Science.gov

Sample records for airframe structural integrity

  1. An integrated computer procedure for sizing composite airframe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1979-01-01

    A computerized algorithm to generate cross-sectional dimensions and fiber orientations for composite airframe structures is described, and its application in a wing structural synthesis is established. The algorithm unifies computations of aeroelastic loads, stresses, and deflections, as well as optimal structural sizing and fiber orientations in an open-ended system of integrated computer programs. A finite-element analysis and a mathematical-optimization technique are discussed.

  2. Supersonic Cruise Research 1979, part 2. [airframe structures and materials, systems integration, economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Advances in airframe structure and materials technology for supersonic cruise aircraft are reported with emphasis on titanium and composite structures. The operation of the Concorde is examined as a baseline for projections into the future. A market survey of U.S. passenger attitudes and preferences, the impact of advanced air transport technology and the integration of systems for the advanced SST and for a smaller research/business jet vehicle are also discussed.

  3. Integrated airframe propulsion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennell, R. E.; Black, S. B.

    1982-01-01

    Perturbation equations which describe flight dynamics and engine operation about a given operating point are combined to form an integrated aircraft/propulsion system model. Included in the model are the dependence of aerodynamic coefficients upon atmospheric variables along with the dependence of engine variables upon flight condition and inlet performance. An off-design engine performance model is used to identify interaction parameters in the model. Inclusion of subsystem interaction effects introduces coupling between flight and propulsion variables. To analyze interaction effects on control, consideration is first given to control requirements for separate flight and engine models. For the separate airframe model, feedback control provides substantial improvement in short period damping. For the integrated system, feedback control compensates for the coupling present in the model and provides good overall system stability. However, this feedback control law involves many non-zero gains. Analysis of suboptimal control strategies indicates that performance of the closed loop integrated system can be maintained with a feedback matrix in which the number of non-zero gains is small relative to the number of components in the feedback matrix.

  4. Airframe-Jet Engine Integration Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher; Antcliff, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    It has been found experimentally that the noise radiated by a jet mounted under the wing of an aircraft exceeds that of the same jet in a stand-alone environment. The increase in noise is referred to as jet engine airframe integration noise. The objectives of the present investigation are, (1) To obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for jet engine airframe integration noise or installation noise. (2) To develop a prediction model for jet engine airframe integration noise. It is known that jet mixing noise consists of two principal components. They are the noise from the large turbulence structures of the jet flow and the noise from the fine scale turbulence. In this investigation, only the effect of jet engine airframe interaction on the fine scale turbulence noise of a jet is studied. The fine scale turbulence noise is the dominant noise component in the sideline direction. Thus we limit out consideration primarily to the sideline.

  5. Ramjets: Airframe Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Thermal Management (Propulsion a vitesse elevee : Conception du moteur - integration et gestion thermique) 14. ABSTRACT These notes deal with the...to those of the ambient air (γ=1.4) • No effects of fuel mass addition (mf << ma) • Complete combustion of the fuel yielding CO2 and H2O as reaction...which leads to a nozzle exit plane static pressure pe that is not necessarily equal to the ambient pressure p0. At zero angle-of-attack the inlet

  6. Integral Airframe Structures (IAS): Validated Feasibility Study of Integrally Stiffened Metallic Fuselage Panels for Reducing Manufacturing Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munroe, J.; Wilkins, K.; Gruber, M.; Domack, Marcia S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Integral Airframe Structures (IAS) program investigated the feasibility of using "integrally stiffened" construction for commercial transport fuselage structure. The objective of the program was to demonstrate structural performance and weight equal to current "built-up" structure with lower manufacturing cost. Testing evaluated mechanical properties, structural details, joint performance, repair, static compression, and two-bay crack residual strength panels. Alloys evaluated included 7050-T7451 plate, 7050-T74511 extrusion, 6013-T6511x extrusion, and 7475-T7351 plate. Structural performance was evaluated with a large 7475-T7351 pressure test that included the arrest of a two-bay longitudinal crack, and a measure of residual strength for a two-bay crack centered on a broken frame. Analysis predictions for the two-bay longitudinal crack panel correlated well with the test results. Analysis activity conducted by the IAS team strongly indicates that current analysis tools predict integral structural behavior as accurately as built-up structure. The cost study results indicated that, compared to built-up fabrication methods, high-speed machining structure from aluminum plate would yield a recurring cost savings of 61%. Part count dropped from 78 individual parts on a baseline panel to just 7 parts for machined IAS structure.

  7. FAA/NASA International Symposium on Advanced Structural Integrity Methods for Airframe Durability and Damage Tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    International technical experts in durability and damage tolerance of metallic airframe structures were assembled to present and discuss recent research findings and the development of advanced design and analysis methods, structural concepts, and advanced materials. The symposium focused on the dissemination of new knowledge and the peer-review of progress on the development of advanced methodologies. Papers were presented on: structural concepts for enhanced durability, damage tolerance, and maintainability; new metallic alloys and processing technology; fatigue crack initiation and small crack effects; fatigue crack growth models; fracture mechanics failure, criteria for ductile materials; structural mechanics methodology for residual strength and life prediction; development of flight load spectra for design and testing; and advanced approaches to resist corrosion and environmentally assisted fatigue.

  8. Thermal-structural design study of an airframe-integrated Scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killackey, J. J.; Katinsky, E. A.; Tepper, S.; Vuigner, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    Design concepts are developed and evaluated for a cooled structures assembly for the Scramjet engine, for engine subsystems mass, volume, and operating requirements, and for the aircraft/engine interface. A thermal protection system was defined that makes it possible to attain a life of 100 hours and 1000 cycles. The coolant equivalence ratio at the Mach 10 maximum thermal loading condition is 0.6, indicating a capacity for airframe cooling. The mechanical design is feasible for manufacture using conventional materials. For the cooled structures in a six-module engine, the mass per unit capture area is 12.4 KN/sq m. The total weight of a six-module engine assembly including the fuel system is 14.73 KN.

  9. Advances in Structural Integrity Analysis Methods for Aging Metallic Airframe Structures with Local Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.; Piascik, Robert S.; Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2003-01-01

    Analysis methodologies for predicting fatigue-crack growth from rivet holes in panels subjected to cyclic loads and for predicting the residual strength of aluminum fuselage structures with cracks and subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are described. The fatigue-crack growth analysis methodology is based on small-crack theory and a plasticity induced crack-closure model, and the effect of a corrosive environment on crack-growth rate is included. The residual strength analysis methodology is based on the critical crack-tip-opening-angle fracture criterion that characterizes the fracture behavior of a material of interest, and a geometric and material nonlinear finite element shell analysis code that performs the structural analysis of the fuselage structure of interest. The methodologies have been verified experimentally for structures ranging from laboratory coupons to full-scale structural components. Analytical and experimental results based on these methodologies are described and compared for laboratory coupons and flat panels, small-scale pressurized shells, and full-scale curved stiffened panels. The residual strength analysis methodology is sufficiently general to include the effects of multiple-site damage on structural behavior.

  10. Aeroacoustics of Propulsion Airframe Integration: Overview of NASA's Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.

    2003-01-01

    The integration of propulsion and airframe is fundamental to the design of an aircraft system. Many considerations influence the integration, such as structural, aerodynamic, and maintenance factors. In regard to the acoustics of an aircraft, the integration can have significant effects on the net radiated noise. Whether an engine is mounted above a wing or below can have a significant effect on noise that reaches communities below because of shielding or reflection of engine noise. This is an obvious example of the acoustic effects of propulsion airframe installation. Another example could be the effect of the pylon on the development of the exhaust plume and on the resulting jet noise. In addition, for effective system noise reduction the impact that installation has on noise reduction devices developed on isolated components must be understood. In the future, a focus on the aerodynamic and acoustic interaction effects of installation, propulsion airframe aeroacoustics, will become more important as noise reduction targets become more difficult to achieve. In addition to continued fundamental component reduction efforts, a system level approach that includes propulsion airframe aeroacoustics will be required in order to achieve the 20 dB of perceived noise reduction envisioned by the long-range NASA goals. This emphasis on the aeroacoustics of propulsion airframe integration is a new part of NASA s noise research. The following paper will review current efforts and highlight technical challenges and approaches.

  11. Hypersonic airbreathing propulsion/airframe integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Recent interest in airbreathing hypersonic flight has centered around the need to develop advanced space launch systems which can reduce the cost of inserting payloads in orbit and make space more accessible. An effect of the thermal environment is to require the vehicle to operate at high altitudes, in very thin air, to maintain aircraft structural load limits. The high altitudes at which the hypersonic vehicle must operate give rise to the concept of an airframe integrated propulsion system to provide a much larger inlet and nozzle to process the required volume of air at low density, atmospheric conditions. In the integrated system, the forward portion of the vehicle compresses the air flow and serves as the external portion of the inlet; the aftbody completes the expansion process for the nozzle. In addition, the engine, which is contained between the body and the forebody shock wave, lends itself to a modular integration of a number of separate engines. In this manner, a relatively small engine can be defined to allow engine development in existing ground facilities.

  12. Airframe Integration Trade Studies for a Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John T.; Wu, Chauncey; Rivers, Kevin; Martin, Carl; Smith, Russell

    1999-01-01

    Future launch vehicles must be lightweight, fully reusable and easily maintained if low-cost access to space is to be achieved. The goal of achieving an economically viable Single-Stage-to-Orbit (SSTO) Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) is not easily achieved and success will depend to a large extent on having an integrated and optimized total system. A series of trade studies were performed to meet three objectives. First, to provide structural weights and parametric weight equations as inputs to configuration-level trade studies. Second, to identify, assess and quantify major weight drivers for the RLV airframe. Third, using information on major weight drivers, and considering the RLV as an integrated thermal structure (composed of thrust structures, tanks, thermal protection system, insulation and control surfaces), identify and assess new and innovative approaches or concepts that have the potential for either reducing airframe weight, improving operability, and/or reducing cost.

  13. Thermal-structural Design Study of an Airframe-integrated Scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchmann, O. A.

    1979-01-01

    Design concepts for the cooled structures assembly for the Langley Scramjet engine, for engine subsystems, and for the aircraft/engine interface were developed and evaluated. Results show that the objectives for the Scramjet engine can be met. A thermal protection system was defined that makes it possible to attain a life of 100 hours and 1000 cycles, which is the specified goal. With stoichiometric combustion, the fuel provides an adequate heat sink for cooling the engine at Mach numbers up to 9 at the minimum fuel flow condition. The mechanical design is feasible for manufacture using conventional materials. For the cooled structures in a six-module engine, the mass per unit capture area is 1328 kg/sq m (259 lb/sq ft). The total mass of a six-module engine assembly including the fuel system is 1577 kg (3477 lb).

  14. FAA/NASA International Symposium on Advanced Structural Integrity Methods for Airframe Durability and Damage Tolerance, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The international technical experts in the areas of durability and damage tolerance of metallic airframe structures were assembled to present and discuss recent research findings and the development of advanced design and analysis methods, structural concepts, and advanced materials. The principal focus of the symposium was on the dissemination of new knowledge and the peer-review of progress on the development of advanced methodologies. Papers were presented on the following topics: structural concepts for enhanced durability, damage tolerance, and maintainability; new metallic alloys and processing technology; fatigue crack initiation and small crack effects; fatigue crack growth models; fracture mechanics failure criteria for ductile materials; structural mechanics methodology for residual strength and life prediction; development of flight load spectra for design and testing; and corrosion resistance.

  15. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A201. Airframe Structures and Non-Metallic Structural Repairs. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on airframe structures and nonmetallic structural repairs. The module contains four units that cover the following topics: (1) identifying aerodynamic and construction characteristics of aircraft structures; (2) inspecting wooden structures; (3) inspecting and…

  16. Advanced design concepts for shuttle airframe structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Davis, J. G., Jr.; Shideler, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of weight-saving advanced design concepts for shuttle airframe structure is presented. Design concepts under investigation employ selective composite reinforcement and/or efficient geometric arrangements. An effort to develop metallic panel designs which exploit the relaxation of smooth external-surface requirements for skin structure is reviewed. Available highlights from research and development studies which investigate the application of composite reinforcement to the design of two types of fuselage panels, a shear web, a large fuselage frame, and a landing-gear-door assembly are presented. Preliminary results from these studies suggest weight savings of 25 percent can be obtained.

  17. Structural Qualification of Composite Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedward, Keith T.; McCarty, John E.

    1997-01-01

    The development of fundamental approaches for predicting failure and elongation characteristics of fibrous composites are summarized in this document. The research described includes a statistical formulation for individual fiber breakage and fragmentation and clustered fiber breakage, termed macrodefects wherein the aligned composite may represent a structural component such as a reinforcing bar element, a rebar. Experimental work conducted in support of the future exploitation of aligned composite rebar elements is also described. This work discusses the experimental challenges associated with rebar tensile test evaluation and describes initial numerical analyses performed in support of the experimental program.

  18. Novel inlet-airframe integration methodology for hypersonic waverider vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feng; Liu, Jun; Shen, Chi-bing; Huang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    With the aim of integrating a ramjet or scramjet with an airframe, a novel inlet-airframe integration methodology for the hypersonic waverider vehicle is proposed. For this newly proposed design concept and for the specified flight conditions, not only the forebody of the vehicle but also its engine cowl and wings can ride on the bow shock wave, causing the bow shock wave to remain attached to the leading edge for the entire length of the vehicle. Thus, this integrated vehicle can take full advantage of the waverider's high lift-to-drag ratio characteristics and the ideal pre-compression surface for the engine. In this work, a novel inlet-airframe integrated axisymmetric basic flow model that accounts for both external and internal flows is first designed using the method of characteristics and the streamline tracing technique. Subsequently, the design of the inlet-airframe integrated waverider vehicle is generated from the integrated axisymmetric basic flow model using the streamline tracing technique. Then, the design methodologies of both the integrated axisymmetric basic flow model and the integrated waverider vehicle are verified by a computational numerical method. Finally, the viscous effects and performance of both the integrated axisymmetric basic flow model and the integrated waverider vehicle are analysed under the design condition using the numerical computation. The obtained results show that the proposed approach is effective in designing the integrated hypersonic waverider vehicle.

  19. IMPAC: An Integrated Methodology for Propulsion and Airframe Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay; Ouzts, Peter J.; Lorenzo, Carl F.; Mattern, Duane L.

    1991-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is actively involved in the development of enabling technologies that will lead towards aircraft with new/enhanced maneuver capabilities such as Short Take-Off Vertical Landing (STOVL) and high angle of attack performance. Because of the high degree of dynamic coupling between the airframe and propulsion systems of these types of aircraft, one key technology is the integration of the flight and propulsion control. The NASA Lewis Research Center approach to developing Integrated Flight Propulsion Control (IFPC) technologies is an in-house research program referred to as IMPAC (Integrated Methodology for Propulsion and Airframe Control). The goals of IMPAC are to develop a viable alternative to the existing integrated control design methodologies that will allow for improved system performance and simplicity of control law synthesis and implementation, and to demonstrate the applicability of the methodology to a supersonic STOVL fighter aircraft. Based on some preliminary control design studies that included evaluation of the existing methodologies, the IFPC design methodology that is emerging at the Lewis Research Center consists of considering the airframe and propulsion system as one integrated system for an initial centralized controller design and then partitioning the centralized controller into separate airframe and propulsion system subcontrollers to ease implementation and to set meaningful design requirements for detailed subsystem control design and evaluation. An overview of IMPAC is provided and detailed discussion of the various important design and evaluation steps in the methodology are included.

  20. Design of an integrated airframe/propulsion control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald C.; Lee, C. William; Strickland, Michael J.; Torkelson, Thomas C.

    1990-01-01

    The design of an integrated airframe/propulsion control system architecture is described. The design is based on a prevalidation methodology that uses both reliability and performance. A detailed account is given for the testing associated with a subset of the architecture and concludes with general observations of applying the methodology to the architecture.

  1. The Integrated Airframe/Propulsion Control System Architecture program (IAPSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Cohen, Gerald C.; Meissner, Charles W.

    1990-01-01

    The Integrated Airframe/Propulsion Control System Architecture program (IAPSA) is a two-phase program which was initiated by NASA in the early 80s. The first phase, IAPSA 1, studied different architectural approaches to the problem of integrating engine control systems with airframe control systems in an advanced tactical fighter. One of the conclusions of IAPSA 1 was that the technology to construct a suitable system was available, yet the ability to create these complex computer architectures has outpaced the ability to analyze the resulting system's performance. With this in mind, the second phase of IAPSA approached the same problem with the added constraint that the system be designed for validation. The intent of the design for validation requirement is that validation requirements should be shown to be achievable early in the design process. IAPSA 2 has demonstrated that despite diligent efforts, integrated systems can retain characteristics which are difficult to model and, therefore, difficult to validate.

  2. Advanced general aviation comparative engine/airframe integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, G. L.; Ellis, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Aviation Comparative Engine/Airframe Integration Study was initiated to help determine which of four promising concepts for new general aviation engines for the 1990's should be considered for further research funding. The engine concepts included rotary, diesel, spark ignition, and turboprop powerplants; a conventional state-of-the-art piston engine was used as a baseline for the comparison. Computer simulations of the performance of single and twin engine pressurized aircraft designs were used to determine how the various characteristics of each engine interacted in the design process. Comparisons were made of how each engine performed relative to the others when integrated into an airframe and required to fly a transportation mission.

  3. Design of an integrated airframe/propulsion control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald C.; Lee, C. William; Strickland, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The design of an integrated airframe/propulsion control system architecture is described. The design is based on a prevalidation methodology that used both reliability and performance tools. An account is given of the motivation for the final design and problems associated with both reliability and performance modeling. The appendices contain a listing of the code for both the reliability and performance model used in the design.

  4. Study of hypersonic propulsion/airframe integration technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartill, W. R.; Goebel, T. P.; Vancamp, V. V.

    1978-01-01

    An assessment is done of current and potential ground facilities, and analysis and flight test techniques for establishing a hypersonic propulsion/airframe integration technology base. A mach 6 cruise prototype aircraft incorporating integrated Scramjet engines was considered the baseline configuration, and the assessment focused on the aerodynamic and configuration aspects of the integration technology. The study describes the key technology milestones that must be met to permit a decision on development of a prototype vehicle, and defines risk levels for these milestones. Capabilities and limitations of analysis techniques, current and potential ground test facilities, and flight test techniques are described in terms of the milestones and risk levels.

  5. Optimization of helicopter airframe structures for vibration reduction considerations, formulations and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, T. Sreekanta

    1988-01-01

    Several key issues involved in the application of formal optimization technique to helicopter airframe structures for vibration reduction are addressed. Considerations which are important in the optimization of real airframe structures are discussed. Considerations necessary to establish relevant set of design variables, constraints and objectives which are appropriate to conceptual, preliminary, detailed design, ground and flight test phases of airframe design are discussed. A methodology is suggested for optimization of airframes in various phases of design. Optimization formulations that are unique to helicopter airframes are described and expressions for vibration related functions are derived. Using a recently developed computer code, the optimization of a Bell AH-1G helicopter airframe is demonstrated.

  6. Airframe-integrated propulsion system for hypersonic cruise vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. A.; Huber, P. W.

    1978-01-01

    Research on a new, hydrogen burning, airbreathing engine concept which offers good potential for efficient hypersonic cruise vehicles is considered. Features of the engine which lead to good performance include; extensive engine-airframe integration, fixed geometry, low cooling, and the control of heat release in the supersonic combustor by mixed-modes of fuel injection from the combustor entrance. The engine concept is described along with results from inlet tests, direct-connect combustor tests, and tests of two subscale boiler-plate research engines presently underway at conditions which simulate flight at Mach 4 and 7.

  7. Computational Structures Technology for Airframes and Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Housner, Jerrold M. (Compiler); Starnes, James H., Jr. (Compiler); Hopkins, Dale A. (Compiler); Chamis, Christos C. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    This conference publication contains the presentations and discussions from the joint University of Virginia (UVA)/NASA Workshops. The presentations included NASA Headquarters perspectives on High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), goals and objectives of the UVA Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST), NASA and Air Force CST activities, CST activities for airframes and propulsion systems in industry, and CST activities at Sandia National Laboratory.

  8. Optimal actuator placement and active structure design for control of helicopter airframe vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heverly, David Ellsworth, II

    A comprehensive research program on active control of rotorcraft airframe vibration is detailed in this thesis. A systematic design methodology, to realize an active vibration control system, is proposed and studied. The methodology is a four-part design cycle and relies heavily on numerical computation, modeling, and analysis. The various analytical tools, models, and processes required to execute the methodology are described. Two dynamic models of the helicopter airframe and an optimization procedure for actuator placement are utilized within the methodology. The optimization procedure simultaneously determines the type of actuation, the locations to apply actuation, and the corresponding active control actions. A feasibility study is conducted to examine the effectiveness of helicopter vibration control by distributing actuators at optimal locations within the airframe, rather than confining actuation to a centralized region. Results indicate that distributed actuation is capable of greater vibration suppression and requires less control effort than a centralized actuation configuration. An analytical and experimental investigation is conducted on a scaled model of a helicopter tailboom. The scaled tailboom model is used to study the actuation design and realization issues associated with integrating dual-point actuation into a semi-monocoque airframe structure. A piezoelectric stack actuator configuration is designed and installed within the tailboom model. Experimental tests indicate the stack actuator configuration is able to produce a bending moment within the structure to suppress vibration without causing excessive localized stress in the structure.

  9. Impact Testing and Simulation of Composite Airframe Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center on composite airframe structural components of increasing complexity to evaluate their energy absorption behavior when subjected to impact loading. A second objective was to assess the capabilities of predicting the dynamic response of composite airframe structures, including damage initiation and progression, using a state-of-the-art nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. The test specimens were extracted from a previously tested composite prototype fuselage section developed and manufactured by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation under the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP). Laminate characterization testing was conducted in tension and compression. In addition, dynamic impact tests were performed on several components, including I-beams, T-sections, and cruciform sections. Finally, tests were conducted on two full-scale components including a subfloor section and a framed fuselage section. These tests included a modal vibration and longitudinal impact test of the subfloor section and a quasi-static, modal vibration, and vertical drop test of the framed fuselage section. Most of the test articles were manufactured of graphite unidirectional tape composite with a thermoplastic resin system. However, the framed fuselage section was constructed primarily of a plain weave graphite fabric material with a thermoset resin system. Test data were collected from instrumentation such as accelerometers and strain gages and from full-field photogrammetry.

  10. Health Monitoring for Airframe Structural Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munns, Thomas E.; Kent, Renee M.; Bartolini, Antony; Gause, Charles B.; Borinski, Jason W.; Dietz, Jason; Elster, Jennifer L.; Boyd, Clark; Vicari, Larry; Ray, Asok; Cooper, E. G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This study established requirements for structural health monitoring systems, identified and characterized a prototype structural sensor system, developed sensor interpretation algorithms, and demonstrated the sensor systems on operationally realistic test articles. Fiber-optic corrosion sensors (i.e., moisture and metal ion sensors) and low-cycle fatigue sensors (i.e., strain and acoustic emission sensors) were evaluated to validate their suitability for monitoring aging degradation; characterize the sensor performance in aircraft environments; and demonstrate placement processes and multiplexing schemes. In addition, a unique micromachined multimeasure and sensor concept was developed and demonstrated. The results show that structural degradation of aircraft materials could be effectively detected and characterized using available and emerging sensors. A key component of the structural health monitoring capability is the ability to interpret the information provided by sensor system in order to characterize the structural condition. Novel deterministic and stochastic fatigue damage development and growth models were developed for this program. These models enable real time characterization and assessment of structural fatigue damage.

  11. Integrating CFD, CAA, and Experiments Towards Benchmark Datasets for Airframe Noise Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Yamamoto, Kazuomi

    2012-01-01

    Airframe noise corresponds to the acoustic radiation due to turbulent flow in the vicinity of airframe components such as high-lift devices and landing gears. The combination of geometric complexity, high Reynolds number turbulence, multiple regions of separation, and a strong coupling with adjacent physical components makes the problem of airframe noise highly challenging. Since 2010, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has organized an ongoing series of workshops devoted to Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations (BANC). The BANC workshops are aimed at enabling a systematic progress in the understanding and high-fidelity predictions of airframe noise via collaborative investigations that integrate state of the art computational fluid dynamics, computational aeroacoustics, and in depth, holistic, and multifacility measurements targeting a selected set of canonical yet realistic configurations. This paper provides a brief summary of the BANC effort, including its technical objectives, strategy, and selective outcomes thus far.

  12. Analysis of airframe/engine interactions in integrated flight and propulsion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schierman, John D.; Schmidt, David K.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis framework for the assessment of dynamic cross-coupling between airframe and engine systems from the perspective of integrated flight/propulsion control is presented. This analysis involves to determining the significance of the interactions with respect to deterioration in stability robustness and performance, as well as critical frequency ranges where problems may occur due to these interactions. The analysis illustrated here investigates both the airframe's effects on the engine control loops and the engine's effects on the airframe control loops in two case studies. The second case study involves a multi-input/multi-output analysis of the airframe. Sensitivity studies are performed on critical interactions to examine the degradations in the system's stability robustness and performance. Magnitudes of the interactions required to cause instabilities, as well as the frequencies at which the instabilities occur are recorded. Finally, the analysis framework is expanded to include control laws which contain cross-feeds between the airframe and engine systems.

  13. Propulsion airframe integration session overview and review of Lewis PAI efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batterton, Peter G.

    1992-01-01

    Propulsion/Airframe Integration (PAI) is a key issue for the High Speed Civil Transport. The aircraft performance, economics, and environmental acceptability can be adversely affected if the integration of the propulsion system and the airframe is not addressed properly or in a timely manner. Some of the goals are listed in this figure. In particular, these goals are highly influenced by how successfully the propulsion system and airframe are integrated. These goals were grouped by the 'Aero' and 'Propulsion' categories to suggest which group of technologists will likely be addressing them. In terms of the NASA High Speed Research Program, the ultimate objective for propulsion/airframe integration is to demonstrate the technologies for achievement of these goals on a 'single' integrated configuration.

  14. Combat Maintenance Concepts and Repair Techniques for Helicopter Airframe Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    helicopter airframe and to de- velop concepts for the assessment and repair of airframe combat damage. A computer model was developed to generate...random simulated hallistic strikes on the Black Hawk helicopter airframe. Random shotlines were generated with the model , and cases involving damage...Distribution of Ballistic Hits on Helicopters from Southeast Asia Combat Experience 23 Shotline Simulation Model 24 Conventions for Azimuth and

  15. Propulsion System Airframe Integration Issues and Aerodynamic Database Development for the Hyper-X Flight Research Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelund, Walter C.; Holland, Scott D.; Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Bittner, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Hyper-X Research Vehicle will provide a unique opportunity to obtain data on an operational airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system at true flight conditions. The airframe integrated nature of the scramjet engine with the Hyper-X vehicle results in a strong coupling effect between the propulsion system operation and the airframe s basic aerodynamic characteristics. Comments on general airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system effects on vehicle aerodynamic performance, stability, and control are provided, followed by examples specific to the Hyper-X research vehicle. An overview is provided of the current activities associated with the development of the Hyper-X aerodynamic database, including wind tunnel test activities and parallel CFD analysis efforts. A brief summary of the Hyper-X aerodynamic characteristics is provided, including the direct and indirect effects of the airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system operation on the basic airframe stability and control characteristics.

  16. Advanced general aviation engine/airframe integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmroczek, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison of the in-airframe performance and efficiency of the advanced engine concepts is presented. The results indicate that the proposed advanced engines can significantly improve the performance and economy of general aviation airplanes. The engine found to be most promising is the highly advanced version of a rotary combustion (Wankel) engine. The low weight and fuel consumption of this engine, as well as its small size, make it suited for aircraft use.

  17. Airframe structural damage detection: a non-linear structural surface intensity based technique.

    PubMed

    Semperlotti, Fabio; Conlon, Stephen C; Barnard, Andrew R

    2011-04-01

    The non-linear structural surface intensity (NSSI) based damage detection technique is extended to airframe applications. The selected test structure is an upper cabin airframe section from a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter (Sikorsky Aircraft, Stratford, CT). Structural damage is simulated through an impact resonator device, designed to simulate the induced vibration effects typical of non-linear behaving damage. An experimental study is conducted to prove the applicability of NSSI on complex mechanical systems as well as to evaluate the minimum sensor and actuator requirements. The NSSI technique is shown to have high damage detection sensitivity, covering an extended substructure with a single sensing location.

  18. Investigation of contact acoustic nonlinearities on metal and composite airframe structures via intensity based health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Romano, P Q; Conlon, S C; Smith, E C

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear structural intensity (NSI) and nonlinear structural surface intensity (NSSI) based damage detection techniques were improved and extended to metal and composite airframe structures. In this study, the measurement of NSI maps at sub-harmonic frequencies was completed to provide enhanced understanding of the energy flow characteristics associated with the damage induced contact acoustic nonlinearity mechanism. Important results include NSI source localization visualization at ultra-subharmonic (nf/2) frequencies, and damage detection results utilizing structural surface intensity in the nonlinear domain. A detection metric relying on modulated wave spectroscopy was developed and implemented using the NSSI feature. The data fusion of the intensity formulation provided a distinct advantage, as both the single interrogation frequency NSSI and its modulated wave extension (NSSI-MW) exhibited considerably higher sensitivities to damage than using single-sensor (strain or acceleration) nonlinear detection metrics. The active intensity based techniques were also extended to composite materials, and results show both NSSI and NSSI-MW can be used to detect damage in the bond line of an integrally stiffened composite plate structure with high sensitivity. Initial damage detection measurements made on an OH-58 tailboom (Penn State Applied Research Laboratory, State College, PA) indicate the techniques can be transitioned to complex airframe structures achieving high detection sensitivities with minimal sensors and actuators.

  19. Fabrication and development of several heat pipe honeycomb sandwich panel concepts. [airframe integrated scramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating and processing liquid metal heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for application on the NASA Langley airframe-integrated Scramjet engine was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts was evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. The chosen design consists of an all-stainless steel structure, sintered screen facesheets, and two types of core-ribbon; a diffusion bonded wire mesh and a foil-screen composite. Cleaning, fluid charging, processing, and process port sealing techniques were established. The liquid metals potassium, sodium and cesium were used as working fluids. Eleven honeycomb panels 15.24 cm X 15.24 cm X 2.94 cm were delivered to NASA Langley for extensive performance testing and evaluation; nine panels were processed as heat pipes, and two panels were left unprocessed.

  20. Bibliography on aerodynamics of airframe/engine integration of high-speed turbine-powered aircraft, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    This bibliography was developed as a first step in the preparation of a monograph on the subject of the aerodynamics of airframe/engine integration of high speed turbine powered aircraft. It lists 1535 unclassified documents published mainly in the period from 1955 to 1980. Primary emphasis was devoted to aerodynamic problems and interferences encountered in the integration process; however, extensive coverage also was given to the characteristics and problems of the isolated propulsion system elements. A detailed topic breakdown structure is used. The primary contents of the individual documents are indicated by the combination of the document's title and its location within the framework of the bibliography.

  1. Subscale, hydrogen-burning, airframe-integrated-scramjet: Experimental and theoretical evaluation of a water cooled strut airframe-integrated-scramjet: Experimental leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.; Guy, R. W.; Beach, H. L., Jr.; Rogers, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A water-cooled leading-edge design for an engine/airframe integrated scramjet model strut leading edge was evaluated. The cooling design employs a copper cooling tube brazed just downstream of the leading edge of a wedge-shaped strut which is constructed of oxygen-free copper. The survival of the strut leading edge during a series of tests at stagnation point heating rates confirms the practicality of the cooling design. A finite difference thermal model of the strut was also proven valid by the reasonable agreement of calculated and measured values of surface temperature and cooling-water heat transfer.

  2. The Engineering Design of Engine/Airframe Integration for the SAENGER Fully Reusable Space Transportation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    propellant rocket engine 26. Parachute container 31. RAMJET nitrogen cooling system storage tank 32. RAMJET control unit 33. High- pressure helium bottle...33. High- pressure helium bottle 34. RAMJET and its service lines fairing 35. Thermal-insulated LH2 tank 36. Studied RAMJET module 37. RAMJE fuel...operational modes and the results of the engine/airframe integration. Major experimental (EFD) and computational ( CFD ) results from the detailed intake

  3. Aerothermodynamic flow phenomena of the airframe-integrated supersonic combustion ramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.

    1992-01-01

    The unique component flow phenomena is discussed of the airframe-integrated supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) in a format geared towards new players in the arena of hypersonic propulsion. After giving an overview of the scramjet aerothermodynamic cycle, the characteristics are then covered individually of the vehicle forebody, inlet, combustor, and vehicle afterbody/nozzle. Attention is given to phenomena such as inlet speeding, inlet starting, inlet spillage, fuel injection, thermal choking, and combustor-inlet interaction.

  4. Propulsion-airframe integration for commercial and military aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, William P.

    1988-01-01

    A significant level of research is ongoing at NASA's Langley Research Center on integrating the propulsion system with the aircraft. This program has included nacelle/pylon/wing integration for turbofan transports, propeller/nacelle/wing integration for turboprop transports, and nozzle/afterbody/empennage integration for high performance aircraft. The studies included in this paper focus more specifically on pylon shaping and nacelle location studies for turbofan transports, nacelle and wing contouring and propeller location effects for turboprop transports, and nozzle shaping and empennage effects for high performance aircraft. The studies were primarily conducted in NASA Langley's 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers up to 1.20. Some higher Mach number data obtained at NASA's Lewis Research Center is also included.

  5. Validation of an Integrated Airframe and Turbofan Engine Simulation for Evaluation of Propulsion Control Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Sowers, T Shane; Liu, Yuan; Owen, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed independent airframe and engine models that have been integrated into a single real-time aircraft simulation for piloted evaluation of propulsion control algorithms. In order to have confidence in the results of these evaluations, the integrated simulation must be validated to demonstrate that its behavior is realistic and that it meets the appropriate Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification requirements for aircraft. The paper describes the test procedures and results, demonstrating that the integrated simulation generally meets the FAA requirements and is thus a valid testbed for evaluation of propulsion control modes.

  6. Internal Shock Interactions in Propulsion/Airframe Integrated Three-Dimensional Sidewall Compression Scramjet Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott D.; Perkins, John N.

    1992-01-01

    The advantages and design requirements of propulsion/airframe integration for high Mach number flight have led to extensive study of the three-dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet in recent years. Recent research publications have indicated testing over a broad range of Mach number (2 to 18) in a variety of test gases, such as air, helium, and tetrafluoromethane. Multiple experimental techniques have been employed to obtain detailed internal shock interaction data, performance data, and inlet starting limits. Computational fluid dynamics has been effectively used for preliminary parametric studies as well as in parallel with experiments to aid in the explanation of unusual or unexpected flow phenomena. Inlets of this genre afford a relatively simple, generic geometry while producing a highly complex, three-dimensional flow field dominated by shock/shock and shock/boundary layer interactions. While the importance of the viscous effects in high speed inlet interactions is recognized, the present work addresses in a parametric fashion the inviscid effects of leading edge sweep, sidewall compression, and inflow Mach number on the internal shock structure in terms of inlet compression and mass capture. In the process, the source of the of the Mach number invariance with leading edge sweep for a constant sidewall compression class of inlet is identified, and a previously undocumented spillage phenomenon in a constant effective wedge angle class of inlets is discussed.

  7. Numerical Research of Airframe/Engine Integrative Hypersonic Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    paper, an engineering method and a finite volume method based on the center of grid are developed for preliminary research of interested integrative...development of hypersonic technology, advanced experimental, analytical and computational methods are being exploited in the design of hypersonic...configurations to obtain excellent aerodynamic characteristics[5]. Due to the limitation of test capabilities to model all the impossible flight conditions

  8. Airframe Technology Development for Next Generation Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    2004-01-01

    The Airframe subproject within NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program has the responsibility to develop airframe technology for both rocket and airbreathing vehicles for access to space. The Airframe sub-project pushes the state-of-the-art in airframe technology for low-cost, reliable, and safe space transportation. Both low and medium technology readiness level (TRL) activities are being pursued. The key technical areas being addressed include design and integration, hot and integrated structures, cryogenic tanks, and thermal protection systems. Each of the technologies in these areas are discussed in this paper.

  9. Low-frequency noise reduction of lightweight airframe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Getline, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the noise attenuation characteristics of aircraft type fuselage structural panels were presented. Of particular interest was noise attenuation at low frequencies, below the fundamental resonances of the panels. All panels were flightweight structures for transport type aircraft in the 34,050 to 45,400 kg (75,000 to 100,000 pounds) gross weight range. Test data include the results of vibration and acoustic transmission loss tests on seven types of isotropic and orthotropically stiffened, flat and curved panels. The results show that stiffness controlled acoustically integrated structures can provide very high noise reductions at low frequencies without significantly affecting their high frequency noise reduction capabilities.

  10. Studies on Long Term Durability of Aluminum Airframe Structure Made by Affordable Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    New Metallic Materials for the Structure of Aging Aircraft [les Nouveaux Materiaux metalliques pour les structures des aeronefs d’ancienne generation...good resistance to fatigue crack growth. But it also has some problems in formability and the S1. INTRODUCTION corrosion resistance . 6000 series...airframe structural material. Development of properties like corrosion resistance , formability, lower density composites increases its speed now, and

  11. Hypersonic airframe structures: Technology needs and flight test requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.; Koch, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles, that may be produced by the year 2000, were identified. Candidate thermal/structural concepts that merit consideration for these vehicles were described. The current status of analytical methods, materials, manufacturing techniques, and conceptual developments pertaining to these concepts were reviewed. Guidelines establishing meaningful technology goals were defined and twenty-eight specific technology needs were identified. The extent to which these technology needs can be satisfied, using existing capabilities and facilities without the benefit of a hypersonic research aircraft, was assessed. The role that a research aircraft can fill in advancing this technology was discussed and a flight test program was outlined. Research aircraft thermal/structural design philosophy was also discussed. Programs, integrating technology advancements with the projected vehicle needs, were presented. Program options were provided to reflect various scheduling and cost possibilities.

  12. New Tools Being Developed for Engine- Airframe Blade-Out Structural Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles

    2003-01-01

    One of the primary concerns of aircraft structure designers is the accurate simulation of the blade-out event. This is required for the aircraft to pass Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification and to ensure that the aircraft is safe for operation. Typically, the most severe blade-out occurs when a first-stage fan blade in a high-bypass gas turbine engine is released. Structural loading results from both the impact of the blade onto the containment ring and the subsequent instantaneous unbalance of the rotating components. Reliable simulations of blade-out are required to ensure structural integrity during flight as well as to guarantee successful blade-out certification testing. The loads generated by these analyses are critical to the design teams for several components of the airplane structures including the engine, nacelle, strut, and wing, as well as the aircraft fuselage. Currently, a collection of simulation tools is used for aircraft structural design. Detailed high-fidelity simulation tools are used to capture the structural loads resulting from blade loss, and then these loads are used as input into an overall system model that includes complete structural models of both the engines and the airframe. The detailed simulation (shown in the figure) includes the time-dependent trajectory of the lost blade and its interactions with the containment structure, and the system simulation includes the lost blade loadings and the interactions between the rotating turbomachinery and the remaining aircraft structural components. General-purpose finite element structural analysis codes are typically used, and special provisions are made to include transient effects from the blade loss and rotational effects resulting from the engine s turbomachinery. To develop and validate these new tools with test data, the NASA Glenn Research Center has teamed with GE Aircraft Engines, Pratt & Whitney, Boeing Commercial Aircraft, Rolls-Royce, and MSC.Software.

  13. An Assessment of IMPAC - Integrated Methodology for Propulsion and Airframe Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, G. P.; Wagner, E. A.; Bodden, D. S.

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the work done under a NASA sponsored contract to transition to industry technologies developed under the NASA Lewis Research Center IMPAC (Integrated Methodology for Propulsion and Airframe Control) program. The critical steps in IMPAC are exercised on an example integrated flight/propulsion control design for linear airframe/engine models of a conceptual STOVL (Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing) aircraft, and MATRIXX (TM) executive files to implement each step are developed. The results from the example study are analyzed and lessons learned are listed along with recommendations that will improve the application of each design step. The end product of this research is a set of software requirements for developing a user-friendly control design tool which will automate the steps in the IMPAC methodology. Prototypes for a graphical user interface (GUI) are sketched to specify how the tool will interact with the user, and it is recommended to build the tool around existing computer aided control design software packages.

  14. Piloted Evaluation of an Integrated Methodology for Propulsion and Airframe Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Simon, Donald L.; Garg, Sanjay; Mattern, Duane L.; Ranaudo, Richard J.; Odonoghue, Dennis P.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated methodology for propulsion and airframe control has been developed and evaluated for a Short Take-Off Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft using a fixed base flight simulator at NASA Lewis Research Center. For this evaluation the flight simulator is configured for transition flight using a STOVL aircraft model, a full nonlinear turbofan engine model, simulated cockpit and displays, and pilot effectors. The paper provides a brief description of the simulation models, the flight simulation environment, the displays and symbology, the integrated control design, and the piloted tasks used for control design evaluation. In the simulation, the pilots successfully completed typical transition phase tasks such as combined constant deceleration with flight path tracking, and constant acceleration wave-off maneuvers. The pilot comments of the integrated system performance and the display symbology are discussed and analyzed to identify potential areas of improvement.

  15. Propulsion Airframe Integration Test Techniques for Hypersonic Airbreathing Configurations at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, David W.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Trexler, Carl A.; Cabell, Karen F.; Andrews, Earl H., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The scope and significance of propulsion airframe integration (PAI) for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles is presented through a discussion of the PAI test techniques utilized at NASA Langley Research Center. Four primary types of PAI model tests utilized at NASA Langley for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles are discussed. The four types of PAI test models examined are the forebody/inlet test model, the partial-width/truncated propulsion flowpath test model, the powered exhaust simulation test model, and the full-length/width propulsion flowpath test model. The test technique for each of these four types of PAI test models is described, and the relevant PAI issues addressed by each test technique are illustrated through the presentation of recent PAI test data.

  16. Reduced complexity structural modeling for automated airframe synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, Prabhat

    1987-01-01

    A procedure is developed for the optimum sizing of wing structures based on representing the built-up finite element assembly of the structure by equivalent beam models. The reduced-order beam models are computationally less demanding in an optimum design environment which dictates repetitive analysis of several trial designs. The design procedure is implemented in a computer program requiring geometry and loading information to create the wing finite element model and its equivalent beam model, and providing a rapid estimate of the optimum weight obtained from a fully stressed design approach applied to the beam. The synthesis procedure is demonstrated for representative conventional-cantilever and joined wing configurations.

  17. Feedback strategies for visual search in airframe structural inspection.

    PubMed

    Gramopadhye, A K; Drury, C G; Sharit, J

    1997-05-01

    Feedback of information has consistently shown positive results in human inspection, provided it is given in a timely and appropriate manner. Feedback serves as the basis of most training schemes; traditionally this has been performance feedback. Other forms of feedback which provide strategy information rather than performance information may have a role in improving inspection. This study compared performance feedback and cognitive feedback in a realistic simulation of an aircraft structural inspection task. Performance (time, errors) feedback showed the greatest improvements in performance measures. Cognitive feedback enhanced efficiency measures of search strategy. When cognitive feedback consisted of visual representations of the path and the coverage of the search sequence, subjects also were able to use this task information to improve their search performance.

  18. Foam composite structures. [for fire retardant airframe materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Milligan, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The need to include fire resistant foams into state of the art aircraft interior paneling to increase passenger safety in aircraft fires was studied. Present efforts were directed toward mechanical and fire testing of panels with foam inclusions. Skinned foam filled honeycomb and PBI structural foams were the two constructions investigated with attention being directed toward weight/performance/cost trade-off. All of the new panels demonstrated improved performance in fire and some were lighter weight but not as strong as the presently used paneling. Continued efforts should result in improved paneling for passenger safety. In particular the simple partial filling (fire side) of state-of-the-art honeycomb with fire resistant foams with little sacrifice in weight would result in panels with increased fire resistance. More important may be the retarded rate of toxic gas evolution in the fire due to the protection of the honeycomb by the foam.

  19. Synergistic Airframe-Propulsion Interactions and Integrations: A White Paper Prepared by the 1996-1997 Langley Aeronautics Technical Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaros, Steven F.; Sexstone, Matthew G.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Lamar, John E.; McKinley, Robert E., Jr.; Torres, Abel O.; Burley, Casey L.; Scott, Robert C.; Small, William J.

    1998-01-01

    This white paper addresses the subject of Synergistic Airframe-Propulsion interactions and integrations (SnAPII). The benefits of SnAPII have not been as extensively explored. This is due primarily to the separateness of design process for airframes and propulsion systems, with only unfavorable interactions addressed. The question 'How to design these two systems in such a way that the airframe needs the propulsion and the propulsion needs the airframe?' is the fundamental issue addressed in this paper. Successful solutions to this issue depend on appropriate technology ideas. This paper first details some ten technologies that have yet to make it to commercial products (with limited exceptions) and that could be utilized in a synergistic manner. Then these technologies, either alone or in combination, are applied to both a conventional twin-engine transonic transport and to an unconventional transport, the Blended Wing Body. Lastly, combinations of these technologies are applied to configuration concepts to assess the possibilities of success relative to five of the ten NASA aeronautics goals. These assessments are subjective, but they point the way in which the applied technologies could work together for some break-through benefits.

  20. SCRAM - AN ENGINEER'S TOOL FOR PREDICTION OF AIRFRAME INTEGRATED SCRAMJET PERFORMANCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    This program determines the one-dimensional performance for an airframe integrated supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet). The supersonic combustion ramjet cycle, which uses hydrogen for fuel and atmospheric air for oxidation, is essential for the development of a propulsion system for single-stage-to-orbit aerospace vehicles. These vehicles are intended to be launched horizontally, as opposed to vertical launching for current space vehicles. In addition, they must achieve hypersonic flight to Mach 25 prior to orbital insertion into low Earth orbit. The propulsion system of these vehicles must be reusable, efficient, and cost effective. The scramjet cycle analysis code performs nose-to-tail, hydrogen fueled, Airframe Integrated Scramjet (AIS) simulation in a real gas flow with equilibrium thermodynamic properties. This allows ready generation of preliminary estimates for SCRAM cycle performance. SCRAM is a reliable, efficient, and speedy design tool that is useable on all standard computers down to IBM PC-AT compatible machines. Developed in the Hypersonic Propulsion Branch at NASA Langley Research Center for the Hypersonic Research Engine and Langley 3-Strut engine programs, the current version of this code has been modified by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility of the Ames Research Center for the purpose of supporting the Langley Strutless Parametric engine and National AeroSpace Plane (NASP) engine test programs. The current version of SCRAM optimizes the tradeoffs between the needs for computational speed, accuracy, and future modifications. The program utilizes a five station geometry model, with variable step size between each station, to analyze a vehicle nose-to-tail mass capture stream tube control-volume with real gas equilibrium flow properties. SCRAM applies the laws of Conservation of Mass, Momentum, and Energy across each step to calculate the changing flow parameters along the control volume. The code incorporates an integral boundary layer

  1. Bibliography on propulsion airframe integration technologies for high-speed civil transport applications, 1980-1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Mizukami, Masashi

    1993-01-01

    NASA has initiated the High Speed Research (HSR) program with the goal to develop technologies for a new generation, economically viable, environmentally acceptable, supersonic transport (SST) called the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). A significant part of this effort is expected to be in multidisciplinary systems integration, such as in propulsion airframe integration (PAI). In order to assimilate the knowledge database on PAI for SST type aircraft, a bibliography on this subject was compiled. The bibliography with over 1200 entries, full abstracts, and indexes. Related topics are also covered, such as the following: engine inlets, engine cycles, nozzles, existing supersonic cruise aircraft, noise issues, computational fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, and external interference. All identified documents from 1980 through early 1991 are included; this covers the latter part of the NASA Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) program and the beginnings of the HSR program. In addition, some pre-1980 documents of significant merit or reference value are also included. The references were retrieved via a computerized literature search using the NASA RECON database system.

  2. Application of an Integrated Methodology for Propulsion and Airframe Control Design to a STOVL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay; Mattern, Duane

    1994-01-01

    An advanced methodology for integrated flight propulsion control (IFPC) design for future aircraft, which will use propulsion system generated forces and moments for enhanced maneuver capabilities, is briefly described. This methodology has the potential to address in a systematic manner the coupling between the airframe and the propulsion subsystems typical of such enhanced maneuverability aircraft. Application of the methodology to a short take-off vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft in the landing approach to hover transition flight phase is presented with brief description of the various steps in the IFPC design methodology. The details of the individual steps have been described in previous publications and the objective of this paper is to focus on how the components of the control system designed at each step integrate into the overall IFPC system. The full nonlinear IFPC system was evaluated extensively in nonreal-time simulations as well as piloted simulations. Results from the nonreal-time evaluations are presented in this paper. Lessons learned from this application study are summarized in terms of areas of potential improvements in the STOVL IFPC design as well as identification of technology development areas to enhance the applicability of the proposed design methodology.

  3. Identification of integrated airframe: Propulsion effects on an F-15 aircraft for application to drag minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.

    1993-01-01

    The application of an adaptive real-time measurement-based performance optimization technique is being explored for a future flight research program. The key technical challenge of the approach is parameter identification, which uses a perturbation-search technique to identify changes in performance caused by forced oscillations of the controls. The controls on the NASA F-15 highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) aircraft were perturbed using inlet cowl rotation steps at various subsonic and supersonic flight conditions to determine the effect on aircraft performance. The feasibility of the perturbation-search technique for identifying integrated airframe-propulsion system performance effects was successfully shown through flight experiments and postflight data analysis. Aircraft response and control data were analyzed postflight to identify gradients and to determine the minimum drag point. Changes in longitudinal acceleration as small as 0.004 g were measured, and absolute resolution was estimated to be 0.002 g or approximately 50 lbf of drag. Two techniques for identifying performance gradients were compared: a least-squares estimation algorithm and a modified maximum likelihood estimator algorithm. A complementary filter algorithm was used with the least squares estimator.

  4. Simulating the Impact Response of Full-Scale Composite Airframe Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Seal, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center obtained a composite helicopter cabin structure in 2010 from the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP) that was fabricated by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation. The cabin had been subjected to a vertical drop test in 2008 to evaluate a tilting roof concept to limit the intrusion of overhead masses into the fuselage cabin. Damage to the cabin test article was limited primarily to the roof. Consequently, the roof area was removed and the remaining structure was cut into test specimens including a large subfloor section and a forward framed fuselage section. In 2011, NASA and Sikorsky entered into a cooperative research agreement to study the impact responses of composite airframe structures and to evaluate the capabilities of the explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA®, to simulate these responses including damage initiation and progressive failure. Most of the test articles were manufactured of graphite unidirectional tape composite with a thermoplastic resin system. However, the framed fuselage section was constructed primarily of a plain weave graphite fabric material with a thermoset resin system. Test data were collected from accelerometers and full-field photogrammetry. The focus of this paper will be to document impact testing and simulation results for the longitudinal impact of the subfloor section and the vertical drop test of the forward framed fuselage section.

  5. Application of CART3D to Complex Propulsion-Airframe Integration with Vehicle Sketch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) is an easy-to-use modeler used to generate aircraft geometries for use in conceptual design and analysis. It has been used in the past to generate metageometries for aerodynamic analyses ranging from handbook methods to Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD). As desirable as it is to bring high order analyses, such as CFD, into the conceptual design process, this has been difficult and time consuming in practice due to the manual nature of both surface and volume grid generation. Over the last couple of years, VSP has had a major upgrade of its surface triangulation and export capability. This has enhanced its ability to work with Cart3D, an inviscid, three dimensional fluid flow toolset. The combination of VSP and Cart3D allows performing inviscid CFD on complex geometries with relatively high productivity. This paper will illustrate the use of VSP with Cart3D through an example case of a complex propulsion-airframe integration (PAI) of an over-wing nacelle (OWN) airliner configuration.

  6. Turbine Powered Simulator Calibration and Testing for Hybrid Wing Body Powered Airframe Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shea, Patrick R.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Long, Kurtis R.; James, Kevin D.; Tompkins, Daniel M.; Beyar, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Propulsion airframe integration testing on a 5.75% scale hybrid wing body model us- ing turbine powered simulators was completed at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-foot test section. Four rear control surface con gurations including a no control surface de ection con guration were tested with the turbine powered simulator units to investigate how the jet exhaust in uenced the control surface performance as re- lated to the resultant forces and moments on the model. Compared to ow-through nacelle testing on the same hybrid wing body model, the control surface e ectiveness was found to increase with the turbine powered simulator units operating. This was true for pitching moment, lift, and drag although pitching moment was the parameter of greatest interest for this project. With the turbine powered simulator units operating, the model pitching moment was seen to increase when compared to the ow-through nacelle con guration indicating that the center elevon and vertical tail control authority increased with the jet exhaust from the turbine powered simulator units.

  7. Passive impact localisation for the structural health monitoring of new airframe materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jacob; Croxford, Anthony; Paget, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    This experimental work considers the use of permanently attached sensors for the detection and location of impacts to a carbon fibre reinforced plastic panel with stringers. Deterministic knowledge of the propagation of Lamb waves in the structure is not used. Instead a statistical measure of the signal is used to determine the arrival time of elastic waves propagating in the structure as a result of the impact. A comparison is made between a conventional method and the statistical method. The conventional method, which has been routinely used in industry for acoustic emission imaging, uses the timing of a peak in the recorded signal. The statistical method uses the Rayleigh maximum likelihood estimator. The statistical method is shown to provide both more precise and robust estimates of the elastic wave arrival time. An array of just four sensors is used to locate the impacts. The accuracy of the localisations is used to visualise the effectiveness of the two methods for the low sensor density used. Low sensor density is necessary for minimising system weight and cost. The equivalent net sensor density used in this experiment was five sensors per meter squared. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic is today used for both exterior surfaces and primary structure of airframes entering service. The industrial relevance of this work is to mitigate the diminishing role of visual inspection for evaluating the health of aerospace structures, where impact damage may not be visible.

  8. Life cycle strain monitoring of composite airframe structures by FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, I.; Sekine, K.; Kume, M.; Takeya, H.; Minakuchi, S.; Takeda, N.; Enomoto, K.

    2013-04-01

    Life cycle health monitoring technology for composite airframe structures based on strain mapping is proposed. It detects damages and deformation harmful to the structures by strain mapping using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors through their life cycles including the stages of molding, machining, assembling, operation, and maintenance. In this paper, we firstly carried out a strain monitoring test of CFRP mock-up structure through the life cycle including the stage of molding, machining, assembling, and operation. The experimental result confirms that the strain which arises in each life cycle stage can be measured by FBG sensors embedded in molding stage and demonstrates the feasibility of life cycle structural health monitoring by using FBG sensors. Secondly, we conducted the strain monitoring test of CFRP scarf-repaired specimen subject to fatigue load. FBG sensors were embedded in the scarf-repaired part of the specimen and their reflection spectra were measured in uni-axial cyclic load test. Strain changes were compared with the pulse thermographic inspection. As a result, strain measured by FBG sensors changed sensitively with debonded area of repair patch, which demonstrates that the debondings of repair patches in scarf-repaired composites due to fatigue load can be detected by FBG sensors.

  9. Small Engine Technology (SET). Task 33: Airframe, Integration, and Community Noise Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieber, Lys S.; Elkins, Daniel; Golub, Robert A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Task Order 33 had four primary objectives as follows: (1) Identify and prioritize the airframe noise reduction technologies needed to accomplish the NASA Pillar goals for business and regional aircraft. (2) Develop a model to estimate the effect of jet shear layer refraction and attenuation of internally generated source noise of a turbofan engine on the aircraft system noise. (3) Determine the effect on community noise of source noise changes of a generic turbofan engine operating from sea level to 15,000 feet. (4) Support lateral attenuation experiments conducted by NASA Langley at Wallops Island, VA, by coordinating opportunities for Contractor Aircraft to participate as a noise source during the noise measurements. Noise data and noise prediction tools, including airframe noise codes, from the NASA Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program were applied to assess the current status of noise reduction technologies relative to the NASA pillar goals for regional and small business jet aircraft. In addition, the noise prediction tools were applied to evaluate the effectiveness of airframe-related noise reduction concepts developed in the AST program on reducing the aircraft system noise. The AST noise data and acoustic prediction tools used in this study were furnished by NASA.

  10. Integration of Propulsion-Airframe-Aeroacoustic Technologies and Design Concepts for a Quiet Blended-Wing-Body Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, G. A.; Brown, S. A.; Geiselhart, K. A.

    2004-01-01

    increasing the propulsive efficiency at cruise, and therefore offered a means to offset performance penalties imposed by some of the advanced PAA configurations. It was also found that the podded Distributed Exhaust Nozzle configuration imposed high penalties on the mission range and the need for substantial synergistic performance enhancements from an advanced integration scheme was identified. The High Aspect Ratio Nozzle showed inconclusive noise results and posed significant integration difficulties. Distributed Propulsion, in general, imposed performance penalties but may offer some promise for noise reduction from jet-to-jet shielding effects. Finally, a retractable aft airframe extension provided excellent noise reduction for a modest decrease in range.

  11. Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Integration Effects for a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H; Elkoby, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was performed to study the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic effects of a high bypass ratio engine for a hybrid wing body aircraft configuration where the engine is installed above the wing. The objective was to provide an understanding of the jet noise shielding effectiveness as a function of engine gas condition and location as well as nozzle configuration. A 4.7% scale nozzle of a bypass ratio seven engine was run at characteristic cycle points under static and forward flight conditions. The effect of the pylon and its orientation on jet noise was also studied as a function of bypass ratio and cycle condition. The addition of a pylon yielded significant spectral changes lowering jet noise by up to 4 dB at high polar angles and increasing it by 2 to 3 dB at forward angles. In order to assess jet noise shielding, a planform representation of the airframe model, also at 4.7% scale was traversed such that the jet nozzle was positioned from downstream of to several diameters upstream of the airframe model trailing edge. Installations at two fan diameters upstream of the wing trailing edge provided only limited shielding in the forward arc at high frequencies for both the axisymmetric and a conventional round nozzle with pylon. This was consistent with phased array measurements suggesting that the high frequency sources are predominantly located near the nozzle exit and, consequently, are amenable to shielding. The mid to low frequency sources were observed further downstream and shielding was insignificant. Chevrons were designed and used to impact the distribution of sources with the more aggressive design showing a significant upstream migration of the sources in the mid frequency range. Furthermore, the chevrons reduced the low frequency source levels and the typical high frequency increase due to the application of chevron nozzles was successfully shielded. The pylon was further modified with a technology that injects air

  12. Dual-band infrared imaging to detect corrosion damage within airframes and concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelGrande, Nancy; Durbin, Philip F.

    1994-03-01

    We are developing dual-band IR (DBIR) imaging and detection techniques to inspect airframes and concrete bridge decks for hidden corrosion damage. Using selective DBIR image ratios, we enhanced surface temperature contrast and removed surface emissivity noise associated with clutter. Our surface temperature maps depicted defect sites, which heat and cool at different rates than their surroundings. Our emissivity-ratio maps tagged and removed the masking effects of surface clutter. For airframe inspections, we used time-resolved DBIR temperature, emissivity-ratio and composite thermal inertia maps to locate corrosion-thinning effects within a flash-heated Boeing 737 airframe. Emissivity-ratio maps tagged and removed clutter sites from uneven paint, dirt and surface markers. Temperature and thermal inertia maps characterized defect sites, types, sizes, thicknesses, thermal properties and material-loss effects from airframe corrosion. For concrete inspections, we mapped DBIR temperature and emissivity-ratio patterns to better interpret surrogate delamination sites within naturally- heated, concrete slabs and removed the clutter mask from sand pile-up, grease stains, rocks and other surface objects.

  13. A formulation of rotor-airframe coupling for design analysis of vibrations of helicopter airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, R. G.; Walton, W. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A linear formulation of rotor airframe coupling intended for vibration analysis in airframe structural design is presented. The airframe is represented by a finite element analysis model; the rotor is represented by a general set of linear differential equations with periodic coefficients; and the connections between the rotor and airframe are specified through general linear equations of constraint. Coupling equations are applied to the rotor and airframe equations to produce one set of linear differential equations governing vibrations of the combined rotor airframe system. These equations are solved by the harmonic balance method for the system steady state vibrations. A feature of the solution process is the representation of the airframe in terms of forced responses calculated at the rotor harmonics of interest. A method based on matrix partitioning is worked out for quick recalculations of vibrations in design studies when only relatively few airframe members are varied. All relations are presented in forms suitable for direct computer implementation.

  14. Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Integration Effects for a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Elkoby, Ronen

    2010-01-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was performed to study the propulsion airframe aeroacoustic effects of a high bypass ratio engine for a hybrid wing body aircraft configuration where the engine is installed above the wing. The objective was to provide an understanding of the jet noise shielding effectiveness as a function of engine gas condition and location as well as nozzle configuration. A 4.7% scale nozzle of a bypass ratio seven engine was run at characteristic cycle points under static and forward flight conditions. The effect of the pylon and its orientation on jet noise was also studied as a function of bypass ratio and cycle condition. The addition of a pylon yielded significant spectral changes lowering jet noise by up to 4dB at high polar angles and increasing it by 2 to 3dB at forward angles. In order to assess jet noise shielding, a planform representation of the airframe model, also at 4.7% scale was traversed relative to the jet nozzle from downstream to several diameters upstream of the wing trailing edge. Installations at two fan diameters upstream of the wing trailing edge provided only limited shielding in the forward arc at high frequencies for both the axisymmetric and a conventional round nozzle with pylon. This was consistent with phased array measurements suggesting that the high frequency sources are predominantly located near the nozzle exit and, consequently, are amenable to shielding. The mid to low frequencies sources were observed further downstream and shielding was insignificant. Chevrons were designed and used to impact the distribution of sources with the more aggressive design showing a significant upstream migration of the sources in the mid frequency range. Furthermore, the chevrons reduced the low frequency source levels and the typical high frequency increase due to the application of chevron nozzles was successfully shielded. The pylon was further modified with a technology that injects air through the shelf of the

  15. Tension and Bending Testing of an Integral T-Cap for Stitched Composite Airframe Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is a structural concept that was developed by The Boeing Company to address the complex structural design aspects associated with a pressurized hybrid wing body aircraft configuration. An important design feature required for assembly is the integrally stitched T-cap, which provides connectivity of the corner (orthogonal) joint between adjacent panels. A series of tests were conducted on T-cap test articles, with and without a rod stiffener penetrating the T-cap web, under tension (pull-off) and bending loads. Three designs were tested, including the baseline design used in large-scale test articles. The baseline had only the manufacturing stitch row adjacent to the fillet at the base of the T-cap web. Two new designs added stitching rows to the T-cap web at either 0.5- or 1.0-inch spacing along the height of the web. Testing was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to determine the behavior of the T-cap region resulting from the applied loading. Results show that stitching arrests the initial delamination failures so that the maximum strength capability exceeds the load at which the initial delaminations develop. However, it was seen that the added web stitching had very little effect on the initial delamination failure load, but actually decreased the initial delamination failure load for tension loading of test articles without a stiffener passing through the web. Additionally, the added web stitching only increased the maximum load capability by between 1% and 12.5%. The presence of the stiffener, however, did increase the initial and maximum loads for both tension and bending loading as compared to the stringerless baseline design. Based on the results of the few samples tested, the additional stitching in the T-cap web showed little advantage over the baseline design in terms of structural failure at the T-cap web/skin junction for the current test articles.

  16. Thermal design and analysis of a hydrogen-burning wind tunnel model of an airframe-integrated scramjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, R. W.; Mueller, J. N.; Pinckney, S. Z.; Lee, L. P.

    1976-01-01

    An aerodynamic model of a hydrogen burning, airframe integrated scramjet engine has been designed, fabricated, and instrumented. This model is to be tested in an electric arc heated wind tunnel at an altitude of 35.39 km (116,094 ft.) but with an inlet Mach number of 6 simulating precompression on an aircraft undersurface. The scramjet model is constructed from oxygen free, high conductivity copper and is a heat sink design except for water cooling in some critical locations. The model is instrumented for pressure, surface temperature, heat transfer rate, and thrust measurements. Calculated flow properties, heat transfer rates, and surface temperature distributions along the various engine components are included for the conditions stated above. For some components, estimates of thermal strain are presented which indicate significant reductions in plastic strain by selective cooling of the model. These results show that the 100 thermal cycle life of the engine was met with minimum distortion while staying within the 2669 N (600 lbf) engine weight limitation and while cooling the engine only in critical locations.

  17. Airframe Research and Technology for Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Merski, N. Ronald; Glass, Christopher E.

    2002-01-01

    The Hypersonics Investment Area (HIA) within NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) has the responsibility to develop hypersonic airbreathing vehicles for access to space. The Airframe Research and Technology (AR and T) Project, as one of six projects in the HIA, will push the state-of-the-art in airframe and vehicle systems for low-cost, reliable, and safe space transportation. The individual technologies within the project are focused on advanced, breakthrough technologies in airframe and vehicle systems and cross-cutting activities that are the basis for improvements in these disciplines. Both low and medium technology readiness level (TRL) activities are being pursued. The key technical areas that will be addressed by the project include analysis and design tools, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), composite (polymer, metal, and ceramic matrix) materials development, thermal/structural wall concepts, thermal protection systems, seals, leading edges, aerothermodynamics, and airframe/propulsion flowpath technology. Each of the technical areas or sub-projects within the Airframe R and T Project is described in this paper.

  18. Advanced composite airframe program: Today's technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Danny E.; Mazza, L. Thomas

    1988-01-01

    The Advanced Composite Airframe Program (ACAP) was undertaken to demonstrate the advantages of the application of advanced composite materials and structural design concepts to the airframe structure on helicopters designed to stringent military requirements. The primary goals of the program were the reduction of airframe production costs and airframe weight by 17 and 22 percent respectively. The ACAP effort consisted of a preliminary design phase, detail design, and design support testing, full-scale fabrication, laboratory testing, and a ground/flight test demonstration. Since the completion of the flight test demonstration programs follow-on efforts were initiated to more fully evaluate a variety of military characteristics of the composite airframe structures developed under the original ACAP advanced development contracts. An overview of the ACAP program is provided and some of the design features, design support testing, manufacturing approaches, and the results of the flight test evaluation, as well as, an overview of Militarization Test and Evaluation efforts are described.

  19. Structural integrity of future aging airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Jack F.; Goranson, Ulf G.

    1992-01-01

    A multitude of design considerations is involved in ensuring the structural integrity of Boeing jet transports that have common design concepts validated by extensive analyses, tests, and three decades of service. As airplanes approach their design service objectives, the incidences of fatigue and corrosion may become widespread. Continuing airworthiness of the aging jet fleet requires diligent performance from the manufacturer, the airlines, and airworthiness authorities. Aging fleet support includes timely development of supplemental structural inspection documents applicable to selected older airplanes, teardown inspections of high-time airframes retired from service, fatigue testing of older airframes, and structural surveys of more than 130 airplanes operated throughout the world. Lessons learned from these activities are incorporated in service bulletin recommendations, production line modifications, and design manual updates. An overview of traditional Boeing fleet support activities and the anticipated benefits for future generations of commercial airplanes based on the continuous design improvement process are presented.

  20. Nozzle performance calibration and turbomachinery operational analysis of Turbo-Powered Simulators (TPS) for the NASA-Langley EET propulsion airframe integration investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    The Boeing flight simulator chamber facility energy efficient transport (EET) propulsion/airframe integration investigation was tested. Two turbopowered simulators (TPS) were calibrated with four different nacelle configurations. Two nacelle configurations were calibrated on each TPS, each calibration simulating the full nozzle pressure ratio range encountered in a one atmosphere total pressure wind tunnel operating over a Mach number range from 0.70 to 0.90 Mach. The results of the calibration test are in the form of velocity and discharge coefficient which is used in determining the simulator thrust while the TPS is operating in the wind tunnel.

  1. Development of the NASA/FLAGRO computer program for analysis of airframe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA/FLAGRO (NASGRO) computer program was developed for fracture control analysis of space hardware and is currently the standard computer code in NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and the European Agency (ESA) for this purpose. The significant attributes of the NASGRO program are the numerous crack case solutions, the large materials file, the improved growth rate equation based on crack closure theory, and the user-friendly promptive input features. In support of the National Aging Aircraft Research Program (NAARP); NASGRO is being further developed to provide advanced state-of-the-art capability for damage tolerance and crack growth analysis of aircraft structural problems, including mechanical systems and engines. The project currently involves a cooperative development effort by NASA, FAA, and ESA. The primary tasks underway are the incorporation of advanced methodology for crack growth rate retardation resulting from spectrum loading and improved analysis for determining crack instability. Also, the current weight function solutions in NASGRO or nonlinear stress gradient problems are being extended to more crack cases, and the 2-d boundary integral routine for stress analysis and stress-intensity factor solutions is being extended to 3-d problems. Lastly, effort is underway to enhance the program to operate on personal computers and work stations in a Windows environment. Because of the increasing and already wide usage of NASGRO, the code offers an excellent mechanism for technology transfer for new fatigue and fracture mechanics capabilities developed within NAARP.

  2. Fuel Cell Airframe Integration Study for Short-Range Aircraft. Volume 1; Aircraft Propulsion and Subsystems Integration Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummalla, Mallika; Pandy, Arun; Braun, Robert; Carriere, Thierry; Yamanis, Jean; Vanderspurt, Thomas; Hardin, Larry; Welch, Rick

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to define the functionality and evaluate the propulsion and power system benefits derived from a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) based Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) for a future short range commercial aircraft, and to define the technology gaps to enable such a system. United Technologies Corporation (UTC) Integrated Total Aircraft Power System (ITAPS) methodologies were used to evaluate a baseline aircraft and several SOFC architectures. The technology benefits were captured as reductions of the mission fuel burn, life cycle cost, noise and emissions. As a result of the study, it was recognized that system integration is critical to maximize benefits from the SOFC APU for aircraft application. The mission fuel burn savings for the two SOFC architectures ranged from 4.7 percent for a system with high integration to 6.7 percent for a highly integrated system with certain technological risks. The SOFC APU itself produced zero emissions. The reduction in engine fuel burn achieved with the SOFC systems also resulted in reduced emissions from the engines for both ground operations and in flight. The noise level of the baseline APU with a silencer is 78 dBA, while the SOFC APU produced a lower noise level. It is concluded that a high specific power SOFC system is needed to achieve the benefits identified in this study. Additional areas requiring further development are the processing of the fuel to remove sulfur, either on board or on the ground, and extending the heat sink capability of the fuel to allow greater waste heat recovery, resolve the transient electrical system integration issues, and identification of the impact of the location of the SOFC and its size on the aircraft.

  3. Status of ERA Airframe Technology Demonstrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela; Jegley, Dawn; Rigney, Tom

    2015-01-01

    NASA has created the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project to explore and document the feasibility, benefits and technical risk of advanced vehicle configurations and enabling technologies that will reduce the impact of aviation on the environment. A critical aspect of this pursuit is the development of a lighter, more robust airframe that will enable the introduction of unconventional aircraft configurations that have higher lift-to-drag ratios, reduced drag, and lower community noise. The Airframe Technology subproject contains two elements. Under the Damage Arresting Composite Demonstration an advanced material system is being explored which will lead to lighter airframes that are more structural efficient than the composites used in aircraft today. Under the Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge Flight Experiment a new concept of a flexible wing trailing edge is being evaluated which will reduce weight and improve aerodynamic performance. This presentation will describe the development these two airframe technologies.

  4. Airframe noise prediction evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Kingo J.; Donelson, Michael J.; Huang, Shumei C.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of current airframe noise prediction methods using available airframe noise measurements from tests of a narrow body transport (DC-9) and a wide body transport (DC-10) in addition to scale model test data. General features of the airframe noise from these aircraft and models are outlined. The results of the assessment of two airframe prediction methods, Fink's and Munson's methods, against flight test data of these aircraft and scale model wind tunnel test data are presented. These methods were extensively evaluated against measured data from several configurations including clean, slat deployed, landing gear-deployed, flap deployed, and landing configurations of both DC-9 and DC-10. They were also assessed against a limited number of configurations of scale models. The evaluation was conducted in terms of overall sound pressure level (OASPL), tone corrected perceived noise level (PNLT), and one-third-octave band sound pressure level (SPL).

  5. Fuel Efficiencies Through Airframe Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos-O'Connor, Gaudy M.; Mangelsdorf, Mark F.; Maliska, Heather A.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Wahls, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    The factors of continuing strong growth in air traffic volume, the vital role of the air transport system on the economy, and concerns about the environmental impact of aviation have added focus to the National Aeronautics Research Policy. To address these concerns in the context of the National Policy, NASA has set aggressive goals in noise reduction, emissions, and energy consumption. With respect to the goal of reducing energy consumption in the fleet, the development of promising airframe technologies is required to realize the significant improvements that are desired. Furthermore, the combination of advances in materials and structures with aerodynamic technologies may lead to a paradigm shift in terms of potential configurations for the future. Some of these promising airframe technologies targeted at improved efficiency are highlighted.

  6. Characterization of Unsteady Flow Structures Around Tandem Cylinders for Component Interaction Studies in Airframe Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; McGinley, Catherine B.

    2005-01-01

    A joint computational and experimental study has been performed at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate the unsteady flow generated by the components of an aircraft landing gear system. Because the flow field surrounding a full landing gear is so complex, the study was conducted on a simplified geometry consisting of two cylinders in tandem arrangement to isolate and characterize the pertinent flow phenomena. This paper focuses on the experimental effort where surface pressures, 2-D Particle Image Velocimetry, and hot-wire anemometry were used to document the flow interaction around the two cylinders at a Reynolds Number of 1.66 x 10(exp 5), based on cylinder diameter, and cylinder spacing-todiameter ratios, L/D, of 1.435 and 3.70. Transition strips were applied to the forward cylinder to produce a turbulent boundary layer upstream of the flow separation. For these flow conditions and L/D ratios, surface pressures on both the forward and rear cylinders show the effects of L/D on flow symmetry, base pressure, and the location of flow separation and attachment. Mean velocities and instantaneous vorticity obtained from the PIV data are used to examine the flow structure between and aft of the cylinders. Shedding frequencies and spectra obtained using hot-wire anemometry are presented. These results are compared with unsteady, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations for the same configuration in a companion paper by Khorrami, Choudhari, Jenkins, and McGinley (2005). The experimental dataset produced in this study provides information to better understand the mechanisms associated with component interaction noise, develop and validate time-accurate computer methods used to calculate the unsteady flow field, and assist in modeling of the radiated noise from landing gears.

  7. Micro-mechanical damage accumulation in airframe materials and structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiku, Sanjay

    A simple and flexible ACPD probe design methodology incorporating current focusing technique was developed for on-line as well as off-line measurements in laboratory and industrial scale test environments. The effectiveness of the current focusing technique and the resulting three-dimensional control of the current density distribution was demonstrated. The ACPD technique was successfully used to obtain strain calibration and crack calibration curves in 7075 Al alloys. This also included quantifying the effect of residual stresses on ACPD signal. The smallest crack depth detected was 140 mum at 120 kHz, 5 amp. and 3000 gain. A quadratic relation was found to correlate crack depth with potential change. The ACPD sensors were installed on a F-18 aircraft undergoing full scale test at Canadair. The sensors were able to measure the response of the structure to spectrum loading. A crack was detected by the ACPD sensors only after 3400 SFH and it was established that ACPD probes were able to detect the crack long before (˜2500 SFH) any other established techniques utilized by DND/Canadair was able to detect the crack. The technique was successfully used to characterize short crack growth behaviour of naturally initiated fatigue cracks in Al alloys from 40 mum crack depth onwards. The cracks were semi-elliptical in shape and crack growth along the notch root was faster than crack growth into the specimen. The effect of various grain orientations on short crack growth behaviour was studied. The crack tip interactions with grain boundaries were shown to control the SCG behaviour of Al alloys even at notch root peak stresses close to yield stress of the material. This effect was less prominent at notch root peak stresses considerably higher than yield stresses. The fatigue crack growth rates were correlated with the SIF (K) calculated using Newman's model for thumb nail cracks. This correlation resulted in a very large scatter in the data. The fatigue crack growth rate data

  8. Computational aeroelastic modelling of airframes and turbomachinery: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Bartels, R E; Sayma, A I

    2007-10-15

    Computational analyses such as computational fluid dynamics and computational structural dynamics have made major advances towards maturity as engineering tools. Computational aeroelasticity (CAE) is the integration of these disciplines. As CAE matures, it also finds an increasing role in the design and analysis of aerospace vehicles. This paper presents a survey of the current state of CAE with a discussion of recent research, success and continuing challenges in its progressive integration into multidisciplinary aerospace design. It approaches CAE from the perspective of the two main areas of application: airframe and turbomachinery design. An overview will be presented of the different prediction methods used for each field of application. Differing levels of nonlinear modelling will be discussed with insight into accuracy versus complexity and computational requirements. Subjects will include current advanced methods (linear and nonlinear), nonlinear flow models, use of order reduction techniques and future trends in incorporating structural nonlinearity. Examples in which CAE is currently being integrated into the design of airframes and turbomachinery will be presented.

  9. Synthesis of aircraft structures using integrated design and analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Goetz, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    A systematic research is reported to develop and validate methods for structural sizing of an airframe designed with the use of composite materials and active controls. This research program includes procedures for computing aeroelastic loads, static and dynamic aeroelasticity, analysis and synthesis of active controls, and optimization techniques. Development of the methods is concerned with the most effective ways of integrating and sequencing the procedures in order to generate structural sizing and the associated active control system, which is optimal with respect to a given merit function constrained by strength and aeroelasticity requirements.

  10. Unstructured CFD and Noise Prediction Methods for Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, S. Paul; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Campbell, Richard L.; Hunter, Craig A.; Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2006-01-01

    Using unstructured mesh CFD methods for Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics (PAA) analysis has the distinct advantage of precise and fast computational mesh generation for complex propulsion and airframe integration arrangements that include engine inlet, exhaust nozzles, pylon, wing, flaps, and flap deployment mechanical parts. However, accurate solution values of shear layer velocity, temperature and turbulence are extremely important for evaluating the usually small noise differentials of potential applications to commercial transport aircraft propulsion integration. This paper describes a set of calibration computations for an isolated separate flow bypass ratio five engine nozzle model and the same nozzle system with a pylon. These configurations have measured data along with prior CFD solutions and noise predictions using a proven structured mesh method, which can be used for comparison to the unstructured mesh solutions obtained in this investigation. This numerical investigation utilized the TetrUSS system that includes a Navier-Stokes solver, the associated unstructured mesh generation tools, post-processing utilities, plus some recently added enhancements to the system. New features necessary for this study include the addition of two equation turbulence models to the USM3D code, an h-refinement utility to enhance mesh density in the shear mixing region, and a flow adaptive mesh redistribution method. In addition, a computational procedure was developed to optimize both solution accuracy and mesh economy. Noise predictions were completed using an unstructured mesh version of the JeT3D code.

  11. HSCT Propulsion Airframe Integration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaney, Steve

    1999-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin spillage study was a substantial effort and is worthy of a separate paper. However, since a paper was not submitted a few of the most pertinent results have been pulled out and included in this paper. The reader is urged to obtain a copy of the complete Boeing Configuration Aerodynamics final 1995 contract report for the complete Lockheed documentation of the spillage work. The supersonic cruise studies presented here focus on the bifurcated - axisymmetric inlet drag delta. In the process of analyzing this delta several test/CFD data correlation problems arose that lead to a correction of the measured drag delta from 4.6 counts to 3.1 counts. This study also lead to much better understanding of the OVERFLOW gridding and solution process, and to increased accuracy of the force and moment data. Detailed observations of the CFD results lead to the conclusion that the 3.1 count difference between the two inlet types could be reduced to approximately 2 counts, with an absolute lower bound of 1.2 counts due to friction drag and the bifurcated lip bevel.

  12. Advanced method and processing technology for complicated shape airframe part forming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miodushevsky, P. V.; Rajevskaya, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    Slow deformation modes of forming give considerably higher residual fatigue life of the airframe part. It has experimentally proven that fatigue life of complicated shape integral airframe panels made of high strength aluminum alloys is significantly increased after creep deformation process. To implement the slow deformation mode forming methods, universal automated equipment was developed. Multichannel forming systems provide high accuracy of airframe part shape eliminating residual stresses and spring effect. Forming process multizone control technology was developed and experimentally proved that static/fatigue properties of formed airframe parts are increased.

  13. Fundamental Investigations of Airframe Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, M. G.

    2004-01-01

    An extensive numerical and experimental study of airframe noise mechanisms associated with a subsonic high-lift system has been performed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Investigations involving both steady and unsteady computations and experiments on a small-scale, part-span flap model are presented. Both surface (steady and unsteady pressure measurements, hot films, oil flows, pressure sensitive paint) and off surface (5 hole-probe, particle-imaged velocimetry, laser velocimetry, laser light sheet measurements) were taken in the LaRC Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) and several hard-wall tunnels up to flight Reynolds number. Successful microphone array measurements were also taken providing both acoustic source maps on the model, and quantitative spectra. Critical directivity measurements were obtained in the QFF. NASA Langley unstructured and structured Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes codes modeled the flap geometries excellent comparisons with surface and offsurface experimental data were obtained. Subsequently, these meanflow calculations were utilized in both linear stability and direct numerical simulations of the flap-edge flow field to calculate unsteady surface pressures and farfield acoustic spectra. Accurate calculations were critical in obtaining not only noise source characteristics, but shear layer correction data as well. Techniques utilized in these investigations as well as brief overviews of results will be given.

  14. Reliability-Based Design Optimization of a Composite Airframe Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Coroneos, Rula M.

    2009-01-01

    A stochastic design optimization methodology (SDO) has been developed to design components of an airframe structure that can be made of metallic and composite materials. The design is obtained as a function of the risk level, or reliability, p. The design method treats uncertainties in load, strength, and material properties as distribution functions, which are defined with mean values and standard deviations. A design constraint or a failure mode is specified as a function of reliability p. Solution to stochastic optimization yields the weight of a structure as a function of reliability p. Optimum weight versus reliability p traced out an inverted-S-shaped graph. The center of the inverted-S graph corresponded to 50 percent (p = 0.5) probability of success. A heavy design with weight approaching infinity could be produced for a near-zero rate of failure that corresponds to unity for reliability p (or p = 1). Weight can be reduced to a small value for the most failure-prone design with a reliability that approaches zero (p = 0). Reliability can be changed for different components of an airframe structure. For example, the landing gear can be designed for a very high reliability, whereas it can be reduced to a small extent for a raked wingtip. The SDO capability is obtained by combining three codes: (1) The MSC/Nastran code was the deterministic analysis tool, (2) The fast probabilistic integrator, or the FPI module of the NESSUS software, was the probabilistic calculator, and (3) NASA Glenn Research Center s optimization testbed CometBoards became the optimizer. The SDO capability requires a finite element structural model, a material model, a load model, and a design model. The stochastic optimization concept is illustrated considering an academic example and a real-life raked wingtip structure of the Boeing 767-400 extended range airliner made of metallic and composite materials.

  15. Optimal airframe synthesis for gust loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajela, P.

    1986-01-01

    An optimization capability for sizing airframe structures that are subjected to a combination of deterministic and random flight loads was established. The random vibration environment introduces the need for selecting a statistical process that best describes the random loads and permits computation of the dynamic response parameters of interest. Furthermore, it requires a formulation of design constraints that would minimize the conservativeness in the design and retain computational viability. The random loads are treated as a stationary, homogeneous process with a Gaussian probability distribution. The formulation of the analysis problem, the structure of the optimization programming system and a representative numerical example are discussed.

  16. Application of linear array imaging techniques to the real-time inspection of airframe structures and substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1995-01-01

    Development and application of linear array imaging technologies to address specific aging-aircraft inspection issues is described. Real-time video-taped images were obtained from an unmodified commercial linear-array medical scanner of specimens constructed to simulate typical types of flaws encountered in the inspection of aircraft structures. Results suggest that information regarding the characteristics, location, and interface properties of specific types of flaws in materials and structures may be obtained from the images acquired with a linear array. Furthermore, linear array imaging may offer the advantage of being able to compare 'good' regions with 'flawed' regions simultaneously, and in real time. Real-time imaging permits the inspector to obtain image information from various views and provides the opportunity for observing the effects of introducing specific interventions. Observation of an image in real-time can offer the operator the ability to 'interact' with the inspection process, thus providing new capabilities, and perhaps, new approaches to nondestructive inspections.

  17. Interaction of power plant with airframe of new generation aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, V.

    2013-03-01

    Strategic development of new generation airplanes goes in the direction of further noise decreasing and increasing fuel efficiency, where the determining role belongs to superhigh bypass ratio engines, especially with application gearbox scheme. Fan shaft components will determine the spectrum of power plant dynamic effect transferred via mounting assembly (engine attachments) on airframe structure. This spectrum is reradiated into the cabin in the form of structural noise. Long-term researches of engines (with different bypass ratio) and airframe have allowed (i) to calculate expected structural noise on the new generation aircraft; and (ii) to offer the concept of new vibration isolation mounting.

  18. Application of Linear Array Imaging Techniques to the Real-Time Inspection of Airframe Structures and Substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Current concern for ensuring, the air-worthiness of the aging commercial air fleet has prompted the establishment of broad-agency programs to develop NDT technologies that address specific aging-aircraft issues. One of the crucial technological needs that has been identified is the development of rapid, quantitative systems for depot-level inspection of bonded aluminum lap joints on aircraft. Research results for characterization of disbond and corrosion based on normal-incidence pulse-echo measurement geometries are showing promise, but are limited by the single-site nature of the measurement which requires manual or mechanical scanning to inspect an area. One approach to developing efficient systems may be to transfer specific aspects of current medical imaging technology to the NDT arena. Ultrasonic medical imaging, systems offer many desirable attributes for large scale inspection. They are portable, provide real-time imaging, and have integrated video tape recorder and printer capabilities available for documentation and post-inspection review. Furthermore, these systems are available at a relatively low cost (approximately $50,000 to $200,000) and can be optimized for use with metals with straight-forward modifications.

  19. Fuel efficiency through new airframe technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    In its Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program, NASA has expended approximately 200 million dollars toward development and application of advanced airframe technologies to United States's commercial transports. United States manufacturers have already been given a significant boost toward early application of advanced composite materials to control surface and empennage structures and toward selected applications of active controls and advanced aerodynamic concepts. In addition, significant progress in definition and development of innovative, but realistic systems for laminar flow control over the wings of future transports has already been made.

  20. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 147 - Airframe Curriculum Subjects

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... titanium. (1) 18. Solder stainless steel. (1) 19. Fabricate tubular structures. (2) 20. Solder, braze, gas... control systems. j. fire protection systems (1) 54. Inspect, check, and service smoke and carbon monoxide... of proficiency at which that item must be taught. I. Airframe Structures Teaching level a....

  1. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 147 - Airframe Curriculum Subjects

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... titanium. (1) 18. Solder stainless steel. (1) 19. Fabricate tubular structures. (2) 20. Solder, braze, gas... control systems. j. fire protection systems (1) 54. Inspect, check, and service smoke and carbon monoxide... of proficiency at which that item must be taught. I. Airframe Structures Teaching level a....

  2. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 147 - Airframe Curriculum Subjects

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... titanium. (1) 18. Solder stainless steel. (1) 19. Fabricate tubular structures. (2) 20. Solder, braze, gas... control systems. j. fire protection systems (1) 54. Inspect, check, and service smoke and carbon monoxide... of proficiency at which that item must be taught. I. Airframe Structures Teaching level a....

  3. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 147 - Airframe Curriculum Subjects

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... titanium. (1) 18. Solder stainless steel. (1) 19. Fabricate tubular structures. (2) 20. Solder, braze, gas... control systems. j. fire protection systems (1) 54. Inspect, check, and service smoke and carbon monoxide... of proficiency at which that item must be taught. I. Airframe Structures Teaching level a....

  4. Airframe Noise Prediction by Acoustic Analogy: Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Casper, Jay H.; Tinetti, A.; Dunn, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    The present work follows a recent survey of airframe noise prediction methodologies. In that survey, Lighthill s acoustic analogy was identified as the most prominent analytical basis for current approaches to airframe noise research. Within this approach, a problem is typically modeled with the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) equation, for which a geometry-independent solution is obtained by means of the use of the free-space Green function (FSGF). Nonetheless, the aeroacoustic literature would suggest some interest in the use of tailored or exact Green s function (EGF) for aerodynamic noise problems involving solid boundaries, in particular, for trailing edge (TE) noise. A study of possible applications of EGF for prediction of broadband noise from turbulent flow over an airfoil surface and the TE is, therefore, the primary topic of the present work. Typically, the applications of EGF in the literature have been limited to TE noise prediction at low Mach numbers assuming that the normal derivative of the pressure vanishes on the airfoil surface. To extend the application of EGF to higher Mach numbers, the uniqueness of the solution of the wave equation when either the Dirichlet or the Neumann boundary condition (BC) is specified on a deformable surface in motion. The solution of Lighthill s equation with either the Dirichlet or the Neumann BC is given for such a surface using EGFs. These solutions involve both surface and volume integrals just like the solution of FW-H equation using FSGF. Insight drawn from this analysis is evoked to discuss the potential application of EGF to broadband noise prediction. It appears that the use of a EGF offers distinct advantages for predicting TE noise of an airfoil when the normal pressure gradient vanishes on the airfoil surface. It is argued that such an approach may also apply to an airfoil in motion. However, for the prediction of broadband noise not directly associated with a trailing edge, the use of EGF does not

  5. Integrated support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruneau, Stephen D.; Campbell, John T.; Struven, Christopher A.

    1990-01-01

    This Major Qualifying Project is part of the Advanced Space Design Program at WPI. The goal is to design a support structure for a NASA GetAway Special experimental canister. The payload integration, weight, volume, and structural integrity of the canister as specified by NASA guidelines were studied. The end result is a complete set of design drawings with interface drawings and data to specify the design and leave a base on which the next group can concentrate.

  6. Simulations & Measurements of Airframe Noise: A BANC Workshops Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Lockard, David

    2016-01-01

    Airframe noise corresponds to the acoustic radiation due to turbulent flow in the vicinity of airframe components such as high-lift devices and landing gears. Since 2010, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has organized an ongoing series of workshops devoted to Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations (BANC). The BANC workshops are aimed at enabling a systematic progress in the understanding and high-fidelity predictions of airframe noise via collaborative investigations that integrate computational fluid dynamics, computational aeroacoustics, and in depth measurements targeting a selected set of canonical yet realistic configurations that advance the current state-of-the-art in multiple respects. Unique features of the BANC Workshops include: intrinsically multi-disciplinary focus involving both fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics, holistic rather than predictive emphasis, concurrent, long term evolution of experiments and simulations with a powerful interplay between the two, and strongly integrative nature by virtue of multi-team, multi-facility, multiple-entry measurements. This paper illustrates these features in the context of the BANC problem categories and outlines some of the challenges involved and how they were addressed. A brief summary of the BANC effort, including its technical objectives, strategy, and selective outcomes thus far is also included.

  7. Crashworthy airframe design concepts: Fabrication and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.; Berry, V. L.

    1982-01-01

    Crashworthy floor concepts applicable to general aviation aircraft metal airframe structures were investigated. Initially several energy absorbing lower fuselage structure concepts were evaluated. Full scale floor sections representative of a twin engine, general aviation airplane lower fuselage structure were designed and fabricated. The floors featured an upper high strength platform with an energy absorbing, crushable structure underneath. Eighteen floors were fabricated that incorporated five different crushable subfloor concepts. The floors were then evaluated through static and dynamic testing. Computer programs NASTRAN and KRASH were used for the static and dynamic analysis of the floor section designs. Two twin engine airplane fuselages were modified to incorporate the most promising crashworthy floor sections for test evaluation.

  8. Airframe technology for aircraft energy efficiency. [economic factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, R. L., Jr.; Maddalon, D. V.

    1984-01-01

    The economic factors that resulted in the implementation of the aircraft energy efficiency program (ACEE) are reviewed and airframe technology elements including content, progress, applications, and future direction are discussed. The program includes the development of laminar flow systems, advanced aerodynamics, active controls, and composite structures.

  9. Crashworthiness of Airframes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    INTRODUCTION During the 1970s, the application of computer technology to analyze large nonlinear behavior of rotary and fixed-wing aircraft structure improved...is to bring together the leading personalities of the NATO nations in the fields of science and technology relating to aerospace for the following...Imperial College of Science and Technology , London, U.K. (Originally presented at the 61st Meeting of the Structures and Materials Panel, September

  10. Integrated structural health monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    Structural health monitoring is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. The goal of the research effort reported herein is to develop a robust and cost-effective structural health monitoring solution by integrating and extending technologies from various engineering and information technology disciplines. It is the authors opinion that all structural health monitoring systems must be application specific. Therefore, a specific application, monitoring welded moment resisting steel frame connections in structures subjected to seismic excitation, is described along with the motivation for choosing this application. The structural health monitoring solution for this application will integrate structural dynamics, wireless data acquisition, local actuation, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and statistical pattern recognition algorithms. The proposed system is based on an assessment of the deficiencies associated with many current structural health monitoring technologies including past efforts by the authors. This paper provides an example of the integrated approach to structural health monitoring being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory and summarizes progress to date on various aspects of the technology development.

  11. Integrated structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Charles R.; Sohn, Hoon; Fugate, Michael L.; Czarnecki, Jerry J.

    2001-07-01

    Structural health monitoring is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. The goal of the research effort reported herein is to develop a robust and cost-effective structural health monitoring solution by integrating and extending technologies from various engineering and information technology disciplines. It is the author's opinion that all structural health monitoring systems must be application specific. Therefore, a specific application, monitoring welded moment resisting steel frame connections in structures subjected to seismic excitation, is described along with the motivation for choosing this application. The structural health monitoring solution for this application will integrate structural dynamics, wireless data acquisition, local actuation, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology, and statistical pattern recognition algorithms. The proposed system is based on an assessment of the deficiencies associated with many current structural health monitoring technologies including past efforts by the authors. This paper provides an example of the integrated approach to structural health monitoring being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory and summarizes progress to date on various aspects of the technology development.

  12. Structural model integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallerstein, D. V.; Lahey, R. S.; Haggenmacher, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Many of the practical aspects and problems of ensuring the integrity of a structural model are discussed, as well as the steps which have been taken in the NASTRAN system to assure that these checks can be routinely performed. Model integrity as used applies not only to the structural model but also to the loads applied to the model. Emphasis is also placed on the fact that when dealing with substructure analysis, all of the checking procedures discussed should be applied at the lowest level of substructure prior to any coupling.

  13. Airframe noise: A design and operating problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A critical assessment of the state of the art in airframe noise is presented. Full-scale data on the intensity, spectra, and directivity of this noise source are evaluated in light of the comprehensive theory developed by Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings. Vibration of panels on the aircraft is identified as a possible additional source of airframe noise. The present understanding and methods for prediction of other component sources - airfoils, struts, and cavities - are discussed. Operating problems associated with airframe noise as well as potential design methods for airframe noise reduction are identified.

  14. Proceedings of the Airframe Icing Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colantonio, Ron O. (Editor)

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has a long history of working with its partners towards the understanding of ice accretion formation and its associated degradation of aerodynamic performance. The June 9, 2009, Airframe Icing Workshop held at GRC provided an opportunity to examine the current NASA airframe icing research program and to dialogue on remaining and emerging airframe icing issues and research with the external community. Some of the airframe icing gaps identified included, but are not limited to, ice accretion simulation enhancements, three-dimensional benchmark icing database development, three-dimensional iced aerodynamics modeling, and technology development for a smart icing system.

  15. Computational Aeroelastic Modeling of Airframes and TurboMachinery: Progress and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, R. E.; Sayma, A. I.

    2006-01-01

    Computational analyses such as computational fluid dynamics and computational structural dynamics have made major advances toward maturity as engineering tools. Computational aeroelasticity is the integration of these disciplines. As computational aeroelasticity matures it too finds an increasing role in the design and analysis of aerospace vehicles. This paper presents a survey of the current state of computational aeroelasticity with a discussion of recent research, success and continuing challenges in its progressive integration into multidisciplinary aerospace design. This paper approaches computational aeroelasticity from the perspective of the two main areas of application: airframe and turbomachinery design. An overview will be presented of the different prediction methods used for each field of application. Differing levels of nonlinear modeling will be discussed with insight into accuracy versus complexity and computational requirements. Subjects will include current advanced methods (linear and nonlinear), nonlinear flow models, use of order reduction techniques and future trends in incorporating structural nonlinearity. Examples in which computational aeroelasticity is currently being integrated into the design of airframes and turbomachinery will be presented.

  16. The Airframe Noise Reduction Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhard, David P.; Lilley, Geoffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA goal of reducing external aircraft noise by 10 dB in the near-term presents the acoustics community with an enormous challenge. This report identifies technologies with the greatest potential to reduce airframe noise. Acoustic and aerodynamic effects will be discussed, along with the likelihood of industry accepting and implementing the different technologies. We investigate the lower bound, defined as noise generated by an aircraft modified with a virtual retrofit capable of eliminating all noise associated with the high lift system and landing gear. However, the airframe noise of an aircraft in this 'clean' configuration would only be about 8 dB quieter on approach than current civil transports. To achieve the NASA goal of 10 dB noise reduction will require that additional noise sources be addressed. Research shows that energy in the turbulent boundary layer of a wing is scattered as it crosses trailing edge. Noise generated by scattering is the dominant noise mechanism on an aircraft flying in the clean configuration. Eliminating scattering would require changes to much of the aircraft, and practical reduction devices have yet to receive serious attention. Evidence suggests that to meet NASA goals in civil aviation noise reduction, we need to employ emerging technologies and improve landing procedures; modified landing patterns and zoning restrictions could help alleviate aircraft noise in communities close to airports.

  17. Airframe Noise Studies: Review and Future Direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rackl, Robert G.; Miller, Gregory; Guo, Yueping; Yamamoto, Kingo

    2005-01-01

    This report contains the following information: 1) a review of airframe noise research performed under NASA's Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) program up to the year 2000, 2) a comparison of the year 1992 airframe noise predictions with those using a year 2000 baseline, 3) an assessment of various airframe noise reduction concepts as applied to the year 2000 baseline predictions, and 4) prioritized recommendations for future airframe noise reduction work. NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program was the software used for all noise predictions and assessments. For future work, the recommendations for the immediate future focus on the development of design tools sensitive to airframe noise treatment effects and on improving the basic understanding of noise generation by the landing gear as well as on its reduction.

  18. Landing approach airframe noise measurements and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Mackall, K. G.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Putnam, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    Flyover measurements of the airframe noise produced by the AeroCommander, JetStar, CV-990, and B-747 airplanes are presented for various landing approach configurations. Empirical and semiempirical techniques are presented to correlate the measured airframe noise with airplane design and aerodynamic parameters. Airframe noise for the jet-powered airplanes in the clean configuration (flaps and gear retracted) was found to be adequately represented by a function of airplane weight and the fifth power of airspeed. Results show the airframe noise for all four aircraft in the landing configuration (flaps extended and gear down) also varied with the fifth power of airspeed, but this noise level could not be represented by the addition of a constant to the equation for clean-configuration airframe noise.

  19. Correlation of AH-1G airframe test data with a NASTRAN mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.; Berry, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    Test data was provided for evaluating a mathematical vibration model of the Bell AH-1G helicopter airframe. The math model was developed and analyzed using the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program. Data from static and dynamic tests were used for comparison with the math model. Static tests of the fuselage and tailboom were conducted to verify the stiffness representation of the NASTRAN model. Dynamic test data were obtained from shake tests of the airframe and were used to evaluate the NASTRAN model for representing the low frequency (below 30 Hz) vibration response of the airframe.

  20. Airframe Noise Reduction Studies and Clean-Airframe Noise Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.; Bailey, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic wind tunnel tests were conducted of a wing model with modified leading edge slat and trailing edge flap. The modifications were intended to reduce the surface pressure response to convected turbulence and thereby reduce the airframe noise without changing the lift at constant incidence. Tests were conducted at 70.7 and 100 m/sec airspeeds, with Reynolds numbers 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power and 2.1 x 10 to the 6th power. Considerable reduction of noise radiation from the side edges of a 40 deflection single slotted flap was achieved by modification to the side edge regions or the leading edge region of the flap panel. Total far field noise was reduced 2 to 3 dB over several octaves of frequency. When these panels were installed as the aft panel of a 40 deg deflection double slotted flap, 2 dB noise reduction was achieved.

  1. Computational Analysis of a Chevron Nozzle Uniquely Tailored for Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Steven J.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Hunter, Craig A.; Thomas, Russell H.; Pao, S. Paul; Mengle, Vinod G.

    2006-01-01

    A computational flow field and predicted jet noise source analysis is presented for asymmetrical fan chevrons on a modern separate flow nozzle at take off conditions. The propulsion airframe aeroacoustic asymmetric fan nozzle is designed with an azimuthally varying chevron pattern with longer chevrons close to the pylon. A baseline round nozzle without chevrons and a reference nozzle with azimuthally uniform chevrons are also studied. The intent of the asymmetric fan chevron nozzle was to improve the noise reduction potential by creating a favorable propulsion airframe aeroacoustic interaction effect between the pylon and chevron nozzle. This favorable interaction and improved noise reduction was observed in model scale tests and flight test data and has been reported in other studies. The goal of this study was to identify the fundamental flow and noise source mechanisms. The flow simulation uses the asymptotically steady, compressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations on a structured grid. Flow computations are performed using the parallel, multi-block, structured grid code PAB3D. Local noise sources were mapped and integrated computationally using the Jet3D code based upon the Lighthill Acoustic Analogy with anisotropic Reynolds stress modeling. In this study, trends of noise reduction were correctly predicted. Jet3D was also utilized to produce noise source maps that were then correlated to local flow features. The flow studies show that asymmetry of the longer fan chevrons near the pylon work to reduce the strength of the secondary flow induced by the pylon itself, such that the asymmetric merging of the fan and core shear layers is significantly delayed. The effect is to reduce the peak turbulence kinetic energy and shift it downstream, reducing overall noise production. This combined flow and noise prediction approach has yielded considerable understanding of the physics of a fan chevron nozzle designed to include propulsion airframe aeroacoustic

  2. Current DOT research on the effect of multiple site damage on structural integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, P.; Arin, Kemal; Jeong, David Y.; Greif, R.; Brewer, John C.; Bobo, Stephan N.; Sampath, Sam N.

    1992-07-01

    Multiple site damage (MSD) is a type of cracking that may be found in aging airplanes and which may adversely affect their continuing airworthiness. The Volpe National Transportation Systems Center has supported the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center on structural integrity research for the past two and half years. The work has focused on understanding the behavior of MSD, detection of MSD during airframe inspection, and the avoidance of MSD in future designs. These three elements of the MSD problem are addressed and a summary of the completed work, the current status, and requirements for future research is provided.

  3. Fluidic actuators for active flow control on airframe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueller, M.; Weigel, P.; Lipowski, M.; Meyer, M.; Schlösser, P.; Bauer, M.

    2016-04-01

    One objective of the European Projects AFLoNext and Clean Sky 2 is to apply Active Flow Control (AFC) on the airframe in critical aerodynamic areas such as the engine/wing junction or the outer wing region for being able to locally improve the aerodynamics in certain flight conditions. At the engine/wing junction, AFC is applied to alleviate or even eliminate flow separation at low speeds and high angle of attacks likely to be associated with the integration of underwing- mounted Ultra High Bypass Ratio (UHBR) engines and the necessary slat-cut-outs. At the outer wing region, AFC can be used to allow more aggressive future wing designs with improved performance. A relevant part of the work on AFC concepts for airframe application is the development of suitable actuators. Fluidic Actuated Flow Control (FAFC) has been introduced as a Flow Control Technology that influences the boundary layer by actively blowing air through slots or holes out of the aircraft skin. FAFC actuators can be classified by their Net Mass Flux and accordingly divided into ZNMF (Zero Net Mass Flux) and NZNMF (Non Zero Net-Mass-Flux) actuators. In the frame of both projects, both types of the FAFC actuator concepts are addressed. In this paper, the objectives of AFC on the airframe is presented and the actuators that are used within the project are discussed.

  4. Should we attempt global (inlet engine airframe) control design?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of multivariable design of the entire airplane control system is briefly addressed. An intermediate step in that direction is to design a control for an inlet engine augmentor system by using multivariable techniques. The supersonic cruise large scale inlet research program is described which will provide an opportunity to develop, integrate, and wind tunnel test a control for a mixed compression inlet and variable cycle engine. The integrated propulsion airframe control program is also discussed which will introduce the problem of implementing MVC within a distributed processing avionics architecture, requiring real time decomposition of the global design into independent modules in response to hardware communication failures.

  5. Investigation of Volumetric Sources in Airframe Noise Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Jay H.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Streett, Craig L.

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid methods for the prediction of airframe noise involve a simulation of the near field flow that is used as input to an acoustic propagation formula. The acoustic formulations discussed herein are those based on the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. Some questions have arisen in the published literature in regard to an apparently significant dependence of radiated noise predictions on the location of the integration surface used in the solution of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. These differences in radiated noise levels are most pronounced between solid-body surface integrals and off-body, permeable surface integrals. Such differences suggest that either a non-negligible volumetric source is contributing to the total radiation or the input flow simulation is suspect. The focus of the current work is the issue of internal consistency of the flow calculations that are currently used as input to airframe noise predictions. The case study for this research is a computer simulation for a three-element, high-lift wing profile during landing conditions. The noise radiated from this flow is predicted by a two-dimensional, frequency-domain formulation of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation. Radiated sound from volumetric sources is assessed by comparison of a permeable surface integration with the sum of a solid-body surface integral and a volume integral. The separate noise predictions are found in good agreement.

  6. Integrated control-structure design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunziker, K. Scott; Kraft, Raymond H.; Bossi, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach for the design and control of flexible space structures is described. The approach integrates the structure and controller design processes thereby providing extra opportunities for avoiding some of the disastrous effects of control-structures interaction and for discovering new, unexpected avenues of future structural design. A control formulation based on Boyd's implementation of Youla parameterization is employed. Control design parameters are coupled with structural design variables to produce a set of integrated-design variables which are selected through optimization-based methodology. A performance index reflecting spacecraft mission goals and constraints is formulated and optimized with respect to the integrated design variables. Initial studies have been concerned with achieving mission requirements with a lighter, more flexible space structure. Details of the formulation of the integrated-design approach are presented and results are given from a study involving the integrated redesign of a flexible geostationary platform.

  7. Engine-Airframe Integration for Rotorcraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    maximum efficien- cy in terms of the range of inlet to free stream velocity ratio (Vi/Vo) as 0.0 Vi/Vo 6 0.65, within which local velocity gradients...ft r = radius, ft Subscripts a = air i = inner surface 1-9 o = outer surface c = cowl e = engine - = outside or free stream air 1 = inlet stations 2...these limift of L/D , the designer has the option of nozzling the primary exit area to induce a higher pAmary stream momentum, or adding a diffuser

  8. 14 CFR 65.85 - Airframe rating; additional privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.85 Airframe rating; additional privileges. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a certificated mechanic with...) A certificated mechanic with an airframe rating can approve and return to service an airframe,...

  9. 14 CFR 65.85 - Airframe rating; additional privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.85 Airframe rating; additional privileges. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a certificated mechanic with...) A certificated mechanic with an airframe rating can approve and return to service an airframe,...

  10. 14 CFR 65.85 - Airframe rating; additional privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.85 Airframe rating; additional privileges. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a certificated mechanic with...) A certificated mechanic with an airframe rating can approve and return to service an airframe,...

  11. 14 CFR 65.85 - Airframe rating; additional privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.85 Airframe rating; additional privileges. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a certificated mechanic with...) A certificated mechanic with an airframe rating can approve and return to service an airframe,...

  12. 14 CFR 65.85 - Airframe rating; additional privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.85 Airframe rating; additional privileges. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a certificated mechanic with...) A certificated mechanic with an airframe rating can approve and return to service an airframe,...

  13. Integrated Control Using the SOFFT Control Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim

    1996-01-01

    The need for integrated/constrained control systems has become clearer as advanced aircraft introduced new coupled subsystems such as new propulsion subsystems with thrust vectoring and new aerodynamic designs. In this study, we develop an integrated control design methodology which accomodates constraints among subsystem variables while using the Stochastic Optimal Feedforward/Feedback Control Technique (SOFFT) thus maintaining all the advantages of the SOFFT approach. The Integrated SOFFT Control methodology uses a centralized feedforward control and a constrained feedback control law. The control thus takes advantage of the known coupling among the subsystems while maintaining the identity of subsystems for validation purposes and the simplicity of the feedback law to understand the system response in complicated nonlinear scenarios. The Variable-Gain Output Feedback Control methodology (including constant gain output feedback) is extended to accommodate equality constraints. A gain computation algorithm is developed. The designer can set the cross-gains between two variables or subsystems to zero or another value and optimize the remaining gains subject to the constraint. An integrated control law is designed for a modified F-15 SMTD aircraft model with coupled airframe and propulsion subsystems using the Integrated SOFFT Control methodology to produce a set of desired flying qualities.

  14. Control Design Strategies to Enhance Long-Term Aircraft Structural Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett A.

    1999-01-01

    Over the operational lifetime of both military and civil aircraft, structural components are exposed to hundreds of thousands of low-stress repetitive load cycles and less frequent but higher-stress transient loads originating from maneuvering flight and atmospheric gusts. Micro-material imperfections in the structure, such as cracks and debonded laminates, expand and grow in this environment, reducing the structural integrity and shortening the life of the airframe. Extreme costs associated with refurbishment of critical load-bearing structural components in a large fleet, or altogether reinventoring the fleet with newer models, indicate alternative solutions for life extension of the airframe structure are highly desirable. Increased levels of operational safety and reliability are also important factors influencing the desirability of such solutions. One area having significant potential for impacting crack growth/fatigue damage reduction and structural life extension is flight control. To modify the airframe response dynamics arising from command inputs and gust disturbances, feedback loops are routinely applied to vehicles. A dexterous flight control system architecture senses key vehicle motions and generates critical forces/moments at multiple points distributed throughout the airframe to elicit the desired motion characteristics. In principle, these same control loops can be utilized to influence the level of exposure to harmful loads during flight on structural components. Project objectives are to investigate and/or assess the leverage control has on reducing fatigue damage and enhancing long-term structural integrity, without degrading attitude control and trajectory guidance performance levels. In particular, efforts have focused on the effects inner loop control parameters and architectures have on fatigue damage rate. To complete this research, an actively controlled flexible aircraft model and a new state space modeling procedure for crack growth

  15. Reliability-Based Design Optimization of a Composite Airframe Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Coroneos, Rula; Patnaik, Surya N.

    2011-01-01

    A stochastic optimization methodology (SDO) has been developed to design airframe structural components made of metallic and composite materials. The design method accommodates uncertainties in load, strength, and material properties that are defined by distribution functions with mean values and standard deviations. A response parameter, like a failure mode, has become a function of reliability. The primitive variables like thermomechanical loads, material properties, and failure theories, as well as variables like depth of beam or thickness of a membrane, are considered random parameters with specified distribution functions defined by mean values and standard deviations.

  16. Reliability and structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    An analytic model is developed to calculate the reliability of a structure after it is inspected for cracks. The model accounts for the growth of undiscovered cracks between inspections and their effect upon the reliability after subsequent inspections. The model is based upon a differential form of Bayes' Theorem for reliability, and upon fracture mechanics for crack growth.

  17. Calculation of rotor impedance for use in design analysis of helicopter airframe vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nygren, Kip P.

    1990-01-01

    Excessive vibration is one of the most prevalent technical obstacles encountered in the development of new rotorcraft. The inability to predict these vibrations is primarily due to deficiencies in analysis and simulation tools. The Langley Rotorcraft Structural Dynamics Program was instituted in 1984 to meet long term industry needs in the area of rotorcraft vibration prediction. As a part of the Langley program, this research endeavors to develop an efficient means of coupling the rotor to the airframe for preliminary design analysis of helicopter airframe vibrations. The main effort was to modify the existing computer program for modeling the dynamic and aerodynamic behavior of rotorcraft called DYSCO (DYnamic System COupler) to calculate the rotor impedance. DYSCO was recently developed for the U.S. Army and has proven to be adaptable for the inclusion of new solution methods. The solution procedure developed to use DYSCO for the calculation of rotor impedance is presented. Verification of the procedure by comparison with a known solution for a simple wind turbine model is about 75 percent completed, and initial results are encouraging. After the wind turbine impedance is confirmed, the verification effort will continue by comparison to solutions of a more sophisticated rotorcraft model. Future work includes determination of the sensitivity of the rotorcraft airframe vibrations to helicopter flight conditions and rotor modeling assumptions. When completed, this research will ascertain the feasibility and efficiency of the impedance matching method of rotor-airframe coupling for use in the analysis of airframe vibrations during the preliminary rotorcraft design process.

  18. Environmental effects on composite airframes: A study conducted for the ARM UAV Program (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle)

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    Composite materials are affected by environments differently than conventional airframe structural materials are. This study identifies the environmental conditions which the composite-airframe ARM UAV may encounter, and discusses the potential degradation processes composite materials may undergo when subjected to those environments. This information is intended to be useful in a follow-on program to develop equipment and procedures to prevent, detect, or otherwise mitigate significant degradation with the ultimate goal of preventing catastrophic aircraft failure.

  19. Structurally integrated steel solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Moore, S.W.

    1975-06-03

    Herein is disclosed a flate plate solar heat collector unit. The solar collector is integrated as a structural unit so that the collector also functions as the building roof. The functions of efficient heat collection, liquid coolant flow passages, roof structural support, and building insulation are combined into one unit.

  20. Structurally integrated steel solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Stanley W.

    1977-03-08

    Herein is disclosed a flat plate solar heat collector unit. The solar collector is integrated as a structural unit so that the collector also functions as the building roof. The functions of efficient heat collection, liquid coolant flow passages, roof structural support and building insulation are combined into one unit.

  1. Weapon System Costing Methodology for Aircraft Airframes and Basic Structures Volume II - Estimating Handbook and User’s Manual, Part 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    asic structure. b. Material costs for secondary structure. c. Basic structure assembly material costs. c. ("om]X)nent assembly material costs. The...LAGS till GFrtf-’ ^Y^M HOURS ? " ASIC STOUCTURt TnoLIMG u t, 6 7 8 HAS 1 £ 3 (♦ F 7 «i R.I T TP? MTL • 7r. O.𔃻...UJ O O O l ( o tJ o «■ J O CJ ’t.- (Ji I J O O C) O cni en tjoD«JtTCJ o C3c_itr»f)t3t3t3tj c czt j in U"- Uŕ i.^ iD

  2. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Shear Formed Aluminum Alloys for Airframe and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troeger, L. P.; Domack, M. S.; Wagner, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced manufacturing processes such as near-net-shape forming can reduce production costs and increase the reliability of launch vehicle and airframe structural components through the reduction of material scrap and part count and the minimization of joints. The current research is an investigation of the processing-microstructure-property relationship for shear formed cylinders of the Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Ag alloy 2195 for space applications and the Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy C415 for airframe applications. Cylinders which have undergone various amounts of shear-forming strain have been studied to assess the microstructure and mechanical properties developed during and after shear forming.

  3. AHS National Technical Specialists' Meeting on Rotorcraft Structures, Williamsburg, VA, Oct. 29-31, 1991, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses structural reliability of fail-safe helicopter components, rotating load usage monitoring from fixed system information, the delamination behavior of graphite-epoxy laminates in tension and torsion, a two-point exponential approximation method for airframe optimization, a design and analysis methodology for composite bonded joints, low-vibration airframes, a damage tolerance processor for structural integrity management, and the effects of composite materials on the wing design of the V-22. Also discussed are advanced kevlar sandwich structures for application to rotorcraft airframes, the evolution of permanent composite repair designs, novel approaches to complex-geometry composite structures, and NASA-Langley techniques for helicopter airframe vibration reduction.

  4. Corrosion and corrosion fatigue of airframe aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. S.; Gao, M.; Harlow, D. G.; Wei, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    Localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth are recognized as degradation mechanisms that effect the durability and integrity of commercial transport aircraft. Mechanically based understanding is needed to aid the development of effective methodologies for assessing durability and integrity of airframe components. As a part of the methodology development, experiments on pitting corrosion, and on corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and early growth from these pits were conducted. Pitting was found to be associated with constituent particles in the alloys and pit growth often involved coalescence of individual particle-nucleated pits, both laterally and in depth. Fatigue cracks typically nucleated from one of the larger pits that formed by a cluster of particles. The size of pit at which fatigue crack nucleates is a function of stress level and fatigue loading frequency. The experimental results are summarized, and their implications on service performance and life prediction are discussed.

  5. Design of a convective cooling system for a Mach 6 hypersonic transport airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helenbrook, R. G.; Anthony, F. M.

    1971-01-01

    Results of analytical and design studies are presented for a water-glycol convective cooling system for the airframe structure of a hypersonic transport. System configurations and weights are compared. The influences of system pressure drop and flow control schedules on system weight are defined.

  6. Improved Durability Aluminium Alloys for Airframe Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    propagation. ,° " Sensitivity to IGC itself is a purely electrochemical C phenomenon (see e.g.1 ,2) determined by the existence of a " , microgalvanic...which is discussed later. S , Beside this main aspect of fatigue, it is necessary to assess the fatigue resistance of the bulk material1 1. Improved...Warner (1994) International patent Kc(MPa4m)* application WO 96/12829. T-L 100 / 150 90 / 130 8 Warner, T J ; Shahani, R A ; Lassince, P ; Raynaud , G M

  7. Nanocomposites for Enhanced Structural Integrity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-11

    to develop the science base necessary for full utilization of nanoreinforcements into polymers and fiber composites to improve mechanical , thermal and...prepreg plies were also studied to a limited extent. The properly oxidated GNPs were found to improve not only mechanical properties but also thermal...102 Nanocomposites for Enhanced Structural Integrity AFOSR bn0)2-1-0414 H. Thomas Hahn Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department University of

  8. Overview of the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) Full Scale Crash Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin; Littell, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) full-scale tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility in 2013 and 2014. Two CH-46E airframes were impacted at 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocities onto soft soil, which represents a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. TRACT 1 provided a baseline set of responses, while TRACT 2 included retrofits with composite subfloors and other crash system improvements based on TRACT 1. For TRACT 2, a total of 18 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATD) responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and activation of emergency locator transmitters and crash sensors. Combinations of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 ATDs were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. The structural response of the airframe was assessed based on accelerometers located throughout the airframe and using three-dimensional photogrammetric techniques. Analysis of the photogrammetric data indicated regions of maximum deflection and permanent deformation. The response of TRACT 2 was noticeably different in the horizontal direction due to changes in the cabin configuration and soil surface, with higher acceleration and damage occurring in the cabin. Loads from ATDs in energy absorbing seats and restraints were within injury limits. Severe injury was likely for ATDs in forward facing passenger seats.

  9. Evaluation of the Second Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 2) Full Scale Crash Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin; Littell, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Two Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) full-scale tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility in 2013 and 2014. Two CH-46E airframes were impacted at 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocities onto soft soil, which represents a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. TRACT 1 provided a baseline set of responses, while TRACT 2 included retrofits with composite subfloors and other crash system improvements based on TRACT 1. For TRACT 2, a total of 18 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate ATD responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and activation of emergency locator transmitters and crash sensors. Combinations of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. The structural response of the airframe was assessed based on accelerometers located throughout the airframe and using three-dimensional photogrammetric techniques. Analysis of the photogrammetric data indicated regions of maximum deflection and permanent deformation. The response of TRACT 2 was noticeably different in the longitudinal direction due to changes in the cabin configuration and soil surface, with higher acceleration and damage occurring in the cabin. Loads from ATDs in energy absorbing seats and restraints were within injury limits. Severe injury was likely for ATDs in forward facing passenger seats.

  10. Simulating the Impact Response of Composite Airframe Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, NASA Langley Research Center obtained residual hardware from the US Army's Survivable Affordable Repairable Airframe Program (SARAP). The hardware consisted of a composite fuselage section that was representative of the center section of a Black Hawk helicopter. The section was fabricated by Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and designated the Test Validation Article (TVA). The TVA was subjected to a vertical drop test in 2008 to evaluate a tilting roof concept to limit the intrusion of overhead mass items, such as the rotor transmission, into the fuselage cabin. As a result of the 2008 test, damage to the hardware was limited primarily to the roof. Consequently, when the post-test article was obtained in 2010, the roof area was removed and the remaining structure was cut into six different types of test specimens including: (1) tension and compression coupons for material property characterization, (2) I-beam sections, (3) T-sections, (4) cruciform sections, (5) a large subfloor section, and (6) a forward framed fuselage section. In 2011, NASA and Sikorsky entered into a cooperative research agreement to study the impact responses of composite airframe structures and to evaluate the capabilities of the explicit transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA®, to simulate these responses including damage initiation and progressive failure. Finite element models of the composite specimens were developed and impact simulations were performed. The properties of the composite material were represented using both a progressive in-plane damage model (Mat 54) and a continuum damage mechanics model (Mat 58) in LS-DYNA. This paper provides test-analysis comparisons of time history responses and the location and type of damage for representative I-beam, T-section, and cruciform section components.

  11. Assuring structural integrity in Army systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The object of this study was to recommend possible improvements in the manner in which structural integrity of Army systems is assured. The elements of a structural integrity program are described, and relevant practices used in various industries and government organizations are reviewed. Some case histories of Army weapon systems are examined. The mandatory imposition of a structural integrity program patterned after the Air Force Aircraft Structural Integrity Program is recommended and the benefits of such an action are identified.

  12. An advanced arc track resistant airframe wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tensolite, a custom cable manufacturer specializing in high temperature materials as the dielectric medium, develops an advance arc track resistant airframe wire called Tufflite 2000. Tufflite 2000 has the following advantages over the other traditional wires: lighter weight and smaller in diameter; excellent wet and dry arc track resistance; superior dynamic cut-through performance even at elevated temperatures; flight proven performance on Boeing 737 and 757 airplanes; and true 260 C performance by utilizing Nickel plated copper conductors. This paper reports the different tests performed on Tufflite 2000: accelerated aging, arc resistance (wet and dry), dynamic cut through, humidity resistance, wire-to-wire abrasion, flammability, smoke, weight, notch sensitivity, flexibility, and markability. It particularly focuses on the BSI (British Standards Institute) dry arc resistance test and BSI wet arc tracking.

  13. Aerodynamics of a rolling airframe missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisserand, L. E.

    1981-05-01

    For guidance-related reasons, there is considerable interest in rolling missiles having single-plane steering capability. To aid the aerodynamic design of these airframes, a unique investigation into the aerodynamics of a rolling, steering missile has been carried out. It represents the first known attempt to measure in a wind tunnel the aerodynamic forces and moments that act on a spinning body-canard-tail configuration that exercises canard steering in phase with body roll position. Measurements were made with the model spinning at steady-state roll rates ranging from 15 to 40 Hz over an angle-of-attack range up to about 16 deg. This short, exploratory investigation has demonstrated that a better understanding and a more complete definition of the aerodynamics of rolling, steering vehicles can be developed by way of simulative wind-tunnel testing.

  14. Robotic dry stripping of airframes - Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Robert A.; Wittenberg, Art M.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes a program for the development of a dust-free closed-cycle robotic system for dry stripping of airframes, designed to insure dust-free work environment and reduce plastic-media loss, the contamination risk, and the media inventory requirement. Phase I of the program involved building a prototype of the proposed robotic arm and its dust enclosure to prove basic automation concepts, showing reasonable paint removal rate from a curved surface, and establishing that the process is dust-free and recovers plastic media in a closed-cycle fashion. This paper contains calculations on the effect of different blasting parameters in order to determine optimum values required for the completion of Phase I. Also presented is the progress achieved by the Phase II of the program, which is to prove the total concept by building the complete system and demonstrating its capability.

  15. On the Problems of Cracking and the Question of Structural Integrity of Engineering Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Peter W. R.

    2014-02-01

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a "fracture safe design" is immense. For example, when human life depends upon structural integrity as an essential design requirement, it takes ten thousand material test coupons per composite laminate configuration to evaluate an airframe plus loading to ultimate failure tails, wing boxes, and fuselages to achieve a commercial aircraft airworthiness certification. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of aerospace composites include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep, and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy, and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined. Furthermore, SI takes into account service duty. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk.

  16. Application of Circulation Control Technology to Airframe Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Sankar, L. N.; Englar, R. J.; Munro, Scott E.; Li, Yi; Gaeta, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    This report is a summary of the work performed by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) under NASA Langley Grant NAG-1-2146, which was awarded as a part of NASA's Breakthrough Innovative Technologies (BIT) initiative. This was a three-year program, with a one-year no-cost extension. Each year's study has been an integrated effort consisting of computational fluid dynamics, experimental aerodynamics, and detailed noise and flow measurements. Year I effort examined the feasibility of reducing airframe noise by replacing the conventional wing systems with a Circulation Control Wing (CCW), where steady blowing was used through the trailing edge of the wing over a Coanda surface. It was shown that the wing lift increases with CCW blowing and indeed for the same lift, a CCW wing was shown to produce less noise. Year 2 effort dealt with a similar study on the role of pulsed blowing on airframe noise. The main objective of this portion of the study was to assess whether pulse blowing from the trailing edge of a CCW resulted in more, less, or the same amount of radiated noise to the farfield. Results show that a reduction in farfield noise of up to 5 dB is measured when pulse flow is compared with steady flow for an equivalent lift configuration. This reduction is in the spectral region associated with the trailing edge jet noise. This result is due to the unique advantage that pulsed flow has over steady flow. For a range of frequencies, more lift is experienced with the same mass flow as the steady case. Thus, for an equivalent lift and slot height, the pulsed system can operate at lower jet velocities, and hence lower jet noise. The computational analysis showed that for a given time-averaged mass flow rate, pulsed jets give a higher value of C(sub l) and a higher L/D than equivalent steady jets. This benefit is attributable to higher instantaneous jet velocities, and higher instantaneous C(sub mu) values for the pulsed jet. Pulsed jet benefits increase at higher

  17. Ground shake test of the UH-60A helicopter airframe and comparison with NASTRAN finite element model predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howland, G. R.; Durno, J. A.; Twomey, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    Sikorsky Aircraft, together with the other major helicopter airframe manufacturers, is engaged in a study to improve the use of finite element analysis to predict the dynamic behavior of helicopter airframes, under a rotorcraft structural dynamics program called DAMVIBS (Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS), sponsored by the NASA-Langley. The test plan and test results are presented for a shake test of the UH-60A BLACK HAWK helicopter. A comparison is also presented of test results with results obtained from analysis using a NASTRAN finite element model.

  18. Nacelle-wing integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappuccio, Gelsomina

    1992-01-01

    The Aerodynamics Division at NASA ARC is participating in the propulsion airframe integration phase of the High Speed Research Program. The two areas of research being pursued include an experimental program and analysis using computational fluid dynamics. The applied Aerodynamics Branch is conducting the experimental program, which will involve a nacelle airframe model that was tested in the Ames 11- by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel in 1973. This branch will also assess various Euler codes in predicting nacelle airframe interference effects. The goal is to provide the industry with the necessary data and tools to design a high speed civil transport with favorable propulsion airframe interference.

  19. Damage Tolerance of Integral Structure in Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Urban, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The rotorcraft industry has rapidly implemented integral structures into aircraft to benefit from the weight and cost advantages over traditionally riveted structure. The cost to manufacture an integral structure, where the entire component is machined from a single plate of material, is about one-fifth that of a riveted structure. Furthermore, the integral structure can weigh only one-half that of a riveted structure through optimal design of stiffening structure and part reduction. Finally, inspection and repair of damage in the field can be less costly than riveted structure. There are no rivet heads to inspect under, reducing inspection time, and damage can be removed or patched readily without altering the primary structure, reducing replacement or repair costs. In this paper, the authors will investigate the damage tolerance implications of fielding an integral structure manufactured from thick plate aluminum.

  20. Evaluation of the First Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 1) Full-Scale Crash Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.; Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Bark, Lindley W.; DeWeese, Rick L.; McEntire, B. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    absorbing seats and restraints were within injury limits. Severe injury was likely for ATDs in forward facing passenger seats, legacy troop bench seats, and a three-tiered patient litter. In addition, two standing ATDs were used to evaluate the benefit of Mobile Aircrew Restraint Systems (MARS) versus a standard gunner's belt. The ATD with the MARS survived the impact, while fatal head blunt trauma occurred for the standing ATD held by the legacy gunner's belt. In addition to occupant loading, the structural response of the airframe was assessed based on accelerometers located throughout the airframe and using three-dimensional photogrammetric techniques. Analysis of the photogrammetric data indicated regions of maximum deflection and permanent deformation.

  1. Airframe Noise Prediction Using the Sngr Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongqian; Wu, Yizhao; Xia, Jian

    In this paper, the Stochastic Noise Generation and Radiation method (SNGR) is used to predict airframe noise. The SNGR method combines a stochastic model with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), and it can give acceptable noise results while the computation cost is relatively low. In the method, the time-averaged mean flow field is firstly obtained by solving Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS), and a stochastic velocity is generated based on the obtained information. Then the turbulent field is used to generate the source for the Acoustic Perturbation Equations (APEs) that simulate the noise propagation. For numerical methods, timeaveraged RANS equations are solved by finite volume method, and the turbulent model is K - ɛ model; APEs are solved by finite difference method, and the numerical scheme is the Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) scheme, with explicit optimized 5-stage Rung-Kutta scheme time step. In order to test the APE solver, propagation of a Gaussian pulse in a uniform mean flow is firstly simulated and compared with the analytical solution. Then, using the method, the trailing edge noise of NACA0012 airfoil is calculated. The results are compared with reference data, and good agreements are demonstrated.

  2. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Results on Sikorsky Aircraft Survivable Affordable Reparable Airframe Program (SARAP) Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Anastasi, Robert F.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The Survivable, Affordable, Reparable Airframe Program (SARAP) will develop/produce new structural design concepts with lower structural weight, reduced manufacturing complexity and development time, increased readiness, and improved threat protection. These new structural concepts will require advanced field capable inspection technologies to help meet the SARAP structural objectives. In the area of repair, damage assessment using nondestructive inspection (NDI) is critical to identify repair location and size. The purpose of this work is to conduct an assessment of new and emerging NDI methods that can potentially satisfy the SARAP program goals.

  3. Structural Integrity in Measures of Self Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenner, A. Jackson; Katzenmeyer, W.G.

    Structural integrity of a measure is defined in terms of its replicability, constancy, invariance, and stability. Work completed in the development and validation of the Self Observation Scales (SOS) Primary Level (Stenner and Katzenmeyer, 1973) serves to illustrate one method of establishing structural integrity. The name of each scale of the SOS…

  4. Experiences at Langley Research Center in the application of optimization techniques to helicopter airframes for vibration reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreekanta Murthy, T.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1991-01-01

    A NASA/industry rotorcraft structural dynamics program known as Design Analysis Methods for VIBrationS (DAMVIBS) was initiated at Langley Research Center in 1984 with the objective of establishing the technology base needed by the industry for developing an advanced finite-element-based vibrations design analysis capability for airframe structures. As a part of the in-house activities contributing to that program, a study was undertaken to investigate the use of formal, nonlinear programming-based, numerical optimization techniques for airframe vibrations design work. Considerable progress has been made in connection with that study since its inception in 1985. This paper presents a unified summary of the experiences and results of that study. The formulation and solution of airframe optimization problems are discussed. Particular attention is given to describing the implementation of a new computational procedure based on MSC/NASTRAN and CONstrained function MINimization (CONMIN) in a computer program system called DYNOPT for the optimization of airframes subject to strength, frequency, dynamic response, and fatigue constraints. The results from the application of the DYNOPT program to the Bell AH-1G helicopter are presented and discussed.

  5. In Search of the Physics: NASA's Approach to Airframe Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macaraeg, Michele G.; Lockard, David P.; Streett, Craig L.

    1999-01-01

    An extensive numerical and experimental study of airframe noise mechanisms associated with a subsonic high-lift system has been performed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Investigations involving both steady and unsteady computations and experiments on small-scale models with part-span flaps and full-span flaps are presented. Both surface (steady and unsteady pressure measurements, hot films, oil flows, pressure sensitive paint) and off-surface (5 holeprobe, particle-imaged velocimetry, laser velocimetry, laser light sheet measurements) were taken in the LaRC Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) and several hard-wall tunnels. Experiments in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) included Reynolds number variations up to flight conditions. Successful microphone array measurements were also taken providing both acoustic source maps on the model, and quantitative spectra. Critical directivity measurements were obtained in the QFF. NASA Langley unstructured and structured Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes codes modeled the steady aspects of the flows. Excellent comparisons with surface and off-surface experimental data were obtained. Subsequently, these meanflow calculations were utilized in both linear stability and direct numerical simulations of the flow fields to calculate unsteady surface pressures and farfield acoustic spectra. Accurate calculations were critical in obtaining not only noise source characteristics, but shear layer correction data as well. Techniques utilized in these investigations as well as brief overviews of the results are given.

  6. Design and Test of an Improved Crashworthiness Small Composite Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terry, James E.; Hooper, Steven J.; Nicholson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this small business innovative research (SBIR) program was to evaluate the feasibility of developing small composite airplanes with improved crashworthiness. A combination of analysis and half scale component tests were used to develop an energy absorbing airframe. Four full scale crash tests were conducted at the NASA Impact Dynamics Research Facility, two on a hard surface and two onto soft soil, replicating earlier NASA tests of production general aviation airplanes. Several seat designs and restraint systems including both an air bag and load limiting shoulder harnesses were tested. Tests showed that occupant loads were within survivable limits with the improved structural design and the proper combination of seats and restraint systems. There was no loss of cabin volume during the events. The analysis method developed provided design guidance but time did not allow extending the analysis to soft soil impact. This project demonstrated that survivability improvements are possible with modest weight penalties. The design methods can be readily applied by airplane designers using the examples in this report.

  7. Crash Testing of Helicopter Airframe Fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Charles W.; Townsend, William; Boitnott, Richard

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Rotary Wing Structures Technology Demonstration (RWSTD) program, a surrogate RAH-66 seat attachment fitting was dynamically tested to assess its response to transient, crash impact loads. The dynamic response of this composite material fitting was compared to the performance of an identical fitting subjected to quasi-static loads of similar magnitude. Static and dynamic tests were conducted of both smaller bench level and larger full-scale test articles. At the bench level, the seat fitting was supported in a steel fixture, and in the full-scale tests, the fitting was integrated into a surrogate RAH-66 forward fuselage. Based upon the lessons learned, an improved method to design, analyze, and test similar composite material fittings is proposed.

  8. Plated lamination structures for integrated magnetic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Bucknell C.

    2014-06-17

    Semiconductor integrated magnetic devices such as inductors, transformers, etc., having laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are provided, wherein the laminated magnetic-insulator stack structures are formed using electroplating techniques. For example, an integrated laminated magnetic device includes a multilayer stack structure having alternating magnetic and insulating layers formed on a substrate, wherein each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure is separated from another magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure by an insulating layer, and a local shorting structure to electrically connect each magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to an underlying magnetic layer in the multilayer stack structure to facilitate electroplating of the magnetic layers using an underlying conductive layer (magnetic or seed layer) in the stack as an electrical cathode/anode for each electroplated magnetic layer in the stack structure.

  9. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Installation Effects for Conventional and Unconventional Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    As extensive experimental campaign was performed to study the aeroacoustic installation effects of an open rotor with respect to both a conventional tube and wing type airframe and an unconventional hybrid wing body airframe. The open rotor rig had two counter rotating rows of blades each with eight blades of a design originally flight tested in the 1980s. The aeroacoustic installation effects measured in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel included those from flow effects due to inflow distortion or wake interaction and acoustic propagation effects such as shielding and reflection. The objective of the test campaign was to quantify the installation effects for a wide range of parameters and configurations derived from the two airframe types. For the conventional airframe, the open rotor was positioned in increments in front of and then over the main wing and then in positions representative of tail mounted aircraft with a conventional tail, a T-tail and a U-tail. The interaction of the wake of the open rotor as well as acoustic scattering results in an increase of about 10 dB when the rotor is positioned in front of the main wing. When positioned over the main wing a substantial amount of noise reduction is obtained and this is also observed for tail-mounted installations with a large U-tail. For the hybrid wing body airframe, the open rotor was positioned over the airframe along the centerline as well as off-center representing a twin engine location. A primary result was the documentation of the noise reduction from shielding as a function of the location of the open rotor upstream of the trailing edge of the hybrid wing body. The effects from vertical surfaces and elevon deflection were also measured. Acoustic lining was specially designed and inserted flush with the elevon and airframe surface, the result was an additional reduction in open rotor noise propagating to the far field microphones. Even with the older blade design used, the experiment provided

  10. Test Structures For Bumpy Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.; Sayah, Hoshyar R.

    1989-01-01

    Cross-bridge resistors added to comb and serpentine patterns. Improved combination of test structures built into integrated circuit used to evaluate design rules, fabrication processes, and quality of interconnections. Consist of meshing serpentines and combs, and cross bridge. Structures used to make electrical measurements revealing defects in design or fabrication. Combination of test structures includes three comb arrays, two serpentine arrays, and cross bridge. Made of aluminum or polycrystalline silicon, depending on material in integrated-circuit layers evaluated. Aluminum combs and serpentine arrays deposited over steps made by polycrystalline silicon and diffusion layers, while polycrystalline silicon versions of these structures used to cross over steps made by thick oxide layer.

  11. Integrated flow field (IFF) structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pien, Shyhing M. (Inventor); Warshay, Marvin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present disclosure relates in part to a flow field structure comprising a hydrophilic part and a hydrophobic part communicably attached to each other via a connecting interface. The present disclosure further relates to electrochemical cells comprising the aforementioned flow fields.

  12. Tools Lighten Designs, Maintain Structural Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Collier Research Corporation of Hampton, Virginia, licensed software developed at Langley Research Center to reduce design weight through the use of composite materials. The first license of NASA-developed software, it has now been used in everything from designing next-generation cargo containers, to airframes, rocket engines, ship hulls, and train bodies. The company now has sales of the NASA-derived software topping $4 million a year and has recently received several Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to apply its software to nearly all aspects of the new Orion crew capsule design.

  13. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  14. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2004-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  15. Fracture Testing of Integral Stiffened Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Piascik, Robert S.; Dawicke, David S.; Johnston, William M.; Willard, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory testing was conducted to evaluate safety concerns for integrally-stiffened tanks that were found to have developed cracks during pressurization testing. Cracks occurred at fastener holes where additional stiffeners were attached to the integrally-stiffened tank structure. Tests were conducted to obtain material properties and to reproduce the crack morphologies that were observed in service to help determine if the tanks are safe for operation. Reproducing the cracking modes observed during pressurization testing required a complex loading state involving both a tensile load in the integrally-stiffened structure and a pin-load at a fastener hole.

  16. Integrable structures in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negro, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    This review was born as notes for a lecture given at the Young Researchers Integrability School (YRIS) school on integrability in Durham, in the summer of 2015. It deals with a beautiful method, developed in the mid-nineties by Bazhanov, Lukyanov and Zamolodchikov and, as such, called BLZ. This method can be interpreted as a field theory version of the quantum inverse scattering, also known as the algebraic Bethe ansatz. Starting with the case of conformal field theories (CFTs) we show how to build the field theory analogues of commuting transfer T matrices and Baxter Q-operators of integrable lattice models. These objects contain the complete information of the integrable structure of the theory, viz. the integrals of motion, and can be used, as we will show, to derive the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and nonlinear integral equations. This same method can be easily extended to the description of integrable structures of certain particular massive deformations of CFTs; these, in turn, can be described as quantum group reductions of the quantum sine-Gordon model and it is an easy step to include this last theory in the framework of BLZ approach. Finally we show an interesting and surprising connection of the BLZ structures with classical objects emerging from the study of classical integrable models via the inverse scattering transform method. This connection goes under the name of ODE/IM correspondence and we will present it for the specific case of quantum sine-Gordon model only.

  17. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A204. Aircraft Welding. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on aircraft welding on airframes. The module contains four units that cover the following topics: (1) gas welding and cutting; (2) brazing and soldering; (3) shielded metal arc welding; and (4) gas tungsten arc welding. Each unit follows a standardized format…

  18. Structurally Integrated Antenna Concepts for HALE UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin L.; Vedeler, Erik; Goins, Larry; Young, W. Robert; Lawrence, Roland W.

    2006-01-01

    This technical memorandum describes work done in support of the Multifunctional Structures and Materials Team under the Vehicle Systems Program's ITAS (Integrated Tailored Aero Structures) Project during FY 2005. The Electromagnetics and Sensors Branch (ESB) developed three ultra lightweight antenna concepts compatible with HALE UAVs (High Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Aerial Vehicles). ESB also developed antenna elements that minimize the interaction between elements and the vehicle to minimize the impact of wing flexure on the EM (electromagnetic) performance of the integrated array. In addition, computer models were developed to perform phase correction for antenna arrays whose elements are moving relative to each other due to wing deformations expected in HALE vehicle concepts. Development of lightweight, conformal or structurally integrated antenna elements and compensating for the impact of a lightweight, flexible structure on a large antenna array are important steps in the realization of HALE UAVs for microwave applications such as passive remote sensing and communications.

  19. Coupled rotor/airframe vibration analysis program manual manual. Volume 1: User's and programmer's instructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassarino, S.; Sopher, R.

    1982-01-01

    user instruction and software descriptions for the base program of the coupled rotor/airframe vibration analysis are provided. The functional capabilities and procedures for running the program are provided. Interfaces with external programs are discussed. The procedure of synthesizing a dynamic system and the various solution methods are described. Input data and output results are presented. Detailed information is provided on the program structure. Sample test case results for five representative dynamic configurations are provided and discussed. System response are plotted to demonstrate the plots capabilities available. Instructions to install and execute SIMVIB on the CDC computer system are provided.

  20. Characterization of Flap Edge Noise Radiation from a High-Fidelity Airframe Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockhard, David P.; Neuhart, Dan H.; Bahr, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the noise generated by a baseline high-fidelity airframe model are presented. The test campaign was conducted in the open-jet test section of the NASA Langley 14- by 22-foot Subsonic Tunnel on an 18%-scale, semi-span Gulfstream airframe model incorporating a trailing edge flap and main landing gear. Unsteady surface pressure measurements were obtained from a series of sensors positioned along the two flap edges, and far field acoustic measurements were obtained using a 97-microphone phased array that viewed the pressure side of the airframe. The DAMAS array deconvolution method was employed to determine the locations and strengths of relevant noise sources in the vicinity of the flap edges and the landing gear. A Coherent Output Power (COP) spectral method was used to couple the unsteady surface pressures measured along the flap edges with the phased array output. The results indicate that outboard flap edge noise is dominated by the flap bulb seal cavity with very strong COP coherence over an approximate model-scale frequency range of 1 to 5 kHz observed between the array output and those unsteady pressure sensors nearest the aft end of the cavity. An examination of experimental COP spectra for the inboard flap proved inconclusive, most likely due to a combination of coherence loss caused by decorrelation of acoustic waves propagating through the thick wind tunnel shear layer and contamination of the spectra by tunnel background noise at lower frequencies. Directivity measurements obtained from integration of DAMAS pressure-squared values over defined geometric zones around the model show that the baseline flap and landing gear are only moderately directional as a function of polar emission angle.

  1. Clean wing airframe noise modeling for multidisciplinary design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosder, Serhat

    A new noise metric has been developed that may be used for optimization problems involving aerodynamic noise from a clean wing. The modeling approach uses a classical trailing edge noise theory as the starting point. The final form of the noise metric includes characteristic velocity and length scales that are obtained from three-dimensional, steady, RANS simulations with a two equation k-o turbulence model. The noise metric is not the absolute value of the noise intensity, but an accurate relative noise measure as shown in the validation studies. One of the unique features of the new noise metric is the modeling of the length scale, which is directly related to the turbulent structure of the flow at the trailing edge. The proposed noise metric model has been formulated so that it can capture the effect of different design variables on the clean wing airframe noise such as the aircraft speed, lift coefficient, and wing geometry. It can also capture three dimensional effects which become important at high lift coefficients, since the characteristic velocity and the length scales are allowed to vary along the span of the wing. Noise metric validation was performed with seven test cases that were selected from a two-dimensional NACA 0012 experimental database. The agreement between the experiment and the predictions obtained with the new noise metric was very good at various speeds, angles of attack, and Reynolds Number, which showed that the noise metric is capable of capturing the variations in the trailing edge noise as a relative noise measure when different flow conditions and parameters are changed. Parametric studies were performed to investigate the effect of different design variables on the noise metric. Two-dimensional parametric studies were done using two symmetric NACA four-digit airfoils (NACA 0012 and NACA 0009) and two supercritical (SC(2)-0710 and SC(2)-0714) airfoils. The three-dimensional studies were performed with two versions of a conventional

  2. Integrated Management of Structural Pests in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    The state of Illinois is encouraging schools to better inspect and evaluate the causes of their pest infestation problems through use of the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) guidelines developed by the Illinois Department of Public Health. This guide reviews the philosophy and organization of an IPM program for structural pests in schools,…

  3. NASA Airframe Icing Research Overview Past and Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the past and current research that NASA has done in the area of airframe icing. Both the history experimental efforts and model development to understand the process and problem of ice formation are reviewed. This has resulted in the development of new experimental methods, advanced icing simulation software, flight dynamics and experimental databases that have an impact on design, testing, construction and certification and qualification of the aircraft and its sub-systems.

  4. Analysis of small crack behavior for airframe applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, R. C.; Chan, K. S.; Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Davidson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The small fatigue crack problem is critically reviewed from the perspective of airframe applications. Different types of small cracks-microstructural, mechanical, and chemical-are carefully defined and relevant mechanisms identified. Appropriate analysis techniques, including both rigorous scientific and practical engineering treatments, are briefly described. Important materials data issues are addressed, including increased scatter in small crack data and recommended small crack test methods. Key problems requiring further study are highlighted.

  5. Quantifying the structural integrity of nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Thöle, Florian; Xue, Longjian; HEß, Claudia; Hillebrand, Reinald; Gorb, Stanislav N; Steinhart, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Arrays of aligned nanorods oriented perpendicular to a support, which are accessible by top-down lithography or by means of shape-defining hard templates, have received increasing interest as sensor components, components for nanophotonics and nanoelectronics, substrates for tissue engineering, surfaces having specific adhesive or antiadhesive properties and as surfaces with customized wettability. Agglomeration of the nanorods deteriorates the performance of components based on nanorod arrays. A comprehensive body of literature deals with mechanical failure mechanisms of nanorods and design criteria for mechanically stable nanorod arrays. However, the structural integrity of nanorod arrays is commonly evaluated only visually and qualitatively. We use real-space analysis of microscopic images to quantify the fraction of condensed nanorods in nanorod arrays. We suggest the number of array elements apparent in the micrographs divided by the number of array elements a defect-free array would contain in the same area, referred to as integrity fraction, as a measure of structural array integrity. Reproducible procedures to determine the imaged number of array elements are introduced. Thus, quantitative comparisons of different nanorod arrays, or of one nanorod array at different stages of its use, are possible. Structural integrities of identical nanorod arrays differing only in the length of the nanorods are exemplarily analysed.

  6. Experimental Analysis of Flow over a Highly Maneuverable Airframe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirnak, Jonathan; Benson, Michael; van Poppel, Bret; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John; Team HMA Team

    2015-11-01

    One way to reduce the collateral damage in war is by increasing the accuracy of indirect fire weapons. The Army Research Laboratory is currently developing a Highly Maneuverable Airframe (HMA) consisting of four deflecting canards to provide in-flight maneuverability while fins maintain short duration aerodynamic stability. An experiment was conducted using Magnetic Resonance Velocimetry (MRV) techniques to gather three dimensional, three-component velocity data for fluid flow over a scaled down HMA model. Tests were performed at an angle of attack of 2.3° and canard deflection angles of 0° and 2°. The resulting data serve to both validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and understand the flow over this complex geometry. Particular interest is given to the development of the tip and inboard vortices that originate at the canard/body junction and the canard tips to determine their effects on airframe stability. Results show the development of a strong tip vortex and four weaker inboard vortices off each canard. Although the weaker inboard vortices dissipate rapidly downstream of the canard trailing edges, the stronger tip vortices persist until reaching the fins approximately six chord lengths downstream of the canard trailing edges. Team HMA designed and built the water channel and airframe for this experiment.

  7. Integrated Propulsion/Vehicle System Structurally Optimized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, James E.; McCurdy, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Ongoing research and testing are essential in the development of air-breathing hypersonic propulsion technology, and this year some positive advancement was made at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Recent work performed for GTX, a rocket-based combined-cycle, single-stage-to-orbit concept, included structural assessments of both the engine and flight vehicle. In the development of air-breathing engine technology, it is impractical to design and optimize components apart from the fully integrated system because tradeoffs must be made between performance and structural capability. Efforts were made to control the flight trajectory, for example, to minimize the aerodynamic heating effects. Structural optimization was applied to evaluate concept feasibility and was instrumental in the determination of the gross liftoff weight of the integrated system. Achieving low Earth orbit with even a small payload requires an aggressive approach to weight minimization through the use of lightweight, oxidation-resistant composite materials. Assessing the integrated system involved investigating the flight trajectory to determine where the critical load events occur in flight and then generating the corresponding environment at each of these events. Structural evaluation requires the mapping of the critical flight loads to finite element models, including the combined effects of aerodynamic, inertial, combustion, and other loads. NASA s APAS code was used to generate aerodynamic pressure and temperature profiles at each critical event. The radiation equilibrium surface temperatures from APAS were used to predict temperatures through the thickness. Heat transfer solutions using NASA's MINIVER code and the SINDA code (Cullimore & Ring Technologies, Littleton, CO) were calculated at selective points external to the integrated vehicle system and then extrapolated over the entire exposed surface. FORTRAN codes were written to expedite the finite element mapping of the aerodynamic heating

  8. Stress and Strain Estimation of Notches in Aircraft Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    initiation prediction models, see [23, 24, 25, 26, 27]. Currently the F/A-18 structure is monitored using a derivative of one of these programs . In the...for the F111C stiffener runout region", FAA/NASA International Symposium on Advanced Structural Integrity Methods for Airframes Durability and Damage...effect of industrial explosions on structures , maintenance and asset assessment. He has experience in metallurgical and mechanical engineering and

  9. The Prediction and Analysis of Jet Flows and Scattered Turbulent Mixing Noise about Flight Vehicle Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Jet flows interacting with nearby surfaces exhibit a complex behavior in which acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics are altered. The physical understanding and prediction of these characteristics are essential to designing future low noise aircraft. A new approach is created for predicting scattered jet mixing noise that utilizes an acoustic analogy and steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solutions. A tailored Green's function accounts for the propagation of mixing noise about the airframe and is calculated numerically using a newly developed ray tracing method. The steady aerodynamic statistics, associated unsteady sound source, and acoustic intensity are examined as jet conditions are varied about a large flat plate. A non-dimensional number is proposed to estimate the effect of the aerodynamic noise source relative to jet operating condition and airframe position.The steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solutions, acoustic analogy, tailored Green's function, non-dimensional number, and predicted noise are validated with a wide variety of measurements. The combination of the developed theory, ray tracing method, and careful implementation in a stand-alone computer program result in an approach that is more first principles oriented than alternatives, computationally efficient, and captures the relevant physics of fluid-structure interaction.

  10. The Prediction and Analysis of Jet Flows and Scattered Turbulent Mixing Noise About Flight Vehicle Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Jet flows interacting with nearby surfaces exhibit a complex behavior in which acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics are altered. The physical understanding and prediction of these characteristics are essential to designing future low noise aircraft. A new approach is created for predicting scattered jet mixing noise that utilizes an acoustic analogy and steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solutions. A tailored Green's function accounts for the propagation of mixing noise about the air-frame and is calculated numerically using a newly developed ray tracing method. The steady aerodynamic statistics, associated unsteady sound source, and acoustic intensity are examined as jet conditions are varied about a large at plate. A non-dimensional number is proposed to estimate the effect of the aerodynamic noise source relative to jet operating condition and airframe position. The steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solutions, acoustic analogy, tailored Green's function, non- dimensional number, and predicted noise are validated with a wide variety of measurements. The combination of the developed theory, ray tracing method, and careful implementation in a stand-alone computer program result in an approach that is more first principles oriented than alternatives, computationally efficient, and captures the relevant physics of fluid-structure interaction.

  11. Integrated structural-aerodynamic design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P. J.; Grossman, B.; Polen, D.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper focuses on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration, with emphasis on the major difficulty associated with multidisciplinary design optimization processes, their enormous computational costs. Methods are presented for reducing this computational burden through the development of efficient methods for cross-sensitivity calculations and the implementation of approximate optimization procedures. Utilizing a modular sensitivity analysis approach, it is shown that the sensitivities can be computed without the expensive calculation of the derivatives of the aerodynamic influence coefficient matrix, and the derivatives of the structural flexibility matrix. The same process is used to efficiently evaluate the sensitivities of the wing divergence constraint, which should be particularly useful, not only in problems of complete integrated aircraft design, but also in aeroelastic tailoring applications.

  12. Structural Integrity of a Wind Tunnel Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karkehabadi, R.; Rhew, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) has been designing strain-gage balances for utilization in wind tunnels since its inception. The utilization of balances span over a wide variety of aerodynamic tests. A force balance is an inherently critically stressed component due to the requirements of measurement sensitivity. Research and analyses are done in order to investigate the structural integrity of the balances as well as developing an understanding of their performance in order to enhance their capability. Maximum loading occurs when all 6 components of the loads are applied simultaneously with their maximum value allowed (limit load). This circumstance normally does not occur in the wind tunnel. However, if it occurs, is the balance capable of handling the loads with an acceptable factor of safety? LaRC Balance 1621 was modeled and meshed in PATRAN for analysis in NASTRAN. For a complete analysis, it is necessary to consider all the load cases as well as use dense mesh near all the edges. Because of computer limitations, it is not possible to have one model with the dense mesh near all edges. In the present study, a dense mesh is limited to the surface corners where the cage and axial sections meet. Four different load combinations are used for the current analysis. Linear analysis is performed for each load case. In the case where the stress value is above linear elastic region, it is necessary to perform nonlinear analysis. It is also important to investigate the variables limiting the structural integrity of the balances. In order to investigate the possibility of modifying the existing balances to enhance the structural integrity, some modifications are done on this balance. The structural integrity of the balance after modification is investigated.

  13. Integrated support structure for GASCAN 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Advanced Space Design Program was the preliminary design of the Integrated Support Structure for GASCAN II, a Get Away Special canister donated by the MITRE Corporation. Two teams of three students each worked on the support structure. There was a structural design team and a thermal design team. The structure will carry three experiments also undergoing preliminary design this year, the mu-gravity Ignition Experiment, the Rotational Flow in Low Gravity Experiment, and the Ionospheric Properties and Propagation Experiment. The structural design team was responsible for the layout of the GASCAN and the preliminary design of the structure itself. They produced the physical interface specifications defining the baseline weights and volumes for the equipment and produced layout drawings of the system. The team produced static and modal finite element analysis of the structure using ANSYS. The thermal design team was responsible for the power and timing requirements of the payload and for the identification and preliminary analysis of potential thermal problems. The team produced the power, timing, and energy interface specifications and assisted in the development of the specification of the battery pack. The thermal parameters of each experiment were cataloged and the experiments were subjected to worst case heat transfer scenarios.

  14. Integrated design of structures, controls, and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    In this talk we shall discuss algorithms and CAD tools for the design and analysis of structures for high performance applications using advanced composite materials. An extensive mathematical theory for optimal structural (e.g., shape) design was developed over the past thirty years. Aspects of this theory have been used in the design of components for hypersonic vehicles and thermal diffusion systems based on homogeneous materials. Enhancement of the design methods to include optimization of the microstructure of the component is a significant innovation which can lead to major enhancements in component performance. Our work is focused on the adaptation of existing theories of optimal structural design (e.g., optimal shape design) to treat the design of structures using advanced composite materials (e.g., fiber reinforced, resin matrix materials). In this talk we shall discuss models and algorithms for the design of simple structures from composite materials, focussing on a problem in thermal management. We shall also discuss methods for the integration of active structural controls into the design process.

  15. Self assembled structures for 3D integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madhav

    Three dimensional (3D) micro-scale structures attached to a silicon substrate have various applications in microelectronics. However, formation of 3D structures using conventional micro-fabrication techniques are not efficient and require precise control of processing parameters. Self assembly is a method for creating 3D structures that takes advantage of surface area minimization phenomena. Solder based self assembly (SBSA), the subject of this dissertation, uses solder as a facilitator in the formation of 3D structures from 2D patterns. Etching a sacrificial layer underneath a portion of the 2D pattern allows the solder reflow step to pull those areas out of the substrate plane resulting in a folded 3D structure. Initial studies using the SBSA method demonstrated low yields in the formation of five different polyhedra. The failures in folding were primarily attributed to nonuniform solder deposition on the underlying metal pads. The dip soldering method was analyzed and subsequently refined. A modified dip soldering process provided improved yield among the polyhedra. Solder bridging referred as joining of solder deposited on different metal patterns in an entity influenced the folding mechanism. In general, design parameters such as small gap-spacings and thick metal pads were found to favor solder bridging for all patterns studied. Two types of soldering: face and edge soldering were analyzed. Face soldering refers to the application of solder on the entire metal face. Edge soldering indicates application of solder only on the edges of the metal face. Mechanical grinding showed that face soldered SBSA structures were void free and robust in nature. In addition, the face soldered 3D structures provide a consistent heat resistant solder standoff height that serve as attachments in the integration of dissimilar electronic technologies. Face soldered 3D structures were developed on the underlying conducting channel to determine the thermo-electric reliability of

  16. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, Ralf; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert; Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram

    2015-07-27

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  17. Challenges for the aircraft structural integrity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-six years ago the United States Air Force established the USAF Aircraft Structural Integrity Program (ASIP) because flight safety had been degraded by fatigue failures of operational aircraft. This initial program evolved, but has been stable since the issuance of MIL-STD-1530A in 1975. Today, the program faces new challenges because of a need to maintain aircraft longer in an environment of reduced funding levels. Also, there is increased pressure to reduce cost of the acquisition of new aircraft. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the challenges for the ASIP and identify the changes in the program that will meet these challenges in the future.

  18. Damage Tolerance: Assessment Handbook. Volume 2: Airframe Damage Tolerance Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Airframe Damage Tolerance Evaluation NJ 084u5 DTIC FLE 15 1994 Research and Special Programs Administration John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems...permission of John Wiley and Sons, New York, N.Y.] (4-5] CORRODED END Magnes;um Magnesium alloys Zinc Galvanized steel or galvanized wrought iron Aluminum...Reprinted from M M. Ratwani and D.P. Wilhem , iDeelopment andEvaluation of Methods of Plane Strain Fractuire Analysis, Northrop Corporation, AFFDL-TR-73-42

  19. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-08

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  20. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    PubMed Central

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  1. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within +/-1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  2. Development of a SMA-Based, Slat-Gap Filler for Airframe Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Long, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Noise produced by unsteady flow around aircraft structures, termed airframe noise, is an important source of aircraft noise during the approach and landing phases of flight. Conventional leading-edge-slat devices for high lift on typical transport aircraft are a prominent source of airframe noise. Many concepts for slat noise reduction have been investigated. Slat-cove fillers have emerged as an attractive solution, but they maintain the gap flow, leaving some noise production mechanisms unabated, and thus represent a nonoptimal solution. Drooped-leading-edge (DLE) concepts have been proposed as "optimal" because the gap flow is eliminated. The deployed leading edge device is not distinct and separate from the main wing in DLE concepts and the high-lift performance suffers at high angles of attack (alpha) as a consequence. Elusive high-alpha performance and excessive weight penalty have stymied DLE development. The fact that high-lift performance of DLE systems is only affected at high alpha suggests another concept that simultaneously achieves the high-lift of the baseline airfoil and the noise reduction of DLE concepts. The concept involves utilizing a conventional leading-edge slat device and a deformable structure that is deployed from the leading edge of the main wing and closes the gap between the slat and main wing, termed a slat-gap filler (SGF). The deployable structure consists of a portion of the skin of the main wing and it is driven in conjunction with the slat during deployment and retraction. Benchtop models have been developed to assess the feasibility and to study important parameters. Computational models have assisted in the bench-top model design and provided valuable insight in the parameter space as well as the feasibility.

  3. Development, documentation and correlation of a NASTRAN vibration model of the AH-1G helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronkhite, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    NASTRAN was evaluated for vibration analysis of the helicopter airframe. The first effort involved development of a NASTRAN model of the AH-1G helicopter airframe and comprehensive documentation of the model. The next effort was to assess the validity of the NASTRAN model by comparisons with static and vibration tests.

  4. Airframe Noise from a Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    A high fidelity aeroacoustic test was conducted in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to establish a detailed database of component noise for a 5.8% scale HWB aircraft configuration. The model has a modular design, which includes a drooped and a stowed wing leading edge, deflectable elevons, twin verticals, and a landing gear system with geometrically scaled wheel-wells. The model is mounted inverted in the test section and noise measurements are acquired at different streamwise stations from an overhead microphone phased array and from overhead and sideline microphones. Noise source distribution maps and component noise spectra are presented for airframe configurations representing two different approach flight conditions. Array measurements performed along the aircraft flyover line show the main landing gear to be the dominant contributor to the total airframe noise, followed by the nose gear, the inboard side-edges of the LE droop, the wing tip/LE droop outboard side-edges, and the side-edges of deployed elevons. Velocity dependence and flyover directivity are presented for the main noise components. Decorrelation effects from turbulence scattering on spectral levels measured with the microphone phased array are discussed. Finally, noise directivity maps obtained from the overhead and sideline microphone measurements for the landing gear system are provided for a broad range of observer locations.

  5. Correlation of AH-1G airframe flight vibration data with a coupled rotor-fuselage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sangha, K.; Shamie, J.

    1990-01-01

    The formulation and features of the Rotor-Airframe Comprehensive Analysis Program (RACAP) is described. The analysis employs a frequency domain, transfer matrix approach for the blade structural model, a time domain wake or momentum theory aerodynamic model, and impedance matching for rotor-fuselage coupling. The analysis is applied to the AH-1G helicopter, and a correlation study is conducted on fuselage vibration predictions. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the state-of-the-art in helicopter fuselage vibration prediction technology. The fuselage vibration predicted using RACAP are fairly good in the vertical direction and somewhat deficient in the lateral/longitudinal directions. Some of these deficiencies are traced to the fuselage finite element model.

  6. Investigation on the use of optimization techniques for helicopter airframe vibrations design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreekanta Murthy, T.

    1992-01-01

    Results of the investigation of formal nonlinear programming-based numerical optimization techniques of helicopter airframe vibration reduction are summarized. The objective and constraint function and the sensitivity expressions used in the formulation of airframe vibration optimization problems are presented and discussed. Implementation of a new computational procedure based on MSC/NASTRAN and CONMIN in a computer program system called DYNOPT for optimizing airframes subject to strength, frequency, dynamic response, and dynamic stress constraints is described. An optimization methodology is proposed which is thought to provide a new way of applying formal optimization techniques during the various phases of the airframe design process. Numerical results obtained from the application of the DYNOPT optimization code to a helicopter airframe are discussed.

  7. Integrated Force Method for Indeterminate Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Dale A.; Halford, Gary R.; Patnaik, Surya N.

    2008-01-01

    Two methods of solving indeterminate structural-mechanics problems have been developed as products of research on the theory of strain compatibility. In these methods, stresses are considered to be the primary unknowns (in contrast to strains and displacements being considered as the primary unknowns in some prior methods). One of these methods, denoted the integrated force method (IFM), makes it possible to compute stresses, strains, and displacements with high fidelity by use of modest finite-element models that entail relatively small amounts of computation. The other method, denoted the completed Beltrami Mitchell formulation (CBMF), enables direct determination of stresses in an elastic continuum with general boundary conditions, without the need to first calculate displacements as in traditional methods. The equilibrium equation, the compatibility condition, and the material law are the three fundamental concepts of the theory of structures. For almost 150 years, it has been commonly supposed that the theory is complete. However, until now, the understanding of the compatibility condition remained incomplete, and the compatibility condition was confused with the continuity condition. Furthermore, the compatibility condition as applied to structures in its previous incomplete form was inconsistent with the strain formulation in elasticity.

  8. Enhanced Composites Integrity Through Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Soutis, Constantinos

    2012-10-01

    This paper discusses the topic of how the integrity of safety-critical structural composites can be enhanced by the use of structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques. The paper starts with a presentation of how the certification of flight-critical composite structures can be achieved within the framework of civil aviation safety authority requirements. Typical composites damage mechanisms, which make this process substantially different from that for metallic materials are discussed. The opportunities presented by the use of SHM techniques in future civil aircraft developments are explained. The paper then focuses on active SHM with piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS). After reviewing the PWAS-based SHM options, the paper follows with a discussion of the specifics of guided wave propagation in composites and PWAS-tuning effects. The paper presents a number of experimental results for damage detection in simple flat unidirectional and quasi-isotropic composite specimens. Calibrated through holes of increasing diameter and impact damage of various energies and velocities are considered. The paper ends with conclusions and suggestions for further work.

  9. Acceptance Criteria for Aerospace Structural Adhesives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ADHESIVES, *AIRFRAMES, PRIMERS, STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING, CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION , DATA ACQUISITION , PARTICLE SIZE, ACCEPTANCE TESTS, ELASTOMERS, BONDING, QUALITY CONTROL, .

  10. Proceedings of the Structural Integrity Program Conference. Held in San Antonio, Texas on 29 November-1 December 1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Study of the Quality of Screw Threaded Products, .174 CF1l6 Full-Scale Durability and Damage Tolerance Test ,. . ....... 200 F-16 Full-Scale Airframe...1330 LUNCH AND PRESENTATION Long Life Assurance Issues for the Space Station T. Cruse, Southwest Research Institute SESSION II. STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS...Taylor, Noetic Technologies 1400 - 1430 Predicting Fatigue Crack Growth Under Combined Tension and Out of Plane Bending in Transitional Thickness

  11. Structural integrity of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, John F.

    2013-09-01

    The paper starts from concerns expressed by Sir Alan Cottrell, in the early 1970s, related to the safety of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) proposed at that time for the next phase of electrical power generation. It proceeds to describe the design and operation of nuclear generation plant and gives details of the manufacture of PWR reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Attention is paid to stress-relief cracking and under-clad cracking, experienced with early RPVs, explaining the mechanisms for these forms of cracking and the means taken to avoid them. Particular note is made of the contribution of non-destructive inspection to structural integrity. Factors affecting brittle fracture in RPV steels are described: in particular, effects of neutron irradiation. The use of fracture mechanics to assess defect tolerance is explained, together with the failure assessment diagram embodied in the R6 procedure. There is discussion of the Master Curve and how it incorporates effects of irradiation on fracture toughness. Dangers associated with extrapolation of data to low probabilities are illustrated. The treatment of fatigue-crack growth is described, in the context of transients that may be experienced in the operation of PWR plant. Detailed attention is paid to the thermal shock associated with a large loss-of-coolant accident. The final section reviews the arguments advanced to justify 'Incredibility of Failure' and how these are incorporated in assessments of the integrity of existing plant and proposed 'new build' PWR pressure vessels.

  12. Integrated structural repair of a producing FPSO

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.R.; Smith, T.A.

    1997-07-01

    The state of the art in FPSO design is advancing rapidly. The long-term reliability of FPSO systems has improved as maintenance issues, have received greater emphasis in both new-builds and conversions. Despite this new emphasis, problems will still arise and repairs will still be required. Ultimately, the ability of any FPSO to stay on location and on production will depend on the scope of repairs which can be economically performed in-situ. In 1994 and 1995, Marathon Petroleum Indonesia Limited (MPIL) performed an in-situ repair on the FPSO Kakap Natuna. The scope and complexity of this work suggests there are few, if any, limits on in-situ structural repairs which can be successfully performed on a producing FPSO. The use of an integrated execution strategy for the repairs greatly reduced their cost.

  13. Advanced Airframe Structural Materials: A Primer and Cost Estimating Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    laying machines for larger, mildly con- toured parts such as wing and stabilizer skins. For such parts, automated tape laying machines can operate many...heat guns (90-130°F). However, thermoplastics require as much as 650°F for forming. Automated tape laying machines for these materials use warm...cycles to properly seat the plies onto the tool. This time-consuming process can sometimes be eliminated or reduced by the use of automated tape laying procedures

  14. Superplastic Formed Aluminum Airframe Structures. Volume 1. Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    Cone Tests ................... 28 3.3 Material Evaluation .................. 32 3.3.1 Cavitation Behavior of 7475 Alloy .... . 33 3.3.2 Mill Produced... 7075 and 7475, have SPF potential after their wrought forms have undergone grain refinement. The grain refinement is achieved through a thermomechanical... 7075 , 7050, 2024, Supral 100, Alcan 08050 25 and powder alloy, X7091 were considered. The three alloys se- lected for preliminary evaluation and a

  15. Superplastic Formed Aluminum Airframe Structures. Volume 2. Technical Details

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    inches above the lower moldline at the centerline with a 0.75-inch joggle at F.S. 68.50. The proposed SPF configuration consisted of the follow- ing...flanges of the waffle pan, where the upper skin, waffle pan and lower skin joined, were modified to reduce the number of joggles on the lower skin...flanges. All the joggles on the upper skin, waffle pan, and lower skin were elini- nated at F.S. 47.50 and 87.50 for simplicity. This was done subsequent

  16. Plan, execute, and discuss vibration measurements and correlations to evaluate a NASTRAN finite element model of the AH-64 helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferg, D.; Foote, L.; Korkosz, G.; Straub, F.; Toossi, M.; Weisenburger, R.

    1990-01-01

    A ground vibration test was performed on the AH-64 (Apache) helicopter to determine the frequency response of the airframe. The structure was excited at both the main and tail rotor hubs, separately, and response measurements were taken at 102 locations throughout the fuselage structure. Frequency responses were compared and correlated with results from a NASTRAN finite element model of AH-64. In addition, natural frequencies and mode shapes were estimated from the frequency response data and were correlated with analytical results.

  17. Experimental Results of the 2.7% Reference H Nacelle Airframe Interference High Speed Civil Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappuccio, Gelsomina

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in the NASA Ames 9-Ft by 7-Ft Supersonic and 11-Ft by 11-Ft Transonic Wind Tunnels of a 2.7% Reference H (Ref. H) Nacelle Airframe Interference (NAI) High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) model. NASA Ames did the experiment with the cooperation and assistance of Boeing and McDonnell Douglas. The Ref. H geometry was designed by Boeing. The model was built and tested by NASA under a license agreement with Boeing. Detailed forces and pressures of individual components of the configuration were obtained to assess nacelle airframe interference through the transonic and supersonic flight regime. The test apparatus was capable of measuring forces and pressures of the Wing body (WB) and nacelles. Axisymmetric and 2-D inlet nacelles were tested with the WB in both the in-proximity and captive mode. The in-proximity nacelles were mounted to a nacelle support system apparatus and were individually positioned. The right hand nacelles were force instrumented with flow through strain-gauged balances and the left hand nacelles were pressure instrumented. Mass flow ratio was varied to get steady state inlet unstart data. In addition, supersonic spillage data was taken by testing the 2-D inlet nacelles with ramps and the axisymmetric inlet nacelles with an inlet centerbody for the Mach condition of interest. The captive nacelles, both axisymmetric and 2-D, were attached to the WB via diverters. The captive 2-D inlet nacelle was also tested with ramps to get supersonic spillage data. Boeing analyzed the data and showed a drag penalty of four drag counts for the 2-D compared with the axisymmetric inlet nacelle. Two of the four counts were attributable to the external bevel designed into the 2-D inlet contour. Boeing and McDonnell Douglas used these data for evaluating Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and for evaluation of nacelle airframe integration problems and solutions.

  18. Prediction of jet exhaust noise on airframe surfaces during flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butzel, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    The behavior of pressure fluctuations measured on the airframe of a prototype high lift jet transport (YC-14) is presented. The data are characterized in terms of a particular jet exhaust flow field idealization, jet mixing noise, and exhaust shock noise. Generalized spectrum shapes and scaling relations for peak level and frequency of peak level are developed, and the frequency is found to depend on jet exhaust velocity and aircraft velocity. Comparisons are made with near-field engine exhaust noise of a conventional jet, and results suggest that the same two exhaust noises are important for both aircraft types. Surface fluctuating pressure data are assessed, and results suggest that the jet mixing and exhaust shock noise source characterizations for the YC-14 have useful applicability to conventionally configured jets.

  19. Structural design and analysis of a Mach zero to five turbo-ramjet system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spoth, Kevin A.; Moses, Paul L.

    1993-01-01

    The paper discusses the structural design and analysis of a Mach zero to five turbo-ramjet propulsion system for a Mach five waverider-derived cruise vehicle. The level of analysis detail necessary for a credible conceptual design is shown. The results of a finite-element failure mode sizing analysis for the engine primary structure is presented. The importance of engine/airframe integration is also discussed.

  20. Crack Turning in Integrally Stiffened Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard Glen

    2000-01-01

    Current emphasis in the aircraft industry toward reducing manufacturing cost has created a renewed interest in integrally stiffened structures. Crack turning has been identified as an approach to improve the damage tolerance and fail-safety of this class of structures. A desired behavior is for skin cracks to turn before reaching a stiffener, instead of growing straight through. A crack in a pressurized fuselage encounters high T-stress as it nears the stiffener--a condition favorable to crack turning. Also, the tear resistance of aluminum alloys typically varies with crack orientation, a form of anisotropy that can influence the crack path. The present work addresses these issues with a study of crack turning in two-dimensions, including the effects of both T-stress and fracture anisotropy. Both effects are shown to have relation to the process zone size, an interaction that is central to this study. Following an introduction to the problem, the T-stress effect is studied for a slightly curved semi-infinite crack with a cohesive process zone, yielding a closed form expression for the future crack path in an infinite medium. For a given initial crack tip curvature and tensile T-stress, the crack path instability is found to increase with process zone size. Fracture orthotropy is treated using a simple function to interpolate between the two principal fracture resistance values in two-dimensions. An extension to three-dimensions interpolates between the six principal values of fracture resistance. Also discussed is the transition between mode I and mode II fracture in metals. For isotropic materials, there is evidence that the crack seeks out a direction of either local symmetry (pure mode I) or local asymmetry (pure mode II) growth. For orthotropic materials the favored states are not pure modal, and have mode mixity that is a function of crack orientation.

  1. Assessment of structural integrity of wooden poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craighead, Ian A.; Thackery, Steve; Redstall, Martin; Thomas, Matthew R.

    2000-05-01

    Despite recent advances in the development of new materials, wood continues to be used globally for the support of overhead cable networks used by telecommunications and electrical utility companies. As a natural material, wood is subject to decay and will eventually fail, causing disruption to services and danger to public and company personnel. Internal decay, due to basidomycetes fungi or attack by termites, can progress rapidly and is often difficult to detect by casual inspection. The traditional method of testing poles for decay involves hitting them with a hammer and listening to the sound that results. However, evidence suggests that a large number of poles are replaced unnecessarily and a significant number of poles continue to fail unexpectedly in service. Therefore, a more accurate method of assessing the structural integrity of wooden poles is required. Over the last 25 years there have been a number of attempts at improving decay detection. Techniques such as ultrasound, drilling X rays etc. have been developed but have generally failed to improve upon the practicality and accuracy of the traditional testing method. The paper describes the use of signal processing techniques to analyze the acoustic response of the pole and thereby determine the presence of decay. Development of a prototype meter is described and the results of initial tests on several hundred poles are presented.

  2. Structural integration in hypoxia-inducible factors

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dalei; Potluri, Nalini; Lu, Jingping; Kim, Youngchang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2015-08-20

    The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) coordinate cellular adaptations to low oxygen stress by regulating transcriptional programs in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and metabolism. These programs promote the growth and progression of many tumours, making HIFs attractive anticancer targets. Transcriptionally active HIFs consist of HIF-alpha and ARNT (also called HIF-1 beta) subunits. Here we describe crystal structures for each of mouse HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT heterodimers in states that include bound small molecules and their hypoxia response element. A highly integrated quaternary architecture is shared by HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT, wherein ARNT spirals around the outside of each HIF-alpha subunit. Five distinct pockets are observed that permit small-molecule binding, including PAS domain encapsulated sites and an interfacial cavity formed through subunit heterodimerization. The DNA-reading head rotates, extends and cooperates with a distal PAS domain to bind hypoxia response elements. HIF-alpha mutations linked to human cancers map to sensitive sites that establish DNA binding and the stability of PAS domains and pockets.

  3. Investigation of threaded fastener structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Technical nondestructive evaluation approaches to the determination of fastener integrity were assessed. Existing instruments and methods used to measure stress or strain were examined, with particular interest in fastener shank stress. Industry procedures being followed were evaluated to establish fastener integrity criteria.

  4. Recent Advances in Structures for Hypersonic Flight, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The papers at this symposium were presented by 24 speakers representing airframe, missile, and engine manufacturers, the U.S. Air Force, and two NASA Research Centers. The papers cover a variety of topics including engine structures, cooled airframe structures, hot structures, thermal protection systems, cryogenic tankage structures, cryogenic insulations, and analysis methods for thermal/structures.

  5. Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics Technology Evaluation and Selection Using a Multi-Attribute Decision Making Process and Non-Deterministic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burg, Cecile M.; Hill, Geoffrey A.; Brown, Sherilyn A.; Geiselhart, Karl A.

    2004-01-01

    The Systems Analysis Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has investigated revolutionary Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustics (PAA) technologies and configurations for a Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) type aircraft as part of its research for NASA s Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Project. Within the context of the long-term NASA goal of reducing the perceived aircraft noise level by a factor of 4 relative to 1997 state of the art, major configuration changes in the propulsion airframe integration system were explored with noise as a primary design consideration. An initial down-select and assessment of candidate PAA technologies for the BWB was performed using a Multi-Attribute Decision Making (MADM) process consisting of organized brainstorming and decision-making tools. The assessments focused on what effect the PAA technologies had on both the overall noise level of the BWB and what effect they had on other major design considerations such as weight, performance and cost. A probabilistic systems analysis of the PAA configurations that presented the best noise reductions with the least negative impact on the system was then performed. Detailed results from the MADM study and the probabilistic systems analysis will be published in the near future.

  6. A manufacturer's approach to ensure long term structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, Hans; Fredriksson, Billy; Holm, Ingvar

    1992-01-01

    The main features of the design concepts for the Saab 340 and Saab 2000 aircraft are described with respect to structural integrity and high reliability. Also described is the approach taken at Saab Aircraft to ensure structural integrity and high reliability. The concepts of global and local loads and sequences, and the fatigue and damage tolerance sizing and their verification are discussed. Also described is quality assurance in the production and structural maintenance program. Structural repair and feedback from operators are also covered.

  7. Analysis of a System to Prevent Helicopter Rotor Blade-Airframe Strikes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    airframe are particularly vulnerable: the tail boom, canopy and, in the case of the underslung, teetoring rotor, the rotor shaft. This latter case is...but they do occur. Three areas of the airframe are particularly vulnerable: the tail boom, canopy and, in the case of the underslung, teetoring rotor...particular vulnerable, the tail boom, canopy and, in the case of the underslung, teetoring rotor, the rotor shaft. This latter case, known as "mast

  8. Structural Integrity and Aging-Related Issues of Helicopters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    an all- "poor design, non- conformity of components, more composite airframe is still not a reality. The total severe load spectrum than expected" and...the development, * non- conformal parts, and manufacturing and operational processes of rotorcraft. * manufacturing defects. In development, causes...sustained, or returned to service after repairing 35 30 . 4 25-- C.) 2 ) 25 0I 2 U) 10 0) J 1~ 5 CL 0- Corrosion Fretting & Wear Bearing Flaws Loss of

  9. The NASA/industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) program: Boeing Helicopters airframe finite element modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabel, R.; Lang, P.; Reed, D.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models based on the finite element method of structural analysis, as embodied in the NASTRAN computer code, are routinely used by the helicopter industry to calculate airframe static internal loads used for sizing structural members. Historically, less reliance has been placed on the vibration predictions based on these models. Beginning in the early 1980's NASA's Langley Research Center initiated an industry wide program with the objective of engendering the needed trust in vibration predictions using these models and establishing a body of modeling guides which would enable confident future prediction of airframe vibration as part of the regular design process. Emphasis in this paper is placed on the successful modeling of the Army/Boeing CH-47D which showed reasonable correlation with test data. A principal finding indicates that improved dynamic analysis requires greater attention to detail and perhaps a finer mesh, especially the mass distribution, than the usual stress model. Post program modeling efforts show improved correlation placing key modal frequencies in the b/rev range with 4 percent of the test frequencies.

  10. Airframe Noise Results from the QTD II Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elkoby, Ronen; Brusniak, Leon; Stoker, Robert W.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Abeysinghe, Amal; Moe, Jefferey W.

    2007-01-01

    With continued growth in air travel, sensitivity to community noise intensifies and materializes in the form of increased monitoring, regulations, and restrictions. Accordingly, realization of quieter aircraft is imperative, albeit only achievable with reduction of both engine and airframe components of total aircraft noise. Model-scale airframe noise testing has aided in this pursuit; however, the results are somewhat limited due to lack of fidelity of model hardware, particularly in simulating full-scale landing gear. Moreover, simulation of true in-flight conditions is non-trivial if not infeasible. This paper reports on an investigation of full-scale landing gear noise measured as part of the 2005 Quiet Technology Demonstrator 2 (QTD2) flight test program. Conventional Boeing 777-300ER main landing gear were tested, along with two noise reduction concepts, namely a toboggan fairing and gear alignment with the local flow, both of which were down-selected from various other noise reduction devices evaluated in model-scale testing at Virginia Tech. The full-scale toboggan fairings were designed by Goodrich Aerostructures as add-on devices allowing for complete retraction of the main gear. The baseline-conventional gear, faired gear, and aligned gear were all evaluated with the high-lift system in the retracted position and deployed at various flap settings, all at engine idle power setting. Measurements were taken with flyover community noise microphones and a large aperture acoustic phased array, yielding far-field spectra, and localized sources (beamform maps). The results were utilized to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the merit of each noise reduction concept. Complete similarity between model-scale and full-scale noise reduction levels was not found and requires further investigation. Far-field spectra exhibited no noise reduction for both concepts across all angles and frequencies. Phased array beamform maps show inconclusive evidence of noise

  11. Design of an airframe agnostic roll-on/roll-off (AA-RORO) sensor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Bruce; Wowczuk, Zenovy S.; Harrison, A. Jay

    2009-05-01

    The US military has recently taken tactical steps to increase its ISR capabilities to support military operations. Due to the dynamic capabilities of the terrorist threat, there is a need for a payload- and airframe-agnostic, rapid-deployment sensor system that can be used on multiple airframes for in-theater missions and for the test and evaluation of sensors prior to fielding. This "plug-and-play" system, based upon the Oculus Sensor Deployment System technology, uses a system-of-systems approach to modularize the base platform, thereby allowing the system to conform to aircraft such as the C-130, C-27, V-22, CH-47, CH-53 and CASA-235 without any modification to the airframe itself. This type of system can be used as (1) a versatile, cost-effective test and evaluation platform for current and developmental sensors as well as (2) an in-theater ISR asset that can be used on readily available airframes at a particular location. This paper illustrates the CONUS and OCONUS mission potential of this multi-airframe system and outlines the novel design characteristics that the Airframe Agnostic Roll-on/Roll-off (AA-RORO) sensor platform incorporates to make it the most versatile, rapid-deployment sensor platform available to support near-term U.S. military operations. The system concept was developed with the support of and input from multiple military agencies and the respective branches they represent.

  12. Integrable structure in discrete shell membrane theory

    PubMed Central

    Schief, W. K.

    2014-01-01

    We present natural discrete analogues of two integrable classes of shell membranes. By construction, these discrete shell membranes are in equilibrium with respect to suitably chosen internal stresses and external forces. The integrability of the underlying equilibrium equations is proved by relating the geometry of the discrete shell membranes to discrete O surface theory. We establish connections with generalized barycentric coordinates and nine-point centres and identify a discrete version of the classical Gauss equation of surface theory. PMID:24808755

  13. Structural basis for retroviral integration into nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Daniel P; Renault, Ludovic; Serrao, Erik; Lesbats, Paul; Matadeen, Rishi; Hare, Stephen; Lindemann, Dirk; Engelman, Alan N; Costa, Alessandro; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-07-16

    Retroviral integration is catalysed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location ±3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration.

  14. Towards an Airframe Noise Prediction Methodology: Survey of Current Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, Fereidoun; Casper, Jay H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a critical survey of the current airframe noise (AFN) prediction methodologies. Four methodologies are recognized. These are the fully analytic method, CFD combined with the acoustic analogy, the semi-empirical method and fully numerical method. It is argued that for the immediate need of the aircraft industry, the semi-empirical method based on recent high quality acoustic database is the best available method. The method based on CFD and the Ffowcs William- Hawkings (FW-H) equation with penetrable data surface (FW-Hpds ) has advanced considerably and much experience has been gained in its use. However, more research is needed in the near future particularly in the area of turbulence simulation. The fully numerical method will take longer to reach maturity. Based on the current trends, it is predicted that this method will eventually develop into the method of choice. Both the turbulence simulation and propagation methods need to develop more for this method to become useful. Nonetheless, the authors propose that the method based on a combination of numerical and analytical techniques, e.g., CFD combined with FW-H equation, should also be worked on. In this effort, the current symbolic algebra software will allow more analytical approaches to be incorporated into AFN prediction methods.

  15. Tip Fence for Reduction of Lift-Generated Airframe Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C. (Inventor); Storms, Bruce L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a unique lift-generated noise reduction apparatus. This apparatus includes a plurality of tip fences that are secured to the trailing and leading assemblies of the high-lift system, as close as possible to the discontinuities where the vortices are most likely to form. In one embodiment, these tip fences are secured to some or all of the outboard and inboard tips of the wing slats and flaps. The tip fence includes a generally flat, or an aerodynamically shaped plate or device that could be formed of almost any rigid material, such as metal, wood, plastic, fiber glass, aluminum, etc. In a preferred embodiment, the tip fences extend below and perpendicularly to flaps and the slats to which they are attached, such that these tip fences are aligned with the nominal free stream velocity of the aircraft. In addition to reducing airframe noise, the tip fence tends to decrease drag and to increase lift, thus improving the overall aerodynamic performance of the aircraft. Another advantage presented by the tip fence lies in the simplicity of its design, its elegance, and its ready ability to fit on the wing components, such as the flaps and the slats. Furthermore, it does not require non-standard materials or fabrication techniques, and it can be readily, easily and inexpensively retrofited on most of the existing aircraft, with minimal design changes.

  16. An integrated approach to structural genomics.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, U; Frevert, J; Hofmann, K; Illing, G; Maurer, C; Oschkinat, H; Saenger, W

    2000-01-01

    Structural genomics aims at determining a set of protein structures that will represent all domain folds present in the biosphere. These structures can be used as the basis for the homology modelling of the majority of all remaining protein domains or, indeed, proteins. Structural genomics therefore promises to provide a comprehensive structural description of the protein universe. To achieve this, a broad scientific effort is required. The Berlin-based "Protein Structure Factory" (PSF) plans to contribute to this effort by setting up a local infrastructure for the low-cost, high-throughput analysis of soluble human proteins. In close collaboration with the German Human Genome Project (DHGP) protein-coding genes will be expressed in Escherichia coli or yeast. Affinity-tagged proteins will be purified semi-automatically for biophysical characterization and structure analysis by X-ray diffraction methods and NMR spectroscopy. In all steps of the structure analysis process, possibilities for automation, parallelization and standardization will be explored. Major new facilities that are created for the PSF include a robotic station for large-scale protein crystallization, an NMR center and an experimental station for protein crystallography at the synchrotron storage ring BESSY II in Berlin.

  17. Integrated aerodynamic/structural design of a sailplane wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Gurdal, Z.; Haftka, R. T.; Strauch, G. J.; Eppard, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Using lifting-line theory and beam analysis, the geometry (planiform and twist) and composite material structural sizes (skin thickness, spar cap, and web thickness) were designed for a sailplane wing, subject to both structural and aerodynamic constraints. For all elements, the integrated design (simultaneously designing the aerodynamics and the structure) was superior in terms of performance and weight to the sequential design (where the aerodynamic geometry is designed to maximize the performance, following which a structural/aeroelastic design minimizes the weight). Integrated designs produced less rigid, higher aspect ratio wings with favorable aerodynamic/structural interactions.

  18. 2. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking north. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking north. The Components Test Laboratory (T-27) is located in the immediate foreground. Immediately uphill to the left of T-27 is the Boiler Chiller Plant (T-28H). To the left of T-28H is the Oxidizer Conditioning Structure (T-28D). Behind the T-28D is the Long-Term Oxidizer Silo (T-28B). The twin gantry structure at the left is the Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Microfabricated structures for integrated DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, M A; Mastrangelo, C H; Sammarco, T S; Man, F P; Webster, J R; Johnsons, B N; Foerster, B; Jones, D; Fields, Y; Kaiser, A R; Burke, D T

    1996-01-01

    Photolithographic micromachining of silicon is a candidate technology for the construction of high-throughput DNA analysis devices. However, the development of complex silicon microfabricated systems has been hindered in part by the lack of a simple, versatile pumping method for integrating individual components. Here we describe a surface-tension-based pump able to move discrete nanoliter drops through enclosed channels using only local heating. This thermocapillary pump can accurately mix, measure, and divide drops by simple electronic control. In addition, we have constructed thermal-cycling chambers, gel electrophoresis channels, and radiolabeled DNA detectors that are compatible with the fabrication of thermocapillary pump channels. Since all of the components are made by conventional photolithographic techniques, they can be assembled into more complex integrated systems. The combination of pump and components into self-contained miniaturized devices may provide significant improvements in DNA analysis speed, portability, and cost. The potential of microfabricated systems lies in the low unit cost of silicon-based construction and in the efficient sample handling afforded by component integration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643614

  20. Integrating electrostatic adhesion to composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Callum J. C.; Bond, Ian P.; Potter, Kevin D.

    2015-04-01

    Additional functionality within load bearing components holds potential for adding value to a structure, design or product. We consider the adaptation of an established technology, electrostatic adhesion or electroadhesion, for application in glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials. Electroadhesion uses high potential difference (~2-3 kV) between co-planar electrodes to generate temporary holding forces to both electrically conductive and nonconductive contact surfaces. Using a combination of established fabrication techniques, electroadhesive elements are co-cured within a composite host structure during manufacture. This provides an almost symbiotic relationship between the electroadhesive and the composite structure, with the electroadhesive providing an additional functionality, whilst the epoxy matrix material of the composite acts as a dielectric for the high voltage electrodes of the device. Silicone rubber coated devices have been shown to offer high shear load (85kPa) capability for GFRP components held together using this technique. Through careful control of the connection interface, we consider the incorporation of these devices within complete composite structures for additional functionality. The ability to vary the internal connectivity of structural elements could allow for incremental changes in connectivity between discrete sub-structures, potentially introducing variable stiffness to the global structure.

  1. Arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft structural design concepts evaluation. Volume 4: Sections 15 through 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The analyses performed to provide structural mass estimates for the arrow wing supersonic cruise aircraft are presented. To realize the full potential for structural mass reduction, a spectrum of approaches for the wing and fuselage primary structure design were investigated. The objective was: (1) to assess the relative merits of various structural arrangements, concepts, and materials; (2) to select the structural approach best suited for the Mach 2.7 environment; and (3) to provide construction details and structural mass estimates based on in-depth structural design studies. Production costs, propulsion-airframe integration, and advanced technology assessment are included.

  2. Towards Full Aircraft Airframe Noise Prediction: Lattice Boltzmann Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Fares, Ehab; Casalino, Damiano

    2014-01-01

    Computational results for an 18%-scale, semi-span Gulfstream aircraft model are presented. Exa Corporation's lattice Boltzmann PowerFLOW(trademark) solver was used to perform time-dependent simulations of the flow field associated with this high-fidelity aircraft model. The simulations were obtained for free-air at a Mach number of 0.2 with the flap deflected at 39 deg (landing configuration). We focused on accurately predicting the prominent noise sources at the flap tips and main landing gear for the two baseline configurations, namely, landing flap setting without and with gear deployed. Capitalizing on the inherently transient nature of the lattice Boltzmann formulation, the complex time-dependent flow features associated with the flap were resolved very accurately and efficiently. To properly simulate the noise sources over a broad frequency range, the tailored grid was very dense near the flap inboard and outboard tips. Extensive comparison of the computed time-averaged and unsteady surface pressures with wind tunnel measurements showed excellent agreement for the global aerodynamic characteristics and the local flow field at the flap inboard and outboard tips and the main landing gear. In particular, the computed fluctuating surface pressure field for the flap agreed well with the measurements in both amplitude and frequency content, indicating that the prominent airframe noise sources at the tips were captured successfully. Gear-flap interaction effects were remarkably well predicted and were shown to affect only the inboard flap tip, altering the steady and unsteady pressure fields in that region. The simulated farfield noise spectra for both baseline configurations, obtained using a Ffowcs-Williams and Hawkings acoustic analogy approach, were shown to be in close agreement with measured values.

  3. DSSTox EPA Integrated Risk Information System Structure ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database was developed and is maintained by EPA's Office of Research and Developement, National Center for Environmental Assessment. IRIS is a database of human health effects that may result from exposure to various substances found in the environment. The information in IRIS is intended for those without extensive training in toxicology, but with some knowledge of sciences. IRIS chemical files contain descriptive and quantitative information in oral reference doses and inhalation reference concentrations and hazard identification, oral slope factors, and oral and inhalation unit risks for carcinogenic effects.

  4. Embedded Sensor Array Development for Composite Structure Integrity Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Bryan, W. L.; Clonts, L. G.; Franks, S.

    2007-06-26

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Accellent Technologies, Inc. (the "Participant") was for the development of an embedded ultrasonic sensor system for composite structure integrity monitoring.

  5. Electromechanical co-design and experiment of structurally integrated antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinzhu; Huang, Jin; Song, Liwei; Zhang, Dan; Ma, Yunchao

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes an electromechanical co-design method of a structurally integrated antenna to simultaneously meet mechanical and electrical requirements. The method consists of three stages. The first stage involves finishing an initial design of the microstrip antenna without a facesheet or honeycomb, according to some predefined performances. Subsequently, the facesheet and honeycomb of the structurally integrated antenna are designed using an electromechanical co-design optimization. Based on the results from the first and second stages, a fine full-wave electromagnetic model is developed and the coarse design results are further optimized to meet the electrical performance. The co-design method is applied to the design of a 2.5 GHz structurally integrated antenna, and then the designed antenna is fabricated. Experiments from the mechanical and electrical performances are conducted, and the results confirm the effectiveness of the co-design method. This method shows great promise for the multidisciplinary design of a structurally integrated antenna.

  6. Addressable-Matrix Integrated-Circuit Test Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayah, Hoshyar R.; Buehler, Martin G.

    1991-01-01

    Method of quality control based on use of row- and column-addressable test structure speeds collection of data on widths of resistor lines and coverage of steps in integrated circuits. By use of straightforward mathematical model, line widths and step coverages deduced from measurements of electrical resistances in each of various combinations of lines, steps, and bridges addressable in test structure. Intended for use in evaluating processes and equipment used in manufacture of application-specific integrated circuits.

  7. Preliminary Analysis of Acoustic Measurements from the NASA-Gulfstream Airframe Noise Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Lockhard, David D.; Humphreys, Willliam M.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Van De Ven, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The NASA-Gulfstream joint Airframe Noise Flight Test program was conducted at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility during October, 2006. The primary objective of the AFN flight test was to acquire baseline airframe noise data on a regional jet class of transport in order to determine noise source strengths and distributions for model validation. To accomplish this task, two measuring systems were used: a ground-based microphone array and individual microphones. Acoustic data for a Gulfstream G550 aircraft were acquired over the course of ten days. Over twenty-four test conditions were flown. The test matrix was designed to provide an acoustic characterization of both the full aircraft and individual airframe components and included cruise to landing configurations. Noise sources were isolated by selectively deploying individual components (flaps, main landing gear, nose gear, spoilers, etc.) and altering the airspeed, glide path, and engine settings. The AFN flight test program confirmed that the airframe is a major contributor to the noise from regional jets during landing operations. Sound pressure levels from the individual microphones on the ground revealed the flap system to be the dominant airframe noise source for the G550 aircraft. The corresponding array beamform maps showed that most of the radiated sound from the flaps originates from the side edges. Using velocity to the sixth power and Strouhal scaling of the sound pressure spectra obtained at different speeds failed to collapse the data into a single spectrum. The best data collapse was obtained when the frequencies were left unscaled.

  8. Effect of Directional Array Size on the Measurement of Airframe Noise Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of overall size of directional (or phased) arrays on the measurement of aeroacoustic components. An airframe model was mounted in the potential core of an open-jet windtunnel, with the directional arrays located outside the flow in an anechoic environment. Two array systems were used; one with a solid measurement angle that encompasses 31.6 deg.of source directivity and a smaller one that encompasses 7.2 deg. The arrays, and sub-arrays of various sizes, measured noise from a calibrator source and flap edge model setups. In these cases, noise was emitted from relatively small, but finite size source regions, with intense levels compared to other sources. Although the larger arrays revealed much more source region detail, the measured source levels were substantially reduced due to finer resolution compared to that of the smaller arrays. To better understand the measurements quantitatively, an analytical model was used to define the basic relationships between array to source region sizes and measured output level. Also, the effect of noise scattering by shear layer turbulence was examined using the present data and those of previous studies. Taken together, the two effects were sufficient to explain spectral level differences between arrays of different sizes. An important result of this study is that total (integrated) noise source levels are retrievable and the levels are independent of the array size as long as certain experimental and processing criteria are met. The criteria for both open and closed tunnels are discussed. The success of special purpose diagonal-removal processing in obtaining integrated results is apparently dependent in part on source distribution. Also discussed is the fact that extended sources are subject to substantial measurement error, especially for large arrays.

  9. 1. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking northwest. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View, structures in Systems Integration Laboratory complex, looking northwest. The twin gantry structure in the center is the Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28). To its immediate left in the foreground is a truck well, concrete retaining wall, piping, and stack associated with the oxidizer vault storage area. To the immediate right of T-28 is the concrete Signal Transfer Building (T-28A). At the extreme right is the Long-Term Hydrazine Silo (T-28E). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. Integrative Structural Biomechanical Concepts of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Nair, Kalyani; Andonian, Brian J.; Prus, Kristina M.; Kelly, Joseph; Sanchez, Jose R.; Henderson, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is not fully explained by inflammatory processes. Clinical, epidemiological, genetic, and course of disease features indicate additional host-related risk processes and predispositions. Collectively, the pattern of predisposition to onset in adolescent and young adult ages, male preponderance, and widely varied severity of AS is unique among rheumatic diseases. However, this pattern could reflect biomechanical and structural differences between the sexes, naturally occurring musculoskeletal changes over life cycles, and a population polymorphism. During juvenile development, the body is more flexible and weaker than during adolescent maturation and young adulthood, when strengthening and stiffening considerably increase. During middle and later ages, the musculoskeletal system again weakens. The novel concept of an innate axial myofascial hypertonicity reflects basic mechanobiological principles in human function, tissue reactivity, and pathology. However, these processes have been little studied and require critical testing. The proposed physical mechanisms likely interact with recognized immunobiological pathways. The structural biomechanical processes and tissue reactions might possibly precede initiation of other AS-related pathways. Research in the combined structural mechanobiology and immunobiology processes promises to improve understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of AS than prevailing concepts. The combined processes might better explain characteristic enthesopathic and inflammatory processes in AS. PMID:22216409

  11. Integrated aerodynamic-structural-control wing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rais-Rohani, M.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Unger, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic-structural-control design of a forward-swept composite wing for a high subsonic transport aircraft is considered. The structural analysis is based on a finite-element method. The aerodynamic calculations are based on a vortex-lattice method, and the control calculations are based on an output feedback control. The wing is designed for minimum weight subject to structural, performance/aerodynamic and control constraints. Efficient methods are used to calculate the control-deflection and control-effectiveness sensitivities which appear as second-order derivatives in the control constraint equations. To suppress the aeroelastic divergence of the forward-swept wing, and to reduce the gross weight of the design aircraft, two separate cases are studied: (1) combined application of aeroelastic tailoring and active controls; and (2) aeroelastic tailoring alone. The results of this study indicated that, for this particular example, aeroelastic tailoring is sufficient for suppressing the aeroelastic divergence, and the use of active controls was not necessary.

  12. Integrated controls-structures optimization of a large space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Sandridge, Chris A.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for the simultaneous optimization of structural and control elements of a large space structure is developed and demonstrated for a test problem, the NASA COFS-I Mast Flight System. General-purpose control and structural-analysis codes are applied directly to a large detailed model, with realistic objective and constraint functions. The steps in the process (structural optimization, control optimization, and system coordination) are described and illustrated with diagrams; the numerical implementation (using different computers for different steps) is discussed; and results showing significant design improvements in three COFS-I configurations are presented in graphs. When the weights of both structure and power-generating equipment are taken into account, a 40-bay truss design is found to be better than designs with 42 or 44 bays.

  13. Reactor pressure vessel structural integrity research

    SciTech Connect

    Pennell, W.E.; Corwin, W.R.

    1995-04-01

    Development continues on the technology used to assess the safety of irradiation-embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws. Fracture mechanics tests on RPV steel, coupled with detailed elastic-plastic finite-element analyses of the crack-tip stress fields, have shown that (1) constraint relaxation at the crack tip of shallows surface flaws results in increased data scatter but no increase in the lower-bound fracture toughness, (2) the nil ductility temperature (NDT) performs better than the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RT{sub NDT}) as a normalizing parameter for shallow-flaw fracture toughness data, (3) biaxial loading can reduce the shallow-flaw fracture toughness, (4) stress-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlations cannot predict the effect of biaxial loading on a shallow-flaw fracture toughness because in-plane stresses at the crack tip are not influenced by biaxial loading, and (5) an implicit strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation can predict the effect of biaxial loading on shallow-flaw fracture toughness. Experimental irradiation investigations have shown that (1) the irradiation-induced shift in Charpy V-notch vs temperature behavior may not be adequate to conservatively assess fracture toughness shifts due to embrittlement, and (2) the wide global variations of initial chemistry and fracture properties of a nominally uniform material within a pressure vessel may confound accurate integrity assessments that require baseline properties.

  14. Advanced subsonic transport approach noise: The relative contribution of airframe noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.; Garber, Donald P.

    1992-01-01

    With current engine technology, airframe noise is a contributing source for large commercial aircraft on approach, but not the major contributor. With the promise of much quieter jet engines with the planned new generation of high-by-pass turbofan engines, airframe noise has become a topic of interest in the advanced subsonic transport research program. The objective of this paper is to assess the contribution of airframe noise relative to the other aircraft noise sources on approach. The assessment will be made for a current technology large commercial transport aircraft and for an envisioned advanced technology aircraft. NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) will be used to make total aircraft noise predictions for these two aircraft types. Predicted noise levels and areas of noise contours will be used to determine the relative importance of the contributing approach noise sources. The actual set-up decks used to make the ANOPP runs for the two aircraft types are included in appendixes.

  15. Low-Cost Composite Materials and Structures for Aircraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deo, Ravi B.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Holzwarth, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of current applications of composite materials and structures in military, transport and General Aviation aircraft is presented to assess the maturity of composites technology, and the payoffs realized. The results of the survey show that performance requirements and the potential to reduce life cycle costs for military aircraft and direct operating costs for transport aircraft are the main reasons for the selection of composite materials for current aircraft applications. Initial acquisition costs of composite airframe components are affected by high material costs and complex certification tests which appear to discourage the widespread use of composite materials for aircraft applications. Material suppliers have performed very well to date in developing resin matrix and fiber systems for improved mechanical, durability and damage tolerance performance. The next challenge for material suppliers is to reduce material costs and to develop materials that are suitable for simplified and inexpensive manufacturing processes. The focus of airframe manufacturers should be on the development of structural designs that reduce assembly costs by the use of large-scale integration of airframe components with unitized structures and manufacturing processes that minimize excessive manual labor.

  16. Model reduction in integrated controls-structures design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.

    1993-01-01

    It is the objective of this paper to present a model reduction technique developed for the integrated controls-structures design of flexible structures. Integrated controls-structures design problems are typically posed as nonlinear mathematical programming problems, where the design variables consist of both structural and control parameters. In the solution process, both structural and control design variables are constantly changing; therefore, the dynamic characteristics of the structure are also changing. This presents a problem in obtaining a reduced-order model for active control design and analysis which will be valid for all design points within the design space. In other words, the frequency and number of the significant modes of the structure (modes that should be included) may vary considerably throughout the design process. This is also true as the locations and/or masses of the sensors and actuators change. Moreover, since the number of design evaluations in the integrated design process could easily run into thousands, any feasible order-reduction method should not require model reduction analysis at every design iteration. In this paper a novel and efficient technique for model reduction in the integrated controls-structures design process, which addresses these issues, is presented.

  17. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two-day conference on the structural integrity and durability of reusable space propulsion systems was held on May 12 and 13, 1987, at the NASA Lewis research Center. Aerothermodynamic loads; instrumentation; fatigue, fracture, and constitutive modeling; and structural dynamics were discussed.

  18. Enabling technologies research and development structures. [for National Aerospace Plane Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, John G., Jr.; Murrow, Harold N.

    1989-01-01

    The technology-development areas of most critical importance to the definition of the NASP vehicle's airframe and integrated propulsion systems are discussed with a view to the progress made to date and the prospects for the expansion of a definitive NASP design data base on materials, structures, etc. It is necessary to achieve a very low structural-mass fraction, to withstand 6000 F radiation equilibrium fuselage nosecap temperatures, to manage an extensive active cooling network for both airframe and propulsion system capable of dissipating 10,000 BTU/sq ft-sec thermal fluxes, to maintain effective hot-gas sealing, and to manufacture high temperature effectiveness-retaining control surfaces. An account is given of successes thus far achieved.

  19. Application of integrated fluid-thermal-structural analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, Allan R.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Bey, Kim S.; Thornton, Earl A.; Morgan, Ken

    1988-01-01

    Hypersonic vehicles operate in a hostile aerothermal environment which has a significant impact on their aerothermostructural performance. Significant coupling occurs between the aerodynamic flow field, structural heat transfer, and structural response creating a multidisciplinary interaction. Interfacing state-of-the-art disciplinary analysis methods is not efficient, hence interdisciplinary analysis methods integrated into a single aerothermostructural analyzer are needed. The NASA Langley Research Center is developing such methods in an analyzer called LIFTS (Langley Integrated Fluid-Thermal-Structural) analyzer. The evolution and status of LIFTS is reviewed and illustrated through applications.

  20. Integrated Controls-Structures Design Methodology for Flexible Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, P. G.; Joshi, S. M.; Price, D. B.

    1995-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for the design of flexible spacecraft, wherein the structural design and the control system design are performed simultaneously. The integrated design problem is posed as an optimization problem in which both the structural parameters and the control system parameters constitute the design variables, which are used to optimize a common objective function, thereby resulting in an optimal overall design. The approach is demonstrated by application to the integrated design of a geostationary platform, and to a ground-based flexible structure experiment. The numerical results obtained indicate that the integrated design approach generally yields spacecraft designs that are substantially superior to the conventional approach, wherein the structural design and control design are performed sequentially.

  1. ICAM Manufacturing Cost/Design Guide. Volume 3. Airframes. User’s Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    PER MATERIAL CUBIC INCH POUND ALUMINUM 705F -T6 -T652 r-T7352 TITANIUM 0.16 $30Ti6AI-4V LOW ALLOY STEEL 0.28 $3 4340 PH CRES $0.28 $7 15 - 5PH FIGURE...DG ...... ................ ... 3-3 3.3 Utilization of Learning Curve . . . . . . . . . 3-6 3.4 Cost Worksheet for Airframe Designers ...... 3-9 3.4.1...for Airframe Assemblies . 4.2- 15 4.2.5 Ground Rules for Mechanically Fastened Assembly Section .............. 4.2-27 4.2.5.1 General Ground Rules

  2. An examination of the relations between rotor vibratory loads and airframe vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebanck, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    Harmonic rotor hub loads and airframe interactions in steady flight are reviewed, with regard to the objective of achieving lower airframe vibration by modifying blade root loads. Flight test and wind tunnel data are reviewed, along with sample fuselage response data. Trends which could provide a generalized approach to the above objective are found to be very limited. Recent analytical and corresponding experimental blade tuning modifications are reviewed and compared. Rotor vibratory load modification and substantial vibration changes were achieved over a wide range of rotor operating conditions.

  3. Summary of the Tandem Cylinder Solutions from the Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations-I Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen submissions in the tandem cylinders category of the First Workshop on Benchmark problems for Airframe Noise Computations are summarized. Although the geometry is relatively simple, the problem involves complex physics. Researchers employed various block-structured, overset, unstructured and embedded Cartesian grid techniques and considerable computational resources to simulate the flow. The solutions are compared against each other and experimental data from 2 facilities. Overall, the simulations captured the gross features of the flow, but resolving all the details which would be necessary to compute the noise remains challenging. In particular, how to best simulate the effects of the experimental transition strip, and the associated high Reynolds number effects, was unclear. Furthermore, capturing the spanwise variation proved difficult.

  4. Integrated structural control design of large space structures

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Lauffer, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Active control of structures has been under intensive development for the last ten years. Reference 2 reviews much of the identification and control technology for structural control developed during this time. The technology was initially focused on space structure and weapon applications; however, recently the technology is also being directed toward applications in manufacturing and transportation. Much of this technology focused on multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) identification and control methodology because many of the applications require a coordinated control involving multiple disturbances and control objectives where multiple actuators and sensors are necessary for high performance. There have been many optimal robust control methods developed for the design of MIMO robust control laws; however, there appears to be a significant gap between the theoretical development and experimental evaluation of control and identification methods to address structural control applications. Many methods have been developed for MIMO identification and control of structures, such as the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), Q-Markov Covariance Equivalent Realization (Q-Markov COVER) for identification; and, Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG), Frequency Weighted LQG and H-/ii-synthesis methods for control. Upon implementation, many of the identification and control methods have shown limitations such as the excitation of unmodelled dynamics and sensitivity to system parameter variations. As a result, research on methods which address these problems have been conducted.

  5. Structural design of integral tankage for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, I. O.; Davis, R. B.; Lemessurier, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Fully reusable launch vehicle concepts being studied for post-Shuttle era transports present major challenges for the structural design of large propellant tankage. The dominant structural elements are internal tankage for both cryogenic and non-cryogenic propellants which must operate in a broad range of thermal environments while meeting requirements for low weight and reusability. Several approaches to integral tank design are discussed and an analysis of a hot structure honeycomb sandwich tank for a circular body vehicle is presented.

  6. Development and Characterization of Multilayer Integrated Warhead Structure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    the final concept. Steel castings ( 17 - 4PH ) were made and specimens were machined to characterize the structural properties of the concept. The pioperty...casting 17 - 4PH test specimens and characterizing these composite structures. It was anticipated that problem would occur in the transition . from...MULTILAYER Final Report INTEGRATED WARHEAD STRUCTURE 3/ 17 /83 to 9/30/84 G. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(a) 0. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) D

  7. OVERVIEW OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY - 12123

    SciTech Connect

    RAST RS; RINKER MW; WASHENFELDER DJ; JOHNSON JB

    2012-01-25

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration. Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford SSTs. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford SSTs is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS{reg_sign} The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford SSTs has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analyses of the remaining Hanford SSTs are scheduled for FY2013. Hanford SSTs are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of the concrete tank domes, looking for cracks and

  8. Overview of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Rast, Richard S.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2013-11-14

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford Single-Shell Tanks. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS. The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford Single-Shell Tanks has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analysis of the remaining Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is scheduled for FY2014. Hanford Single-Shell Tanks are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of

  9. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 1: Wind tunnel test pressure data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilz, D. E.; Devereaux, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 1 of 2: Wind Tunnel Test Pressure Data Report.

  10. Flight Test Results for Uniquely Tailored Propulsion-Airframe Aeroacoustic Chevrons: Community Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, Eric; Mengle, Vinod; Czech, Michael; Callendar, Bryan; Thomas, Russ

    2006-01-01

    The flow/acoustic environment around the jet exhaust of an engine when installed on an airplane, say, under the wing, is highly asymmetric due to the pylon, the wing and the high-lift devices. Recent scale model tests have shown that such Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic (PAA) interactions and the jet mixing noise can be reduced more than with conventional azimuthally uniform chevrons by uniquely tailoring the chevrons to produce enhanced mixing near the pylon. This paper describes the community noise results from a flight test on a large twin-engine airplane using this concept of azimuthally varying chevrons for engines installed under the wing. Results for two different nozzle configurations are described: azimuthally varying "PAA T-fan" chevrons on the fan nozzle with a baseline no-chevron core nozzle and a second with PAA T-fan chevrons with conventional azimuthally uniform chevrons on the core nozzle. We analyze these test results in comparison to the baseline no-chevron nozzle on both spectral and integrated power level bases. The study focuses on the peak jet noise reduction and the effects at high frequencies for typical take-off power settings. The noise reduction and the absolute noise levels are then compared to model scale results. The flight test results verify that the PAA T-fan nozzles in combination with standard core chevron nozzles can, indeed, give a reasonable amount of noise reduction at low frequencies without high-frequency lift during take-off conditions and hardly any impact on the cruise thrust coefficient.

  11. Multi-scale mechanism based life prediction of polymer matrix composites for high temperature airframe applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Priyank

    A multi-scale mechanism-based life prediction model is developed for high-temperature polymer matrix composites (HTPMC) for high temperature airframe applications. In the first part of this dissertation the effect of Cloisite 20A (C20A) nano-clay compounding on the thermo-oxidative weight loss and the residual stresses due to thermal oxidation for a thermoset polymer bismaleimide (BMI) are investigated. A three-dimensional (3-D) micro-mechanics based finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to investigate the residual stresses due to thermal oxidation using an in-house FEA code (NOVA-3D). In the second part of this dissertation, a novel numerical-experimental methodology is outlined to determine cohesive stress and damage evolution parameters for pristine as well as isothermally aged (in air) polymer matrix composites. A rate-dependent viscoelastic cohesive layer model was implemented in an in-house FEA code to simulate the delamination initiation and propagation in unidirectional polymer composites before and after aging. Double cantilever beam (DCB) experiments were conducted (at UT-Dallas) on both pristine and isothermally aged IM-7/BMI composite specimens to determine the model parameters. The J-Integral based approach was adapted to extract cohesive stresses near the crack tip. Once the damage parameters had been characterized, the test-bed FEA code employed a micromechanics based viscoelastic cohesive layer model to numerically simulate the DCB experiment. FEA simulation accurately captures the macro-scale behavior (load-displacement history) simultaneously with the micro-scale behavior (crack-growth history).

  12. Calibration of Airframe and Occupant Models for Two Full-Scale Rotorcraft Crash Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta, Lucas G.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter were conducted in 2009 and 2010 at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility in support of NASA s Subsonic Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Project. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of an externally mounted composite deployable energy absorber under combined impact conditions. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish baseline loads that are regarded as severe but survivable. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to a system integrated finite element model of the test article. Results from 19 accelerometers placed throughout the airframe were compared to finite element model responses. The model developed for the purposes of predicting acceleration responses from the first crash test was inadequate when evaluating more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used to calibrate model results for the second full-scale crash test. This combination of heuristic and quantitative methods was used to identify modeling deficiencies, evaluate parameter importance, and propose required model changes. It is shown that the multi-dimensional calibration techniques presented here are particularly effective in identifying model adequacy. Acceleration results for the calibrated model were compared to test results and the original model results. There was a noticeable improvement in the pilot and co-pilot region, a slight improvement in the occupant model response, and an over-stiffening effect in the passenger region. This approach should be adopted early on, in combination with the building-block approaches that are customarily used, for model development and test planning guidance. Complete crash simulations with validated finite element models can be used

  13. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating

  14. Multiple methods integration for structural mechanics analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    A new research area of multiple methods integration is proposed for joining diverse methods of structural mechanics analysis which interact with one another. Three categories of multiple methods are defined: those in which a physical interface are well defined; those in which a physical interface is not well-defined, but selected; and those in which the interface is a mathematical transformation. Two fundamental integration procedures are presented that can be extended to integrate various methods (e.g., finite elements, Rayleigh Ritz, Galerkin, and integral methods) with one another. Since the finite element method will likely be the major method to be integrated, its enhanced robustness under element distortion is also examined and a new robust shell element is demonstrated.

  15. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analysis is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperatures for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  16. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analyses is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperature for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal-structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  17. Structural Integrity Evaluation of the Lear Fan 2100 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, H. P.; Dyer, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    An in-situ nondestructive inspection was conducted to detect manufacturing and assembly induced defects in the upper two wing surfaces (skin s) and upper fuselage skin of the Lear Fan 2100 aircraft E009. The effects of the defects, detected during the inspection, on the integrity of the structure was analytically evaluated. A systematic evaluation was also conducted to determine the damage tolerance capability of the upper wing skin against impact threats and assembly induced damage. The upper wing skin was divided into small regions for damage tolerance evaluations. Structural reliability, margin of safety, allowable strains, and allowable damage size were computed. The results indicated that the impact damage threat imposed on composite military aircraft structures is too severe for the Lear Fan 2100 upper wing skin. However, the structural integrity is not significantly degraded by the assembly induced damage for properly assembled structures, such as the E009 aircraft.

  18. NeoCASS: An integrated tool for structural sizing, aeroelastic analysis and MDO at conceptual design level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, Luca; Ricci, Sergio; Travaglini, Lorenzo

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a design framework called NeoCASS (Next generation Conceptual Aero-Structural Sizing Suite), developed at the Department of Aerospace Engineering of Politecnico di Milano in the frame of SimSAC (Simulating Aircraft Stability And Control Characteristics for Use in Conceptual Design) project, funded by EU in the context of 6th Framework Program. It enables the creation of efficient low-order, medium fidelity models particularly suitable for structural sizing, aeroelastic analysis and optimization at the conceptual design level. The whole methodology is based on the integration of geometry construction, aerodynamic and structural analysis codes that combine depictive, computational, analytical, and semi-empirical methods, validated in an aircraft design environment. The work here presented aims at including the airframe and its effect from the very beginning of the conceptual design. This aspect is usually not considered in this early phase. In most cases, very simplified formulas and datasheets are adopted, which implies a low level of detail and a poor accuracy. Through NeoCASS, a preliminar distribution of stiffness and inertias can be determined, given the initial layout. The adoption of empirical formulas is reduced to the minimum in favor of simple numerical methods. This allows to consider the aeroelastic behavior and performances, as well, improving the accuracy of the design tools during the iterative steps and lowering the development costs and reducing the time to market. The result achieved is a design tool based on computational methods for the aero-structural analysis and Multi-Disciplinary Optimization (MDO) of aircraft layouts at the conceptual design stage. A complete case study regarding the TransoniCRuiser aircraft, including validation of the results obtained using industrial standard tools like MSC/NASTRAN and a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code, is reported. As it will be shown, it is possible to improve the degree of

  19. A performance comparison of integration algorithms in simulating flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Asymptotic formulas for the characteristic root errors as well as transfer function gain and phase errors are presented for a number of traditional and new integration methods. Normalized stability regions in the lambda h plane are compared for the various methods. In particular, it is shown that a modified form of Euler integration with root matching is an especially efficient method for simulating lightly-damped structural modes. The method has been used successfully for structural bending modes in the real-time simulation of missiles. Performance of this algorithm is compared with other special algorithms, including the state-transition method. A predictor-corrector version of the modified Euler algorithm permits it to be extended to the simulation of nonlinear models of the type likely to be obtained when using the discretized structure approach. Performance of the different integration methods is also compared for integration step sizes larger than those for which the asymptotic formulas are valid. It is concluded that many traditional integration methods, such as RD-4, are not competitive in the simulation of lightly damped structures.

  20. Impact of active controls technology on structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of The Technical Cooperation Program to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting the loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle. The potential for active controls to adversely affect structural integrity is described, and load predictions obtained using two state-of-the-art analytical methods are given.

  1. Airframe Repair Specialist, 2-3. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    These military-developed curriculum materials consist of five volumes of individualized, self-paced training manuals for use by those studying to be airframe repair technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are the following topics: fundamentals of organization and management (ground safety, aircraft ground safety, and aerospace and power…

  2. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A203. Aircraft Fabric Covering, Painting, and Finishing. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on airframe building and repair, including fabric covering, painting, and finishing. The module contains two units that cover the following topics: (1) inspecting, testing, and installing aircraft fabric coverings and (2) applying dope, paint, and trim. Each unit…

  3. An integrable system and associated integrable models as well as Hamiltonian structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Hon-Wah; Zhang, Yufeng

    2012-10-01

    Starting from an existed Lie algebra introduces a new Lie algebra A1 = {e1, e2, e3} so that two isospectral Lax matrices are established. By employing the Tu scheme an integrable equation hierarchy denoted by IEH is obtained from which a few reduced evolution equations are presented. One of them is the mKdV equation. The elliptic variable solutions and three kinds of Darboux transformations for one coupled equation which is from the IEH are worked out, respectively. Finally, we take use of the Lie algebra A1 to generate eight higher-dimensional Lie algebras from which the linear integrable couplings, the nonlinear integrable couplings, and the bi-integrable couplings of the IEH are engendered, whose Hamiltonian structures are also obtained by the variational identity. Then further reduce one coupled integrable equation to get a nonlinear generalized mKdV equation.

  4. Propeller propulsion system integration: State of technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, S. J.; Vonlavante, E.

    1985-01-01

    A literature survey was performed to identify and review technical material applicable to the problem area of propeller propulsion system integration. The survey covered only aerodynamic interference aspects of the problem, and was restricted primarily to propeller effects on the airframe. The subject of airframe aerodynamic interference on the propeller was limited to the problem of vibration due to nonuniform inflow. The problem of airframe effects on propeller performance was not included. A total of 1121 references are given. The references are grouped into the subject areas of Aircraft Stability, Propulsive Efficiency, Aerodynamic Interference, Aerodynamic Interference-Propeller Vibration, and Miscellaneous.

  5. The structure of integral dimensions: contrasting topological and Cartesian representations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matt; Goldstone, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Diverse evidence shows that perceptually integral dimensions, such as those composing color, are represented holistically. However, the nature of these holistic representations is poorly understood. Extant theories, such as those founded on multidimensional scaling or general recognition theory, model integral stimulus spaces using a Cartesian coordinate system, just as with spaces defined by separable dimensions. This approach entails a rich geometrical structure that has never been questioned but may not be psychologically meaningful for integral dimensions. In particular, Cartesian models carry a notion of orthogonality of component dimensions, such that if 1 dimension is diagnostic for a classification or discrimination task, another can be selected as uniquely irrelevant. This article advances an alternative model in which integral dimensions are characterized as topological spaces. The Cartesian and topological models are tested in a series of experiments using the perceptual-learning phenomenon of dimension differentiation, whereby discrimination training with integral-dimension stimuli can induce an analytic representation of those stimuli. Under the present task design, the 2 models make contrasting predictions regarding the analytic representation that will be learned. Results consistently support the Cartesian model. These findings indicate that perceptual representations of integral dimensions are surprisingly structured, despite their holistic, unanalyzed nature.

  6. Integrated control/structure optimization by multilevel decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    A method for integrated control/structure optimization by multilevel decomposition is presented. It is shown that several previously reported methods were actually partial decompositions wherein only the control was decomposed into a subsystem design. One of these partially decomposed problems was selected as a benchmark example for comparison. The present paper fully decomposes the system into structural and control subsystem designs and produces an improved design. Theory, implementation, and results for the method are presented and compared with the benchmark example.

  7. Modeling the Dependency Structure of Integrated Intensity Processes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies an important issue of dependence structure. To model this structure, the intensities within the Cox processes are driven by dependent shot noise processes, where jumps occur simultaneously and their sizes are correlated. The joint survival probability of the integrated intensities is explicitly obtained from the copula with exponential marginal distributions. Subsequently, this result can provide a very useful guide for credit risk management. PMID:26270638

  8. Structural Integrity Program for INTEC Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Bryant

    2008-08-30

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities.

  9. Integrated structural and optical modeling of the orbiting stellar interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaklan, Stuart B.; Yu, Jeffrey W.; Briggs, Hugh C.

    1993-11-01

    The Integrated Modeling of Optical Systems (IMOS) Integration Workbench at JPL has been used to model the effects of structural perturbations on the optics in the proposed Orbiting Stellar Interferometer (OSI). OSI consists of 3 pairs of interferometers and delay lines attached to a 7.5 meter truss. They are interferometrically monitored from a separate boom by a laser metrology system. The spatially distributed nature of the science instrument calls for a high level of integration between the optics and support structure. Because OSI is designed to achieve micro-arcsecond astrometry, many of its alignment, stability, and knowledge tolerances are in the submicron regime. The spacecraft will be subject to vibrations caused by reaction wheels and on-board equipment, as well as thermal strain due to solar and terrestrial heating. These perturbations affect optical parameters such as optical path differences and beam co-parallelism which are critical to instrument performance. IMOS provides an environment that allows one to design and perturb the structure, attach optics to structural or non-structural nodes, trace rays, and analyze the impact of mechanical perturbations on optical performance. This tool makes it simple to change the structure and immediately see performance enhancement/degradation. We have employed IMOS to analyze the effect of reaction wheel disturbances on the optical path difference in both the science and metrology interferometers.

  10. Integrate modelling of smart structures for astronomy: design future technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Moschetti, M.

    2016-07-01

    The astronomical instrumentation needs high level of image quality and stability. The quality of images processed by an optical instrument can be referred to the size of the spot and/or the point spread function (p.s.f.), while the stability is related to the displacement of the spot centroid during the observations. The importance of new design procedures for astronomical instruments through the direct design of the materials taking into account their functionalities integrating different approaches (FEM + raytracing) is then enhanced by the new upcoming requirement. Different functional materials can be joined together exploiting each peculiar property in order to realize an integrated structure better known as Smart Structure. They are capable of sensing and reacting to their environment in a predictable and desired manner, through the integration of various elements, such as sensors, actuators, power sources, signal processors, and communications network. The Paper describes possible application related to two main functional materials: piezoelectric materials and Shape Memory Alloys.

  11. Development of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Integrated with Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    2007-01-01

    An effort has been initiated to integrate manufacturing process simulations with probabilistic structural analyses in order to capture the important impacts of manufacturing uncertainties on component stress levels and life. Two physics-based manufacturing process models (one for powdered metal forging and the other for annular deformation resistance welding) have been linked to the NESSUS structural analysis code. This paper describes the methodology developed to perform this integration including several examples. Although this effort is still underway, particularly for full integration of a probabilistic analysis, the progress to date has been encouraging and a software interface that implements the methodology has been developed. The purpose of this paper is to report this preliminary development.

  12. STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY MONITORING FOR IMPROVED DRINKING WATER INFRASTRUCTURE SUSTAINABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structural integrity monitoring (SIM) is the systematic detection, location, and quantification of pipe wall damage or associated indicators. Each of the adverse situations below has the potential to be reduced by more effective and economical SIM of water mains:
    1) the dr...

  13. Integration of fluidic jet actuators in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueller, Martin; Lipowski, Mathias; Schirmer, Eckart; Walther, Marco; Otto, Thomas; Geßner, Thomas; Kroll, Lothar

    2015-04-01

    Fluidic Actuated Flow Control (FAFC) has been introduced as a technology that influences the boundary layer by actively blowing air through slots or holes in the aircraft skin or wind turbine rotor blade. Modern wing structures are or will be manufactured using composite materials. In these state of the art systems, AFC actuators are integrated in a hybrid approach. The new idea is to directly integrate the active fluidic elements (such as SJAs and PJAs) and their components in the structure of the airfoil. Consequently, the integration of such fluidic devices must fit the manufacturing process and the material properties of the composite structure. The challenge is to integrate temperature-sensitive active elements and to realize fluidic cavities at the same time. The transducer elements will be provided for the manufacturing steps using roll-to-roll processes. The fluidic parts of the actuators will be manufactured using the MuCell® process that provides on the one hand the defined reproduction of the fluidic structures and, on the other hand, a high light weight index. Based on the first design concept, a demonstrator was developed in order to proof the design approach. The output velocity on the exit was measured using a hot-wire anemometer.

  14. Integrated Controls-Structures Design Methodology: Redesign of an Evolutionary Test Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Gupta, Sandeep; Elliot, Kenny B.; Joshi, Suresh M.

    1997-01-01

    An optimization-based integrated controls-structures design methodology for a class of flexible space structures is described, and the phase-0 Controls-Structures-Integration evolutionary model, a laboratory testbed at NASA Langley, is redesigned using this integrated design methodology. The integrated controls-structures design is posed as a nonlinear programming problem to minimize the control effort required to maintain a specified line-of-sight pointing performance, under persistent white noise disturbance. Static and dynamic dissipative control strategies are employed for feedback control, and parameters of these controllers are considered as the control design variables. Sizes of strut elements in various sections of the CEM are used as the structural design variables. Design guides for the struts are developed and employed in the integrated design process, to ensure that the redesigned structure can be effectively fabricated. The superiority of the integrated design methodology over the conventional design approach is demonstrated analytically by observing a significant reduction in the average control power needed to maintain specified pointing performance with the integrated design approach.

  15. Integration of encapsulated piezoelectric actuators in highly loaded CFRP structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Florian; Ermanni, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    The present work has been initiated in the frame of the European research project DREAM. Within this highly interdisciplinary project we are focusing on the development and application of vibration damping solutions based on piezoelectric shunt circuits for future aeroelastic applications. The scientific community has put significant effort into the investigation of piezoelectric shunt damping in conjuction with typical engineering test structures such as beams and plates. However, investigations are mainly restricted to surface bonded piezoelectric elements. Commercially available actuators and sensors can be easily bonded to structures using standard epoxy resins. Yet, the structural integration into composite laminates is cumbersome, due to the implications in terms of overall structural integrity and functionality, and due to the problems in achieving a good electrical conductivity, intimate contact betwen electrode and piezoceramic material as well as a perfect isolation from the surrounding host structure. This contribution is concerned with technological aspects related to the integration of piezoceramic actuators into highly loaded CFRP structures. In particular, we present results of a comparative study aiming at the characterization of less invasive electrodes to establish electrical contact between the piezoceramic material and possible shunt circuits. Another drawback of commercial actuators are their limited strain allowables ranging from 0.1% to 0.3% which is not sufficient for high performance lighweight structures. The second part of this contribution is therefore dedicated to the description of a novel prestressing procedure which is used to fabricate actuators that command 170% higher strain allowables than non-prestressed actuators. Mechanical testing of these prestressed actuators are very encouraging, showing high strain allowables, perfect electrical isolation from the host structure, excellent electric contacting of the piezoelectric material

  16. Making the difference: integrating structural variation detection tools.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ke; Smit, Sandra; Bonnema, Guusje; Sanchez-Perez, Gabino; de Ridder, Dick

    2015-09-01

    From prokaryotes to eukaryotes, phenotypic variation, adaptation and speciation has been associated with structural variation between genomes of individuals within the same species. Many computer algorithms detecting such variations (callers) have recently been developed, spurred by the advent of the next-generation sequencing technology. Such callers mainly exploit split-read mapping or paired-end read mapping. However, as different callers are geared towards different types of structural variation, there is still no single caller that can be considered a community standard; instead, increasingly the various callers are combined in integrated pipelines. In this article, we review a wide range of callers, discuss challenges in the integration step and present a survey of pipelines used in population genomics studies. Based on our findings, we provide general recommendations on how to set-up such pipelines. Finally, we present an outlook on future challenges in structural variation detection.

  17. Integrated Multidisciplinary Constrained Optimization of Offshore Support Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, Rad; Ashuri, Turaj; van der Valk, Paul L. C.; Molenaar, David P.

    2014-12-01

    In the current offshore wind turbine support structure design method, the tower and foundation, which form the support structure are designed separately by the turbine and foundation designer. This method yields a suboptimal design and it results in a heavy, overdesigned and expensive support structure. This paper presents an integrated multidisciplinary approach to design the tower and foundation simultaneously. Aerodynamics, hydrodynamics, structure and soil mechanics are the modeled disciplines to capture the full dynamic behavior of the foundation and tower under different environmental conditions. The objective function to be minimized is the mass of the support structure. The model includes various design constraints: local and global buckling, modal frequencies, and fatigue damage along different stations of the structure. To show the usefulness of the method, an existing SWT-3.6-107 offshore wind turbine where its tower and foundation are designed separately is used as a case study. The result of the integrated multidisciplinary design optimization shows 12.1% reduction in the mass of the support structure, while satisfying all the design constraints.

  18. An optimization-based integrated controls-structures design methodology for flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Joshi, Suresh M.; Armstrong, Ernest S.

    1993-01-01

    An approach for an optimization-based integrated controls-structures design is presented for a class of flexible spacecraft that require fine attitude pointing and vibration suppression. The integrated design problem is posed in the form of simultaneous optimization of both structural and control design variables. The approach is demonstrated by application to the integrated design of a generic space platform and to a model of a ground-based flexible structure. The numerical results obtained indicate that the integrated design approach can yield spacecraft designs that have substantially superior performance over a conventional design wherein the structural and control designs are performed sequentially. For example, a 40-percent reduction in the pointing error is observed along with a slight reduction in mass, or an almost twofold increase in the controlled performance is indicated with more than a 5-percent reduction in the overall mass of the spacecraft (a reduction of hundreds of kilograms).

  19. Adaptivity demonstration of inflatable rigidized integrated structures (IRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natori, M. C.; Higuchi, Ken; Sekine, Koji; Okazaki, Kakuma

    1995-10-01

    An inflatable rigidized integrated structure (IRIS), which is composed of membrane elements and cable networks, and whose structural accuracy is decided by mainly cable networks, has various design adaptivity, since it is a high performance deployable structure for future space applications. In order to keep some stiffness after deployment, materials of membrane are assumed to be rigidized in space, and sometimes the cable network is also rigidized. The concept can cover various structural elements and structure systems. The accuracy analysis of reflector surface constrained by inside hard points and the manufacturing of a simple reflector model is introduced. Test results of rigidized cable columns to show many variations of IRIS to be feasible are also reported.

  20. Validated Feasibility Study of Integrally Stiffened Metallic Fuselage Panels for Reducing Manufacturing Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, R. G.; Wang, J. J.; Toh, C.

    2000-01-01

    The continual need to reduce airframe cost and the emergence of high speed machining and other manufacturing technologies has brought about a renewed interest in large-scale integral structures for aircraft applications. Applications have been inhibited, however, because of the need to demonstrate damage tolerance, and by cost and manufacturing risks associated with the size and complexity of the parts. The Integral Airframe Structures (IAS) Program identified a feasible integrally stiffened fuselage concept and evaluated performance and manufacturing cost compared to conventional designs. An integral skin/stiffener concept was produced both by plate hog-out and near-net extrusion. Alloys evaluated included 7050-T7451 plate, 7050-T74511 extrusion, 6013-T6511 extrusion, and 7475-T7351 plate. Mechanical properties, structural details, and joint performance were evaluated as well as repair, static compression, and two-bay crack residual strength panels. Crack turning behavior was characterized through panel tests and improved methods for predicting crack turning were developed. Manufacturing cost was evaluated using COSTRAN. A hybrid design, made from high-speed machined extruded frames that are mechanically fastened to high-speed machined plate skin/stringer panels, was identified as the most cost-effective manufacturing solution. Recurring labor and material costs of the hybrid design are up to 61 percent less than the current technology baseline.

  1. The Development of Two Composite Energy Absorbers for Use in a Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 2) Full-Scale Crash Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Seal, Michael D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Two composite energy absorbers were developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center through multi-level testing and simulation performed under the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program. A conical-shaped energy absorber, designated the conusoid, was evaluated that consisted of four layers of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric oriented at [+45deg/-45deg/-45deg/+45deg] with respect to the vertical direction. A sinusoidal-shaped energy absorber, designated the sinusoid, was developed that consisted of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric face sheets, two layers for each face sheet oriented at +/-45deg with respect to the vertical direction, and a closed-cell ELFOAM P200 polyisocyanurate (2.0-lb/cu ft) foam core. The design goal for the energy absorbers was to achieve average floor-level accelerations of between 25- and 40-g during the full-scale crash test of a retrofitted CH-46E helicopter airframe, designated TRACT 2. Variations in both designs were assessed through dynamic crush testing of component specimens. Once the designs were finalized, subfloor beams of each configuration were fabricated and retrofitted into a barrel section of a CH-46E helicopter. A vertical drop test of the barrel section was conducted onto concrete to evaluate the performance of the energy absorbers prior to retrofit into TRACT 2. The retrofitted airframe was crash tested under combined forward and vertical velocity conditions onto soft soil. Finite element models were developed of all test articles and simulations were performed using LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Test-analysis results are presented for each energy absorber as comparisons of time-history responses, as well as predicted and experimental structural deformations and progressive damage under impact loading for each evaluation level.

  2. Integrated Aeromechanics with Three-Dimensional Solid-Multibody Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Anubhav; Johnson, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    A full three-dimensional finite element-multibody structural dynamic solver is coupled to a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver for the prediction of integrated aeromechanical stresses and strains on a rotor blade in forward flight. The objective is to lay the foundations of all major pieces of an integrated three-dimensional rotor dynamic analysis - from model construction to aeromechanical solution to stress/strain calculation. The primary focus is on the aeromechanical solution. Two types of three-dimensional CFD/CSD interfaces are constructed for this purpose with an emphasis on resolving errors from geometry mis-match so that initial-stage approximate structural geometries can also be effectively analyzed. A three-dimensional structural model is constructed as an approximation to a UH-60A-like fully articulated rotor. The aerodynamic model is identical to the UH-60A rotor. For preliminary validation measurements from a UH-60A high speed flight is used where CFD coupling is essential to capture the advancing side tip transonic effects. The key conclusion is that an integrated aeromechanical analysis is indeed possible with three-dimensional structural dynamics but requires a careful description of its geometry and discretization of its parts.

  3. Structural Integrity of Single Shell Tanks at Hanford - 9491

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, Michael W.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Karri, Naveen K.; Deibler, John E.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Holbery, James D.; Mullen, O Dennis; Hurley, David E.

    2009-03-01

    The 149 Single Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site were constructed between the 1940’s and the 1960’s. Many of the tanks are either known or suspected to have leaked in the past. While the free liquids have been removed from the tanks, they still contain significant waste volumes. Recently, the tank farm operations contractor established a Single Shell Tank Integrity Program. Structural integrity is one aspect of the program. The structural analysis of the Single Shell Tanks has several challenging factors. There are several tank sizes and configurations that need to be analyzed. Tank capacities range from fifty-five thousand gallons to one-million gallons. The smallest tank type is approximately twenty feet in diameter, and the three other tank types are all seventy-five feet in diameter. Within each tank type there are varying concrete strengths, types of steel, tank floor arrangements, in-tank hardware, riser sizes and locations, and other appurtenances that need to be addressed. Furthermore, soil properties vary throughout the tank farms. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting preliminary structural analyses of the various single shell tank types to address these parameters. The preliminary analyses will assess which aspects of the tanks will require further detailed analysis. Evaluation criteria to which the tanks will be analyzed are also being developed for the Single Shell Tank Integrity Program. This information will be reviewed by the Single Shell Tank Integrity Expert Panel that has been formed to issue recommendations to the DOE and to the tank farm operations contractor regarding Single Shell Tank Integrity. This paper provides a summary of the preliminary analysis of the single shell tanks, a summary of the recommendations for the detailed analyses, and the proposed evaluation criteria by which the tanks will be judged.

  4. Approximation method to compute domain related integrals in structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oanta, E.; Panait, C.; Raicu, A.; Barhalescu, M.; Axinte, T.

    2015-11-01

    Various engineering calculi use integral calculus in theoretical models, i.e. analytical and numerical models. For usual problems, integrals have mathematical exact solutions. If the domain of integration is complicated, there may be used several methods to calculate the integral. The first idea is to divide the domain in smaller sub-domains for which there are direct calculus relations, i.e. in strength of materials the bending moment may be computed in some discrete points using the graphical integration of the shear force diagram, which usually has a simple shape. Another example is in mathematics, where the surface of a subgraph may be approximated by a set of rectangles or trapezoids used to calculate the definite integral. The goal of the work is to introduce our studies about the calculus of the integrals in the transverse section domains, computer aided solutions and a generalizing method. The aim of our research is to create general computer based methods to execute the calculi in structural studies. Thus, we define a Boolean algebra which operates with ‘simple’ shape domains. This algebraic standpoint uses addition and subtraction, conditioned by the sign of every ‘simple’ shape (-1 for the shapes to be subtracted). By ‘simple’ shape or ‘basic’ shape we define either shapes for which there are direct calculus relations, or domains for which their frontiers are approximated by known functions and the according calculus is carried out using an algorithm. The ‘basic’ shapes are linked to the calculus of the most significant stresses in the section, refined aspect which needs special attention. Starting from this idea, in the libraries of ‘basic’ shapes, there were included rectangles, ellipses and domains whose frontiers are approximated by spline functions. The domain triangularization methods suggested that another ‘basic’ shape to be considered is the triangle. The subsequent phase was to deduce the exact relations for the

  5. Integrated structural analysis of the human nuclear pore complex scaffold.

    PubMed

    Bui, Khanh Huy; von Appen, Alexander; DiGuilio, Amanda L; Ori, Alessandro; Sparks, Lenore; Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Bock, Thomas; Hagen, Wim; Andrés-Pons, Amparo; Glavy, Joseph S; Beck, Martin

    2013-12-05

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a fundamental component of all eukaryotic cells that facilitates nucleocytoplasmic exchange of macromolecules. It is assembled from multiple copies of about 30 nucleoporins. Due to its size and complex composition, determining the structure of the NPC is an enormous challenge, and the overall architecture of the NPC scaffold remains elusive. In this study, we have used an integrated approach based on electron tomography, single-particle electron microscopy, and crosslinking mass spectrometry to determine the structure of a major scaffold motif of the human NPC, the Nup107 subcomplex, in both isolation and integrated into the NPC. We show that 32 copies of the Nup107 subcomplex assemble into two reticulated rings, one each at the cytoplasmic and nuclear face of the NPC. This arrangement may explain how changes of the diameter are realized that would accommodate transport of huge cargoes.

  6. Performance optimized, small structurally integrated ion thruster system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyman, J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A 5-cm structurally integrated ion thruster has been developed for attitude control and stationkeeping of synchronous satellites. As optimized with a conventional ion extraction system, the system demonstrates a thrust T = 0.47 mlb at a beam voltage of 1600 V, total mass efficiency of 76%, and electrical efficiency of 56%. Under the subject contract effort, no significant performance change was noted for operation with two dimensional electrostatic thrust-vectoring grids. Structural integrity with the vectoring grids was demonstrated for shock (+ or - 30 G), sinusoidal (9 G), and random (19.9 G rms) accelerations. System envelope is 31.2 cm long by 13.4 cm flange bolt circle, with a mass of 9.0 Kg, including 6.8 Kg mercury propellant.

  7. Bionic intraocular lens with variable focus and integrated structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuan-Yin; Du, Jia-Wei; Xiang, Ke

    2015-10-01

    This paper proposes a bionic accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for ophthalmic surgery. The designed lens has a solid-liquid mixed integrated structure, which mainly consists of a support ring, elastic membrane, rigid lens, and optical liquid. The lens focus can be adjusted through the deformation of the lens front surface when compressed. The integrated structure of the IOL is presented, as well as a detailed description of the lens materials and fabrication process. Images under different radial pressures are captured, and the lens deformation process, accommodating range, density, and optical property are analyzed. The designed lens achieves a 14.6 D accommodating range under a radial pressure of 51.4 mN and a 0.24 mm alteration of the lens outer radius. The deformation property of the lens matches well with the characteristic of the eye and shows the potential to help patients fully recover their vision accommodation ability after the cataract surgery.

  8. Integrative Analysis of Metabolic Models – from Structure to Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Anja; Schreiber, Falk

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of biological systems with respect to their behavior and functionality based on versatile biochemical interactions is a major challenge. To understand these complex mechanisms at systems level modeling approaches are investigated. Different modeling formalisms allow metabolic models to be analyzed depending on the question to be solved, the biochemical knowledge and the availability of experimental data. Here, we describe a method for an integrative analysis of the structure and dynamics represented by qualitative and quantitative metabolic models. Using various formalisms, the metabolic model is analyzed from different perspectives. Determined structural and dynamic properties are visualized in the context of the metabolic model. Interaction techniques allow the exploration and visual analysis thereby leading to a broader understanding of the behavior and functionality of the underlying biological system. The System Biology Metabolic Model Framework (SBM2 – Framework) implements the developed method and, as an example, is applied for the integrative analysis of the crop plant potato. PMID:25674560

  9. Conformational States of macromolecular assemblies explored by integrative structure calculation.

    PubMed

    Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Pandurangan, Arun Prasad; Xu, Min; Alber, Frank; Topf, Maya

    2013-09-03

    A detailed description of macromolecular assemblies in multiple conformational states can be very valuable for understanding cellular processes. At present, structural determination of most assemblies in different biologically relevant conformations cannot be achieved by a single technique and thus requires an integrative approach that combines information from multiple sources. Different techniques require different computational methods to allow efficient and accurate data processing and analysis. Here, we summarize the latest advances and future challenges in computational methods that help the interpretation of data from two techniques-mass spectrometry and three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy (with focus on alignment and classification of heterogeneous subtomograms from cryo-electron tomography). We evaluate how new developments in these two broad fields will lead to further integration with atomic structures to broaden our picture of the dynamic behavior of assemblies in their native environment.

  10. Integrated Structural/Control Design via Multiobjective Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-10

    members, Dr Vadim Komkov and Lt Col Ronald Bagley, for their help and advice, as well as Dr Brad Liebst for his careful * the thorough review of my work...very strong, frequently unintentional and adverse coupling between the flexible structure and active control system, a wholistic or simultaneous...feedback). The primary contribution has been to treat the problem in an integrated or simultaneous fashion vice sequential design iterations on the two

  11. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A two-day conference on the structural integrity and durability of reusable space propulsion systems was held on 14 to 15 May 1991 at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Presentations were made by industry, university, and government researchers organized into four sessions: (1) aerothermodynamic loads; (2) instrumentation; (3) fatigue, fracture, and constitutive modeling; and (4) structural dynamics. The principle objectives were to disseminate research results and future plans in each of four areas. This publication contains extended abstracts and the visual material presented during the conference. Particular emphasis is placed on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the SSME turbopump.

  12. Efficient optimization of integrated aerodynamic-structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Eppard, W. M.; Kao, P. J.; Polen, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for reducing the computational complexity of multidisciplinary design optimization (DO) of aerodynamic structures are described and demonstrated. The basic principles of aerodynamic and structural DO are reviewed; the formulation of the combined DO problem is outlined; and particular attention is given to (1) the application of perturbation methods to cross-sensitivity computations and (2) numerical approximation procedures. Trial DOs of a simple sailplane design are presented in tables and graphs and discussed in detail. The IBM 3090 CPU time for the entire integrated DO was reduced from an estimated 10 h to about 6 min.

  13. Status of research aimed at predicting structural integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, W.G.

    1997-12-31

    Considerable research has been performed throughout the world on measuring the fracture toughness of metals. The existing capability fills the need encountered when selecting materials, thermal-mechanical treatments, welding procedures, etc., but cannot predict the fracture process of structural components containing cracks. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have been collaborating for a number of years on developing capabilities for using fracture toughness results to predict structural integrity. Because of the high cost of fabricating and testing structural components, these studies have been limited to predicting the fracture process in specimens containing surface cracks. This paper summarizes the present status of the experimental studies of using fracture toughness data to predict crack growth initiation in specimens (structural components) containing surface cracks. These results are limited to homogeneous base materials.

  14. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Peter W R; Soutis, Costas

    2016-07-13

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a 'fracture safe design' is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  15. Structural integrity of engineering composite materials: a cracking good yarn

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Peter W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Predicting precisely where a crack will develop in a material under stress and exactly when in time catastrophic fracture of the component will occur is one the oldest unsolved mysteries in the design and building of large-scale engineering structures. Where human life depends upon engineering ingenuity, the burden of testing to prove a ‘fracture safe design’ is immense. Fitness considerations for long-life implementation of large composite structures include understanding phenomena such as impact, fatigue, creep and stress corrosion cracking that affect reliability, life expectancy and durability of structure. Structural integrity analysis treats the design, the materials used, and figures out how best components and parts can be joined, and takes service duty into account. However, there are conflicting aims in the complete design process of designing simultaneously for high efficiency and safety assurance throughout an economically viable lifetime with an acceptable level of risk. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials’. PMID:27242293

  16. Sensitivity method for integrated structure/active control law design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    The development is described of an integrated structure/active control law design methodology for aeroelastic aircraft applications. A short motivating introduction to aeroservoelasticity is given along with the need for integrated structures/controls design algorithms. Three alternative approaches to development of an integrated design method are briefly discussed with regards to complexity, coordination and tradeoff strategies, and the nature of the resulting solutions. This leads to the formulation of the proposed approach which is based on the concepts of sensitivity of optimum solutions and multi-level decompositions. The concept of sensitivity of optimum is explained in more detail and compared with traditional sensitivity concepts of classical control theory. The analytical sensitivity expressions for the solution of the linear, quadratic cost, Gaussian (LQG) control problem are summarized in terms of the linear regulator solution and the Kalman Filter solution. Numerical results for a state space aeroelastic model of the DAST ARW-II vehicle are given, showing the changes in aircraft responses to variations of a structural parameter, in this case first wing bending natural frequency.

  17. Plan, formulate, discuss and correlate a NASTRAN finite element vibrations model of the Boeing Model 360 helicopter airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabel, R.; Lang, P. F.; Smith, L. A.; Reed, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Boeing Helicopter, together with other United States helicopter manufacturers, participated in a finite element applications program to emplace in the United States a superior capability to utilize finite element analysis models in support of helicopter airframe design. The activities relating to planning and creating a finite element vibrations model of the Boeing Model 36-0 composite airframe are summarized, along with the subsequent analytical correlation with ground shake test data.

  18. Poling of PVDF matrix composites for integrated structural load sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghiashtiani, Ghazaleh; Greminger, Michael A.; Zhao, Ping

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to create and evaluate a smart composite structure that can be used for integrated load sensing and structural health monitoring. In this structure, PVDF films are used as the matrix material instead of epoxy resin or other thermoplastics. The reinforcements are two layers of carbon fiber with one layer of Kevlar separating them. Due to the electrical conductivity properties of carbon fiber and the dielectric effect of Kevlar, the structure acts as a capacitor. Furthermore, the piezoelectric properties of the PVDF matrix can be used to monitor the response of the structure under applied loads. In order to exploit the piezoelectric properties of PVDF, the PVDF material must be polarized to align the dipole moments of its crystalline structure. The optimal condition for poling the structure was found by performing a 23 factorial design of experiment (DoE). The factors that were studied in DoE were temperature, voltage, and duration of poling. Finally, the response of the poled structure was monitored by exposing the samples to an applied load.

  19. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  20. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  1. CFD Assessment of Aerodynamic Degradation of a Subsonic Transport Due to Airframe Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Atkins, Harold L.; Viken, Sally A.; Morrison, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    A computational study is presented to assess the utility of two NASA unstructured Navier-Stokes flow solvers for capturing the degradation in static stability and aerodynamic performance of a NASA General Transport Model (GTM) due to airframe damage. The approach is to correlate computational results with a substantial subset of experimental data for the GTM undergoing progressive losses to the wing, vertical tail, and horizontal tail components. The ultimate goal is to advance the probability of inserting computational data into the creation of advanced flight simulation models of damaged subsonic aircraft in order to improve pilot training. Results presented in this paper demonstrate good correlations with slope-derived quantities, such as pitch static margin and static directional stability, and incremental rolling moment due to wing damage. This study further demonstrates that high fidelity Navier-Stokes flow solvers could augment flight simulation models with additional aerodynamic data for various airframe damage scenarios.

  2. A summary of recent NASA/Army contributions to rotorcraft vibrations and structural dynamics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Bartlett, Felton D., Jr.; Cline, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The requirement for low vibrations has achieved the status of a critical design consideration in modern helicopters. There is now a recognized need to account for vibrations during both the analytical and experimental phases of design. Research activities in this area were both broad and varied and notable advances were made in recent years in the critical elements of the technology base needed to achieve the goal of a jet smooth ride. The purpose is to present an overview of accomplishments and current activities of govern and government-sponsored research in the area of rotorcraft vibrations and structural dynamics, focusing on NASA and Army contributions over the last decade or so. Specific topics addressed include: airframe finite-element modeling for static and dynamic analyses, analysis of coupled rotor-airframe vibrations, optimization of airframes subject to vibration constraints, active and passive control of vibrations in both the rotating and fixed systems, and integration of testing and analysis in such guises as modal analysis, system identification, structural modification, and vibratory loads measurement.

  3. Static and Dynamic Friction Behavior of Candidate High Temperature Airframe Seal Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V.; Morris, D. E.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1994-01-01

    The following report describes a series of research tests to evaluate candidate high temperature materials for static to moderately dynamic hypersonic airframe seals. Pin-on-disk reciprocating sliding tests were conducted from 25 to 843 C in air and hydrogen containing inert atmospheres. Friction, both dynamic and static, was monitored and serves as the primary test measurement. In general, soft coatings lead to excessive static friction and temperature affected friction in air environments only.

  4. A NASTRAN Vibration Model of the AH-1G Helicopter Airframe. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    ACCESSION NO 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE fand Sub(ltl*> A NASTRAN VIBRATION "lODEL OF TUE AU-IG HELICOPTER AIRFRAME VOLUIE I OF TVJO...Half Drive Snaft (AN 30051) = 1.55 lb - Transmitter Dual Tachometer (AN 3<.Ü54) = 0.80 lb Total Engine Weight = 585.35 ib 4-2

  5. Development and application of a technique for reducing airframe finite element models for dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemi-Kia, Mostafa; Toossi, Mostafa

    1990-01-01

    A computational procedure for the reduction of large finite element models was developed. This procedure is used to obtain a significantly reduced model while retaining the essential global dynamic characteristics of the full-size model. This reduction procedure is applied to the airframe finite element model of AH-64A Attack Helicopter. The resulting reduced model is then validated by application to a vibration reduction study.

  6. Materials, Structures and Manufacturing: An Integrated Approach to Develop Expandable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Zander, Martin E.; Sleight, Daid W.; Connell, John; Holloway, Nancy; Palmieri, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Membrane dominated space structures are lightweight and package efficiently for launch; however, they must be expanded (deployed) in-orbit to achieve the desired geometry. These expandable structural systems include solar sails, solar power arrays, antennas, and numerous other large aperture devices that are used to collect, reflect and/or transmit electromagnetic radiation. In this work, an integrated approach to development of thin-film damage tolerant membranes is explored using advanced manufacturing. Bio-inspired hierarchical structures were printed on films using additive manufacturing to achieve improved tear resistance and to facilitate membrane deployment. High precision, robust expandable structures can be realized using materials that are both space durable and processable using additive manufacturing. Test results show this initial work produced higher tear resistance than neat film of equivalent mass. Future research and development opportunities for expandable structural systems designed using an integrated approach to structural design, manufacturing, and materials selection are discussed.

  7. Development of Eddy Current Techniques for Detection of Deep Fatigue Cracks in Multi-Layer Airframe Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.

    2008-01-01

    Thick, multi-layer aluminum structure has been widely used in aircraft design in critical wing splice areas. The multi-layer structure generally consists of three or four aluminum layers with different geometry and varying thickness, which are held together with fasteners. The detection of cracks under fasteners with ultrasonic techniques in subsurface layers away from the skin is impeded primarily by interlayer bonds and faying sealant condition. Further, assessment of such sealant condition is extremely challenging in terms of complexity of structure, limited access, and inspection cost. Although Eddy current techniques can be applied on in-service aircraft from the exterior of the skin without knowing sealant condition, the current eddy current techniques are not able to detect defects with wanted sensitivity. In this work a series of low frequency eddy current probes have been designed, fabricated and tested for this application. A probe design incorporating a shielded magnetic field sensor concentrically located in the interior of a drive coil has been employed to enable a localized deep diffusion of the electromagnetic field into the part under test. Due to the required low frequency inspections, probes have been testing using a variety of magnetic field sensors (pickup coil, giant magneto-resistive, anisotropic magneto-resistive, and spin-dependent tunneling). The probe designs as well as capabilities based upon a target inspection for sub-layer cracking in an airframe wing spar joint is presented.

  8. Cooperative airframe/propulsion control for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhard, W. G.; Berry, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Interactions between propulsion systems and flight controls have emerged as a major control problem on supersonic cruise aircraft. This paper describes the nature and causes of these interactions and the approaches to predicting and solving the problem. Integration of propulsion and flight control systems appears to be the most promising solution if the interaction effects can be adequately predicted early in the vehicle design. Significant performance, stability, and control improvements may be realized from a cooperative control system.

  9. Music and language perception: expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Music can be described as sequences of events that are structured in pitch and time. Studying music processing provides insight into how complex event sequences are learned, perceived, and represented by the brain. Given the temporal nature of sound, expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing are central in music perception (i.e., which sounds are most likely to come next and at what moment should they occur?). This paper focuses on similarities in music and language cognition research, showing that music cognition research provides insight into the understanding of not only music processing but also language processing and the processing of other structured stimuli. The hypothesis of shared resources between music and language processing and of domain-general dynamic attention has motivated the development of research to test music as a means to stimulate sensory, cognitive, and motor processes.

  10. Fluorescence microscopy for the characterization of structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth W.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1991-01-01

    The absorption characteristics of light and the optical technique of fluorescence microscopy for enhancing metallographic interpretation are presented. Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings by optical microscopy suffers because of the tendency for misidentification of the microstructure produced by metallographic preparation. Gray scale, in bright field microscopy, is frequently the only means of differentiating the actual structural details of porosity, cracking, and debonding of coatings. Fluorescence microscopy is a technique that helps to distinguish the artifacts of metallographic preparation (pullout, cracking, debonding) from the microstructure of the specimen by color contrasting structural differences. Alternative instrumentation and the use of other dye systems are also discussed. The combination of epoxy vacuum infiltration with fluorescence microscopy to verify microstructural defects is an effective means to characterize advanced materials and to assess structural integrity.

  11. Integrated modeling for the GPi flexure sensitive structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Darren; Roberts, Scott; Pazder, John S.; Fletcher, J. Murray

    2008-07-01

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPi) is comprised of three main opto-mechanical systems: the Adaptive Optics (AO) system, the Calibration (CAL) system, and the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS). Each of these subsystems are built and aligned independently, and then integrated into the final instrument. A truss framework called the Flexure Sensitive Structure (FSS) has been designed to locate each optical subsystem within the instrument, utilizing kinematic bipods to eliminate distortion due to flexure and thermal changes. Due to the distributed nature of the optical system, an end-to-end opto-mechanical modeling approach is taken using the NRC Integrated Model (NRCIM). This set of numerical tools was originally developed to support the Canadian VLOT and TMT telescope studies. The instrument structural response is calculated using a commercial finite element package; and the 6 degree-of-freedom rigid body motions of the optical elements are then passed to an optical model. Ray-tracing is performed to determine the line-of-sight errors at numerous critical focal planes and pupil planes. Disturbances to the system include gravity induced flexure and thermal distortions. Optical compensation using a combination of closedloop feedback and open-loop models are then applied using steering mirrors to improve the line-of-sight figures of merit. Finally, these figures of merit are compared against the system optical error budget to assess the overall performance of the opto-mechanical system.

  12. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  13. Design and Construction of a Composite Airframe for UAV Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    sparboxes were covered in 1/ 8th inch thick balsa wood . It was necessary to glue balsa cover plates to the foam. Balsa provided a solid base for the access...structure was assembled using cyanoacrylate glue (Figure 13) . All joints were reinforced with fiberglass cloth and resin. With the primary structure...H. Lin y, cond Reader Prof. E. Roberts Wood , Chairman Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics ii S ABSTRACT A half-scale Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV

  14. Terahertz filter integrated with a subwavelength structured antireflection coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jeong Min; Kim, Dae-Seon; Kim, Dong-Ju; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2015-12-01

    Micro-pyramid shaped subwavelength structures (SWSs) were integrated on both sides of a terahertz (THz) filter by means of stamping methods. Two silicon-based stamping molds fabricated via crystallographic wet etching were utilized to replicate SWSs onto cyclo-olefin copolymer (COC) films coated onto both sides of a THz filter at the same time. The SWSs act as an broadband antireflection coating to reduce the surface reflection loss in a frequency range of 0.2 THz to 1.4 THz. Compared to a THz filter without SWSs, the filter integrated with double-sided SWSs exhibits a low standing wave ratio inside the substrate and THz signal transmission enhancement of up to 10.8%.

  15. STAGS Developments for Residual Strength Analysis Methods for Metallic Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    A summary of advances in the Structural Analysis of General Shells (STAGS) finite element code for the residual strength analysis of metallic fuselage structures, that were realized through collaboration between the structures group at NASA Langley, and Dr. Charles Rankin is presented. The majority of the advancements described were made in the 1990's under the NASA Airframe Structural Integrity Program (NASIP). Example results from studies that were conducted using the STAGS code to develop improved understanding of the nonlinear response of cracked fuselage structures subjected to combined loads are presented. An integrated residual strength analysis methodology for metallic structure that models crack growth to predict the effect of cracks on structural integrity is demonstrated

  16. Fast simulation method for airframe analysis based on big data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dongliang; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we employ the big data method to structural analysis by considering the correlations between loads and loads, loads and results and results and results. By means of fundamental mathematics and physical rules, the principle, feasibility and error control of the method are discussed. We then establish the analysis process and procedures. The method is validated by two examples. The results show that the fast simulation method based on big data is fast and precise when it is applied to structural analysis.

  17. An automated, integrated approach to Space Station structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenmoyer, Alan J.; Habermeyer, John A.

    1989-01-01

    NASA and its contractors have developed an integrated, interdisciplinary CAD/analysis system designated IDEAS(double asterisk)2 in order to conduct evaluations of alternative Space Station concepts' performance over the projected course of the Station's evolution in orbit. Attention is presently given to the requirements associated with automated FEM-building methods applicable to Space Station system-level structural dynamic analysis, and the ways in which IDEAS(double asterisk)2 addresses these requirements. Advantage is taken of the interactive capabilities of the SUPERTAB FEM preprocessor system for Space Station model manipulation and modification.

  18. Preliminary weight and cost estimates for transport aircraft composite structural design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary weight and cost estimates have been prepared for design concepts utilized for a transonic long range transport airframe with extensive applications of advanced composite materials. The design concepts, manufacturing approach, and anticipated details of manufacturing cost reflected in the composite airframe are substantially different from those found in conventional metal structure and offer further evidence of the advantages of advanced composite materials.

  19. Structuration theory: open the black box of integrated care

    PubMed Central

    Esslinger, Adelheid Susanne

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The health care system is in transition. Integrated cares solutions are prominent and even forced by health care policy. But how can we understand the needs of different stakeholders in this system? Why do they still not act effectively and efficiently together? A closer look, using the structuration theory of Anthony Giddens, may be helpful. Theory The theory of structuration enables people to explain social interactions. As this is a matter of fact, the health care system was analyzed by the author in her habilitation thesis. The focus of the study laid on the effective and efficient care of the very old people in Germany. The structuration theory was presented, and as an example of practical translation of the theory, the implementation of the ‘Pflegestützpunkte’ (service point for care) was described. Practice Giddens' structuration theory is on the one hand complex in theory, and simple on the other hand in practice. Choosing the paradigm may be helpful to explain the motivation of the different stakeholders in the health care system. It would be necessary to create a suitable questionnaire, to get deeper insight in how the different actors in the system act and react. Such a questionnaire should be based on Giddens' theory. The following three dimensions are needed: structure (including domination, legitimation, and signification), interaction (including power, sanctioning, and communication) and modality/duality (including instruments of power, norms and interpretation).

  20. Airborne Transducer Integrity under Operational Environment for Structural Health Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Salmanpour, Mohammad Saleh; Sharif Khodaei, Zahra; Aliabadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-12-12

    This paper investigates the robustness of permanently mounted transducers used in airborne structural health monitoring systems, when exposed to the operational environment. Typical airliners operate in a range of conditions, hence, structural health monitoring (SHM) transducer robustness and integrity must be demonstrated for these environments. A set of extreme temperature, altitude and vibration environment test profiles are developed using the existing Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA)/DO-160 test methods. Commercially available transducers and manufactured versions bonded to carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials are tested. It was found that the DuraAct transducer is robust to environmental conditions tested, while the other transducer types degrade under the same conditions.

  1. Integrated Thermal Protection Systems and Heat Resistant Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pichon, Thierry; Lacoste, Marc; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    In the early stages of NASA's Exploration Initiative, Snecma Propulsion Solide was funded under the Exploration Systems Research & Technology program to develop integrated thermal protection systems and heat resistant structures for reentry vehicles. Due to changes within NASA's Exploration Initiative, this task was cancelled early. This presentation provides an overview of the work that was accomplished prior to cancellation. The Snecma team chose an Apollo-type capsule as the reference vehicle for the work. They began with the design of a ceramic aft heatshield (CAS) utilizing C/SiC panels as the capsule heatshield, a C/SiC deployable decelerator and several ablators. They additionally developed a health monitoring system, high temperature structures testing, and the insulation characterization. Though the task was pre-maturely cancelled, a significant quantity of work was accomplished.

  2. Interfacing modules for integrating discipline specific structural mechanics codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endres, Ned M.

    1989-01-01

    An outline of the organization and capabilities of the Engine Structures Computational Simulator (Simulator) at NASA Lewis Research Center is given. One of the goals of the research at Lewis is to integrate various discipline specific structural mechanics codes into a software system which can be brought to bear effectively on a wide range of engineering problems. This system must possess the qualities of being effective and efficient while still remaining user friendly. The simulator was initially designed for the finite element simulation of gas jet engine components. Currently, the simulator has been restricted to only the analysis of high pressure turbine blades and the accompanying rotor assembly, although the current installation can be expanded for other applications. The simulator presently assists the user throughout its procedures by performing information management tasks, executing external support tasks, organizing analysis modules and executing these modules in the user defined order while maintaining processing continuity.

  3. Airborne Transducer Integrity under Operational Environment for Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Salmanpour, Mohammad Saleh; Sharif Khodaei, Zahra; Aliabadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the robustness of permanently mounted transducers used in airborne structural health monitoring systems, when exposed to the operational environment. Typical airliners operate in a range of conditions, hence, structural health monitoring (SHM) transducer robustness and integrity must be demonstrated for these environments. A set of extreme temperature, altitude and vibration environment test profiles are developed using the existing Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA)/DO-160 test methods. Commercially available transducers and manufactured versions bonded to carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials are tested. It was found that the DuraAct transducer is robust to environmental conditions tested, while the other transducer types degrade under the same conditions. PMID:27973450

  4. Integrated aerodynamic-structural design of a transport wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Haftka, R. T.; Kao, P.-J.; Polen, D. M.; Rais-Rohani, M.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.

    1989-01-01

    The integrated aerodynamic-structural design of a subsonic transport wing for minimum weight subject to required range is formulated and solved. The problem requires large computational resources, and two methods are used to alleviate the computational burden. First, a modular sensitivity method that permits the usage of black-box disciplinary software packages, is used to reduce the cost of sensitivity derivatives. In particular, it is shown that derivatives of the aeroelastic response and divergence speed can be calculated without the costly computation of derivatives of aerodynamic influence coefficient and structural stiffness matrices. A sequential approximate optimization is used to further reduce computational cost. The optimization procedure is shown to require a relatively small number of analysis and sensitivity calculations.

  5. FKBP5 Genotype and Structural Integrity of the Posterior Cingulum

    PubMed Central

    Fani, Negar; King, Tricia Z; Reiser, Emily; Binder, Elisabeth B; Jovanovic, Tanja; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in the microarchitecture of the posterior cingulum (PC), a white matter tract proximal to the hippocampus that facilitates communication between the entorhinal and cingulate cortices, have been observed in individuals with psychiatric disorders, such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PC decrements may be a heritable source of vulnerability for the development of affective disorders; however, genetic substrates for these white matter abnormalities have not been identified. The FKBP5 gene product modulates glucocorticoid receptor function and has been previously associated with differential hippocampal structure, function, and affect disorder risk. Thus, FKBP5 is an attractive genetic target for investigations of PC integrity. We examined associations between PC integrity, measured through diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fractional anisotropy (FA; an index of white matter integrity), and polymorphisms in the FKBP5 SNP rs1360780 in a sample of 82 traumatized female civilians. Findings indicated that, compared with individuals without this allele, individuals who carried two ‘risk' alleles for this FKBP5 SNP (T allele; previously associated with mood and anxiety disorder risk) demonstrated significantly lower FA in the left PC, even after statistically controlling for variance associated with age, trauma exposure, and PTSD symptoms. These data suggest that specific allelic variants for an FKBP5 polymorphism are associated with decrements in the left PC microarchitecture. These white matter abnormalities may be a heritable biological marker that indicates increased vulnerability for the development of psychiatric disorders, such as PTSD. PMID:24253961

  6. Application of an integrated flight/propulsion control design methodology to a STOVL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Sanjay; Mattern, Duane L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented from the application of an emerging Integrated Flight/Propulsion Control (IFPC) design methodology to a Short Take Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft in transition flight. The steps in the methodology consist of designing command shaping prefilters to provide the overall desired response to pilot command inputs. A previously designed centralized controller is first validated for the integrated airframe/engine plant used. This integrated plant is derived from a different model of the engine subsystem than the one used for the centralized controller design. The centralized controller is then partitioned in a decentralized, hierarchical structure comprising of airframe lateral and longitudinal subcontrollers and an engine subcontroller. Command shaping prefilters from the pilot control effector inputs are then designed and time histories of the closed loop IFPC system response to simulated pilot commands are compared to desired responses based on handling qualities requirements. Finally, the propulsion system safety and nonlinear limited protection logic is wrapped around the engine subcontroller and the response of the closed loop integrated system is evaluated for transients that encounter the propulsion surge margin limit.

  7. Structural integrity of fuselage panels with multisite damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jai H.; Singh, Ripudaman; Pyo, Chang R.; Atluris, Satya N.

    1995-05-01

    Structural integrity assessment of aging flight vehicles is extremely important to ensure their economic and safe operation. A two-step analytical approach, developed to estimate the residual strength of pressurized fuselage stiffened shell panels with multi-bay fatigue cracking is presented in this article. Conventional finite element analysis of the damaged multibay panel is first carried out to obtain the load flow pattern through it. The Schwartz-Neumann alternating method is then applied to the fuselage skin with multiple site damage, to obtain stresses and the relevant crack tip parameters that govern the onset of fracture. Fracture mechanics as well as net section yield criteria are used to evaluate the static residual strength. The presence of holes with or without multisite damage ahead of a dominant crack is found to significantly degrade the capacity of the fuselage shell panels to sustain static internal pressure. An elastic-plastic alternating method is newly developed and applied to evaluate the residual strength of flat panels with multiple cracks. The computational methodologies presented herein are marked improvements to the present state-of-the-art, and are extremely efficient, both from engineering manpower as well as computational costs point of view. Once verified, they can very well complement the experimental requirements, reducing the cost of structural integrity assessment programs.

  8. Method and apparatus for determining material structural integrity

    DOEpatents

    Pechersky, Martin

    1996-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus for determining the structural integrity of materials by combining laser vibrometry with damping analysis techniques to determine the damping loss factor of a material. The method comprises the steps of vibrating the area being tested over a known frequency range and measuring vibrational force and velocity as a function of time over the known frequency range. Vibrational velocity is preferably measured by a laser vibrometer. Measurement of the vibrational force depends on the vibration method. If an electromagnetic coil is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by the amount of coil current used in vibrating the magnet. If a reciprocating transducer is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by a force gauge in the reciprocating transducer. Using known vibrational analysis methods, a plot of the drive point mobility of the material over the preselected frequency range is generated from the vibrational force and velocity measurements. The damping loss factor is derived from a plot of the drive point mobility over the preselected frequency range using the resonance dwell method and compared with a reference damping loss factor for structural integrity evaluation.

  9. Method and apparatus for determining material structural integrity

    DOEpatents

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a nondestructive method and apparatus for determining the structural integrity of materials by combining laser vibrometry with damping analysis to determine the damping loss factor. The method comprises the steps of vibrating the area being tested over a known frequency range and measuring vibrational force and velocity vs time over the known frequency range. Vibrational velocity is preferably measured by a laser vibrometer. Measurement of the vibrational force depends on the vibration method: if an electromagnetic coil is used to vibrate a magnet secured to the area being tested, then the vibrational force is determined by the coil current. If a reciprocating transducer is used, the vibrational force is determined by a force gauge in the transducer. Using vibrational analysis, a plot of the drive point mobility of the material over the preselected frequency range is generated from the vibrational force and velocity data. Damping loss factor is derived from a plot of the drive point mobility over the preselected frequency range using the resonance dwell method and compared with a reference damping loss factor for structural integrity evaluation.

  10. An expert system for integrated structural analysis and design optimization for aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of a research study on the development of an expert system for integrated structural analysis and design optimization is presented. An Object Representation Language (ORL) was developed first in conjunction with a rule-based system. This ORL/AI shell was then used to develop expert systems to provide assistance with a variety of structural analysis and design optimization tasks, in conjunction with procedural modules for finite element structural analysis and design optimization. The main goal of the research study was to provide expertise, judgment, and reasoning capabilities in the aerospace structural design process. This will allow engineers performing structural analysis and design, even without extensive experience in the field, to develop error-free, efficient and reliable structural designs very rapidly and cost-effectively. This would not only improve the productivity of design engineers and analysts, but also significantly reduce time to completion of structural design. An extensive literature survey in the field of structural analysis, design optimization, artificial intelligence, and database management systems and their application to the structural design process was first performed. A feasibility study was then performed, and the architecture and the conceptual design for the integrated 'intelligent' structural analysis and design optimization software was then developed. An Object Representation Language (ORL), in conjunction with a rule-based system, was then developed using C++. Such an approach would improve the expressiveness for knowledge representation (especially for structural analysis and design applications), provide ability to build very large and practical expert systems, and provide an efficient way for storing knowledge. Functional specifications for the expert systems were then developed. The ORL/AI shell was then used to develop a variety of modules of expert systems for a variety of modeling, finite element analysis, and

  11. Engine/airframe compatibility studies for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Technology assessment studies were conducted to provide an updated technology base from which an advanced supersonic cruise aircraft can be produced with a high probability of success. An assessment of the gains available through the application of advanced technologies in aerodynamics, propulsion, acoustics, structures, materials, and active controls is developed. The potential market and range requirements as well as economic factors including payload, speed, airline operating costs, and airline profitability are analyzed. The conceptual design of the baseline aircraft to be used in assessing the technology requirements is described.

  12. Developing and utilizing an Euler computational method for predicting the airframe/propulsion effects for an aft-mounted turboprop transport. Volume 2: User guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. C.; Neback, H. E.; Kao, T. J.; Yu, N. Y.; Kusunose, K.

    1991-01-01

    This manual explains how to use an Euler based computational method for predicting the airframe/propulsion integration effects for an aft-mounted turboprop transport. The propeller power effects are simulated by the actuator disk concept. This method consists of global flow field analysis and the embedded flow solution for predicting the detailed flow characteristics in the local vicinity of an aft-mounted propfan engine. The computational procedure includes the use of several computer programs performing four main functions: grid generation, Euler solution, grid embedding, and streamline tracing. This user's guide provides information for these programs, including input data preparations with sample input decks, output descriptions, and sample Unix scripts for program execution in the UNICOS environment.

  13. Towards Full Aircraft Airframe Noise Prediction: Detached Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Mineck, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from a computational study on the aeroacoustic characteristics of an 18%-scale, semi-span Gulf-stream aircraft model are presented in this paper. NASA's FUN3D unstructured compressible Navier-Stokes solver was used to perform steady and unsteady simulations of the flow field associated with this high-fidelity aircraft model. Solutions were obtained for free-air at a Mach number of 0.2 with the flap deflected at 39 deg, with the main gear off and on (the two baseline configurations). Initially, the study focused on accurately predicting the prominent noise sources at both flap tips for the baseline configuration with deployed flap only. Building upon the experience gained from this initial effort, subsequent work involved the full landing configuration with both flap and main landing gear deployed. For the unsteady computations, we capitalized on the Detached Eddy Simulation capability of FUN3D to capture the complex time-dependent flow features associated with the flap and main gear. To resolve the noise sources over a broad frequency range, the tailored grid was very dense near the flap inboard and outboard tips and the region surrounding the gear. Extensive comparison of the computed steady and unsteady surface pressures with wind tunnel measurements showed good agreement for the global aerodynamic characteristics and the local flow field at the flap inboard tip. However, the computed pressure coefficients indicated that a zone of separated flow that forms in the vicinity of the outboard tip is larger in extent along the flap span and chord than measurements suggest. Computed farfield acoustic characteristics from a FW-H integral approach that used the simulated pressures on the model solid surface were in excellent agreement with corresponding measurements.

  14. Integrated thermal-structural finite element analysis. [for applications to hypersonic transport design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Decahaumphai, P.; Wieting, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analysis is presented. An integrated thermal-structural rod element is developed and used in four thermal-structural applications; the accuracy of this integrated approach is illustrated by comparisons with the customary approach of finite difference thermal-finite element structural analyses. Results show that integrated thermal-structural analysis of structures modeled with rod elements is more accurate than conventional analysis, and that its further development promises significant results.

  15. Structural health management technologies for inflatable/deployable structures: Integrating sensing and self-healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; Vozoff, Max; Kolawa, Elizabeth A.; Studor, George F.; Lyons, Frankel; Keller, Michael W.; Beiermann, Brett; White, Scott R.; Sottos, Nancy R.; Curry, Mark A.; Banks, David L.; Brocato, Robert; Zhou, Lisong; Jung, Soyoun; Jackson, Thomas N.; Champaigne, Kevin

    2011-04-01

    Inflatable/deployable structures are under consideration as habitats for future Lunar surface science operations. The use of non-traditional structural materials combined with the need to maintain a safe working environment for extended periods in a harsh environment has led to the consideration of an integrated structural health management system for future habitats, to ensure their integrity. This article describes recent efforts to develop prototype sensing technologies and new self-healing materials that address the unique requirements of habitats comprised mainly of soft goods. A new approach to detecting impact damage is discussed, using addressable flexible capacitive sensing elements and thin film electronics in a matrixed array. Also, the use of passive wireless sensor tags for distributed sensing is discussed, wherein the need for on-board power through batteries or hardwired interconnects is eliminated. Finally, the development of a novel, microencapuslated self-healing elastomer with applications for inflatable/deployable habitats is reviewed.

  16. X-band rf structure with integrated alignment monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehler, M.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Citterio, A.; Falone, A.; Wuensch, W.; Riddone, G.; Grudiev, A.; Zennaro, R.

    2009-06-01

    We present the electrical design for an X-band traveling wave accelerator structure with integrated alignment monitors to measure the transverse wake, which will be used as part of the PSI-XFEL project and in the CLIC structure testing program. At PSI, it will compensate nonlinearities in the longitudinal phase space at the injector prototype of the PSI-XFEL. At CLIC it will be tested for breakdown limits and rates in the high gradient regime. The prolonged operation of such a structure in the PSI-XFEL injector, albeit not for the CLIC parameter regime, will constitute a good quality test of the manufacturing procedures employed. The operation in the PSI-XFEL injector will be at a relatively modest beam energy of 250 MeV, at which transverse wakes can easily destroy the beam emittance. For this reason, the layout chosen employs a large iris, 5π/6 phase advance geometry, which minimizes transverse wakefield effects while still retaining a good efficiency. As a second important feature, the design includes two wakefield monitors coupling to the transverse higher order modes, which allow steering the beam to the structure axis, potentially facilitating a higher precision than mechanical alignment strategies. Of special interest is the time domain envelope of these monitor signals. Local offsets due to bends or tilts have individual signatures in the frequency spectrum, which in turn are correlated with different delays in the signal envelope. By taking advantage of this combined with the single bunch mode at the PSI-XFEL, the use of a relatively simple detector-type rf front end should be possible, which will not only show beam offsets but also higher order misalignments such as tilts in the structure. The resolution of these monitors is determined by the tolerance of the random cell-to-cell misalignment leading to a spurious signal in the monitors.

  17. Integrated Flight and Propulsion Controls for Advanced Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Walter; Garg, Sanjay

    1995-01-01

    The research vision of the NASA Lewis Research Center in the area of integrated flight and propulsion controls technologies is described. In particular the Integrated Method for Propulsion and Airframe Controls developed at the Lewis Research Center is described including its application to an advanced aircraft configuration. Additionally, future research directions in integrated controls are described.

  18. Apparatus for integrating a rigid structure into a flexible wall of an inflatable structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J. (Inventor); Patterson, Ross M. (Inventor); Spexarth, Gary R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    For an inflatable structure having a flexible outer shell or wall structure having a flexible restraint layer comprising interwoven, load-bearing straps, apparatus for integrating one or more substantially rigid members into the flexible shell. For each rigid member, a corresponding opening is formed through the flexible shell for receiving the rigid member. A plurality of connection devices are mounted on the rigid member for receiving respective ones of the load-bearing straps. In one embodiment, the connection devices comprise inner connecting mechanisms and outer connecting mechanisms, the inner and outer connecting mechanisms being mounted on the substantially rigid structure and spaced along a peripheral edge portion of the structure in an interleafed array in which respective outer connecting mechanisms are interposed between adjacent pairs of inner connecting mechanisms, the outer connecting mechanisms projecting outwardly from the peripheral edge portion of the substantially rigid structure beyond the adjacent inner connecting mechanisms to form a staggered array of connecting mechanisms extending along the panel structure edge portion. In one embodiment, the inner and outer connecting mechanisms form part of an integrated, structure rotatably mounted on the rigid member peripheral edge portion.

  19. Truss structure integrity identification using PZT sensor-actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, F.P.; Chaudhry, Z.; Liang, C.; Rogers, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a frequency domain impedance-signature-based technique for health monitoring of an assembled truss structure. Unlike conventional modal analysis approaches, the technique uses piezoceramic (PZT) elements as integrated sensor-actuators for acquisition of signature pattern of the truss. The concept of the localization of sensing/actuation area for damage detection of an assembled structure is presented for the first time. Through a PZT patch bonded to a truss node and the measurement of its electric admittance, which is coupled with the mechanical impedance of the truss, the signature pattern of a truss is monitored. The admittance of a truss in question is compared with that of the original healthy truss. Statistic algorithm is then applied to extract a damage index of the truss based on the signature pattern difference. Experimental proof that over a selected band, the detection range of a bonded PZT sensor on a truss is highly constrained to its immediate neighborhood is presented. This characteristic allows accurate determination of the damage location in a complex real-world structure with a minimum mathematical modeling and numerical computation.

  20. NURBS-Based Geometry for Integrated Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, James H.

    1997-01-01

    This grant was initiated in April 1993 and completed in September 1996. The primary goal of the project was to exploit the emerging defacto CAD standard of Non- Uniform Rational B-spline (NURBS) based curve and surface geometry to integrate and streamline the process of turbomachinery structural analysis. We focused our efforts on critical geometric modeling challenges typically posed by the requirements of structural analysts. We developed a suite of software tools that facilitate pre- and post-processing of NURBS-based turbomachinery blade models for finite element structural analyses. We also developed tools to facilitate the modeling of blades in their manufactured (or cold) state based on nominal operating shape and conditions. All of the software developed in the course of this research is written in the C++ language using the Iris Inventor 3D graphical interface tool-kit from Silicon Graphics. In addition to enhanced modularity, improved maintainability, and efficient prototype development, this design facilitates the re-use of code developed for other NASA projects and provides a uniform and professional 'look and feel' for all applications developed by the Iowa State Team.

  1. Applications of Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) Structure in Microwave Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhi

    This thesis is focused on some applications of the Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) structure in microwave engineering. It is mainly divided into two parts, covering a dual-band high Q filter and a broadband high gain ring slot antenna, both of which are based on SIW resonators. This work indicates strong potential of SIW structure in communication system and discusses its unique advantages in detail. In the first part of the thesis, a dual-band high Q second order filter is designed to work at around 10 GHz and 14 GHz. SIW cavities are chosen in order to fulfill the low loss requirements. Two kinds of perturbation theories are applied in this structure to make two second order pass bands. Transmission lines of proper length are designed to connect the cavities together and make them work efficiently. In the second part of the thesis, a broadband high gain SIW ring slot antenna working at around 18 GHz is discussed. The bandwidth of the antenna is approximately 12.7% and the gain is around 7 dB. The cavity mode is properly chosen to reach the high antenna gain requirement. The working mechanism of its broadband property is discussed in detail to reach a reasonable argument.

  2. OpenStructure: an integrated software framework for computational structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Biasini, M.; Schmidt, T.; Bienert, S.; Mariani, V.; Studer, G.; Haas, J.; Johner, N.; Schenk, A. D.; Philippsen, A.; Schwede, T.

    2013-01-01

    Research projects in structural biology increasingly rely on combinations of heterogeneous sources of information, e.g. evolutionary information from multiple sequence alignments, experimental evidence in the form of density maps and proximity constraints from proteomics experiments. The OpenStructure software framework, which allows the seamless integration of information of different origin, has previously been introduced. The software consists of C++ libraries which are fully accessible from the Python programming language. Additionally, the framework provides a sophisticated graphics module that interactively displays molecular structures and density maps in three dimensions. In this work, the latest developments in the OpenStructure framework are outlined. The extensive capabilities of the framework will be illustrated using short code examples that show how information from molecular-structure coordinates can be combined with sequence data and/or density maps. The framework has been released under the LGPL version 3 license and is available for download from http://www.openstructure.org. PMID:23633579

  3. OpenStructure: an integrated software framework for computational structural biology.

    PubMed

    Biasini, M; Schmidt, T; Bienert, S; Mariani, V; Studer, G; Haas, J; Johner, N; Schenk, A D; Philippsen, A; Schwede, T

    2013-05-01

    Research projects in structural biology increasingly rely on combinations of heterogeneous sources of information, e.g. evolutionary information from multiple sequence alignments, experimental evidence in the form of density maps and proximity constraints from proteomics experiments. The OpenStructure software framework, which allows the seamless integration of information of different origin, has previously been introduced. The software consists of C++ libraries which are fully accessible from the Python programming language. Additionally, the framework provides a sophisticated graphics module that interactively displays molecular structures and density maps in three dimensions. In this work, the latest developments in the OpenStructure framework are outlined. The extensive capabilities of the framework will be illustrated using short code examples that show how information from molecular-structure coordinates can be combined with sequence data and/or density maps. The framework has been released under the LGPL version 3 license and is available for download from http://www.openstructure.org.

  4. Integral structural-functional method for characterizing microbial populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, A. V.

    2015-04-01

    An original integral structural-functional method has been proposed for characterizing microbial communities. The novelty of the approach is the in situ study of microorganisms based on the growth kinetics of microbial associations in liquid nutrient broth media under selective conditions rather than on the level of taxa or large functional groups. The method involves the analysis of the integral growth model of a periodic culture. The kinetic parameters of such associations reflect their capacity of growing on different media, i.e., their physiological diversity, and the metabolic capacity of the microorganisms for growth on a nutrient medium. Therefore, the obtained parameters are determined by the features of the microbial ecological strategies. The inoculation of a dense medium from the original inoculate allows characterizing the taxonomic composition of the dominants in the soil community. The inoculation from the associations developed on selective media characterizes the composition of syntrophic groups, which fulfill a specific function in nature. This method is of greater information value than the classical methods of inoculation on selective media.

  5. Structural integrity analysis of the 224U elevator mothballing

    SciTech Connect

    Boehnke, W.M.

    1994-11-18

    As part of the preparation of Building 224U for turnover to Decontamination and Decommissioning, it is necessary to place the elevator in a mothballed condition so that it can be reactivated for use after 10 to 25 years. This mothballing is going to be accomplished by landing the counterweight on wooden timbers and suspending the elevator cab with wire rope or chain slings. This will take the load off the cables and make it relatively easy to reactive. The objective of this Supporting Document is to verify the structural integrity of all of the load bearing components involved in mothballing the 224U Building elevator. Building 224U is part of the UO{sub 3} Plant where uranyl nitrates from the PUREX Plant was converted to UO{sub 3} powder.

  6. Structural integrity of wind tunnel wooden fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Clarence P., Jr.; Wingate, Robert T.; Rooker, James R.; Mort, Kenneth W.; Zager, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    Information is presented which was compiled by the NASA Inter-Center Committee on Structural Integrity of Wooden Fan Blades and is intended for use as a guide in design, fabrication, evaluation, and assurance of fan systems using wooden blades. A risk assessment approach for existing NASA wind tunnels with wooden fan blades is provided. Also, state of the art information is provided for wooden fan blade design, drive system considerations, inspection and monitoring methods, and fan blade repair. Proposed research and development activities are discussed, and recommendations are provided which are aimed at future wooden fan blade design activities and safely maintaining existing NASA wind tunnel fan blades. Information is presented that will be of value to wooden fan blade designers, fabricators, inspectors, and wind tunnel operations personnel.

  7. The Galaxy in Context: Structural, Kinematic, and Integrated Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Gerhard, Ortwin

    2016-09-01

    Our Galaxy, the Milky Way, is a benchmark for understanding disk galaxies. It is the only galaxy whose formation history can be studied using the full distribution of stars from faint dwarfs to supergiants. The oldest components provide us with unique insight into how galaxies form and evolve over billions of years. The Galaxy is a luminous (L⋆) barred spiral with a central box/peanut bulge, a dominant disk, and a diffuse stellar halo. Based on global properties, it falls in the sparsely populated “green valley” region of the galaxy color-magnitude diagram. Here we review the key integrated, structural and kinematic parameters of the Galaxy, and point to uncertainties as well as directions for future progress. Galactic studies will continue to play a fundamental role far into the future because there are measurements that can only be made in the near field and much of contemporary astrophysics depends on such observations.

  8. Integrated structural electromagnetic optimization of large space antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Adelman, H. M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for extremely precise and powerful large space antenna reflectors have motivated the development of a procedure for shape control of the reflector surface. A mathematical optimization procedure has been developed which improves antenna performance while minimizing necessary shape correction effort. In contrast to previous work which proposed controlling the rms distortion error of the surface thereby indirectly improving antenna performance, the current work includes electromagnetic (EM) performance calculations as an integral part of the control procedure. The application of the procedure to a radiometer design with a tetrahedral truss backup structure demonstrates the potential for significant improvement. The results indicate the benefit of including EM performance calculations in procedures for shape control of large space antenna reflectors.

  9. Integrated structure electromagnetic optimization of large space antenna reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Adelman, Howard M.; Bailey, M. C.

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for extremely precise and powerful large space antenna reflectors have motivated the development of a procedure for shape control of the reflector surface. A mathematical optimization procedure has been developed which improves antenna performance while minimizing necessary shape correction effort. In contrast to previous work which proposed controlling the rms distortion error of the surface thereby indirectly improving antenna performance, the current work includes electromagnetic (EM) performance calculations as an integral of the control procedure. The application of the procedure to a radiometer design with a tetrahedral truss backup structure demonstrates the potential for significant improvement. The results indicate the benefit of including EM performance calculations in procedures for shape control of large space antenna reflectors.

  10. SMI: a structural dynamics toolbox for integrated modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael; Baier, Horst

    2002-07-01

    In cooperation with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), the Institute of Lightweight Structures (LLB), Technische Universtitaet Muenchen, has developed the Structural Modeling Interface Toolbox (SMI), a Matlab based software package for creation of a dynamical model of a telescope structure. It is called Interface, since it uses the modal data of a finite element (FE) analysis and creates a dynamic model to be used within a time-dependent control loop simulation in the Matlab/Simulink environment. SMI is part of the Integrated Modeling Toolbox (IMT) developed in a joint effort by ESO, Astrium GmbH and LLB. Since SMI can read modal data in a general format, it is not depending on the FE-software. In addition to that, an interface to the FE-package ANSYS has been developed. It allows the variation of parameters and some settings for the FE-analysis directly within SMI. Both, force excitation like windloads and base excitation like micro seismic perturbations can be included. Several tools for model reduction are provided. Some of them are modal based, like effective modal masses, others are general model reduction procedures from control engineering like balanced truncation. For the evaluation of the reduced models, transfer functions of different models can be displayed in a Bode-plot. Time characteristics like step response or impulse response are also available. Moreover, for a typical excitation PSD the response PSD can be computed. This response can either be compared to the response of an exact model or to measured data and the rms-error can be calculated. The final result is a linear statespace model of the structure and a Simulink block, which can be included into a Simulink model.

  11. Sensing and Active Flow Control for Advanced BWB Propulsion-Airframe Integration Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, John; Anderson, Jason; Ng, Wing; Harrison, Neal

    2005-01-01

    In order to realize the substantial performance benefits of serpentine boundary layer ingesting diffusers, this study investigated the use of enabling flow control methods to reduce engine-face flow distortion. Computational methods and novel flow control modeling techniques were utilized that allowed for rapid, accurate analysis of flow control geometries. Results were validated experimentally using the Techsburg Ejector-based wind tunnel facility; this facility is capable of simulating the high-altitude, high subsonic Mach number conditions representative of BWB cruise conditions.

  12. Integrated Airframe Design Technology (Les Technologies pour la Conception Integree des Cellules)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    such assembled early in design and then evolved as, "Can X performance be built for Y cost"? from conceptual design through manufacture. The benefits of...can incorporate manufacturing and de- and X -terminal environment especially suit- tail design considerations in the conceptual and ble for the...while static RAM (SRAM) does not. subquarter micron (< 0.25 x 10-6 m); and b) increasing the However. advances in DRAM permit double the amount of speed

  13. Engineering Engine/Airframe Integration for Fully Reusable Space Transportation Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    system concept for SÄNGER first stage is important to compare the major performance characteristics of the engine cycle types which were under...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Aerospace Consulting 82024...Taufkirchen 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11

  14. Monolithical integration of polymer-based microfluidic structures on application-specific integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemnitz, Steffen; Schafer, Heiko; Schumacher, Stephanie; Koziy, Volodymyr; Fischer, Alexander; Meixner, Alfred J.; Ehrhardt, Dietmar; Bohm, Markus

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, a concept for a monolithically integrated chemical lab on microchip is presented. It contains an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit), an interface to the polymer based microfluidic layer and a Pyrex glass cap. The top metal layer of the ASIC is etched off and replaced by a double layer metallization, more suitable to microfluidic and electrophoresis systems. The metallization consists of an approximately 50 nm gold layer and a 10 nm chromium layer, acting as adhesion promoter. A necessary prerequisite is a planarized ASIC topography. SU-8 is used to serve as microfluidic structure because of its excellent aspect ratio. This polymer layer contains reservoirs, channels, mixers and electrokinetic micro pumps. The typical channel cross section is 10μm"10μm. First experimental results on a microfluidic pump, consisting of pairs of interdigitated electrodes on the bottom of the channel and without any moving parts show a flow of up to 50μm per second for low AC-voltages in the range of 5 V for aqueous fluids. The microfluidic system is irreversibly sealed with a 150μm thick Pyrex glass plate bonded to the SU-8-layer, supported by oxygen plasma. Due to capillary forces and surfaces properties of the walls the system is self-priming. The technologies for the fabrication of the microfluidic system and the preparation of the interface between the lab layer and the ASIC are presented.

  15. AH-1G flight vibration correlation using NASTRAN and the C81 rotor/airframe coupled analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dompka, R. V.; Corrigan, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Analytical results are presented bearing on the accuracy of state-of-the-art NASTRAN FEM modeling techniques and rotor/airframe coupling methods for the prediction of flight vibrations; these results have been studied by NASA and industry experts in order to ensure scientific control of the analysis/correlation exercise. The rotor loads predicted by the dynamically coupled rotor/airframe analysis showed good agreement between calculated and experimental blade loads, as did the predominant excitation frequency vibration levels predicted by NASTRAN.

  16. A feasibility study for advanced technology integration for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Matsuyama, G. T.; Hawley, K. E.; Meredith, P. T.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to identify candidate technologies and specific developments which offer greatest promise for improving safety, fuel efficiency, performance, and utility of general aviation airplanes. Interviews were conducted with general aviation airframe and systems manufacturers and NASA research centers. The following technologies were evaluated for use in airplane design tradeoff studies conducted during the study: avionics, aerodynamics, configurations, structures, flight controls, and propulsion. Based on industry interviews and design tradeoff studies, several recommendations were made for further high payoff research. The most attractive technologies for use by the general aviation industry appear to be advanced engines, composite materials, natural laminar flow airfoils, and advanced integrated avionics systems. The integration of these technologies in airplane design can yield significant increases in speeds, ranges, and payloads over present aircraft with 40 percent to 50 percent reductions in fuel used.

  17. The role of structural bioinformatics resources in the era of integrative structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Oldfield, Thomas J.; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sen, Sanchayita; Velankar, Sameer; Kleywegt, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    The history and the current state of the PDB and EMDB archives is briefly described, as well as some of the challenges that they face. It seems natural that the role of structural biology archives will change from being a pure repository of historic data into becoming an indispensable resource for the wider biomedical community. As part of this transformation, it will be necessary to validate the biomacromolecular structure data and ensure the highest possible quality for the archive holdings, to combine structural data from different spatial scales into a unified resource and to integrate structural data with functional, genetic and taxonomic data as well as other information available in bioinformatics resources. Some recent developments and plans to address these challenges at PDBe are presented. PMID:23633580

  18. A Comparison of Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings Solvers for Airframe Noise Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between two implementations of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation for airframe noise applications. Airframe systems are generally moving at constant speed and not rotating, so these conditions are used in the current investigation. Efficient and easily implemented forms of the equations applicable to subsonic, rectilinear motion of all acoustic sources are used. The assumptions allow the derivation of a simple form of the equations in the frequency-domain, and the time-domain method uses the restrictions on the motion to reduce the work required to find the emission time. The comparison between the frequency domain method and the retarded time formulation reveals some of the advantages of the different approaches. Both methods are still capable of predicting the far-field noise from nonlinear near-field flow quantities. Because of the large input data sets and potentially large numbers of observer positions of interest in three-dimensional problems, both codes utilize the message passing interface to divide the problem among different processors. Example problems are used to demonstrate the usefulness and efficiency of the two schemes.

  19. MUNI Ways and Structures Building Integrated Solar Membrane Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Randall

    2014-07-03

    The initial goal of the MUNI Ways and Structures Building Integrated Solar Membrane Installation Project was for the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) to gain experience using the integrated higher efficiency solar photovoltaic (PV) single-ply membrane product, as it differs from the conventional, low efficiency, thin-film PV products, to determine the feasibility of success of larger deployment. As several of CCSF’s municipal rooftops are constrained with respect to weight restrictions, staff of the Energy Generation Group of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) proposed to install a solar PV system using single-ply membrane The installation of the 100 kW (DC-STC) lightweight photo voltaic (PV) system at the MUNI Ways and Structures Center (700 Pennsylvania Ave., San Francisco) is a continuation of the commitment of the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) to increase the pace of municipal solar development, and serve its municipal facilities with clean renewable energy. The fourteen (14) solar photovoltaic systems that have already been installed at CCSF municipal facilities are assisting in the reduction of fossil-fuel use, and reduction of greenhouse gases from fossil combustion. The MUNI Ways & Structures Center roof has a relatively low weight-bearing capacity (3.25 pounds per square foot) and use of traditional crystalline panels was therefore rejected. Consequently it was decided to use the best available highest efficiency Building-Integrated PV (BIPV) technology, with consideration for reliability and experience of the manufacturer which can meet the low weight-bearing capacity criteria. The original goal of the project was to provide an opportunity to monitor the results of the BIPV technology and compare these results to other City and County of San Francisco installed PV systems. The MUNI Ways and Structures Center was acquired from the Cookson Doors Company, which had run the Center for many decades. The building was

  20. Hydrodynamic impact of a system with a single elastic mode I : theory and generalized solution with an application to an elastic airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, Wilbur L

    1952-01-01

    Solutions of impact of a rigid prismatic float connected by a massless spring to a rigid upper mass are presented. The solutions are based on hydrodynamic theory which has been experimentally confirmed for a rigid structure. Equations are given for defining the spring constant and the ratio of the sprung mass to the lower mass so that the two-mass system provides representation of the fundamental mode of an airplane wing. The forces calculated are more accurate than the forces which would be predicted for a rigid airframe since the effect of the fundamental mode on the hydrodynamic force is taken into account. In a comparison of the theoretical data with data for a severe flight-test landing impact, the effect of the fundamental mode on the hydrodynamic force is considered and response data are compared with experimental data.

  1. Propulsion and airframe aerodynamic interactions of supersonic V/STOL configurations. Volume 2: Wind tunnel test force and moment data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilz, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel model of a supersonic V/STOL fighter configuration has been tested to measure the aerodynamic interaction effects which can result from geometrically close-coupled propulsion system/airframe components. The approach was to configure the model to represent two different test techniques. One was a conventional test technique composed of two test modes. In the Flow-Through mode, absolute configuration aerodynamics are measured, including inlet/airframe interactions. In the Jet-Effects mode, incremental nozzle/airframe interactions are measured. The other test technique is a propulsion simulator approach, where a sub-scale, externally powered engine is mounted in the model. This allows proper measurement of inlet/airframe and nozzle/airframe interactions simultaneously. This is Volume 2 of 2: Wind Tunnel Test Force and Moment Data Report.

  2. Development and Calibration of a Field-Deployable Microphone Phased Array for Propulsion and Airframe Noise Flyover Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Culliton, William G.; McSwain, Robert G.; Ravetta, Patricio A.; Johns, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    A new aeroacoustic measurement capability has been developed consisting of a large channelcount, field-deployable microphone phased array suitable for airframe noise flyover measurements for a range of aircraft types and scales. The array incorporates up to 185 hardened, weather-resistant sensors suitable for outdoor use. A custom 4-mA current loop receiver circuit with temperature compensation was developed to power the sensors over extended cable lengths with minimal degradation of the signal to noise ratio and frequency response. Extensive laboratory calibrations and environmental testing of the sensors were conducted to verify the design's performance specifications. A compact data system combining sensor power, signal conditioning, and digitization was assembled for use with the array. Complementing the data system is a robust analysis system capable of near real-time presentation of beamformed and deconvolved contour plots and integrated spectra obtained from array data acquired during flyover passes. Additional instrumentation systems needed to process the array data were also assembled. These include a commercial weather station and a video monitoring / recording system. A detailed mock-up of the instrumentation suite (phased array, weather station, and data processor) was performed in the NASA Langley Acoustic Development Laboratory to vet the system performance. The first deployment of the system occurred at Finnegan Airfield at Fort A.P. Hill where the array was utilized to measure the vehicle noise from a number of sUAS (small Unmanned Aerial System) aircraft. A unique in-situ calibration method for the array microphones using a hovering aerial sound source was attempted for the first time during the deployment.

  3. Arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft structural design concepts evaluation. Volume 1: Sections 1 through 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The structural approach best suited for the design of a Mach 2.7 arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft was investigated. Results, procedures, and principal justification of results are presented. Detailed substantiation data are given. In general, each major analysis is presented sequentially in separate sections to provide continuity in the flow of the design concepts analysis effort. In addition to the design concepts evaluation and the detailed engineering design analyses, supporting tasks encompassing: (1) the controls system development; (2) the propulsion-airframe integration study; and (3) the advanced technology assessment are presented.

  4. Monitoring of Structural Integrity of Composite Structures by Embedded Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osei, Albert J.

    2002-01-01

    Real time monitoring of the mechanical integrity and stresses on key aerospace composite structures like aircraft wings, walls of pressure vessels and fuel tanks or any other structurally extended components and panels as in space telescopes is very important to NASA. Future military and commercial aircraft as well as NASA space systems such as Space Based Radar and International Space Station will incorporate a monitoring system to sense any degradation to the structure. In the extreme flight conditions of an aerospace vehicle it might be desirable to measure the strain every ten centimeters and thus fully map out the strain field of a composite component. A series of missions and vehicle health management requirements call for these measurements. At the moment thousands of people support a few vehicle launches per year. This number can be significantly reduced by implementing intelligent vehicles with integral nervous systems (smart structures). This would require maintenance to be performed only as needed. Military and commercial aircrafts have an equally compelling case. Maintenance yearly costs are currently reaching astronomical heights. Monitoring techniques are therefore required that allow for maintenance to be performed only when needed. This would allow improved safety by insuring that necessary tasks are performed while reducing costs by eliminating procedures that are costly and not needed. The advantages fiber optical sensors have over conventional electro-mechanical systems like strain gauges have been widely extolled in the research literature. These advantages include their small size, low weight, immunity to electrical resistance, corrosion resistance, compatibility with composite materials and process conditions, and multiplexing capabilities. One fiber optic device which is suitable for distributed sensing is the fiber Bragg grating (FBG). Researchers at NASA MSFC are currently developing techniques for using FBGs for monitoring the integrity of

  5. Application of supersonic particle deposition to enhance the structural integrity of aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, N.; Jones, R.; Sih, G. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aircraft metal components and structures are susceptible to environmental degradation throughout their original design life and in many cases their extended lives. This paper summarizes the results of an experimental program to evaluate the ability of Supersonic Particle Deposition (SPD), also known as cold spray, to extend the limit of validity (LOV) of aircraft structural components and to restore the structural integrity of corroded panels. In this study [LU1]the potential for the SPD to seal the mechanically fastened joints and for this seal to remain intact even in the presence of multi-site damage (MSD) has been evaluated. By sealing the joint the onset of corrosion damage in the joint can be significantly retarded, possibly even eliminated, thereby dramatically extending the LOV of mechanically fastened joints. The study also shows that SPD can dramatically increase the damage tolerance of badly corroded wing skins.

  6. Surface integrity of creep feed ground structural ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanics of creep feed grinding of structural ceramics with particular emphasis on the integrity of the finished surface. A fractional factorial experiment of 2{sup 5} conditions was used to determine the effects of grinding wheel bond (resinoid and vitreous), grit size (80 and 180), grit concentration (50 and 100) and work speed on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} specimens. Two depths of cut were interspersed with the varied grinding conditions. Normal and tangential grinding wheel stresses were calculated from wheel entry and exit incremental, measured vertical and horizontal force data. Average normal and tangential stresses were found to be nearly constant below a local material removal rate of about 4 mm{sup 2}/sec{sup 2} (time rate of change of volumetric removal rate per unit wheel width). This implies that rubbing or plowing predominates in the low material removal rate region of the finished surface. In the higher material removal rate regions, large grinding wheel stresses imply greater abrasive grit penetration into the workpiece and a predominance of lateral fracture as a removal mechanism. An additional result of the stress determination is that exit conditions are different from entry conditions and thus highlight the effect of median fracture as a result of workpiece geometry.

  7. Titanium and advanced composite structures for a supersonic cruise arrow wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Hoy, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Structural design studies were made, based on current technology and on an estimate of technology to be available in the mid 1980's, to assess the relative merits of structural concepts and materials for an advanced arrow wing configuration cruising at Mach 2.7. Preliminary studies were made to insure compliance of the configuration with general design criteria, integrate the propulsion system with the airframe, and define an efficient structural arrangement. Material and concept selection, detailed structural analysis, structural design and airplane mass analysis were completed based on current technology. Based on estimated future technology, structural sizing for strength and a preliminary assessment of the flutter of a strength designed composite structure were completed. An advanced computerized structural design system was used, in conjunction with a relatively complex finite element model, for detailed analysis and sizing of structural members.

  8. Integrated controls-structures design - A practical design tool for modern spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, P. G.; Joshi, S. M.; Lim, K. B.

    1991-01-01

    An integrated controls-structures design approach is developed for a class of flexible spacecraft. The integrated design problem is posed in the form of simultaneous optimization of both the structural and the control design variables. The approach is demonstrated by application to the integrated design of a geostationary platform and to a ground-based flexible structure experiment. The numerical results obtained indicate that the integrated design approach can yield spacecraft designs that have substantially superior performance over the conventional design approach wherein the structural design and control design are performed sequentially.

  9. Performance improvements of a highly integrated digital electronic control system for an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Andries, M. G.; Kelly, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program is structured to conduct flight research into the benefits of integrating an aircraft flight control system with the engine control system. A brief description of the HIDEC system installed on an F-15 aircraft is provided. The adaptive engine control system (ADECS) mode is described in detail, together with simulation results and analyses that show the significant excess thrust improvements achievable with the ADECS mode. It was found that this increased thrust capability is accompanied by reduced fan stall margin and can be realized during flight conditions where engine face distortion is low. The results of analyses and simulations also show that engine thrust response is improved and that fuel consumption can be reduced. Although the performance benefits that accrue because of airframe and engine control integration are being demonstrated on an F-15 aircraft, the principles are applicable to advanced aircraft such as the advanced tactical fighter and advanced tactical aircraft.

  10. Logical Schema Acquisition from Text-Based Sources for Structured and Non-Structured Biomedical Sources Integration

    PubMed Central

    García-Remesal, Miguel; Maojo, Víctor; Crespo, José; Billhardt, Holger

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach to integrate non-structured and structured sources of biomedical information. We part from previous research on database integration conducted in the context of the EC funded INFOGENMED project. In this project we developed the ONTOFUSION system, which provides a robust framework to integrate large sets of structured biomedical sources. Methods and tools provided by ONTOFUSION cannot be used to integrate non-structured sources, since the latter usually lack a logical schema. In this article we introduce a novel method to extract logical schemas from text-based collections of biomedical information. Non-structured sources equipped with a logical schema can be regarded as regular structured sources, and thus can be bridged together using the methods and tools provided by ONTOFUSION. To test the validity of this approach, we carried out an experiment with a set of five cancer databases. PMID:18693838

  11. Development of cyber-based autonomous structural integrity assessment system for building structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, M.; Fujita, K.; Li, X.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2013-04-01

    For the application of structural health monitoring (SHM) system to the post-earthquake damage screening of building structures, an immediate evaluation of the degree of damage in primary structural components is a challenging task. To increase the resolution in damage detection above a certain level to detect damage in individual components, a SHM requires the use of a dense array of sensors deployed to building structures. In order to deal with a large amount of data acquired by the sensing network and to distribute quick safety alerts on the condition of earthquake-affected buildings, a SHM system that is connected with a cyberinfrastructure specifically designed for the autonomous structural integrity assessment of buildings is developed. In the system, big data transferred from a dense sensing network is automatically stored and processed to extract damage features using a PostgresSQL relational database and embedded local damage detection algorithms. In a benchmark study, the schema of the SHM system is specifically designed to function with a built-in local damage detection algorithm that needs a comparative study of current dataset with past reference dataset. To visualize the results of the damage detection analysis, a PHP-based web-viewer is also designed for the SHM system. Finally, the performance of the developed cyber-based SHM system is evaluated through a series of the damage detection tests on a 5-story steel testbed frame that can replicate damage in beams and columns.

  12. Coupled rotor/airframe vibration analysis program manual. Volume 2: Sample input and output listings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassarino, S.; Sopher, R.

    1982-01-01

    Sample input and output listings obtained with the base program (SIMVIB) of the coupled rotor/airframe vibration analysis and the external programs, G400/F389 and E927 are presented. Results for five of the base program test cases are shown. They represent different applications of the SIMVIB program to study the vibration characteristics of various dynamic configurations. Input and output listings obtained for one cycle of the G400/F389 coupled program are presented. Results from the rotor aeroelastic analysis E927 also appear. A brief description of the check cases is provided. A summary of the check cases for all the external programs interacting with the SIMVIB program is illustrated.

  13. Toward Improved CFD Predictions of Slender Airframe Aerodynamics Using the F-16XL Aircraft (CAWAPI-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Rizzi, Arthur; Davis, M. Bruce

    2014-01-01

    A coordinated project has been underway to improve CFD predictions of slender airframe aerodynamics. The work is focused on two flow conditions and leverages a unique flight data set obtained with an F-16XL aircraft. These conditions, a low-speed high angleof- attack case and a transonic low angle-of-attack case, were selected from a prior prediction campaign wherein the CFD failed to provide acceptable results. In this paper the background, objectives and approach to the current project are presented. The work embodies predictions from multiple numerical formulations that are contributed from multiple organizations, and the context of this campaign to other multi-code, multiorganizational efforts is included. The relevance of this body of work toward future supersonic commercial transport concepts is also briefly addressed.

  14. Investigation of airframe noise for a large-scale wing model with high-lift devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Zaytsev, M. Yu.; Belyaev, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The acoustic characteristics of a large-scale model of a wing with high-lift devices in the landing configuration have been studied in the DNW-NWB wind tunnel with an anechoic test section. For the first time in domestic practice, data on airframe noise at high Reynolds numbers (1.1-1.8 × 106) have been obtained, which can be used for assessment of wing noise levels in aircraft certification tests. The scaling factor for recalculating the measurement results to natural conditions has been determined from the condition of collapsing the dimensionless noise spectra obtained at various flow velocities. The beamforming technique has been used to obtain localization of noise sources and provide their ranking with respect to intensity. For flap side-edge noise, which is an important noise component, a noise reduction method has been proposed. The efficiency of this method has been confirmed in DNW-NWB experiments.

  15. The Structure of Integral Dimensions: Contrasting Topological and Cartesian Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Matt; Goldstone, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Diverse evidence shows that perceptually integral dimensions, such as those composing color, are represented holistically. However, the nature of these holistic representations is poorly understood. Extant theories, such as those founded on multidimensional scaling or general recognition theory, model integral stimulus spaces using a Cartesian…

  16. Recent advances and progress towards an integrated interdisciplinary thermal-structural finite element technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namburu, Raju R.; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1993-01-01

    An integrated finite element approach is presented for interdisciplinary thermal-structural problems. Of the various numerical approaches, finite element methods with direct time integration procedures are most widely used for these nonlinear problems. Traditionally, combined thermal-structural analysis is performed sequentially by transferring data between thermal and structural analysis. This approach is generally effective and routinely used. However, to solve the combined thermal-structural problems, this approach results in cumbersome data transfer, incompatible algorithmic representations, and different discretized element formulations. The integrated approach discussed in this paper effectively combines thermal and structural fields, thus overcoming the above major shortcomings. The approach follows Lax-Wendroff type finite element formulations with flux and stress based representations. As a consequence, this integrated approach uses common algorithmic representations and element formulations. Illustrative test examples show that the approach is effective for integrated thermal-structural problems.

  17. Reducing Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Interactions with Uniquely Tailored Chevrons. 2; Installed Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Elkoby, Ronen; Brusniak, Leon; Thomas, Russ H.

    2006-01-01

    Propulsion airframe aeroacoustic (PAA) interactions arise due to the manner in which an engine is installed on the airframe and lead to an asymmetry in the flow/acoustic environment, for example, for under-the-wing installations due to the pylon, the wing and the high-lift devices. In this work we study how we can affect these PAA interactions to reduce the overall jet-related installed noise by tailoring the chevron shapes on fan and core nozzles in a unique fashion to take advantage of this asymmetry. In part 1 of this trio of papers we introduced the concept of azimuthally varying chevrons (AVC) and showed how some types of AVCs can be more beneficial than the conventional chevrons when tested on "isolated" scaled nozzles inclusive of the pylon effect. In this paper, we continue to study the effect of installing these AVC nozzles under a typical scaled modern wing with high-lift devices placed in a free jet. The noise benefits of these installed nozzles, as well as their installation effects are systematically studied for several fan/core AVC combinations at typical take-off conditions with high bypass ratio. We show, for example, that the top-enhanced mixing T-fan AVC nozzle (with enhanced mixing near the pylon and less mixing away from it) when combined with conventional chevrons on the core nozzle is quieter than conventional chevrons on both nozzles, and hardly produces any high-frequency lift, just as in the isolated case; however, its installed nozzle benefit is less than its isolated nozzle benefit. This suppression of take-off noise benefit under installed conditions, compared to its isolated nozzle benefit, is seen for all other chevron nozzles. We show how these relative noise benefits are related to the relative installation effects of AVCs and baseline nozzles.

  18. Numerical investigation of tandem-cylinder aerodynamic noise and its control with application to airframe noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltaweel, Ahmed

    Prediction and reduction of airframe noise are critically important to the development of quieter civil transport aircraft. The key to noise reduction is a full understanding of the underlying noise source mechanisms. In this study, tandem cylinders in cross-flow as an idealization of a complex aircraft landing gear configuration are considered to investigate the noise generation and its reduction by flow control using single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators. The flow over tandem cylinders at ReD = 22, 000 with and without plasma actuation is computed using large-eddy simulation. The plasma effect is modeled as a body force obtained from a semi-empirical model. The flow statistics and surface pressure frequency spectra show excellent agreement with previous experimental measurements. For acoustic calculations, a boundary-element method is implemented to solve the convected Lighthill equation. The solution method is validated in a number of benchmark problems including flows over a cylinder, a rod-airfoil configuration, and a sphere. With validated flow field and acoustic solver, acoustic analysis is performed for the tandem-cylinder configuration to extend the experimental results and understand the mechanisms of noise generation and its control. Without flow control, the acoustic field is dominated by the interaction between the downstream cylinder and the upstream wake. Through suppression of vortex shedding from the upstream cylinder, the interaction noise is reduced drastically by the plasma flow control, and the vortex-shedding noise from the downstream cylinder becomes equally important. At a free-stream Mach number of 0.2, the peak sound pressure level is reduced by approximately 16 dB. This suggests the viability of plasma actuation for active control of airframe noise. The numerical investigation is extended to the noise from a realistic landing gear experimental model. Coarse-mesh computations are performed, and preliminary results are

  19. State of the Art in Beta Titanium Alloys for Airframe Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, James D.; Briggs, Robert D.; Boyer, Rodney R.; Tamirisakandala, Sesh; Russo, Patrick; Shchetnikov, Nikolay; Fanning, John C.

    2015-06-01

    Beta titanium alloys were recognized as a distinct materials class in the 1950s, and following the introduction of Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al in the early 1960s, intensive research occurred for decades thereafter. By the 1980s, dozens of compositions had been explored and sufficient work had been accomplished to warrant the first major conference in 1983. Metallurgists of the time recognized beta alloys as highly versatile and capable of remarkable property development at much lower component weights than steels, coupled with excellent corrosion resistance. Although alloys such as Ti-15V-3Al-3Sn-3Cr, Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al and Ti-3AI-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr (Beta C) were commercialized into well-known airframe systems by the 1980s, Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al was largely discarded following extensive employment on the SR-71 Blackbird. The 1990s saw the implementation of specialty beta alloys such as Beta 21S and Alloy C, in large part for their chemical and oxidation resistance. It was also predicted that by the 1990s, cost would be the major limitation on expansion into new applications. This turned out to be true and is part of the reason for some stagnation in commercialization of new such compositions over the past two decades, despite a good understanding of the relationships among chemistry, processing, and performance and some very attractive offerings. Since then, only a single additional metastable beta alloy, Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr-0.5Fe, has been commercialized in aerospace, although low volumes of other chemistries have found a place in the biomedical implant market. This article examines the evolution of this important class of materials and the current status in airframe applications. It speculates on challenges for expanding their use.

  20. Study of metallic structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Grande, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    A structural design study was made, to assess the relative merits of various metallic structural concepts and materials for an advanced supersonic aircraft cruising at Mach 2.7. Preliminary studies were made to ensure compliance of the configuration with general design criteria, integrate the propulsion system with the airframe, select structural concepts and materials, and define an efficient structural arrangement. An advanced computerized structural design system was used, in conjunction with a relatively large, complex finite element model, for detailed analysis and sizing of structural members to satisfy strength and flutter criteria. A baseline aircraft design was developed for assessment of current technology. Criteria, analysis methods, and results are presented. The effect on design methods of using the computerized structural design system was appraised, and recommendations are presented concerning further development of design tools, development of materials and structural concepts, and research on basic technology.

  1. Advances in Hot-Structure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has actively participated in the development of hot structures technology for application to hypersonic flight systems. Hot structures have been developed for vehicles including the X-43A, X-37, and the Space Shuttle. These trans-atmospheric and atmospheric entry flight systems that incorporate hot-structures technology are lighter weight and require less maintenance than those that incorporate parasitic, thermal-protection materials that attach to warm or cool substructure. The development of hot structures requires a thorough understanding of material performance in an extreme environment, boundary conditions and load interactions, structural joint performance, and thermal and mechanical performance of integrated structural systems that operate at temperatures ranging from 1500 C to 3000 C, depending on the application. This paper will present recent advances in the development of hot structures, including development of environmentally durable, high temperature leading edges and control surfaces, integrated thermal protection systems, and repair technologies. The X-43A Mach-10 vehicle utilized carbon/carbon (C/C) leading edges on the nose, horizontal control surface, and vertical tail. The nose and vertical and horizontal tail leading edges were fabricated out of a 3:1 biased, high thermal conductivity C/C. The leading edges were coated with a three-layer coating comprised of a SiC conversion of the C/C, followed by a CVD layer of SiC, followed by a thin CVD layer of HfC. Work has also been performed on the development of an integrated structure and was focused on both hot and warm (insulated) structures and integrated fuselage/tank/TPS systems. The objective was to develop integrated multifunctional airframe structures that eliminate fragile external thermal-protection systems and incorporate the insulating function within the structure. The approach taken to achieve this goal was to develop candidate hypersonic

  2. Experimental validation of an integrated controls-structures design methodology for a class of flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Gupta, Sandeep; Elliott, Kenny B.; Joshi, Suresh M.; Walz, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the first experimental validation of an optimization-based integrated controls-structures design methodology for a class of flexible space structures. The Controls-Structures-Interaction (CSI) Evolutionary Model, a laboratory test bed at Langley, is redesigned based on the integrated design methodology with two different dissipative control strategies. The redesigned structure is fabricated, assembled in the laboratory, and experimentally compared with the original test structure. Design guides are proposed and used in the integrated design process to ensure that the resulting structure can be fabricated. Experimental results indicate that the integrated design requires greater than 60 percent less average control power (by thruster actuators) than the conventional control-optimized design while maintaining the required line-of-sight performance, thereby confirming the analytical findings about the superiority of the integrated design methodology. Amenability of the integrated design structure to other control strategies is considered and evaluated analytically and experimentally. This work also demonstrates the capabilities of the Langley-developed design tool CSI DESIGN which provides a unified environment for structural and control design.

  3. Inspect, Detect, Correct: Structural Integrated Pest Management Strategies at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochim, Jerry

    2003-01-01

    Describes a model integrated pest management (IPM) program for schools used in Monroe County, Indiana. Addresses how to implement an IPM program, specific school problem areas, specific pest problems and solutions, and common questions. (EV)

  4. Crack Turning and Arrest Mechanisms for Integral Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    In the course of several years of research efforts to predict crack turning and flapping in aircraft fuselage structures and other problems related to crack turning, the 2nd order maximum tangential stress theory has been identified as the theory most capable of predicting the observed test results. This theory requires knowledge of a material specific characteristic length, and also a computation of the stress intensity factors and the T-stress, or second order term in the asymptotic stress field in the vicinity of the crack tip. A characteristic length, r(sub c), is proposed for ductile materials pertaining to the onset of plastic instability, as opposed to the void spacing theories espoused by previous investigators. For the plane stress case, an approximate estimate of r(sub c), is obtained from the asymptotic field for strain hardening materials given by Hutchinson, Rice and Rosengren (HRR). A previous study using of high order finite element methods to calculate T-stresses by contour integrals resulted in extremely high accuracy values obtained for selected test specimen geometries, and a theoretical error estimation parameter was defined. In the present study, it is shown that a large portion of the error in finite element computations of both K and T are systematic, and can be corrected after the initial solution if the finite element implementation utilizes a similar crack tip discretization scheme for all problems. This scheme is applied for two-dimensional problems to a both a p-version finite element code, showing that sufficiently accurate values of both K(sub I) and T can be obtained with fairly low order elements if correction is used. T-stress correction coefficients are also developed for the singular crack tip rosette utilized in the adaptive mesh finite element code FRANC2D, and shown to reduce the error in the computed T-stress significantly. Stress intensity factor correction was not attempted for FRANC2D because it employs a highly accurate

  5. Variable Structure PID Control to Prevent Integrator Windup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, C. E.; Hodel, A. S.; Hung, J. Y.

    1999-01-01

    PID controllers are frequently used to control systems requiring zero steady-state error while maintaining requirements for settling time and robustness (gain/phase margins). PID controllers suffer significant loss of performance due to short-term integrator wind-up when used in systems with actuator saturation. We examine several existing and proposed methods for the prevention of integrator wind-up in both continuous and discrete time implementations.

  6. Supersonic cruise research aircraft structural studies: Methods and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, J.; Gross, D.; Kurtze, W.; Newsom, J.; Wrenn, G.; Greene, W.

    1981-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center SCAR in-house structural studies are reviewed. In methods development, advances include a new system of integrated computer programs called ISSYS, progress in determining aerodynamic loads and aerodynamically induced structural loads (including those due to gusts), flutter optimization for composite and metal airframe configurations using refined and simplified mathematical models, and synthesis of active controls. Results given address several aspects of various SCR configurations. These results include flutter penalties on composite wing, flutter suppression using active controls, roll control effectiveness, wing tip ground clearance, tail size effect on flutter, engine weight and mass distribution influence on flutter, and strength and flutter optimization of new configurations. The ISSYS system of integrated programs performed well in all the applications illustrated by the results, the diversity of which attests to ISSYS' versatility.

  7. An integrated runtime and compile-time approach for parallelizing structured and block structured applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Gagan; Sussman, Alan; Saltz, Joel

    1993-01-01

    Scientific and engineering applications often involve structured meshes. These meshes may be nested (for multigrid codes) and/or irregularly coupled (called multiblock or irregularly coupled regular mesh problems). A combined runtime and compile-time approach for parallelizing these applications on distributed memory parallel machines in an efficient and machine-independent fashion was described. A runtime library which can be used to port these applications on distributed memory machines was designed and implemented. The library is currently implemented on several different systems. To further ease the task of application programmers, methods were developed for integrating this runtime library with compilers for HPK-like parallel programming languages. How this runtime library was integrated with the Fortran 90D compiler being developed at Syracuse University is discussed. Experimental results to demonstrate the efficacy of our approach are presented. A multiblock Navier-Stokes solver template and a multigrid code were experimented with. Our experimental results show that our primitives have low runtime communication overheads. Further, the compiler parallelized codes perform within 20 percent of the code parallelized by manually inserting calls to the runtime library.

  8. The challenging scales of the bird: Shuttle tile structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, W. C.; Miller, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    The principal design issues, tests, and analyses required to solve the tile integrity problem on the space shuttle orbiters are addressed. Proof testing of installed tiles is discussed along with an airflow test of special tiles. Orbiter windshield tiles are considered in terms of changes necessary to ensure acceptable margins of safety for flight.

  9. Do integrated care structures foster processes of integration? A quasi-experimental study in frail elderly care from the professional perspective

    PubMed Central

    Janse, Benjamin; Huijsman, Robbert; de Kuyper, Ruben Dennis Maurice; Fabbricotti, Isabelle Natalina

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explores the processes of integration that are assumed to underlie integrated care delivery. Design A quasi-experimental design with a control group was used; a new instrument was developed to measure integration from the professional perspective. Setting and participants Professionals from primary care practices and home-care organizations delivering care to the frail elderly in the Walcheren region of the Netherlands. Intervention An integrated care intervention specifically targeting frail elderly patients was implemented. Main Outcome Measures Structural, cultural, social and strategic integration and satisfaction with integration. Results The intervention significantly improved structural, cultural and social integration, agreement on goals, interests, power and resources and satisfaction with integration. Conclusions This study confirms that integrated care structures foster processes of integration among professionals. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN05748494. PMID:27174858

  10. Integrated Control with Structural Feedback to Enable Lightweight Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation for the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference covers the benefits of active structural control, related research areas, and focuses on the use of optimal control allocation for the prevention of critical loads. Active control of lightweight structures has the potential to reduce aircraft weight and fuel burn. Sensor, control law, materials, control effector, and system level research will be necessary to enable active control of lightweight structures. Optimal control allocation with structural feedback has been shown in simulation to be feasible in preventing critical loads and is one example of a control law to enable future lightweight aircraft.

  11. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Presentations were made by industry, university, and government researchers organized into four sessions: aerothermodynamic loads; instrumentation; fatigue, fracture, and constitutive modeling; and structural dynamics.

  12. Response of a structural health monitoring fastener to fatigue crack growth and loads in metallic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakow, Alexi S.; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2009-03-01

    Fatigue cracks initiating at fastener hole locations in metallic structure are among the most common form of airframe damage. Current methods for inspecting airframes for these cracks are manual, whereby inspectors rely on nondestructive inspection equipment or hand-held probes to scan over areas to be monitored. Use of this equipment often demands disassembly of the airframe to search appropriate hole locations for cracks, which elevates the complexity and cost of maintenance inspections. In this study an Additive, Interleaved, Multi-layer Electromagnetic (AIME) sensor was developed and integrated with the shank of a fastener to form a Structural Health Monitoring Fastener, a new technology targeted at insitu detection of fastener hole cracks. The major advantages of the Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Fastener over other SHM technologies are its installation, which does not require joint layer disassembly, its capability to detect inner layer cracks in a multi-layer joint, and its capability to operate in a continuous monitoring mode. The AIME sensor design, SHM Fastener, and complete SHM system are presented along with experimental results from a series of single-layer and bolted double lap-joint aluminum specimens to validate the capability of these sensors to monitor metallic joints for fastener hole cracks and loads. Fatigue cracks were successfully tracked to over 0.7 inches from the fastener hole in these tests. Sensor output obtained from single-layer fatigue specimens was compared with analytical predictions for fatigue crack growth versus cycle number showing a good correlation in trend between sensor output and predicted crack size.

  13. Weapon System Costing Methodology for Aircraft Airframes and Basic Structures. Volume I. Technical Volume

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    COsTo CObTC CObTC CObTC CObTC >- COSTC (..au J" I i,. 1L CObTC. ,n .,-L I 1 W i> 1 u , fl...PAGE \\ 1 &OV1 ACCESSION NO ) ■M«\\’(. \\VKAl’f)N ÜV.STKM CnSTlXl. .\\ 1 KTIlnDul.( K’-V AIIU’KAMKS AND uASIC STH" L’J’I K KM • \\(i’iuiiH...8217 1_ 1 cchu ical \\,(ilunic t ! / 7- int+ntfrtiM, H. i-:./Keny< KKAO INSTROCTIONS BKKORK C’OMI’I.KTINr, FORM 3 RtCIPIt N TS r A T M

  14. Mechanical Properties and Fatigue Behavior of Unitized Composite Airframe Structures at Elevated Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    matrix (typically a polymer , metal, or ceramic resin) and the reinforcement (can also be polymeric , metallic, or ceramic) in the form of fibers, whiskers...when all absorbed water was evaporated. Weight loss stabilized in less than 9 days as shown in Figure 12. The specimens were then removed 27 from the...The tension-tension fatigue behavior of newly developed polymer matrix composites (PMCs) and that of a unitized composite was studied. The PMCs

  15. Research on Deep Hardening Titanium Alloy for Large Airframe Structural Members. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    Property Data Water 23-24 Quenched vs. Simulated Cooled Conditions Phase II Aged Mechanical Property Data 25-26 Water Quenched Samples Aged Dynamic ...ö li , t L.1 n TABLE XXII AGED DYNAMIC MODULUS MEASUREMENTS OF SELECTED ALLOYS 1 Li i! Composition Alloy (bal.Ti) 227 7Mo-4Cr-2. 5A1 232...4Mo-8V-6Cr-2. 5A1 240 6M0-6V Dynamic Modulus, E Direction0 (lb.in.Ŗ) L T L T L T 14.8 x lO6 15.2 12.9 14.3 15.1 16.5 I Li I

  16. The NASA/Industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program - Boeing helicopters airframe finite element modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabel, R.; Lang, P.; Reed, D.

    1992-01-01

    Finite-element modeling of the airframe vibration of the Army/Boeing CH-47D helicopter is conducted with comparisons to experimental data in an effort to improve the design process. A NASTRAN FEM is developed that is fully representative of the test configuration and includes the support fixture, shakers, and the aircraft/shaker suspension system. The analysis is conducted with specific attention given to the prediction of reasonable forced amplitudes throughout the airframe. Reasonable correlation is noted between the FEM and experimental results, although improved correlation can be obtained by including more accurate damping values and secondary effects such as stringer shear loading. It is shown that the general stress model does not provide an adequate dynamic analysis on which to base design improvements. A more detailed model is required that emphasizes highly detailed helicopter elements and employs a finer mesh particularly in the description of the mass distribution.

  17. 49 CFR 178.337-3 - Structural integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., the suspension sub-frame, accident protection structures, and external circumferential reinforcement... generated by design pressure, the weight of lading, the weight of structure supported by the cargo tank wall... percent of the ultimate tensile strength of the type steel used. (e) The minimum metal thickness for...

  18. 49 CFR 178.337-3 - Structural integrity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., the suspension sub-frame, accident protection structures, and external circumferential reinforcement... weight of lading, the weight of structure supported by the cargo tank wall, and the effect of temperature... percent of the ultimate tensile strength of the type steel used. (e) The minimum metal thickness for...

  19. Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft System Noise Assessment with Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burley, Casey L.; Olson, Erik D.

    2010-01-01

    A system noise assessment of a hybrid wing body configuration was performed using NASA s best available aircraft models, engine model, and system noise assessment method. A propulsion airframe aeroacoustic effects experimental database for key noise sources and interaction effects was used to provide data directly in the noise assessment where prediction methods are inadequate. NASA engine and aircraft system models were created to define the hybrid wing body aircraft concept as a twin engine aircraft with a 7500 nautical mile mission. The engines were modeled as existing technology high bypass ratio turbofans. The baseline hybrid wing body aircraft was assessed at 22 dB cumulative below the FAA Stage 4 certification level. To determine the potential for noise reduction with relatively near term technologies, seven other configurations were assessed beginning with moving the engines two fan nozzle diameters upstream of the trailing edge and then adding technologies for reduction of the highest noise sources. Aft radiated noise was expected to be the most challenging to reduce and, therefore, the experimental database focused on jet nozzle and pylon configurations that could reduce jet noise through a combination of source reduction and shielding effectiveness. The best configuration for reduction of jet noise used state-of-the-art technology chevrons with a pylon above the engine in the crown position. This configuration resulted in jet source noise reduction, favorable azimuthal directivity, and noise source relocation upstream where it is more effectively shielded by the limited airframe surface, and additional fan noise attenuation from acoustic liner on the crown pylon internal surfaces. Vertical and elevon surfaces were also assessed to add shielding area. The elevon deflection above the trailing edge showed some small additional noise reduction whereas vertical surfaces resulted in a slight noise increase. With the effects of the configurations from the

  20. Airframe RDT&E Cost Estimating: A Justification for and Development of Unique Cost Estimating Relationships According to Aircraft Type.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    T1I4 PAGO(ftWg, Dle& Bnt e 0 ’-Airframe RDT&E costs are invariably predicted by utilizing one general cost estimatin relationship (CER) regardless of...and in funding decisions demanding reliable , internally consistent estimates of absolute cost (10:1). Cost estimating capability is only as accurate as...pertaining to the RDT&E phase appear to be limited in their ability to accurately predict weapon system development costs. This thesis focuses on a

  1. Calculation of the three-dimension, supersonic, inviscid, steady flow past an arrow-winged airframe, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed description of the procedure used to compute three dimensional, supersonic, inviscid, steady flows past airframes is given. No limitations are imposed on the geometry of the airplane. Suitable computational grids are generated by automatic conformal mappings. The equations of motion, with pressure, entropy, and velocity direction as basic unknowns, are written and discretized in the computational space. Special rules to approximate derivatives are given. Boundary points are treated by a modified method of characteristics.

  2. Structural Oil Pan With Integrated Oil Filtration And Cooling System

    DOEpatents

    Freese, V, Charles Edwin

    2000-05-09

    An oil pan for an internal combustion engine includes a body defining a reservoir for collecting engine coolant. The reservoir has a bottom and side walls extending upwardly from the bottom to present a flanged lip through which the oil pan may be mounted to the engine. An oil cooler assembly is housed within the body of the oil pan for cooling lubricant received from the engine. The body includes an oil inlet passage formed integrally therewith for receiving lubricant from the engine and delivering lubricant to the oil cooler. In addition, the body also includes an oil pick up passage formed integrally therewith for providing fluid communication between the reservoir and the engine through the flanged lip.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes as Structural Elements in Integrated Biological Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Rohit; Cheney, Richard; Washburn, Sean; Superfine, Richard; Falvo, Michael

    2003-11-01

    Because of their unique mechanical, electrical, and spatial properties, Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) is an ideal candidate for nanometer scale electromechanical systems. An obstacle that arises immediately is the ability to produce substantial forces. Instead of following this course of miniaturization, it is possible integrate force-generating components that have been present for many years: biological motors. These protein complexes are responsible for muscle contractility and the intracellular transport of chromosomes and vesicles; they typically produce forces on a scale of piconewtons. We report progress toward attaching biological motor/filament complexes onto CNTs. We will also present results showing that individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be visualized with fluorescence microscopy through non-covalent labeling with conventional fluorophores. These studies lend themselves not only to the integration of nano-scale objects into biological sciences, but also give us some understanding of the surface properties of CNTs.

  4. Structural Integrity Assessment Using Laser Measured Surface Vibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    acoustic technique (left) and by a tap test (right) in a fresco panel in the Brumidi Corridor of The U.S. Senate. Figure 4. Co-ordinate system and...precious artwork such as mosaic or frescoed images. In the case of the latter, where the paintings were created on wet plaster, the current physical...Capitol Building to evaluate the ability of our techniques for assessing the integrity of fresco -bearing plaster walls and ceilings in various rooms of

  5. Integrated identification and robust control tuning for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Scheid, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    System identification is studied for the explicit purpose of supporting modern H-infinity robust control design objectives. In the analysis, the true plant is not assumed to be in the identification model set. An integrated identification/robust control problem is posed in which the optimal solution guarantees the best robust performance relative to the system information contained in a given experimental data set. A numerical example demonstrating an approximate solution to the problem indicates the usefulness of the approach.

  6. The home hemodialysis hub: physical infrastructure and integrated governance structure.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Mark R; Young, Bessie A; Fox, Sally J; Cleland, Calli J; Walker, Robert J; Masakane, Ikuto; Herold, Aaron M

    2015-04-01

    An effective home hemodialysis program critically depends on adequate hub facilities and support functions and on transparent and accountable organizational processes. The likelihood of optimal service delivery and patient care will be enhanced by fit-for-purpose facilities and implementation of a well-considered governance structure. In this article, we describe the required accommodation and infrastructure for a home hemodialysis program and a generic organizational structure that will support both patient-facing clinical activities and business processes.

  7. Design structure for in-system redundant array repair in integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Bright, Arthur A.; Crumley, Paul G.; Dombrowa, Marc; Douskey, Steven M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Oakland, Steven F.; Quellette, Michael R.; Strissel, Scott A.

    2008-11-25

    A design structure for repairing an integrated circuit during operation of the integrated circuit. The integrated circuit comprising of a multitude of memory arrays and a fuse box holding control data for controlling redundancy logic of the arrays. The design structure provides the integrated circuit with a control data selector for passing the control data from the fuse box to the memory arrays; providing a source of alternate control data, external of the integrated circuit; and connecting the source of alternate control data to the control data selector. The design structure further passes the alternate control data from the source thereof, through the control data selector and to the memory arrays to control the redundancy logic of the memory arrays.

  8. Integration of Design, Thermal, Structural, and Optical Analysis, Including Thermal Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    1993-01-01

    In many industries there has recently been a concerted movement toward 'quality management' and the issue of how to accomplish work more efficiently. Part of this effort is focused on concurrent engineering; the idea of integrating the design and analysis processes so that they are not separate, sequential processes (often involving design rework due to analytical findings) but instead form an integrated system with smooth transfers of information. Presented herein are several specific examples of concurrent engineering methods being carried out at Langley Research Center (LaRC): integration of thermal, structural and optical analyses to predict changes in optical performance based on thermal and structural effects; integration of the CAD design process with thermal and structural analyses; and integration of analysis and presentation by animating the thermal response of a system as an active color map -- a highly effective visual indication of heat flow.

  9. Providing structural modules with self-integrity monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, W. B.; Ibanez, P.; Yessaie, G.

    1988-01-01

    With the advent of complex space structures (i.e., U.S. Space Station), the need for methods for remotely detecting structural damage will become greater. Some of these structures will have hundreds of individual structural elements (i.e., strut members). Should some of them become damaged, it could be virtually impossible to detect it using visual or similar inspection techniques. The damage of only a few individual members may or may not be a serious problem. However, should a significant number of the members be damaged, a significant problem could be created. The implementation of an appropriate remote damage detection scheme would greatly reduce the likelihood of a serious problem related to structural damage ever occurring. This report presents the results of the research conducted on remote structural damage detection approaches and the related mathematical algorithms. The research was conducted for the Small Business Innovation and Research (SBIR) Phase 2 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contract NAS7-961.

  10. Systems integration and demonstration of advanced reusable structure for ALS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbins, Martin N.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the potential of advanced material to achieve life cycle cost (LCC) benefits for reusable structure on the advanced launch system. Three structural elements were investigated - all components of an Advanced Launch System reusable propulsion/avionics module. Leading aeroshell configurations included sandwich structure using titanium, graphite/polyimide (Gr/PI), or high-temperature aluminum (HTA) face sheets. Thrust structure truss concepts used titanium, graphite/epoxy, or silicon carbide/aluminum struts. Leading aft bulkhead concepts employed graphite epoxy and aluminum. The technical effort focused on the aeroshell because the greatest benefits were expected there. Thermal analyses show the structural temperature profiles during operation. Finite element analyses show stresses during splash-down. Weight statements and manufacturing cost estimates were prepared for calculation of LCC for each design. The Gr/PI aeroshell showed the lowest potential LCC, but the HTA aeroshell was judged to be lower risk. A technology development plan was prepared to validate the applicable structural technology.

  11. Toward Establishing a Realistic Benchmark for Airframe Noise Research: Issues and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.

    2010-01-01

    The availability of realistic benchmark configurations is essential to enable the validation of current Computational Aeroacoustic (CAA) methodologies and to further the development of new ideas and concepts that will foster the technologies of the next generation of CAA tools. The selection of a real-world configuration, the subsequent design and fabrication of an appropriate model for testing, and the acquisition of the necessarily comprehensive aeroacoustic data base are critical steps that demand great care and attention. In this paper, a brief account of the nose landing-gear configuration, being proposed jointly by NASA and the Gulfstream Aerospace Company as an airframe noise benchmark, is provided. The underlying thought processes and the resulting building block steps that were taken during the development of this benchmark case are given. Resolution of critical, yet conflicting issues is discussed - the desire to maintain geometric fidelity versus model modifications required to accommodate instrumentation; balancing model scale size versus Reynolds number effects; and time, cost, and facility availability versus important parameters like surface finish and installation effects. The decisions taken during the experimental phase of a study can significantly affect the ability of a CAA calculation to reproduce the prevalent flow conditions and associated measurements. For the nose landing gear, the most critical of such issues are highlighted and the compromises made to resolve them are discussed. The results of these compromises will be summarized by examining the positive attributes and shortcomings of this particular benchmark case.

  12. What Was Learned in Predicting Slender Airframe Aerodynamics with the F16-XL Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Arthur; Lucking, James M.

    2014-01-01

    The CAWAPI-2 coordinated project has been underway to improve CFD predictions of slender airframe aerodynamics. The work is focused on two flow conditions and leverages a unique flight data set obtained with the F-16XL aircraft for comparison and verification. These conditions, a low-speed high angle-of-attack case and a transonic low angle-of-attack case, were selected from a prior prediction campaign wherein the CFD failed to provide acceptable results. In re-visiting these two cases, approaches for improved results include better, denser grids using more grid adaptation to local flow features as well as unsteady higher-fidelity physical modeling like hybrid RANS/URANS-LES methods. The work embodies predictions from multiple numerical formulations that are contributed from multiple organizations where some authors investigate other possible factors that could explain the discrepancies in agreement, e.g. effects due to deflected control surfaces during the flight tests, as well as static aeroelastic deflection of the outer wing. This paper presents the synthesis of all the results and findings and draws some conclusions that lead to an improved understanding of the underlying flow physics, and finally making the connections between the physics and aircraft features.

  13. An Evaluation of High Temperature Airframe Seals for Advanced Hypersonic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Drlik, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    High temperature seals are required for advanced hypersonic airframe applications. In this study, both spring tube thermal barriers and innovative wafer seal systems were evaluated under relevant hypersonic test conditions (temperatures, pressures, etc.) via high temperature compression testing and room temperature flow assessments. Thermal barriers composed of a Rene 41 spring tube filled with Saffil insulation and overbraided with a Nextel 312 sheath showed acceptable performance at 1500 F in both short term and longer term compression testing. Nextel 440 thermal barriers with Rene 41 spring tubes and Saffil insulation demonstrated good compression performance up to 1750 F. A silicon nitride wafer seal/compression spring system displayed excellent load performance at temperatures as high as 2200 F and exhibited room temperature leakage values that were only 1/3 those for the spring tube rope seals. For all seal candidates evaluated, no significant degradation in leakage resistance was noted after high temperature compression testing. In addition to these tests, a superalloy seal suitable for dynamic seal applications was optimized through finite element techniques.

  14. Basic materials and structures aspects for hypersonic transport vehicles (HTV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheil, E.; Uhse, W.

    A Mach 5 transport design is used to illustrate structural concepts and criteria for materials selections and also key technologies that must be followed in the areas of computational methods, materials and construction methods. Aside from the primary criteria of low weight, low costs, and conceivable risks, a number of additional requirements must be met, including stiffness and strength, corrosion resistance, durability, and a construction adequate for inspection, maintenance and repair. Current aircraft construction requirements are significantly extended for hypersonic vehicles. Additional consideration is given to long-duration temperature resistance of the airframe structure, the integration of large-volume cryogenic fuel tanks, computational tools, structural design, polymer matrix composites, and advanced manufacturing technologies.

  15. Curriculum Integration in Context: An Exploration of How Structures and Circumstances Affect Design and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Amy Bell; Charner, Ivan; White, Robin

    In order to obtain firsthand information about different approaches and strategies for curriculum integration, case studies of curriculum integration models were conducted in seven sites across the United States. It was concluded that the presence or lack of certain contextual factors related to structure and operations had implications for the…

  16. An Empirical Test of Tinto's Integration Framework for Community Colleges Using Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-George, Arlene A.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation empirically tested Tinto's student integration theory through structural equation modeling using a national sample of 2,847 first-time entering community college students. Tinto theorized that the more academically and socially integrated a student is to the college environment, the more likely the student will persist through…

  17. Integrated Force Method Solution to Indeterminate Structural Mechanics Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.; Halford, Gary R.

    2004-01-01

    Strength of materials problems have been classified into determinate and indeterminate problems. Determinate analysis primarily based on the equilibrium concept is well understood. Solutions of indeterminate problems required additional compatibility conditions, and its comprehension was not exclusive. A solution to indeterminate problem is generated by manipulating the equilibrium concept, either by rewriting in the displacement variables or through the cutting and closing gap technique of the redundant force method. Compatibility improvisation has made analysis cumbersome. The authors have researched and understood the compatibility theory. Solutions can be generated with equal emphasis on the equilibrium and compatibility concepts. This technique is called the Integrated Force Method (IFM). Forces are the primary unknowns of IFM. Displacements are back-calculated from forces. IFM equations are manipulated to obtain the Dual Integrated Force Method (IFMD). Displacement is the primary variable of IFMD and force is back-calculated. The subject is introduced through response variables: force, deformation, displacement; and underlying concepts: equilibrium equation, force deformation relation, deformation displacement relation, and compatibility condition. Mechanical load, temperature variation, and support settling are equally emphasized. The basic theory is discussed. A set of examples illustrate the new concepts. IFM and IFMD based finite element methods are introduced for simple problems.

  18. Neural networks for structural design - An integrated system implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berke, Laszlo; Hafez, Wassim; Pao, Yoh-Han

    1992-01-01

    The development of powerful automated procedures to aid the creative designer is becoming increasingly critical for complex design tasks. In the work described here Artificial Neural Nets are applied to acquire structural analysis and optimization domain expertise. Based on initial instructions from the user an automated procedure generates random instances of structural analysis and/or optimization 'experiences' that cover a desired domain. It extracts training patterns from the created instances, constructs and trains an appropriate network architecture and checks the accuracy of net predictions. The final product is a trained neural net that can estimate analysis and/or optimization results instantaneously.

  19. Hardware Specific Integration Strategy for Impedance-Based Structural Health Monitoring of Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Robert B.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Inman, Daniel J.; Ha, Dong S.

    2011-01-01

    The Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) Project, sponsored by NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate, is conducting research to advance the state of highly integrated and complex flight-critical health management technologies and systems. An effective IVHM system requires Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The impedance method is one such SHM technique for detection and monitoring complex structures for damage. This position paper on the impedance method presents the current state of the art, future directions, applications and possible flight test demonstrations.

  20. Structural testing of the technology integration box beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    A full scale section of a transport aircraft wing box was designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested. The wing box section, which was called the technology integration box beam, contained blade stiffened covers and T-stiffened channel spars constructed using graphite-epoxy materials. Covers, spars, and the aluminum ribs were assembled using mechanical fasteners. The box beam was statically tested for several loading conditions to verify the stiffness and strength characteristics of the composite wing design. Failure of the box beam occurred at 125 pct. of design limit load during the combined unbending and torsion ultimate design load test. It appears that the failure initiated at a stiffener runout location in the upper cover which resulted in rupture of the upper cover and portions of both spars.

  1. Structural testing of the technology integration box beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    A full-scale section of a transport aircraft wing box was designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested. The wing box section, which was called the technology integration box beam, contained blade stiffened covers and T-stiffened channel spars constructed using graphite/epoxy materials. Covers, spars, and the aluminum ribs were assembled using mechanical fasteners. The box beam was statically tested for several loading conditions to verify the stiffness and strength characteristics of the composite wing design. Failure of the box beam occurred at 125 percent of design limit load during the combined upbending and torsion ultimate design load test. It appears that the failure initiated at a stiffener runout location in the upper cover which resulted in rupture of the upper cover and portions of both spars.

  2. Passively Damped Laminated Piezoelectric Shell Structures with Integrated Electric Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-field mechanics are presented for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates interfaced with distributed passive electric components. The equations of motion for laminated piezoelectric shell structures with embedded passive electric networks are directly formulated and solved using a finite element methodology. The modal damping and frequencies of the piezoelectric shell are calculated from the poles of the system. Experimental and numerical results are presented for the modal damping and frequency of composite beams with a resistively shunted piezoceramic patch. The modal damping and frequency of plates, cylindrical shells and cylindrical composite blades with piezoelectric-resistor layers are predicted. Both analytical and experimental studies illustrate a unique dependence of modal damping and frequencies on the shunting resistance and show the effect of structural shape and curvature on piezoelectric damping.

  3. Structural and leakage integrity of tubes affected by circumferential cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Hernalsteen, P.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper the author deals with the notion that circumferential cracks are generally considered unacceptable. He argues for the need to differentiate two facets of such cracks: the issue of the size and growth rate of a crack; and the issue of the structural strength and leakage potential of the tube in the presence of the crack. In this paper the author tries to show that the second point is not a major concern for such cracks. The paper presents data on the structural strength or burst pressure characteristics of steam generator tubes derived from models and data bases of experimental work. He also presents a leak rate model, and compares the performance of circumferential and axial cracks as far as burst strength and leak rate. The final conclusion is that subject to improvement in NDE capabilities (sizing, detection, growth), that Steam Generator Defect Specific Management can be used to allow circumferentially degraded tubes to remain in service.

  4. The structural integrity of affordable thick-section fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S

    1999-06-01

    The Long-Term Research Objectives are to advance the understanding of the mechanics of polymers and polymer composites; develop predictive capabilities as well as experimental characterization and validation tools for the mechanical behavior of these materials; and further develop our knowledge of structure-mechanical property relationships for this class of materials. The approach used was to develop novel experimental tools and use them to characterize the multiaxial failure and fatigue behavior of materials for thick-section fiber composite structures. These tools include capabilities for applying well-defined biaxial and triaxial stress states. These experiments are carefully chosen to provide results that can be used for discriminating evaluation of predictive failure models.

  5. Toward an Integrated Structural Model of the 26S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the end point of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and degrades ubiquitylated substrates. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP), where degradation occurs, and the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which ensures substrate specificity of degradation. Whereas the CP is resolved to atomic resolution, the architecture of the RP is largely unknown. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the current structural knowledge on the RP, including structures of the RP subunits, physical protein-protein interactions, and cryoelectron microscopy data. These data allowed us to compute an atomic model for the CP-AAA-ATPase subcomplex. In addition to this atomic model, further subunits can be mapped approximately, which lets us hypothesize on the substrate path during its degradation. PMID:20467039

  6. PRSEUS Structural Concept Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velicki, Alex; Jegley, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    A lighter, more robust airframe is one of the key technological advancements necessary for the successful launch of any large next-generation transport aircraft. Such a premise dictates that considerable improvements beyond current state-of-the-art aluminum structures is needed, and that improvements of this magnitude will require an extensive use of composite materials that are not only lightweight, but also economical to produce. To address this challenge, researchers at NASA and The Boeing Company are developing a novel structural concept called the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. It is an integrally stiffened panel concept that is stitched together and designed to maintain residual load-carrying capabilities under a variety of damage scenarios. In addition to improved structural performance, an important facet of this unique arrangement of stitched carbon fibers is its innovative manufacturing method that has the potential to lower fabrication costs by eliminating fasteners and autoclave cures. The rationale and development status for this new approach forms the basis of the work described in this paper. The test specimens described herein were fabricated, or are currently being fabricated, by The Boeing Company, while the structural analyses and testing tasks are being performed by NASA and Boeing personnel.

  7. An integrated control/structure design method using multi-objective optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sandeep; Joshi, Suresh M.

    1991-01-01

    The benefits are demonstrated of a multiobjective optimization based control structure integrated design methodology. An application of the proposed CSI methodology to the integrated design of the Spacecraft COntrol Lab Experiment (SCOLE) configuration is presented. Integrated design resulted in reducing both the control performance measure and the mass. Thus, better overall performance is achieved through integrated design optimization. The mutliobjective optimization approach used provides Pareto optimal solutions by unconstrained minimization of a differentiable KS function. Furthermore, adjusting the parameters gives insight into the trade-offs involved between different objectives.

  8. Influence of Weld Porosity on the Integrity of Marine Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    Bruce Mustain Mr. Alexander B . Stavov; U. S. MERCHANT MARINE ACADEMY NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Dr. C. B . Kim COMMITTEE ON MARINE STRUCTURE,, U. S...FIGURE 9(a). STRESS-LIFE PLOT SHOWING ACTUAL FATIGUE LIVES VERSUS PREDICTED FATIGUE LIVES OF WELDS CONTAINING POROSITY 32 FIGURE 9( b ). STRESS-LIFE PLOT...37 FIGURE 11. CLASS A AND CLASS B POROSITY CHART FOR 0.5 INCH (12.5 MM) THICK MATERIAL ....... ...................... ... 38 FIGURE 12

  9. Structural integrity evaluation of high activity moderator system evaporator

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.

    1994-05-01

    The High Activity Moderator (HAM) system is wanted in a batch mode in which the evaporator tank is filled with 70{degrees}F cold moderator (D{sub 2}O) every 4 hours. This operation induces thermal shock to the wall of the tank. Thermal and structural analyses are performed to evaluate the impact of this thermal shock on the 220{degrees}F hot evaporator tank walls. Conservative thermal models are analyzed. Case 1 analyzes a 4 in. wide strip of D{sub 2}O running down the tank walls during the filling process and Case 2 analyzes the tank being filled instantly with 70{degrees}F D{sub 2}O. It is found that Case 1 results in larger temperature gradients are then input into the structural model for calculating the thermal stresses. The structural analysis shows that the maximum stress intensity due to combined pressure and thermal loading is about 17240 psi which is well below the yield stress (21000 psi) of the evaporator tank wall material, stainless steel 304L. The fatigue life is evaluated in accordance with the criteria given in ASME Code, Section VIII. It is found that at the stress level of 17240 psi plus any residual stresses that might be present at the welded attachments to the tank wall, the fatigue life is about 4{times}10{sup 6} cycles. If the evaporator tank is filled every 4 hours, the tank fatigue life is well above the anticipated batch operation period of 2 years.

  10. Adaptive radiations, ecological specialization, and the evolutionary integration of complex morphological structures.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Leandro R; Nogueira, Marcelo R

    2010-03-01

    The evolutionary integration of complex morphological structures is a macroevolutionary pattern in which morphogenetic components evolve in a coordinated fashion, which can result from the interplay among processes of developmental, genetic integration, and different types of selection. We tested hypotheses of ecological versus developmental factors underlying patterns of within-species and evolutionary integration in the mandible of phyllostomid bats, during the most impressive ecological and morphological radiation among mammals. Shape variation of mandibular morphogenetic components was associated with diet, and the transition of integration patterns from developmental to within-species to evolutionary was examined. Within-species (as a proxy to genetic) integration in different lineages resembled developmental integration regardless of diet specialization, however, evolutionary integration patterns reflected selection in different mandibular components. For dietary specializations requiring extensive functional changes in mastication patterns or biting, such as frugivores and sanguivores, the evolutionary integration pattern was not associated with expected within-species or developmental integration. On the other hand, specializations with lower mastication demands or without major functional reorganization (such as nectarivores and carnivores), presented evolutionary integration patterns similar to the expected developmental pattern. These results show that evolutionary integration patterns are largely a result of independent selection on specific components regardless of developmental modules.

  11. Study of structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic transport configuration, volume 1. Tasks 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A structural design study was made, based on a 1975 level of technology, to assess the relative merits of structural concepts and materials for an advanced supersonic transport cruising at Mach 2.7. Preliminary studies were made to insure compliance of the configuration with general design criteria, to integrate the propulsion system with the airframe, to select structural concepts and materials, and to define an efficient structural arrangement. An advanced computerized structural design system was used, in conjunction with a relatively large, complex finite element model, for detailed analysis and sizing of structural members to satisfy strength and flutter criteria. A baseline aircraft design was developed for assessment of current technology and for use in future studies of aerostructural trades, and application of advanced technology. Criteria, analysis methods, and results are presented.

  12. Compressive failure modes and parameter optimization of the trabecular structure of biomimetic fully integrated honeycomb plates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinxiang; Tuo, Wanyong; Zhang, Xiaoming; He, Chenglin; Xie, Juan; Liu, Chang

    2016-12-01

    To develop lightweight biomimetic composite structures, the compressive failure and mechanical properties of fully integrated honeycomb plates were investigated experimentally and through the finite element method. The results indicated that: fracturing of the fully integrated honeycomb plates primarily occurred in the core layer, including the sealing edge structure. The morphological failures can be classified into two types, namely dislocations and compactions, and were caused primarily by the stress concentrations at the interfaces between the core layer and the upper and lower laminations and secondarily by the disordered short-fiber distribution in the material; although the fully integrated honeycomb plates manufactured in this experiment were imperfect, their mass-specific compressive strength was superior to that of similar biomimetic samples. Therefore, the proposed bio-inspired structure possesses good overall mechanical properties, and a range of parameters, such as the diameter of the transition arc, was defined for enhancing the design of fully integrated honeycomb plates and improving their compressive mechanical properties.

  13. A Guided Ultrasonic Waves Array for Structural Integrity Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Fromme, P.; Wilcox, P.D.; Lowe, M.; Cawley, P.

    2005-04-09

    Constant, long-term monitoring of large plate-like structures, e.g., oil storage tanks, can be performed using permanently attached remote sensors. A guided ultrasonic waves array, consisting of piezoelectric transducer elements for the excitation and reception of the first antisymmetric Lamb wave mode A0, has been designed and built. Laboratory measurements for a steel plate containing various defects have been performed. The results are compared to theoretical predictions and the sensitivity of the array device for defect detection is ascertained.

  14. Integrated High Accuracy Portable Metrology for Large Scale Structural Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaas, Andrej; Richardson, Paul; Burguete, Richard; Harris, Linden

    2014-06-01

    As the performance and accuracy of analysis tools increases bespoke solutions are more regularly being requested to perform high-accuracy measurement on structural tests to validate these methods. These can include optical methods and full-field techniques in place of the more traditional point measurements. As each test is unique it presents its own individual challenges.In this paper two recent, large scale tests performed by Airbus, will be presented and the metrology solutions that were identified for them will be discussed.

  15. Structural Integrity of Water Reactor Pressure Boundary Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-20

    RES-79-103 UNCLASSIFIED NRL--- 400 NURE-CR-17B3 NL mnmmnuunin -’El-.--. IIIIIIINI ., *q. - - ,aM T? * NUREG /CI 73 NIL Iteof AW, SOIituA 1 nert of Water...Progress Report for July-September 1979," NUREG /CR-1197, Oak Ridge National Labora- tory, Oak Ridge, Tn., Oct. 1978. 2. F. J. Loss, Ed., "Structural...Progress Report for April-June 1976," ORNL/ NUREG /TM-49, Oak Ridge National Labora- tory, Oak Ridge, Tn., Oct. 1976, pp. 27-38. 5. R. G. Berggren

  16. Structurally Integrated, Damage-Tolerant, Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vackel, Andrew; Dwivedi, Gopal; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Thermal spray coatings are used extensively for the protection and life extension of engineering components exposed to harsh wear and/or corrosion during service in aerospace, energy, and heavy machinery sectors. Cermet coatings applied via high-velocity thermal spray are used in aggressive wear situations almost always coupled with corrosive environments. In several instances (e.g., landing gear), coatings are considered as part of the structure requiring system-level considerations. Despite their widespread use, the technology has lacked generalized scientific principles for robust coating design, manufacturing, and performance analysis. Advances in process and in situ diagnostics have provided significant insights into the process-structure-property-performance correlations providing a framework-enhanced design. In this overview, critical aspects of materials, process, parametrics, and performance are discussed through exemplary studies on relevant compositions. The underlying connective theme is understanding and controlling residual stresses generation, which not only addresses process dynamics but also provides linkage for process-property relationship for both the system (e.g., fatigue) and the surface (wear and corrosion). The anisotropic microstructure also invokes the need for damage-tolerant material design to meet future goals.

  17. Structural integrity and potential failure modes of hanford high-level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Han, F.C.

    1996-09-30

    Structural Integrity of the Hanford High-Level Waste Tanks were evaluated based on the existing Design and Analysis Documents. All tank structures were found adequate for the normal operating and seismic loads. Potential failure modes of the tanks were assessed by engineering interpretation and extrapolation of the existing engineering documents.

  18. Structure of the Lithosphere in Central Europe: Integrated Density Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielik, M.; Grinč, M.; Zeyen, H. J.; Plašienka, D.; Pasteka, R.; Krajňák, M.; Bošanský, M.; Mikuška, J.

    2014-12-01

    Firstly, we present new results related to the lithospheric structure and tectonics of the Central Europe and the Western Carpathians. For geophysical study of the lithosphere in Central Europe we calculated four original 2D lithosphere-scales transects crossing this area from the West European Platform in the North to the Aegean Sea in the South and from the Adriatic Sea in the West to the East European Platform in the East. Modelling is based on the joint interpretation of gravity, geoid, topography and surface heat flow data with temperature-dependent density. Wherever possible, crustal structure is constrained by seismic data. The thickness of the lithosphere decreases from the older and colder platforms to the younger and hotter Pannonian Basin with a maximum thickness under the Eastern and Southern Carpathians. The thickness of the Carpathian arc lithosphere varies between 150 km in the North (the Western Carpathians) and about 300 km in the Vrancea zone (the Eastern and Southern Carpathian junction). In the Platform areas it is between 120 and 150 km and in the Pannonian Basin it is about 70 km. The models show that the Moesian Platform is overthrust from the North by the Southern Carpathians and from the South by the Balkanides and characterized by bending of this platform. In all transects, the thickest crust is found underneath the Carpathian Mountains or, as in the case of the Vrancea area, under their immediate foreland. The thickest crust outside the orogens is modelled for the Moesian Platform with Moho depths of up to 45 km. The thinnest crust is located under the Pannonian Basin with about 26-27 km. Secondly, our presentation deals with construction of the stripped gravity map in the Turiec Basin, which represents typical intramontane Neogene depression of the Western Carpathians. Based on this new and original gravity map corrected by regional gravity effect we were able to interpret the geological structure and tectonics of this sedimentary basin

  19. Nondestructive methods of integrating energy harvesting systems with structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, Sumedh; Zimowski, Krystian; Crawford, Richard; Wood, Kristin; Jensen, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Designing an attachment structure that is both novel and meets the system requirements can be a difficult task especially for inexperienced designers. This paper presents a design methodology for concept generation of a "parent/child" attachment system. The "child" is broadly defined as any device, part, or subsystem that will attach to any existing system, part, or device called the "parent." An inductive research process was used to study a variety of products, patents, and biological examples that exemplified the parent/child system. Common traits among these products were found and categorized as attachment principles in three different domains: mechanical, material, and field. The attachment principles within the mechanical domain and accompanying examples are the focus of this paper. As an example of the method, a case study of generating concepts for a bridge mounted wind energy harvester using the mechanical attachment principles derived from the methodology and TRIZ principles derived from Altshuller's matrix of contradictions is presented.

  20. Design integration of favorable geometry, structural support and containment

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, J.A.; McGehee, G.A.

    1991-07-01

    In designs for fissile processes at Savannah River site, different approaches have been used to provide engineered margins of safety for criticality with containment and seismic resistance as additional requirements. These requirements are frequently at odds in engineered systems. This paper proposes a plan to take advantage of vessels with favorable geometry to provide seismic resistance and to support a glovebox for containment. Thin slab tanks, small diameter pencil tanks, annular tanks, and other novel designs have been used for criticality safety. The requirement for DBE seismic resistance and rigid control of dimensions leads the designer to consider annular tanks for meeting these requirements. The high strength of annular tanks may logically be used to support secondary containment. Hands-on access to all instruments, piping etc. within containment can be provided through gloveports, thus a specialized glovebox. This paper examines the advantages of using an annular tank design to provide favorable geometry, structural support and containment.

  1. Functional, Structural, and Neurotoxicity Biomarkers in Integrative Assessment of Concussions

    PubMed Central

    Dambinova, Svetlana A.; Maroon, Joseph C.; Sufrinko, Alicia M.; Mullins, John David; Alexandrova, Eugenia V.; Potapov, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Concussion is a complex, heterogeneous process affecting the brain. Accurate assessment and diagnosis and appropriate management of concussion are essential to ensure that athletes do not prematurely return to play or others to work or active military duty, risking re-injury. To date, clinical diagnosis relies primarily on evaluating subjects for functional impairment using instruments that include neurocognitive testing, subjective symptom report, and neurobehavioral assessments, such as balance and vestibular-ocular reflex testing. Structural biomarkers, defined as advanced neuroimaging techniques and biomarkers assessing neurotoxicity and immunoexcitotoxicity, may complement the use of functional biomarkers. We hypothesize that neurotoxicity AMPA, NMDA, and kainite receptor biomarkers might be utilized as a part of comprehensive approach to concussion evaluations, with the goal of increasing diagnostic accuracy and facilitating treatment planning and prognostic assessment. PMID:27761129

  2. Integrated Structural/Acoustic Modeling of Heterogeneous Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett, A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven, M.; Pennline, James, A.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the dynamic response of heterogeneous media is presented. A given medium is discretized into a number of subvolumes, each of which may contain an elastic anisotropic material, void, or fluid, and time-dependent boundary conditions are applied to simulate impact or incident pressure waves. The full time-dependent displacement and stress response throughout the medium is then determined via an explicit solution procedure. The model is applied to simulate the coupled structural/acoustic response of foam core sandwich panels as well as aluminum panels with foam inserts. Emphasis is placed on the acoustic absorption performance of the panels versus weight and the effects of the arrangement of the materials and incident wave frequency.

  3. Flight Test Results for Uniquely Tailored Propulsion-Airframe Aeroacoustic Chevrons: Shockcell Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Ganz, Ulrich W.; Nesbitt, Eric; Bultemeier, Eric J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Nesbitt, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Azimuthally varying chevrons (AVC) which have been uniquely tailored to account for the asymmetric propulsion-airframe aeroacoustic interactions have recently shown significant reductions in jet-related community noise at low-speed take-off conditions in scale model tests of coaxial nozzles with high bypass ratio. There were indications that such AVCs may also provide shockcell noise reductions at high cruise speeds. This paper describes the flight test results when one such AVC concept, namely, the T-fan chevrons with enhanced mixing near the pylon, was tested at full-scale on a modern large twin-jet aircraft (777-300ER) with focus on shockcell noise at mid-cruise conditions. Shockcell noise is part of the interior cabin noise at cruise conditions and its reduction is useful from the viewpoint of passenger comfort. Noise reduction at the source, in the exhaust jet, especially, at low frequencies, is beneficial from the perspective of reduced fuselage sidewall acoustic lining. Results are shown in terms of unsteady pressure spectra both on the exterior surface of the fuselage at several axial stations and also microphone arrays placed inside the fuselage aft of the engine. The benefits of T-fan chevrons, with and without conventional chevrons on the core nozzle, are shown for several engine operating conditions at cruise involving supersonic fan stream and subsonic or supersonic core stream. The T-fan AVC alone provides up to 5 dB low-frequency noise reduction on the fuselage exterior skin and up to 2 dB reduction inside the cabin. Addition of core chevrons appears to increase the higher frequency noise. This flight test result with the previous model test observation that the T-fan AVCs have hardly any cruise thrust coefficient loss (< 0.05%) make them viable candidates for reducing interior cabin noise in high bypass ratio engines.

  4. Reducing Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic Interactions with Uniquely Tailored Chevrons. 1.; Isolated Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Elkroby, Ronen; Brunsniak, Leon; Thomas, Russ H.

    2006-01-01

    The flow/acoustic environment surrounding an engine nozzle installed on an airplane, say, under the wing, is asymmetric due to the pylon, the wing and the interaction of the exhaust jet with flaps on the wing. However, the conventional chevrons, which are azimuthally uniform serrations on the nozzle lip, do not exploit the asymmetry due to these propulsion airframe aeroacoustic interactions to reduce jet noise. In this pioneering study we use this non-axisymmetry to our advantage and examine if the total jet-related noise radiated to the ground can be reduced by using different types of azimuthally varying chevrons (AVC) which vary the mixing around the nozzle periphery. Several scale models of the isolated nozzle, representative of high bypass ratio engine nozzles, were made with a pylon and azimuthally varying chevrons on both fan and core nozzles to enhance mixing at the top (near the pylon) with less mixing at the bottom (away from the pylon) or vice versa. Various combinations of fan and core AVC nozzles were systematically tested at typical take-off conditions inside a free jet wind-tunnel and, here, in Part 1 we analyze the acoustics results for the isolated nozzle with a pylon, with installation effects reported in Parts 2 and 3. Several interesting results are discovered: amongst the fan AVCs the top-enhanced mixing T-fan chevron nozzle is quieter in combination with any core AVC nozzle when compared to conventional chevrons; however, the bottom-mixing B-fan chevrons, as well as the core AVC nozzles, by themselves, are noisier. Further, the low-frequency source strengths in the jet plume, obtained via phased microphone arrays, also corroborate the far field sound, and for the T-fan chevrons such sources move further downstream than those for baseline or conventional chevron nozzles.

  5. Unsteady Flowfield Around Tandem Cylinders as Prototype for Component Interaction in Airframe Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Meldi R.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Jenkins, Luther N.; McGinley, Catherine B.

    2005-01-01

    Synergistic application of experiments and numerical simulations is crucial to understanding the underlying physics of airframe noise sources. The current effort is aimed at characterizing the details of the flow interaction between two cylinders in a tandem configuration. This setup is viewed to be representative of several component-level flow interactions that occur when air flows over the main landing gear of large civil transports. Interactions of this type are likely to have a significant impact on the noise radiation associated with the aircraft undercarriage. The paper is focused on two-dimensional, time-accurate flow simulations for the tandem cylinder configuration. Results of the unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations with a two-equation turbulence model, at a Reynolds number of 0.166 million and a Mach number of 0.166, are presented. The experimental measurements of the same flow field are discussed in a separate paper by Jenkins, Khorrami, Choudhari, and McGinley (2005). Two distinct flow regimes of interest, associated with short and intermediate separation distances between the two cylinders, are considered. Emphasis is placed on understanding both time averaged and unsteady flow features between the two cylinders and in the wake of the rear cylinder. Predicted mean flow quantities and vortex shedding frequencies show reasonable agreement with the measured data for both cylinder spacings. Computations for short separation distance indicate decay of flow unsteadiness with time, which is not unphysical; however, the predicted sensitivity of mean lift coefficient to small angles of attack explains the asymmetric flowfield observed during the experiments.

  6. An Integrated Geophysical study of the Lithospheric Structure Beneath Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. A.; Doser, D. I.; Keller, R. G.

    2003-12-01

    The tectonic evolution of Libya has yielded a complex crustal structure, which is composed of a series of basins and uplifts. A considerable amount of oil exploration has been undertaken in the area and numerous studies have been published on the shallow (<10km depth) geology and geophysics of the region. In addition, over 6000 gravity measurements are available for the northern Libya region. We are using these data in conjunction with other geologic and geophysical control to construct a 3-D model of density/geology for northern Libya and surrounding regions. Knowing the surface geology and having a digital elevation model and observed gravity value at specified stations, we first calculate the gravity contribution for polygonal areas assuming infinite depth. We then calculate the gravitational contribution for the same polygonal area using the Paleozoic surface as the elevation, assuming uniform density for the volume of rocks below the Paleozoic surface. Subtracting the value calculated at the Paleozoic layer from the gravitational value at the surface yields a gravitational value matching that of the layer between the surface and the top of the Paleozoic layer. The same procedure is then repeated for the top of the Precambrian, the Moho, etc. The 3-D model will then be used to develop a regional velocity model that can be verified/modified by analysis of regional seismic waveform data we are collecting from earthquakes occurring within northern Libya. Northern Libya is the most seismologically active and highly faulted portion of the country. For this reason we have collected thirteen Landsat 5 satellite images covering the most seismically active and structurally significant regions of northeast and northwest Libya. The satellite images have been mosaicked using a seamless mosaicking technology based on ENVI's cutline feathering approached. The resulting mosaicked figures were then overlain with the previously mapped faults analyzed to identify the more recent

  7. Normal volumes and microstructural integrity of deep gray matter structures in AQP4+ NMOSD

    PubMed Central

    Heine, Josephine; Pache, Florence; Lacheta, Anna; Borisow, Nadja; Kuchling, Joseph; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Ruprecht, Klemens; Brandt, Alexander U.; Paul, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess volumes and microstructural integrity of deep gray matter structures in a homogeneous cohort of patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). Methods: This was a cross-sectional study including 36 aquaporin-4 antibody-positive (AQP4 Ab-positive) Caucasian patients with NMOSD and healthy controls matched for age, sex, and education. Volumetry of deep gray matter structures (DGM; thalamus, caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens) was performed using 2 independent automated methods. Microstructural integrity was assessed based on diffusion tensor imaging. Results: Both volumetric analysis methods consistently revealed similar volumes of DGM structures in patients and controls without significant group differences. Moreover, no differences in DGM microstructural integrity were observed between groups. Conclusions: Deep gray matter structures are not affected in AQP4 Ab-positive Caucasian patients with NMOSD. NMOSD imaging studies should be interpreted with respect to Ab status, educational background, and ethnicity of included patients. PMID:27144219

  8. Quantitative genetics of shape in cricket wings: developmental integration in a functional structure.

    PubMed

    Klingenberg, Christian Peter; Debat, Vincent; Roff, Derek A

    2010-10-01

    The role of developmental and genetic integration for evolution is contentious. One hypothesis states that integration acts as a constraint on evolution, whereas an alternative is that developmental and genetic systems evolve to match the functional modularity of organisms. This study examined a morphological structure, the cricket wing, where developmental and functional modules are discordant, making it possible to distinguish the two alternatives. Wing shape was characterized with geometric morphometrics, quantitative genetic information was extracted using a full-sibling breeding design, and patterns of developmental integration were inferred from fluctuating asymmetry of wing shape. The patterns of genetic, phenotypic, and developmental integration were clearly similar, but not identical. Heritabilities for different shape variables varied widely, but no shape variables were devoid of genetic variation. Simulated selection for specific shape changes produced predicted responses with marked deflections due to the genetic covariance structure. Three hypotheses of modularity according to the wing structures involved in sound production were inconsistent with the genetic, phenotypic, or developmental covariance structure. Instead, there appears to be strong integration throughout the wing. The hypothesis that genetic and developmental integration evolve to match functional modularity can therefore be rejected for this example.

  9. DNA minicircles clarify the specific role of DNA structure on retroviral integration.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Marco; Mornico, Damien; Volant, Stevenn; Juchet, Anna; Batisse, Julien; Bouchier, Christiane; Parissi, Vincent; Ruff, Marc; Lavery, Richard; Lavigne, Marc

    2016-09-19

    Chromatin regulates the selectivity of retroviral integration into the genome of infected cells. At the nucleosome level, both histones and DNA structure are involved in this regulation. We propose a strategy that allows to specifically study a single factor: the DNA distortion induced by the nucleosome. This strategy relies on mimicking this distortion using DNA minicircles (MCs) having a fixed rotational orientation of DNA curvature, coupled with atomic-resolution modeling. Contrasting MCs with linear DNA fragments having identical sequences enabled us to analyze the impact of DNA distortion on the efficiency and selectivity of integration. We observed a global enhancement of HIV-1 integration in MCs and an enrichment of integration sites in the outward-facing DNA major grooves. Both of these changes are favored by LEDGF/p75, revealing a new, histone-independent role of this integration cofactor. PFV integration is also enhanced in MCs, but is not associated with a periodic redistribution of integration sites, thus highlighting its distinct catalytic properties. MCs help to separate the roles of target DNA structure, histone modifications and integrase (IN) cofactors during retroviral integration and to reveal IN-specific regulation mechanisms.

  10. The Structure and Effectiveness of Health Systems: Exploring the Impact of System Integration in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Birch, Stephen; Ma, Huifen; Zhu, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Facing the challenges of aging populations, increasing chronic diseases prevalence and health system fragmentation, there have been several pilots of integrated health systems in China. But little is known about their structure, mechanism and effectiveness. The aim of this paper is to analyze health system integration and develop recommendations for achieving integration. Method: Huangzhong and Hualong counties in Qinghai province were studied as study sites, with only Huangzhong having implemented health system integration. Questionnaires, interviews, and health insurance records were sources of data. Social network analysis was employed to analyze integration, through structure measurement and effectiveness evaluation. Results: Health system integration in Huangzhong is higher than in Hualong, so is system effectiveness. The patient referral network in Hualong has more “leapfrog” referrals. The information sharing networks in both counties are larger than the other types of networks. The average distance in the joint training network of Huangzhong is less than in Hualong. Meanwhile, there are deficiencies common to both systems. Conclusion: Both county health systems have strengths and limitations regarding system integration. The use of medical consortia in Huangzhong has contributed to system effectiveness. Future research might consider alternative more context specific models of health system integration. PMID:28316541

  11. Novel integrated CMOS pixel structures for vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Matis, Howard S.; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans Georg; Wieman, Howard H.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2003-10-29

    Novel CMOS active pixel structures for vertex detector applications have been designed and tested. The overriding goal of this work is to increase the signal to noise ratio of the sensors and readout circuits. A large-area native epitaxial silicon photogate was designed with the aim of increasing the charge collected per struck pixel and to reduce charge diffusion to neighboring pixels. The photogate then transfers the charge to a low capacitance readout node to maintain a high charge to voltage conversion gain. Two techniques for noise reduction are also presented. The first is a per-pixel kT/C noise reduction circuit that produces results similar to traditional correlated double sampling (CDS). It has the advantage of requiring only one read, as compared to two for CDS, and no external storage or subtraction is needed. The technique reduced input-referred temporal noise by a factor of 2.5, to 12.8 e{sup -}. Finally, a column-level active reset technique is explored that suppresses kT/C noise during pixel reset. In tests, noise was reduced by a factor of 7.6 times, to an estimated 5.1 e{sup -} input-referred noise. The technique also dramatically reduces fixed pattern (pedestal) noise, by up to a factor of 21 in our tests. The latter feature may possibly reduce pixel-by-pixel pedestal differences to levels low enough to permit sparse data scan without per-pixel offset corrections.

  12. Integrated Thermal Protection Systems and Heat Resistant Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pichon, Thierry; Lacoste, Marc; Barreteau, R.; Glass, David E.

    2006-01-01

    In the early stages of NASA's Exploration Initiative, Snecma Propulsion Solide was funded under the Exploration Systems Research & Technology program to develop a CMC heatshield, a deployable decelerator, and an ablative heat shield for reentry vehicles. Due to changes within NASA's Exploration Initiative, this task was cancelled in early FY06. This paper will give an overview of the work that was accomplished prior to cancellation. The Snecma team consisted of MT Aerospace, Germany, and Materials Research & Design (MR&D), NASA Langley, NASA Dryden, and NASA Ames in the United States. An Apollo-type capsule was chosen as the reference vehicle for the work. NASA Langley generated the trajectory and aerothermal loads. Snecma and MT Aerospace began the design of a ceramic aft heatshield (CAS) utilizing C/SiC panels as the capsule heatshield. MR&D led the design of a C/SiC deployable decelerator, NASA Ames led the characterization of several ablators, NASA Dryden led the development of a heath management system and the high temperature structures testing, and NASA Langley led the insulation characterization. Though the task was pre-maturely cancelled, a significant quantity of work was accomplished.

  13. Integrated quality assurance for assembly and testing of complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kopylow, Christoph; Bothe, Thorsten; Elandaloussi, Frank; Kalms, Michael; Jüptner, Werner

    2005-11-01

    Modern production processes are directed by properties of the components to be manufactured. These components have different sizes, functionalities, high assembly complexity and high security requirements. The increasing requirements during the manufacturing of complex products like cars and aircrafts demand new solutions for the quality assurance - especially for the production at different places. The main focus is to find a measurement strategy that is cost effective, flexible and adaptive. That means a clear definition of the measurement problem, the measurement with adapted resolution, the data preparation and evaluation and support during measurement and utilisation of the results directly in the production. In this paper we describe flexible measurement devices on example of three different techniques: fringe projection, fringe reflection and shearography. These techniques allow the detection of surface and subsurface defects like bumps, dents and delaminations with high resolution. The defects can be optically mapped onto the object's surface. Results are demonstrated with big components taken from automotive and aircraft production. We will point out the most important adaptations of the systems to realize miniaturized, robust and mobile devices for the quality assurance in an industrial environment. Additionally the implementation into a Mobile Maintenance and Control structure is demonstrated.

  14. Integrated aerodynamic-structural design of a forward-swept transport wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Grossman, Bernard; Kao, Pi-Jen; Polen, David M.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of composite materials is having a profound effect on aircraft design. Since these materials permit the designer to tailor material properties to improve structural, aerodynamic and acoustic performance, they require an integrated multidisciplinary design process. Futhermore, because of the complexity of the design process, numerical optimization methods are required. The utilization of integrated multidisciplinary design procedures for improving aircraft design is not currently feasible because of software coordination problems and the enormous computational burden. Even with the expected rapid growth of supercomputers and parallel architectures, these tasks will not be practical without the development of efficient methods for cross-disciplinary sensitivities and efficient optimization procedures. The present research is part of an on-going effort which is focused on the processes of simultaneous aerodynamic and structural wing design as a prototype for design integration. A sequence of integrated wing design procedures has been developed in order to investigate various aspects of the design process.

  15. Integrative Approaches to Enhance Understanding of Plant Metabolic Pathway Structure and Regulation1

    PubMed Central

    Tohge, Takayuki; Scossa, Federico; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2015-01-01

    Huge insight into molecular mechanisms and biological network coordination have been achieved following the application of various profiling technologies. Our knowledge of how the different molecular entities of the cell interact with one another suggests that, nevertheless, integration of data from different techniques could drive a more comprehensive understanding of the data emanating from different techniques. Here, we provide an overview of how such data integration is being used to aid the understanding of metabolic pathway structure and regulation. We choose to focus on the pairwise integration of large-scale metabolite data with that of the transcriptomic, proteomics, whole-genome sequence, growth- and yield-associated phenotypes, and archival functional genomic data sets. In doing so, we attempt to provide an update on approaches that integrate data obtained at different levels to reach a better understanding of either single gene function or metabolic pathway structure and regulation within the context of a broader biological process. PMID:26371234

  16. A structure-based model of semantic integrity constraints for relational data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasdorf, William J.; Ulberg, Karen J.; Baugh, John W., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Data base management systems (DBMSs) are in widespread use because of the ease and flexibility with which users access large volumes of data. Ensuring data accuracy through integrity constraints is a central aspect of DBMS use. However, many DBMSs still lack adequate integrity support. In additon, a comprehensive theoretical basis for such support the role of a constraint classification system - has yet to be developed. This paper presents a formalism that classifies semantic integrity constraints based on the structure of the relational model. Integrity constraints are characterized by the portion of the data base structure they access, whether one or more relations, attributes, or tuples. Thus, the model is completely general, allowing the arbitrary specification of any constraint. Examples of each type of constraint are illustrated using a small engineering data base, and various implementation issues are discussed.

  17. Flight and wind-tunnel comparisons of the inlet-airframe interaction of the F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, L. D.; Andriyich-Varda, D.; Whitmore, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    The design of inlets and nozzles and their interactions with the airplane which may account for a large percentage of the total drag of modern high performance aircraft is discussed. The inlet/airframe interactions program and the flight tests conducted is described. Inlet drag and lift data from a 7.5% wind-tunnel model are compared with data from an F-15 airplane with instrumentation to match the model. Pressure coefficient variations with variable cowl angles, capture ratios, examples of flow interactions and angles of attack are for Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, and 1.5 are presented.

  18. In Search of the Physics: The Interplay of Experiment and Computation in Airframe Noise Research: Flap-Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streett, C. L.; Lockard, D. P.; Singer, B. A.; Khorrami, M. R.; Choudhari, M. M.

    2003-01-01

    The LaRC investigative process for airframe noise has proven to be a useful guide for elucidation of the physics of flow-induced noise generation over the last five years. This process, relying on a close interplay between experiment and computation, is described and demonstrated here on the archetypal problem of flap-edge noise. Some detailed results from both experiment and computation are shown to illustrate the process, and a description of the multi-source physics seen in this problem is conjectured.

  19. Integrating Substrateless Electrospinning with Textile Technology for Creating Biodegradable Three-Dimensional Structures.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John; Nair, Shantikumar V; Menon, Deepthy

    2015-08-12

    The present study describes a unique way of integrating substrateless electrospinning process with textile technology. We developed a new collector design that provided a pressure-driven, localized cotton-wool structure in free space from which continuous high strength yarns were drawn. An advantage of this integration was that the textile could be drug/dye loaded and be developed into a core-sheath architecture with greater functionality. This method could produce potential nanotextiles for various biomedical applications.

  20. An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Pfiffner, Susan M.

    2005-08-11

    Our current research represents a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Florida State University (FSU), and the University of Tennessee. ORNL will serve as the lead institution with Dr. A.V. Palumbo responsible for project coordination, integration, and deliverables. This project was initiated in November, 2004, in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR program. The overall goal of our project is to provide an improved understanding of the relationships between microbial community structure, geochemistry, and metal reduction rates.

  1. Monolithic integration of waveguide structures with surface-micromachined polysilicon actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Carson, R.F.; Sullivan, C.T.; McClellan, G.

    1996-03-01

    The integration of optical components with polysilicon surface micromechanical actuation mechanisms show significant promise for signal switching, fiber alignment, and optical sensing applications. Monolithically integrating the manufacturing process for waveguide structures with the processing of polysilicon actuators allows actuated waveguides to take advantage of the economy of silicon manufacturing. The optical and stress properties of the oxides and nitrides considered for the waveguide design along with design, fabrication, and testing details for the polysilicon actuators are presented.

  2. Interrater reliability and discriminative validity of the structural elements of the Ayres Sensory Integration Fidelity Measure.

    PubMed

    May-Benson, Teresa A; Roley, Susanne Smith; Mailloux, Zoe; Parham, L Diane; Koomar, Jane; Schaaf, Roseann C; Jaarsveld, Annamarie Van; Cohn, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of the structural section of the Ayres Sensory Integration® Fidelity Measure© (ASIFM), which provides a method for monitoring the extent to which an intervention was implemented as conceptualized in studies of occupational therapy using sensory integration intervention methods (OT-SI). We examined the structural elements of the measure, including content of assessment reports, availability of specific equipment and adequate space, safety monitoring, and integration of communication with parents and other team members, such as collaborative goal setting with parents or family and teacher education, into the intervention program. Analysis of self-report ratings by 259 occupational therapists from 185 different facilities indicated that the structural section of the ASIFM has acceptable interrater reliability (r ≥ .82) and significantly differentiates between settings in which therapists reportedly do and do not practice OT-SI (p < .001).

  3. Integrated Layout and Support Structure Optimization for Offshore Wind Farm Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashuri, T.; Ponnurangam, C.; Zhang, J.; Rotea, M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper develops a multidisciplinary design optimization framework for integrated design optimization of offshore wind farm layout and support structure. A computational model is developed to characterize the physics of the wind farm wake, aerodynamic and hydrodynamic loads, response of the support structure to these loads, soil- structure interaction, as well as different cost elements. Levelized cost of energy is introduced as the objective function. The design constraints are the farm external boundary, and support structure buckling, first modal-frequency, fatigue damage and ultimate stresses. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, four optimization scenarios are considered: a feasible baseline design, optimization of layout only, optimization of support structure only, and integrated design of the layout and support structure. Compared to the baseline design, the optimization results show that the isolated support structure design reduces the levelized cost of energy by 0.6%, the isolated layout design reduces the levelized cost of energy by 2.0%, and the integrated layout and support structure design reduces the levelized cost of energy by 2.6%.

  4. Lewis Structures Technology, 1988. Volume 3: Structural Integrity Fatigue and Fracture Wind Turbines HOST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The charter of the Structures Division is to perform and disseminate results of research conducted in support of aerospace engine structures. These results have a wide range of applicability to practioners of structural engineering mechanics beyond the aerospace arena. The specific purpose of the symposium was to familiarize the engineering structures community with the depth and range of research performed by the division and its academic and industrial partners. Sessions covered vibration control, fracture mechanics, ceramic component reliability, parallel computing, nondestructive evaluation, constitutive models and experimental capabilities, dynamic systems, fatigue and damage, wind turbines, hot section technology (HOST), aeroelasticity, structural mechanics codes, computational methods for dynamics, structural optimization, and applications of structural dynamics, and structural mechanics computer codes.

  5. The role of organizational structure in readiness for change: A conceptual integration.

    PubMed

    Benzer, Justin K; Charns, Martin P; Hamdan, Sami; Afable, Melissa

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to extend extant conceptualizations of readiness for change as an individual-level phenomenon. This review-of-reviews focuses on existing conceptual frameworks from the dissemination, implementation, quality improvement, and organizational transformation literatures in order to integrate theoretical rationales for how organization structure, a key dimension of the organizational context, may impact readiness for change. We propose that the organization structure dimensions of differentiation and integration impact readiness for change at the individual level of analysis by influencing four key concepts of relevance, legitimacy, perceived need for change, and resource allocation. We identify future research directions that focus on these four key concepts.

  6. Discrete integration of continuous Kalman filtering equations for time invariant second-order structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Belvin, W. Keith

    1990-01-01

    A general form for the first-order representation of the continuous second-order linear structural-dynamics equations is introduced to derive a corresponding form of first-order continuous Kalman filtering equations. Time integration of the resulting equations is carried out via a set of linear multistep integration formulas. It is shown that a judicious combined selection of computational paths and the undetermined matrices introduced in the general form of the first-order linear structural systems leads to a class of second-order discrete Kalman filtering equations involving only symmetric sparse N x N solution matrices.

  7. Cooperative control theory and integrated flight and propulsion control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, David K.; Schierman, John D.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the activities and research results obtained under a grant (NAG3-998) from the NASA Lewis Research Center. The focus of the research was the investigation of dynamic interactions between airframe and engines for advanced ASTOVL aircraft configurations, and the analysis of the implications of these interactions on the stability and performance of the airframe and engine control systems. In addition, the need for integrated flight and propulsion control for such aircraft was addressed. The major contribution of this research was the exposition of the fact that airframe and engine interactions could be present, and their effects could include loss of stability and performance of the control systems. Also, the significance of two directional, as opposed to one-directional, coupling was identified and explained. A multi variable stability and performance analysis methodology was developed, and applied to several candidate aircraft configurations. Also exposed was the fact that with interactions present along with some integrated control approaches, the engine command/limiting logic (which represents an important non-linear component of the engine control system) can impact closed-loop airframe/engine system stability. Finally, a brief investigation of control-law synthesis techniques appropriate for the class of systems was pursued, and it was determined that multi variable techniques, included model-following formulations of LQG and/or H (infinity) methods showed promise. However, for practical reasons, decentralized control architectures are preferred, which is an architecture incompatible with these synthesis methods.

  8. An Integrated Control and Minimum Mass Structural Optimization Algorithm for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messac, A.; Turner, J.; Soosaar, K.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach is discussed for solving dual structural control optimization problems for high-order flexible space structures, where reduced-order structural models are employed and minimum mass designs are sought. For a given initial structural design, a quadratic control cost is minimized subject to a constant-mass constraint. The sensitivity of the optimal control cost with respect to the structural design variables is then determined and used to obtain successive structural redesigns, using a constrained gradient optimization algorithm. This process is repeated until the constrained control cost sensitivity becomes negligible. The minimum mass design is obtained by solving a sequence of neighboring optimal constant mass designs, where the sequence of optimal performance indices has a minimum at the optimal minimum mass design. A numerical example is presented which demonstrates that this new approach effectively addresses the problem of dual optimization for potentially very high-order structures.

  9. An aeroacoustic study of micro-tab on airframe noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chiawei B.

    Aircraft high-lift devices such as leading-edge slats and trailing-edge flaps generate noise when extended, causing significant contributions to overall aircraft sound pressure levels, in particular in approach to land phase. It is shown by previous research efforts that noise generated by the high-lift devices increases with their deployment angles. Hence it is possible to mitigate such high-lift noise by using reduced settings without sacrificing the aerodynamic performance, particularly lift. In this dissertation research, micro-tab device attached at the pressure side of the flap surface near its trailing-edge is envisioned as the way to compensate the lift loss due to reduced high-lift device settings. Hybrid numerical method, which combines computational fluid dynamics and acoustics analogy, was adopted to predict the farfield noise spectrum. It is the goal of this research project to illustrate that noise level increase due to micro-tab deployment is smaller than that from the prescribed slat and flap setting increases, so that an overall airframe noise reduction can be achieved. Two-dimensional computational simulations and three-dimensional computational simulations were performed progressively. Results indicated that the proposed reduced high-lift settings with micro-tab application achieved noise reduction, particularly in the mid-frequency range where human hearing is most sensitive to. Parametric studies involving geometry and size effects of the micro-tab configurations were conducted using two-dimensional and three-dimensional models. Results showed that considerable noise reduction was obtained if slit micro-tab was used. An airworthiness study regarding applying micro-tab device onto existing commercial airliners as retrofit to lower noise emission in approach was also investigated and compliance strategy was provided. In the last part of this research, a different approach from aviation policy was taken as the airport noise compatibility planning

  10. Fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensors on flexible sensing skin substrates for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Kurata, Masahiro; Nishino, Hiromichi; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2016-04-01

    New advances in nanotechnology and material processing is creating opportunities for the design and fabrication of a new generation of thin film sensors that can used to assess structural health. In particular, thin film sensors attached to large areas of the structure surface has the potential to provide spatially rich data on the performance and health of a structure. This study focuses on the development of a fully integrated strain sensor that is fabricated on a flexible substrate for potentially use in sensing skins. This is completed using a carbon nanotube-polymer composite material that is patterned on a flexible polyimide substrate using optical lithography. The piezoresistive carbon nanotube elements are integrated into a complete sensing system by patterning copper electrodes and integrating off-the-shelf electrical components on the flexible film for expanded functionality. This diverse material utilization is realized in a versatile process flow to illustrate a powerful toolbox for sensing severity, location, and failure mode of damage on structural components. The fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensor is tested on a quarter-scale, composite beam column connection. The results and implications for future structural damage detection are discussed.

  11. Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyn, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Integrated learning is an exciting adventure for both teachers and students. It is not uncommon to observe the integration of academic subjects such as math, science, and language arts. However, educators need to recognize that movement experiences in physical education also can be linked to academic curricula and, may even lead the…

  12. Integration of periodic structure and highly narrowband MEMS sensor to enhance crack detection ability in steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Minoo; Ozevin, Didem

    2016-09-01

    Acoustic emission method is a nondestructive evaluation method based on the propagation of elastic waves due to the sudden change in strain field caused by newly formed fracture surfaces. While the method has been successfully applied to many structures, the influence of friction emissions limits the diverse use of the method in large-scale structures. This research integrates the metamaterial geometry to block low frequency friction signals while allowing high frequency signals due to the crack growth. The phononic structure is composed of periodic arrangement of holes in a steel plate that prohibits propagation of elastic waves near the band gap of 60 kHz. The dispersion curve of the periodic structure is calculated using finite element modeling of a unit cell in COMSOL Multiphysics. As the band gap of the periodic structure is highly narrowband, the acoustic sensing is achieved by highly narrowband capacitive type Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) sensors tuned to the desired stop band frequency. The integration of periodic plate design and MEMS sensors provides wave-field focusing to reduce wave attenuation, and prevent interference of secondary waves sources, such as friction, with the primary waveforms. The waveguiding feature of the designed structure is experimentally investigated and discussed in this paper.

  13. An integrated map of structural variation in 2,504 human genomes.

    PubMed

    Sudmant, Peter H; Rausch, Tobias; Gardner, Eugene J; Handsaker, Robert E; Abyzov, Alexej; Huddleston, John; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Kai; Jun, Goo; Hsi-Yang Fritz, Markus; Konkel, Miriam K; Malhotra, Ankit; Stütz, Adrian M; Shi, Xinghua; Paolo Casale, Francesco; Chen, Jieming; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Dayama, Gargi; Chen, Ken; Malig, Maika; Chaisson, Mark J P; Walter, Klaudia; Meiers, Sascha; Kashin, Seva; Garrison, Erik; Auton, Adam; Lam, Hugo Y K; Jasmine Mu, Xinmeng; Alkan, Can; Antaki, Danny; Bae, Taejeong; Cerveira, Eliza; Chines, Peter; Chong, Zechen; Clarke, Laura; Dal, Elif; Ding, Li; Emery, Sarah; Fan, Xian; Gujral, Madhusudan; Kahveci, Fatma; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Kong, Yu; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; McCarthy, Shane; Flicek, Paul; Gibbs, Richard A; Marth, Gabor; Mason, Christopher E; Menelaou, Androniki; Muzny, Donna M; Nelson, Bradley J; Noor, Amina; Parrish, Nicholas F; Pendleton, Matthew; Quitadamo, Andrew; Raeder, Benjamin; Schadt, Eric E; Romanovitch, Mallory; Schlattl, Andreas; Sebra, Robert; Shabalin, Andrey A; Untergasser, Andreas; Walker, Jerilyn A; Wang, Min; Yu, Fuli; Zhang, Chengsheng; Zhang, Jing; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Zhou, Wanding; Zichner, Thomas; Sebat, Jonathan; Batzer, Mark A; McCarroll, Steven A; Mills, Ryan E; Gerstein, Mark B; Bashir, Ali; Stegle, Oliver; Devine, Scott E; Lee, Charles; Eichler, Evan E; Korbel, Jan O

    2015-10-01

    Structural variants are implicated in numerous diseases and make up the majority of varying nucleotides among human genomes. Here we describe an integrated set of eight structural variant classes comprising both balanced and unbalanced variants, which we constructed using short-read DNA sequencing data and statistically phased onto haplotype blocks in 26 human populations. Analysing this set, we identify numerous gene-intersecting structural variants exhibiting population stratification and describe naturally occurring homozygous gene knockouts that suggest the dispensability of a variety of human genes. We demonstrate that structural variants are enriched on haplotypes identified by genome-wide association studies and exhibit enrichment for expression quantitative trait loci. Additionally, we uncover appreciable levels of structural variant complexity at different scales, including genic loci subject to clusters of repeated rearrangement and complex structural variants with multiple breakpoints likely to have formed through individual mutational events. Our catalogue will enhance future studies into structural variant demography, functional impact and disease association.

  14. Multilevel decomposition approach to integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural optimization of helicopter rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural (IADS) optimization procedure for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance, dynamics, and structural analyses with a general purpose optimizer using multilevel decomposition techniques. At the upper level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (stiffnesses, mass, and average strains). At the lower level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (detailed dimensions of the blade structure and stresses). The IADS procedure provides an optimization technique that is compatible with industrial design practices in which the aerodynamic and dynamic design is performed at a global level and the structural design is carried out at a detailed level with considerable dialogue and compromise among the aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural groups. The IADS procedure is demonstrated for several cases.

  15. Integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural optimization of helicopter rotor blades using multilevel decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural (IADS) optimization procedure for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance, dynamics, and structural analyses with a general-purpose optimizer using multilevel decomposition techniques. At the upper level, the structure is defined in terms of global quantities (stiffness, mass, and average strains). At the lower level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (detailed dimensions of the blade structure and stresses). The IADS procedure provides an optimization technique that is compatible with industrial design practices in which the aerodynamic and dynamic designs are performed at a global level and the structural design is carried out at a detailed level with considerable dialog and compromise among the aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural groups. The IADS procedure is demonstrated for several examples.

  16. Guidelines for development of structural integrity programs for DOE high-level waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Bush, S.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; Rooyen, D. van; Weeks, J.

    1997-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for developing programs to promote the structural integrity of high-level waste storage tanks and transfer lines at the facilities of the Department of Energy. Elements of the program plan include a leak-detection system, definition of appropriate loads, collection of data for possible material and geometric changes, assessment of the tank structure, and non-destructive examination. Possible aging degradation mechanisms are explored for both steel and concrete components of the tanks, and evaluated to screen out nonsignificant aging mechanisms and to indicate methods of controlling the significant aging mechanisms. Specific guidelines for assessing structural adequacy will be provided in companion documents. Site-specific structural integrity programs can be developed drawing on the relevant portions of the material in this document.

  17. Thermal-Acoustic Analysis of a Metallic Integrated Thermal Protection System Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behnke, Marlana N.; Sharma, Anurag; Przekop, Adam; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A study is undertaken to investigate the response of a representative integrated thermal protection system structure under combined thermal, aerodynamic pressure, and acoustic loadings. A two-step procedure is offered and consists of a heat transfer analysis followed by a nonlinear dynamic analysis under a combined loading environment. Both analyses are carried out in physical degrees-of-freedom using implicit and explicit solution techniques available in the Abaqus commercial finite-element code. The initial study is conducted on a reduced-size structure to keep the computational effort contained while validating the procedure and exploring the effects of individual loadings. An analysis of a full size integrated thermal protection system structure, which is of ultimate interest, is subsequently presented. The procedure is demonstrated to be a viable approach for analysis of spacecraft and hypersonic vehicle structures under a typical mission cycle with combined loadings characterized by largely different time-scales.

  18. Integrated structures/controls optimization of a smart composite plate with segmented active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beri, Rajan; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Nam, Changho

    2000-06-01

    A rigorous multi-objective optimization procedure, is developed to address the integrated structures/control design of composite plates with surface bonded segmented active constrained layer (ACL) damping treatment. The Kresselmeier- Steinhauser function approach is used to formulate this multidisciplinary problem. The goal is to control vibration without incorporating a weight penalty. Objective functions and constraints include damping ratios, structural weight and natural frequencies. Design variables include the ply stacking sequence, dimensions and placement of segmented ACL. The optimal designs show improved plate vibratory characteristics and reduced structural weight. The results of the multi- objective optimization problem are compared to those of a single objective optimization with vibration control as the objective. Results establish the necessity for developing the integrated structures/controls optimization procedure.

  19. Finite element analysis of helicopter structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Application of the finite element analysis is now being expanded to three dimensional analysis of mechanical components. Examples are presented for airframe, mechanical components, and composite structure calculations. Data are detailed on the increase of model size, computer usage, and the effect on reducing stress analysis costs. Future applications for use of finite element analysis for helicopter structures are projected.

  20. Acoustic Emission of Large PRSEUS Structures (Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Michael R.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    In the role of structural health monitoring (SHM), Acoustic Emission (AE) analysis is being investigated as an effective method for tracking damage development in large composite structures under load. Structures made using Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) for damage tolerant, light, and economical airframe construction are being pursued by The Boeing Company and NASA under the Environmentally Responsible Aircraft initiative (ERA). The failure tests of two PRSEUS substructures based on the Boeing Hybrid Wing Body fuselage concept were conducted during third quarter 2011 and second quarter 2015. One fundamental concern of these tests was determining the effectiveness of the stitched integral stiffeners to inhibit damage progression. By design, severe degradation of load carrying capability should not occur prior to Design Ultimate Load (DUL). While minor damage prior to DUL was anticipated, the integral stitching should not fail since this would allow a stiffener-skin delamination to progress rapidly and alter the transfer of load into the stiffeners. In addition, the stiffeners should not fracture because they are fundamental to structural integrity. Getting the best information from each AE sensor is a primary consideration because a sparse network of sensors is implemented. Sensitivity to stiffener-contiguous degradation is supported by sensors near the stiffeners, which increases the coverage per sensor via AE waveguide actions. Some sensors are located near potentially critical areas or "critical zones" as identified by numerical analyses. The approach is compared with the damage progression monitored by other techniques (e.g. ultrasonic C-scan).