. The test section instrumentation consisted of surface pressure taps, wake rakes, surface-mounted microphones, and skin-friction gauges. Also, a modest wind tunnel test was performed for an integrated airfoil/heat-exchanger configuration, which is currently on Aurora's 'Theseus' aircraft. Although not directly related to the APEX tests, the aerodynamics or heat exchangers has been identified as a crucial aspect of designing high-altitude aircraft and hence is relevant to the ERAST program.

  8. Modern Airfoil Ice Accretions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Sheldon, David W.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents results from the first icing tests performed in the Modem Airfoils program. Two airfoils have been subjected to icing tests in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Both airfoils were two dimensional airfoils; one was representative of a commercial transport airfoil while the other was representative of a business jet airfoil. The icing test conditions were selected from the FAR Appendix C envelopes. Effects on aerodynamic performance are presented including the effects of varying amounts of glaze ice as well as the effects of approximately the same amounts of glaze, mixed, and rime ice. Actual ice shapes obtained in these tests are also presented for these cases. In addition, comparisons are shown between ice shapes from the tests and ice shapes predicted by the computer code, LEWICE for similar conditions. Significant results from the tests are that relatively small amounts of ice can have nearly as much effect on airfoil lift coefficient as much greater amounts of ice and that glaze ice usually has a more detrimental effect than either rime or mixed ice. LEWICE predictions of ice shapes, in general, compared reasonably well with ice shapes obtained in the IRT, although differences in details of the ice shapes were observed.

  9. Sealing apparatus for airfoils of gas turbine engines

    DOEpatents

    Jones, R.B.

    1998-05-19

    An improved airfoil tip sealing apparatus is disclosed wherein brush seals are attached to airfoil tips with the distal ends of the brush seal fibers sealingly contacting opposing wall surfaces. Embodiments for variable vanes, stators and both cooled and uncooled turbine blade applications are disclosed. 17 figs.

  10. Sealing apparatus for airfoils of gas turbine engines

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Russell B.

    1998-01-01

    An improved airfoil tip sealing apparatus is disclosed wherein brush seals are attached to airfoil tips with the distal ends of the brush seal fibers sealingly contacting opposing wall surfaces. Embodiments for variable vanes, stators and both cooled and uncooled turbine blade applications are disclosed.

  11. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D; Wilson, Jr., Jack W.

    2010-11-02

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

  12. Plasma Flow Control Optimized Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voikov, Vladimir; Patel, Mehul

    2005-11-01

    Recent advances in flow control research have demonstrated that plasma actuators can be efficient in different aerodynamic applications, particularly in providing flight control without conventional moving surfaces. The concept involves the use of a laminar airfoil design that employs a separation ramp at the trailing edge that can be manipulated by a plasma actuator to control lift, similar to trailing-edge flaps. The advantages are lower drag by a combination of the laminar flow design, and elimination of parasitic drag associated with wing-flap junctions. This work involves numerical simulations and experiments on a HSNLF(1)-0213 airfoil. The numerical results are obtained using an unsteady, compressible Navier-Stokes simulation that includes a model for the plasma actuators. The experiments are performed on a 2-D airfoil section that is mounted on a lift-drag force balance. The results demonstrate lift enhancement produced by the plasma actuator that is comparable to a plane flap. They also reveal an optimum actuator unsteady frequency that scales with the length of the separated region and local velocity, and is associated with the generation of a train of spanwise vortices. Other scaling including the effect of Reynolds number is presented.

  13. Intermittent Flow Regimes in a Transonic Fan Airfoil Cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; McFarland, E. R.; Chima, R. V.; Capece, V. R.; Hayden, J.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center linear cascade on the intermittent flow on the suction surface of an airfoil section from the tip region of a modern low aspect ratio fan blade. Experimental results revealed that, at a large incidence angle, a range of transonic inlet Mach numbers exist where the leading-edge shock-wave pattern was unstable. Flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers indicated large local jumps in the pressure in the leading edge area, which generates large intermittent loading on the blade leading edge. These measurements suggest that for an inlet Mach number between 0.9 and 1.0 the flow is bi-stable, randomly switching between subsonic and supersonic flows. Hence, it appears that the change in overall flow conditions in the transonic region is based on the frequency of switching between two stable flow states rather than on the continuous increase of the flow velocity. To date, this flow behavior has only been observed in a linear transonic cascade. Further research is necessary to confirm this phenomenon occurs in actual transonic fans and is not the byproduct of an endwall restricted linear cascade.

  14. Broadband Noise Predictions for an Airfoil in a Turbulent Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, J.; Farassat, F.; Mish, P. F.; Devenport, W. J.

    2003-01-01

    Loading noise is predicted from unsteady surface pressure measurements on a NACA 0015 airfoil immersed in grid-generated turbulence. The time-dependent pressure is obtained from an array of synchronized transducers on the airfoil surface. Far field noise is predicted by using the time-dependent surface pressure as input to Formulation 1A of Farassat, a solution of the Ffowcs Williams - Hawkings equation. Acoustic predictions are performed with and without the effects of airfoil surface curvature. Scaling rules are developed to compare the present far field predictions with acoustic measurements that are available in the literature.

  15. About the effects of an oscillating miniflap upon the wake on an airfoil, all immersed in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Delnero J.; J, Marañón Di Leo; Colman; J; M, Camocardi; Sainz M, García; F, Muñoz

    2011-12-01

    The present research analyzes the asymmetry in the rolling up shear layers behind the blunt trailing edge of an airfoil 4412 with a miniflap acting as active flow control device and its wake organization. Experimental investigations relating the asymmetry of the vortex flow in the near wake region, able to distort the flow increasing the downwash of an airfoil, have been performed. All of these in a free upstream turbulent flow (1.8% intensity). We examine the near wake region characteristics of a wing model with a 4412 airfoil without and with a rotating miniflap located on the lower surface, near the trailing edge. The flow in the near wake, for 3 x-positions (along chord line) and 20 vertical points in each x-position, was explored, for three different rotating frequencies, in order to identify signs of asymmetry of the initial counter rotating vortex structures. Experimental evidence is presented showing that for typical lifting conditions the shear layer rollup process within the near wake is different for the upper and lower vortices: the shear layer separating from the pressure side of the airfoil begins its rollup immediately behind the trailing edge, creating a stronger vortex while the shear layer from the suction side begins its rollup more downstream creating a weaker vortex. The experimental data were processed by classical statistics methods. Aspects of a mechanism connecting the different evolution and pattern of these initial vortex structures with lift changes and wake alleviating processes, due to these miniflaps, will be studied in future works.

  16. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  17. Vortex noise from nonrotating cylinders and airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlinker, R. H.; Amiet, R. K.; Fink, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental study of vortex-shedding noise was conducted in an acoustic research tunnel over a Reynolds-number range applicable to full-scale helicopter tail-rotor blades. Two-dimensional tapered-chord nonrotating models were tested to simulate the effect of spanwise frequency variation on the vortex-shedding mechanism. Both a tapered circular cylinder and tapered airfoils were investigated. The results were compared with data for constant-diameter cylinder and constant-chord airfoil models also tested during this study. Far-field noise, surface pressure fluctuations, and spanwise correlation lengths were measured for each configuration. Vortex-shedding noise for tapered cylinders and airfoils was found to contain many narrowband-random peaks which occurred within a range of frequencies corresponding to a predictable Strouhal number referenced to the maximum and minimum chord. The noise was observed to depend on surface roughness and Reynolds number.

  18. Investigation of airfoil leading edge separation control with nanosecond plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J. G.; Cui, Y. D.; Zhao, Z. J.; Li, J.; Khoo, B. C.

    2016-11-01

    A combined numerical and experimental investigation of airfoil leading edge flow separation control with a nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is presented. Our study concentrates on describing dynamics of detailed flow actuation process and elucidating the nanosecond DBD actuation mechanism. A loose coupling methodology is employed to perform simulation, which consists of a self-similar plasma model for the description of pulsed discharge and two-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations for the calculation of external airflow. A series of simulations of poststall flows around a NACA0015 airfoil is conducted with a Reynolds number range covering both low and high Re at Re=(0.05 ,0.15 ,1.2 ) ×106 . Meanwhile, wind-tunnel experiment is performed for two low Re flows to measure aerodynamic force on airfoil model and transient flow field with time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV measurement provides possibly the clearest view of flow reattachment process under the actuation of a nanosecond plasma actuator ever observed in experiments, which is highly comparable to that predicted by simulation. It is found from the detailed simulation that the discharge-induced residual heat rather than shock wave plays a dominant role in flow control. For any leading edge separations, the preliminary flow reattachment is realized by residual heat-induced spanwise vortices. After that, the nanosecond actuator functions by continuing exciting flow instability at poststall attack angles or acting as an active trip near stall angle. As a result, the controlled flow is characterized by a train of repetitive, downstream moving vortices over suction surface or an attached turbulent boundary layer, which depends on both angle of attack and Reynolds number. The advection of residual temperature with external flow offers a nanosecond plasma actuator a lot of flexibility to extend its influence region. Animations are provided for

  19. Effect of Reynolds Number and Periodic Unsteady Wake Flow Condition on Boundary Layer Development, Separation, and Re-attachment along the Suction Surface of a Low Pressure Turbine Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozturk, B.; Schobeiri, M. T.; Ashpis, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The paper experimentally studies the effects of periodic unsteady wake flow and different Reynolds numbers on boundary layer development, separation and re-attachment along the suction surface of a low pressure turbine blade. The experimental investigations were performed on a large scale, subsonic unsteady turbine cascade research facility at Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL) of Texas A&M University. The experiments were carried out at Reynolds numbers of 110,000 and 150,000 (based on suction surface length and exit velocity). One steady and two different unsteady inlet flow conditions with the corresponding passing frequencies, wake velocities, and turbulence intensities were investigated. The reduced frequencies chosen cover the operating range of LP turbines. In addition to the unsteady boundary layer measurements, surface pressure measurements were performed. The inception, onset, and the extent of the separation bubble information collected from the pressure measurements were compared with the hot wire measurements. The results presented in ensemble-averaged, and the contour plot forms help to understand the physics of the separation phenomenon under periodic unsteady wake flow and different Reynolds number. It was found that the suction surface displayed a strong separation bubble for these three different reduced frequencies. For each condition, the locations defining the separation bubble were determined carefully analyzing and examining the pressure and mean velocity profile data. The location of the boundary layer separation was dependent of the Reynolds number. It is observed that starting point of the separation bubble and the re-attachment point move further downstream by increasing Reynolds number from 110,000 to 150,000. Also, the size of the separation bubble is smaller when compared to that for Re=110,000.

  20. Boundary-Layer Separation Control under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions using Glow-Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    transition. Gad-el-Hak provides a review of various techniques for flow control in general and Volino discusses recent studies on separation control under low-pressure-turbine conditions utilizing passive as well as active devices. As pointed out by Volino, passive devices optimized for separation control at low Reynolds numbers tend to increase losses at high Reynolds numbers, Active devices have the attractive feature that they can be utilized only in operational regimes where they are needed and when turned off would not affect the flow. The focus in the present paper is an experimental Separation is induced on a flat plate installed in a closed-circuit wind tunnel by a shaped insert on the opposite wall. The flow conditions represent flow over the suction surface of a modem low-pressure-turbine airfoil ('Pak-B'). The Reynolds number, based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, is varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low (0.2%) and high (2.5%) Gee-stream turbulence intensities are set using passive grids. A spanwise-oriented phased-plasma-array actuator, fabricated on a printed circuit board, is surface- flush-mounted upstream of the separation point and can provide forcing in a wide frequency range. Static surface pressure measurements and hot-wire anemometry of the base and controlled flows are performed and indicate that the glow-discharge plasma actuator is an effective device for separation control. of active separation control using glow discharge plasma actuators.

  1. A supercritical airfoil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mateer, G. G.; Seegmiller, H. L.; Hand, L. A.; Szodruck, J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to provide a comprehensive data base for the validation of numerical simulations. The objective of the present paper is to provide a tabulation of the experimental data. The data were obtained in the two-dimensional, transonic flowfield surrounding a supercritical airfoil. A variety of flows were studied in which the boundary layer at the trailing edge of the model was either attached or separated. Unsteady flows were avoided by controlling the Mach number and angle of attack. Surface pressures were measured on both the model and wind tunnel walls, and the flowfield surrounding the model was documented using a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Although wall interference could not be completely eliminated, its effect was minimized by employing the following techniques. Sidewall boundary layers were reduced by aspiration, and upper and lower walls were contoured to accommodate the flow around the model and the boundary-layer growth on the tunnel walls. A data base with minimal interference from a tunnel with solid walls provides an ideal basis for evaluating the development of codes for the transonic speed range because the codes can include the wall boundary conditions more precisely than interference connections can be made to the data sets.

  2. Airfoil deposition model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology to predict deposit evolution (deposition rate and subsequent flow of liquid deposits) as a function of fuel and air impurity content and relevant aerodynamic parameters for turbine airfoils is developed in this research. The spectrum of deposition conditions encountered in gas turbine operations includes the mechanisms of vapor deposition, small particle deposition with thermophoresis, and larger particle deposition with inertial effects. The focus is on using a simplified version of the comprehensive multicomponent vapor diffusion formalism to make deposition predictions for: (1) simple geometry collectors; and (2) gas turbine blade shapes, including both developing laminar and turbulent boundary layers. For the gas turbine blade the insights developed in previous programs are being combined with heat and mass transfer coefficient calculations using the STAN 5 boundary layer code to predict vapor deposition rates and corresponding liquid layer thicknesses on turbine blades. A computer program is being written which utilizes the local values of the calculated deposition rate and skin friction to calculate the increment in liquid condensate layer growth along a collector surface.

  3. NASA supercritical airfoils: A matrix of family-related airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA supercritical airfoil development program is summarized in a chronological fashion. Some of the airfoil design guidelines are discussed, and coordinates of a matrix of family related supercritical airfoils ranging from thicknesses of 2 to 18 percent and over a design lift coefficient range from 0 to 1.0 are presented.

  4. Multiple element airfoils optimized for maximum lift coefficient.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Optimum airfoils in the sense of maximum lift coefficient are obtained for incompressible fluid flow at large Reynolds number. The maximum lift coefficient is achieved by requiring that the turbulent skin friction be zero in the pressure rise region on the airfoil upper surface. Under this constraint, the pressure distribution is optimized. The optimum pressure distribution is a function of Reynolds number and the trailing edge velocity. Geometries of those airfoils which will generate these optimum pressure distributions are obtained using a direct-iterative method which is developed in this study. This method can be used to design airfoils consisting of any number of elements. Numerical examples of one- and two-element airfoils are given. The maximum lift coefficients obtained range from 2 to 2.5.

  5. Design optimization of transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joh, C.-Y.; Grossman, B.; Haftka, R. T.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical optimization procedures were considered for the design of airfoils in transonic flow based on the transonic small disturbance (TSD) and Euler equations. A sequential approximation optimization technique was implemented with an accurate approximation of the wave drag based on the Nixon's coordinate straining approach. A modification of the Euler surface boundary conditions was implemented in order to efficiently compute design sensitivities without remeshing the grid. Two effective design procedures producing converged designs in approximately 10 global iterations were developed: interchanging the role of the objective function and constraint and the direct lift maximization with move limits which were fixed absolute values of the design variables.

  6. Use of a liquid-crystal and heater-element composite for quantitative, high-resolution heat-transfer coefficients on a turbine airfoil including turbulence and surface-roughness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, S. A.; Russell, L. M.; Torres, F. J.

    1987-01-01

    Local heat transfer coefficients were measured along the midchord of a three-times-size turbine vane airfoil in a static cascade operated at room temperature over a range of Reynolds numbers. The test surface consisted of a composite of commercially available materials: a Mylar sheet with a layer of cholestric liquid crystals, which change color with temperature, and a heater made of a polyester sheet coated with vapor-deposited gold, which produces uniform heat flux. After the initial selection and calibration of the composite sheet, accurate, quantitative, and continuous heat transfer coefficients were mapped over the airfoil surface. Tests were conducted at two free-stream turbulence intensities: 0.6 percent, which is typical of wind tunnels; and 10 percent, which is typical of real engine conditions. In addition to a smooth airfoil, the effects of local leading-edge sand roughness were also examined for a value greater than the critical roughness. The local heat transfer coefficients are presented for both free-stream turbulence intensities for inlet Reynolds numbers from 1.20 to 5.55 x 10 to the 5th power. Comparisons are also made with analytical values of heat transfer coefficients obtained from the STAN5 boundary layer code.

  7. Use of a liquid-crystal and heater-element composite for quantitative, high-resolution heat-transfer coefficients on a turbine airfoil including turbulence and surface-roughness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippensteele, S. A.; Russell, L. M.; Torres, F. J.

    Local heat transfer coefficients were measured along the midchord of a three-times-size turbine vane airfoil in a static cascade operated at room temperature over a range of Reynolds numbers. The test surface consisted of a composite of commercially available materials: a Mylar sheet with a layer of cholestric liquid crystals, which change color with temperature, and a heater made of a polyester sheet coated with vapor-deposited gold, which produces uniform heat flux. After the initial selection and calibration of the composite sheet, accurate, quantitative, and continuous heat transfer coefficients were mapped over the airfoil surface. Tests were conducted at two free-stream turbulence intensities: 0.6 percent, which is typical of wind tunnels; and 10 percent, which is typical of real engine conditions. In addition to a smooth airfoil, the effects of local leading-edge sand roughness were also examined for a value greater than the critical roughness. The local heat transfer coefficients are presented for both free-stream turbulence intensities for inlet Reynolds numbers from 1.20 to 5.55 x 10 to the 5th power. Comparisons are also made with analytical values of heat transfer coefficients obtained from the STAN5 boundary layer code.

  8. Dynamical effects of suction/heating on turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwelder, Ron

    1992-01-01

    The main emphasis of this quarter has been to test the effects of suction in a controlled environment with the emulated wall eddy structure. A study of the curved working wall of the test section in the Goertler Wind Tunnel showed that there were sufficient stresses within the plexiglas that cutting elongated slits for suction would probably cause the surface to develop step-type roughnesses. Thus several individual holes were initially drilled along the streamline direction in a spanwise region between two vortices. Air was withdrawn through this series of holes to provide a semi-continuous region of suction. Differing rates of suction through these holes were used to explore the effects upon the eddy structure. These preliminary results were obtained using visualization; i.e., smoke as introduced via a smoke wire into the boundary layer. Images were captured using a video camera and analyzed to determine the best suction rates. The preliminary results showed that suction has a large effect upon individual streaks of low speed fluid. Without the suction, the low speed region lying in the upwelling zone between two streamwise vortices was broken down by a secondary instability. This instability typically caused the low speed fluid marked with the smoke to oscillate from side to side in a manifestation of an inflectional instability in the spanwise direction as found and reported earlier in this research. With increasing distance downstream, the oscillation amplitude grew very rapidly until it broke down into complete turbulence.

  9. Exact solutions in oscillating airfoil theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    A result obtained by Williams (1977) for two-dimensional airfoils oscillating in an arbitrary subsonic parallel flowfield is reformulated to show that the pressure distribution induced by any deformation can be construed from the particular solutions for heaving and pitching motions. Specific formulas are presented for an oscillating control surface with a sealed gap.

  10. Characteristics of an Airfoil as Affected by Fabric Sag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Kenneth E

    1932-01-01

    This report presents the results of tests made at a high value of the Reynolds Number in the N.A.C.A. variable-density wind tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil as affected by fabric sag. Tests were made of two Gottingen 387 airfoils, one having the usual smooth surface and the other having a surface modified to simulate two types of fabric sag. The results of these tests indicate that the usual sagging of the wind covering between ribs has a very small effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil.

  11. Transonic airfoil calculations using solution-adaptive grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Brown, D.

    1981-01-01

    A new algorithm for generating solution-adaptive grids (SAG) about airfoil configurations embedded in transonic flow is presented. The present SAG approach uses only the airfoil surface solution to recluster grid points on the airfoil surface, i.e., the reclustering problem is one dimension smaller than the flow-field calculation problem. Special controls automatically built into the elliptic grid generation procedure are then used to obtain grids with suitable interior behavior. This concept of redistributing grid points greatly simplifies the idea of solution-adaptive grids. Numerical results indicate significant improvements in accuracy for SAG grids relative to standard grids using the same number of points.

  12. Potential flow analysis of glaze ice accretions on an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaguli, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical/experimental study of the flow fields about an airfoil with leading edge glaze ice accretion shapes are presented. Tests were conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel to measure surface pressure distributions and boundary layer separation reattachment characteristics on a general aviation wing section to which was affixed wooden ice shapes which approximated typical glaze ice accretions. Comparisons were made with predicted pressure distributions using current airfoil analysis codes as well as the Bristow mixed analysis/design airfoil panel code. The Bristow code was also used to predict the separation reattachment dividing streamline by inputting the appropriate experimental surface pressure distribution.

  13. Robust, Optimal Subsonic Airfoil Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2014-01-01

    A method has been developed to create an airfoil robust enough to operate satisfactorily in different environments. This method determines a robust, optimal, subsonic airfoil shape, beginning with an arbitrary initial airfoil shape, and imposes the necessary constraints on the design. Also, this method is flexible and extendible to a larger class of requirements and changes in constraints imposed.

  14. Biorobotic adhesion in water using suction cups.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R; Hrubes, J Dana; Leinhos, Henry A

    2008-03-01

    Echeneid fish, limpets and octopi use suction cups for underwater adhesion. When echeneid fish use suckers to 'hitch a ride' on sharks (which have riblet-patterned skins), the apparent absence of any pump or plumbing may be an advantage over biorobotic suction cups. An intriguing question is: How do they achieve seemingly persistent leak-free contact at low energy cost over rough surfaces? The design features of their suckers are explored in a biorobotic context of adhesion in water over rough surfaces. We have carried out experiments to compare the release force and tenacity of man-made suction cups with those reported for limpets and echeneid fish. Applied tensile and shear release forces were monotonically increased until release. The effects of cup size and type, host surface roughness, curvature and liquid surface tension have been examined. The flow of water in the sharkskin-like host surface roughness has been characterized. The average tenacity is 5.28 N cm(-2) (sigma = 0.53 N cm(-2), N = 37) in the sub-ambient pressure range of 14.6-49.0 kPa, in man-made cups for monotonically increasing applied release force. The tenacity is lower for harmonically oscillating release forces. The dynamic structural interactions between the suction cup and the oscillating applied forcing are discussed. Inspired by the matching of sharkskin riblet topology in echeneid fish suckers, it was found that biorobotic sealed contact over rough surfaces is also feasible when the suction cup makes a negative copy of the rough host surface. However, for protracted, persistent contact, the negative topology would have to be maintained by active means. Energy has to be spent to maintain the negative host roughness topology to minute detail, and protracted hitch-riding on sharks for feeding may not be free for echeneid fish. Further work is needed on the mechanism and efficiency of the densely populated tiny actuators in the fish suckers that maintain leak-proof contact with minimal

  15. Iced-airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Broeren, A. P.; Blumenthal, L. A.

    2005-07-01

    Past research on airfoil aerodynamics in icing are reviewed. This review emphasizes the time period after the 1978 NASA Lewis workshop that initiated the modern icing research program at NASA and the current period after the 1994 ATR accident where aerodynamics research has been more aircraft safety focused. Research pre-1978 is also briefly reviewed. Following this review, our current knowledge of iced airfoil aerodynamics is presented from a flowfield-physics perspective. This article identifies four classes of ice accretions: roughness, horn ice, streamwise ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. For each class, the key flowfield features such as flowfield separation and reattachment are discussed and how these contribute to the known aerodynamic effects of these ice shapes. Finally Reynolds number and Mach number effects on iced-airfoil aerodynamics are summarized.

  16. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Kimmel, Keith D

    2010-11-09

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of hook shaped struts each mounted within channels extending in a spanwise direction of the spar and the shell to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also fanning a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure. The hook struts have a hooked shaped end and a rounded shaped end in order to insert the struts into the spar.

  17. Aerodynamics of a Flapping Airfoil with a Flexible Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Alan Kai San

    This dissertation presents computational solutions to an airfoil in a oscillatory heaving motion with a aeroelastically flexible tail attachment. An unsteady potential flow solver is coupled to a structural solver to obtain the aeroelastic flow solution over an inviscid fluid to investigate the propulsive performance of such a configuration. The simulation is then extended to a two-dimensional viscous solver by coupling NASA's CFL3D solver to the structural solver to study how the flow is altered by the presence of viscosity. Finally, additional simulations are done in three dimensions over wings with varying aspect ratio to study the three-dimensional effects on the propulsive performance of an airfoil with an aeroelastic tail. The computation reveals that the addition of the aeroelastic trailing edge improved the thrust generated by a heaving airfoil significantly. As the frequency of the heaving motion increases, the thrust generated by the airfoil with the tail increases exponentially. In an inviscid fluid, the increase in thrust is insufficient to overcome the increase in power required to maintain the motion and as a result the overall propulsive efficiency is reduced. When the airfoil is heaving in a viscous fluid, the presence of a suction boundary layer and the appearance of leading edge vortex increase the thrust generated to such an extent that the propulsive efficiency is increased by about 3% when compared to the same airfoil with a rigid tail. The three-dimensional computations shows that the presence of the tip vorticies suppress some of the increase in thrust observed in the two-dimensional viscous computations for short span wings. For large span wings, the overall thrust enhancing capabilities of the aeroelastic tail is preserved.

  18. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  19. Turbine airfoil film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Larry D.

    1986-01-01

    Emphasis is placed on developing more accurate analytical models for predicting turbine airfoil external heat transfer rates. Performance goals of new engines require highly refined, accurate design tools to meet durability requirements. In order to obtain improvements in analytical capabilities, programs are required which focus on enhancing analytical techniques through verification of new models by comparison with relevant experimental data. The objectives of the current program are to develop an analytical approach, based on boundary layer theory, for predicting the effects of airfoil film cooling on downstream heat transfer rates and to verify the resulting analytical method by comparison of predictions with hot cascade data obtained under this program.

  20. Transonic airfoil codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    Computer codes for the design and analysis of transonic airfoils are considered. The design code relies on the method of complex characteristics in the hodograph plane to construct shockless airfoil. The analysis code uses artificial viscosity to calculate flows with weak shock waves at off-design conditions. Comparisons with experiments show that an excellent simulation of two dimensional wind tunnel tests is obtained. The codes have been widely adopted by the aircraft industry as a tool for the development of supercritical wing technology.

  1. Theoretical effect of modifications to the upper surface of two NACA airfoils using smooth polynomial additional thickness distributions which emphasize leading edge profile and which vary quadratically at the trailing edge. [using flow equations and a CDC 7600 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merz, A. W.; Hague, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a CDC 7600 digital computer to determine the effects of additional thickness distributions to the upper surface of the NACA 64-206 and 64 sub 1 - 212 airfoils. The additional thickness distribution had the form of a continuous mathematical function which disappears at both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The function behaves as a polynomial of order epsilon sub 1 at the leading edge, and a polynomial of order epsilon sub 2 at the trailing edge. Epsilon sub 2 is a constant and epsilon sub 1 is varied over a range of practical interest. The magnitude of the additional thickness, y, is a second input parameter, and the effect of varying epsilon sub 1 and y on the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil was investigated. Results were obtained at a Mach number of 0.2 with an angle-of-attack of 6 degrees on the basic airfoils, and all calculations employ the full potential flow equations for two dimensional flow. The relaxation method of Jameson was employed for solution of the potential flow equations.

  2. An experimental low Reynolds number comparison of a Wortmann FX67-K170 airfoil, a NACA 0012 airfoil and a NACA 64-210 airfoil in simulated heavy rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Anthony P.; Hansman, R. John

    1987-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were conducted on Wortmann FX67-K170, NACA 0012, and NACA 64-210 airfoils at rain rates of 1000 mm/hr and Reynolds numbers of 310,000 to compare the aerodynamic performance degradation of the airfoils and to attempt to identify the various mechanisms which affect performance in heavy rain conditions. Lift and drag were measured in dry and wet conditions, a variety of flow visualization techniques were employed, and a computational code which predicted airfoil boundary layer behavior was used. At low angles of attack, the lift degradation in wet conditions varied significantly between the airfoils. The Wortmann section had the greatest overall lift degradation and the NACA 64-210 airfoil had the smallest. At high angles of attack, the NACA 64-210 and 0012 airfoils had improved aerodynamic performance in rain conditions due to an apparent reduction of the boundry layer separation. Performance degradation in heavy rain for all three airfoils at low angles of attack could be emulated by forced boundary layer transition near the leading edge. The secondary effect occurs at time scales consistent with top surface water runback times. The runback layer is thought to effectively alter the airfoil geometry. The severity of the performance degradation for the airfoils varied. The relative differences appeared to be related to the susceptibility of each airfoil to premature boundary layer transition.

  3. Unsteady Aerodynamic Response of a Linear Cascade of Airfoils in Separated Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capece, Vincent R.; Ford, Christopher; Bone, Christopher; Li, Rui

    2004-01-01

    The overall objective of this research program was to investigate methods to modify the leading edge separation region, which could lead to an improvement in aeroelastic stability of advanced airfoil designs. The airfoil section used is representative of current low aspect ratio fan blade tip sections. The experimental potion of this study investigated separated zone boundary layer from removal through suction slots. Suction applied to a cavity in the vicinity of the separation onset point was found to be the most effective location. The computational study looked into the influence of front camber on flutter stability. To assess the influence of the change in airfoil shape on stability the work-per-cycle was evaluated for torsion mode oscillations. It was shown that the front camberline shape can be an important factor for stabilizing the predicted work-per-cycle and reducing the predicted extent of the separation zone. In addition, data analysis procedures are discussed for reducing data acquired in experiments that involve periodic unsteady data. This work was conducted in support of experiments being conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Flutter Cascade. The spectral block averaging method is presented. This method is shown to be able to account for variations in airfoil oscillation frequency that can occur in experiments that force oscillate the airfoils to simulate flutter.

  4. Wind tunnel tests of two airfoils for wind turbines operating at high reynolds numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Sommers, D.; Tangler, J.

    2000-06-29

    The objectives of this study were to verify the predictions of the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code for Reynolds numbers up to 6 x 106 and to acquire the section characteristics of two airfoils being considered for large, megawatt-size wind turbines. One airfoil, the S825, was designed to achieve a high maximum lift coefficient suitable for variable-speed machines. The other airfoil, the S827, was designed to achieve a low maximum lift coefficient suitable for stall-regulated machines. Both airfoils were tested in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) for smooth, fixed-transition, and rough surface conditions at Reynolds numbers of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 x 106. The results show the maximum lift coefficient of both airfoils is substantially underpredicted for Reynolds numbers over 3 x 106 and emphasized the difficulty of designing low-lift airfoils for high Reynolds numbers.

  5. Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Richard T.; Middleton, Marc G.

    1983-01-01

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell.

  6. Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, R.T.; Middleton, M.G.

    1983-01-25

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell. 5 figs.

  7. Multi-Element Airfoil System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Lockard, David P. (Inventor); McKenney, Martin J. (Inventor); Atherley, Raymond D. (Inventor); Kidd, Reggie T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-element airfoil system includes an airfoil element having a leading edge region and a skin element coupled to the airfoil element. A slat deployment system is coupled to the slat and the skin element, and is capable of deploying and retracting the slat and the skin element. The skin element substantially fills the lateral gap formed between the slat and the airfoil element when the slat is deployed. The system further includes an uncoupling device and a sensor to remove the skin element from the gap based on a critical angle-of-attack of the airfoil element. The system can alternatively comprise a trailing edge flap, where a skin element substantially fills the lateral gap between the flap and the trailing edge region of the airfoil element. In each case, the skin element fills a gap between the airfoil element and the deployed flap or slat to reduce airframe noise.

  8. Airfoil Design and Rotorcraft Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between global performance of a typical helicopter and the airfoil environment, as represented by the airfoil angles of attack and Mach number, has been examined using the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II. A general correspondence is observed between global performance parameters, such as rotor L/D, and airfoil performance parameters, such as airfoil L/D, the drag bucket boundaries, and the divergence Mach number. Effects of design parameters such as blade twist and rotor speed variation have been examined and, in most cases, improvements observed in global performance are also observed in terms of airfoil performance. The relations observed between global Performance and the airfoil environment suggests that the emphasis in airfoil design should be for good L/D, while the maximum lift coefficient performance is less important.

  9. An investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of a new general aviation airfoil in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorek, G. M.; Hoffmann, M. J.; Weislogel, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    A low speed airfoil, the GA(W)-2, - a 13% thickness to chord ratio airfoil was evaluated. The wing of a Beech Sundowner was modified at by adding balsa ribs and covered with aluminum skin, to alter the existing airfoil shape to that of the GA(W)-2 airfoil. The aircraft was flown in a flight test program that gathered wing surface pressures and wake data from which the lift drag, and pitching moment of the airfoil could be determined. After the base line performance of the airfoil was measured, the drag due to surface irregularities such as steps, rivets and surface waviness was determined. The potential reduction of drag through the use of surface coatings such as KAPTON was also investigated.

  10. TAIR- TRANSONIC AIRFOIL ANALYSIS COMPUTER CODE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, F. C.

    1994-01-01

    . Output from TAIR may include aerodynamic coefficients, the airfoil surface solution, convergence histories, and printer plots of Mach number and density contour maps. The TAIR program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 7600 computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 155K (octal) of 60 bit words. The TAIR program was developed in 1981.

  11. Second-order subsonic airfoil theory including edge effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1956-01-01

    Several recent advances in plane subsonic flow theory are combined into a unified second-order theory for airfoil sections of arbitrary shape. The solution is reached in three steps: the incompressible result is found by integration, it is converted into the corresponding subsonic compressible result by means of the second-order compressibility rule, and it is rendered uniformly valid near stagnation points by further rules. Solutions for a number of airfoils are given and are compared with the results of other theories and of experiment. A straight-forward computing scheme is outlined for calculating the surface velocities and pressures on any airfoil at any angle of attack

  12. Laser velocimetry measurements of oscillating airfoil dynamic stall flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Ahmed, S.

    1991-01-01

    Ensemble-averaged two-component velocity measurements over an airfoil experiencing oscillatory dynamic stall under compressibility conditions were obtained. The measurements show the formation of a separation bubble over the airfoil that persists till angles of attack close to when the dynamic stall vortex forms and convects. The fluid attains mean velocities as large as 1.6 times the free stream velocity with instantaneous values of 1.8 times the free stream velocity. The airfoil motion induces these large velocities in regions that are far removed from the surface.

  13. An experimental study of a bio-inspired corrugated airfoil for micro air vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeffery T.; Hu, Hui

    2010-08-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of a bio-inspired corrugated airfoil compared with a smooth-surfaced airfoil and a flat plate at the chord Reynolds number of Re C = 58,000-125,000 to explore the potential applications of such bio-inspired corrugated airfoils for micro air vehicle designs. In addition to measuring the aerodynamic lift and drag forces acting on the tested airfoils, a digital particle image velocimetry system was used to conduct detailed flowfield measurements to quantify the transient behavior of vortex and turbulent flow structures around the airfoils. The measurement result revealed clearly that the corrugated airfoil has better performance over the smooth-surfaced airfoil and the flat plate in providing higher lift and preventing large-scale flow separation and airfoil stall at low Reynolds numbers (Re C < 100,000). While aerodynamic performance of the smooth-surfaced airfoil and the flat plate would vary considerably with the changing of the chord Reynolds numbers, the aerodynamic performance of the corrugated airfoil was found to be almost insensitive to the Reynolds numbers. The detailed flow field measurements were correlated with the aerodynamic force measurement data to elucidate underlying physics to improve our understanding about how and why the corrugation feature found in dragonfly wings holds aerodynamic advantages for low Reynolds number flight applications.

  14. Airfoil modification effects on subsonic and transonic pressure distributions and performance for the EA-6B airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Dennis O.; Sewall, William G.

    1995-01-01

    Longitudinal characteristics and wing-section pressure distributions are compared for the EA-6B airplane with and without airfoil modifications. The airfoil modifications were designed to increase low-speed maximum lift for maneuvering, while having a minimal effect on transonic performance. Section contour changes were confined to the leading-edge slat and trailing-edge flap regions of the wing. Experimental data are analyzed from tests in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel on the baseline and two modified wing-fuselage configurations with the slats and flaps in their retracted positions. Wing modification effects on subsonic and transonic performance are seen in wing-section pressure distributions of the various configurations at similar lift coefficients. The modified-wing configurations produced maximum lift coefficients which exceeded those of the baseline configuration at low-speed Mach numbers (0.300 and 0.400). This benefit was related to the behavior of the wing upper surface leading-edge suction peak and the behavior of the trailing-edge pressure. At transonic Mach numbers (0.725 to 0.900), the wing modifications produced a somewhat stronger nose-down pitching moment, a slightly higher drag at low-lift levels, and a lower drag at higher lift levels.

  15. The Influence of Sweep on the Aerodynamic Loading of an Oscillating NACA0012 Airfoil. Volume 2: Data Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.hilaire, A. O.; Carta, F. O.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of sweep on the dynamic response of the NACA 0012 airfoil was investigated. Unsteady chordwise distributed pressure data were obtained from a tunnel spanning wing equipped with 21 single surface transducers (13 on the suction side and 8 on the pressure side of the airfoil). The pressure data were obtained at pitching amplitudes of 8 and 10 degrees over a tunnel Mach number range of 0.10 to 0.46 and a pitching frequency range of 2.5 to 10.6 cycles per second. The wing was oscillated in the unswept and swept positions about the quarter-chord pivot axis relative to mean incidence angle settings of 0, 9, 12, and 15 degrees. A compilation of all the response data obtained during the test program is presented. These data are in the form of normal force, chord force, lift force, pressure drag, and moment hysteresis loops derived from chordwise integrations of the unsteady pressure distributions. The hysteresis loops are organized in two main sections. In the first section, the loop data are arranged to show the effect of sweep (lambda = 0 and 30 deg) for all available combinations of mean incidence angle, pitching amplitude, reduced frequency, and chordwise Mach number. The second section shows the effect of chordwise Mach number (MC = 0.30 and MC = 0.40) on the swept wing response for all available combinations of mean incidence angle, pitching amplitude, and reduced frequency.

  16. Octopus-like suction cups: from natural to artificial solutions.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, F; Follador, M; Pugno, N M; Mazzolai, B

    2015-05-13

    Octopus suckers are able to attach to all nonporous surfaces and generate a very strong attachment force. The well-known attachment features of this animal result from the softness of the sucker tissues and the surface morphology of the portion of the sucker that is in contact with objects or substrates. Unlike artificial suction cups, octopus suckers are characterized by a series of radial grooves that increase the area subjected to pressure reduction during attachment. In this study, we constructed artificial suction cups with different surface geometries and tested their attachment performances using a pull-off setup. First, smooth suction cups were obtained for casting; then, sucker surfaces were engraved with a laser cutter. As expected, for all the tested cases, the engraving treatment enhanced the attachment performance of the elastomeric suction cups compared with that of the smooth versions. Moreover, the results indicated that the surface geometry with the best attachment performance was the geometry most similar to octopus sucker morphology. The results obtained in this work can be utilized to design artificial suction cups with higher wet attachment performance.

  17. Unsteady Newton-Busemann flow theory. I - Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, W. H.; Tobak, M.

    1981-01-01

    Newtonian flow theory for unsteady flow at very high Mach numbers is completed by the addition of a centrifugal force correction to the impact pressures. The correction term is the unsteady counterpart of Busemann's centrifugal force correction to impact pressures in steady flow. For airfoils of arbitary shape, exact formulas for the unsteady pressure and stiffness and damping-in-pitch derivatives are obtained in closed form, which require only numerical quadratures of terms involving the airfoil shape. They are applicable to airfoils of arbitrary thickness having sharp or blunt leading edges. For wedges and thin airfoils these formulas are greatly simplified, and it is proved that the pitching motions of thin airfoils of convex shape and of wedges of arbitrary thickness are always dynamically stable according to Newton-Busemann theory. Leading-edge bluntness is shown to have a favorable effect on the dynamic stability; on the other hand, airfoils of concave shape tend toward dynamic instability over a range of axis positions if the surface curvature exceeds a certain limit. As a byproduct, it is also shown that a pressure formula recently given by Barron and Mandl for unsteady Newtonian flow over a pitching power-law shaped airfoil is erroneous and that their conclusion regarding the effect of pivot position on the dynamic stability is misleading.

  18. Technology for pressure-instrumented thin airfoil models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, David A.

    1988-01-01

    A novel method of airfoil model construction was developed. This Laminated Sheet technique uses 0.8 mm thick sheets of A286 containing a network of pre-formed channels which are vacuum brazed together to form the airfoil. A 6.25 percent model of the X29A canard, which has a 5 percent thick section, was built using this technique. The model contained a total of 96 pressure orifices, 56 in three chordwise rows on the upper surface and 37 in three similar rows on the lower surface. It was tested in the NASA Langley 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Unique aerodynamic data was obtained over the full range of temperature and pressure. Part of the data was at transonic Mach numbers and flight Reynolds number. A larger two dimensional model of the NACA 64a-105 airfoil section was also fabricated. Scale up presented some problems, but a testable airfoil was fabricated.

  19. Measurements in a Transitional Boundary Layer Under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Terrence W.; Qiu, Songgang; Yuan, Kebiao; Ashpis, David (Technical Monitor); Simon, Fred (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of transition from laminar to turbulent flow in boundary layers or in shear layers over separation zones on a convex-curved surface which simulates the suction surface of a low-pressure turbine airfoil. Flows with various free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI) values (0.5%, 2.5% and 10%), and various Reynolds numbers (50,000, 100,000 200,000 and 300,000) are investigated. Reynold numbers in the present study are based on suction surface length and passage exit mean velocity. Flow separation followed by transition within the separated flow region is observed for the lower-Re cases at each of the FSTI levels. At the highest Reynolds numbers and at elevated FSn, transition of the attached boundary layer begins before separation, and the separation zone is small. Transition proceeds in the shear layer over the separation bubble. For both the transitional boundary layer and the transitional shear layer, mean velocity, turbulence intensity and intermittency (the fraction of the time the flow is turbulent) distributions are presented. The present data are compared to published distribution models for bypass transition, intermittency distribution through transition, transition start position, and transition length. A model developed for transition of separated flows is shown to adequately predict the location of the beginning of transition, for these cases, and a model developed for transitional boundary layer flows seems to adequately predict the path of intermittency through transition when the transition start and end are known. These results are useful for the design of low-pressure turbine stages which are known to operate under conditions replicated by these tests.

  20. Method for forming a liquid cooled airfoil for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Grondahl, Clayton M.; Willmott, Leo C.; Muth, Myron C.

    1981-01-01

    A method for forming a liquid cooled airfoil for a gas turbine is disclosed. A plurality of holes are formed at spaced locations in an oversized airfoil blank. A pre-formed composite liquid coolant tube is bonded into each of the holes. The composite tube includes an inner member formed of an anti-corrosive material and an outer member formed of a material exhibiting a high degree of thermal conductivity. After the coolant tubes have been bonded to the airfoil blank, the airfoil blank is machined to a desired shape, such that a portion of the outer member of each of the composite tubes is contiguous with the outer surface of the machined airfoil blank. Finally, an external skin is bonded to the exposed outer surface of both the machined airfoil blank and the composite tubes.

  1. Shape Changing Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Scoping of shape changing airfoil concepts including both aerodynamic analysis and materials-related technology assessment effort was performed. Three general categories of potential components were considered-fan blades, booster and compressor blades, and stator airfoils. Based on perceived contributions to improving engine efficiency, the fan blade was chosen as the primary application for a more detailed assessment. A high-level aerodynamic assessment using a GE90-90B Block 4 engine cycle and fan blade geometry indicates that blade camber changes of approximately +/-4deg would be sufficient to result in fan efficiency improvements nearing 1 percent. Constraints related to flight safety and failed mode operation suggest that use of the baseline blade shape with actuation to the optimum cruise condition during a portion of the cycle would be likely required. Application of these conditions to the QAT fan blade and engine cycle was estimated to result in an overall fan efficiency gain of 0.4 percent.

  2. Computational design and analysis of flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayda, Edward A.; van Dam, C.P.; Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

  3. Grid Sensitivity and Aerodynamic Optimization of Generic Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, Ideen; Smith, Robert E.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to obtain the grid sensitivity with respect to design parameters for aerodynamic optimization. The procedure is advocating a novel (geometrical) parameterization using spline functions such as NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B- Splines) for defining the airfoil geometry. An interactive algebraic grid generation technique is employed to generate C-type grids around airfoils. The grid sensitivity of the domain with respect to geometric design parameters has been obtained by direct differentiation of the grid equations. A hybrid approach is proposed for more geometrically complex configurations such as a wing or fuselage. The aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients are obtained by direct differentiation of the compressible two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. An optimization package has been introduced into the algorithm in order to optimize the airfoil surface. Results demonstrate a substantially improved design due to maximized lift/drag ratio of the airfoil.

  4. A critical evaluation of the predictions of the NASA-Lockheed multielement airfoil computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, G. W.; Manke, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of several versions of the multielement airfoil computer program are evaluated. The computed results are compared with experimental high lift data of general aviation airfoils with a single trailing edge flap, and of airfoils with a leading edge flap and double slotted trailing edge flaps. Theoretical and experimental data include lift, pitching moment, profile drag and surface pressure distributions, boundary layer integral parameters, skin friction coefficients, and velocity profiles.

  5. An experimental study of dynamic stall on advanced airfoil section. Volume 2: Pressure and force data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, K. W.; Pucci, S. L.; Mccroskey, W. J.; Carr, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Experimentally derived force and moment data are presented for eight airfoil sections that were tested at fixed and varying incidence in a subsonic two dimensional stream. Airfoil incidence was varied through sinusoidal oscillations in pitch over a wide range of amplitude and frequency. The surface pressure distribution, as well as the lift, drag, and pitching moment derived therefrom, are displayed in a uniform fashion to delineate the static and dynamic characteristics of each airfoil both in and out of stall.

  6. Airfoil for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George [Palm City, FL

    2011-01-18

    An airfoil is provided for a gas turbine comprising an outer structure comprising a first wall, an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced relative to the first wall such that a cooling gap is defined between at least portions of the first and second walls, and seal structure provided within the cooling gap between the first and second walls for separating the cooling gap into first and second cooling fluid impingement gaps. An inner surface of the second wall may define an inner cavity. The inner structure may further comprise a separating member for separating the inner cavity of the inner structure into a cooling fluid supply cavity and a cooling fluid collector cavity. The second wall may comprise at least one first impingement passage, at least one second impingement passage, and at least one bleed passage.

  7. NREL airfoil families for HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    The development of special-purpose airfoils for horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) began in 1984 as a joint effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), and Airfoils, Incorporated. Since that time nine airfoil families have been designed for various size rotors using the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code. A general performance requirement of the new airfoil families is that they exhibit a maximum lift coefficient (c{sub 1,max}) which is relatively insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil families address the needs of stall-regulated, variable-pitch, and variable-rpm wind turbines. For stall-regulated rotors, better peak-power control is achieved through the design of tip airfoils that restrain the maximum lift coefficient. Restrained maximum lift coefficient allows the use of more swept disc area for a given generator size. Also, for stall-regulated rotors, tip airfoils with high thickness are used to accommodate overspeed control devices. For variable-pitch and variable-rpm rotors, tip airfoils having a high maximum lift coefficient lend themselves to lightweight blades with low solidity. Tip airfoils having low thickness result in less drag for blades having full-span pitch control. Annual energy improvements from the NREL airfoil families are projected to be 23% to 35% for stall-regulated turbines, 8% to 20% for variable-pitch turbines, and 8% to 10% for variable-rpm turbines. The improvement for stall-regulated turbines has been verified in field tests.

  8. NREL airfoil families for HAWTs

    SciTech Connect

    Tangler, J L; Somers, D M

    1995-01-01

    The development of special-purpose airfoils for horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) began in 1984 as a joint effort between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), and Airfoils, Incorporated. Since that time seven airfoil families have been designed for various size rotors using the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code. A general performance requirement of the new airfoil families is that they exhibit a maximum lift coefficient (c{sub l,max}) which is relatively insensitive to roughness effects. The airfoil families address the needs of stall-regulated, variable-pitch, and variable-rpm wind turbines. For stall-regulated rotors, better peak-power control is achieved through the design of tip airfoils that restrain the maximum lift coefficient. Restrained maximum lift coefficient allows the use of more swept disc area for a given generator size. Also, for stall-regulated rotors, tip airfoils with high thickness are used to accommodate overspeed control devices. For variable-pitch and variable-rpm rotors, tip airfoils having a high maximum lift coefficient lend themselves to lightweight blades with low solidity. Tip airfoils having low thickness result in less drag for blades having full-span pitch control. Annual energy improvements from the NREL airfoil families are projected to be 23% to 35% for stall-regulated turbines, 8% to 20% for variable-pitch turbines, and 8% to 10% for variable-rpm turbines. The improvement for stall-regulated turbines has been verified in field tests.

  9. Turbulent Flow over Rough Turbine Airfoils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB. GR. Turbine blades ’ vanes ; surface roughness...turbulent boundary layer over rough turbine vanes or blades is developed. A new formulation of the mixing length model, expressed in the velocity-space...A-163 005 TURBULENT FLOW OVER ROUGH TURBINE AIRFOILS (U) OHIO 1/ STATE UNIV RESEARCH FOUNDATION COLUMBUS L S HAN AUG B5 OSURF-76357/?i4467 AFWL-TR-95

  10. Ordered roughness effects on NACA 0026 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, Z.; Abbas, A. A.; Dheyaa, R. Mohammed; Ghazali, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of highly-ordered rough surface - riblets, applied onto the surface of a NACA 0026 airfoil, are investigated experimentally using wind tunnel. The riblets are arranged in directionally converging - diverging pattern with dimensions of height, h = 1 mm, pitch or spacing, s = 1 mm, yaw angle α = 0o and 10o The airfoil with external geometry of 500 mm span, 600 mm chord and 156 mm thickness has been built using mostly woods and aluminium. Turbulence quantities are collected using hotwire anemometry. Hotwire measurements show that flows past converging and diverging pattern inherit similar patterns in the near-wall region for both mean velocity and turbulence intensities profiles. The mean velocity profiles in logarithmic regions for both flows past converging and diverging riblet pattern are lower than that with yaw angle α = 0o. Converging riblets cause the boundary layer to thicken and the flow with yaw angle α = 0o produces the thinnest boundary layer. Both the converging and diverging riblets cause pronounced outer peaks in the turbulence intensities profiles. Most importantly, flows past converging and diverging pattern experience 30% skin friction reductions. Higher order statistics show that riblet surfaces produce similar effects due to adverse pressure gradient. It is concluded that a small strip of different ordered roughness features applied at a leading edge of an airfoil can change the turbulence characteristics dramatically.

  11. Lift enhancing tabs for airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A tab deployable from the trailing edge of a main airfoil element forces flow onto a following airfoil element, such as a flap, to keep the flow attached and thus enhance lift. For aircraft wings with high lift systems that include leading edge slats, the slats may also be provided with tabs to turn the flow onto the following main element.

  12. Inverse airfoil design procedure using a multigrid Navier-Stokes method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, J. B.; Swanson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Modified Garabedian McFadden (MGM) design procedure was incorporated into an existing 2-D multigrid Navier-Stokes airfoil analysis method. The resulting design method is an iterative procedure based on a residual correction algorithm and permits the automated design of airfoil sections with prescribed surface pressure distributions. The new design method, Multigrid Modified Garabedian McFadden (MG-MGM), is demonstrated for several different transonic pressure distributions obtained from both symmetric and cambered airfoil shapes. The airfoil profiles generated with the MG-MGM code are compared to the original configurations to assess the capabilities of the inverse design method.

  13. An experimental and numerical investigation on the formation of stall-cells on airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolesos, M.; Papadakis, G.; Voutsinas, S.

    2014-12-01

    Stall Cells (SCs) are large scale three-dimensional structures of separated flow that have been observed on the suction side of airfoils designed for or used on wind turbine blades. SCs are unstable in nature but can be stabilised by means of a localized disturbance; here in the form of a zigzag tape covering 10% of the wing span. Based on extensive tuft flow visualisations, the resulting flow was found macroscopically similar to the undisturbed flow. Next a combined investigation was carried out including pressure recordings, Stereo-PIV measurements and CFD simulations. The investigation parameters were the aspect ratio, the angle of attack and the Re number. Tuft and pressure data were found in good agreement. The 3D CFD simulations reproduced the structure of the SCs in qualitative agreement with the experimental data but had a delay of ~3deg in capturing the first appearance of a SC. The error in Cl max prediction was 7% compared to 19% for the 2D cases. Tests show that SCs grow with Re number and angle of attack. Also analysis of the time averaged computational results indicated the presence of three types of vortices: (a) the trailing edge line vortex (TELV) in the wake, (b) the separation line vortex (SLV) over the wing and (c) the SC vortices. The TELV and SLV run parallel to the trailing edge and are of opposite sign, while the SC vortices start normal to the wing suction surface, then bend towards the SC centre and later extend downstream, with their vorticity parallel to the free stream.

  14. Analysis of crossover between local and massive separation on airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Mark

    1987-01-01

    The occurrence of massive separation on airfoils operating at high Reynolds number poses an important problem to the aerodynamicist. In the present study, the phenomenon of crossover, induced by airfoil thickness, between local separation and massive separation is investigated for low speed (incompressible), symmetric flow past realistic airfoil geometries. This problem is studied both for the infinite Reynolds number asymptotic limit using triple-deck theory and for finite Reynolds number using interacting boundary-layer theory. Numerical results are presented which illustrate how the flow evolves from local to massive separation as the airfoil thickness is increased. The results of the triple-deck and the interacting boundary-layer analyses are found to be in qualitative agreement for the NACA four digit series and an uncambered supercritical airfoil. The effect of turbulence on the evolution of the flow is also considered. Solutions are presented for turbulent flows past a NACA 0014 airfoil and a circular cylinder. For the latter case, the calculated surface pressure distribution is found to agree well with experimental data if the proper eddy pressure level is specified.

  15. Incidence angle effects on convected gust airfoil noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, E. J.; Myers, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis is developed which predicts the influence of airfoil mean loading on noise generation due to convected gusts. The theory is based on a linearization of the exact inviscid equations about a nonuniform compressible mean flow and the solution is developed using singular perturbation techniques. The case of a flat plate airfoil, at incidence angle alpha, interacting with three-dimensional disturbances is analyzed. It is found that in the vicinity of the airfoil leading and trailing edges, local regions are present which scale on the disturbance wavelength, with the noise generation concentrated in these regions. Away from the airfoil edges, the mean flow variation is found to be slow compared to the disturbance wavelength and no significant noise generation occurs. The mean flow variation near the leading edge generates additional noise by distorting the convected gust. The cumulative effect of the airfoil mean loading in the trailing edge region produces a 0(1) phase shift between the disturbances on the upper and lower surfaces of the airfoil. A corresponding 0(1) decrease, compared to the alpha = 0 case, is found in the noise generated at the trailing edge.

  16. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  17. Turbine engine airfoil and platform assembly

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; James, Allister W [Chuluota, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-07-31

    A turbine airfoil (22A) is formed by a first process using a first material. A platform (30A) is formed by a second process using a second material that may be different from the first material. The platform (30A) is assembled around a shank (23A) of the airfoil. One or more pins (36A) extend from the platform into holes (28) in the shank (23A). The platform may be formed in two portions (32A, 34A) and placed around the shank, enclosing it. The two platform portions may be bonded to each other. Alternately, the platform (30B) may be cast around the shank (23B) using a metal alloy with better castability than that of the blade and shank, which may be specialized for thermal tolerance. The pins (36A-36D) or holes for them do not extend to an outer surface (31) of the platform, avoiding stress concentrations.

  18. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils at High Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, L J; Dryden, H L

    1927-01-01

    This report deals with the pressure distribution over airfoils at high speeds, and describes an extension of an investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of certain airfoils which was presented in NACA Technical Report no. 207. The results presented in report no. 207 have been confirmed and extended to higher speeds through a more extensive and systematic series of tests. Observations were also made of the air flow near the surface of the airfoils, and the large changes in lift coefficients were shown to be associated with a sudden breaking away of the flow from the upper surface. The tests were made on models of 1-inch chord and comparison with the earlier measurements on models of 3-inch chord shows that the sudden change in the lift coefficient is due to compressibility and not to a change in the Reynolds number. The Reynolds number still has a large effect, however, on the drag coefficient. The pressure distribution observations furnish the propeller designer with data on the load distribution at high speeds, and also give a better picture of the air-flow changes.

  19. Ridge suction drives plume-ridge interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Hékinian, R.

    2003-04-01

    geochemical anomalies extend < 400 km along the slower (20 to 13 mm/yr northward) spreading South Kolbeinsey Ridge, but > 1500 km along the faster (20 to 25 mm/yr southward) spreading Reykjanes Ridge. 4. The spreading-rate dependent ridge suction force also explains the first-order differences between the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) and the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Identified mantle plumes/hotspots are abundant near the MAR (e.g., Iceland, Azores, Ascension, Tristan, Gough, Shona and Bouvet), but rare along the entire EPR (notably, the Easter hotspot at ˜27^oS on the Nazca plate). Such apparent unequal hotspot distribution would allow a prediction of more enriched MORB at the MAR than at the EPR. However, the mean compositions between MAR-MORB and EPR-MORB are the same in terms of incompatible element abundances, and are identical in terms of Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios. This suggests similar extents of mantle plume contributions to EPR and MAR MORB. We consider that the apparent rarity of near-EPR plumes/hotspots results from fast spreading. The fast spreading creates large ridge suction forces that do not allow the development of surface expressions of mantle plumes as such, but draw plume materials to a broad zone of sub-ridge upwelling, giving rise to random distribution of abundant enriched MORB and elevated and smooth axial topography along the EPR (vs. MAR). One of the important implications is that the asthenospheric flow is necessarily decoupled from its overlaying oceanic lithospheric plate. This decoupling increases with increasing spreading rate.

  20. Effectiveness evaluation of different suction systems.

    PubMed

    Junevicius, Jonas; Surna, Algimantas; Surna, Rimas

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms of the patient's oral cavity and his/her blood and saliva may cause different air-borne and blood-borne infectious diseases among odontologists and their assistants who work with patients. Quantitative analysis and spatial distribution analysis of the environmental spread of oral liquid and cooling liquid mixture were performed during this study. Effectiveness of suction systems of four types was evaluated: without suction, using a small-size suction pump alone, using a small-size and large-size suction pumps, using a small-size suction pump together with an experimental extra-oral aspirator. Quantitative changes of the water aerosol, which enters the environment during the preparation of teeth, were determined in respect of the used suction systems. The small-size pump system together with an experimental extra-oral suction system eliminated best the aerosol formed during the preparation.

  1. Theory and Low-Order Modeling of Unsteady Airfoil Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Kiran

    Unsteady flow phenomena are prevalent in a wide range of problems in nature and engineering. These include, but are not limited to, aerodynamics of insect flight, dynamic stall in rotorcraft and wind turbines, leading-edge vortices in delta wings, micro-air vehicle (MAV) design, gust handling and flow control. The most significant characteristics of unsteady flows are rapid changes in the circulation of the airfoil, apparent-mass effects, flow separation and the leading-edge vortex (LEV) phenomenon. Although experimental techniques and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have enabled the detailed study of unsteady flows and their underlying features, a reliable and inexpensive loworder method for fast prediction and for use in control and design is still required. In this research, a low-order methodology based on physical principles rather than empirical fitting is proposed. The objective of such an approach is to enable insights into unsteady phenomena while developing approaches to model them. The basis of the low-order model developed here is unsteady thin-airfoil theory. A time-stepping approach is used to solve for the vorticity on an airfoil camberline, allowing for large amplitudes and nonplanar wakes. On comparing lift coefficients from this method against data from CFD and experiments for some unsteady test cases, it is seen that the method predicts well so long as LEV formation does not occur and flow over the airfoil is attached. The formation of leading-edge vortices (LEVs) in unsteady flows is initiated by flow separation and the formation of a shear layer at the airfoil's leading edge. This phenomenon has been observed to have both detrimental (dynamic stall in helicopters) and beneficial (high-lift flight in insects) effects. To predict the formation of LEVs in unsteady flows, a Leading Edge Suction Parameter (LESP) is proposed. This parameter is calculated from inviscid theory and is a measure of the suction at the airfoil's leading edge. It

  2. Effect of air exposure and suction on blood cell activation and hemolysis in an in vitro cardiotomy suction model.

    PubMed

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed M; Toomasian, Cory J; Toomasian, John M; Ulysse, Guerlain; Major, Terry; Bartlett, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) elicits a systemic inflammatory response. The cause may include surface-induced leukocyte activation and hemolysis. A study was designed to describe the effects of both suction and an air-blood interface independently and in combination on leukocyte and platelet activation, and hemolysis in an in vitro model. Fresh human blood was drawn and tested in four different conditions including control (A), 10 minutes of -600 mm Hg suction (B), 10 minutes of blood exposure to room air at 100 ml/min (C), and 10 minutes of simultaneous suction and air flow (D). Samples were analyzed by flow cytometry (platelets and leukocytes) and plasma-free hemoglobin (PFHb). Leukocyte CD11b expression and platelet P-selectin (CD62P) were analyzed by flow cytometry. In comparison with baseline, granulocytes were significantly activated by air (group C, p = 0.0029) and combination (group D, p = 0.0123) but not by suction alone (group B). Monocytes and platelets were not significantly activated in any group. The PFHb increased significantly in group C (p < 0.001) and group D (p < 0.001). This study suggests that the inflammatory response and associated hemolysis during CPB may be related to air exposure, which could be reduced by minimizing the air exposure of air to blood during cardiotomy suction.

  3. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  4. Extensions of the concept of suction analogy to prediction of vortex lift effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Flow field data for a double delta wing at low speed were used to determine the location of a vortex action point. The result was found to be consistent with what was determined for a delta wing. In supersonic flow, the action point location was determined empirically. For a wing with rounded leading edges, an assumption for initial vortex separation was shown to be equivalent to initial leading edge bubble separation for airfoils. A theoretical formulation by the section analogy to determine the delayed vortex separation on a cambered wing with rounded leading edges was presented. The method of suction analogy was further shown to be applicable to predicting the body vortex lift.

  5. On the general theory of thin airfoils for nonuniform motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reissner, Eric

    1944-01-01

    General thin-airfoil theory for a compressible fluid is formulated as boundary problem for the velocity potential, without recourse to the theory of vortex motion. On the basis of this formulation the integral equation of lifting-surface theory for an incompressible fluid is derived with the chordwise component of the fluid velocity at the airfoil as the function to be determined. It is shown how by integration by parts this integral equation can be transformed into the Biot-Savart theorem. A clarification is gained regarding the use of principal value definitions for the integral which occur. The integral equation of lifting-surface theory is used a s the starting point for the establishment of a theory for the nonstationary airfoil which is a generalization of lifting-line theory for the stationary airfoil and which might be called "lifting-strip" theory. Explicit expressions are given for section lift and section moment in terms of the circulation function, which for any given wing deflection is to be determined from an integral equation which is of the type of the equation of lifting-line theory. The results obtained are for airfoils of uniform chord. They can be extended to tapered airfoils. One of the main uses of the results should be that they furnish a practical means for the analysis of the aerodynamic span effect in the problem of wing flutter. The range of applicability of "lifting-strip" theory is the same as that of lifting-line theory so that its results may be applied to airfoils with aspect ratios as low as three.

  6. LES tests on airfoil trailing edge serration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, a large number of acoustic simulations are carried out for a low noise airfoil with different Trailing Edge Serrations (TES). The Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) acoustic analogy is used for noise prediction at trailing edge. The acoustic solver is running on the platform of our in-house incompressible flow solver EllipSys3D. The flow solution is first obtained from the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), the acoustic part is then carried out based on the instantaneous hydrodynamic pressure and velocity field. To obtain the time history data of sound pressure, the flow quantities are integrated around the airfoil surface through the FWH approach. For all the simulations, the chord based Reynolds number is around 1.5x106. In the test matrix, the effects from angle of attack, the TE flap angle, the length/width of the TES are investigated. Even though the airfoil under investigation is already optimized for low noise emission, most numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments show that the noise level is further decreased by adding the TES device.

  7. Numerical exploration of the origin of aerodynamic enhancements in [low-Reynolds number] corrugated airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Caleb J.; Visbal, Miguel R.

    2013-11-01

    This paper explores the flow structure of a corrugated airfoil using a high-fidelity implicit large eddy simulation approach. The first three-dimensional simulations for a corrugated wing section are presented considering a range of Reynolds numbers of Rec = 5 × 103 to 5.8 × 104 bridging the gap left by previous numerical and experimental studies. Several important effects are shown to result from the corrugations in the leading-edge region. First, interaction between the detached shear layer and the first corrugation peak promotes recirculation upstream and enhances transition to turbulence due to flow instabilities. Thus, early transitional flow develops on the corrugated wing which helps to delay stall even at Reynolds numbers as low as Rec = 1 × 104. Transition is shown to occur as early as Rec = 7.5 × 103 and quickly advances toward the leading-edge as Reynolds number is increased. Modification of the first corrugation peak height produces significantly reduced separation and improved aerodynamic forces demonstrating the sensitivity of flow behavior to leading-edge geometry. Second, the unusual orientation of the corrugated surface and strong suction resulting from rapidly turning fluid over the separated region upstream of the first corrugation produces a new effect which serves to reduce drag. This effect was amplified through the enhanced interaction produced by a modified geometry. Corrugations were found to be most advantageous in the leading-edge region and could be optimized to properly take advantage of the flow field under different operating conditions.

  8. The leading-edge stall of airfoils with various nose shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraljic, Matthew; Rusak, Zvi; Wang, Shixiao

    2015-11-01

    We study the inception of leading-edge stall on stationary, smooth thin airfoils with various nose shapes of the form xa (where 0 < a < 1 / 2) at low to moderately high chord Reynolds number flows. A reduced-order, multi-scale model problem is developed and solved using numerical simulations. The asymptotic theory demonstrates that a subsonic flow about a thin airfoil can be described in terms of an outer region, around most of the airfoil's chord, and an inner region, around the nose, that asymptotically match each other. The flow in the outer region is dominated by the classical thin airfoil theory. Scaled (magnified) coordinates and a modified (smaller) Reynolds number ReM are used to correctly account for the nonlinear behavior and extreme velocity changes in the inner region, where both the near-stagnation and high suction areas occur. The inner region problem is solved numerically to determine the inception of leading-edge stall on the nose. It is found that stall is delayed to higher angles of attack with the decrease of nose parameter a. Specifically, new airfoil shapes are proposed with increased stall angle at subsonic speeds and higher critical Mach numbers at transonic speeds.

  9. Initial Circulation and Peak Vorticity Behavior of Vortices Shed from Airfoil Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.; Biesiadny, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An extensive parametric study of vortices shed from airfoil vortex generators has been conducted to determine the dependence of initial vortex circulation and peak vorticity on elements of the airfoil geometry and impinging flow conditions. These elements include the airfoil angle of attack, chord length, span, aspect ratio, local boundary layer thickness, and free stream Mach number. In addition, the influence of airfoil-to-airfoil spacing on the circulation and peak vorticity has been examined for pairs of co-rotating and counter-rotating vortices. The vortex generators were symmetric airfoils having a NACA-0012 cross-sectional profile. These airfoils were mounted either in isolation, or in pairs, on the surface of a straight pipe. The turbulent boundary layer thickness to pipe radius ratio was about 17 percent. The circulation and peak vorticity data were derived from cross-plane velocity measurements acquired with a seven-hole probe at one chord-length downstream of the airfoil trailing edge location. The circulation is observed to be proportional to the free-stream Mach number, the angle-of-attack, and the span-to-boundary layer thickness ratio. With these parameters held constant, the circulation is observed to fall off in monotonic fashion with increasing airfoil aspect ratio. The peak vorticity is also observed to be proportional to the free-stream Mach number, the airfoil angle-of-attack, and the span-to-boundary layer thickness ratio. Unlike circulation, however, the peak vorticity is observed to increase with increasing aspect ratio, reaching a peak value at an aspect ratio of about 2.0 before falling off again at higher values of aspect ratio. Co-rotating vortices shed from closely spaced pairs of airfoils have values of circulation and peak vorticity under those values found for vortices shed from isolated airfoils of the same geometry. Conversely, counter-rotating vortices show enhanced values of circulation and peak vorticity when compared to values

  10. Effect of suction pipe leaning angle and water level on the internal flow of pump sump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.-M.; Lee, Y.-B.; Kim, K.-Y.; Park, S.-H.; Choi, Y.-D.

    2016-11-01

    The pump sump, which connects forebay and intake of pump station, supplies good flow condition for the intake of the pump. If suction sumps are improperly shaped or sized, air entraining vortices or submerged vortices may develop. This may greatly affect pump operation if vortices grow to an appreciable extent. Moreover, the noise and vibration of the pump can be increased by the remaining of vortices in the pump flow passage. Therefore, the vortices in the pump flow passage have to be reduced for a good performance of pump sump station. In this study, the effect of suction pipe leaning angle on the pump sump internal flow with different water level has been investigated by CFD analysis. Moreover, an elbow type pipe was also investigated. There are 3 leaning angles with 0°, 45° and 90° for the suction pipe. The suction pipe inlet centre is kept same for all the cases. In addition, the three different water levels of H/D=1.85, 1.54, and 1.31, is applied to different suction pipe types. The result shows that the amount of air sucked into the suction pipe increases with increasing the suction pipe leaning angle. Especially for the horizontal suction pipe, there is maximum air sucked into the suction pipe. However, there is certain effect of the elbow type bell mouth installation in the horizontal suction pipe on suppressing the amount of air sucked into the pipe. Moreover, vertical suction pipe plays an effective role on reducing the free surface vortex intake area.

  11. Nozzle airfoil having movable nozzle ribs

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A nozzle vane or airfoil structure is provided in which the nozzle ribs are connected to the side walls of the vane or airfoil in such a way that the ribs provide the requisite mechanical support between the concave side and convex side of the airfoil but are not locked in the radial direction of the assembly, longitudinally of the airfoil. The ribs may be bi-cast onto a preformed airfoil side wall structure or fastened to the airfoil by an interlocking slide connection and/or welding. By attaching the nozzle ribs to the nozzle airfoil metal in such a way that allows play longitudinally of the airfoil, the temperature difference induced radial thermal stresses at the nozzle airfoil/rib joint area are reduced while maintaining proper mechanical support of the nozzle side walls.

  12. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  13. Second Stage Turbine Bucket Airfoil.

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Liming; Ahmadi, Majid; Humanchuk, David John; Moretto, Nicholas; Delehanty, Richard Edward

    2003-05-06

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  14. Numerical design of shockless airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to indicate and briefly discuss only the most significant achievements of the research. The most successful contribution from the contract was the code for two dimensional analysis of airfoils in transonic flow.

  15. Investigation of the Kline-Fogleman airfoil section for rotor blade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumsdaine, E.; Johnson, W. S.; Fletcher, L. M.; Peach, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a wedgeshaped airfoil with sharp leading edge and a spanwise step were conducted. The airfoil was tested with variations of the following parameters: (1) Reynolds number, (2) step location, (3) step shape, (4) apex angle, and (5) with the step on either the upper or lower surface. The results are compared with a flat plate and with wedge airfoils without a step having the same aspect ratio. Water table tests were conducted for flow visualization and it was determined that the flow separates from the upper surface at low angles of attack. The wind tunnel tests show that the lift/drag ratio of the airfoil is lower than for a flat plate and the pressure data show that the airfoil derives its lift in the same manner as a flat plate.

  16. Computation of viscous transonic flow about a lifting airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walitt, L.; Liu, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The viscous transonic flow about a stationary body in free air was numerically investigated. The geometry chosen was a symmetric NACA 64A010 airfoil at a freestream Mach number of 0.8, a Reynolds number of 4 million based on chord, and angles of attack of 0 and 2 degrees. These conditions were such that, at 2 degrees incidence unsteady periodic motion was calculated along the aft portion of the airfoil and in its wake. Although no unsteady measurements were made for the NACA 64A010 airfoil at these flow conditions, interpolated steady measurements of lift, drag, and surface static pressures compared favorably with corresponding computed time-averaged lift, drag, and surface static pressures.

  17. Optimum Suction Distribution for Transition Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Hall, P.

    1996-01-01

    The optimum suction distribution which gives the longest laminar region for a given total suction is computed. The goal here is to provide the designer with a method to find the best suction distribution subject to some overall constraint applied to the suction. We formulate the problem using the Lagrangian multiplier method with constraints. The resulting non-linear system of equations is solved using the Newton-Raphson technique. The computations are performed for a Blasius boundary layer on a flat-plate and crossflow cases. For the Blasius boundary layer, the optimum suction distribution peaks upstream of the maximum growth rate region and remains flat in the middle before it decreases to zero at the end of the transition point. For the stationary and travelling crossflow instability, the optimum suction peaks upstream of the maximum growth rate region and decreases gradually to zero.

  18. The acoustics and unsteady wall pressure of a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Jonathan C.

    A Circulation Control (CC) airfoil uses a wall jet exiting onto a rounded trailing edge to generate lift via the Coanda effect. The aerodynamics of the CC airfoil have been studied extensively. The acoustics of the airfoil are, however, much less understood. The primary goal of the present work was to study the radiated sound and unsteady surface pressures of a CC airfoil. The focus of this work can be divided up into three main categories: characterizing the unsteady surface pressures, characterizing the radiated sound, and understanding the acoustics from surface pressures. The present work is the first to present the unsteady surface pressures from the trailing edge cylinder of a circulation control airfoil. The auto-spectral density of the unsteady surface pressures at various locations around the trailing edge are presented over a wide range of the jets momentum coefficient. Coherence of pressure and length scales were computed and presented. Single microphone measurements were made at a range of angles for a fixed observer distance in the far field. Spectra are presented for select angles to show the directivity of the airfoil's radiated sound. Predictions of the acoustics were made from unsteady surface pressures via Howe's curvature noise model and a modified Curle's analogy. A summary of the current understanding of the acoustics from a CC airfoil is given along with suggestions for future work.

  19. Rime ice accretion and its effect on airfoil performance. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, M. B.

    1982-01-01

    A methodology was developed to predict the growth of rime ice, and the resulting aerodynamic penalty on unprotected, subcritical, airfoil surfaces. The system of equations governing the trajectory of a water droplet in the airfoil flowfield is developed and a numerical solution is obtained to predict the mass flux of super cooled water droplets freezing on impact. A rime ice shape is predicted. The effect of time on the ice growth is modeled by a time-stepping procedure where the flowfield and droplet mass flux are updated periodically through the ice accretion process. Two similarity parameters, the trajectory similarity parameter and accumulation parameter, are found to govern the accretion of rime ice. In addition, an analytical solution is presented for Langmuir's classical modified inertia parameter. The aerodynamic evaluation of the effect of the ice accretion on airfoil performance is determined using an existing airfoil analysis code with empirical corrections. The change in maximum lift coefficient is found from an analysis of the new iced airfoil shape. The drag correction needed due to the severe surface roughness is formulated from existing iced airfoil and rough airfoil data. A small scale wind tunnel test was conducted to determine the change in airfoil performance due to a simulated rime ice shape.

  20. Appropriate suction device in rescue medicine.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, B E; Nilsson, H; Bjorn, P; Skedevik, C

    1987-12-01

    In rescue medicine, a suction apparatus must function in a variety of environmental conditions. To find an appropriate device for the Swedish Air Force air rescue service the Laerdal suction device 790,000 was selected for further testing according to international standards for aviation safety. Tests showed that vibrations had deleterious effects on the internal construction of the suction device. In addition, an electromagnetic field was generated affecting the navigation, autopilot, and communication systems. We conclude that the suction apparatus and probably other devices as well must be tested for their functioning in adverse environments and their ability to meet international aviation safety regulations.

  1. The Analysis and Design of Two-Element Airfoil Configurations in Transonic Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Experimental Surface Pressure Distribution: NACA 64A010 Airfoil With 18A Slat; M_,z 0.7, a = 6", Re = 7.8 x 106• 26 14 Computed and Experimental Surface...separated flow. In Fig. 13, the computed pressure distribution and the experimental data (Ref 17) for an NACA 64A010 airfoil with a slat at M = 0.7, 0 60 and...T) Fig. 13 Computed and Experimental Surface Pressure Distributions: NACA 64A010 Airfoil With 18A Slat; M = 0.7. c = 60, Re = 7.8 x 10 26 II The

  2. Improvement of aerodynamic characteristics of a thick airfoil with a vortex cell in sub- and transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, Sergey; Baranov, Paul; Popov, Igor; Sudakov, Alexander; Usachov, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    The modified SST model (2005) is verified using Rodi- Leschziner-Isaev's approach and the multiblock computational technologies are validated in the VP2/3 code on different-structure overlapping grids by comparing the numerical predictions with the experimental data on transonic flow around an NACA0012 airfoil at an angle of attack of 4o for M=0.7 and Re=4×106. It is proved that the aerodynamic characteristics of a thick (20% of the chord) MQ airfoil mounted at an angle of attack of 2o for Re=107 and over the Mach number range 0.3-0.55 are significantly improved because an almost circular small-size (0.12) vortex cell with a defined volumetric flow rate coefficient of 0.007 during slot suction has been located on the upper airfoil section and an intense trapped vortex has been formed in it. A detailed analysis of buffeting within the self-oscillatory regime of flow around the MQ airfoil with a vortex cell has demonstrated the periodic changes in local and integral characteristics; the lift and the aerodynamic efficiency remain quite high, but inferior to the similar characteristics at M=0.55. It is found that the vortex cell at M=0.7 is inactive, and the aerodynamic characteristics of the MQ airfoil with a vortex cell are close to those of a smooth airfoil without a cell.

  3. Design and test of a natural laminar flow/large Reynolds number airfoil with a high design cruise lift coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolesar, C. E.

    1987-01-01

    Research activity on an airfoil designed for a large airplane capable of very long endurance times at a low Mach number of 0.22 is examined. Airplane mission objectives and design optimization resulted in requirements for a very high design lift coefficient and a large amount of laminar flow at high Reynolds number to increase the lift/drag ratio and reduce the loiter lift coefficient. Natural laminar flow was selected instead of distributed mechanical suction for the measurement technique. A design lift coefficient of 1.5 was identified as the highest which could be achieved with a large extent of laminar flow. A single element airfoil was designed using an inverse boundary layer solution and inverse airfoil design computer codes to create an airfoil section that would achieve performance goals. The design process and results, including airfoil shape, pressure distributions, and aerodynamic characteristics are presented. A two dimensional wind tunnel model was constructed and tested in a NASA Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel which enabled testing at full scale design Reynolds number. A comparison is made between theoretical and measured results to establish accuracy and quality of the airfoil design technique.

  4. Thick airfoil designs for the root of the 10MW INNWIND.EU wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu≁oz, A.; Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.

    2016-09-01

    The main objective of the “INNWIND.EU” project is to investigate and demonstrate innovative designs for 10-20MW offshore wind turbines and their key components, such as lightweight rotors. In this context, the present paper describes the development of two new airfoils for the blade root region. From the structural point of view, the root is the region in charge of transmitting all the loads of the blade to the hub. Thus, it is very important to include airfoils with adequate structural properties in this region. The present article makes use of high-thickness and blunt trailing edge airfoils to improve the structural characteristics of the airfoils used to build this blade region. CENER's (National Renewable Energy Center of Spain) airfoil design tool uses the airfoil software XFOIL to compute the aerodynamic characteristics of the designed airfoils. That software is based on panel methods which show some problems with the calculation of airfoils with thickness bigger than 35% and with blunt trailing edge. This drawback has been overcome with the development of an empirical correction for XFOIL lift and drag prediction based on airfoil experiments. From the aerodynamic point of view, thick airfoils are known to be very sensitive to surface contamination or turbulent inflow conditions. Consequently, the design optimization takes into account the aerodynamic torque in both clean and contaminated conditions. Two airfoils have been designed aiming to improve the structural and the aerodynamic behaviour of the blade in clean and contaminated conditions. This improvement has been corroborated with Blade Element Momentum (BEM) computations.

  5. Computational Analysis of Dual Radius Circulation Control Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Vatsa, V. N.; Rumsey, C. L.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the work is to use multiple codes and multiple configurations to provide an assessment of the capability of RANS solvers to predict circulation control dual radius airfoil performance and also to identify key issues associated with the computational predictions of these configurations that can result in discrepancies in the predicted solutions. Solutions were obtained for the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) dual radius circulation control airfoil and the General Aviation Circulation Control (GACC) dual radius airfoil. For the GTRI-DR airfoil, two-dimensional structured and unstructured grid computations predicted the experimental trend in sectional lift variation with blowing coefficient very well. Good code to code comparisons between the chordwise surface pressure coefficients and the solution streamtraces also indicated that the detailed flow characteristics were matched between the computations. For the GACC-DR airfoil, two-dimensional structured and unstructured grid computations predicted the sectional lift and chordwise pressure distributions accurately at the no blowing condition. However at a moderate blowing coefficient, although the code to code variation was small, the differences between the computations and experiment were significant. Computations were made to investigate the sensitivity of the sectional lift and pressure distributions to some of the experimental and computational parameters, but none of these could entirely account for the differences in the experimental and computational results. Thus, CFD may indeed be adequate as a prediction tool for dual radius CC flows, but limited and difficult to obtain two-dimensional experimental data prevents a confident assessment at this time.

  6. Turbine Vane External Heat Transfer. Volume 1: Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Surface Heat Transfer Distributions with Leading Edge Showerhead Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, E. R.; Wilson, M. D.; Hylton, L. D.; Kaufman, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in predictive design capabilities for external heat transfer to turbine vanes was summarized. A two dimensional linear cascade (previously used to obtain vane surface heat transfer distributions on nonfilm cooled airfoils) was used to examine the effect of leading edge shower head film cooling on downstream heat transfer. The data were used to develop and evaluate analytical models. Modifications to the two dimensional boundary layer model are described. The results were used to formulate and test an effective viscosity model capable of predicting heat transfer phenomena downstream of the leading edge film cooling array on both the suction and pressure surfaces, with and without mass injection.

  7. Calculation of steady and unsteady airfoil flow fields via the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamroth, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A compressible time-dependent procedure for the two-dimensional ensemble averaged Navier-Stokes equations has been applied to the isolated airfoil problem in steady and unsteady flows. The procedure solves the governing equations via the linearized block implicit technique. Turbulence is modeled either via a mixing length or turbulence energy approach. The equations are solved in general non-orthogonal form with no-slip boundary conditions applied at the airfoil surface. Results are presented for airfoils at constant incidence, an airfoil in ramp motion and an airfoil oscillating through a dynamic stall loop. In general, steady converged solutions are obtained within 70 time steps over the range of Mach numbers considered. Comparisons with measured data show good agreement between computation and measurement.

  8. An improved viscid/inviscid interaction procedure for transonic flow over airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnik, R. E.; Chow, R. R.; Mead, H. R.; Jameson, A.

    1985-01-01

    A new interacting boundary layer approach for computing the viscous transonic flow over airfoils is described. The theory includes a complete treatment of viscous interaction effects induced by the wake and accounts for normal pressure gradient effects across the boundary layer near trailing edges. The method is based on systematic expansions of the full Reynolds equation of turbulent flow in the limit of Reynolds numbers, Reynolds infinity. Procedures are developed for incorporating the local trailing edge solution into the numerical solution of the coupled full potential and integral boundary layer equations. Although the theory is strictly applicable to airfoils with cusped or nearly cusped trailing edges and to turbulent boundary layers that remain fully attached to the airfoil surface, the method was successfully applied to more general airfoils and to flows with small separation zones. Comparisons of theoretical solutions with wind tunnel data indicate the present method can accurately predict the section characteristics of airfoils including the absolute levels of drag.

  9. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines (MATE). Project 4: Erosion resistant compressor airfoil coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashid, J. M.; Freling, M.; Friedrich, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of coatings to provide at least a 2X improvement in particulate erosion resistance for steel, nickel and titanium compressor airfoils was identified and demonstrated. Coating materials evaluated included plasma sprayed cobalt tungsten carbide, nickel carbide and diffusion applied chromium plus boron. Several processing parameters for plasma spray processing and diffusion coating were evaluated to identify coating systems having the most potential for providing airfoil erosion resistance. Based on laboratory results and analytical evaluations, selected coating systems were applied to gas turbine blades and evaluated for surface finish, burner rig erosion resistance and effect on high cycle fatigue strength. Based on these tests, the following coatings were recommended for engine testing: Gator-Gard plasma spray 88WC-12Co on titanium alloy airfoils, plasma spray 83WC-17Co on steel and nickel alloy airfoils, and Cr+B on nickel alloy airfoils.

  10. Lift enhancement of an airfoil using a Gurney flap and vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storms, Bruce L.; Jang, Cory S.

    1993-01-01

    The results of a low-speed wind tunnel test are presented for a single-element airfoil incorporating two lift-enhancing devices, namely a Gurney flap and vortex generators. The former consists of a small plate, on the order of one to two percent of the airfoil chord in height, located at the trailing edge perpendicular to the pressure side of the airfoil. The later consist of commercially-available, wishbone-shaped vortex generators. The test was conducted in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-foot Wind Tunnel with a full-span NACA 4412 airfoil. Measurements of surface pressure distributions and wake profiles were made to determine the lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients for the various airfoil configurations. The results indicate that the addition of a Gurney flap increased the maximum lift coefficient from 1.49 up to 1.96.

  11. Aerodynamic performance of an annular classical airfoil cascade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergsten, D. E.; Stauter, R. C.; Fleeter, S.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented for a series of experiments that were performed in a large-scale subsonic annular cascade facility that was specifically designed to provide three-dimensional aerodynamic data for the verification of numerical-calculation codes. In particular, the detailed three-dimensional aerodynamic performance of a classical flat-plate airfoil cascade is determined for angles of incidence of 0, 5, and 10 deg. The resulting data are analyzed and are correlated with predictions obtained from NASA's MERIDL and TSONIC numerical programs. It is found that: (1) at 0 and 5 deg, the airfoil surface data show a good correlation with the predictions; (2) at 10 deg, the data are in fair agreement with the numerical predictions; and (3) the two-dimensional Gaussian similarity relationship is appropriate for the wake velocity profiles in the mid-span region of the airfoil.

  12. An analytic study of nonsteady two-phase laminar boundary layer around an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Yu-Kao

    1989-01-01

    Recently, NASA, FAA, and other organizations have focused their attention upon the possible effects of rain on airfoil performance. Rhode carried out early experiments and concluded that the rain impacting the aircraft increased the drag. Bergrum made numerical calculation for the rain effects on airfoils. Luers and Haines did an analytic investigation and found that heavy rain induces severe aerodynamic penalties including both a momentum penalty due to the impact of the rain and a drag and lift penalty due to rain roughening of the airfoil and fuselage. More recently, Hansman and Barsotti performed experiments and declared that performance degradation of an airfoil in heavy rain is due to the effective roughening of the surface by the water layer. Hansman and Craig did further experimental research at low Reynolds number. E. Dunham made a critical review for the potential influence of rain on airfoil performance. Dunham et al. carried out experiments for the transport type airfoil and concluded that there is a reduction of maximum lift capability with increase in drag. There is a scarcity of published literature in analytic research of two-phase boundary layer around an airfoil. Analytic research is being improved. The following assumptions are made: the fluid flow is non-steady, viscous, and incompressible; the airfoil is represented by a two-dimensional flat plate; and there is only a laminar boundary layer throughout the flow region. The boundary layer approximation is solved and discussed.

  13. Airfoil Vibration Dampers program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The Airfoil Vibration Damper program has consisted of an analysis phase and a testing phase. During the analysis phase, a state-of-the-art computer code was developed, which can be used to guide designers in the placement and sizing of friction dampers. The use of this computer code was demonstrated by performing representative analyses on turbine blades from the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) and High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). The testing phase of the program consisted of performing friction damping tests on two different cantilever beams. Data from these tests provided an empirical check on the accuracy of the computer code developed in the analysis phase. Results of the analysis and testing showed that the computer code can accurately predict the performance of friction dampers. In addition, a valuable set of friction damping data was generated, which can be used to aid in the design of friction dampers, as well as provide benchmark test cases for future code developers.

  14. On the attenuating effect of permeability on the low frequency sound of an airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidenfeld, M.; Manela, A.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of structure permeability on the far-field radiation of a thin airfoil is studied. Assuming low-Mach and high-Reynolds number flow, the near- and far-field descriptions are investigated at flapping-flight and unsteady flow conditions. Analysis is carried out using thin-airfoil theory and compact-body-based calculations for the hydrodynamic and acoustic fields, respectively. Airfoil porosity is modeled via Darcy's law, governed by prescribed distribution of surface intrinsic permeability. Discrete vortex model is applied to describe airfoil wake evolution. To assess the impact of penetrability, results are compared to counterpart predictions for the sound of an impermeable airfoil. Considering the finite-chord airfoil as "acoustically transparent", the leading-order contribution of surface porosity is obtained in terms of an acoustic dipole. It is shown that, at all flow conditions considered, porosity causes attenuation in outcome sound level. This is accompanied by a time-delay in the pressure signal, reflecting the mediating effect of permeability on the interaction of fluid flow with airfoil edge points. To the extent that thin-airfoil theory holds (requiring small normal-to-airfoil flow velocities), the results indicate on a decrease of ~ 10 percent and more in the total energy radiated by a permeable versus an impermeable airfoil. This amounts to a reduction in system sound pressure level of 3 dB and above at pitching flight conditions, where the sound-reducing effect of the seepage dipole pressure becomes dominant. The applicability of Darcy's law to model the effect of material porosity is discussed in light of existing literature.

  15. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L.; Somers, Dan M.

    1995-01-01

    A thick airfoil for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%-26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4-1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects.

  16. Advanced technology airfoil research, volume 2. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive review of airfoil research is presented. The major thrust of the research is in three areas: development of computational aerodynamic codes for airfoil analysis and design, development of experimental facilities and test techniques, and all types of airfoil applications.

  17. Experimental results for the Eppler 387 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, Robert J.; Walker, Betty S.; Millard, Betty F.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results were obtained for an Eppler 387 airfoil in the Langley Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.03 to 0.13 and a chord Reynolds number range for 60,000 to 460,000. Lift and pitching moment data were obtained from airfoil surface pressure measurements and drag data for wake surveys. Oil flow visualization was used to determine laminar separation and turbulent reattachment locations. Comparisons of these results with data on the Eppler 387 airfoil from two other facilities as well as the Eppler airfoil code are included.

  18. Aerodynamic characteristics of an improved 10-percent-thick NASA supercritical airfoil. [Langley 8 foot transonic tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    Refinements in a 10 percent thick supercritical airfoil produced improvements in the overall drag characteristics at normal force coefficients from about 0.30 to 0.65 compared with earlier supercritical airfoils which were developed for a normal force coefficient of 0.7. The drag divergence Mach number of the improved supercritical airfoil (airfoil 26a) varied from approximately 0.82 at a normal force coefficient to of 0.30, to 0.78 at a normal force coefficient of 0.80 with no drag creep evident. Integrated section force and moment data, surface pressure distributions, and typical wake survey profiles are presented.

  19. Control of flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil with a micro-riblet film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.-J.; Jang, Y.-G.

    2005-07-01

    The flow structure of the wake behind a NACA 0012 airfoil covered with a V-shaped micro-riblet film (hereafter, MRF) has been investigated experimentally. The results were compared with the corresponding results from an identical airfoil covered with a smooth polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film of the same thickness. The drag force acting on each airfoil, as well as the spatial distributions of turbulence statistics in the near wake behind each airfoil, were measured for Reynolds numbers (calculated based on the chord length, C=75mm) ranging from Re=1.03×104 to 5.14×104. At Re=1.54×104 (U0=3 m/s), the drag force on the MRF-covered airfoil was about 6.6% lower than that on the smooth airfoil. In contrast, at the higher Reynolds number of Re=4.62×104 (U0=9 m/s), application of the MRF increased the drag force by about 9.8%. To determine the spatial distributions of turbulence intensity, including the mean velocity, turbulence intensity and turbulent kinetic energy, 500 instantaneous velocity fields of the wake behind each airfoil were measured using a 2-frame PIV technique and ensemble averaged. For the case of drag reduction (Re=1.54×104), the near wake behind the MRF-covered airfoil had a shorter vortex formation region and higher vertical velocity component compared with that behind the smooth airfoil. At the downstream end of vortex formation region, the Reynolds shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy for the MRF-covered airfoil were similar or slightly larger than for the smooth airfoil. Smoke-wire flow visualization showed that the presence of the MRF on the airfoil surface caused the smoke filaments to become thinner and to be separated by a smaller lateral spacing, indicating suppression of spanwise movement. For the drag-increasing case (Re=4.62×104), the presence of MRF grooves on the airfoil seemed to increase the vertical velocity component and decrease the height of the large-scale streamwise vortices, which interacted actively. This active

  20. Airfoil shape for a turbine nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Patik, Joseph Francis; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2002-01-01

    A first-stage nozzle vane includes an airfoil having a profile according to Table I. The annulus profile of the hot gas path is defined in conjunction with the airfoil profile and the profile of the inner and outer walls by the Cartesian coordinate values given in Tables I and II, respectively. The airfoil is a three-dimensional bowed design, both in the airfoil body and in the trailing edge. The airfoil is steam and air-cooled by flowing cooling mediums through cavities extending in the vane between inner and outer walls.

  1. Hook nozzle arrangement for supporting airfoil vanes

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A gas turbine engine's nozzle structure includes a nozzle support ring, a plurality of shroud segments, and a plurality of airfoil vanes. The plurality of shroud segments are distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each airfoil vane is connected to a corresponding shroud segment so that the airfoil vanes are also distributed around the nozzle support ring. Each shroud segment has a hook engaging the nozzle support ring so that the shroud segments and corresponding airfoil vanes are supported by the nozzle support ring. The nozzle support ring, the shroud segments, and the airfoil vanes may be ceramic.

  2. Synthetic Vortex Generator Jets Used to Control Separation on Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Volino, Ralph J.

    2005-01-01

    Low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoils are subject to increasingly stronger pressure gradients as designers impose higher loading in an effort to improve efficiency and lower cost by reducing the number of airfoils in an engine. When the adverse pressure gradient on the suction side of these airfoils becomes strong enough, the boundary layer will separate. Separation bubbles, particularly those that fail to reattach, can result in a significant loss of lift and a subsequent degradation of engine efficiency. The problem is particularly relevant in aircraft engines. Airfoils optimized to produce maximum power under takeoff conditions may still experience boundary layer separation at cruise conditions because of the thinner air and lower Reynolds numbers at altitude. Component efficiency can drop significantly between takeoff and cruise conditions. The decrease is about 2 percent in large commercial transport engines, and it could be as large as 7 percent in smaller engines operating at higher altitudes. Therefore, it is very beneficial to eliminate, or at least reduce, the separation bubble.

  3. Complex Flow Separation Pattern on Transonic Fan Airfoils Revealed by Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Modern turbofan engines employ a highly loaded fan stage with transonic or low-supersonic velocities in the blade-tip region. The fan blades are often prone to flutter at off-design conditions. Flutter is a highly undesirable and dangerous self-excited mode of blade oscillations that can result in high-cycle fatigue blade failure. The origins of blade flutter are not fully understood yet. The latest view is that the blade oscillations are triggered by high-frequency changes in the extent of the partially separated area on the airfoil suction side. There is a lack of experimental data describing the separated flow characteristics of modern airfoils for transonic fans.

  4. Estimating soil suction from electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegari, E.; Di Maio, R.

    2013-09-01

    Soil suction and resistivity strongly depend on the degree of soil saturation and, therefore, both are used for estimating water content variations. The main difference between them is that soil suction is measured using tensiometers, which give point information, while resistivity is obtained by tomography surveys, which provide distributions of resistivity values in large volumes, although with less accuracy. In this paper, we have related soil suction to electrical resistivity with the aim of obtaining information about soil suction changes in large volumes, and not only for small areas around soil suction probes. We derived analytical relationships between soil matric suction and electrical resistivity by combining the empirical laws of van Genuchten and Archie. The obtained relationships were used to evaluate maps of soil suction values in different ashy layers originating in the explosive activity of the Mt Somma-Vesuvius volcano (southern Italy). Our findings provided a further example of the high potential of geophysical methods in contributing to more effective monitoring of soil stress conditions; this is of primary importance in areas where rainfall-induced landslides occur periodically.

  5. Optimization of steady suction for disturbance control on infinite swept wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralits, Jan O.; Hanifi, Ardeshir

    2003-09-01

    We present a theory for computing the optimal steady suction distribution to suppress convectively unstable disturbances in growing boundary layers on infinite swept wings. This work includes optimization based on minimizing the disturbance kinetic energy and the integral of the shape factor. Further, a suction distribution in a continuous control domain is compared to an approach using a number of discrete pressure chambers. In the latter case, the internal static pressures of these chambers are optimized. Optimality systems are derived using Lagrange multipliers. The corresponding optimality conditions are evaluated using the adjoint of the parabolized stability equations and the adjoint of the boundary layer equations. Results are presented for an airfoil designed for medium range commercial aircraft. We show that an optimal suction distribution based on a minimization of the integral of the shape factor is not always successful in the sense of delaying laminar-turbulent transition. It is also demonstrated that including different types of disturbances, e.g., Tollmien-Schlichting and cross-flow types, in the analysis may be crucial.

  6. The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil - Drag equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Harris, Charles D.; Harvey, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has designed a swept, supercritical airfoil incorporating Laminar Flow Control for testing at transonic speeds. Analytical expressions have been developed and an evaluation made of the experimental section drag, composed of suction drag and wake drag, using theoretical design information and experimental data. The analysis shows that, although the sweep-induced boundary-layer crossflow influence on the wake drag is too large to be ignored and there is not a practical method for evaluating these crossflow effects on the experimental wake data, the conventional unswept 2-D wake-drag computation used in the reduction of the experimental data is at worst 10 percent too high.

  7. An airfoil designed for a high-altitude, long endurance remotely piloted vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughmer, Mark D.; Somers, Dan M.

    1987-01-01

    The preliminary design of high-altitude, long-endurance RPVs is complicated by the paucity of data concerning airfoils with high lift coefficients at low Re numbers. Attention is presently given to a generic airfoil of this type for the design Re number range of 700,000 to 2 million. Low drag is predicted for lift coefficients from 0.4 (for high speed dashes) to 1.5 (for maximum mission endurance). The airfoil is such that its maximum lift coefficient, at 1.8, is unaffected by the surface contamination that would be encountered during takeoffs and landings in rain or over insect-infested runways.

  8. Fluid mechanics mechanisms in the stall process of airfoils for helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Phenomena that control the flow during the stall portion of a dynamic stall cycle are analyzed, and their effect on blade motion is outlined. Four mechanisms by which dynamic stall may be initiated are identified: (1) bursting of the separation bubble, (2) flow reversal in the turbulent boundary layer on the airfoil upper surface, (3) shock wave-boundary layer interaction behind the airfoil crest, and (4) acoustic wave propagation below the airfoil. The fluid mechanics that contribute to the identified flow phenomena are summarized, and the usefulness of a model that incorporates the required fluid mechanics mechanisms is discussed.

  9. Pneumatic Spoiler Controls Airfoil Lift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, D.; Krauss, T.

    1991-01-01

    Air ejection from leading edge of airfoil used for controlled decrease of lift. Pneumatic-spoiler principle developed for equalizing lift on helicopter rotor blades. Also used to enhance aerodynamic control of short-fuselage or rudderless aircraft such as "flying-wing" airplanes. Leading-edge injection increases maneuverability of such high-performance fixed-wing aircraft as fighters.

  10. Supercritical Flow Past Symmetrical Airfoils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    about quasi-elliptic airfoil sections. The method was later extended by Boerstoel [1967] to present a catalog of solutions for certain body shapes. Bauer...Lecture Notes in Economics and Mathematical Systems, Springer- Verlag, New York, 1972. Boerstoel , J. W., "A Survey of Symmetrical Transonic Potential

  11. High Reynolds Number Hybrid Laminar Flow Control (HLFC) Flight Experiment. Report 4; Suction System Design and Manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the design of the leading edge suction system for flight demonstration of hybrid laminar flow control on the Boeing 757 airplane. The exterior pressures on the wing surface and the required suction quantity and distribution were determined in previous work. A system consisting of porous skin, sub-surface spanwise passages ("flutes"), pressure regulating screens and valves, collection fittings, ducts and a turbocompressor was defined to provide the required suction flow. Provisions were also made for flexible control of suction distribution and quantity for HLFC research purposes. Analysis methods for determining pressure drops and flow for transpiration heating for thermal anti-icing are defined. The control scheme used to observe and modulate suction distribution in flight is described.

  12. Efficient atraumatic liquid suction by means of slit suction tubes combined with a pressure control unit.

    PubMed

    Vällfors, B

    1984-01-01

    In 1976 a modified suction system for neurosurgery and precision surgery was presented. It was developed to meet the need for efficient and atraumatic liquid suction. the system consists of suction tube ends provided with three vertical slits in the suction edge (W-tubes), a Pressure Control Unit (PCU) and an independent suction pump with an air capacity of 25-30 litres per min. This system has subsequently been modified for microsurgery. The PCU normally controls the negative pressure to 20 kPa (corresponding to 200 cm of water) for atraumatic suction of liquid, which is needed during most of the operating time. For suction of various tissues or cleaning the system, the surgeon can set the pressure limit to 50 or 90 kPa by means of a foot-operated IR-transmitter in a pedal with a kick-down function. The PCU and the W-tubes, which neutralize the pressure load on tissue and the sudden interruption of liquid flow that are inevitable with conventional suction tips, form a system with a high liquid suction capacity in spite of the atraumatic suction pressure. This is possible because the slits maintain a large active suction area. Crushed or soft tissues and coagulated blood are aspirated as and when required, if necessary by elevation of the negative pressure limit. The W-tubes are not provided with an air inlet hole on the tube because that method of pressure control proved unpredictable and variable and reduced the suction capacity by interfering with the flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. The modelling of symmetric airfoil vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, B. A.; Wendt, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted to determine the dependence of vortex generator geometry and impinging flow conditions on shed vortex circulation and crossplane peak vorticity for one type of vortex generator. The vortex generator is a symmetric airfoil having a NACA 0012 cross-sectional profile. The geometry and flow parameters varied include angle-of-attack alfa, chordlength c, span h, and Mach number M. The vortex generators are mounted either in isolation or in a symmetric counter-rotating array configuration on the inside surface of a straight pipe. The turbulent boundary layer thickness to pipe radius ratio is delta/R = 0. 17. Circulation and peak vorticity data are derived from crossplane velocity measurements conducted at or about 1 chord downstream of the vortex generator trailing edge. Shed vortex circulation is observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. With these parameters held constant, circulation is observed to fall off in monotonic fashion with increasing airfoil aspect ratio AR. Shed vortex peak vorticity is also observed to be proportional to M, alfa, and h/delta. Unlike circulation, however, peak vorticity is observed to increase with increasing aspect ratio, reaching a peak value at AR approx. 2.0 before falling off.

  14. Calculation of vortex lift effect for cambered wings by the suction analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, C. E.; Chang, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    An improved version of Woodward's chord plane aerodynamic panel method for subsonic and supersonic flow is developed for cambered wings exhibiting edge separated vortex flow, including those with leading edge vortex flaps. The exact relation between leading edge thrust and suction force in potential flow is derived. Instead of assuming the rotated suction force to be normal to wing surface at the leading edge, new orientation for the rotated suction force is determined through consideration of the momentum principle. The supersonic suction analogy method is improved by using an effective angle of attack defined through a semi-empirical method. Comparisons of predicted results with available data in subsonic and supersonic flow are presented.

  15. On the influence of airfoil deviations on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstroth, J.; Seume, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The manufacture of large wind turbine rotor blades is a difficult task that still involves a certain degree of manual labor. Due to the complexity, airfoil deviations between the design airfoils and the manufactured blade are certain to arise. Presently, the understanding of the impact of manufacturing uncertainties on the aerodynamic performance is still incomplete. The present work analyzes the influence of a series of airfoil deviations likely to occur during manufacturing by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics and the aeroelastic code FAST. The average power production of the NREL 5MW wind turbine is used to evaluate the different airfoil deviations. Analyzed deviations include: Mold tilt towards the leading and trailing edge, thick bond lines, thick bond lines with cantilever correction, backward facing steps and airfoil waviness. The most severe influences are observed for mold tilt towards the leading and thick bond lines. By applying the cantilever correction, the influence of thick bond lines is almost compensated. Airfoil waviness is very dependent on amplitude height and the location along the surface of the airfoil. Increased influence is observed for backward facing steps, once they are high enough to trigger boundary layer transition close to the leading edge.

  16. On the effect of leading edge blowing on circulation control airfoil aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    In the present context the term circulation control is used to denote a method of lift generation that utilizes tangential jet blowing over the upper surface of a rounded trailing edge airfoil to determine the location of the boundary layer separation points, thus setting an effective Kutta condition. At present little information exists on the flow structure generated by circulation control airfoils under leading edge blowing. Consequently, no theoretical methods exist to predict airfoil performance under such conditions. An experimental study of the flow field generated by a two dimensional circulation control airfoil under steady leading and trailing edge blowing was undertaken. The objective was to fundamentally understand the overall flow structure generated and its relation to airfoil performance. Flow visualization was performed to define the overall flow field structure. Measurements of the airfoil forces were also made to provide a correlation of the observed flow field structure to airfoil performance. Preliminary results are presented, specifically on the effect on the flow field structure of leading edge blowing, alone and in conjunction with trailing edge blowing.

  17. SiC/SiC Leading Edge Turbine Airfoil Tested Under Simulated Gas Turbine Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. Craig; Hatton, Kenneth S.

    1999-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics have been proposed as component materials for use in gas turbine engine hot-sections. A high pressure burner rig was used to expose both a baseline metal airfoil and ceramic matrix composite leading edge airfoil to typical gas turbine conditions to comparatively evaluate the material response at high temperatures. To eliminate many of the concerns related to an entirely ceramic, rotating airfoil, this study has focused on equipping a stationary metal airfoil with a ceramic leading edge insert to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of such a configuration. Here, the idea was to allow the SiC/SiC composite to be integrated as the airfoil's leading edge, operating in a "free-floating" or unrestrained manner. and provide temperature relief to the metal blade underneath. The test included cycling the airfoils between simulated idle, lift, and cruise flight conditions. In addition, the airfoils were air-cooled, uniquely instrumented, and exposed to the same internal and external conditions, which included gas temperatures in excess of 1370 C (2500 F). Results show the leading edge insert remained structurally intact after 200 simulated flight cycles with only a slightly oxidized surface. The instrumentation clearly suggested a significant reduction (approximately 600 F) in internal metal temperatures as a result of the ceramic leading edge. The object of this testing was to validate the design and analysis done by Materials Research and Design of Rosemont, PA and to determine the feasibility of this design for the intended application.

  18. Numerical study on reduction of aerodynamic noise around an airfoil with biomimetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Chengchun; Wu, Zhengyang; Wharton, James; Ren, Luquan

    2017-04-01

    A biomimetic airfoil featuring leading edge waves, trailing edge serrations and surface ridges is proposed in this study, based on flow control with each section meeting the NACA 0012 airfoil profile. Numerical simulations have been conducted to compare aerodynamic and acoustic performances between the NACA 0012 and biomimetic airfoils. These simulations utilize the large eddy simulation (LES) method and aeroacoustic analogy at an angle of attack of 0° and a Reynolds number of 1.0×105, based on using the airfoil chord as the characteristic length. The simulation results reveal the overall sound pressure levels (OASPLs) for all frequencies and at the seven observer points around the biomimetic airfoil, and a decrease of 13.1-13.9 dB is observed, whereas the drag coefficient is almost unchanged. The biomimetic structures can transform the shedding vortices in laminar mode for the NACA 0012 airfoil to regular horseshoe-type vortices in the wake, and reduce the spanwise correlation of the large-scale vortices, thereby restrain the vortex shedding noise around the biomimetic airfoil.

  19. A Two Element Laminar Flow Airfoil Optimized for Cruise. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steen, Gregory Glen

    1994-01-01

    Numerical and experimental results are presented for a new two-element, fixed-geometry natural laminar flow airfoil optimized for cruise Reynolds numbers on the order of three million. The airfoil design consists of a primary element and an independent secondary element with a primary to secondary chord ratio of three to one. The airfoil was designed to improve the cruise lift-to-drag ratio while maintaining an appropriate landing capability when compared to conventional airfoils. The airfoil was numerically developed utilizing the NASA Langley Multi-Component Airfoil Analysis computer code running on a personal computer. Numerical results show a nearly 11.75 percent decrease in overall wing drag with no increase in stall speed at sailplane cruise conditions when compared to a wing based on an efficient single element airfoil. Section surface pressure, wake survey, transition location, and flow visualization results were obtained in the Texas A&M University Low Speed Wind Tunnel. Comparisons between the numerical and experimental data, the effects of the relative position and angle of the two elements, and Reynolds number variations from 8 x 10(exp 5) to 3 x 10(exp 6) for the optimum geometry case are presented.

  20. Effects of enviromentally imposed roughness on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1987-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the effects of rain, insects, and ice on airfoil performance are examined. The extent to which the available information can be incorporated in a calculation method in terms of change of shape and surface roughness is discussed. The methods described are based on the interactive boundary layer procedure of Cebeci or on the thin layer Navier Stokes procedure developed at NASA. Cases presented show that extensive flow separation occurs on the rough surfaces.

  1. Effects of environmentally imposed roughness on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1987-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the effects of rain, insects, and ice on airfoil performance are examined. The extent to which the available information can be incorporated in a calculation method in terms of change of shape and surface roughness is discussed. The methods described are based on the interactive boundary procedure of Cebeci or on the thin layer Navier Stokes procedure developed at NASA. Cases presented show that extensive flow separation occurs on the rough surfaces.

  2. Heat Transfer of Airfoils and Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seibert, Otto

    1943-01-01

    The few available test data on the heat dissipation of wholly or partly heated airfoil models are compared with the corresponding data for the flat plate as obtained by an extension of Prandtl's momentum theory, with differentiation between laminar and turbulent boundary layer and transitional region between both, the extent and appearance of which depend upon certain critical factors. The satisfactory agreement obtained justifies far-reaching conclusions in respect to other profile forms and arrangements of heated surface areas. The temperature relationship of the material quantities in its effect on the heat dissipation is discussed as far as is possible at tk.e present state of research, and it is shown that the profile drag of heated wing surfaces can increase or decrease with the temperature increase depending upon the momentarily existent structure of the boundary layer.

  3. Effectiveness of Thermal-Pneumatic Airfoil-Ice-Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gowan, William H., Jr.; Mulholland, Donald R.

    1951-01-01

    Icing and drag investigations were conducted in the NACA Lewis icing research tunnel employing a combination thermal-pneumatic de-icer mounted on a 42-inch-chord NACA 0018 airfoil. The de-icer consisted of a 3-inch-wide electrically heated strip symmetrically located about the leading edge with inflatable tubes on the upper and lower airfoil surfaces aft of the heated area. The entire de-icer extended to approximately 25 percent of chord. A maximum power density of 9.25 watts per square inch was required for marginal ice protection on the airfoil leading edge at an air temperature of 00 F and an airspeed of 300 miles per hour. Drag measurements indicated, that without icing, the de-icer installation increased the section drag to approximately 140 percent of that of the bare airfoil; with the tubes inflated, this value increased to a maximum of approximately 620 percent. A 2-minute tube-inflation cycle prevented excessive ice formation on the inflatable area although small scattered residual Ice formations remained after inflation and were removed intermittently during later cycles. Effects of the time lag of heater temperatures after initial application of power and the insulating effect of ice formations on heater temperatures were also determined.

  4. Decomposing the aerodynamic forces of low-Reynolds flapping airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriche, Manuel; Garcia-Villalba, Manuel; Flores, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of flow around flapping NACA0012 airfoils at relatively small Reynolds numbers, Re = 1000 . The simulations are carried out with TUCAN, an in-house code that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible flow with an immersed boundary method to model the presence of the airfoil. The motion of the airfoil is composed of a vertical translation, heaving, and a rotation about the quarter of the chord, pitching. Both motions are prescribed by sinusoidal laws, with a reduced frequency of k = 1 . 41 , a pitching amplitude of 30deg and a heaving amplitude of one chord. Both, the mean pitch angle and the phase shift between pitching and heaving motions are varied, to build a database with 18 configurations. Four of these cases are analysed in detail using the force decomposition algorithm of Chang (1992) and Martín Alcántara et al. (2015). This method decomposes the total aerodynamic force into added-mass (translation and rotation of the airfoil), a volumetric contribution from the vorticity (circulatory effects) and a surface contribution proportional to viscosity. In particular we will focus on the second, analysing the contribution of the leading and trailing edge vortices that typically appear in these flows. This work has been supported by the Spanish MINECO under Grant TRA2013-41103-P. The authors thankfully acknowledge the computer resources provided by the Red Española de Supercomputacion.

  5. Low-speed wind tunnel results for a modified 13-percent-thick airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests were conducted to evaluate the effects on performance of modifying a 13-percent-thick low-speed airfoil. The airfoil contour was altered to reduce the aft upper surface pressure gradient and hence delay boundary layer separation at typical lift coefficients for light general aviation airplanes. The tests were conducted at a Mach number of 0.15 or less over a Reynolds number range from about 1,000,000 to 9,000,000.

  6. Three-dimensional aerodynamics of an annular airfoil cascade including loading effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeter, S.; Stauter, R. C.; Manwaring, S. R.

    1989-10-01

    A series of experiments are described which investigate and quantify the effect of loading on the three-dimensional flow through a subsonic annular cascade of cambered airfoils. At two levels of loading, detailed data quantify the cascade inlet velocity, the intrapassage flow field, the airfoil surface pressure distributions, the exit flow field, and the total pressure loss distributions. Aerodynamic loading is shown to strengthen the radial pressure gradient, the passage vortex structure, the vortex-endwall boundary layer interactions, and the losses.

  7. Three-dimensional aerodynamics of an annular airfoil cascade including loading effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleeter, S.; Stauter, R. C.; Manwaring, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    A series of experiments are described which investigate and quantify the effect of loading on the three-dimensional flow through a subsonic annular cascade of cambered airfoils. At two levels of loading, detailed data quantify the cascade inlet velocity, the intrapassage flow field, the airfoil surface pressure distributions, the exit flow field, and the total pressure loss distributions. Aerodynamic loading is shown to strengthen the radial pressure gradient, the passage vortex structure, the vortex-endwall boundary layer interactions, and the losses.

  8. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  9. Thin oblique airfoils at supersonic speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jone, Robert T

    1946-01-01

    The well-known methods of thin-airfoil theory have been extended to oblique or sweptback airfoils of finite aspect ratio moving at supersonic speeds. The cases considered thus far are symmetrical airfoils at zero lift having plan forms bounded by straight lines. Because of the conical form of the elementary flow fields, the results are comparable in simplicity to the results of the two-dimensional thin-airfoil theory for subsonic speeds. In the case of untapered airfoils swept back behind the Mach cone the pressure distribution at the center section is similar to that given by the Ackeret theory for a straight airfoil. With increasing distance from the center section the distribution approaches the form given by the subsonic-flow theory. The pressure drag is concentrated chiefly at the center section and for long wings a slight negative drag may appear on outboard sections. (author)

  10. Determination of forced convective heat transfer coefficients for subsonic flows over heated asymmetric NANA 4412 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dag, Yusuf

    Forced convection over traditional surfaces such as flat plate, cylinder and sphere have been well researched and documented. Data on forced convection over airfoil surfaces, however, remain very scanty in literature. High altitude vehicles that employ airfoils as lifting surfaces often suffer leading edge ice accretions which have tremendous negative consequences on the lifting capabilities and stability of the vehicle. One of the ways of mitigating the effect of ice accretion involves judicious leading edge convective cooling technique which in turn depends on the accuracy of convective heat transfer coefficient used in the analysis. In this study empirical investigation of convective heat transfer measurements on asymmetric airfoil is presented at different angle of attacks ranging from 0° to 20° under subsonic flow regime. The top and bottom surface temperatures are measured at given points using Senflex hot film sensors (Tao System Inc.) and used to determine heat transfer characteristics of the airfoils. The model surfaces are subjected to constant heat fluxes using KP Kapton flexible heating pads. The monitored temperature data are then utilized to determine the heat convection coefficients modelled empirically as the Nusselt Number on the surface of the airfoil. The experimental work is conducted in an open circuit-Eiffel type wind tunnel, powered by a 37 kW electrical motor that is able to generate subsonic air velocities up to around 41 m/s in the 24 square-inch test section. The heat transfer experiments have been carried out under constant heat flux supply to the asymmetric airfoil. The convective heat transfer coefficients are determined from measured surface temperature and free stream temperature and investigated in the form of Nusselt number. The variation of Nusselt number is shown with Reynolds number at various angles of attacks. It is concluded that Nusselt number increases with increasing Reynolds number and increase in angle of attack from 0

  11. Root region airfoil for wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, J.L.; Somers, D.M.

    1995-05-23

    A thick airfoil is described for the root region of the blade of a wind turbine. The airfoil has a thickness in a range from 24%--26% and a Reynolds number in a range from 1,000,000 to 1,800,000. The airfoil has a maximum lift coefficient of 1.4--1.6 that has minimum sensitivity to roughness effects. 3 Figs.

  12. Boundary-layer stability and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeffrey K.

    1986-01-01

    Several different natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils have been analyzed for stability of the laminar boundary layer using linear stability codes. The NLF airfoils analyzed come from three different design conditions: incompressible; compressible with no sweep; and compressible with sweep. Some of the design problems are discussed, concentrating on those problems associated with keeping the boundary layer laminar. Also, there is a discussion on how a linear stability analysis was effectively used to improve the design for some of the airfoils.

  13. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  14. Evaluation of a stalled airfoil analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Stalled Airfoil Analysis Program (SAAP) is a computer code for predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil up to, and beyond, stall. SAAP is presently evaluated through comparisons with experiments and with two other theoretical methods over an extensive range of airfoils and Reynolds number conditions. SAAP modeled drag more accurately than either of the other methods, and at angles of attack below stall yielded a smoother lift variation with angle of attack.

  15. Microbial contamination of suction tubes attached to suction instruments and preventive methods.

    PubMed

    Yorioka, Katsuhiro; Oie, Shigeharu; Kamiya, Akira

    2010-03-01

    We investigated the microbial contamination of suction tubes attached to wall-type suction instruments. Microbial contamination of suction tubes used for endoscopy or sputum suction in hospital wards was examined before and after their disinfection. In addition, disinfection and washing methods for suction tubes were evaluated. Suction tubes (n=33) before disinfection were contaminated with 10(2)-10(8) colony-forming units (cfu)/tube. The main contaminants were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The suction tubes were disinfected with sodium hypochlorite (n=11) or hot water (n=11), or by an automatic tube cleaner (n=11). After 2-h immersion in 0.1% (1,000 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, 10(3)-10(7) cfu/tube of bacteria were detected in all 11 tubes examined. After washing in hot running water (65 degrees C), 10(3)-10(7) cfu/tube were detected in 3 of the 11 examined tubes. The bacteria detected in the suction tubes after disinfection with sodium hypochlorite or hot water were P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, and S. maltophilia. On the other hand, after washing with warm water (40 degrees C) using the automatic tube cleaner, contamination was found to be <20 cfu/tube (lower detection limit, 20 cfu/tube) in all 11 tubes examined. These results suggest the usefulness of washing with automatic tube cleaners.

  16. Inverse transonic airfoil design including viscous interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique was developed for the analysis of specified transonic airfoils or for the design of airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution, including the effect of weak viscous interaction. The method uses the full potential equation, a stretched Cartesian coordinate system, and the Nash-MacDonald turbulent boundary layer method. Comparisons with experimental data for typical transonic airfoils show excellent agreement. An example shows the application of the method to design a thick aft-cambered airfoil, and the effects of viscous interaction on its performance are discussed.

  17. Generalized multi-point inverse airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selig, Michael S.; Maughmer, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    In a rather general sense, inverse airfoil design can be taken to mean the problem of specifying a desired set of airfoil characteristics, such as the airfoil maximum thickness ratio, pitching moment, part of the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development, etc., then from this information determine the corresponding airfoil shape. This paper presents a method which approaches the design problem from this perspective. In particular, the airfoil is divided into segments along which, together with the design conditions, either the velocity distribution or boundary-layer development may be prescribed. In addition to these local desired distributions, single parameters like the airfoil thickness can be specified. The problem of finding the airfoil shape is determined by coupling an incompressible, inviscid, inverse airfoil design method with a direct integral boundary-layer analysis method and solving the resulting nonlinear equations via a multidimensional Newton iteration technique. The approach is fast and easily allows for interactive design. It is also flexible and could be adapted to solving compressible, inverse airfoil design problems.

  18. Schooling behavior of heaving flexible airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Sunghyuk; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    The schooling behavior of rigid and flexible NACA0017 airfoils in the heaving motion is experimentally explored in a merry-go-round equipment. The airfoil was attached to the end of a horizontal support bar whose other end was connected to the freely rotating vertical axis. The axis was forced to undergo a sinusoidal motion in the vertical direction to make a pure heaving motion of the airfoils in the frequency range of 0.5 to 5 Hz. The propulsion due to the heaving airfoils is expressed by a horizontally rotating speed of the support bar. This experimental setup is simulating infinite schooling situations of airfoils in an in-phase heaving motion with the streamwise distance d. The ratio of the distance to the chord length d/ c was determined by the number of airfoils (1 <= n <= 8) . The rotational frequency F according to the heaving frequency f was measured with different experimental parameters. The schooling number S = f /(nF), representing the number of heaving oscillations between each airfoil, was introduced to explain the schooling behavior of the airfoils. The effects of the flexibility, d/ c and f on the propulsive performance were examined with the schooling behavior of the airfoils. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2016-004749) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP).

  19. Adjoint-based airfoil shape optimization in transonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramanzini, Joe-Ray

    The primary focus of this work is efficient aerodynamic shape optimization in transonic flow. Adjoint-based optimization techniques are employed on airfoil sections and evaluated in terms of computational accuracy as well as efficiency. This study examines two test cases proposed by the AIAA Aerodynamic Design Optimization Discussion Group. The first is a two-dimensional, transonic, inviscid, non-lifting optimization of a Modified-NACA 0012 airfoil. The second is a two-dimensional, transonic, viscous optimization problem using a RAE 2822 airfoil. The FUN3D CFD code of NASA Langley Research Center is used as the ow solver for the gradient-based optimization cases. Two shape parameterization techniques are employed to study their effect and the number of design variables on the final optimized shape: Multidisciplinary Aerodynamic-Structural Shape Optimization Using Deformation (MASSOUD) and the BandAids free-form deformation technique. For the two airfoil cases, angle of attack is treated as a global design variable. The thickness and camber distributions are the local design variables for MASSOUD, and selected airfoil surface grid points are the local design variables for BandAids. Using the MASSOUD technique, a drag reduction of 72.14% is achieved for the NACA 0012 case, reducing the total number of drag counts from 473.91 to 130.59. Employing the BandAids technique yields a 78.67% drag reduction, from 473.91 to 99.98. The RAE 2822 case exhibited a drag reduction from 217.79 to 132.79 counts, a 39.05% decrease using BandAids.

  20. A compressible solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent flow about an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamroth, S. J.; Gibeling, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    A compressible time dependent solution of the Navier-Stokes equations including a transition turbulence model is obtained for the isolated airfoil flow field problem. The equations are solved by a consistently split linearized block implicit scheme. A nonorthogonal body-fitted coordinate system is used which has maximum resolution near the airfoil surface and in the region of the airfoil leading edge. The transition turbulence model is based upon the turbulence kinetic energy equation and predicts regions of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow. Mean flow field and turbulence field results are presented for an NACA 0012 airfoil at zero and nonzero incidence angles of Reynolds number up to one million and low subsonic Mach numbers.

  1. SmaggIce 2.0: Additional Capabilities for Interactive Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreeger, Richard E.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Schilling, Herbert W.; Vickerman, Mary B.

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Modeling and Grid Generation for Iced Airfoils (SmaggIce) software toolkit has been extended to allow interactive grid generation for multi-element iced airfoils. The essential phases of an icing effects study include geometry preparation, block creation and grid generation. SmaggIce Version 2.0 now includes these main capabilities for both single and multi-element airfoils, plus an improved flow solver interface and a variety of additional tools to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of icing effects studies. An overview of these features is given, especially the new multi-element blocking strategy using the multiple wakes method. Examples are given which illustrate the capabilities of SmaggIce for conducting an icing effects study for both single and multi-element airfoils.

  2. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil.

    PubMed

    Tian, Weijun; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jiyue; Li, Ming; Ma, Yi; Cong, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift.

  3. Bionic Design of Wind Turbine Blade Based on Long-Eared Owl's Airfoil

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a bionic design for the airfoil of wind turbines inspired by the morphology of Long-eared Owl's wings. Glauert Model was adopted to design the standard blade and the bionic blade, respectively. Numerical analysis method was utilized to study the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoils as well as the blades. Results show that the bionic airfoil inspired by the airfoil at the 50% aspect ratio of the Long-eared Owl's wing gives rise to a superior lift coefficient and stalling performance and thus can be beneficial to improving the performance of the wind turbine blade. Also, the efficiency of the bionic blade in wind turbine blades tests increases by 12% or above (up to 44%) compared to that of the standard blade. The reason lies in the bigger pressure difference between the upper and lower surface which can provide stronger lift. PMID:28243053

  4. Grid generation by elliptic partial differential equations for a tri-element Augmentor-Wing airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Two efforts to numerically simulate the flow about the Augmentor-Wing airfoil in the cruise configuration using the GRAPE elliptic partial differential equation grid generator algorithm are discussed. The Augmentor-Wing consists of a main airfoil with a slotted trailing edge for blowing and two smaller airfoils shrouding the blowing jet. The airfoil and the algorithm are described, and the application of GRAPE to an unsteady viscous flow simulation and a transonic full-potential approach is considered. The procedure involves dividing a complicated flow region into an arbitrary number of zones and ensuring continuity of grid lines, their slopes, and their point distributions across the zonal boundaries. The method for distributing the body-surface grid points is discussed.

  5. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  6. Three-dimensional effects on airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevallier, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of boundary layer flows along the walls of wind tunnels were studied to validate the transfer of two dimensional calculations to three dimensional transonic flowfield calculations. Results from trials in various wind tunnels were examind to determine the effects of the wall boundary flow on the control surfaces of an airfoil. Models sliding along a groove in the wall of a channel at sub- and transonic speeds were examined, with the finding that with either nonuniformities in the groove, or even if the channel walls are uniform, the lateral boundary layer can cause variations in the central flow region or alter the onset of shock at the transition point. Models for the effects in both turbulence and in the absence of turbulence are formulated, and it is noted that the characteristics of individual wind tunnels must be studied to quantify any existing three dimensional effects.

  7. Porous plug for reducing orifice induced pressure error in airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, Elizabeth B. (Inventor); Gloss, Blair B. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Stack, John P. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A porous plug is provided for the reduction or elimination of positive error caused by the orifice during static pressure measurements of airfoils. The porous plug is press fitted into the orifice, thereby preventing the error caused either by fluid flow turning into the exposed orifice or by the fluid flow stagnating at the downstream edge of the orifice. In addition, the porous plug is made flush with the outer surface of the airfoil, by filing and polishing, to provide a smooth surface which alleviates the error caused by imperfections in the orifice. The porous plug is preferably made of sintered metal, which allows air to pass through the pores, so that the static pressure measurements can be made by remote transducers.

  8. Aerodynamic coefficients in generalized unsteady thin airfoil theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    Two cases are considered: (1) rigid body motion of an airfoil-flap combination consisting of vertical translation of given amplitude, rotation of given amplitude about a specified axis, and rotation of given amplitude of the control surface alone about its hinge; the upwash for this problem is defined mathematically; and (2) sinusoidal gust of given amplitude and wave number, for which the upwash is defined mathematically. Simple universal formulas are presented for the most important aerodynamic coefficients in unsteady thin airfoil theory. The lift and moment induced by a generalized gust are evaluated explicitly in terms of the gust wavelength. Similarly, in the control surface problem, the lift, moment, and hinge moments are given as explicit algebraic functions of hinge location. These results can be used together with any of the standard numerical inversion routines for the elementary loads (pitch and heave).

  9. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-15-119, 127) Surface, Subsurface and Tank 43H (HTF-43-15-116, 117 and 118) Surface, Feed Pump Suction and Jet Suction Subsurface Supernatant Samples in Support of Enrichment, Corrosion Control and Salt Batch Planning Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.

    2015-12-17

    Compositional feed limits have been established to ensure that a nuclear criticality event for the 2H and 3H Evaporators is not possible. The Enrichment Control Program (ECP) requires feed sampling to determine the equivalent enriched uranium content prior to transfer of waste other than recycle transfers (requires sampling to determine the equivalent enriched uranium at two locations in Tanks 38H and 43H every 26 weeks) The Corrosion Control Program (CCP) establishes concentration and temperature limits for key constituents and periodic sampling and analysis to confirm that waste supernate is within these limits. This report provides the results of analyses on Tanks 38H and 43H surface and subsurface supernatant liquid samples in support of the ECP, the CCP, and the Salt Batch 10 Planning Program.

  10. Wind-tunnel Tests of the NACA 45-125 Airfoil: A Thick Airfoil for High-Speed Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, James B.

    1940-01-01

    Investigations of the pressure distribution, the profile drag, and the location of transition for a 30-inch-chord 25-percent-thick N.A,C.A. 45-125 airfoil were made in the N.A.C.A 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel for the purpose of aiding in the development of a thick wing for high-speed airplanes. The tests were made at a lift coefficient of 0.1 for Reynolds Numbers from 1,750,000 to 8,690,000, corresponding to speeds from 80 to 440 miles per hour at 59 F. The effect on the profile drag of fixing the transition point was also investigated. The effect of compressibility on the rate of increase of pressure coefficients was found to be greater than that predicted by a simplified theoretical expression for thin wings. The results indicated that, for a lift coefficient of 0.1, the critical speed of the N.A.C,A. 45-125 airfoil was about 460 miles per hour at 59 F,. The value of the profile-drag coefficient at a Reynolds Number of 4,500,000 was 0.0058, or about half as large as the value for the N.A,C,A. 0025 airfoil. The increase in the profile-drag coefficient for a given movement of the transition point was about three times as large as the corresponding increase for the N.A.C,A. 0012 airfoil. Transition determinations indicated that, for Reynolds Numbers up to ?,000,000, laminar boundary 1ayers were maintained over approximately 40 percent of the upper and the lower surfaces of the airfoil.

  11. Cylinder wake influence on the tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Y.; Fujisawa, N.; Nakano, T.; Nashimoto, A.

    2006-11-01

    The influence of cylinder wake on discrete tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil is studied experimentally in a uniform flow at a moderate Reynolds number. The experiments are carried out by measuring sound pressure levels and spectrum, separation and the reattachment points, pressure distribution, fluid forces, mean-flow and turbulence characteristics around the airfoil with and without the cylinder wake. Present results indicate that the tonal noise from the airfoil is suppressed by the influence of the cylinder wake and the aerodynamic characteristics are improved in comparison with the case without the cylinder wake. These are mainly due to the separation control of boundary layers over the airfoil caused by the wake-induced transition, which is observed by surface flow visualization with liquid- crystal coating. The PIV measurements of the flow field around the airfoil confirm that highly turbulent velocity fluctuation of the cylinder wake induces the transition of the boundary layers and produces an attached boundary layer over the airfoil. Then, the vortex shedding phenomenon near the trailing edge of pressure surface is removed by the influence of the wake and results in the suppression of tonal noise.

  12. Aerodynamic sound of flow past an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1995-01-01

    The long term objective of this project is to develop a computational method for predicting the noise of turbulence-airfoil interactions, particularly at the trailing edge. We seek to obtain the energy-containing features of the turbulent boundary layers and the near-wake using Navier-Stokes Simulation (LES or DNS), and then to calculate the far-field acoustic characteristics by means of acoustic analogy theories, using the simulation data as acoustic source functions. Two distinct types of noise can be emitted from airfoil trailing edges. The first, a tonal or narrowband sound caused by vortex shedding, is normally associated with blunt trailing edges, high angles of attack, or laminar flow airfoils. The second source is of broadband nature arising from the aeroacoustic scattering of turbulent eddies by the trailing edge. Due to its importance to airframe noise, rotor and propeller noise, etc., trailing edge noise has been the subject of extensive theoretical (e.g. Crighton & Leppington 1971; Howe 1978) as well as experimental investigations (e.g. Brooks & Hodgson 1981; Blake & Gershfeld 1988). A number of challenges exist concerning acoustic analogy based noise computations. These include the elimination of spurious sound caused by vortices crossing permeable computational boundaries in the wake, the treatment of noncompact source regions, and the accurate description of wave reflection by the solid surface and scattering near the edge. In addition, accurate turbulence statistics in the flow field are required for the evaluation of acoustic source functions. Major efforts to date have been focused on the first two challenges. To this end, a paradigm problem of laminar vortex shedding, generated by a two dimensional, uniform stream past a NACA0012 airfoil, is used to address the relevant numerical issues. Under the low Mach number approximation, the near-field flow quantities are obtained by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations numerically at chord

  13. Multi-element airfoil viscous-inviscid interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, L. W.

    1979-01-01

    Subsonic viscous-inviscid interactions for multi-element airfoils are predicted by iterating between inviscid and viscous solutions until the performance coefficients converge. Inviscid flow is modelled by using distributed source-vortex singularities on configuration surface panels. Viscous effects are calculated by an existing laminar separation bubble model and a NASA-Lockheed boundary layer-wake method. Numerical formulations and example calculations are presented.

  14. Remotely operated submersible underwater suction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kristan, Louis L.

    1990-01-01

    A completely submersible, remotely operated underwater suction device for collection of irradiated materials in a nuclear pool is disclosed. The device includes a pump means for pumping water through the device, a filter means for capturing irradiated debris, remotely operated releasable connector means, a collection means and a means for remotely maneuvering the collection means. The components of the suction device may be changed and replaced underwater to take advantage of the excellent radiation shielding ability of water to thereby minimize exposure of personnel to radiation.

  15. Transport suction apparatus and absorption materials evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives were as follows. The effectiveness and function was evaluated of the hand held, manually powered v-vac for suction during microgravity. The function was evaluated of the battery powered laerdal suction unit in microgravity. The two units in control of various types of simulated bodily fluids were compared. Various types of tubing and attachments were evaluated which are required to control the collection of bodily fluids during transport. Various materials were evaluated for absorption of simulated bodily fluids. And potential problems were identified for waste management and containment of secretions and fluids during transport. Test procedures, results, and conclusions are briefly discussed.

  16. Effects of Suction on Swept-Wing Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.

    1998-01-01

    Stability experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel on a 45 deg swept airfoil. The pressure gradient is designed to provide purely crossflow-dominated transition; that is, the boundary layer is subcritical to Tollmien-Schlichting disturbances. The airfoil surface is hand polished to a 0.25 microns rms finish. Under these conditions, stationary crossflow disturbances grow to nonuniform amplitude due to submicron surface irregularities near the leading edge. Uniform stationary crossflow waves are produced by controlling the initial conditions with spanwise arrays of micron-sized roughness elements near the attachment line. Hot-wire measurements provide detailed maps of the crossflow wave structure, and accurate spectral decompositions isolate individual-mode growth rates for the fundamental and harmonic disturbances. Roughness spacing, roughness height, and Reynolds number are varied to investigate the growth of all amplified wavelengths. The measurements show early nonlinear mode interaction causing amplitude saturation well before transition. Comparisons with nonlinear parabolized stability equations calculations show excellent agreement in both the disturbance amplitude and the mode-shape profiles.

  17. Propulsion of a flapping and oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I E

    1937-01-01

    Formulas are given for the propelling or drag force experience in a uniform air stream by an airfoil or an airfoil-aileron combination, oscillating in any of three degrees of freedom; vertical flapping, torsional oscillations about a fixed axis parallel to the span, and angular oscillations of the aileron about a hinge.

  18. AFSMO/AFSCL- AIRFOIL SMOOTHING AND SCALING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L

    1994-01-01

    Since its early beginnings, NASA has been actively involved in the design and testing of airfoil sections for a wide variety of applications. Recently a set of programs has been developed to smooth and scale arbitrary airfoil coordinates. The smoothing program, AFSMO, utilizes both least-squares polynomial and least-squares cubic-spline techniques to iteratively smooth the second derivatives of the y-axis airfoil coordinates with respect to a transformed x-axis system which unwraps the airfoil and stretches the nose and trailing-edge regions. The corresponding smooth airfoil coordinates are then determined by solving a tridiagonal matrix of simultaneous cubic-spline equations relating the y-axis coordinates and their corresponding second derivatives. The camber and thickness distribution of the smooth airfoil are also computed. The scaling program, AFSCL, may then be used to scale the thickness distribution generated by the smoothing program to a specified maximum thickness. Once the thickness distribution has been scaled, it is combined with the camber distribution to obtain the final scaled airfoil contour. The airfoil smoothing and scaling programs are written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and have been implemented on a CDC CYBER 170 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 70K (octal) of 60 bit words. Both programs generate plotted output via CALCOMP type plotting calls. These programs were developed in 1983.

  19. Airfoil Dynamic Stall and Rotorcraft Maneuverability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    2000-01-01

    The loading of an airfoil during dynamic stall is examined in terms of the augmented lift and the associated penalties in pitching moment and drag. It is shown that once stall occurs and a leading-edge vortex is shed from the airfoil there is a unique relationship between the augmented lift, the negative pitching moment, and the increase in drag. This relationship, referred to here as the dynamic stall function, shows limited sensitivity to effects such as the airfoil section profile and Mach number, and appears to be independent of such parameters as Reynolds number, reduced frequency, and blade sweep. For single-element airfoils there is little that can be done to improve rotorcraft maneuverability except to provide good static C(l(max)) characteristics and the chord or blade number that is required to provide the necessary rotor thrust. However, multi-element airfoils or airfoils with variable geometry features can provide augmented lift in some cases that exceeds that available from a single-element airfoil. The dynamic stall function is shown to be a useful tool for the evaluation of both measured and calculated dynamic stall characteristics of single element, multi-element, and variable geometry airfoils.

  20. Measuring Lift with the Wright Airfoils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.; Soleymanloo, Arianne

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory or demonstration exercise, we mount a small airfoil with its long axis vertical at one end of a nearly frictionless rotating platform. Air from a leaf blower produces a sidewise lift force L on the airfoil and a drag force D in the direction of the air flow (Fig. 1). The rotating platform is kept in equilibrium by adding weights…

  1. On the acoustic signature of tandem airfoils: The sound of an elastic airfoil in the wake of a vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.

    2016-07-01

    The acoustic signature of an acoustically compact tandem airfoil setup in uniform high-Reynolds number flow is investigated. The upstream airfoil is considered rigid and is actuated at its leading edge with small-amplitude harmonic pitching motion. The downstream airfoil is taken passive and elastic, with its motion forced by the vortex-street excitation of the upstream airfoil. The non-linear near-field description is obtained via potential thin-airfoil theory. It is then applied as a source term into the Powell-Howe acoustic analogy to yield the far-field dipole radiation of the system. To assess the effect of downstream-airfoil elasticity, results are compared with counterpart calculations for a non-elastic setup, where the downstream airfoil is rigid and stationary. Depending on the separation distance between airfoils, airfoil-motion and airfoil-wake dynamics shift between in-phase (synchronized) and counter-phase behaviors. Consequently, downstream airfoil elasticity may act to amplify or suppress sound through the direct contribution of elastic-airfoil motion to the total signal. Resonance-type motion of the elastic airfoil is found when the upstream airfoil is actuated at the least stable eigenfrequency of the downstream structure. This, again, results in system sound amplification or suppression, depending on the separation distance between airfoils. With increasing actuation frequency, the acoustic signal becomes dominated by the direct contribution of the upstream airfoil motion, whereas the relative contribution of the elastic airfoil to the total signature turns negligible.

  2. Pump tank divider plate for sump suction sodium pumps

    DOEpatents

    George, John A.; Nixon, Donald R.

    1977-01-01

    A circular plate extends across the diameter of "sump suction" pump, with a close clearance between the edge of the plate and the wall of the pump tank. The plate is located above the pump impeller, inlet and outlet flow nozzles but below the sodium free surface and effectively divides the pump tank into two separate chambers. On change of pump speed, the close fitting flow restriction plate limits the rate of flow into or out of the upper chamber, thereby minimizing the rate of level change in the tank and permitting time for the pump cover gas pressure to be varied to maintain an essentially constant level.

  3. Development of two supercritical airfoils with a thickness-to-chord ratio of 0.20 and design lift coefficients of 0.3 and 0.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jernell, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    Two supercritical airfoils were developed specifically for application to span distributed loading cargo aircraft. These airfoils have a thickness-to-chord ratio of 0.20 and design lift coefficients of 0.3 and 0.4, and were derived by modifying a recently developed supercritical airfoil having a thickness-to-chord ratio of 0.18 and a design lift coefficient of 0.5. The aerodynamic characteristics were calculated using a theoretical method which computes the flow field about an airfoil having supercritical surface velocities.

  4. Investigation to optimize the passive shock wave/boundary layer control for supercritical airfoil drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Dyer, R.

    1984-01-01

    The passive shock wave/boundary layer control for reducing the drag of 14%-thick supercritical airfoil was investigated in the 3 in. x 15.4 in. RPI Transonic Wind Tunnel with and without the top wall insert at transonic Mach numbers. Top wall insert was installed to increase the flow Mach number to 0.90 with the model mounted on the test section bottom wall. Various porous surfaces with a cavity underneath were positioned on the area of the airfoil where the shock wave occurs. The higher pressure behind the shock wave circulates flow through the cavity to the lower pressure ahead of the shock wave. The effects from this circulation prevent boundary layer separation and enthropy increase hrough the shock wave. The static pressure distributions over the airfoil, the wake impact pressure survey for determining the profile drag and the Schlieren photographs for porous surfaces are presented and compared with the results for solid surface airfoil. With a 2.8% uniform porosity the normal shock wave for the solid surface was changed to a lambda shock wave, and the wake impact pressure data indicate a drag coefficient reduction as much as 45% lower than for the solid surface airfoil at high transonic Mach numbers.

  5. Using potential flow theory and conformal mapping technique to measure pressure differential on airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mughal, Umair Najeeb

    2017-01-01

    Flow around an airfoil to calculate pressure co-efficient variations at different relative velocities have always been an important/basic part of Aerodynamic Study. Potential flow theory is used to study flow behavior on rankine half body, non-rotating cylinder and rotating cylinder as it is more trackable. Falkan-Skan Similarity Solution is taken to simulate the flow behavior on wedge. However, to use potential flow theory on usable airfoils the author have used conformal mapping to show a relation between realistic airfoil shapes and the knowledge gained from flow about cylinders. This method can further be used in the designing of an airfoil section. The author has used Joukowski Tranform to generate the flow around airfoils of various geometries and then utilized Kutta condition to force the stagnation point at the trailing edge. Co-efficient of pressure over the entire airfoil surface were calculated and corrected using Karman-Tsien compressibility correction equations. On the basis of this, the location of the ports to install the flush measurement system is suggested.

  6. Effect of cavity on shock oscillation in transonic flow over RAE2822 supercritical airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. Rizwanur; Labib, Md. Itmam; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, M.; Mitsutake, Y.; Setoguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    Transonic flow past a supercritical airfoil is strongly influenced by the interaction of shock wave with boundary layer. This interaction induces unsteady self-sustaining shock wave oscillation, flow instability, drag rise and buffet onset which limit the flight envelop. In the present study, a computational analysis has been carried out to investigate the flow past a supercritical RAE2822 airfoil in transonic speeds. To control the shock wave oscillation, a cavity is introduced on the airfoil surface where shock wave oscillates. Different geometric configurations have been investigated for finding optimum cavity geometry and dimension. Unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) are computed at Mach 0.729 with an angle of attack of 5°. Computed results are well validated with the available experimental data in case of baseline airfoil. However, in case of airfoil with control cavity; it has been observed that the introduction of cavity completely suppresses the unsteady shock wave oscillation. Further, significant drag reduction and successive improvement of aerodynamic performance have been observed in airfoil with shock control cavity.

  7. Wind tunnel evaluation of a truncated NACA 64-621 airfoil for wind turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Law, S. P.; Gregorek, G. M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental program to measure the aerodynamic performance of a NACA 64-621 airfoil with a truncated trailing edge for wind turbine applications has been conducted in the Ohio State University Aeronautical and Astronautical Research Laboratory 6 in. by 21 in. pressurized wind tunnel. The blunted or trailing edge truncated (TET) airfoil has an advantage over similar trailing edge airfoils because it is able to streamline a larger spar structure, while also providing aerodynamic properties that are quite good. Surface pressures were measured and integrated to determine the lift, pressure drag, and moment coefficients over angles of attack ranging from -14 to +90 deg at Mach 0.2 and Reynolds numbers of 1,000,000 and 600,000. Results are compared to the NACA 0025, 0030, and 0035 thick airfoils with sharp trailing edges. Comparison shows that the 30 percent thick NACA 64-621-TET airfoil has higher maximum lift, higher lift curve slope, lower drag at higher lift coefficients, and higher chordwise force coefficient than similar thick airfoils with sharp trailing edges.

  8. A steady and oscillatory kernel function method for interfering surfaces in subsonic, transonic and supersonic flow. [prediction analysis techniques for airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The theory, results and user instructions for an aerodynamic computer program are presented. The theory is based on linear lifting surface theory, and the method is the kernel function. The program is applicable to multiple interfering surfaces which may be coplanar or noncoplanar. Local linearization was used to treat nonuniform flow problems without shocks. For cases with imbedded shocks, the appropriate boundary conditions were added to account for the flow discontinuities. The data describing nonuniform flow fields must be input from some other source such as an experiment or a finite difference solution. The results are in the form of small linear perturbations about nonlinear flow fields. The method was applied to a wide variety of problems for which it is demonstrated to be significantly superior to the uniform flow method. Program user instructions are given for easy access.

  9. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... suction curette is a device used to remove material from the uterus and from the mucosal lining of the uterus by scraping and vacuum suction. This device is used to obtain tissue for biopsy or for...

  10. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... suction curette is a device used to remove material from the uterus and from the mucosal lining of the uterus by scraping and vacuum suction. This device is used to obtain tissue for biopsy or for...

  11. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... suction curette is a device used to remove material from the uterus and from the mucosal lining of the uterus by scraping and vacuum suction. This device is used to obtain tissue for biopsy or for...

  12. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... suction curette is a device used to remove material from the uterus and from the mucosal lining of the uterus by scraping and vacuum suction. This device is used to obtain tissue for biopsy or for...

  13. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... suction curette is a device used to remove material from the uterus and from the mucosal lining of the uterus by scraping and vacuum suction. This device is used to obtain tissue for biopsy or for...

  14. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  15. On the use of surface porosity to reduce wake-stator interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Ana Fiorella

    An innovative application of existing technology is proposed for attenuating the effects of transient phenomena, such as rotor-stator and rotor-strut interactions, linked to noise and fatigue failure in turbomachinery environments. A computational study was designed to assess the potential of Passive Porosity Technology as a mechanism for alleviating interaction effects and radiated noise by reducing the fluctuating forces acting on the vane surfaces. The study involved a typical high bypass fan stator airfoil immersed in a free field and exposed to the effects of a transversely moving wake. Time histories of the primitive aerodynamic variables obtained from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations were input into an acoustic prediction code to estimate noise levels at a radial distance of ten chords from the stator airfoil. This procedure was performed on the solid airfoil to obtain a baseline, and on approximately fifty porous configurations in order to isolate those that would yield maximum noise reductions without compromising the aerodynamic performance of the stator. It was found during the study that, for a single stator immersed in a free flow field, communication between regions of high pressure differential---made possible by the use of passive porosity---tends to induce a time-dependent oscillatory pattern of small inflow-outflow regions near the stator leading edge (LE), which is well established before wake effects come into play. The oscillatory pattern starts at the LE, and travels downstream on both suction and pressure sides of the airfoil. The amplitude of the oscillations seemed to be proportional to the extension of the porous patch on the pressure side. Regardless of this effect, which may not have occurred if the airfoil were placed within a stator cascade, communication between regions of high pressure differential is necessary to significantly alter the noise radiation pattern of the stator airfoil. Whether those changes result in

  16. Airfoil flutter model suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Wilmer H. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A wind tunnel suspension system for testing flutter models under various loads and at various angles of attack is described. The invention comprises a mounting bracket assembly affixing the suspension system to the wind tunnel, a drag-link assembly and a compound spring arrangement comprises a plunge spring working in opposition to a compressive spring so as to provide a high stiffness to trim out steady state loads and simultaneously a low stiffness to dynamic loads. By this arrangement an airfoil may be tested for oscillatory response in both plunge and pitch modes while being held under high lifting loads in a wind tunnel.

  17. Two-dimensional cascade test of a highly loaded, low-solidity, tandem airfoil turbine rotor blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, J. F.; Stabe, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    A tip region section of a low-solidity tandem airfoil blade for a turbine rotor was tested in a two-dimensional cascade tunnel at solidities of 0.736 and 0.912. Blade surface static pressures and blade exit total and static pressure and flow angle were surveyed. Blade surface velocities, wake shapes, and kinetic energy losses were analyzed and compared with values for 1.852 solidity tandem airfoil blading.

  18. An experimental study of transonic flow about a supercritical airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, F. W.; Dahlin, J. A.; Bachalo, W. D.; Stivers, L. S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on flow fields about two airfoil models whose sections are slight modifications of the original Whitcomb supercritical airfoil section. Data obtained include surface static-pressure distributions, far-wake surveys, oil-flow photographs, pitot-pressure surveys in the viscous regions, and holographic interferograms. These data were obtained for different combinations of lift coefficient and free-stream Mach number, which included both subcritical cases and flows with upper-surface shock waves. The availability of both pitot-pressure data and density data from interferograms allowed determination of flow-field properties in the vicinity of the trailing edge and in the wake without recourse to any assumptions about the local static pressure. The data show that significant static-pressure gradients normal to viscous layers exist in this region, and that they persist to approximately 10% chord downstream of the trailing edge. Comparisons are made between measured boundary-layer properties and results from boundary-layer computations that employed measured static-pressure distributions, as well as comparisons between data and results of airfoil flow-field computations.

  19. Flow control at low Reynolds numbers using periodic airfoil morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Gareth; Santer, Matthew; Papadakis, George; Bouremel, Yann; Debiasi, Marco; Imperial-NUS Joint PhD Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    The performance of airfoils operating at low Reynolds numbers is known to suffer from flow separation even at low angles of attack as a result of their boundary layers remaining laminar. The lack of mixing---a characteristic of turbulent boundary layers---leaves laminar boundary layers with insufficient energy to overcome the adverse pressure gradient that occurs in the pressure recovery region. This study looks at periodic surface morphing as an active flow control technique for airfoils in such a flight regime. It was discovered that at sufficiently high frequencies an oscillating surface is capable of not only reducing the size of the separated region---and consequently significantly reducing drag whilst simultaneously increasing lift---but it is also capable of delaying stall and as a result increasing CLmax. Furthermore, by bonding Macro Fiber Composite actuators (MFCs) to the underside of an airfoil skin and driving them with a sinusoidal frequency, it is shown that this control technique can be practically implemented in a lightweight, energy efficient way. Imperial-NUS Joint Ph.D. Programme.

  20. Static and dynamic pressure measurements on a NACA 0012 airfoil in the Ames High Reynolds Number Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdevitt, J. B.; Okuno, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    The supercritical flows at high subsonic speeds over a NACA 0012 airfoil were studied to acquire aerodynamic data suitable for evaluating numerical-flow codes. The measurements consisted primarily of static and dynamic pressures on the airfoil and test-channel walls. Shadowgraphs were also taken of the flow field near the airfoil. The tests were performed at free-stream Mach numbers from approximately 0.7 to 0.8, at angles of attack sufficient to include the onset of buffet, and at Reynolds numbers from 1 million to 14 million. A test action was designed specifically to obtain two-dimensional airfoil data with a minimum of wall interference effects. Boundary-layer suction panels were used to minimize sidewall interference effects. Flexible upper and lower walls allow test-channel area-ruling to nullify Mach number changes induced by the mass removal, to correct for longitudinal boundary-layer growth, and to provide contouring compatible with the streamlines of the model in free air.

  1. Use of Suction Piles for Mooring of Mobile Offshore Bases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-11

    ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT Title: Use of Suction Piles for Mooring of Mobile Offshore Bases (ONR Grant No. N00014-97-1-0887) Period: June...Literature Review The literature study on suction piles has been completed and the final report has been submitted to the Naval Facilities Engineering...Analytical Performance Study of Suction Piles The suction pile performance study using linear elastic soil material properties has been completed. Results

  2. NASA low- and medium-speed airfoil development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcghee, R. J.; Beasley, W. D.; Whitcomb, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The status of NASA low and medium speed airfoil research is discussed. Effects of airfoil thickness-chord ratios varying from 9 percent to 21 percent on the section characteristics for a design lift coefficient of 0.40 are presented for the initial low speed family of airfoils. Also, modifications to the 17-percent low-speed airfoil to reduce the pitching-moment coefficient and to the 21-percent low speed airfoil results are shown for two new medium speed airfoils with thickness ratios of 13 percent and 17 percent and design-lift coefficients of 0.30. Applications of NASA-developed airfoils to general aviation aircraft are summarized.

  3. Control of Vortex Shedding on an Airfoil using Mini Flaps at Low Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiyama, Daisuke; Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effects of mini flaps (MFs) on a NACA0012 airfoil were investigated experimentally at low Reynolds number. MFs are small flat plates attached to the trailing edge of an airfoil perpendicularly. All the tests were conducted at the Tohoku-University Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at the chord Reynolds number of 25,000. Aerodynamic forces were measured using a 3-component balance and the surface flow was visualized by luminescent oil film technique. The results of force measurement show that attachment of MFs enhances lift and the enhanced lift increases with MF height. On the other hand, the results of oil flow visualization show that attachment of MFs enlarges the separated region on the airfoil rather than diminishes it. To understand the physical mechanism of MFs for lift enhancement, the flow around the airfoil was visualized by the smoke-wire method and the wake profile behind the airfoil was measured using a hot wire anemometer. It was found that vortices shed periodically from the tip of the MFs and interact with the separated shear layer from the upper surface. This unsteady vortex shedding forms a low-pressure region on the upper surface, generating higher lift. These results suggest that the height of MFs controls the frequency of vortex shedding behind the MF, forcing the separated shear layer on the upper surface flow in unsteady manner.

  4. 21 CFR 870.5050 - Patient care suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient care suction apparatus. 870.5050 Section 870.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A patient care suction apparatus is a device used with...

  5. 21 CFR 870.5050 - Patient care suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Patient care suction apparatus. 870.5050 Section 870.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A patient care suction apparatus is a device used with...

  6. 21 CFR 874.5350 - Suction antichoke device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5350 Suction antichoke device. (a) Identification. A suction antichoke device is a device intended to be used in an emergency situation to remove... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suction antichoke device. 874.5350 Section...

  7. Uncertainty Quantification for Airfoil Icing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGennaro, Anthony Matteo

    Ensuring the safety of airplane flight in icing conditions is an important and active arena of research in the aerospace community. Notwithstanding the research, development, and legislation aimed at certifying airplanes for safe operation, an analysis of the effects of icing uncertainties on certification quantities of interest is generally lacking. The central objective of this thesis is to examine and analyze problems in airfoil ice accretion from the standpoint of uncertainty quantification. We focus on three distinct areas: user-informed, data-driven, and computational uncertainty quantification. In the user-informed approach to uncertainty quantification, we discuss important canonical icing classifications and show how these categories can be modeled using a few shape parameters. We then investigate the statistical effects of these parameters. In the data-driven approach, we build statistical models of airfoil ice shapes from databases of actual ice shapes, and quantify the effects of these parameters. Finally, in the computational approach, we investigate the effects of uncertainty in the physics of the ice accretion process, by perturbing the input to an in-house numerical ice accretion code that we develop in this thesis.

  8. Trailing edge modifications for flatback airfoils.

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Daniel L.; van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.

    2008-03-01

    The adoption of blunt trailing edge airfoils (also called flatback airfoils) for the inboard region of large wind turbine blades has been proposed. Blunt trailing edge airfoils would not only provide a number of structural benefits, such as increased structural volume and ease of fabrication and handling, but they have also been found to improve the lift characteristics of thick airfoils. Therefore, the incorporation of blunt trailing edge airfoils would allow blade designers to more freely address the structural demands without having to sacrifice aerodynamic performance. These airfoils do have the disadvantage of generating high levels of drag as a result of the low-pressure steady or periodic flow in the near-wake of the blunt trailing edge. Although for rotors, the drag penalty appears secondary to the lift enhancement produced by the blunt trailing edge, high drag levels are of concern in terms of the negative effect on the torque and power generated by the rotor. Hence, devices are sought that mitigate the drag of these airfoils. This report summarizes the literature on bluff body vortex shedding and bluff body drag reduction devices and proposes four devices for further study in the wind tunnel.

  9. Removing Boundary Layer by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface.

  10. Effect of Wall Suction on Cross-Flow Absolute Instability of a Rotating Disk Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Joanna; Corke, Thomas; Matlis, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The effect of uniform suction on the absolute instability of Type I cross-flow modes on a rotating disk is examined. Specifically it investigates if wall suction transforms the absolute instability into a global mode as postulated in the numerical simulations of Davies and Carpenter (2003). The experiment is designed so that a suction parameter of a =W0 /(νω) 1 / 2 = 0 . 2 locates the absolute instability critical Reynolds number, Rca = 650 , on the disk. Uniform wall suction is applied from R = 317 to 696. The design for wall suction follows that of Gregory and Walker (1950), where an array of holes through the disk communicate between the measurement side of the disk and the underside of the disk in an enclosure that is maintained at a slight vacuum. The measurement surface is covered by a 20 micron pore size Polyethylene sheet. Temporal disturbances are introduced using the method of Othman and Corke (2006), and the evolution of the resulting wave packets are documented. The present results indicate a rapid transition to turbulence near Rca.

  11. Navier-Stokes simulations of WECS airfoil flowfields

    SciTech Connect

    Homicz, G.F.

    1994-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has initiated an effort to apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the study of WECS aerodynamics. Preliminary calculations are presented for the flow past a SAND 0018/50 airfoil. The flow solver used is F3D, an implicitly, finite-difference code which solves the Thin-Layer Navier-airfoil. The flow solver used is F3D, an implicit, finite-difference code which solves the Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes equations. 2D steady-state calculations are presented at various angles of attack, {alpha}. Sectional lift and drag coefficient, as well as surface pressure distributions, are compared with wind tunnel data, and exhibit reasonable agreement at low to moderate angles of attack. At high {alpha}, where the airfoil is stalled, a converged solution to the steady-state equations could not be obtained. The flowfield continued to change with successive iterations, which is consistent with the fact that the actual flow is inherently transient, and requires the solution of the full unsteady form of the equations.

  12. Instabilities orginating from suction holes used for Laminar Flow Control (LFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1994-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer studies has been modified for experiments in laminar flow control. The facility incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces which are used to stabilize the boundary layer and delay transition to turbulent flow. The thin porous test surfaces are supported by a baffled plenum chamber box which also acts to gather the flow through the surface into tubes which are routed to a high pressure fan. An elliptic leading edge is attached to the assembly to establish a new layer on the test plate. A slot is used to remove the test section flow below the leading edge. The test section was lengthened and fitted with a new ceiling. Substantial modifications were also made to the 3D probe traverse. Detailed studies have been made using isolated holes to explore the underlying instability mechanisms. The suction is perturbed harmonically and data are averaged on the basis of the phase of the disturbance. Conditions corresponding to strong suction and without suction have been studied. In both cases, 3D contour surfaces in the vicinity of the hole show highly three-dimensional T-S waves that fan out away from the hole with streamwise distance. With suction, the perturbations on the centerline are much stronger and decay less rapidly, while the far field is similar to the case without suction. Downstream the contour surfaces of the bow-shaped TS waves develop spanwise irregularities which eventually form into clumps. The contours remain smooth when suction is not applied. Even without suction, the harmonic point source is challenging for CFD; e.g. DNS has been used for streamwise growth. With suction, grid resources are consumed by the hole and this makes DNS even more expensive. Limited DNS results so far indicate that the vortices which emanate from suction holes appear to be stable. The spanwise clumping observed in the experiment is evidence of a secondary instability that could be

  13. Some recent applications of the suction analogy to vortex-lift estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    An extension of the suction analogy for the estimation of vortex lift along the side edge of wings is reviewed along with the concept of an augmented vortex lift to account for the effect of the leading-edge vortex passing downstream over an aft part of the model. Applications of these extensions have resulted in an improved estimating capability for a wide range of isolated sharp-edge planforms and also for multiple lifting surfaces. Hence, the suction analogy concept can now have wider applicability at both subsonic and supersonic speeds, especially in the preliminary design cycle.

  14. Analysis of a laminar boundary layer flow over a flat plate with injection or suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadri, S.; Babaelahi, M.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis is performed to study a laminar boundary layer flow over a porous flat plate with injection or suction imposed at the wall. The basic equations of this problem are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by means of appropriate transformations. These equations are solved analytically by the optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM), and the solutions are compared with the numerical solution (NS). The effect of uniform suction/injection on the heat transfer and velocity profile is discussed. A constant surface temperature in thermal boundary conditions is used for the horizontal flat plate.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Effect of Wall Suction on Cross-Flow Absolute Instability in a Rotating Disk Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Joanna; Corke, Thomas; Matlis, Eric

    2013-11-01

    The research is intended to investigate the effect of uniform suction on the absolute instability of Type I cross-flow modes on a rotating disk. Specifically it is designed to investigate if wall suction will transform the absolute instability into a global mode as postulated in the numerical simulations of Davies and Carpenter (2003). The disk is designed so that with a suction parameter of a = w /(νω) 1 / 2 = 0 . 4 , the radial location of the absolute instability critical Reynolds number, RCa = 803 , occurs on the disk. Uniform wall suction is applied from R = 449 to 919. The design for wall suction follows that of Gregory and Walker (1950), where an array of holes through the disk communicate between the measurement side of the disk and the underside of the disk in an enclosure that is maintained at a slight vacuum. The holes in the measurement surface are covered by a stretched silk cloth that provides a smooth, finely porous surface. A companion numerical simulation was performed to investigate the effect of the size and vacuum pressure of the underside enclosure on the uniformity of the measurement surface suction. Temporal disturbances are introduced using the method of Othman and Corke (2006), and the evolution of the resulting wave packets is documented.

  16. Hypersensitivity dermatitis following suction-assisted lipectomy: a complication of local anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Fine, P G; Dingman, D L

    1988-06-01

    We report a case of severe dermatitis involving the abdomen and thighs following suction-assisted lipectomy of these areas wherein local anesthetic containing the preservative methylparaben was used for infiltrative anesthesia. This use of local anesthetics with epinephrine can be of value in the performance of suction-assisted lipectomy to reduce blood loss, serve as an adjunct to other intraoperative anesthetic techniques, and for postoperative analgesia. Local anesthetic solutions commonly contain additives, which serve as antioxidants and antimicrobials. The most common of these preservatives is methylparaben, which can cause delayed hypersensitivity reactions. These reactions may be neither recognized nor clinically significant in small areas of infection, whereas in large body surface infiltrative procedures, such as suction-assisted lipectomy, these reactions may be of considerable consequence. This article reviews the pathophysiology and treatment of these reactions and gives recommendations for avoiding them.

  17. Functional morphology of suction discs and attachment performance of the Mediterranean medicinal leech (Hirudo verbana Carena)

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, Laura; Gallenmüller, Friederike; Speck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal leeches use their suction discs for locomotion, adhesion to the host and, in the case of the anterior disc, also for blood ingestion. The biomechanics of their suction-based adhesion systems has been little understood until now. We investigated the functional morphology of the anterior and posterior suckers of Hirudo verbana by using light and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, we analysed the adhesion qualitatively and quantitatively by conducting behavioural and mechanical experiments. Our high-speed video analyses provide new insights into the attachment and detachment processes and we present a detailed description of the leech locomotion cycle. Pull-off force measurements of the anterior and posterior suction organs on seven different substrates under both aerial and water-submersed conditions reveal a significant influence of the surrounding medium, the substrate surface roughness and the tested organ on attachment forces and tenacities. PMID:27075001

  18. Effectiveness of spoilers on the GA(W)-1 airfoil with a high performance Fowler flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Two-dimensional wind-tunnel tests were conducted to determine effectiveness of spoilers applied to the GA(W)-1 airfoil. Tests of several spoiler configurations show adequate control effectiveness with flap nested. It is found that providing a vent path allowing lower surface air to escape to the upper surface as the spoiler opens alleviates control reversal and hysteresis tendencies. Spoiler cross-sectional shape variations generally have a modest influence on control characteristics. A series of comparative tests of vortex generators applied to the (GA-W)-1 airfoil show that triangular planform vortex generators are superior to square planform vortex generators of the same span.

  19. Bernoulli Suction Effect on Soap Bubble Blowing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    As a model system for thin-film bubble with two gas-liquid interfaces, we experimentally investigated the pinch-off of soap bubble blowing. Using the lab-built bubble blower and high-speed videography, we have found that the scaling law exponent of soap bubble pinch-off is 2/3, which is similar to that of soap film bridge. Because air flowed through the decreasing neck of soap film tube, we studied possible Bernoulli suction effect on soap bubble pinch-off by evaluating the Reynolds number of airflow. Image processing was utilized to calculate approximate volume of growing soap film tube and the volume flow rate of the airflow, and the Reynolds number was estimated to be 800-3200. This result suggests that soap bubbling may involve the Bernoulli suction effect.

  20. Ice Accretions on Modern Airfoils Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The Icing Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field initiated and conducted the Modern Airfoils Ice Accretions project to identify ice shapes and determine their effects on the aerodynamic performance of aircraft, particularly on lift and drag. Previous aircraft ice shape and performance documentation focused on a few, older airfoils. This permitted more basic studies of the ice accretion process to be undertaken. However, having established both a working data base of ice shapes and the capability to predict these shapes for basic airfoils, questions arose about how ice might accrete differently on airfoils more representative of those being designed and flown on various aircraft today. Similarly, information about how these ice shapes would affect aerodynamic performance was needed.

  1. Low speed airfoil design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, R.; Somers, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    A low speed airfoil design and analysis program was developed which contains several unique features. In the design mode, the velocity distribution is not specified for one but many different angles of attack. Several iteration options are included which allow the trailing edge angle to be specified while other parameters are iterated. For airfoil analysis, a panel method is available which uses third-order panels having parabolic vorticity distributions. The flow condition is satisfied at the end points of the panels. Both sharp and blunt trailing edges can be analyzed. The integral boundary layer method with its laminar separation bubble analog, empirical transition criterion, and precise turbulent boundary layer equations compares very favorably with other methods, both integral and finite difference. Comparisons with experiment for several airfoils over a very wide Reynolds number range are discussed. Applications to high lift airfoil design are also demonstrated.

  2. Second-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; By, Robert Romany; Sims, Calvin L.; Hyde, Susan Marie

    2002-01-01

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X and Y values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket. The second-stage wheel has sixty buckets.

  3. Third-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Pirolla, Peter Paul; Siden, Gunnar Leif; Humanchuk, David John; Brassfield, Steven Robert; Wilson, Paul Stuart

    2002-01-01

    The third-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  4. Airfoil self-noise and prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Pope, D. Stuart; Marcolini, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    A prediction method is developed for the self-generated noise of an airfoil blade encountering smooth flow. The prediction methods for the individual self-noise mechanisms are semiempirical and are based on previous theoretical studies and data obtained from tests of two- and three-dimensional airfoil blade sections. The self-noise mechanisms are due to specific boundary-layer phenomena, that is, the boundary-layer turbulence passing the trailing edge, separated-boundary-layer and stalled flow over an airfoil, vortex shedding due to laminar boundary layer instabilities, vortex shedding from blunt trailing edges, and the turbulent vortex flow existing near the tip of lifting blades. The predictions are compared successfully with published data from three self-noise studies of different airfoil shapes. An application of the prediction method is reported for a large scale-model helicopter rotor, and the predictions compared well with experimental broadband noise measurements. A computer code of the method is given.

  5. Active flow control on a NACA 23012 airfoil model by means of magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanskiy, P. N.; Moralev, I. A.; Bityurin, V. A.; Efimov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of high speed flow control around the airfoil by means of the Lorentz force. The latter is formed by creating the pulsed arc filament, moving in the magnetic field along the upper airfoil surface. The research was performed for the NACA23012 airfoil model at flow velocities up to 60 m/s (134 mph). The dynamic measurement of the aerodynamic forces on the airfoil was made. Changes up to 5% in an average value of lift and pitching moment were obtained at pulse repetition frequency up to 13 Hz and average discharge power less than 200 W. The amplitude of lift force oscillation was obtained as high as 10%, with the integration time of the balance 30 ms. The dynamic flow visualization of an airfoil model after a single discharge ignition was performed. It is shown that interaction of the main flow with the arc-induced disturbance leads to the dramatic changes in the flow structure. It was shown that the upstream movement of the arc channel (I = 40-700 A) leads to the local flow separation and simultaneously to the formation of a high pressure region above the model surface. Current paper presents investigation of previous work.

  6. Water-tunnel experiments on an oscillating airfoil at RE equals 21,000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, K. W.; Carr, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    Flow visualization experiments were performed in a water tunnel on a modified NACA 0012 airfoil undergoing large amplitude harmonic oscillations in pitch. Hydrogen bubbles were used to: (1) create a conveniently striated and well preserved set of inviscid flow markers; and (2) to expose the succession of events occurring within the viscous domain during the onset of dynamic stall. Unsteady effects were shown to have an important influence on the progression of flow reversal along the airfoil surface prior to stall. A region of reversed flow underlying a free shear layer was found to momentarily exist over the entire upper surface without any appreciable disturbance of the viscous-inviscid boundary. A flow protuberance was observed to develop near the leading edge, while minor vortices evolve from an expanding instability of the free shear layer over the rear portion of the airfoil. The complete breakdown of this shear layer culminates in the successive formation of two dominant vortices.

  7. Transient technique for measuring heat transfer coefficients on stator airfoils in a jet engine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Proctor, M. P.

    A transient technique was used to measure heat transfer coefficients on stator airfoils in a high-temperature annular cascade at real engine conditions. The transient response of thin film thermocouples on the airfoil surface to step changes in the gas stream temperature was used to determine these coefficients. In addition, gardon gages and paired thermocouples were also utilized to measure heat flux on the airfoil pressure surface at steady state conditions. The tests were conducted at exit gas stream Reynolds numbers of one-half to 1.9 million based on true chord. The results from the transient technique show good comparison with the steady-state results in both trend and magnitude. In addition, comparison is made with the STAN5 boundary layer code and shows good comparison with the trends. However, the magnitude of the experimental data is consistently higher than the analysis.

  8. Transient technique for measuring heat transfer coefficients on stator airfoils in a jet engine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, H. J.; Proctor, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    A transient technique was used to measure heat transfer coefficients on stator airfoils in a high-temperature annular cascade at real engine conditions. The transient response of thin film thermocouples on the airfoil surface to step changes in the gas stream temperature was used to determine these coefficients. In addition, gardon gages and paired thermocouples were also utilized to measure heat flux on the airfoil pressure surface at steady state conditions. The tests were conducted at exit gas stream Reynolds numbers of one-half to 1.9 million based on true chord. The results from the transient technique show good comparison with the steady-state results in both trend and magnitude. In addition, comparison is made with the STAN5 boundary layer code and shows good comparison with the trends. However, the magnitude of the experimental data is consistently higher than the analysis.

  9. Transonic airfoil design using Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique for designing transonic airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution (the inverse problem) is presented. The method employs the basic features of Jameson's iterative solution for the full potential equation, except that inverse boundary conditions and Cartesian coordinates are used. The method is a direct-inverse approach that controls trailing-edge closure. Examples show the application of the method to design aft-cambered and other airfoils specifically for transonic flight.

  10. Modeling and Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickerman, Mary B.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Hackenberg, Anthony W.; Pennline, James A.; Schilling, Herbert W.

    2007-01-01

    SmaggIce Version 2.0 is a software toolkit for geometric modeling and grid generation for two-dimensional, singleand multi-element, clean and iced airfoils. A previous version of SmaggIce was described in Preparing and Analyzing Iced Airfoils, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 8 (August 2004), page 32. To recapitulate: Ice shapes make it difficult to generate quality grids around airfoils, yet these grids are essential for predicting ice-induced complex flow. This software efficiently creates high-quality structured grids with tools that are uniquely tailored for various ice shapes. SmaggIce Version 2.0 significantly enhances the previous version primarily by adding the capability to generate grids for multi-element airfoils. This version of the software is an important step in streamlining the aeronautical analysis of ice airfoils using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. The user may prepare the ice shape, define the flow domain, decompose it into blocks, generate grids, modify/divide/merge blocks, and control grid density and smoothness. All these steps may be performed efficiently even for the difficult glaze and rime ice shapes. Providing the means to generate highly controlled grids near rough ice, the software includes the creation of a wrap-around block (called the "viscous sublayer block"), which is a thin, C-type block around the wake line and iced airfoil. For multi-element airfoils, the software makes use of grids that wrap around and fill in the areas between the viscous sub-layer blocks for all elements that make up the airfoil. A scripting feature records the history of interactive steps, which can be edited and replayed later to produce other grids. Using this version of SmaggIce, ice shape handling and grid generation can become a practical engineering process, rather than a laborious research effort.

  11. Transonic Airfoils with a Given Pressure Distribution,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    erovse sidst necesosar mod Ideatify b lock mmb)L An inverse design procedure for airfoils, based on hodograph techniques, has been developed. For...w L-:- " " -- - r- L i -- _ 9 ABSTRACT An inverse design procedure for airfoils, based on hodograph tech...generated in the hodograph plane by Nieuwand,5 Bauer, Garabedian and Korn,6 Boerstoel and Huizing,7 and Sobieczky.8 More recently, the development of

  12. Unsteady Pressure Distributions on Airfoils in Cascade.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    of thin airfoil theory has been used by Henderson (-ftj’ and Bruce (1-7-)’to derive expressions for the unsteady response which includes the cascade...model in conjunction with the assumptions of thin airfoil theory has been used by Henderson (16) and Bruce (17) to derive expressions for the unsteady...effect, that is, a sharp change in the unsteady lift when the disturbance wavelength equals the blade spacing. Bruce (19) further extends this theory to

  13. An Ultrasonic Suction Pump with No Physically Moving Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Cheol-Ho; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki

    2004-05-01

    A new ultrasonic suction pump is described in this paper. The pump uses the suction force of a rigid cylinder tube vibrating at an ultrasonic frequency and has no physically moving parts. The pump consists of a longitudinal bolt-clamped Langevin transducer (BLT) combined with a stepped horn working at a resonance frequency of 24 kHz. A glass tube with the length of the half-wavelength-resonance is glued at the tip of the horn. To enhance pump performance, we introduced a reflection plate and a thin rod installed to the end of the glass tube with a small gap. Maximum pressures of 7.2 kPa and 23.5 kPa were recorded using the reflection plate and the thin rod, respectively. In this study, we experimentally investigate the characteristics of the pump and the operating physics. The maximum pressure is a function of the vibration velocity of the end surface of the glass tube and of the gap.

  14. Propulsion by active and passive airfoil oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2013-11-01

    Oscillating airfoils have been the subject of much research both as a mechanism of propulsion in engineering devices as well as a model of understanding how fish, birds, and insects produce thrust and maneuvering forces. Additionally, the jet or wake generated by an oscillating airfoil exhibits a multitude of vortex patterns, which are an interesting study in their own right. We present PIV measurements of the vortex flow behind an airfoil undergoing controlled pitching oscillations at moderate Reynolds number. As a method of propulsion, oscillating foils have been found to be capable performers when undergoing both pitching and heaving motions [Anderson et al. 1998]. While an airfoil undergoing only pitching motion is a relatively inefficient propulsor, we examine the effect of adding passive dynamics to the system: for example, actuated pitching with a passive spring in the heave direction. Practically speaking, a mechanical system with such an arrangement has the potential to reduce the cost and complexity of an oscillating airfoil propulsor. To study an airfoil undergoing both active and passive motion, we employ our ``cyber-physical fluid dynamics'' technique [Mackowski & Williamson, 2011] to simulate the effects of passive dynamics in a physical experiment.

  15. Numerical investigation of multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Russell M.

    1993-01-01

    The flow over multi-element airfoils with flat-plate lift-enhancing tabs was numerically investigated. Tabs ranging in height from 0.25 percent to 1.25 percent of the reference airfoil chord were studied near the trailing edge of the main-element. This two-dimensional numerical simulation employed an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on a structured, embedded grid topology. New grid refinements were used to improve the accuracy of the solution near the overlapping grid boundaries. The effects of various tabs were studied at a constant Reynolds number on a two-element airfoil with a slotted flap. Both computed and measured results indicated that a tab in the main-element cove improved the maximum lift and lift-to-drag ratio relative to the baseline airfoil without a tab. Computed streamlines revealed that the additional turning caused by the tab may reduce the amount of separated flow on the flap. A three-element airfoil was also studied over a range of Reynolds numbers. For the optimized flap rigging, the computed and measured Reynolds number effects were similar. When the flap was moved from the optimum position, numerical results indicated that a tab may help to reoptimize the airfoil to within 1 percent of the optimum flap case.

  16. Simulation of a Controlled Airfoil with Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Holt, Maurice; Packard, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a two-dimensional airfoil, controlled by an applied moment in pitch and an airfoil controlled by jets, were investigated. These simulations couple the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and Euler's equations of rigid body motion, with an active control system. Controllers for both systems were designed to track altitude commands and were evaluated by simulating a closed-loop altitude step response using the coupled system. The airfoil controlled by a pitching moment used an optimal state feedback controller. A closed-loop simulation, of the airfoil with an applied moment, showed that the trajectories compared very well with quasi-steady aerodynamic theory, providing a measure of validation. The airfoil with jets used a controller designed by robust control methods. A linear plant model for this system was identified using open-loop data generated by the nonlinear coupled system. A closed-loop simulation of the airfoil with jets, showed good tracking of an altitude command. This simulation also showed oscillations in the control input as a result of dynamics not accounted for in the control design. This research work demonstrates how computational fluid dynamics, coupled with rigid body dynamics, and a control law can be used to prototype control systems in problematic nonlinear flight regimes.

  17. Reduction of acoustic disturbances in the test section of supersonic wind tunnels by laminarizing their nozzle and test section wall boundary layers by means of suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, W.; Syberg, J.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of quiet, suction laminarized, high Reynolds number (Re) supersonic wind tunnel nozzles was studied. According to nozzle wall boundary layer development and stability studies, relatively weak area suction can prevent amplified nozzle wall TS (Tollmien-Schlichting) boundary layer oscillations. Stronger suction is needed in and shortly upstream of the supersonic concave curvature nozzle area to avoid transition due to amplified TG (Taylor-Goertler) vortices. To control TG instability, moderately rapid and slow expansion nozzles require smaller total suction rates than rapid expansion nozzles, at the cost of larger nozzle length Re and increased TS disturbances. Test section mean flow irregularities can be minimized with suction through longitudinal or highly swept slots (swept behind local Mach cone) as well as finely perforated surfaces. Longitudinal slot suction is optimized when the suction-induced crossflow velocity increases linearly with surface distance from the slot attachment line toward the slot (through suitable slot geometry). Suction in supersonic blowdown tunnels may be operated by one or several individual vacuum spheres.

  18. [Pressure-volume analysis of wound suction drainage containers and suction capacity of drainage tubes].

    PubMed

    Mohadjer, C; Siegert, R; Jäger, H; Weidauer, H

    1994-01-01

    Four low-vacuum systems and eight high-vacuum systems were examined with special reference to the pressure-volume relations. The maximum filling volume for adequate transport of wound secretion was determined for each type. The use of a synthetic wound fluid instead of water resulted in a smaller aspiration volume. Enlargement of the tube diameter resulted in a reduced initial vacuum for the low-vacuum systems, whereas the high-vacuum systems were not affected. Normal drain tubes were compared with "Ulm drains" and silicon tubes for suction capacity. The suction maximum of normal tubes and silicon tubes was located at the proximal holes of the perforated tubes. The "Ulm drain," with perforation diameter increasing continuously to the distal end of the tube, was found to exert suction even at the more distal part of the tube. It is estimated that this tube allows locally more balanced vacuum in the wound.

  19. Simultaneous monitoring of ice accretion and thermography of an airfoil: an IR imaging methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni, M.; Frioult, M.; Amirfazli, A.

    2012-10-01

    A novel image analysis methodology based on infrared (IR) imaging was developed for simultaneous monitoring of ice accretion and thermography of airfoils. In this study, an IR camera was calibrated and used to measure the surface temperature of the energized airfoils, and monitor the ice accretion and growth pattern on the airfoils’ surfaces. The methodology comprises the automatic processing of a series of IR video frames with the purpose of detecting ice pattern evolution during the icing test period. A specially developed MATLAB code was used to detect the iced areas in the IR images, and simultaneously monitor surface temperature evolution of the airfoil during an icing test. Knowing the correlation between the icing pattern and surface temperature changes during an icing test is essential for energy efficient design of thermal icing mitigation systems. Processed IR images were also used to determine the ice accumulation rate on the airfoil's surface in a given icing test. The proposed methodology has been demonstrated to work successfully, since the optical images taken at the end of icing tests from the airfoils’ surfaces compared well with the processed IR images detecting the ice grown outward from the airfoils’ leading edge area.

  20. Characteristics of two sharp-nosed airfoils having reduced spinning tendencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N

    1932-01-01

    According to Mr. L.D. Bell, of the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation, certain undesirable spinning characteristics of a commercial airplane were eliminated by the addition of a filler to the forward part of the wing to give it a sharp leading edge. To ascertain what aerodynamic effects result from such a change of section, two airfoils having sharp leading edges were tested in the variable-density wind tunnel. Both sections were derived by modifying the Gott. 398. The tests, which were made at a large value of the Reynolds Number, were carried to very large angles of attack to provide data for application to flight at angles of attack well beyond the stall. The characteristics of the sharp-nosed airfoils are compared with those of the normal Gott. 398 airfoil. Both of the sharp-nosed airfoils, which differ in the angle between the upper and lower surfaces at the leading edge, have about the same characteristics. As compared with the normal airfoil, the maximum lift is reduced by approximately 26 per cent, but the objectionable rapidly decreasing lift with angle of attack beyond the stall is eliminated; the profile drag of the section is slightly reduced in the range of the lift coefficient between 0.2 and 0.85, but at higher and lower lift coefficients the drag is increased.

  1. Flow past a self-oscillating airfoil with two degrees of freedom: measurements and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šidlof, Petr; Štěpán, Martin; Vlček, Václav; Řidký, Václav; Šimurda, David; Horáček, Jaromír

    2014-03-01

    The paper focuses on investigation of the unsteady subsonic airflow past an elastically supported airfoil for subcritical flow velocities and during the onset of the flutter instability. A physical model of the NACA0015 airfoil has been designed and manufactured, allowing motion with two degrees of freedom: pitching (rotation about the elastic axis) and plunging (vertical motion). The structural mass and stiffness matrix can be tuned to certain extent, so that the natural frequencies of the two modes approach as needed. The model was placed in the measuring section of the wind tunnel in the aerodynamic laboratory of the Institute of Thermomechanics in Nový Knín, and subjected to low Mach number airflow up to the flow velocities when self-oscillation reach amplitudes dangerous for the structural integrity of the model. The motion of the airfoil was registered by a high-speed camera, with synchronous measurement of the mechanic vibration and discrete pressure sensors on the surface of the airfoil. The results of the measurements are presented together with numerical simulation results, based on a finite volume CFD model of airflow past a vibrating airfoil.

  2. Efficient simulation of incompressible viscous flow over multi-element airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Stuart E.; Wiltberger, N. Lyn; Kwak, Dochan

    1993-01-01

    The incompressible, viscous, turbulent flow over single and multi-element airfoils is numerically simulated in an efficient manner by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The solution algorithm employs the method of pseudo compressibility and utilizes an upwind differencing scheme for the convective fluxes, and an implicit line-relaxation scheme. The motivation for this work includes interest in studying high-lift take-off and landing configurations of various aircraft. In particular, accurate computation of lift and drag at various angles of attack up to stall is desired. Two different turbulence models are tested in computing the flow over an NACA 4412 airfoil; an accurate prediction of stall is obtained. The approach used for multi-element airfoils involves the use of multiple zones of structured grids fitted to each element. Two different approaches are compared; a patched system of grids, and an overlaid Chimera system of grids. Computational results are presented for two-element, three-element, and four-element airfoil configurations. Excellent agreement with experimental surface pressure coefficients is seen. The code converges in less than 200 iterations, requiring on the order of one minute of CPU time on a CRAY YMP per element in the airfoil configuration.

  3. Closed-form equations for the lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients of airfoil sections in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Closed-form equations for the lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficients of two dimensional airfoil sections in steady subsonic flow were obtained from published theoretical and experimental results. A turbulent boundary layer was assumed to exist on the airfoil surfaces. The effects of section angle of attack, Mach number, Reynolds number, and the specific airfoil type were considered. The equations were applicable through an angle of attack range of -180 deg to +180 deg; however, above about + or - 20 deg, the section characteristics were assumed to be functions only of angle of attack. A computer program is presented which evaluates the equations for a range of Mach numbers and angles of attack. Calculated results for the NACA 23012 airfoil section were compared with experimental data.

  4. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  5. A Surrogate Approach to the Experimental Optimization of Multielement Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, John C.; Landman, Drew; Patera, Anthony T.

    1996-01-01

    The incorporation of experimental test data into the optimization process is accomplished through the use of Bayesian-validated surrogates. In the surrogate approach, a surrogate for the experiment (e.g., a response surface) serves in the optimization process. The validation step of the framework provides a qualitative assessment of the surrogate quality, and bounds the surrogate-for-experiment error on designs "near" surrogate-predicted optimal designs. The utility of the framework is demonstrated through its application to the experimental selection of the trailing edge ap position to achieve a design lift coefficient for a three-element airfoil.

  6. An inverse method with regularity condition for transonic airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Ziqiang; Xia, Zhixun; Wu, Liyi

    1991-01-01

    It is known from Lighthill's exact solution of the incompressible inverse problem that in the inverse design problem, the surface pressure distribution and the free stream speed cannot both be prescribed independently. This implies the existence of a constraint on the prescribed pressure distribution. The same constraint exists at compressible speeds. Presented here is an inverse design method for transonic airfoils. In this method, the target pressure distribution contains a free parameter that is adjusted during the computation to satisfy the regularity condition. Some design results are presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the method.

  7. Evaluation of a research circulation control airfoil using Navier-Stokes methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrewsbury, George D.

    1987-01-01

    The compressible Reynolds time averaged Navier-Stokes equations were used to obtain solutions for flows about a two dimensional circulation control airfoil. The governing equations were written in conservation form for a body-fitted coordinate system and solved using an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) procedure. A modified algebraic eddy viscosity model was used to define the turbulent characteristics of the flow, including the wall jet flow over the Coanda surface at the trailing edge. Numerical results are compared to experimental data obtained for a research circulation control airfoil geometry. Excellent agreement with the experimental results was obtained.

  8. Turbine airfoil with an internal cooling system having vortex forming turbulators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-12-30

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels having a plurality of turbulators protruding from an inner surface and positioned generally nonorthogonal and nonparallel to a longitudinal axis of the airfoil cooling channel. The configuration of turbulators may create a higher internal convective cooling potential for the blade cooling passage, thereby generating a high rate of internal convective heat transfer and attendant improvement in overall cooling performance. This translates into a reduction in cooling fluid demand and better turbine performance.

  9. Assessment of PIV-based unsteady load determination of an airfoil with actuated flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterenborg, J. J. H. M.; Lindeboom, R. C. J.; Simão Ferreira, C. J.; van Zuijlen, A. H.; Bijl, H.

    2014-02-01

    For complex experimental setups involving movable structures it is not trivial to directly measure unsteady loads. An alternative is to deduce unsteady loads indirectly from measured velocity fields using Noca's method. The ultimate aim is to use this method in future work to determine unsteady loads for fluid-structure interaction problems. The focus in this paper is first on the application and assessment of Noca's method for an airfoil with an oscillating trailing edge flap. To our best knowledge Noca's method has not been applied yet to airfoils with moving control surfaces or fluid-structure interaction problems. In addition, wind tunnel corrections for this type of unsteady flow problem are considered.

  10. Analytical Investigation of Icing Limit for Diamond-Shaped Airfoil in Transonic and Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E.; Serafini, John S.

    1953-01-01

    Calculations have been made for the icing limit of a diamond airfoil at zero angle of attack in terms of the stream Mach number, stream temperature, and pressure altitude. The icing limit is defined as a wetted-surface temperature of 320 F and is related to the stream conditions by the method of Hardy. The results show that the point most likely to ice on the airfoil lies immediately behind the shoulder and is subject to possible icing at Mach numbers as high as 1.4.

  11. Investigations of a circulation control airfoil flowfield using an advanced laser velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Charles J.; Cornelius, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    The flowfield of a Circulation Control Airfoil was examined in detail through the use of a specially designed wind tunnel model and test program. Surface pressures on the model were obtained and the velocity field was surveyed in the trailing edge region of the model airfoil using the nonintrusive Laser Velocimetry technique. In this region mean flow and turbulence measurements indicate that, while the flowfield is similar to other wall-bounded jet flows, the external freestream plays an important role in the overall mixing and structure of the wall bounded flow. Finally, the turbulence measurements were used to compute eddy viscosities for the purpose of aiding computational fluid dynamics model development.

  12. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šidlof, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge) coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  13. Comparison of Evolutionary (Genetic) Algorithm and Adjoint Methods for Multi-Objective Viscous Airfoil Optimizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, T. H.; Nemec, M.; Holst, T.; Zingg, D. W.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comparison between an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and an Adjoint-Gradient (AG) Method applied to a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes code for airfoil design is presented. Both approaches use a common function evaluation code, the steady-state explicit part of the code,ARC2D. The parameterization of the design space is a common B-spline approach for an airfoil surface, which together with a common griding approach, restricts the AG and EA to the same design space. Results are presented for a class of viscous transonic airfoils in which the optimization tradeoff between drag minimization as one objective and lift maximization as another, produces the multi-objective design space. Comparisons are made for efficiency, accuracy and design consistency.

  14. Theoretical Prediction of Pressure Distributions on Nonlifting Airfoils at High Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, John R; Alksne, Alberta

    1955-01-01

    Theoretical pressure distributions on nonlifting circular-arc airfoils in two-dimensional flows with high subsonic free-stream velocity are found by determining approximate solutions, through an iteration process, of an integral equation for transonic flow proposed by Oswatitsch. The integral equation stems directly from the small-disturbance theory for transonic flow. This method of analysis possesses the advantage of remaining in the physical, rather than the hodograph, variable and can be applied in airfoils having curved surfaces. After discussion of the derivation of the integral equation and qualitative aspects of the solution, results of calculations carried out for circular-arc airfoils in flows with free-stream Mach numbers up to unity are described. These results indicate most of the principal phenomena observed in experimental studies.

  15. Program manual for the Eppler airfoil inversion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program is described for calculating the profile of an airfoil as well as the boundary layer momentum thickness and energy form parameter. The theory underlying the airfoil inversion technique developed by Eppler is discussed.

  16. Determination of Minimum Suction Level Necessary for Field Dental Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 175, 4:285, 2010 Determination of Minimum Suction Level Necessary for Field Dental Units David G. Charlton, DDS ABSTRACT A...significant problem with most field dental units is that their suction is too weak to effectively remove debris from the mouth. The purpose of this study was...to determine the minimum clinically acceptable suction level for routine dentistry. A vacuum pump was connected to a high-volume dental evacuation

  17. Preliminary Analysis on Matric Suction for Barren Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, A. T. S.; Fazlina, M. I. S.; Aziman, M.; Fairus, Y. M.; Azman, K.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Most research conducted on slope failures can broadly be attributed to the convergence of three factors, i.e. rainfall, steepness of slope, and soil geological profile. The mechanism of the failures is mainly due to the loss of matric suction of soils by rainwater. When rainwater infiltrates into the slopes, it will start to saturate the soil, i.e., reduce the matric suction. A good understanding of landslide mechanisms and the characteristics of unsaturated soil and rock in tropical areas is crucial in landslide hazard formulation. Most of the slope failures in unsaturated tropical residual soil in Malaysia are mainly due to infiltration, especially during intense and prolonged rainfall, which reduces the soil matric suction and hence decreases the stability of the slope. Therefore, the aim of this research is to determine the matric suction for barren soil and to model an unsaturated slope with natural rainfall to evaluate the effects of matric suction on rainfall intensity. A field test was carried out using the Watermark Soil Moisture Sensor to determine the matric suction. The sensor was connected to a program called SpecWare 9 Basic which also used Data Logging Rain gauge Watermark 1120 to measure the intensity and duration of rainfall. This study was conducted at the Research Centre for Soft Soil which is a new Research and Development (R & D) initiative by Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Parit Raja. Field observation showed that the highest daily suction was recorded during noon while the lowest suction was obtained at night and early morning. The highest matric suction for loose condition was 31.0 kPa while the highest matric suction for compacted condition was 32.4 kPa. The results implied that the field suction variation was not only governed by the rainfall, but also the cyclic evaporation process. The findings clearly indicated that the changes in soil suction distribution patterns occurred due to different weather conditions.

  18. Transition Flight Experiments on a Swept Wing with Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Montoya, L. C.; Putnam, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Flight boundary-layer transition experiments were conducted on a 30 degree swept wing with a perforated leading-edge suction panel. The transition location on the panel was changed by systematically varying the location and amount of suction. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading-edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on flight condition and suction variation. Amplification factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations using a state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility.

  19. Transition flight experiments on a swept wing with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Montoya, L. C.; Putnam, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Flight boundary-layer transition experiments were conducted on a 30-degree swept wing with a perforated leading-edge suction panel. The transition location on the panel was changed by systematically varying the location and amount of suction. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading-edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on flight condition and suction variation. Amplification factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations using a state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility.

  20. AirfoilPrep.py Documentation: Release 0.1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    AirfoilPrep.py provides functionality to preprocess aerodynamic airfoil data. Essentially, the module is an object oriented version of the AirfoilPrep spreadsheet with additional functionality and is written in the Python language. It allows the user to read in two-dimensional aerodynamic airfoil data, apply three-dimensional rotation corrections for wind turbine applications, and extend the datato very large angles of attack. This document discusses installation, usage, and documentation of the module.

  1. Critical Mach Numbers of Thin Airfoil Sections with Plain Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pardee, Otway O'm.; Heaslet, Max A.

    1946-01-01

    Critical Mach number as function of lift coefficient is determined for certain moderately thick NACA low-drag airfoils. Results, given graphically, included calculations on same airfoil sections with plain flaps for small flap deflections. Curves indicate optimum critical conditions for airfoils with flaps in such form that they can be compared with corresponding results for zero flap deflections. Plain flaps increase life-coefficient range for which critical Mach number is in region of high values characteristic of low-drag airfoils.

  2. Coating-Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    Technical Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coating - Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Tresa Pollock 3...Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils Final Report ONRGrant#N00014-l 1-1-0616 Technical Contact (Principal Investigator) Tresa M. Pollock Materials...Substrate Systems for Thermomechanically Durable Turbine Airfoils 1. Summary In the severe operating environments encountered in Naval ship

  3. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Michael A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    A flight-test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane (McDonnell Douglas Corporation, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois). The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  4. Flight Tests of a Supersonic Natural Laminar Flow Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80-inch (203 cm) chord and 40-inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The wing was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0 deg to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2-D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, were similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  5. Flight tests of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, M. A.; Banks, D. W.; Garzon, G. A.; Matisheck, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    A flight test campaign of a supersonic natural laminar flow airfoil has been recently completed. The test surface was an 80 inch (203 cm) chord and 40 inch (102 cm) span article mounted on the centerline store location of an F-15B airplane. The test article was designed with a leading edge sweep of effectively 0° to minimize boundary layer crossflow. The test article surface was coated with an insulating material to avoid significant heat transfer to and from the test article structure to maintain a quasi-adiabatic wall. An aircraft-mounted infrared camera system was used to determine boundary layer transition and the extent of laminar flow. The tests were flown up to Mach 2.0 and chord Reynolds numbers in excess of 30 million. The objectives of the tests were to determine the extent of laminar flow at high Reynolds numbers and to determine the sensitivity of the flow to disturbances. Both discrete (trip dots) and 2D disturbances (forward-facing steps) were tested. A series of oblique shocks, of yet unknown origin, appeared on the surface, which generated sufficient crossflow to affect transition. Despite the unwanted crossflow, the airfoil performed well. The results indicate that the sensitivity of the flow to the disturbances, which can translate into manufacturing tolerances, was similar to that of subsonic natural laminar flow wings.

  6. Measurements in Separated and Transitional Boundary Layers Under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Hultgren, Lennart .

    2000-01-01

    Detailed velocity measurements were made along a flat plate subject to the same dimensionless pressure gradient as the suction side of a modern low-pressure turbine airfoil. Reynolds numbers based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity were varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low and high inlet free-stream turbulence intensities (0.2% and 7%) were set using passive grids. The location of boundary-layer separation does not depend strongly on the free-stream turbulence level or Reynolds number, as long as the boundary layer remains non-turbulent prior to separation. Strong acceleration prevents transition on the upstream part of the plate in all cases. Both free-stream turbulence and Reynolds number have strong effects on transition in the adverse pressure gradient region. Under low free-stream turbulence conditions transition is induced by instability waves in the shear layer of the separation bubble. Reattachment generally occurs at the transition start. At Re = 50,000 the separation bubble does not close before the trailing edge of the modeled airfoil. At higher Re, transition moves upstream, and the boundary layer reattaches. With high free-stream turbulence levels, transition appears to occur in a bypass mode, similar to that in attached boundary layers. Transition moves upstream, resulting in shorter separation regions. At Re above 200,000, transition begins before separation. Mean velocity, turbulence and intermittency profiles are presented.

  7. Compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Little, David A.; Pu, Zhengxiang

    2015-08-18

    A compressor airfoil tip clearance optimization system for reducing a gap between a tip of a compressor airfoil and a radially adjacent component of a turbine engine is disclosed. The turbine engine may include ID and OD flowpath boundaries configured to minimize compressor airfoil tip clearances during turbine engine operation in cooperation with one or more clearance reduction systems that are configured to move the rotor assembly axially to reduce tip clearance. The configurations of the ID and OD flowpath boundaries enhance the effectiveness of the axial movement of the rotor assembly, which includes movement of the ID flowpath boundary. During operation of the turbine engine, the rotor assembly may be moved axially to increase the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  8. Options for Robust Airfoil Optimization under Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Li, Wu

    2002-01-01

    A robust optimization method is developed to overcome point-optimization at the sampled design points. This method combines the best features from several preliminary methods proposed by the authors and their colleagues. The robust airfoil shape optimization is a direct method for drag reduction over a given range of operating conditions and has three advantages: (1) it prevents severe degradation in the off-design performance by using a smart descent direction in each optimization iteration, (2) it uses a large number of spline control points as design variables yet the resulting airfoil shape does not need to be smoothed, and (3) it allows the user to make a tradeoff between the level of optimization and the amount of computing time consumed. For illustration purposes, the robust optimization method is used to solve a lift-constrained drag minimization problem for a two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil in Euler flow with 20 geometric design variables.

  9. Comparative Study of Airfoil Flow Separation Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Nick; Kahouli, Waad; Epps, Brenden

    2015-11-01

    Airfoil flow separation impacts a multitude of applications including turbomachinery, wind turbines, and bio-inspired micro-aerial vehicles. In order to achieve maximum performance, some devices operate near the edge of flow separation, and others use dynamic flow separation advantageously. Numerous criteria exist for predicting the onset of airfoil flow separation. This talk presents a comparative study of a number of such criteria, with emphasis paid to speed and accuracy of the calculations. We evaluate the criteria using a two-dimensional unsteady vortex lattice method, which allows for rapid analysis (on the order of seconds instead of days for a full Navier-Stokes solution) and design of optimal airfoil geometry and kinematics. Furthermore, dynamic analyses permit evaluation of dynamic stall conditions for enhanced lift via leading edge vortex shedding, commonly present in small flapping-wing flyers such as the bumblebee and hummingbird.

  10. Experimental observation of gravity-capillary solitary waves generated by a moving air-suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Beomchan; Cho, Yeunwoo

    2016-11-01

    Gravity-capillary solitary waves are generated by a moving "air-suction" forcing instead of a moving "air-blowing" forcing. The air-suction forcing moves horizontally over the surface of deep water with speeds close to the minimum linear phase speed cmin = 23 cm/s. Three different states are observed according to forcing speed below cmin. At relatively low speeds below cmin, small-amplitude linear circular depressions are observed, and they move steadily ahead of and along with the moving forcing. As the forcing speed increases close to cmin, however, nonlinear 3-D gravity-capillary solitary waves are observed, and they move steadily ahead of and along with the moving forcing. Finally, when the forcing speed is very close to cmin, oblique shedding phenomena of 3-D gravity-capillary solitary waves are observed ahead of the moving forcing. We found that all the linear and nonlinear wave patterns generated by the air-suction forcing correspond to those generated by the air-blowing forcing. The main difference is that 3-D gravity-capillary solitary waves are observed "ahead of" the air-suction forcing, whereas the same waves are observed "behind" the air-blowing forcing. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2014R1A1A1002441).

  11. The effects of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle, and surface roughness on the heat transfer distribution in a large-scale turbine rotor passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, Michael F.; Anderson, Olof L.

    1989-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational program was conducted to examine the heat transfer distribution in a turbine rotor passage geometrically similiar to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP). Heat transfer was measured and computed for both the full-span suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor airfoil as well as for the hub endwall surface. The primary objective of the program was to provide a benchmark-quality data base for the assessment of rotor passage heat transfer computational procedures. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale, ambient temperature, rotating turbine model. Heat transfer data were obtained using thermocouple and liquid-crystal techniques to measure temperature distributions on the thin, electrically-heated skin of the rotor passage model. Test data were obtained for various combinations of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle and model surface roughness. The data are reported in the form of contour maps of Stanton number. These heat distribution maps revealed numerous local effects produced by the three-dimensional flows within the rotor passage. Of particular importance were regions of local enhancement produced on the airfoil suction surface by the main-passage and tip-leakage vortices and on the hub endwall by the leading-edge horseshoe vortex system. The computational portion consisted of the application of a well-posed parabolized Navier-Stokes analysis to the calculation of the three-dimensional viscous flow through ducts simulating the a gas turbine passage. These cases include a 90 deg turning duct, a gas turbine cascade simulating a stator passage, and a gas turbine rotor passage including Coriolis forces. The calculated results were evaluated using experimental data of the three-dimensional velocity fields, wall static pressures, and wall heat transfer on the suction surface of the turbine airfoil and on the end wall. Particular attention was paid to an

  12. Blowing Circulation Control on a Seaplane Airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B. D.; Liu, P. Q.; Qu, Q. L.

    2011-09-01

    RANS simulations are presented for blowing circulation control on a seaplane airfoil. Realizable k-epsilon turbulent model and pressure-based coupled algorithm with second-order discretization were adopted to simulate the compressible flow. Both clear and simple flap configuration were simulated with blowing momentum coefficient Cμ = 0, 0.15 and 0.30. The results show that blowing near the airfoil trailing edge could enhance the Coanda effect, delay the flow separation, and increase the lift coefficient dramatically. The blowing circulation control is promising to apply to taking off and landing of an amphibious aircraft or seaplane.

  13. An efficient algorithm for numerical airfoil optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1979-01-01

    A new optimization algorithm is presented. The method is based on sequential application of a second-order Taylor's series approximation to the airfoil characteristics. Compared to previous methods, design efficiency improvements of more than a factor of 2 are demonstrated. If multiple optimizations are performed, the efficiency improvements are more dramatic due to the ability of the technique to utilize existing data. The method is demonstrated by application to subsonic and transonic airfoil design but is a general optimization technique and is not limited to a particular application or aerodynamic analysis.

  14. Transonic flow theory of airfoils and wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garabedian, P. R.

    1976-01-01

    There are plans to use the supercritical wing on the next generation of commercial aircraft so as to economize on fuel consumption by reducing drag. Computer codes have served well in meeting the consequent demand for new wing sections. The possibility of replacing wind tunnel tests by computational fluid dynamics is discussed. Another approach to the supercritical wing is through shockless airfoils. A novel boundary value problem in the hodograph plane is studied that enables one to design a shockless airfoil so that its pressure distribution very nearly takes on data that are prescribed.

  15. Stiffness characteristics of airfoils under pulse loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Kevin Eugene

    The turbomachinery industry continually struggles with the adverse effects of contact rubs between airfoils and casings. The key parameter controlling the severity of a given rub event is the contact load produced when the airfoil tips incur into the casing. These highly non-linear and transient forces are difficult to calculate and their effects on the static and rotating components are not well understood. To help provide this insight, experimental and analytical capabilities have been established and exercised through an alliance between GE Aviation and The Ohio State University Gas Turbine Laboratory. One of the early findings of the program is the influence of blade flexibility on the physics of rub events. The core focus of the work presented in this dissertation is to quantify the influence of airfoil flexibility through a novel modeling approach that is based on the relationship between applied force duration and maximum tip deflection. This relationship is initially established using a series of forward, non-linear and transient analyses in which simulated impulse rub loads are applied. This procedure, although effective, is highly inefficient and costly to conduct by requiring numerous explicit simulations. To alleviate this issue, a simplified model, named the pulse magnification model, is developed that only requires a modal analysis and a static analyses to fully describe how the airfoil stiffness changes with respect to load duration. Results from the pulse magnification model are compared to results from the full transient simulation method and to experimental results, providing sound verification for the use of the modeling approach. Furthermore, a unique and highly efficient method to model airfoil geometries was developed and is outlined in this dissertation. This method produces quality Finite Element airfoil definitions directly from a fully parameterized mathematical model. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by comparing modal

  16. Interferometric investigations of compressible dynamic stall over a transiently pitching airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Carr, L. W.; Wilder, M. C.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic stall flow field over NACA 0012 airfoil pitching transiently from 0 - 60 at a constant rate under compressible flow conditions has been studied using the real-time technique of point diffraction interferometry. This investigation using nonintrusive diagnostics provides a quantitative description of the overall flow field, including the finer details of dynamic stall vortex formation, growth and the concomitant changes in the pressure distribution. Analysis of several hundred interferograms obtained for a range of flow conditions shows that the peak leading edge suction pressure coefficient that stall is nearly constant for a given free stream Mach number at all nondimensional pitch rates. Also, this value is below that seen in steady flow at static stall for the same Mach number, indicating that dynamic effects significantly effect the separation behavior. Further, for a given Mach number, the dynamic stall vortex seems to form rapidly at nearly the same angle of attack for all pitch rates studied. As the vortex is shed, it induces an anti-clockwise trailing edge vortex, which grows in a manner similar to that of a starting vortex. The measured peak suction pressure coefficient drops as the free stream Mach number increases. For free stream Mach numbers above 0.4, small multiple shocks appear near the leading edge.

  17. Advanced technology airfoil research, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This compilation contains papers presented at the NASA Conference on Advanced Technology Airfoil Research held at Langley Research Center on March 7-9, 1978, which have unlimited distribution. This conference provided a comprehensive review of all NASA airfoil research, conducted in-house and under grant and contract. A broad spectrum of airfoil research outside of NASA was also reviewed. The major thrust of the technical sessions were in three areas: development of computational aerodynamic codes for airfoil analysis and design, development of experimental facilities and test techniques, and all types of airfoil applications.

  18. Multiple piece turbine engine airfoil with a structural spar

    DOEpatents

    Vance, Steven J.

    2011-10-11

    A multiple piece turbine airfoil having an outer shell with an airfoil tip that is attached to a root with an internal structural spar is disclosed. The root may be formed from first and second sections that include an internal cavity configured to receive and secure the one or more components forming the generally elongated airfoil. The internal structural spar may be attached to an airfoil tip and place the generally elongated airfoil in compression. The configuration enables each component to be formed from different materials to reduce the cost of the materials and to optimize the choice of material for each component.

  19. Unsteady Thick Airfoil Aerodynamics: Experiments, Computation, and Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangfeld, C.; Rumsey, C. L.; Mueller-Vahl, H.; Greenblatt, D.; Nayeri, C. N.; Paschereit, C. O.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental, computational and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the aerodynamic loads acting on a relatively thick NACA 0018 airfoil when subjected to pitching and surging, individually and synchronously. Both pre-stall and post-stall angles of attack were considered. Experiments were carried out in a dedicated unsteady wind tunnel, with large surge amplitudes, and airfoil loads were estimated by means of unsteady surface mounted pressure measurements. Theoretical predictions were based on Theodorsen's and Isaacs' results as well as on the relatively recent generalizations of van der Wall. Both two- and three-dimensional computations were performed on structured grids employing unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS). For pure surging at pre-stall angles of attack, the correspondence between experiments and theory was satisfactory; this served as a validation of Isaacs theory. Discrepancies were traced to dynamic trailing-edge separation, even at low angles of attack. Excellent correspondence was found between experiments and theory for airfoil pitching as well as combined pitching and surging; the latter appears to be the first clear validation of van der Wall's theoretical results. Although qualitatively similar to experiment at low angles of attack, two-dimensional URANS computations yielded notable errors in the unsteady load effects of pitching, surging and their synchronous combination. The main reason is believed to be that the URANS equations do not resolve wake vorticity (explicitly modeled in the theory) or the resulting rolled-up un- steady flow structures because high values of eddy viscosity tend to \\smear" the wake. At post-stall angles, three-dimensional computations illustrated the importance of modeling the tunnel side walls.

  20. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return...

  2. 21 CFR 878.5040 - Suction lipoplasty system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... The device consists of a powered suction pump (containing a microbial filter on the exhaust and a... cannula must be capable of being changed between patients. The powered suction pump has a motor with a... without oil), a single or double diaphragm, a single or double piston, and a safety trap....

  3. 21 CFR 878.5040 - Suction lipoplasty system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... The device consists of a powered suction pump (containing a microbial filter on the exhaust and a... cannula must be capable of being changed between patients. The powered suction pump has a motor with a... without oil), a single or double diaphragm, a single or double piston, and a safety trap....

  4. 21 CFR 878.5040 - Suction lipoplasty system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... The device consists of a powered suction pump (containing a microbial filter on the exhaust and a... cannula must be capable of being changed between patients. The powered suction pump has a motor with a... without oil), a single or double diaphragm, a single or double piston, and a safety trap....

  5. 21 CFR 874.5350 - Suction antichoke device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A suction antichoke device is a device intended to be used in an emergency situation to remove, by the application of suction, foreign objects that obstruct a patient's airway to prevent asphyxiation to the patient. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of PDP...

  6. 21 CFR 874.5350 - Suction antichoke device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suction antichoke device. 874.5350 Section 874.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Drug Administration on or before July 13, 1999 for any suction antichoke device that was in...

  7. 21 CFR 878.5040 - Suction lipoplasty system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... The device consists of a powered suction pump (containing a microbial filter on the exhaust and a microbial in-line filter in the connecting tubing between the collection bottle and the safety trap... cannula must be capable of being changed between patients. The powered suction pump has a motor with...

  8. Swimming muscles power suction feeding in largemouth bass.

    PubMed

    Camp, Ariel L; Roberts, Thomas J; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2015-07-14

    Most aquatic vertebrates use suction to capture food, relying on rapid expansion of the mouth cavity to accelerate water and food into the mouth. In ray-finned fishes, mouth expansion is both fast and forceful, and therefore requires considerable power. However, the cranial muscles of these fishes are relatively small and may not be able to produce enough power for suction expansion. The axial swimming muscles of these fishes also attach to the feeding apparatus and have the potential to generate mouth expansion. Because of their large size, these axial muscles could contribute substantial power to suction feeding. To determine whether suction feeding is powered primarily by axial muscles, we measured the power required for suction expansion in largemouth bass and compared it to the power capacities of the axial and cranial muscles. Using X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM), we generated 3D animations of the mouth skeleton and created a dynamic digital endocast to measure the rate of mouth volume expansion. This time-resolved expansion rate was combined with intraoral pressure recordings to calculate the instantaneous power required for suction feeding. Peak expansion powers for all but the weakest strikes far exceeded the maximum power capacity of the cranial muscles. The axial muscles did not merely contribute but were the primary source of suction expansion power and generated up to 95% of peak expansion power. The recruitment of axial muscle power may have been crucial for the evolution of high-power suction feeding in ray-finned fishes.

  9. 21 CFR 874.5350 - Suction antichoke device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Suction antichoke device. 874.5350 Section 874.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5350 Suction antichoke device....

  10. 21 CFR 874.5350 - Suction antichoke device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suction antichoke device. 874.5350 Section 874.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5350 Suction antichoke device....

  11. 21 CFR 878.5040 - Suction lipoplasty system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A suction lipoplasty system is a device intended for aesthetic body contouring... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Suction lipoplasty system. 878.5040 Section 878.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  12. Technology for pressure-instrumented thin airfoil models, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wigley, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A network of channels was chemically milled into one surface of a pair of matched plates having bond planes which were neither planar or profiled to match the contour of the trailing edge of a supercritical airfoil for testing in cryogenic wind tunnels. Vacuum brazing bonded the plates together to create a network of pressure passages without blockages or cross leaks. The greatest success was achieved with the smaller samples and planar bonding surfaces. In larger samples, problems were encountered due to warpage created by the relief of residual stresses. Successful bonds were formed by brazing A286, Nitronic 40 and 300 series stainless steels at 1065 C using AMS 4777B brazing alloy, but excessive grain growth occurred in samples of 200 grade 18 nickel maraging steels. Good bonds were obtained with maraging steel using a 47 percent Nickel-47 percent Palladium-6 percent Silicon alloy and brazing at 927 C. Electro-Discharge-Machining was an effective method of cutting profiled bond planes and airfoil contours. Orifices of good definition were obtained when the EDM wire cut passed through predrilled holes. Possible configurations for joints between small segments and the larger main wing were also studied.

  13. Aerodynamic Control of a Pitching Airfoil using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2012-11-01

    Aero-effected flight control using distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across lifting surface and regulated by integrated louver actuators is investigated in wind tunnel experiments. The interaction between unsteady bleed and the cross flows alters the apparent aerodynamic shape of the lifting surface by regulating the accumulation and shedding of vorticity concentrations, and consequently the distributions of forces and moments. The present experiments are conducted using a 2-D dynamically-pitching VR-7 airfoil model from pre- to post-stall angles of attack. The effects of leading edge bleed at high angles of attack on the formation and evolution of the dynamic stall vorticity concentrations are investigated at high reduced frequencies (k > 0.1) using PIV phase-locked to the airfoil's motion. The time-dependent bleed enables broad-range variation in lift and pitching moment with significant extension of the stall margin. In particular, bleed actuation reduces the extent of ``negative damping'' or pitching moment instability with minimal lift penalty. Supported by NTRC-VLRCOE, monitored by Dr. Mike Rutkowski.

  14. Transition Flight Experiments on a Swept Wing With Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Montoya, L. C.; Land, C. K.

    1989-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on a 30 degree swept wing with a perforated leading edge by systematically varying the location and amount of suction over a range of Mach number and Reynolds number. Suction was varied chordwise ahead of the front spar from either the front or rear direction by sealing spanwise perforated strips. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth-depending on the test configuration, flight condition, and suction location. A state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility was used to study the boundary layer stability as suction location and magnitude varied. N-factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations.

  15. Transition flight experiments on a swept wing with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Land, C. K.; Collier, F. S.; Montoya, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on a 30 degree swept wing with a perforated leading edge by systematically varying the location and amount of suction over a range of Mach number and Reynolds number. Suction was varied chordwise ahead of the front spar from either the front or rear direction by sealing spanwise perforated strips. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on the test configuration, flight condition, and suction location. A state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility was used to study the boundary layer stability as suction location and magnitude varied. N-factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations.

  16. Measurement of suction and discharge pressure pulsations in waterflood facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wurzbach, W.M. Jr.; Happel, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent mechanical problems with reciprocating water injection pumps prompted a study of suction and discharge pressure conditions in the Red River Bull Bayou Unit, Red River Parish, La. Frequent failures in plunger pump components and discharge lines were occurring at several injection sites within the unit. Electronic surveillance equipment consisting of an oscilloscope and pressure transducers was utilized to locate and identify large suction and discharge pressure pulses. The severity of these pulses could not be identified with standard pressure gages. The data obtained with the electronic equipment indicated that cavitation was occurring on the suction side of the pumps due to insufficient net positive suction head. The large pressure pulsations caused by this cavitation problem were carried through the pump and amplified on the discharge side. Changes in the suction and discharge piping design eliminated cavitation and effectively reduced the peak pressure pulses.

  17. On the acoustic radiation of a pitching airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.

    2013-07-01

    We examine the acoustic far field of a thin elastic airfoil, immersed in low-Mach non-uniform stream flow, and actuated by small-amplitude sinusoidal pitching motion. The near-field fluid-structure interaction problem is analyzed using potential thin-airfoil theory, combined with a discrete vortex model to describe the evolution of airfoil trailing edge wake. The leading order dipole-sound signature of the system is investigated using Powell-Howe acoustic analogy. Compared with a pitching rigid airfoil, the results demonstrate a two-fold effect of structure elasticity on airfoil acoustic field: at actuation frequencies close to the system least stable eigenfrequency, elasticity amplifies airfoil motion amplitude and associated sound levels; however, at frequencies distant from this eigenfrequency, structure elasticity acts to absorb system kinetic energy and reduce acoustic radiation. In the latter case, and with increasing pitching frequency ωp, a rigid-airfoil setup becomes significantly noisier than an elastic airfoil, owing to an ω _p^{5/2} increase of its direct motion noise component. Unlike rigid airfoil signature, it is shown that wake sound contribution to elastic airfoil radiation is significant for all ωp. Remarkably, this contribution contains, in addition to the fundamental pitching frequency, its odd multiple harmonics, which result from nonlinear interactions between the airfoil and the wake. The results suggest that structure elasticity may serve as a viable means for design of flapping flight noise control methodologies.

  18. Trailing edge flow conditions as a factor in airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsbee, A. I.; Maughmer, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Some new developments relevant to the design of single-element airfoils using potential flow methods are presented. In particular, the role played by the non-dimensional trailing edge velocity in design is considered and the relationship between the specified value and the resulting airfoil geometry is explored. In addition, the ramifications of the unbounded trailing edge pressure gradients generally present in the potential flow solution of the flow over an airfoil are examined, and the conditions necessary to obtain a class of airfoils having finite trailing edge pressure gradients developed. The incorporation of these conditions into the inverse method of Eppler is presented and the modified scheme employed to generate a number of airfoils for consideration. The detailed viscous analysis of airfoils having finite trailing edge pressure gradients demonstrates a reduction in the strong inviscid-viscid interactions generally present near the trailing edge of an airfoil.

  19. Origins, Innovations, and Diversification of Suction Feeding in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Peter C; McGee, Matthew D; Longo, Sarah J; Hernandez, L Patricia

    2015-07-01

    We review the origins, prominent innovations, and major patterns of diversification in suction feeding by vertebrates. Non-vertebrate chordates and larval lamprey suspension-feed by capturing small particles in pharyngeal mucous. In most of these lineages the gentle flows that transport particles are generated by buccal cilia, although larval lamprey and thaliacean urochordates have independently evolved a weak buccal pump to generate an oscillating flow of water that is powered by elastic recovery of the pharynx following compression by buccal muscles. The evolution of jaws and the hyoid facilitated powerful buccal expansion and high-performance suction feeding as found today throughout aquatic vertebrates. We highlight three major innovations in suction feeding. Most vertebrate suction feeders have mechanisms that occlude the corners of the open mouth during feeding. This produces a planar opening that is often nearly circular in shape. Both features contribute to efficient flow of water into the mouth and help direct the flow to the area directly in front of the mouth's aperture. Among several functions that have been identified for protrusion of the upper jaw, is an increase in the hydrodynamic forces that suction feeders exert on their prey. Protrusion of the upper jaw has evolved five times in ray-finned fishes, including in two of the most successful teleost radiations, cypriniforms and acanthomorphs, and is found in about 60% of living teleost species. Diversification of the mechanisms of suction feeding and of feeding behavior reveals that suction feeders with high capacity for suction rarely approach their prey rapidly, while slender-bodied predators with low capacity for suction show the full range of attack speeds. We hypothesize that a dominant axis of diversification among suction feeders involves a trade-off between the forces that are exerted on prey and the volume of water that is ingested.

  20. Music therapy following suctioning: four case studies.

    PubMed

    Burke, M; Walsh, J; Oehler, J; Gingras, J

    1995-10-01

    This descriptive study evaluates and compares the effectiveness of music, presented both aurally and vibrotactilely, in reducing agitation and physiological instability following a stress-producing intervention (suctioning) in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Heart rate, oxygen saturation levels, level of arousal, stressful facial expressions, and autonomic indicators were recorded for each of four preterm infants. All infants experienced a reduction in the level of arousal during the taped music intervention when compared with the control condition. Three infants spent an increased amount of time in a quiet alert state and had improved oxygen saturation levels during the vibrotactile intervention. All infants spent more time sleeping during the taped music condition than without music or with the vibrotactile intervention. Results suggest that music is effective in reducing stress-related behaviors for some infants.

  1. Lifetime prediction modeling of airfoils for advanced power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaivanov, Ventzislav Gueorguiev

    The use of gases produced from coal as a turbine fuel offers an attractive means for efficiently generating electric power from our Nation's most abundant fossil fuel resource. The oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbine concepts promise increased efficiency and low emissions on the expense of increased turbine inlet temperature (TIT) and different working fluid. Developing the turbine technology and materials is critical to the creation of these near-zero emission power generation technologies. A computational methodology, based on three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) and damage mechanics is presented for predicting the evolution of creep and fatigue in airfoils. We took a first look at airfoil thermal distributions in these advanced turbine systems based on CFD analysis. The damage mechanics-based creep and fatigue models were implemented as user modified routine in commercial package ANSYS. This routine was used to visualize the creep and fatigue damage evolution over airfoils for hydrogen-fired and oxy-fuel turbines concepts, and regions most susceptible to failure were indentified. Model allows for interaction between creep and fatigue damage thus damage due to fatigue and creep processes acting separately in one cycle will affect both the fatigue and creep damage rates in the next cycle. Simulation results were presented for various thermal conductivity of the top coat. Surface maps were created on the airfoil showing the development of the TGO scale and the Al depletion of the bond coat. In conjunction with model development, laboratory-scale experimental validation was executed to evaluate the influence of operational compressive stress levels on the performance of the TBC system. TBC coated single crystal coupons were exposed isothermally in air at 900, 1000, 1100oC with and without compressive load. Exposed samples were cross-sectioned and evaluated with scanning electron microscope (SEM). Performance data was collected based on image analysis

  2. Simplified dragonfly airfoil aerodynamics at Reynolds numbers below 8000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, David-Elie; Seifert, Avraham

    2009-07-01

    Effective aerodynamics at Reynolds numbers lower than 10 000 is of great technological interest and a fundamental scientific challenge. The current study covers a Reynolds number range of 2000-8000. At these Reynolds numbers, natural insect flight could provide inspiration for technology development. Insect wings are commonly characterized by corrugated airfoils. In particular, the airfoil of the dragonfly, which is able to glide, can be used for two-dimensional aerodynamic study of fixed rigid wings. In this study, a simplified dragonfly airfoil is numerically analyzed in a steady free-stream flow. The aerodynamic performance (such as mean and fluctuating lift and drag), are first compared to a "traditional" low Reynolds number airfoil: the Eppler-E61. The numerical results demonstrate superior performances of the corrugated airfoil. A series of low-speed wind and water tunnel experiments were performed on the corrugated airfoil, to validate the numerical results. The findings indicate quantitative agreement with the mean wake velocity profiles and shedding frequencies while validating the two dimensionality of the flow. A flow physics numerical study was performed in order to understand the underlying mechanism of corrugated airfoils at these Reynolds numbers. Airfoil shapes based on the flow field characteristics of the corrugated airfoil were built and analyzed. Their performances were compared to those of the corrugated airfoil, stressing the advantages of the latter. It was found that the flow which separates from the corrugations and forms spanwise vortices intermittently reattaches to the aft-upper arc region of the airfoil. This mechanism is responsible for the relatively low intensity of the vortices in the airfoil wake, reducing the drag and increasing the flight performances of this kind of corrugated airfoil as compared to traditional low Reynolds number airfoils such as the Eppler E-61.

  3. Experimental and computational investigation of lift-enhancing tabs on a multi-element airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Dale

    1996-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the effect of lift enhancing tabs on a two-element airfoil was conducted. The objective of the study was to develop an understanding of the flow physics associated with lift enhancing tabs on a multi-element airfoil. A NACA 63(sub 2)-215 ModB airfoil with a 30 percent chord Fowler flap was tested in the NASA Ames 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel. Lift enhancing tabs of various heights were tested on both the main element and the flap for a variety of flap riggings. Computations of the flow over the two-element airfoil were performed using the two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes code INS2D-UP. The computer results predict all of the trends in the experimental data quite well. When the flow over the flap upper surface is attached, tabs mounted at the main element trailing edge (cove tabs) produce very little change in lift. At high flap deflections. however, the flow over the flap is separated and cove tabs produce large increases in lift and corresponding reductions in drag by eliminating the separated flow. Cove tabs permit high flap deflection angles to be achieved and reduce the sensitivity of the airfoil lift to the size of the flap gap. Tabs attached to the flap training edge (flap tabs) are effective at increasing lift without significantly increasing drag. A combination of a cove tab and a flap tab increased the airfoil lift coefficient by 11 percent relative to the highest lift tab coefficient achieved by any baseline configuration at an angle of attack of zero percent and the maximum lift coefficient was increased by more than 3 percent. A simple analytic model based on potential flow was developed to provide a more detailed understanding of how lift enhancing tabs work. The tabs were modeled by a point vortex at the training edge. Sensitivity relationships were derived which provide a mathematical basis for explaining the effects of lift enhancing tabs on a multi-element airfoil. Results of the modeling

  4. A Separation Control CFD Validation Test Case. Part 1; Baseline and Steady Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David; Paschal, Keith B.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Harris, jerome; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    Low speed flow separation over a wall-mounted hump, and its control using steady suction, were studied experimentally in order to generate a data set for a workshop aimed at validating CFD turbulence models. The baseline and controlled data sets comprised static and dynamic surface pressure measurements, flow field measurements using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and wall shear stress obtained via oil-film interferometry. In addition to the specific test cases studied, surface pressures for a wide variety of conditions were reported for different Reynolds numbers and suction rates. Stereoscopic PIV and oil-film flow visualization indicated that the baseline separated flow field was mainly two-dimensional. With the application of control, some three-dimensionality was evident in the spanwise variation of pressure recovery, reattachment location and spanwise pressure fluctuations. Part 2 of this paper, under preparation for the AIAA Meeting in Reno 2005, considers separation control by means of zero-efflux oscillatory blowing.

  5. Numerical simulation of compressible fluid flow in an ultrasonic suction pump.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-08-01

    Characteristics of an ultrasonic suction pump that uses a vibrating piston surface and a pipe are numerically simulated and compared with experimental results. Fluid analysis based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) routine is performed, where the nonlinear term and the moving fluid-surface boundary condition are considered. As a result, the suction mechanism of the pump is found to be similar to that of a check valve, where the gap is open during the inflow phase, and it is nearly closed during the outflow phase. The effects of Reynolds number, vibration amplitude and gap thickness on the pump performance are analyzed. The calculated result is in good agreement with the previously measured results.

  6. Influence of airfoil geometry on delta wing leading-edge vortices and vortex-induced aerodynamics at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Byrd, James E.; Wesselmann, Gary F.

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the influence of airfoil geometry on delta wing leading edge vortex flow and vortex induced aerodynamics at supersonic speeds is discussed. A series of delta wing wind tunnel models were tested over a Mach number range from 1.7 to 2.0. The model geometric variables included leading edge sweep and airfoil shape. Surface pressure data, vapor screen, and oil flow photograph data were taken to evaluate the complex structure of the vortices and shocks on the family of wings tested. The data show that airfoil shape has a significant impact on the wing upper surface flow structure and pressure distribution, but has a minimal impact on the integrated upper surface pressure increments.

  7. Aerodynamic performance and pressure distributions for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Renaldo V.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Ray, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents in graphic and tabular forms the aerodynamic coefficient and surface pressure distribution data for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The test was another in a series of tests involved in the joint NASA/U.S. Industry Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. This 14% thick supercritical airfoil was tested at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.76 and angles of attack from -2.0 to 6.0 degrees. The test Reynolds numbers were 4 million, 6 million, 10 million, 15 million, 30 million, 40 million, and 45 million.

  8. Aerodynamic Simulation of Ice Accretion on Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Bragg, Michael B.; Busch, Greg T.; Montreuil, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in aerodynamic scaling and simulation of ice accretion on airfoils. Ice accretions were classified into four types on the basis of aerodynamic effects: roughness, horn, streamwise, and spanwise ridge. The NASA Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was used to generate ice accretions within these four types using both subscale and full-scale models. Large-scale, pressurized windtunnel testing was performed using a 72-in.- (1.83-m-) chord, NACA 23012 airfoil model with high-fidelity, three-dimensional castings of the IRT ice accretions. Performance data were recorded over Reynolds numbers from 4.5 x 10(exp 6) to 15.9 x 10(exp 6) and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.28. Lower fidelity ice-accretion simulation methods were developed and tested on an 18-in.- (0.46-m-) chord NACA 23012 airfoil model in a small-scale wind tunnel at a lower Reynolds number. The aerodynamic accuracy of the lower fidelity, subscale ice simulations was validated against the full-scale results for a factor of 4 reduction in model scale and a factor of 8 reduction in Reynolds number. This research has defined the level of geometric fidelity required for artificial ice shapes to yield aerodynamic performance results to within a known level of uncertainty and has culminated in a proposed methodology for subscale iced-airfoil aerodynamic simulation.

  9. Body ram, not suction, is the primary axis of suction-feeding diversity in spiny-rayed fishes.

    PubMed

    Longo, Sarah J; McGee, Matthew D; Oufiero, Christopher E; Waltzek, Thomas B; Wainwright, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Suction-feeding fishes exhibit diverse prey-capture strategies that vary in their relative use of suction and predator approach (ram), which is often referred to as the ram-suction continuum. Previous research has found that ram varies more than suction distance among species, such that ram accounts for most differences in prey-capture behaviors. To determine whether these findings hold at broad evolutionary scales, we collected high-speed videos of 40 species of spiny-rayed fishes (Acanthomorpha) feeding on live prey. For each strike, we calculated the contributions of suction, body ram (swimming) and jaw ram (mouth movement relative to the body) to closing the distance between predator and prey. We confirm that the contribution of suction distance is limited even in this phylogenetically and ecologically broad sample of species, with the extreme suction area of prey-capture space conspicuously unoccupied. Instead of a continuum from suction to ram, we find that variation in body ram is the major factor underlying the diversity of prey-capture strategies among suction-feeding fishes. Independent measurement of the contribution of jaw ram revealed that it is an important component of diversity among spiny-rayed fishes, with a number of ecomorphologies relying heavily on jaw ram, including pivot feeding in syngnathiforms, extreme jaw protruders and benthic sit-and-wait ambush predators. A combination of morphological and behavioral innovations has allowed fish to invade the extreme jaw ram area of prey-capture space. We caution that while two-species comparisons may support a ram-suction trade-off, these patterns do not speak to broader patterns across spiny-rayed fishes.

  10. A universal prediction of stall onset for airfoils at a wide range of Reynolds number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Wallace J., II

    The inception of leading-edge stall on two-dimensional, smooth, thin airfoils at various Reynolds number flows in the range O(103) to O(107) is investigated by an asymptotic approach and numerical simulations. The theory demonstrates that a subsonic flow about a thin airfoil can be described in terms of an outer region, around most of the airfoil chord, and an inner region, around the nose, that asymptotically match each other. The flow in the outer region is dominated by the classical thin airfoil theory. Scaled coordinates and a modified Reynolds number ReM, both based on the nose radius of curvature, are used to account for the nonlinear behavior and extreme velocity changes in the nose region, where stagnation and high suction occur. It results in a reduced-order model problem of a uniform, compressible, viscous flow past a semi-infinite canonic parabola. The inner far-field is governed by a circulation parameter A that is related to the airfoil's angle of attack, nose radius of curvature, thickness ratio, camber, and flow Mach number. The model parabola problem is solved numerically for various ReM and A using two methods. The first technique uses the steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model for simulating moderate to high ReM flows. The second method applies direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the unsteady and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for low to moderate ReM flows. In both methods, the critical value As is determined when a large separation zone first appears in the nose flow and the minimum pressure coefficient suddenly drops. The change of As with ReM is determined and these values indicate the onset of stall on the airfoil. The DNS results show that As decreases with ReM for ReM < ˜250, in agreement with Marginal Separation Theory (MST). However, calculations display the appearance of unsteady waves above a limiting value ReMcrit ˜250, where A s reaches a minimum of ˜1.55. For Re

  11. Airfoil Ice-Accretion Aerodynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Michael B.; Broeren, Andy P.; Addy, Harold E.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Guffond, Didier; Montreuil, E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, ONERA, and the University of Illinois are conducting a major research program whose goal is to improve our understanding of the aerodynamic scaling of ice accretions on airfoils. The program when it is completed will result in validated scaled simulation methods that produce the essential aerodynamic features of the full-scale iced-airfoil. This research will provide some of the first, high-fidelity, full-scale, iced-airfoil aerodynamic data. An initial study classified ice accretions based on their aerodynamics into four types: roughness, streamwise ice, horn ice, and spanwise-ridge ice. Subscale testing using a NACA 23012 airfoil was performed in the NASA IRT and University of Illinois wind tunnel to better understand the aerodynamics of these ice types and to test various levels of ice simulation fidelity. These studies are briefly reviewed here and have been presented in more detail in other papers. Based on these results, full-scale testing at the ONERA F1 tunnel using cast ice shapes obtained from molds taken in the IRT will provide full-scale iced airfoil data from full-scale ice accretions. Using these data as a baseline, the final step is to validate the simulation methods in scale in the Illinois wind tunnel. Computational ice accretion methods including LEWICE and ONICE have been used to guide the experiments and are briefly described and results shown. When full-scale and simulation aerodynamic results are available, these data will be used to further develop computational tools. Thus the purpose of the paper is to present an overview of the program and key results to date.

  12. Investigation of passive shock wave-boundary layer control for transonic airfoil drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Brower, W. B., Jr.; Bahi, L.; Ross, J.

    1982-01-01

    The passive drag control concept, consisting of a porous surface with a cavity beneath it, was investigated with a 12-percent-thick circular arc and a 14-percent-thick supercritical airfoil mounted on the test section bottom wall. The porous surface was positioned in the shock wave/boundary layer interaction region. The flow circulating through the porous surface, from the downstream to the upstream of the terminating shock wave location, produced a lambda shock wave system and a pressure decrease in the downstream region minimizing the flow separation. The wake impact pressure data show an appreciably drag reduction with the porous surface at transonic speeds. To determine the optimum size of porosity and cavity, tunnel tests were conducted with different airfoil porosities, cavities and flow Mach numbers. A higher drag reduction was obtained by the 2.5 percent porosity and the 1/4-inch deep cavity.

  13. Dynamic Stall in Pitching Airfoils: Aerodynamic Damping and Compressibility Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corke, Thomas C.; Thomas, Flint O.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stall is an incredibly rich fluid dynamics problem that manifests itself on an airfoil during rapid, transient motion in which the angle of incidence surpasses the static stall limit. It is an important element of many manmade and natural flyers, including helicopters and supermaneuverable aircraft, and low-Reynolds number flapping-wing birds and insects. The fluid dynamic attributes that accompany dynamic stall include an eruption of vorticity that organizes into a well-defined dynamic stall vortex and massive excursions in aerodynamic loads that can couple with the airfoil structural dynamics. The dynamic stall process is highly sensitive to surface roughness that can influence turbulent transition and to local compressibility effects that occur at free-stream Mach numbers that are otherwise incompressible. Under some conditions, dynamic stall can result in negative aerodynamic damping that leads to limit-cycle growth of structural vibrations and rapid mechanical failure. The mechanisms leading to negative damping have been a principal interest of recent experiments and analysis. Computational fluid dynamic simulations and low-order models have not been good predictors so far. Large-eddy simulation could be a viable approach although it remains computationally intensive. The topic is technologically important owing to the desire to develop next-generation rotorcraft that employ adaptive rotor dynamic stall control.

  14. An approach to constrained aerodynamic design with application to airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    An approach was developed for incorporating flow and geometric constraints into the Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (DISC) design method. In this approach, an initial target pressure distribution is developed using a set of control points. The chordwise locations and pressure levels of these points are initially estimated either from empirical relationships and observed characteristics of pressure distributions for a given class of airfoils or by fitting the points to an existing pressure distribution. These values are then automatically adjusted during the design process to satisfy the flow and geometric constraints. The flow constraints currently available are lift, wave drag, pitching moment, pressure gradient, and local pressure levels. The geometric constraint options include maximum thickness, local thickness, leading-edge radius, and a 'glove' constraint involving inner and outer bounding surfaces. This design method was also extended to include the successive constraint release (SCR) approach to constrained minimization.

  15. Dynamic stall experiments on the NACA 0012 airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalister, K. W.; Carr, L. W.; Mccroskey, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    The flow over a NACA 0012 airfoil undergoing large oscillations in pitch was experimentally studied at a Reynolds number of and over a range of frequencies and amplitudes. Hot-wire probes and surface-pressure transducers were used to clarify the role of the laminar separation bubble, to delineate the growth and shedding of the stall vortex, and to quantify the resultant aerodynamic loads. In addition to the pressure distributions and normal force and pitching moment data that have often been obtained in previous investigations, estimates of the unsteady drag force during dynamic stall have been derived from the surface pressure measurements. Special characteristics of the pressure response, which are symptomatic of the occurrence and relative severity of moment stall, have also been examined.

  16. Centrifugal pumps: which suction specific speeds are acceptable

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, J.L.

    1982-04-01

    Suction specific speed is an important consideration when purchasing or analyzing centrifugal pumps. There is a direct correlation between this parameter, pump reliability and maintenance expenses. This article demonstrates that in a large Gulf Coast oil refinery, centrifugal pumps with a suction specific speed greater than 11,000 failed at a frequency nearly twice that of centrifugal pumps with suction specific speed less than 11,000. This study consisted primarily of hydrocarbon pumps with an average horsepower of 150 hp. Results may vary some from those found if high energy water pumps are studied. 5 refs.

  17. Cellular aggregation and trauma in cardiotomy suction systems.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, G; Sanderson, J M

    1979-01-01

    Experiments in dogs showed that the high levels of cellular aggregation and trauma caused by cariodtomy suction can be considerably reduced by the avoidance of air aspiration. A hypothesis is proposed to explain this on the basis of shear stresses in the inlet cannula. Roller pump suction was also found to be slightly more traumatic than vaccum suction, but contact of the blood with the pericardium had no effect so long as the pericardium and epicardium had been previously washed with saline. PMID:515984

  18. Computational Investigations on the Effects of Gurney Flap on Airfoil Aerodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shubham; Sitaram, Nekkanti; Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    The present study comprises steady state, two-dimensional computational investigations performed on NACA 0012 airfoil to analyze the effect of Gurney flap (GF) on airfoil aerodynamics using k-ε RNG turbulence model of FLUENT. Airfoil with GF is analyzed for six different heights from 0.5% to 4% of the chord length, seven positions from 0% to 20% of the chord length from the trailing edge, and seven mounting angles from 30° to 120° with the chord. Computed values of lift and drag coefficients with angle of attack are compared with experimental values and good agreement is found at low angles of attack. In addition static pressure distribution on the airfoil surface and pathlines and turbulence intensities near the trailing edge are present. From the computational investigation, it is recommended that Gurney flaps with a height of 1.5% chord be installed perpendicular to chord and as close to the trailing edge as possible to obtain maximum lift enhancement with minimum drag penalty. PMID:27347517

  19. The semi-discrete Galerkin finite element modelling of compressible viscous flow past an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A method is developed to solve the two-dimensional, steady, compressible, turbulent boundary-layer equations and is coupled to an existing Euler solver for attached transonic airfoil analysis problems. The boundary-layer formulation utilizes the semi-discrete Galerkin (SDG) method to model the spatial variable normal to the surface with linear finite elements and the time-like variable with finite differences. A Dorodnitsyn transformed system of equations is used to bound the infinite spatial domain thereby permitting the use of a uniform finite element grid which provides high resolution near the wall and automatically follows boundary-layer growth. The second-order accurate Crank-Nicholson scheme is applied along with a linearization method to take advantage of the parabolic nature of the boundary-layer equations and generate a non-iterative marching routine. The SDG code can be applied to any smoothly-connected airfoil shape without modification and can be coupled to any inviscid flow solver. In this analysis, a direct viscous-inviscid interaction is accomplished between the Euler and boundary-layer codes, through the application of a transpiration velocity boundary condition. Results are presented for compressible turbulent flow past NACA 0012 and RAE 2822 airfoils at various freestream Mach numbers, Reynolds numbers, and angles of attack. All results show good agreement with experiment, and the coupled code proved to be a computationally-efficient and accurate airfoil analysis tool.

  20. Computational Investigations on the Effects of Gurney Flap on Airfoil Aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shubham; Sitaram, Nekkanti; Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2015-01-01

    The present study comprises steady state, two-dimensional computational investigations performed on NACA 0012 airfoil to analyze the effect of Gurney flap (GF) on airfoil aerodynamics using k-ε RNG turbulence model of FLUENT. Airfoil with GF is analyzed for six different heights from 0.5% to 4% of the chord length, seven positions from 0% to 20% of the chord length from the trailing edge, and seven mounting angles from 30° to 120° with the chord. Computed values of lift and drag coefficients with angle of attack are compared with experimental values and good agreement is found at low angles of attack. In addition static pressure distribution on the airfoil surface and pathlines and turbulence intensities near the trailing edge are present. From the computational investigation, it is recommended that Gurney flaps with a height of 1.5% chord be installed perpendicular to chord and as close to the trailing edge as possible to obtain maximum lift enhancement with minimum drag penalty.

  1. Optimum Duty Cycle of Unsteady Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation for NACA0015 Airfoil Stall Separation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Min; Yang, Bo; Peng, Tianxiang; Lei, Mingkai

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma aerodynamic actuation technology is employed to suppress airfoil stall separation and the technical parameters are explored with wind tunnel experiments on an NACA0015 airfoil by measuring the surface pressure distribution of the airfoil. The performance of the DBD aerodynamic actuation for airfoil stall separation suppression is evaluated under DBD voltages from 2000 V to 4000 V and the duty cycles varied in the range of 0.1 to 1.0. It is found that higher lift coefficients and lower threshold voltages are achieved under the unsteady DBD aerodynamic actuation with the duty cycles less than 0.5 as compared to that of the steady plasma actuation at the same free-stream speeds and attack angles, indicating a better flow control performance. By comparing the lift coefficients and the threshold voltages, an optimum duty cycle is determined as 0.25 by which the maximum lift coefficient and the minimum threshold voltage are obtained at the same free-stream speed and attack angle. The non-uniform DBD discharge with stronger discharge in the positive half cycle due to electrons deposition on the dielectric slabs and the suppression of opposite momentum transfer due to the intermittent discharge with cutoff of the negative half cycle are responsible for the observed optimum duty cycle. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21276036), Liaoning Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 2015020123) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 3132015154)

  2. The effects of leading-edge serrations on reducing flow unsteadiness about airfoils.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwind, R. G.; Allen, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    High frequency surface pressure measurements were obtained from wind-tunnel tests over the Reynolds number range 1.2 x 1,000,000 to 6.2 x 1,000,000 on a rectangular wing of NACA 63-009 airfoil section. A wide selection of leading-edge serrations were also added to the basic airfoil. Under a two-dimensional laminar bubble very close to the leading edge of the basic airfoil there is a large peak in rms pressure, which is interpreted as an oscillation in size and position of the bubble. The serrations divide the bubble into segments and reduce the peak rms pressures. A low Reynolds number flow visualization test on a hydrofoil in water was also conducted. A von Karman vortex street was found trailing from the rear of the foil. Its frequency is at a much lower Strouhal number than in the high Reynolds number experiment, and is related mathematically to the airfoil trailing-edge and boundary-layer thicknesses.

  3. Effect of wakes from moving upstream rods on boundary layer separation from a high lift airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, Ralph J.

    2011-11-01

    Highly loaded airfoils in turbines allow power generation using fewer airfoils. High loading, however, can cause boundary layer separation, resulting in reduced lift and increased aerodynamic loss. Separation is affected by the interaction between rotating blades and stationary vanes. Wakes from upstream vanes periodically impinge on downstream blades, and can reduce separation. The wakes include elevated turbulence, which can induce transition, and a velocity deficit, which results in an impinging flow on the blade surface known as a ``negative jet.'' In the present study, flow through a linear cascade of very high lift airfoils is studied experimentally. Wakes are produced with moving rods which cut through the flow upstream of the airfoils, simulating the effect of upstream vanes. Pressure and velocity fields are documented. Wake spacing and velocity are varied. At low Reynolds numbers without wakes, the boundary layer separates and does not reattach. At high wake passing frequencies separation is largely suppressed. At lower frequencies, ensemble averaged velocity results show intermittent separation and reattachment during the wake passing cycle. Supported by NASA.

  4. Experimental Study of Tip Vortex Flow from a Periodically Pitched Airfoil Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, KBMQ; Fagan, A. F.; Mankbadi, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a tip vortex from a NACA0012 airfoil is conducted in a low-speed wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4x10(exp 4). Initially, data for a stationary airfoil held at various angles-of-attack (alpha) are gathered. Detailed surveys are done for two cases: alpha=10 deg with attached flow and alpha=25 deg with massive flow separation on the upper surface. Distributions of various properties are obtained using hot-wire anemometry. Data include mean velocity, streamwise vorticity and turbulent stresses at various streamwise locations. For all cases, the vortex core is seen to involve a mean velocity deficit. The deficit apparently traces to the airfoil wake, part of which gets wrapped by the tip vortex. At small alpha, the vortex is laminar within the measurement domain. The strength of the vortex increases with increasing alpha but undergoes a sudden drop around alpha (is) greater than 16 deg. The drop in peak vorticity level is accompanied by transition and a sharp rise in turbulence within the core. Data are also acquired with the airfoil pitched sinusoidally. All oscillation cases pertain to a mean alpha=15 deg while the amplitude and frequency are varied. An example of phase-averaged data for an amplitude of +/-10 deg and a reduced frequency of k=0.2 is discussed. All results are compared with available data from the literature shedding further light on the complex dynamics of the tip vortex.

  5. Oscillatory Excitation of Unsteady Compressible Flows over Airfoils at Flight Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seifert, Avi; Pack, LaTunia G.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental investigation, aimed at delaying flow separation due to the occurrence of a shock-wave-boundary-layer interaction, is reported. The experiment was performed using a NACA 0012 airfoil and a NACA 0015 airfoil at high Reynolds number incompressible and compressible flow conditions. The effects of Mach and Reynolds numbers were identified, using the capabilities of the cryogenic-pressurized facility to maintain one parameter fixed and change the other. Significant Reynolds number effects were identified in the baseline compressible flow conditions even at Reynolds number of 10 and 20 million. The main objectives of the experiment were to study the effects of periodic excitation on airfoil drag-divergence and to alleviate the severe unsteadiness associated with shock-induced separation (known as "buffeting"). Zero-mass-flux oscillatory blowing was introduced through a downstream directed slot located at 10% chord on the upper surface of the NACA 0015 airfoil. The effective frequencies generated 2-4 vortices over the separated region, regardless of the Mach number. Even though the excitation was introduced upstream of the shock-wave, due to experimental limitations, it had pronounced effects downstream of it. Wake deficit (associated with drag) and unsteadiness (associated with buffeting) were significantly reduced. The spectral content of the wake pressure fluctuations indicates of steadier flow throughout the frequency range when excitation was applied. This is especially important at low frequencies which are more likely to interact with the airframe.

  6. Estimation of morphing airfoil shape and aerodynamic load using artificial hair sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Nathan S.; Su, Weihua; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    An active area of research in adaptive structures focuses on the use of continuous wing shape changing methods as a means of replacing conventional discrete control surfaces and increasing aerodynamic efficiency. Although many shape-changing methods have been used since the beginning of heavier-than-air flight, the concept of performing camber actuation on a fully-deformable airfoil has not been widely applied. A fundamental problem of applying this concept to real-world scenarios is the fact that camber actuation is a continuous, time-dependent process. Therefore, if camber actuation is to be used in a closed-loop feedback system, one must be able to determine the instantaneous airfoil shape as well as the aerodynamic loads at all times. One approach is to utilize a new type of artificial hair sensors developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory to determine the flow conditions surrounding deformable airfoils. In this work, the hair sensor measurement data will be simulated by using the flow solver XFoil, with the assumption that perfect data with no noise can be collected from the hair sensor measurements. Such measurements will then be used in an artificial neural network based process to approximate the instantaneous airfoil camber shape, lift coefficient, and moment coefficient at a given angle of attack. Various aerodynamic and geometrical properties approximated from the artificial hair sensor and artificial neural network system will be compared with the results of XFoil in order to validate the approximation approach.

  7. The influence of sweep on the aerodynamic loading of an oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.hilaire, A. O.; Carta, F. O.; Fink, M. R.; Jepson, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    Aerodynamic experiments were performed on an oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil utilizing a tunnel-spanning wing in both unswept and 30 degree swept configurations. The airfoil was tested in steady state and in oscillatory pitch about the quarter chord. The unsteady aerodynamic loading was measured using pressure transducers along the chord. Numerical integrations of the unsteady pressure transducer responses were used to compute the normal force, chord force, and moment components of the induced loading. The effects of sweep on the induced aerodynamic load response was examined. For the range of parameters tested, it was found that sweeping the airfoil tends to delay the onset of dynamic stall. Sweeping was also found to reduce the magnitude of the unsteady load variation about the mean response. It was determined that at mean incidence angles greater than 9 degrees, sweep tends to reduce the stability margin of the NACA 0012 airfoil; however, for all cases tested, the airfoil was found to be stable in pure pitch. Turbulent eddies were found to convect downstream above the upper surface and generate forward-moving acoustic waves at the trailing edge which move upstream along the lower surface.

  8. Development of Cutting and Suction Device with Twist Blade Screw for Minimally Invasive Surgery: Evaluation of Suction Performance

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yusuke; Suzuki, Takashi; Tamura, Manabu; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iseki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to develop a narrow-diameter and long-bore device for minimally invasive surgery that achieves the simultaneous cutting and suction of body tissue such as the diseased part of an organ. In this paper, we propose a screw made of a thin metal plate, and we developed a prototype device using this screw. For smooth operation, the suction performance must be superior to the cutting performance. Therefore, we performed experiments and evaluated the suction performance of the developed device assuming the crushed tissue pieces correspond to a highly viscous fluid. From the results, we confirmed that the suction volume is almost proportional to the rotation speed of the screw in the low speed range, and the device has an upper limit of suction volume at a certain rotation speed. Considering practical use, its proportional speed range is suitable for the device controllability of cutting and suction volume, and the size of the device tip needs to be 1 mm or more. Based on these conditions, we are planning to examine the shape of the cutting edge for realizing efficient cutting and suction and we will complete the device. PMID:26132592

  9. Investigation of a bio-inspired lift-enhancing effector on a 2D airfoil.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Joe; Gopalarathnam, Ashok

    2012-09-01

    A flap mounted on the upper surface of an airfoil, called a 'lift-enhancing effector', has been shown in wind tunnel tests to have a similar function to a bird's covert feathers, which rise off the wing's surface in response to separated flows. The effector, fabricated from a thin Mylar sheet, is allowed to rotate freely about its leading edge. The tests were performed in the NCSU subsonic wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of 4 × 10(5). The maximum lift coefficient with the effector was the same as that for the clean airfoil, but was maintained over an angle-of-attack range from 12° to almost 20°, resulting in a very gentle stall behavior. To better understand the aerodynamics and to estimate the deployment angle of the free-moving effector, fixed-angle effectors fabricated out of stiff wood were also tested. A progressive increase in the stall angle of attack with increasing effector angle was observed, with diminishing returns beyond the effector angle of 60°. Drag tests on both the free-moving and fixed effectors showed a marked improvement in drag at high angles of attack. Oil flow visualization on the airfoil with and without the fixed-angle effectors proved that the effector causes the separation point to move aft on the airfoil, as compared to the clean airfoil. This is thought to be the main mechanism by which an effector improves both lift and drag. A comparison of the fixed-effector results with those from the free-effector tests shows that the free effector's deployment angle is between 30° and 45°. When operating at and beyond the clean airfoil's stall angle, the free effector automatically deploys to progressively higher angles with increasing angles of attack. This slows down the rapid upstream movement of the separation point and avoids the severe reduction in the lift coefficient and an increase in the drag coefficient that are seen on the clean airfoil at the onset of stall. Thus, the effector postpones the stall by 4-8° and makes the

  10. Imposing periodic suction to stabilise thin-film flow down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Alice; Papageorgiou, Demetrios; Tseluiko, Dmitri; Imperial Collaboration; Loughborough Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Flow of a thin film down an inclined plane becomes unstable when the slope angle or Reynolds number are sufficiently large; enhancement or suppression of these instabilities is relevant to a range of industrial applications. Here we study the effect of introducing spatially periodic blowing and sucking through the rigid planar boundary. We derive two long-wave, thin-film models to describe the system, including the imposed suction as well as inertia, surface tension, gravity and viscosity. We explore the bifurcation structure in each model, and perform linear stability and time-dependent simulations for both small and large forcing amplitude. Both models predict that forcing via imposed suction can be chosen to either destabilize or stabilize the flow, and we show that forcing at very long wavelengths always has a stabilizing effect on the flow. Support provided by the EPSRC Grant Number EP/K041134/1.

  11. Boundary-layer receptivity due to a wall suction and control of Tollmien-Schlichting waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodonyi, R. J.; Duck, P. W.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical study of the generation of Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves due to the interaction between a small free-stream disturbance and a small localized suction slot on an otherwise flat surface was carried out using finite difference methods. The nonlinear steady flow is of the viscous-inviscid interactive type while the unsteady disturbed flow is assumed to be governed by the Navier-Stokes equations linearized about this flow. Numerical solutions illustrate the growth or decay of T-S waves generated by the interaction between the free-stream disturbance and the suction slot, depending on the value of the scaled Strouhal number. An important result of this receptivity problem is the numerical determination of the amplitude of the T-S waves and the demonstration of the possible active control of the growth of T-S waves.

  12. Boundary-layer receptivity due to a wall suction and control of Tollmien-Schlichting waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodonyi, R. J.; Duck, P. W.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical study of the generation of Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves due to the interaction between a small free-stream disturbance and a small localized suction slot on an otherwise flat surface was carried out using finite difference methods. The nonlinear steady flow is of the viscous-inviscid interactive type while the unsteady disturbed flow is assumed to be governed by the Navier-Stokes equations linearized about this flow. Numerical solutions illustrate the growth or decay of T-S waves generated by the interaction between the free-stream disturbance and the suction slot, depending on the value of the scaled Strouhal number. An important result of this receptivity problem is the numerical determination of the amplitude of the T-S waves and the demonstration of the possible active control of the growth of T-S waves.

  13. Turbine airfoil with laterally extending snubber having internal cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Scribner, Carmen Andrew; Messmann, Stephen John; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-09-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one snubber with a snubber cooling system positioned therein and in communication with an airfoil cooling system is disclosed. The snubber may extend from the outer housing of the airfoil toward an adjacent turbine airfoil positioned within a row of airfoils. The snubber cooling system may include an inner cooling channel separated from an outer cooling channel by an inner wall. The inner wall may include a plurality of impingement cooling orifices that direct impingement fluid against an outer wall defining the outer cooling channel. In one embodiment, the cooling fluids may be exhausted from the snubber, and in another embodiment, the cooling fluids may be returned to the airfoil cooling system. Flow guides may be positioned in the outer cooling channel, which may reduce cross-flow by the impingement orifices, thereby increasing effectiveness.

  14. New airfoils for small horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.; Selig, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    In a continuing effort to enhance the performance of small energy systems, one root airfoil and three primary airfoils were specifically designed for small horizontal axis wind turbines. These airfoils are intended primarily for 1-10 kW variable-speed wind turbines for both conventional (tapered/twisted) or pultruded blades. The four airfoils were wind-tunnel tested at Reynolds numbers between 100,000 and 500,000. Tests with simulated leading-edge roughness were also conducted. The results indicate that small variable-speed wind turbines should benefit from the use of the new airfoils which provide enhanced lift-to-drag ratio performance as compared with previously existing airfoils.

  15. Quiet airfoils for small and large wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Tangler, James L [Boulder, CO; Somers, Dan L [Port Matilda, PA

    2012-06-12

    Thick airfoil families with desirable aerodynamic performance with minimal airfoil induced noise. The airfoil families are suitable for a variety of wind turbine designs and are particularly well-suited for use with horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) with constant or variable speed using pitch and/or stall control. In exemplary embodiments, a first family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with small wind turbines and second family of three thick airfoils is provided for use with very large machines, e.g., an airfoil defined for each of three blade radial stations or blade portions defined along the length of a blade. Each of the families is designed to provide a high maximum lift coefficient or high lift, to exhibit docile stalls, to be relatively insensitive to roughness, and to achieve a low profile drag.

  16. Transonic airfoil analysis and design in nonuniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. F.; Lan, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    A nonuniform transonic airfoil code is developed for applications in analysis, inverse design and direct optimization involving an airfoil immersed in propfan slipstream. Problems concerning the numerical stability, convergence, divergence and solution oscillations are discussed. The code is validated by comparing with some known results in incompressible flow. A parametric investigation indicates that the airfoil lift-drag ratio can be increased by decreasing the thickness ratio. A better performance can be achieved if the airfoil is located below the slipstream center. Airfoil characteristics designed by the inverse method and a direct optimization are compared. The airfoil designed with the method of direct optimization exhibits better characteristics and achieves a gain of 22 percent in lift-drag ratio with a reduction of 4 percent in thickness.

  17. Influence of localised double suction on a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyewola, O.; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.

    2007-07-01

    The effects of localised suction applied through a pair of porous wall strips on a turbulent boundary layer have been quantified through the measurements of mean velocity and Reynolds stresses. The results indicate that the use of second strip extends the pseudo-relaminarisation zone but also reduces the overshoot in the longitudinal and normal r.m.s. velocities. While the minimum r.m.s. occurs at x/δo=3.0 (one strip) and x/δo=12 (two strips), the reduction observed for the latter case is larger. Relative to no suction, the turbulence level is modified by suction and the effect is enhanced with double suction. This increased effectiveness reflects the fact that the second strip acts on a boundary layer whose near-wall active motion has been seriously weakened by the first strip.

  18. Coronary artery surgery: cardiotomy suction or cell salvage?

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Kelvin; Shah, Hetul; Kelleher, Andrea; Moat, Neil

    2007-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) today results in what may be regarded as acceptable levels of blood loss with many institutions avoiding allogeneic red cell transfusion in over 60% of their patients. The majority of cardiac surgeons employ cardiotomy suction to preserve autologous blood during on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery; however the use of cardiotomy suction is associated with a more pronounced systemic inflammatory response and a resulting coagulopathy as well as exacerbating the microembolic load. This leads to a tendency to increased blood loss, transfusion requirement and organ dysfunction. Conversely, the avoidance of cardiotomy suction in coronary artery bypass surgery is not associated with an increased transfusion requirement. There is therefore no indication for the routine use of cardiotomy suction in on-pump coronary artery surgery. PMID:17961227

  19. 21 CFR 878.4780 - Powered suction pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4780 Powered suction pump. (a... support system. The device may be used during surgery in the operating room or at the patient's...

  20. 21 CFR 878.4780 - Powered suction pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4780 Powered suction pump. (a... support system. The device may be used during surgery in the operating room or at the patient's...

  1. 21 CFR 878.4780 - Powered suction pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4780 Powered suction pump. (a... support system. The device may be used during surgery in the operating room or at the patient's...

  2. 21 CFR 878.4780 - Powered suction pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4780 Powered suction pump. (a... support system. The device may be used during surgery in the operating room or at the patient's...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4780 - Powered suction pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4780 Powered suction pump. (a... support system. The device may be used during surgery in the operating room or at the patient's...

  4. Vapor deposition on doublet airfoil substrates: Control of coating thickness and microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Zhao, Hengbei; Wadley, Haydn N. G.

    2015-11-15

    Gas jet assisted vapor deposition processes for depositing coatings are conducted at higher pressures than conventional physical vapor deposition methods, and have shown promise for coating complex shaped substrates including those with non-line-of-sight (NLS) regions on their surface. These regions typically receive vapor atoms at a lower rate and with a wider incident angular distribution than substrate regions in line-of-sight (LS) of the vapor source. To investigate the coating of such substrates, the thickness and microstructure variation along the inner (curved) surfaces of a model doublet airfoil containing both LS and NLS regions has been investigated. Results from atomistic simulations and experiments confirm that the coating's thickness is thinner in flux-shadowed regions than in other regions for all the coating processes investigated. They also indicated that the coatings columnar microstructure and pore volume fraction vary with surface location through the LS to NLS transition zone. A substrate rotation strategy for optimizing the thickness over the entire doublet airfoil surface was investigated, and led to the identification of a process that resulted in only small variation of coating thickness, columnar growth angle, and pore volume fraction on all doublet airfoil surfaces.

  5. Separated transonic airfoil flow calculations with a nonequilibrium turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, L. S.; Johnson, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Navier-Stokes transonic airfoil calculations based on a recently developed nonequilibrium, turbulence closure model are presented for a supercritical airfoil section at transonic cruise conditions and for a conventional airfoil section at shock-induced stall conditions. Comparisons with experimental data are presented which show that this nonequilibrium closure model performs significantly better than the popular Baldwin-Lomax and Cebeci-Smith equilibrium algebraic models when there is boundary-layer separation that results from the inviscid-viscous interactions.

  6. S825 and S826 Airfoils: 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Somers, D. M.

    2005-01-01

    A family of airfoils, the S825 and S826, for 20- to 40-meter, variable-speed and variable-pitch (toward feather), horizontal-axis wind turbines has been designed and analyzed theoretically. The two primary objectives of high maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The constraints on the pitching moments and the airfoil thicknesses have been satisfied. The airfoils should exhibit docile stalls.

  7. The generation of side force by distributed suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard; Hong, John

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an approximate analysis of the generation of side force on a cylinder placed horizontal to the flow direction by the application of distributed suction on the rearward side of the cylinder. Relationships are derived between the side force coefficients and the required suction coefficients necessary to maintain attached flow on one side of the cylinder, thereby inducing circulation around the cylinder and a corresponding side force.

  8. Analysis of airfoil transitional separation bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. L.; Carter, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    A previously developed local inviscid-viscous interaction technique for the analysis of airfoil transitional separation bubbles, ALESEP (Airfoil Leading Edge Separation) has been modified to utilize a more accurate windward finite difference procedure in the reversed flow region, and a natural transition/turbulence model has been incorporated for the prediction of transition within the separation bubble. Numerous calculations and experimental comparisons are presented to demonstrate the effects of the windward differencing scheme and the natural transition/turbulence model. Grid sensitivity and convergence capabilities of this inviscid-viscous interaction technique are briefly addressed. A major contribution of this report is that with the use of windward differencing, a second, counter-rotating eddy has been found to exist in the wall layer of the primary separation bubble.

  9. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine and compared to earlier methods. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  10. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  11. Low Reynolds number airfoil survey, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, B. H.

    1981-01-01

    The differences in flow behavior two dimensional airfoils in the critical chordlength Reynolds number compared with lower and higher Reynolds number are discussed. The large laminar separation bubble is discussed in view of its important influence on critical Reynolds number airfoil behavior. The shortcomings of application of theoretical boundary layer computations which are successful at higher Reynolds numbers to the critical regime are discussed. The large variation in experimental aerodynamic characteristic measurement due to small changes in ambient turbulence, vibration, and sound level is illustrated. The difficulties in obtaining accurate detailed measurements in free flight and dramatic performance improvements at critical Reynolds number, achieved with various types of boundary layer tripping devices are discussed.

  12. Aerodynamic properties of thick airfoils II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Bacon, D L

    1923-01-01

    This investigation is an extension of NACA report no. 75 for the purpose of studying the effect of various modifications in a given wing section, including changes in thickness, height of lower camber, taper in thickness, and taper in plan form with special reference to the development of thick, efficient airfoils. The method consisted in testing the wings in the NACA 5-foot wind tunnel at speeds up to 50 meters (164 feet) per second while they were being supported on a new type of wire balance. Some of the airfoils developed showed results of great promise. For example, one wing (no. 81) with a thickness in the center of 4.5 times that of the U. S. A. 16 showed both uniformly high efficiency and a higher maximum lift than this excellent section. These thick sections will be especially useful on airplanes with cantilever construction. (author)

  13. Experiments on airfoils with trailing edge cut away

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Airfoils with their trailing edge cut away are often found on aircraft, as the fins on the hulls of flying boats and the central section of the wings for affording better visibility. It was therefore of some interest to discover the effect of such cutaways on the lift and drag and on the position of the center of pressure. For this purpose, systematic experiments were performed on two different airfoils, a symmetrical airfoil and an airfoil of medium thickness, with successive shortenings of their chords.

  14. Damping element for reducing the vibration of an airfoil

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Christian X; Marra, John J

    2013-11-12

    An airfoil (10) is provided with a tip (12) having an opening (14) to a center channel (24). A damping element (16) is inserted within the opening of the center channel, to reduce an induced vibration of the airfoil. The mass of the damping element, a spring constant of the damping element within the center channel, and/or a mounting location (58) of the damping element within the center channel may be adjustably varied, to shift a resonance frequency of the airfoil outside a natural operating frequency of the airfoil.

  15. Transonic airfoil analysis and design using Cartesian coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    An inverse numerical technique for designing transonic airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution is presented. The method uses the full potential equation, inverse boundary conditions, and Cartesian coordinates. It includes simultaneous airfoil update and utilizes a direct-inverse approach that permits a logical method for controlling trailing edge closure. The method can also be used for the analysis of flowfields about specified airfoils. Comparison with previous results shows that accurate results can be obtained with a Cartesian grid. Examples show the application of the method to design aft-cambered and other airfoils specifically for transonic flight.

  16. Numerical investigation of acoustic radiation from vortex-airfoil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legault, Anne; Ji, Minsuk; Wang, Meng

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations of vortices interacting with a NACA 0012 airfoil and a flat-plate airfoil at zero angle of attack are carried out to assess the applicability and accuracy of classical theories. Unsteady lift and sound are computed and compared with the predictions by theories of Sears and Amiet, which assume a thin-plate airfoil in an inviscid flow. A Navier-Stokes solver is used in the simulations, and therefore viscous effects are taken into consideration. For the thin-plate airfoil, the effect of viscosity is negligible. For a NACA 0012 airfoil, the viscous contribution to the unsteady lift and sound mainly comes from coherent vortex shedding in the wake of the airfoil and the interaction of the incoming vortices with the airfoil wake, which become stronger at higher Reynolds numbers for a 2-D laminar flow. When the flow is turbulent at chord Reynolds number of 4 . 8 ×105 , however, the viscous contribution becomes negligible as coherent vortex shedding is not present. Sound radiation from vortex-airfoil interaction at turbulent Reynolds numbers is computed numerically via Lighthill's theory and the result is compared with the predictions of Amiet and Curle. The effect of the airfoil thickness is also examined. Supported by ONR Grant N00014-09-1-1088.

  17. Comparisons of Theoretical Methods for Predicting Airfoil Aerodynamic Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Airfoil ,” Airfoils , U.S. Army Aviation Research, Development and Engineering Command, RDECOM TR 10-D-107, August 2010. [2] Somers, D.M. and...Maughmer, M.D., “Design and Experimental Results for the S407 Airfoil ,” U.S. Army Aviation Research, Development and Engineering Command, RDECOM TR 10-D...S414 Airfoil ,” U.S. Army Aviation Research, Development and Engineering Command, RDECOM TR 10-D-112, August 2010. [5] Somers, D.M. and Maughmer

  18. Investigation of the Boundary Layer Behavior on Turbine Airfoils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    turbine airfoil cascade . The airfoil profile was based on a turbine blade design used by Lander ’’4 and employed in previous wake studies by Cox and...simulate the wake from upstream turning vanes or blades , a circular cylinder was placed upstream of the centra l or test airfoil . The displacement of this...of turbine airfoil cascade model s by Cox and Han 15 are very much evident in the graph . It might be noted that the blade stag- nation points are at

  19. An analytical study for the design of advanced rotor airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical study has been conducted to design and evaluate two airfoils for helicopter rotors. The best basic shape, designed with a transonic hodograph design method, was modified to meet subsonic criteria. One airfoil had an additional constraint for low pitching-moment at the transonic design point. Airfoil characteristics were predicted. Results of a comparative analysis of helicopter performance indicate that the new airfoils will produce reduced rotor power requirements compared to the NACA 0012. The hodograph design method, written in CDC Algol, is listed and described.

  20. The conformal transformation of an airfoil into a straight line and its application to the inverse problem of airfoil theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutterperl, William

    1944-01-01

    A method of conformal transformation is developed that maps an airfoil into a straight line, the line being chosen as the extended chord line of the airfoil. The mapping is accomplished by operating directly with the airfoil ordinates. The absence of any preliminary transformation is found to shorten the work substantially over that of previous methods. Use is made of the superposition of solutions to obtain a rigorous counterpart of the approximate methods of thin-airfoils theory. The method is applied to the solution of the direct and inverse problems for arbitrary airfoils and pressure distributions. Numerical examples are given. Applications to more general types of regions, in particular to biplanes and to cascades of airfoils, are indicated. (author)

  1. Transonic airfoil and axial flow rotary machine

    DOEpatents

    Nagai, Naonori; Iwatani, Junji

    2015-09-01

    Sectional profiles close to a tip 124 and a part between a midportion 125 and a hub 123 are shifted to the upstream of an operating fluid flow in a sweep direction. Accordingly, an S shape is formed in which the tip 124 and the part between the midportion 125 and the hub 123 protrude. As a result, it is possible reduce various losses due to shook, waves, thereby forming a transonic airfoil having an excellent aerodynamic characteristic.

  2. Streamwise Oscillation of Airfoils into Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granlund, Kenneth; Jones, Anya; Ol, Michael

    2015-11-01

    An airfoil in freestream is oscillated in streamwise direction to cyclically enter reverse flow. Measured lift is compared to analytical blade element theories. Advance ratio, reduced frequency and angle of attack is varied within those typical for helicopters. Experimental results reveal that lift does not become negative in the flow reversal part, contradicting one theory and supported by another. Flow visualization reveal the leading edge vortex advecting against the freestream to a point in front of the leading edge.

  3. Tail Rotor Airfoils Stabilize Helicopters, Reduce Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Founded by former Ames Research Center engineer Jim Van Horn, Van Horn Aviation of Tempe, Arizona, built upon a Langley Research Center airfoil design to create a high performance aftermarket tail rotor for the popular Bell 206 helicopter. The highly durable rotor has a lifetime twice that of the original equipment manufacturer blade, reduces noise by 40 percent, and displays enhanced performance at high altitudes. These improvements benefit helicopter performance for law enforcement, military training, wildfire and pipeline patrols, and emergency medical services.

  4. Effect of Feeding and Suction on Gastric Impedance Spectroscopy Measurements.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Nohra E; Sánchez-Miranda, Gustavo; Sacristan, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    A specific device and system has been developed and tested for clinical monitoring of gastric mucosal reactance in the critically ill as an early warning of splanchnic hypoperfusion associated with shock and sepsis. This device has been proven effective in clinical trials and is expected to become commercially available next year. The system uses a combination nasogastric tube and impedance spectroscopy probe as a single catheter. Because this device has a double function, the question is: Does enteral feeding or suction affect the gastric reactance measurements? This study was designed to evaluate the effect of feeding and suction on the measurement of gastric impedance spectroscopy in healthy volunteers. Impedance spectra were obtained from the gastric wall epithelia of 18 subjects. The spectra were measured for each of the following conditions: postinsertion of gastric probe, during active suction, postactive suction, and during enteral feeding (236 ml of nutritional supplement). Impedance spectra were reproducible in all volunteers under all conditions tested. There was a slight increase in impedance parameters after suction, and a decrease in impedance after feeding; however, these observed differences were insignificant compared to patient-to-patient variability, and truly negligible compared with previously observed changes associated with splanchnic ischemia in critically ill patients. Our results demonstrate that suction or feeding when using the impedance spectro-metry probe/nasogastric tube does not significantly interfere with gastric impedance spectrometer measurements.

  5. Control of Supersonic Boundary Layers Using Steady Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2006-01-01

    Control of supersonic boundary layers using steady suction through a series of very small two-dimensional strips is numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 1.8. The mean flow induced by rows of suction holes is also computed. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variationdiminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. Computations for the two-dimensional cases are performed at suction coefficients 0.001 and 0.002 to investigate the stabilizing effects of suction. The simulation showed that a series of shock waves are generated at the slots. The stability results showed that the total amplification is reduced up to the end of the computational domain. However, the growth rates become larger at downstream distances away from the suction region. The computations for the suction holes showed the generation of Mach waves from each hole and the formation of longitudinal vortices.

  6. Measurement of suction and discharge pressure pulsations in waterflood facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wurzbach, W.M.; Happel, P.E.

    1983-10-01

    Recent mechanical problems with reciprocating water injection pumps prompted a study of suction and discharge pressure conditions in the Red River Bull Bayou Unit, Red River Parish, Louisiana. Frequent failures in plunger pump components and discharge lines were occurring at several injection sites within the unit. Electronic surveillance equipment consisting of an oscilloscope and pressure transducers was utilized to locate and identify large suction and discharge pressure pulses. The severity of these pulses could not be identified with standard pressure gauges. The data obtained with the electronic equipment indicated that cavitation was occurring on the suction side of the pumps due to insufficient net positive suction head. The large pressure pulsations caused by this cavitation problem were carried through the pump and amplified on the discharge side. This resulted in excessive vibration and equipment overload. Subsequent changes in the suction and discharge piping design eliminated cavitation and effectively reduced the peak pressure pulses. These piping changes were done systematically to measure the effect of each change individually. The resulting measurements gave better insight to future piping design for both suction and discharge installations.

  7. Endotracheal suctioning in intubated newborns: an integrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Roberta Lins; Tsuzuki, Lucila Midori; Carvalho, Marcos Giovanni Santos

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based practices search for the best available scientific evidence to support problem solving and decision making. Because of the complexity and amount of information related to health care, the results of methodologically sound scientific papers must be integrated by performing literature reviews. Although endotracheal suctioning is the most frequently performed invasive procedure in intubated newborns in neonatal intensive care units, few Brazilian studies of good methodological quality have examined this practice, and a national consensus or standardization of this technique is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to review secondary studies on the subject to establish recommendations for endotracheal suctioning in intubated newborns and promote the adoption of best-practice concepts when conducting this procedure. An integrative literature review was performed, and the recommendations of this study are to only perform endotracheal suctioning in newborns when there are signs of tracheal secretions and to avoid routinely performing the procedure. In addition, endotracheal suctioning should be conducted by at least two people, the suctioning time should be less than 15 seconds, the negative suction pressure should be below 100 mmHg, and hyperoxygenation should not be used on a routine basis. If indicated, oxygenation is recommended with an inspired oxygen fraction value that is 10 to 20% greater than the value of the previous fraction, and it should be performed 30 to 60 seconds before, during and 1 minute after the procedure. Saline instillation should not be performed routinely, and the standards for invasive procedures must be respected. PMID:26465249

  8. Suction blister fluid as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins.

    PubMed

    Kool, Jeroen; Reubsaet, Léon; Wesseldijk, Feikje; Maravilha, Raquel T; Pinkse, Martijn W; D'Santos, Clive S; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Zijlstra, Freek J; Heck, Albert J R

    2007-10-01

    Early diagnosis is important for effective disease management. Measurement of biomarkers present at the local level of the skin could be advantageous in facilitating the diagnostic process. The analysis of the proteome of suction blister fluid, representative for the interstitial fluid of the skin, is therefore a desirable first step in the search for potential biomarkers involved in biological pathways of particular diseases. Here, we describe a global analysis of the suction blister fluid proteome as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins. The suction blister fluid proteome was compared with a serum proteome analyzed using identical protocols. By using stringent criteria allowing less than 1% false positive identifications, we were able to detect, using identical experimental conditions and amount of starting material, 401 proteins in suction blister fluid and 240 proteins in serum. As a major result of our analysis we construct a prejudiced list of 34 proteins, relatively highly and uniquely detected in suction blister fluid as compared to serum, with established and putative characteristics as biomarkers. We conclude that suction blister fluid might potentially serve as a good alternative biomarker body fluid for diseases that involve the skin.

  9. Wake structure of a deformable Joukowski airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ysasi, Adam; Kanso, Eva; Newton, Paul K.

    2011-10-01

    We examine the vortical wake structure shed from a deformable Joukowski airfoil in an unbounded volume of inviscid and incompressible fluid. The deformable airfoil is considered to model a flapping fish. The vortex shedding is accounted for using an unsteady point vortex model commonly referred to as the Brown-Michael model. The airfoil’s deformations and rotations are prescribed in terms of a Jacobi elliptic function which exhibits, depending on a dimensionless parameter m, a range of periodic behaviors from sinusoidal to a more impulsive type flapping. Depending on the parameter m and the Strouhal number, one can identify five distinct wake structures, ranging from arrays of isolated point vortices to vortex dipoles and tripoles shed into the wake with every half-cycle of the airfoil flapping motion. We describe these regimes in the context of other published works which categorize wake topologies, and speculate on the importance of these wake structures in terms of periodic swimming and transient maneuvers of fish.

  10. A turbulence model for iced airfoils and its validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jaiwon; Chen, Hsun H.; Cebeci, Tuncer

    1992-01-01

    A turbulence model based on the extension of the algebraic eddy viscosity formulation of Cebeci and Smith developed for two dimensional flows over smooth and rough surfaces is described for iced airfoils and validated for computed ice shapes obtained for a range of total temperatures varying from 28 to -15 F. The validation is made with an interactive boundary layer method which uses a panel method to compute the inviscid flow and an inverse finite difference boundary layer method to compute the viscous flow. The interaction between inviscid and viscous flows is established by the use of the Hilbert integral. The calculated drag coefficients compare well with recent experimental data taken at the NASA-Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) and show that, in general, the drag increase due to ice accretion can be predicted well and efficiently.

  11. Viscous effect on airfoils for unsteady transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The viscous effect on aerodynamic performance of an arbitrary airfoil executing low frequency maneuvers during transonic flight was investigated. The small disturbance code, LTRAN2, was modified by using a conventional integral method, BLAYER, for the boundary layer and an empirical relation, viscous wedge, for simulating the suddenly thickened boundary layer behind the shock. Before the shock, only the boundary layer displacement thickness was evaluated. After the shock, the empirical wedge thickness was superimposed on the boundary layer thickness along the surface as well as in the wake region. The pressure coefficients were calculated for both steady and unsteady states. The viscous solution takes fewer iterations to obtain the converged steady state solution. Comparisons made with experimental data and the inviscid solution show that the viscous solution agrees better with the experimental data with about the same (or slightly less) amount of computational time.

  12. The decay of longitudinal vortices shed from airfoil vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.; Reichert, Bruce A.; Foster, Jeffry D.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study is conducted to examine the crossplane structure and streamwise decay of vortices shed from airfoil-type vortex generators. The vortex generators are set in a counter-rotating array spanning the full circumference of a straight pipe. The span of the vortex generators above the duct surface, h, is approximately equal to the local turbulent boundary layer thickness, delta. Measurement of three-component mean flow velocity in downstream crossplanes are used to characterize the structure of the shed vortices. Measurements in adjacent crossplanes (closely spaced along the streamwise coordinate) characterize the interaction and decay of the embedded vortices. A model constructed by the superposition of Oseen vortices is compared to the data for one test case.

  13. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil optimized for maximum lift coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingham, G. J.; Chen, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the two-dimensional characteristics of an airfoil optimized for maximum lift coefficient. The design maximum lift coefficient was 2.1 at a Reynolds number of 9.7 million. The airfoil with a smooth surface and with surface roughness was tested at angles of attack from 6 deg to 26 deg, Reynolds numbers (based on airfoil chord) from 2.0 million to 12.9 million, and Mach numbers from 0.10 to 0.35. The experimental results are compared with values predicted by theory. The experimental pressure distributions observed at angles of attack up to at least 12 deg were similar to the theoretical values except for a slight increase in the experimental upper-surface pressure coefficients forward of 26 percent chord and a more severe gradient just behind the minimum-pressure-coefficient location. The maximum lift coefficients were measured with the model surface smooth and, depending on test conditions, varied from 1.5 to 1.6 whereas the design value was 2.1.

  14. Flow-field measurements on an airfoil with an oscillating trailing-edge using holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Holographic interferometry data were acquired on an NACA 64A010 airfoil with an oscillating flap. The airfoil was installed in the Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel between splitter plates. Recordings were made at discrete phase angles of the oscillation. The interferometry results provided detailed flow visualization of the shock boundary-layer interaction and the separated flow. Quantitative results were extracted from the interferograms to produce pressure data. These results were compared to the surface pressures obtained with the surface pressure taps. Excellent agreement was found for low angles of incidence. At larger angles of incidence, the flow had greater three-dimensionality, and the results were not in good agreement in some regions of the flow field. Mach contours were traced for representative flow conditions. Wake profiles were also obtained using the assumption of constant pressure across the wake and the Crocco relationship.

  15. The effects of variations in Reynolds number between 3.0 x 10sub6 and 25.0 x 10sub6 upon the aerodynamic characteristics of a number of NACA 6-series airfoil sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, Laurence K, Jr; Bursnall, William J

    1950-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation made to determine the two-dimensional lift and drag characteristics of nine NACA 6-series airfoil section at Reynolds numbers of 15.0 x 10sub6, 20.0 x 10sub6, and 25.0 x 10sub6. Also presented are data from NACA Technical Report 824 for the same airfoils at Reynolds numbers of 3.0 x 10sub6, 6.0 x 10sub6, and 9.0 x 10sub6. The airfoils selected represent sections having variations in the airfoil thickness, thickness form, and camber. The characteristics of an airfoil with a split flap were determined in one instance, as was the effect of surface roughness. Qualitative explanations in terms of flow behavior are advanced for the observed types of scale effect.

  16. The application of the gradient-based adjoint multi-point optimization of single and double shock control bumps for transonic airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, K.; Nejati, A.; Chaharlang Kiani, K.; Taheri, R.

    2016-07-01

    A shock control bump (SCB) is a flow control method that uses local small deformations in a flexible wing surface to considerably reduce the strength of shock waves and the resulting wave drag in transonic flows. Most of the reported research is devoted to optimization in a single flow condition. Here, we have used a multi-point adjoint optimization scheme to optimize shape and location of the SCB. Practically, this introduces transonic airfoils equipped with the SCB that are simultaneously optimized for different off-design transonic flight conditions. Here, we use this optimization algorithm to enhance and optimize the performance of SCBs in two benchmark airfoils, i.e., RAE-2822 and NACA-64-A010, over a wide range of off-design Mach numbers. All results are compared with the usual single-point optimization. We use numerical simulation of the turbulent viscous flow and a gradient-based adjoint algorithm to find the optimum location and shape of the SCB. We show that the application of SCBs may increase the aerodynamic performance of an RAE-2822 airfoil by 21.9 and by 22.8 % for a NACA-64-A010 airfoil compared to the no-bump design in a particular flight condition. We have also investigated the simultaneous usage of two bumps for the upper and the lower surfaces of the airfoil. This has resulted in a 26.1 % improvement for the RAE-2822 compared to the clean airfoil in one flight condition.

  17. A method for predicting shock shapes and pressure distributions on two dimensional airfoils at large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaattari, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for determining shock envelopes and pressure distributions for two-dimensional airfoils at angles of attack sufficiently large to cause shock detachment and subsonic flow over the windward surface of the airfoil. Correlation functions obtained from exact solutions are used to relate the shock standoff distance at the stagnation and sonic points of the body through a suitable choice for the shock shape. The necessary correlation functions were obtained from perfect gas solutions but may be extended to any gas flow for which the normal shock-density ratio can be specified.

  18. Transonic Wind Tunnel Test of a 16-Percent-Thick Circulation Control Airfoil with One-Percent Asymmetric Camber.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    Program Element 63203N Aviation and Surface Effects Department Task Area W0578001 Bethesda, Maryland 20084 Work Unit 1619-200 II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME...maximum lift coefficient was 0.76. As a high-lift device the airfoil was very effective at and below M = 0.4. As a means of direct lift control the...airfoil remained effective up through M = 0.7. - l SgO’a SECURITY C ASSIFICATION OI THIS PA E( Whlen D at Ille ntmA I TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I LIST OF

  19. Design and construction of 2 transonic airfoil models for tests in the NASA Langley C.3-M TCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaechterle, G.; Ludewig, K. H.; Stanewsky, E.; Ray, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    As part of a NASA/DFVLR cooperation program two transonic airfoils were tested in the NASA Langley 0.3-m TCT. Model design and construction was carried out by DFVLR. The models designed and constructed performed extremely well under cryogenic conditions. Essentially no permanent changes in surface quality and geometric dimensions occurred during the tests. The aerodynamic results from the TCT tests which demonstrate the large sensitivity of the airfoil CAST 10-Z/DOAZ to Reynolds number changes compared well with results from other facilities at ambient temperatures.

  20. Navier-Stokes calculations and turbulence modeling in the trailing edge region of a circulation control airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, John R.; Rubesin, Morris W.; Maccormack, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    The accurate prediction of turbulent flows over curved surfaces in general and over the trailing edge region of circulation control airfoils in particular requires the coupled efforts of turbulence modelers, numerical analysts and experimentalists. The purpose of the research program in this area is described. Then, the influence on turbulence modeling of the flow characteristics over a typical circulation control wing is discussed. Next, the scope of this effort to study turbulence in the trailing edge region of a circulation control airfoil is presented. This is followed by a brief overview of the computation scheme, including the grid, governing equations, numerical method, boundary conditions and turbulence models applied to date. Then, examples of applications of two algebraic eddy viscosity models to the trailing edge region of a circulation control airfoil is presented. The results from the calculations is summarized, and conclusions drawn based on examples. Finally, the future directions of the program is outlined.