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Sample records for airlock coolant loop

  1. Performance of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Airlock Coolant Loop Remediation (A/L CLR) Hardware - Final

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Rector, Tony; Gazda, Daniel; Lewis, John

    2011-01-01

    An EMU water processing kit (Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery -- A/L CLR) was developed as a corrective action to Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) coolant flow disruptions experienced on the International Space Station (ISS) in May of 2004 and thereafter. A conservative duty cycle and set of use parameters for A/L CLR use and component life were initially developed and implemented based on prior analysis results and analytical modeling. Several initiatives were undertaken to optimize the duty cycle and use parameters of the hardware. Examination of post-flight samples and EMU Coolant Loop hardware provided invaluable information on the performance of the A/L CLR and has allowed for an optimization of the process. The intent of this paper is to detail the evolution of the A/L CLR hardware, efforts to optimize the duty cycle and use parameters, and the final recommendations for implementation in the post-Shuttle retirement era.

  2. Performance of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU): Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery (A/L CLR) Hardware - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Rector, tony; Gazda, Daniel; Lewis, John

    2009-01-01

    An EMU water processing kit (Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery A/L CLR) was developed as a corrective action to Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) coolant flow disruptions experienced on the International Space Station (ISS) in May of 2004 and thereafter. Conservative schedules for A/L CLR use and component life were initially developed and implemented based on prior analysis results and analytical modeling. The examination of postflight samples and EMU hardware in November of 2006 indicated that the A/L CLR kits were functioning well and had excess capacity that would allow a relaxation of the initially conservative schedules of use and component life. A relaxed use schedule and list of component lives was implemented thereafter. Since the adoption of the relaxed A/L CLR schedules of use and component lives, several A/L CLR kit components, transport loop water samples and sensitive EMU transport loop components have been examined to gage the impact of the relaxed requirements. The intent of this paper is to summarize the findings of that evaluation, and to outline updated schedules for A/L CLR use and component life.

  3. Airlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linderfelt, H. R. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An airlock for use in transferring waste objects from a positively pressurized enclosure aboard an operative space vehicle, to a waste receiver attached to the vehicle and maintained at the negative pressure of a celestial space environment. The airlock is characterized by a shell having an internal chamber and hermetically sealed within an opening formed in a bulkhead of the enclosure. The shell is provided with an insertion hatch adjacent to the enclosure, and an ejection hatch adjacent the waste receiver, each of the hatches being hermetically sealed by a hatch cover supported for deployment to a hatch-opening disposition through a manipulation of a hatch-deploying mechanism. A three-way selector valve is coupled with the deploying mechanism and ported to an internal chamber of the shell, the enclosure, and the environment and is provided for alternately coupling the chamber with the enclosure and the receiver, in direct communication, in response to a manipulation of the mechanism whereby a sequence is imposed on the operation of the airlock.

  4. Redesign of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Airlock Cooling Loop Recovery Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Elms, Theresa; Peyton, Barbara; Rector, Tony; Jennings, Mallory A.

    2016-01-01

    During EVA (Extravehicular Activity) 23 aboard the ISS (International Space Station) on 07/16/2013 an episode of water in the EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) helmet occurred, necessitating a termination of the EVA (Extravehicular Activity) shortly after it began. The root cause of the failure was determined to be ground-processing short-comings of the ALCLR (Airlock Cooling Loop Recovery) Ion Beds which led to various levels of contaminants being introduced into the Ion Beds before they left the ground. The Ion Beds were thereafter used to scrub the failed EMU cooling water loop on-orbit during routine scrubbing operations. The root cause investigation identified several areas for improvement of the ALCLR Assembly which have since been initiated. Enhanced washing techniques for the ALCLR Ion Bed have been developed and implemented. On-orbit cooling water conductivity and pH analysis capability to allow the astronauts to monitor proper operation of the ALCLR Ion Bed during scrubbing operation is being investigation. A simplified means to acquire on-orbit EMU cooling water samples have been designed. Finally, an inherently cleaner organic adsorbent to replace the current lignite-based activated carbon, and a non-separable replacement for the separable mixed ion exchange resin are undergoing evaluation. These efforts are undertaken to enhance the performance and reduce the risk associated with operations to ensure the long-term health of the EMU cooling water circuit.

  5. Redesign of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Airlock Cooling Loop Recovery Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Elms, Theresa; Peyton, Barbara; Rector, Tony; Jennings, Mallory

    2016-01-01

    During EVA (Extravehicular Activity) 23 aboard the ISS (International Space Station) on 07/16/2013 an episode of water in the EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) helmet occurred, necessitating a termination of the EVA (Extravehicular Activity) shortly after it began. The root cause of the failure was determined to be ground-processing short-comings of the ALCLR (Airlock Cooling Loop Recovery) Ion Beds which led to various levels of contaminants being introduced into the Ion Beds before they left the ground. The Ion Beds were thereafter used to scrub the failed EMU cooling water loop on-orbit during routine scrubbing operations. The root cause investigation identified several areas for improvement of the ALCLR Assembly which have since been initiated. Enhanced washing techniques for the ALCLR Ion Bed have been developed and implemented. On-orbit cooling water conductivity and pH analysis capability to allow the astronauts to monitor proper operation of the ALCLR Ion Bed during scrubbing operation is being investigated. A simplified means to acquire on-orbit EMU cooling water samples has been designed. Finally, an inherently cleaner organic adsorbent to replace the current lignite-based activated carbon, and a non-separable replacement for the separable mixed ion exchange resin are undergoing evaluation. These efforts are undertaken to enhance the performance and reduce the risk associated with operations to ensure the long-term health of the EMU cooling water circuit.

  6. Airlock Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Adminstration's Langley Research Center scientists use this plexiglass space station airlock test model to determine astronauts' ability to move in and out through an airlock with the restraint of a pressurized suit. Operations in space that call for crew transfer between spacecraft require airlocks of some kind. Mobility and performance in airlock systems must be determined to establish geometry and associated hardware for equipment suitable for manned space vehicle use. The airlock prevents artificial atmosphere loss when an astronaut transfers from one spacecraft to another or from the interior to the exterior in the performance of duties.

  7. Thermal criteria to compare fast reactors coolants for the intermediate loop

    SciTech Connect

    Saez, Manuel; Rodriguez, Gilles

    2007-07-01

    Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) are typically using a liquid metal as the primary coolant. Up to now, sodium is the referenced coolant for all large-scale FBR, but lead and sodium-potassium alloy have both also been used successfully for smaller rigs. The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has an extensive experience and significant expertise in Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) over the past 40 years of R and D and feedback experiments. Some improvements are needed on the SFR to meet the Generation IV goals, and in particular the safety and the reliability through the intermediate loop coolant. As sodium reacts exo-thermically with air and water and to eliminate the drawback of the water-sodium interaction when a steam generator tube is ruptured, CEA is involved in a substantial effort in order to investigate the interest to use an alternative coolant than sodium in the intermediate loop. This paper presents the main thermal criteria to compare Fast Reactors coolants for the intermediate loop under natural and forced convection. Neutronics considerations are not taken into account for the intermediate loop coolant. Transport, transfer and energetic criteria are analysed in the field of turbulent flows. Criteria are applied to the following potential coolant candidates: sodium, lithium, tin, bismuth, lead, lead-bismuth alloy, lead-lithium alloy, gallium, indium, potassium and sodium-potassium alloy. According to this thermal analysis, the gallium as heat transfer agent for the intermediate loop is considered as a promising candidate. For the discussion of the applicability of the gallium as heat transfer agent for the intermediate loop, a limited thermal hydraulic pre-sizing of a steam generator is undertaken using simple engineering methods implemented in COPERNIC code, a CEA tool dedicated to reactor systems pre-sizing. (authors)

  8. 7. VIEW OF AIRLOCK ENTRY. AIRLOCK DOUBLE DOORS WERE USED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF AIRLOCK ENTRY. AIRLOCK DOUBLE DOORS WERE USED TO KEEP ATMOSPHERES CONFINED TO SPECIFIC AREAS. (6/29/78) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  9. Skylab Trash Airlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab Trash Airlock (TAL) used throughout the Skylab mission to transfer trash materials that could support microbial growth from the pressurized cabin to the unpressurized waste tank is described. The TAL, which uses several basic mechanisms, was successfully operated daily for the 170 days of manned missions for a total of 637 cycles.

  10. Lunar Habitat Airlock/Suitlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brand Norman

    2008-01-01

    Airlocks for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) will be significantly different than previous designs. Until now, airlocks operated infrequently and only in the "clean" weightless environment, but lunar airlocks are planned to be used much more often (every other day) in a dusty, gravity environment. Concepts for airlocks were analyzed by the NASA, JSC Habitability Focus Element during recent lunar outpost studies. Three airlock types were identified; an Airlock (AL) or independent pressure vessel with one hatch to the outside and the other to the Habitat. A Suitlock (SL) which shares a pressure bulkhead with the Habitat allowing rear-entry suits to remain on the dusty side while the crew enters/exits the Habitat. The third option is the Suitport (SP) which offers direct access from the habitable volume into an externally mounted suit. The SP concept was not compared, however between the AL and SL, the AL was favored.

  11. An Improved Design for Air Removal from Aerospace Fluid Loop Coolant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Stephen M. C.; Holladay, Jon B.; Holt, J. Mike; Clark, Dallas W.

    2003-01-01

    Aerospace applications with requirements for large capacity heat removal (launch vehicles, platforms, payloads, etc.) typically utilize a liquid coolant fluid as a transport media to increase efficiency and flexibility in the vehicle design. An issue with these systems however, is susceptibility to the presence of noncondensable gas (NCG) or air. The presence of air in a coolant loop can have numerous negative consequences, including loss of centrifugal pump prime, interference with sensor readings, inhibition of heat transfer, and coolant blockage to remote systems. Hardware ground processing to remove this air is also cumbersome and time consuming which continuously drives recurring costs. Current systems for maintaining the system free of air are tailored and have demonstrated only moderate success. An obvious solution to these problems is the development and advancement of a passive gas removal device, or gas trap, that would be installed in the flight cooling system simplifying the initial coolant fill procedure and also maintaining the system during operations. The proposed device would utilize commercially available membranes thus increasing reliability and reducing cost while also addressing both current and anticipated applications. In addition, it maintains current pressure drop, water loss, and size restrictions while increasing tolerance for pressure increases due to gas build-up in the trap.

  12. Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

  13. Failure probability of PWR reactor coolant loop piping. [Double-ended guillotine break

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, T.; Woo, H.H.; Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1984-02-01

    This paper describes the results of assessments performed on the PWR coolant loop piping of Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering plants. For direct double-ended guillotine break (DEGB), consideration was given to crack existence probability, initial crack size distribution, hydrostatic proof test, preservice inspection, leak detection probability, crack growth characteristics, and failure criteria based on the net section stress failure and tearing modulus stability concept. For indirect DEGB, fragilities of major component supports were estimated. The system level fragility was then calculated based on the Boolean expression involving these fragilities. Indirect DEGB due to seismic effects was calculated by convolving the system level fragility and the seismic hazard curve. The results indicate that the probability of occurrence of both direct and indirect DEGB is extremely small, thus, postulation of DEGB in design should be eliminated and replaced by more realistic criteria.

  14. Astronaut Curbeam in Quest Airlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Astronaut Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 mission specialist, smiles for the camera in the Quest Airlock of the International Space Station (ISS). Curbeam had just completed the mission's first space walk in which the P6 truss installation was conducted.

  15. Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) / International Space Station (ISS) Coolant Loop Failure and Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Cole, Harold; Cronin, Gary; Gazda, Daniel B.; Steele, John

    2006-01-01

    Following the Colombia accident, the Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) onboard ISS were unused for several months. Upon startup, the units experienced a failure in the coolant system. This failure resulted in the loss of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) capability from the US segment of ISS. With limited on-orbit evidence, a team of chemists, engineers, metallurgists, and microbiologists were able to identify the cause of the failure and develop recovery hardware and procedures. As a result of this work, the ISS crew regained the capability to perform EVAs from the US segment of the ISS.

  16. The Orbital Workshop Trash Disposal Airlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is a close-up photograph of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) trash disposal airlock located on the floor of the lower level of the OWS. It provided a means of passing trash from the pressurized habitable area into the unpressurized waste tank. The crewman opened a valve which brought the airlock to the same pressure as that within the workshop. He then opened the lid, placed the bagged trash inside, closed the lid and locked it. By turning the valve handle, he reduced the pressure within the airlock until it reached the vacuum of the waste tank. The crewman then operated an ejector handle that caused a scissors-type mechanism to push the bagged trash from the airlock into the tank.

  17. Develop and Manufacture an airlock sliding tray

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Cindy M.

    2014-02-26

    Objective: The goal of this project is to continue to develop an airlock sliding tray and then partner with an industrial manufacturing company for production. The sliding tray will be easily installed into and removed from most glovebox airlocks in a few minutes. Technical Approach: A prototype of a sliding tray has been developed and tested in the LANL cold lab and 35 trays are presently being built for the plutonium facility (PF-4). The current, recently approved design works for a 14-inch diameter round airlock and has a tray length of approximately 20 inches. The grant will take the already tested and approved round technology and design for the square airlock. These two designs will be suitable for the majority of the existing airlocks in the multitude of DOE facilities. Partnering with an external manufacturer will allow for production of the airlock trays at a much lower cost and increase the availability of the product for all DOE sites. Project duration is estimated to be 12-13 months. Benefits: The purpose of the airlock sliding trays is fourfold: 1) Mitigate risk of rotator cuff injuries, 2) Improve ALARA, 3) Reduce risk of glovebox glove breaches and glove punctures, and 4) Improve worker comfort. I have had the opportunity to visit many other DOE facilities including Savannah, Y-12, ORNL, Sandia, and Livermore for assistance with ergonomic problems and/or injuries. All of these sites would benefit from the airlock sliding tray and I can assume all other DOE facilities with gloveboxes built prior to 1985 could also use the sliding trays.

  18. Assessment and Accommodation of Thermal Expansion of the Internal Active Thermal Control System Coolant During Launch to On-Orbit Activation of International Space Station Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. Darryl; Ungar, Eugene K.; Holt, James M.; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) employs an Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) comprised of several single-phase water coolant loops. These coolant loops are distributed throughout the ISS pressurized elements. The primary element coolant loops (i.e., US Laboratory module) contain a fluid accumulator to accommodate thermal expansion of the system. Other element coolant loops are parasitic (i.e., Airlock), have no accumulator, and require an alternative approach to insure that the system Maximum Design Pressure (MDP) is not exceeded during the Launch to Activation phase. During this time the element loop is a stand alone closed individual system. The solution approach for accommodating thermal expansion was affected by interactions of system components and their particular limitations. The mathematical solution approach was challenged by the presence of certain unknown or not readily obtainable physical and thermodynamic characteristics of some system components and processes. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of a few of the solutions that evolved over time, a novel mathematical solution to eliminate some of the unknowns or derive the unknowns experimentally, and the testing and methods undertaken.

  19. Assessment and Accommodation of Thermal Expansion of the Internal Active Thermal Control System Coolant During Launch to On-Orbit Activation of International Space Station Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Darryl; Ungar, Eugene K.; Holt, James M.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) employs an Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) comprised of several single-phase water coolant loops. These coolant loops are distributed throughout the ISS pressurized elements. The primary element coolant loops (i.e. U.S. Laboratory module) contain a fluid accumulator to accomodate thermal expansion of the system. Other element coolant loops are parasitic (i.e. Airlock), have no accumulator, and require an alternative approach to insure that the system maximum design pressure (MDP) is not exceeded during the Launch to Activation (LTA) phase. During this time the element loops is a stand alone closed system. The solution approach for accomodating thermal expansion was affected by interactions of system components and their particular limitations. The mathematical solution approach was challenged by the presence of certain unknown or not readily obtainable physical and thermodynamic characteristics of some system components and processes. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of a few of the solutions that evolved over time, a novel mathematical solution to eliminate some of the unknowns or derive the unknowns experimentally, and the testing and methods undertaken.

  20. 49. AUXILARY CHAMBER, EAST SIDE AIRLOCK LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM INTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. AUXILARY CHAMBER, EAST SIDE AIRLOCK LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM INTERIOR (LOCATION HHH) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  1. STS-104 Onboard Photograph-ISS Airlock Installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Quest Airlock is in the process of being installed onto the starboard side of the Unity Node 1 of the International Space Station (ISS). Astronaut Susan J. Helms, Expedition Two flight engineer, used controls onboard the station to maneuver the Airlock into place with the Canadarm2, or Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS). The Joint Airlock is a pressurized flight element consisting of two cylindrical chambers attached end-to-end by a cornecting bulkhead and hatch. Once installed and activated, the ISS Airlock becomes the primary path for ISS space walk entry and departure for U.S. spacesuits, which are known as Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs). In addition, it is designed to support the Russian Orlan spacesuit for extravehicular activity (EVA). The Joint Airlock is 20-feet long, 13-feet in diameter and weighs 6.5 tons. It was built at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) by the Space Station prime contractor Boeing. The ISS Airlock has two main components: a crew airlock and an equipment airlock for storing EVA and EVA preflight preps. The Airlock was launched on July 21, 2001 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis for the STS-104 mission.

  2. STS-104 Onboard Photograph-Astronaut in the ISS Airlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Astronaut James F. Reilly participated in the first ever space walk to egress from the International Space Station (ISS) by utilizing the newly-installed Joint Airlock Quest. The Joint Airlock is a pressurized flight element consisting of two cylindrical chambers attached end-to-end by a cornecting bulkhead and hatch. Once installed and activated, the ISS Airlock becomes the primary path for ISS space walk entry and departure for U.S. spacesuits, which are known as Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs). In addition, it is designed to support the Russian Orlan spacesuit for extravehicular activity (EVA). The Joint Airlock is 20-feet long, 13- feet in diameter and weighs 6.5 tons. It was built at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) by the Space Station prime contractor Boeing. The ISS Airlock has two main components: a crew airlock and an equipment airlock for storing EVA and EVA preflight preps. The Airlock was launched on July 21, 2001 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis for the STS-104 mission.

  3. Minimizing EVA Airlock Time and Depress Gas Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Lafuse, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the need and solution for minimizing EVA airlock time and depress gas losses using a new method that minimizes EVA out-the-door time for a suited astronaut and reclaims most of the airlock depress gas. This method consists of one or more related concepts that use an evacuated reservoir tank to store and reclaim the airlock depress gas. The evacuated tank can be an inflatable tank, a spent fuel tank from a lunar lander descent stage, or a backup airlock. During EVA airlock operations, the airlock and reservoir would be equalized at some low pressure, and through proper selection of reservoir size, most of the depress gas would be stored in the reservoir for later reclamation. The benefit of this method is directly applicable to long duration lunar and Mars missions that require multiple EVA missions (up to 100, two-person lunar EVAs) and conservation of consumables, including depress pump power and depress gas. The current ISS airlock gas reclamation method requires approximately 45 minutes of the astronaut s time in the airlock and 1 KW in electrical power. The proposed method would decrease the astronaut s time in the airlock because the depress gas is being temporarily stored in a reservoir tank for later recovery. Once the EVA crew is conducting the EVA, the volume in the reservoir would be pumped back to the cabin at a slow rate. Various trades were conducted to optimize this method, which include time to equalize the airlock with the evacuated reservoir versus reservoir size, pump power to reclaim depress gas versus time allotted, inflatable reservoir pros and cons (weight, volume, complexity), and feasibility of spent lunar nitrogen and oxygen tanks as reservoirs.

  4. 11. Detail view west from airlock chamber of typical refrigerator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail view west from airlock chamber of typical refrigerator door into Trophic Chamber. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  5. EXTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  6. INTERIOR OF AIRLOCK FROM INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF AIRLOCK FROM INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  8. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING DOWN FROM AIRLOCK, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING DOWN FROM AIRLOCK, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. VIEW THROUGH AN ORIGINAL DOOR OF AIRLOCK TO A MODERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW THROUGH AN ORIGINAL DOOR OF AIRLOCK TO A MODERN REPLACEMENT DOOR ON OPPOSITE SIDE. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bombproof Communication Center, Hornet Avenue at Liscome Bay Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. INTERIOR OF SOUTH ENTRY AIRLOCK SHOWING STEEL DOORS OPENING TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF SOUTH ENTRY AIRLOCK SHOWING STEEL DOORS OPENING TO OUTSIDE AND INTO MAIN EQUIPMENT ROOM, VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Telephone Exchange, Coral Sea Road north of Bismarck Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  11. MSFC Skylab airlock module, volume 1. [systems design and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The history and development of the Skylab Airlock Module and Payload Shroud is presented from initial concept through final design. A summary is given of the Airlock features and systems. System design and performance are presented for the Spent Stage Experiment Support Module, structure and mechanical systems, mass properties, thermal and environmental control systems, EVA/IVA suite system, electrical power system, sequential system, sequential system, and instrumentation system.

  12. Coolant injector

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, D.L.; Seleno, F.M.

    1984-04-03

    Apparatus for injecting coolant into the fuel-air mixture supplied to a turbocharged internal combustion engine in which coolant is stored in a reservoir that is connected to the outlet side of a turbocharger compressor and is pressurized during times that the turbocharger is generating positive pressures above a predetermined level. The pressure in the reservoir forces coolant to the inlet side of the turbocharger to cool fuel and injection is interrupted when the pressures are below that level and cooling of the fuel-air mixture is not required.

  13. Automatic sequencing and control of Space Station airlock operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himel, Victor; Abeles, Fred J.; Auman, James; Tqi, Terry O.

    1989-01-01

    Procedures that have been developed as part of the NASA JSC-sponsored pre-prototype Checkout, Servicing and Maintenance (COSM) program for pre- and post-EVA airlock operations are described. This paper addresses the accompanying pressure changes in the airlock and in the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). Additionally, the paper focuses on the components that are checked out, and includes the step-by-step sequences to be followed by the crew, the required screen displays and prompts that accompany each step, and a description of the automated processes that occur.

  14. Hyperbaric environmental control assembly for the Space Station Freedom airlock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubly, Robert P.; Schimenti, Dan

    The hyperbaric environmental control assembly (HECA) monitors and controls temperature, humidity and CO2 levels in the Space Station Freedom airlock when the airlock is used for extravehicular activity (EVA) prebreathing campouts and as a hyperbaric treatment facility. Prebreathing is required prior to extravehicular activity due to the differential between the station nominal pressure and the EVA suit pressure. Hyperbaric treatment is required in the event of decompression sickness. The HECA consists of an atmosphere recirculation circuit which provides air circulation and temperature control, and a separate CO2 and humidity control circuit. CO2 and latent water production rates have been calculated from established metabolic profiles for both campout and hyperbaric protocols. An analytical model has been used to predict carbon dioxide and humidity levels as functions of initial crewlock conditions and the specified loads. This model has demonstrated the suitability and robustness of the dual-bed molecular sieve system for the HECA.

  15. Interior view of the external airlock of the Orbiter Discovery. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of the external airlock of the Orbiter Discovery. In the lower portion of the image is the Aft Hatch and in the upper portion the image is the Upper Hatch. This photograph was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility at the Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  16. Coolant line hydrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, M.D.; Kipp, W.G.

    1987-03-17

    This patent describes a hydrometer unit for connection in an automobile coolant flow line comprising: a tubular fitting adapted to be connected to the coolant flow line; a coolant receiving chamber means connected to the tubular fitting for receiving coolant from the tubular fitting; and indicating float elements contained within the coolant receiving chamber means and adapted to rise therein individually as a function of the specific gravity of the coolant. The coolant receiving chamber means includes a closure cap which when connected to the tubular fitting forms a coolant receiving chamber, retaining means for retaining the indicating float elements within the coolant receiving chamber, a viewing window member of a substantially clear material through which the float elements can be visually observed within the coolant receiving chamber means, and air venturi means located within the coolant receiving chamber means for automatically removing air which may collect within the coolant chamber means.

  17. DSMC Simulations of Disturbance Torque to ISS During Airlock Depressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, F. E., III; Stewart, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    The primary attitude control system on the International Space Station (ISS) is part of the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) and uses Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMG). The secondary system is part of the Russian On orbit Segment (RSOS) and uses a combination of gyroscopes and thrusters. Historically, events with significant disturbances such as the airlock depressurizations associated with extra-vehicular activity (EVA) have been performed using the RSOS attitude control system. This avoids excessive propulsive "de-saturations" of the CMGs. However, transfer of attitude control is labor intensive and requires significant propellant. Predictions employing NASA's DSMC Analysis Code (DAC) of the disturbance torque to the ISS for depressurization of the Pirs airlock on the RSOS will be presented [1]. These predictions were performed to assess the feasibility of using USOS control during these events. The ISS Pirs airlock is vented using a device known as a "T-vent" as shown in the inset in figure 1. By orienting two equal streams of gas in opposite directions, this device is intended to have no propulsive effect. However, disturbance force and torque to the ISS do occur due to plume impingement. The disturbance torque resulting from the Pirs depressurization during EVAs is estimated by using a loosely coupled CFD/DSMC technique [2]. CFD is used to simulate the flow field in the nozzle and the near field plume. DSMC is used to simulate the remaining flow field using the CFD results to create an in flow boundary to the DSMC simulation. Due to the highly continuum nature of flow field near the T-vent, two loosely coupled DSMC domains are employed. An 88.2 cubic meter inner domain contains the Pirs airlock and the T-vent. Inner domain results are used to create an in flow boundary for an outer domain containing the remaining portions of the ISS. Several orientations of the ISS solar arrays and radiators have been investigated to find cases that result in minimal

  18. Boundary and airlock design issues in aseptic facilities.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, M R; Robinson, J E

    1991-01-01

    As more potentially hazardous biopharmaceutical and powder derivative products are being processed aseptically, the term "containment" in aseptic facility design must take on a broader definition. Contamination control must address not only protection of the product, but the protection of aseptic facility workers and of the surrounding environment as well. This paper will focus on design issues related to the physical boundaries (walls, ceilings, doors, etc.) that separate aseptic areas from other spaces within a facility with particular emphasis on the design of airlocks as "control points" for contamination control.

  19. The Joint Airlock Module moves to another stand in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Joint Airlock Module moves to another stand in the SSPF KSC-01PP-0957 KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- - In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Joint Airlock Module is lowered toward the Launch Package Integration Stand. The LPIS provides personnel and equipment access to the flight element in its final launch configuration. The Airlock is the primary payload on mission STS- 104 to the International Space Station. It is a pressurized flight element consisting of two cylindrical chambers attached end-to-end by a connecting bulkhead and hatch. Once installed and activated, the Airlock becomes the primary path for spacewalk entry to and departure from the Space Station for U.S. spacesuits, which are known as Extravehicular Mobility Units, or EMUs. In addition, the Joint Airlock is designed to support the Russian Orlan spacesuit for EVA activity. STS-104 is scheduled for launch June 14 from Launch Pad 39B.

  20. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 9. PRAISE computer code user's manual. Load Combination Program Project I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, E.Y.

    1981-06-01

    The PRAISE (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events) computer code estimates the influence of earthquakes on the probability of failure at a weld joint in the primary coolant system of a pressurized water reactor. Failure, either a through-wall defect (leak) or a complete pipe severance (a large-LOCA), is assumed to be caused by fatigue crack growth of an as-fabricated interior surface circumferential defect. These defects are assumed to be two-dimensional and semi-elliptical in shape. The distribution of initial crack sizes is a function of crack depth and aspect ratio. PRAISE treats the inter-arrival times of operating transients either as a constant or exponentially distributed according to observed or postulated rates. Leak rate and leak detection models are also included. The criterion for complete pipe severance is exceedance of a net section critical stress. Earthquakes of various intensity and arbitrary occurrence times can be modeled. PRAISE presently assumes that exactly one initial defect exists in the weld and that the earthquake of interest is the first earthquake experienced at the reactor. PRAISE has a very modular structure and can be tailored to a variety of crack growth and piping reliability problems. Although PRAISE was developed on a CDC-7600 computer, it was, however, coded in standard FORTRAN IV and is readily transportable to other machines.

  1. The Joint Airlock Module moves to another stand in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- An overhead crane in the Space Station Processing Facility lifts the Joint Airlock Module from its workstand to move it to the Launch Package Integration Stand. The LPIS provides personnel and equipment access to the flight element in its final launch configuration. The Airlock is the primary payload on mission STS-104 to the International Space Station. It is a pressurized flight element consisting of two cylindrical chambers attached end-to-end by a connecting bulkhead and hatch. Once installed and activated, the Airlock becomes the primary path for spacewalk entry to and departure from the Space Station for U.S. spacesuits, which are known as Extravehicular Mobility Units, or EMUs. In addition, the Joint Airlock is designed to support the Russian Orlan spacesuit for EVA activity. STS-104 is scheduled for launch June 14 from Launch Pad 39B.

  2. The Joint Airlock Module moves to another stand in the SSPF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, the Joint Airlock Module is moved from a workstand to the Launch Package Integration Stand. The LPIS provides personnel and equipment access to the flight element in its final launch configuration. The Airlock is the primary payload on mission STS- 104 to the International Space Station. It is a pressurized flight element consisting of two cylindrical chambers attached end-to-end by a connecting bulkhead and hatch. Once installed and activated, the Airlock becomes the primary path for spacewalk entry to and departure from the Space Station for U.S. spacesuits, which are known as Extravehicular Mobility Units, or EMUs. In addition, the Joint Airlock is designed to support the Russian Orlan spacesuit for EVA activity. STS-104 is scheduled for launch June 14 from Launch Pad 39B.

  3. Machine coolant waste reduction by optimizing coolant life. Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Pallansch, J.

    1995-08-01

    The project was designed to study the following: A specific water-soluble coolant (Blasocut 2000 Universal) in use with a variety of machines, tools, and materials; Coolant maintenance practices associated with three types of machines; Health effects of use and handling of recycled coolant; Handling practices for chips and waste coolant; Chip/coolant separation; and Oil/water separation.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR COOLANT

    DOEpatents

    Colichman, E.L.

    1959-10-20

    The formation of new reactor coolants which suppress polymerization resulting from pyrolytic and radiation decomposition is described. The coolants consist of polyphenyls and condensed ring compounds having from two to about four carbon rings and from 0.1 to about 5% of beryllium or magnesium dispersed in the hydrocarbon.

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR COOLANT

    DOEpatents

    Colichman, E.L.

    1959-10-20

    The formation of new reactor coolants which suppress polymerization resulting from pyrolitic and radiation decomposition is described. The coolants consist of polyphenyls and condensed ring compounds having from two to about four carbon rings and from 0.1 to about 10% of an alkall metal dispersed in the hydrocarbon.

  6. Cleanup under Airlock of an Old Uranium Foundry - 13273

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, Daniel; Houee, Jean-Marie; Chambon, Frederic

    2013-07-01

    Since 2004, AREVA's subsidiary SICN has been conducting the cleanup and dismantling of an old uranium foundry located in the town of Annecy (France). The first operations consisted in the removal of the foundry's production equipment, producing more than 300 metric tons (MT) of waste. The second step consisted in performing the radiological characterization of the 1,600 m{sup 2} (17,200 ft{sup 2}) building, including underground trenches and galleries. The building was precisely inventoried, based on operations records and direct measurements. All sub-surfaces, which needed to be cleaned up were characterized, and a determination of the contamination migration was established, in particular with trenches and galleries. The wall thicknesses to be treated were empirically justified, knowing that the maximal migration depth inside concrete is 5 mm for a liquid transfer vector. All singularities such as cracks, anchoring points, etc. were spotted for a complete and systematic treatment. Building structures not laying directly on the soil, such as floor slabs, were not cleaned up but directly deconstructed and disposed of as waste. The facility was located within the town of Annecy. Therefore, in order to avoid the risk of dusts dispersion and public exposure during the building deconstruction and the soil treatment, a third of the building's surface was confined in a sliding airlock built from a metal structure capable of resisting to wind and snow, which are frequent in this area. This particular structure provided a static confinement over the half of the building which was covered and a dynamic confinement using a ventilation and high efficiency air filtration system, sized to provide 2.5 air changes per hour. The enclosure and its metallic structure is 33 m long (108 feet), 25 m wide (82 feet), and 13 m high (42 feet), for a volume of 10,000 m{sup 3} (353,000 ft{sup 3}). It was made up of a double skin envelope, allowing the recycling of its structure and outside

  7. MACHINE COOLANT WASTE REDUCTION BY OPTIMIZING COOLANT LIFE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Machine shops use coolants to improve the life and function of machine tools. hese coolants become contaminated with oils with use, and this contamination can lead to growth of anaerobic bacteria and shortened coolant life. his project investigated methods to extend coolant life ...

  8. Plastic toy shark drifts through airlock in front of EMU suited MS Lenoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Plastic toy shark drifts through airlock and around fully extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) suited Mission Specialist (MS) Lenoir. Lenoir watches as shark drifts pass his left hand. Lenoir donned the EMU in preparation for a scheduled extravehicular activity (EVA) which was cancelled due to EMU problems.

  9. STS-44 OV-104's airlock hatch with tennis shoes and Presidential Sports Award

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-44 airlock hatch is decorated with two pairs of tennis shoes and a Presidential Sports Award Jogging patch (insignia) on the middeck of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. With the crew having a treadmill-like device onboard for exercise and biomedical testing, tennis shoes were in plentiful stock on the eight-day mission.

  10. The IRIS Spool-Type Reactor Coolant Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, J.M.; Kitch, D.M.; Conway, L.E.

    2002-07-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a light water cooled, 335 MWe power reactor which is being designed by an international consortium as part of the US DOE NERI Program. IRIS features an integral reactor vessel that contains all the major reactor coolant system components including the reactor core, the coolant pumps, the steam generators and the pressurizer. This integral design approach eliminates the large coolant loop piping, and thus eliminates large loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) as well as the individual component pressure vessels and supports. In addition, IRIS is being designed with a long life core and enhanced safety to address the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors. One of the innovative features of the IRIS design is the adoption of a reactor coolant pump (called 'spool' pump) which is completely contained inside the reactor vessel. Background, status and future developments of the IRIS spool pump are presented in this paper. (authors)

  11. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the life support and airlock support subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, Jim; Duffy, R.; Barickman, K.; Saiidi, Mo J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Life Support System (LSS) and Airlock Support System (ALSS). Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. The LSS provides for the management of the supply water, collection of metabolic waste, management of waste water, smoke detection, and fire suppression. The ALSS provides water, oxygen, and electricity to support an extravehicular activity in the airlock.

  12. Environmentally Friendly Coolant System

    SciTech Connect

    David Jackson Principal Investigator

    2011-11-08

    Energy reduction through the use of the EFCS is most improved by increasing machining productivity. Throughout testing, nearly all machining operations demonstrated less land wear on the tooling when using the EFCS which results in increased tool life. These increases in tool life advance into increased productivity. Increasing productivity reduces cycle times and therefore reduces energy consumption. The average energy savings by using the EFCS in these machining operations with these materials is 9%. The advantage for end milling stays with flood coolant by about 6.6% due to its use of a low pressure pump. Face milling and drilling are both about 17.5% less energy consumption with the EFCS than flood coolant. One additional result of using the EFCS is improved surface finish. Certain machining operations using the EFCS result in a smoother surface finish. Applications where finishing operations are required will be able to take advantage of the improved finish by reducing the time or possibly eliminating completely one or more finishing steps and thereby reduce their energy consumption. Some machining operations on specific materials do not show advantages for the EFCS when compared to flood coolants. More information about these processes will be presented later in the report. A key point to remember though, is that even with equivalent results, the EFCS is replacing petroleum based coolants whose production produces GHG emissions and create unsafe work environments.

  13. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Coico, Patrick A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    A cooling apparatus for an electronics rack is provided which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures and a tube. The heat exchanger, which is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of distinct, coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and a coolant outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  14. Closed loop spray cooling apparatus. [for particle accelerator targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alger, D. L.; Schwab, W. B.; Furman, E. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A closed loop apparatus for spraying coolant against the back of a radiation target is described. The coolant was circulated through a closed loop with a bubble of inert gas being maintained around the spray. Mesh material was disposed between the bubble and the surface of the liquid coolant which was below the bubble at a predetermined level. In a second embodiment, no inert gas was used, the bubble consisting of a vapor produced when the coolant was sprayed against the target.

  15. STS-31 Mission Specialist (MS) Sullivan dons EMU in OV-103's airlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Mission Specialist (MS) Kathryn D. Sullivan, wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and communications carrier assembly (CCA), attaches service and cooling umbilical (SCU) to the EMU connection on the display and control module (DCM) during contingency extravehicular activity (EVA) preparations in the airlock of Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. The procedure was completed in case an EVA was required to support Hubble Space Telescope (HST) deployment.

  16. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance for the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John W.; Etter, David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, Robert; Vandezande, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with on-orbit ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post-Shuttle 6-year service life.

  17. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Coico, Patrick A.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2015-09-15

    A method is provided for fabricating a cooling apparatus for cooling an electronics rack, which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures, and a tube. The heat exchanger is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  18. Some peculiarities of checking the Topaz-2 system coolant filling quality

    SciTech Connect

    Ogloblin, B.G.; Svishchev, A.M.; Shalaev, A.I.

    1996-03-01

    This paper contains the analysis of validity of methods used for checking the Topaz-2 system coolant filling quality by a metering tank according to the mathematical model developed. A number of criteria is proposed for detecting occluded gas in the coolant loop. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  20. PIPING FOR COOLANT WATER IS INSTALLED INSIDE REACTOR STRUCTURE PRIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PIPING FOR COOLANT WATER IS INSTALLED INSIDE REACTOR STRUCTURE PRIOR TO EMBEDMENT IN CONCRETE. HIGHER PIPE IS INLET; THE OTHER, THE OUTLET LOOP. INLET PIPE WILL CONNECT TO TOP SECTION OF REACTOR VESSEL. INL NEGATIVE NO. 1287. Unknown Photographer, 1/18/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Reactor coolant pump flywheel

    SciTech Connect

    Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

    2013-11-26

    A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

  2. STS-54 MS2 Harbaugh and MS3 Helms during training in JSC's ETA / airlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-54 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist (MS2) Gregory J. Harbaugh, wearing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and communications carrier assembly (CCA), is assisted by MS3 Susan J. Helms during Environmental Test Article (ETA) / Airlock training (STB-SS-956) in JSC's Crew Systems Laboratory Bldg 7. Helms readies the EMU glove as Harbaugh looks on. Though not assigned to the scheduled STS-54 extravehicular activity (EVA), Helms will assist Harbaugh in EVA preparations as she does here and will serve as a backup EVA crewmember. Two crewmembers will perform a four-hour-plus spacewalk during STS-54.

  3. Use of cobalt sulfide (black dye) anodize for thermal control of the Space Station Freedom airlock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiz, John; Berger, Mark

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents six thermal design options of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) airlock and shows the important role that exterior coatings had in minimizing heater power. Options included using anodized coatings separately or in combination, employing fans to circulate interior air, and using a solar shade that eliminates the adverse effect of degrading optical properties. The design that is most efficient, in terms of cost and minimum heater power, and that meets all temperature requirements, has a black anodized exterior finish and uses a maximum of 410 watts of heater power.

  4. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance Time in the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etter,David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, robert; Zande, Chris Vande

    2012-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR - Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post- Shuttle 6-year service life.

  5. F. E. L. coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, D.; Lepper, J.

    1987-11-20

    The compatibility of a number of organic and inorganic materials with Freon-113 in ETA-II is studied. The stability of Freon-113 in the simulated electrical environment is also discussed. It would be desirable to use Freon-113 as the dielectric coolant because it is a factor of twenty less expensive than the currently used Flourinert-75. No substantial problems were observed with any of the materials of interest. Polycarbonate will craze under certain conditions of exposure to Freon-113, mechanical stress, temperature and time. Extruded polymethylmethacrylate crazes on exposure to Freon-113. This is assumed to result from residual stress or processing aids because the cast polymer shows no effects. The polysiloxane swelled severely in the Freon-113 which is no surprise since solubility parameters are close. The Freon-113 did not break down under electrical arcing which simulated service conditions to produce HF or HCl within the detection limits of a Karl Fisher titration even with substantial added water.

  6. MSFC Skylab airlock module, volume 2. [systems design and performance, systems support activity, and reliability and safety programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    System design and performance of the Skylab Airlock Module and Payload Shroud are presented for the communication and caution and warning systems. Crew station and storage, crew trainers, experiments, ground support equipment, and system support activities are also reviewed. Other areas documented include the reliability and safety programs, test philosophy, engineering project management, and mission operations support.

  7. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the life support and airlock support systems, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barickman, K.

    1988-01-01

    The McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC) was selected in June 1986 to perform an Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL). The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Life Support and Airlock Support Systems (LSS and ALSS) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL baseline with proposed Post 51-L updates included. The discrepancies were flagged for potential future resolution. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter LSS and ALSS hardware. Volume 2 continues the presentation of IOA worksheets and contains the critical items list and NASA FMEA to IOA worksheet cross reference and recommendations.

  8. Treatment of mixed waste coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, S.; Bowers, J.S.

    1995-02-01

    The primary processes used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for treatment of radioactively contaminated machine coolants are industrial waste treatment and in situ carbon adsorption. These two processes simplify approaches to meeting the sanitary sewer discharge limits and subsequent Land Disposal Restriction criteria for hazardous and mixed wastes (40 CFR 268). Several relatively simple technologies are used in industrial water treatment. These technologies are considered Best Demonstrated Available Technologies, or BDAT, by the Environmental Protection Agency. The machine coolants are primarily aqueous and contain water soluble oil consisting of ethanol amine emulsifiers derived from fatty acids, both synthetic and natural. This emulsion carries away metal turnings from a part being machined on a lathe or other machining tool. When the coolant becomes spent, it contains chlorosolvents carried over from other cutting operations as well as a fair amount of tramp oil from machine bearings. This results in a multiphasic aqueous waste that requires treatment of metal and organic contaminants. During treatment, any dissolved metals are oxidized with hydrogen peroxide. Once oxidized, these metals are flocculated with ferric sulfate and precipitated with sodium hydroxide, and then the precipitate is filtered through diatomaceous earth. The emulsion is broken up by acidifying the coolant. Solvents and oils are adsorbed using powdered carbon. This carbon is easily separated from the remaining coolant by vacuum filtration.

  9. 1996 Coolant Flow Management Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, Steven A. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The following compilation of documents includes a list of the 66 attendees, a copy of the viewgraphs presented, and a summary of the discussions held after each session at the 1996 Coolant Flow Management Workshop held at the Ohio Aerospace Institute, adjacent to the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio on December 12-13, 1996. The workshop was organized by H. Joseph Gladden and Steven A. Hippensteele of NASA Lewis Research Center. Participants in this workshop included Coolant Flow Management team members from NASA Lewis, their support service contractors, the turbine engine companies, and the universities. The participants were involved with research projects, contracts and grants relating to: (1) details of turbine internal passages, (2) computational film cooling capabilities, and (3) the effects of heat transfer on both sides. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble the team members, along with others who work in gas turbine cooling research, to discuss needed research and recommend approaches that can be incorporated into the Center's Coolant Flow Management program. The workshop was divided into three sessions: (1) Internal Coolant Passage Presentations, (2) Film Cooling Presentations, and (3) Coolant Flow Integration and Optimization. Following each session there was a group discussion period.

  10. Influence of coolant tube curvature on film cooling effectiveness as detected by infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Graham, R. W.; Cageao, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal film cooling footprints observed by infrared imagery from straight, curved, and looped coolant tube geometries are compared. It was hypothesized that the differences in secondary flow and in the turbulence structure of flow through these three tubes should influence the mixing properties between the coolant and the main stream. A flow visualization tunnel, an infrared camera and detector, and a Hilsch tube were employed to test the hypothesis.

  11. Apparatus and method for controlling the rotary airlocks in a coal processing system by reversing the motor current rotating the air lock

    DOEpatents

    Groombridge, Clifton E.

    1996-01-01

    An improvement to a coal processing system where hard materials found in the coal may cause jamming of either inflow or outflow rotary airlocks, each driven by a reversible motor. The instantaneous current used by the motor is continually monitored and compared to a predetermined value. If an overcurrent condition occurs, indicating a jamming of the airlock, a controller means starts a "soft" reverse rotation of the motor thereby clearing the jamming. Three patterns of the motor reversal are provided.

  12. Long life coolant pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design concepts were investigated to improve space system coolant pump technology to be suitable for mission durations of two years and greater. These design concepts included an improved bearing system for the pump rotating elements, consisting of pressurized conical bearings. This design was satisfactorily endurance tested as was a new prototype pump built using various other improved design concepts. Based upon an overall assessment of the results of the program it is concluded that reliable coolant pumps can be designed for three year space missions.

  13. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the life support and airlock support systems, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Duffy, R. E.; Barickman, K.; Saiidi, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Life Support and Airlock Support Systems (LSS and ALSS) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the NASA FMEA/CIL baseline with proposed Post 51-L updates included. The discrepancies were flagged for potential future resolution. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter LSS and ALSS hardware. The IOA product for the LSS and ALSS analysis consisted of 511 failure mode worksheets that resulted in 140 potential critical items. Comparison was made to the NASA baseline which consisted of 456 FMEAs and 101 CIL items. The IOA analysis identified 39 failure modes, 6 of which were classified as CIL items, for components not covered by the NASA FMEAs. It was recommended that these failure modes be added to the NASA FMEA baseline. The overall assessment produced agreement on all but 301 FMEAs which caused differences in 111 CIL items.

  14. Emergency cooling analysis for the loss of coolant malfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peoples, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    This report examines the dynamic response of a conceptual space power fast-spectrum lithium cooled reactor to the loss of coolant malfunction and several emergency cooling concepts. The results show that, following the loss of primary coolant, the peak temperatures of the center most 73 fuel elements can range from 2556 K to the region of the fuel melting point of 3122 K within 3600 seconds after the start of the accident. Two types of emergency aftercooling concepts were examined: (1) full core open loop cooling and (2) partial core closed loop cooling. The full core open loop concept is a one pass method of supplying lithium to the 247 fuel pins. This method can maintain fuel temperature below the 1611 K transient damage limit but requires a sizable 22,680-kilogram auxiliary lithium supply. The second concept utilizes a redundant internal closed loop to supply lithium to only the central area of each hexagonal fuel array. By using this method and supplying lithium to only the triflute region, fuel temperatures can be held well below the transient damage limit.

  15. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M.; Urabe, Y.

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  16. Selection of an Alternate Biocide for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System Coolant, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Cole, Harold; Weir, Natalee; Oehler, Bill; Steele, John; Varsik, Jerry; Lukens, Clark

    2004-01-01

    The ISS (International Space Station) ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) includes two internal coolant loops that utilize an aqueous based coolant for heat transfer. A silver salt biocide had previously been utilized as an additive in the coolant formulation to control the growth and proliferation of microorganisms within the coolant loops. Ground-based and in-flight testing demonstrated that the silver salt was rapidly depleted, and did not act as an effective long-term biocide. Efforts to select an optimal alternate biocide for the ITCS coolant application have been underway and are now in the final stages. An extensive evaluation of biocides was conducted to down-select to several candidates for test trials and was reported on previously. Criteria for that down-select included: the need for safe, non-intrusive implementation and operation in a functioning system; the ability to control existing planktonic and biofilm residing microorganisms; a negligible impact on system-wetted materials of construction; and a negligible reactivity with existing coolant additives. Candidate testing to provide data for the selection of an optimal alternate biocide is now in the final stages. That testing has included rapid biocide effectiveness screening using Biolog MT2 plates to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (amount that will inhibit visible growth of microorganisms), time kill studies to determine the exposure time required to completely eliminate organism growth, materials compatibility exposure evaluations, coolant compatibility studies, and bench-top simulated coolant testing. This paper reports the current status of the effort to select an alternate biocide for the ISS ITCS coolant. The results of various test results to select the optimal candidate are presented.

  17. 60. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, D LOOP STEAM GENERATOR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, D LOOP STEAM GENERATOR AND MAIN COOLANT PUMP LOOKING NORTHEAST (LOCATION OOO) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  18. Apparatus and method for controlling the rotary airlocks in a coal processing system by reversing the motor current rotating the air lock

    SciTech Connect

    Groombridge, C.E.

    1996-11-19

    An improvement is described to a coal processing system where hard materials found in the coal may cause jamming of either inflow or outflow rotary airlocks, each driven by a reversible motor. The instantaneous current used by the motor is continually monitored and compared to a predetermined value. If an overcurrent condition occurs, indicating a jamming of the airlock, a controller means starts a ``soft`` reverse rotation of the motor thereby clearing the jamming. Three patterns of the motor reversal are provided. 10 figs.

  19. INHIBITING THE POLYMERIZATION OF NUCLEAR COOLANTS

    DOEpatents

    Colichman, E.L.

    1959-10-20

    >The formation of new reactor coolants which contain an additive tbat suppresses polymerization of the primary dissoclation free radical products of the pyrolytic and radiation decomposition of the organic coolants is described. The coolants consist of polyphenyls and condensed ring compounds having from two to about four carbon rings and from 0.1 to 5% of a powdered metal hydride chosen from the group consisting of the group IIA and IVA dispersed in the hydrocarbon.

  20. Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant pumps and valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.; Miller, R.F.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1993-05-01

    Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors contains one reactor coolant pump, one PUMP suction side motor operated valve, and other smaller valves. The pumps me double suction, double volute, and radially split type pumps. The valves are different size shutoff and control valves rated from ANSI B16.5 construction class 150 to class 300. The reactor coolant system components, also known as the process water system (PWS), are classified as nuclear Safety Class I components. These components were constructed in the 1950`s in accordance with the then prevailing industry practices. No uniform construction codes were used for design and analysis of these components. However, no pressure boundary failures or bolting failures have ever been recorded throughout their operating history. Over the years, the in-service inspection (ISI) was limited to visual inspection of the pressure boundaries, and surface and volumetric examination of the pressure retaining bolts. Efforts are now underway to implement ISI requirements similar to the ASME Section XI requirements for pumps and valves. This report discusses the new ISI requirements which also call for volumetric examination of the pump casing and valve body welds.

  1. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  2. Cleaning of uranium vs machine coolant formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, S.S.; Byrd, V.R.; Simandl, R.F.

    1984-10-01

    This study compares methods for cleaning uranium chips and the residues left on chips from alternate machine coolants based on propylene glycol-water mixtures with either borax, ammonium tetraborate, or triethanolamine tetraborate added as a nuclear poison. Residues left on uranium surfaces machined with perchloroethylene-mineral oil coolant and on surfaces machined with the borax-containing alternate coolant were also compared. In comparing machined surfaces, greater chlorine contamination was found on the surface of the perchloroethylene-mineral oil machined surfaces, but slightly greater oxidation was found on the surfaces machined with the alternate borax-containing coolant. Overall, the differences were small and a change to the alternate coolant does not appear to constitute a significant threat to the integrity of machined uranium parts.

  3. Effects of coolant volatility on simulated HCDA bubble expansions. Technical report No. 10

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, R.J.

    1980-09-01

    The effects of coolant volatility on the expansion dynamics and cover loading of hypothetical core disruptive accidents (HCDA) were studied by performing experiments with a transparent 1/30-scale model of a typical demonstration size loop-type liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Freon 113 and Freon 11 were used as coolant simulants of increasing volatility. High-pressure nitrogen gas (1450 psia) or flashing water (1160 psia) were used to simulate the qualitative features of sodium vapor or molten fuel expansions. To validate the use of constant mass and constant geometry experiments as a means of evaluating the effects of coolant volatility, a set of baseline experiments was performed in these configurations with the room temperature nitrogen bubble source. In all the experiments, the expanding HCDA bubbles, the motion of the coolant simulant, and the vessel loads were monitored by pressure transducers, a thermocouple in the bubble, and high-speed photography. Results of the constant mass experiments with the flashing water source show that higher volatility results in higher pressure driving the coolant slug and therefore higher impact loads. The Freon experiments had about 50% higher pressure in the upper core and bubble, a 30% larger slug impact impulse, and 25% greater expansion work done on the coolant slug. The higher pressure in the Freon experiments is believed due to vaporization of some of the Freon that mixes with the hot flashing water in the upper core very early in the expansion. Entrainment of coolant within the bubble and the bubble shape were comparable in the Freon and water experiments. Entrainment at slug impact varied between 20 and 40% of the bubble volume. The presence of internal vessel structures attenuated the slug impact impulse by about 50%, whether the coolant was Freon 113 or water. 79 figures, 23 tables.

  4. Skylab reuse study, reference data, part 1. [habitability of the orbital workshop and airlock modules for the space transportation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The accommodations provided by the airlock module and the orbital workshop were completely examined with the thought of total reactivation as an enhancement to the STS long duration missions. Each subsystem is described and a summary of subsystem performance during the Skylab missions is presented. End-of-mission status and the status of today for each subsystem is shown together with refurbishment/resupply requirements and refurb kit descriptions to restore Skylab to full operational capability. An inspection/refurbishment and operations plan for Skylab is included. The initial Shuttle-tended operational activity would provide a safe, effective phase of Skylab rehabilitation while simultaneously benefitting the Orbiter crew through the addition of private accommodations, off-duty recreation area, and physical conditioning equipment. This period would also permit exercising selected onboard experiments.

  5. Influence of coolant injector configuration on film cooling effectiveness for gaseous and liquid film coolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shine, S. R.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Suresh, B. N.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental investigation is conducted to bring out the effects of coolant injector configuration on film cooling effectiveness, film cooled length and film uniformity associated with gaseous and liquid coolants. A series of measurements are performed using hot air as the core gas and gaseous nitrogen and water as the film coolants in a cylindrical test section simulating a thrust chamber. Straight and compound angle injection at two different configurations of 30°-10° and 45°-10° are investigated for the gaseous coolant. Tangential injection at 30° and compound angle injection at 30°-10° are examined for the liquid coolant. The analysis is based on measurements of the film-cooling effectiveness and film uniformity downstream of the injection location at different blowing ratios. Measured results showed that compound angle configuration leads to lower far-field effectiveness and shorter film length compared to tangential injection in the case of liquid film cooling. For similar injector configurations, effectiveness along the stream wise direction showed flat characteristics initially for the liquid coolant, while it was continuously dropping for the gaseous coolant. For liquid coolant, deviations in temperature around the circumference are very low near the injection point, but increases to higher values for regions away from the coolant injection locations. The study brings out the existance of an optimum gaseous film coolant injector configuration for which the effectiveness is maximum.

  6. Coolant mass flow equalizer for nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Betten, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    The coolant mass flow distribution in a liquid metal cooled reactor is enhanced by restricting flow in sub-channels defined in part by the peripheral fuel elements of a fuel assembly. This flow restriction, which results in more coolant flow in interior sub-channels, is achieved through the use of a corrugated liner positioned between the bundle of fuel elements and the inner wall of the fuel assembly coolant duct. The corrugated liner is expandable to accommodate irradiation induced growth of fuel assembly components.

  7. Bi-coolant flat plate solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, W. Y.; Green, L. L.

    The feasibility study of a flat plate solar collector which heats air and water concurrently or separately was carried out. Air flows above the collector absorber plate, while water flows in tubes soldered or brazed beneath the plate. The collector efficiencies computed for the flow of both air and water are compared with those for the flow of a single coolant. The results show that the bi-coolant collector efficiency computed for the entire year in Buffalo, New York is higher than the single-coolant collector efficiency, although the efficiency of the water collector is higher during the warmer months.

  8. 40 CFR 1065.745 - Coolants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... without rust inhibitors. (c) For coolants allowed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, you may use rust inhibitors and additives required for lubricity, up to the levels that the additive...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.745 - Coolants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... without rust inhibitors. (c) For coolants allowed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, you may use rust inhibitors and additives required for lubricity, up to the levels that the additive...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.745 - Coolants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... without rust inhibitors. (c) For coolants allowed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, you may use rust inhibitors and additives required for lubricity, up to the levels that the additive...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.745 - Coolants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... without rust inhibitors. (c) For coolants allowed in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, you may use rust inhibitors and additives required for lubricity, up to the levels that the additive...

  12. Worldwide trends in engine coolants, cooling system materials and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on worldwide trends in engine coolants, cooling systems, materials and testings. Topics covered include: Internationalization of the Automotive Industry - Global Responses in the Functional Fluid Area; Analysis of Coolants from Diesel Engines; Cavitation Damage of Diesel Engine Wet- Cylinder Liners; and Development of Test Stand to Measure the Effect of Coolant Composition on Engine Coolant Pump Seal Leakage.

  13. Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Staunton, M.R.; Starke, M.R.

    2006-09-30

    This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at

  14. Barriers to the Application of High-Temperature Coolants in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, Robert H; Hsu, John S; Starke, Michael R

    2006-09-01

    This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify practical approaches, technical barriers, and cost impacts to achieving high-temperature coolant operation for certain traction drive subassemblies and components of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). HEVs are unique in their need for the cooling of certain dedicated-traction drive subassemblies/components that include the electric motor(s), generators(s), inverter, dc converter (where applicable), and dc-link capacitors. The new coolant system under study would abandon the dedicated 65 C coolant loop, such as used in the Prius, and instead rely on the 105 C engine cooling loop. This assessment is important because automotive manufacturers are interested in utilizing the existing water/glycol engine cooling loop to cool the HEV subassemblies in order to eliminate an additional coolant loop with its associated reliability, space, and cost requirements. In addition, the cooling of power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical in meeting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology (FCVT) goals for power rating, volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost. All of these have been addressed in this study. Because there is high interest by the original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in reducing manufacturing cost to enhance their competitive standing, the approach taken in this analysis was designed to be a positive 'can-do' approach that would be most successful in demonstrating the potential or opportunity of relying entirely on a high-temperature coolant system. Nevertheless, it proved to be clearly evident that a few formidable technical and cost barriers exist and no effective approach for mitigating the barriers was evident in the near term. Based on comprehensive thermal tests of the Prius reported by ORNL in 2005 [1], the continuous ratings at base speed (1200 rpm) with different coolant temperatures were projected from test data at

  15. Influence of coolant pH on corrosion of 6061 aluminum under reactor heat transfer conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, S.J.; Felde, D.K.; Pawel, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    To support the design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), an experimental program was conducted wherein aluminum alloy specimens were exposed at high heat fluxes to high-velocity aqueous coolants in a corrosion test loop. The aluminum alloys selected for exposure were candidate fuel cladding materials, and the loop system was constructed to emulate the primary coolant system for the proposed ANS reactor. One major result of this program has been the generation of an experimental database defining oxide film growth on 6061 aluminum alloy cladding. Additionally, a data correlation was developed from the database to permit the prediction of film growth for any reasonable thermal-hydraulic excursion. This capability was utilized effectively during the conceptual design stages of the reactor. During the course of this research, it became clear that the kinetics of film growth on the aluminum alloy specimens were sensitively dependent on the chemistry of the aqueous coolant and that relatively small deviations from the intended pH 5 operational level resulted in unexpectedly large changes in the corrosion behavior. Examination of the kinetic influences and the details of the film morphology suggested that a mechanism involving mass transport from other parts of the test loop was involved. Such a mechanism would also be expected to be active in the operating reactor. This report emphasizes the results of experiments that best illustrate the influence of the nonthermal-hydraulic parameters on film growth and presents data to show that comparatively small variations in pH near 5.0 invoke a sensitive response. Simply, for operation in the temperature and heat flux range appropriate for the ANS studies, coolant pH levels from 4.5 to 4.9 produced significantly less film growth than those from pH 5.1 to 6. A mechanism for this behavior based on the concept of treating the entire loop as an active corrosion system is presented.

  16. Lead Coolant Test Facility Development Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Paul A. Demkowicz

    2005-06-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on May 25, 2005, to discuss the development of a next generation lead or lead-alloy coolant test facility. Attendees included representatives from the Generation IV lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) program, Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, and several universities. Several participants gave presentations on coolant technology, existing experimental facilities for lead and lead-alloy research, the current LFR design concept, and a design by Argonne National Laboratory for an integral heavy liquid metal test facility. Discussions were focused on the critical research and development requirements for deployment of an LFR demonstration test reactor, the experimental scope of the proposed coolant test facility, a review of the Argonne National Laboratory test facility design, and a brief assessment of the necessary path forward and schedule for the initial stages of this development project. This report provides a summary of the presentations and roundtable discussions.

  17. Coolant monitoring apparatus for nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A system for monitoring coolant conditions within a pressurized vessel. A length of tubing extends outward from the vessel from an open end containing a first line restriction at the location to be monitored. The flowing fluid is cooled and condensed before passing through a second line restriction. Measurement of pressure drop at the second line restriction gives an indication of fluid condition at the first line restriction. Multiple lengths of tubing with open ends at incremental elevations can measure coolant level within the vessel.

  18. On-Line Coolant Chemistry Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    LM Bachman

    2006-07-19

    Impurities in the gas coolant of the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) can provide valuable indications of problems in the reactor and an overall view of system health. By monitoring the types and amounts of these impurities, much can be implied regarding the status of the reactor plant. However, a preliminary understanding of the expected impurities is important before evaluating prospective detection and monitoring systems. Currently, a spectroscopy system is judged to hold the greatest promise for monitoring the impurities of interest in the coolant because it minimizes the number of entry and exit points to the plant and provides the ability to detect impurities down to the 1 ppm level.

  19. Additional requirements for leak-before-break application to primary coolant piping in Belgium

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel, G.

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) technology has not been applied in the first design of the seven Pressurized Water Reactors the Belgian utility is currently operating. The design basis of these plants required to consider the dynamic effects associated with the ruptures to be postulated in the high energy piping. The application of the LBB technology to the existing plants has been recently approved by the Belgian Safety Authorities but with a limitation to the primary coolant loop. LBB analysis has been initiated for the Doel 3 and Tihange 2 plants to allow the withdrawal of some of the reactor coolant pump snubbers at both plants and not reinstall some of the restraints after steam generator replacement at Doel 3. LBB analysis was also found beneficial to demonstrate the acceptability of the primary components and piping to the new conditions resulting from power uprating and stretch-out operation. LBB analysis has been subsequently performed on the primary coolant loop of the Tihange I plant and is currently being performed for the Doel 4 plant. Application of the LBB to the primary coolant loop is based in Belgium on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. However the Belgian Safety Authorities required some additional analyses and put some restrictions on the benefits of the LBB analysis to maintain the global safety of the plant at a sufficient level. This paper develops the main steps of the safety evaluation performed by the Belgian Safety Authorities for accepting the application of the LBB technology to existing plants and summarizes the requirements asked for in addition to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules.

  20. International Space Station Active Thermal Control Sub-System On-Orbit Pump Performance and Reliability Using Liquid Ammonia as a Coolant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Richard D.; Jurick, Matthew; Roman, Ruben; Adamson, Gary; Bui, Chinh T.; Laliberte, Yvon J.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) contains two Active Thermal Control Sub-systems (ATCS) that function by using a liquid ammonia cooling system collecting waste heat and rejecting it using radiators. These subsystems consist of a number of heat exchangers, cold plates, radiators, the Pump and Flow Control Subassembly (PFCS), and the Pump Module (PM), all of which are Orbital Replaceable Units (ORU's). The PFCS provides the motive force to circulate the ammonia coolant in the Photovoltaic Thermal Control Subsystem (PVTCS) and has been in operation since December, 2000. The Pump Module (PM) circulates liquid ammonia coolant within the External Active Thermal Control Subsystem (EATCS) cooling the ISS internal coolant (water) loops collecting waste heat and rejecting it through the ISS radiators. These PM loops have been in operation since December, 2006. This paper will discuss the original reliability analysis approach of the PFCS and Pump Module, comparing them against the current operational performance data for the ISS External Thermal Control Loops.

  1. NGNP Reactor Coolant Chemistry Control Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Castle

    2010-11-01

    The main focus of this paper is to identify the most desirable ranges of impurity levels in the primary coolant to optimize component life in the primary circuit of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which will either be a prismatic block or pebble bed reactor.

  2. 40 CFR 1065.745 - Coolants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.745 Coolants... your engine in use. (b) For laboratory testing of liquid-cooled engines, you may use water with...

  3. Design criteria for Waste Coolant Processing Facility and preliminary proposal 722 for Waste Coolant Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-27

    This document contains the design criteria to be used by the architect-engineer (A-E) in the performance of Titles 1 and 2 design for the construction of a facility to treat the biodegradable, water soluble, waste machine coolant generated at the Y-12 plant. The purpose of this facility is to reduce the organic loading of coolants prior to final treatment at the proposed West Tank Farm Treatment Facility.

  4. Coolant passage heat transfer with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajek, T. J.; Wagner, J.; Johnson, B. V.

    1986-10-01

    In current and advanced gas turbine engines, increased speeds, pressures and temperatures are used to reduce specific fuel consumption and increase thrust/weight ratios. Hence, the turbine airfoils are subjected to increased heat loads escalating the cooling requirements to satisfy life goals. The efficient use of cooling air requires that the details of local geometry and flow conditions be adequately modeled to predict local heat loads and the corresponding heat transfer coefficients. The objective of this program is to develop a heat transfer and pressure drop data base, computational fluid dynamic techniques and correlations for multi-pass rotating coolant passages with and without flow turbulators. The experimental effort is focused on the simulation of configurations and conditions expected in the blades of advanced aircraft high pressure turbines. With the use of this data base, the effects of Coriolis and buoyancy forces on the coolant side flow can be included in the design of turbine blades.

  5. Evaluation of Salt Coolants for Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, David F

    2008-01-01

    Molten fluorides were initially developed for use in the nuclear industry as the high-temperature fluid fuel for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is exploring the use of molten salts as primary and secondary coolants in a new generation of solid-fueled, thermal-spectrum, hightemperature reactors. This paper provides a review of relevant properties for use in evaluation and ranking of salt coolants for high-temperature reactors. Nuclear, physical, and chemical properties were reviewed, and metrics for evaluation are recommended. Chemical properties of the salt were examined to identify factors that affect materials compatibility (i.e., corrosion). Some preliminary consideration of economic factors for the candidate salts is also presented.

  6. A Comparison of Coolant Options for Brayton Power Conversion Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siamidis, John; Mason, Lee S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and surface power applications. The Brayton Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Sodium potassium (NaK) and H2O are two coolant working fluids that have been investigated in the design of a pumped loop and heat pipe space HRS. In general NaK systems are high temperature (300 to 1000 K) low pressure systems, and H2O systems are low temperature (300 to 600 K) high pressure systems. NaK is an alkali metal with health and safety hazards that require special handling procedures. On the other hand, H2O is a common fluid, with no health hazards and no special handling procedures. This paper compares NaK and H2O for the HRS pumped loop coolant working fluid. A detailed Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) analytical model, HRS_Opt, was developed to evaluate the various HRS design parameters. It is capable of analyzing NaK or H2O coolant, parallel or series flow configurations, and numerous combinations of other key parameters (heat pipe spacing, diameter and radial flux, radiator facesheet thickness, fluid duct system pressure drop, system rejected power, etc.) of the HRS. This paper compares NaK against water for the HRS coolant working fluid with respect to the relative mass, performance, design and implementation issues between the two fluids.

  7. A Comparison of Coolant Options for Brayton Power Conversion Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Siamidis, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and surface power applications. The Brayton Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Sodium potassium (NaK) and H2O are two coolant working fluids that have been investigated in the design of a pumped loop and heat pipe space HRS. In general NaK systems are high temperature (300 to 1000 K) low pressure systems, and H2O systems are low temperature (300 to 600 K) high pressure systems. NaK is an alkali metal with health and safety hazards that require special handling procedures. On the other hand, H2O is a common fluid, with no health hazards and no special handling procedures. This paper compares NaK and H20 for the HRS pumped loop coolant working fluid. A detailed Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA) analytical model, HRS_Opt, was developed to evaluate the various HRS design parameters. It is capable of analyzing NaK or H2O coolant, parallel or series flow configurations, and numerous combinations of other key parameters (heat pipe spacing, diameter and radial flux, radiator facesheet thickness, fluid duct system pressure drop, system rejected power, etc.) of the HRS. This paper compares NaK against water for the HRS coolant working fluid with respect to the relative mass, performance, design and implementation issues between the two fluids.

  8. A Comparison of Coolant Options for Brayton Power Conversion Heat Rejection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siamidis, John; Mason, Lee

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and surface power applications. The Brayton Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Sodium potassium (NaK) and H2O are two coolant working fluids that have been investigated in the design of a pumped loop and heat pipe space HRS. In general NaK systems are high temperature (300 to 1000 K) low pressure systems, and H2O systems are low temperature (300 to 600 K) high pressure systems. NaK is an alkali metal with health and safety hazards that require special handling procedures. On the other hand, H2O is a common fluid, with no health hazards and no special handling procedures. This paper compares NaK and H2O for the HRS pumped loop coolant working fluid. A detailed excel analytical model, HRS_Opt, was developed to evaluate the various HRS design parameters. It is capable of analyzing NaK or H2O coolant, parallel or series flow configurations, and numerous combinations of other key parameters (heat pipe spacing, diameter and radial flux, radiator facesheet thickness, fluid duct system pressure drop, system rejected power, etc.) of the HRS. This paper compares NaK against water for the HRS coolant working fluid with respect to the relative mass, performance, design and implementation issues between the two fluids.

  9. A Comparison of Coolant Options for Brayton Power Conversion Heat Rejection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Siamidis, John; Mason, Lee

    2006-01-20

    This paper describes potential heat rejection design concepts for Brayton power conversion systems. Brayton conversion systems are currently under study by NASA for Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and surface power applications. The Brayton Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) must dissipate waste heat generated by the power conversion system due to inefficiencies in the thermal-to-electric conversion process. Sodium potassium (NaK) and H2O are two coolant working fluids that have been investigated in the design of a pumped loop and heat pipe space HRS. In general NaK systems are high temperature (300 to 1000 K) low pressure systems, and H2O systems are low temperature (300 to 600 K) high pressure systems. NaK is an alkali metal with health and safety hazards that require special handling procedures. On the other hand, H2O is a common fluid, with no health hazards and no special handling procedures. This paper compares NaK and H2O for the HRS pumped loop coolant working fluid. A detailed excel analytical model, HRS{sub O}pt, was developed to evaluate the various HRS design parameters. It is capable of analyzing NaK or H2O coolant, parallel or series flow configurations, and numerous combinations of other key parameters (heat pipe spacing, diameter and radial flux, radiator facesheet thickness, fluid duct system pressure drop, system rejected power, etc.) of the HRS. This paper compares NaK against water for the HRS coolant working fluid with respect to the relative mass, performance, design and implementation issues between the two fluids.

  10. Evaluation of engine coolant recycling processes: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, W.H.

    1999-08-01

    Engine coolant recycling continues to provide solutions to both economic and environmental challenges often faced with the disposal of used engine coolant. General Motors` Service Technology Group (STG), in a continuing effort to validate the general practice of recycling engine coolants, has conducted an in-depth study on the capabilities of recycled coolants. Various recycling processes ranging from complex forms of fractional distillation to simple filtration were evaluated in this study to best represent the current state of coolant recycling technology. This study incorporates both lab and (limited) fleet testing to determine the performance capabilities of the recycled coolants tested. While the results suggest the need for additional studies in this area, they reveal the true capabilities of all types of engine coolant recycling technologies.

  11. An investigation of core liquid level depression in small break loss-of-coolant accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.R.; Watkins, J.C. ); Motley, F.E.; Stumpf, H. ); Chen, Y.S. . Div. of Systems Research)

    1991-08-01

    Core liquid level depression can result in partial core dryout and heatup early in a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) transient. Such behavior occurs when steam, trapped in the upper regions of the reactor primary system (between the loop seal and the core inventory), moves coolant out of the core region and uncovers the rod upper elevations. The net result is core liquid level depression. Core liquid level depression and subsequent core heatups are investigated using subscale data from the ROSA-IV Program's 1/48-scale Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and the 1/1705-scale Semiscale facility. Both facilities are Westinghouse-type, four-loop, pressurized water reactor simulators. The depression phenomena and factors which influence the minimum core level are described and illustrated using examples from the data. Analyses of the subject experiments, conducted using the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 (Version 12.7) thermal-hydraulic code, are also described and summarized. Finally, the response of a typical Westinghouse four-loop plant (RESAR-3S) was calculated to qualitatively study coal liquid level depression in a full-scale system. 31 refs., 37 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. SP-100 liquid metal test loop design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallas, T. Ted; Kruger, Gordon B.; Wiltshire, Frank R.; Jensen, Grant C.; Clay, Harold; Upton, Hugh A.; Gamble, Robert E.; Kjaer-Olsen, Christian; Lee, Keith

    1992-01-01

    The SP-100 Power System Qualification (PSO) program validates the technology readiness of the SP-100 Generic Flight System (GFS). As part of the PSQ, the GFS reactor, heat transport and power generation systems are being validated, by test, in high temperature liquid metal test loops. The liquid metal test loop program consists of two test loops. The first, a natural circulation material test loop (MTL), has been successfully operating for the last year at GE's test facility in San Jose. The second, a forced circulation Component Test Loop (CTL) is in the preliminary design phase. Fabrication of the CTL and modifications to the Test Facility will be completed in FY94 with component testing scheduled to begin in FY95. The CTL is a Nb-1Zr test loop with an Electromagnetic (EM) pump providing forced circulation for the liquid lithium coolant. The CTL test program is comprised of a series of individual component tests. Test components containing thermoelectric cells will have their cold side ducts piped to an existing heat rejection loop external to the CTL vacuum vessel. The test assembly and test components are being designed by GE. The detail design of several loop components is being performed by Westinghouse Atomic Energy Systems (WAES). The CTL will be assembled and the test performed at GE's facilties in San Jose, California.

  13. Porous coolant tube holder for fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Robin J.

    1981-01-01

    A coolant tube holder for a stack of fuel cells is a gas porous sheet of fibrous material adapted to be sandwiched between a cell electrode and a nonporous, gas impervious flat plate which separates adjacent cells. The porous holder has channels in one surface with coolant tubes disposed therein for carrying coolant through the stack. The gas impervious plate is preferably bonded to the opposite surface of the holder, and the channel depth is the full thickness of the holder.

  14. CFD analyses of coolant channel flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagley, Jennifer A.; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield characteristics in rocket engine coolant channels are analyzed by means of a numerical model. The channels are characterized by large length to diameter ratios, high Reynolds numbers, and asymmetrical heating. At representative flow conditions, the channel length is approximately twice the hydraulic entrance length so that fully developed conditions would be reached for a constant property fluid. For the supercritical hydrogen that is used as the coolant, the strong property variations create significant secondary flows in the cross-plane which have a major influence on the flow and the resulting heat transfer. Comparison of constant and variable property solutions show substantial differences. In addition, the property variations prevent fully developed flow. The density variation accelerates the fluid in the channels increasing the pressure drop without an accompanying increase in heat flux. Analyses of the inlet configuration suggest that side entry from a manifold can affect the development of the velocity profile because of vortices generated as the flow enters the channel. Current work is focused on studying the effects of channel bifurcation on the flow field and the heat transfer characteristics.

  15. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Liquid Cooling § 23.1063... specimen liner must be conducted with the coolant at operating temperature. Induction System...

  16. A Heated Tube Facility for Rocket Coolant Channel Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James M.; Pease, Gary M.; Meyer, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The capabilities of a heated tube facility used for testing rocket engine coolant channels at the NASA Lewis Research Center are presented. The facility uses high current, low voltage power supplies to resistively heat a test section to outer wall temperatures as high as 730 C (1350 F). Liquid or gaseous nitrogen, gaseous helium, or combustible liquids can be used as the test section coolant. The test section is enclosed in a vacuum chamber to minimize heat loss to the surrounding system. Test section geometry, size, and material; coolant properties; and heating levels can be varied to generate heat transfer and coolant performance data bases.

  17. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  18. Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management - Combining Fluid Loops in Electric Drive Vehicles (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles have increased vehicle thermal management complexity, using separate coolant loop for advanced power electronics and electric motors. Additional thermal components result in higher costs. Multiple cooling loops lead to reduced range due to increased weight. Energy is required to meet thermal requirements. This presentation for the 2013 Annual Merit Review discusses integrated vehicle thermal management by combining fluid loops in electric drive vehicles.

  19. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-09-01

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  20. Power module assemblies with staggered coolant channels

    DOEpatents

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S; Korich, Mark D

    2013-07-16

    A manifold is provided for supporting a power module assembly with a plurality of power modules. The manifold includes a first manifold section. The first face of the first manifold section is configured to receive the first power module, and the second face of the first manifold section defines a first cavity with a first baseplate thermally coupled to the first power module. The first face of the second manifold section is configured to receive the second power module, and the second face of the second manifold section defines a second cavity with a second baseplate thermally coupled to the second power module. The second face of the first manifold section and the second face of the second manifold section are coupled together such that the first cavity and the second cavity form a coolant channel. The first cavity is at least partially staggered with respect to second cavity.

  1. Transpiration cooling using air as a coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kikkawa, Shinzo; Senda, Mamoru; Sakagushi, Katsuji; Shibutani, Hideki )

    1993-02-01

    Transpiration cooling is one of the most effective techniques for protecting a surface exposed to a high-temperature gas stream. In the present paper, the transpiration cooling effectiveness was measured under steady state. Air as a coolant was transpired from the surface of a porous plate exposed to hot gas stream, and the transpiration rate was varied in the range of 0.001 [approximately] 0.006. The transpiration cooling effectiveness was evaluated by measuring the temperature of the upper surface of the plate. Also, a theoretical study was performed and it was clarified that the effectiveness increases with increasing transpiration rate and heat-transfer coefficient of the upper surface. Further, the effectiveness was expressed as a function of the blowing parameter only. The agreement between the experimental results and theoretical ones was satisfactory.

  2. Testing of organic acids in engine coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, T.W.

    1999-08-01

    The effectiveness of 30 organic acids as inhibitors in engine coolants is reported. Tests include glassware corrosion of coupled and uncoupled metals. FORD galvanostatic and cyclic polarization electrochemistry for aluminum pitting, and reserve alkalinity (RA) measurements. Details of each test are discussed as well as some general conclusions. For example, benzoic acid inhibits coupled metals well but is ineffective on cast iron when uncoupled. In benzoic acid inhibits coupled metals well but is ineffective on cast iron when uncoupled. In general, the organic acids provide little RA when titrated to a pH of 5.5, titration to a pH of 4.5 can result in precipitation of the acid. Trends with respect to acid chain length are reported also.

  3. 73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. View of line of stainless steel coolant storage tanks for bi-sodium sulfate/water coolant solution at first floor of transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coolant tank tests. 23.1063 Section 23.1063 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Liquid Cooling § 23.1063 Coolant tank tests. Each...

  5. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1984-01-27

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  6. Effects of rotation on coolant passage heat transfer. Volume 1: Coolant passages with smooth walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajek, T. J.; Wagner, J. H.; Johnson, B. V.; Higgins, A. W.; Steuber, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of rotating multipass passages, for configurations and dimensions typical of modern turbine blades. The immediate objective was the generation of a data base of heat transfer and pressure loss data required to develop heat transfer correlations and to assess computational fluid dynamic techniques for rotating coolant passages. Experiments were conducted in a smooth wall large scale heat transfer model.

  7. Radiant energy receiver having improved coolant flow control means

    DOEpatents

    Hinterberger, H.

    1980-10-29

    An improved coolant flow control for use in radiant energy receivers of the type having parallel flow paths is disclosed. A coolant performs as a temperature dependent valve means, increasing flow in the warmer flow paths of the receiver, and impeding flow in the cooler paths of the receiver. The coolant has a negative temperature coefficient of viscosity which is high enough such that only an insignificant flow through the receiver is experienced at the minimum operating temperature of the receiver, and such that a maximum flow is experienced at the maximum operating temperature of the receiver. The valving is accomplished by changes in viscosity of the coolant in response to the coolant being heated and cooled. No remotely operated valves, comparators or the like are needed.

  8. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  9. Method for removing cesium from a nuclear reactor coolant

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, Richard P.

    1986-01-01

    A method of and system for removing cesium from a liquid metal reactor coolant including a carbon packing trap in the primary coolant system for absorbing a major portion of the radioactive cesium from the coolant flowing therethrough at a reduced temperature. A regeneration subloop system having a secondary carbon packing trap is selectively connected to the primary system for isolating the main trap therefrom and connecting it to the regeneration system. Increasing the temperature of the sodium flowing through the primary trap diffuses a portion of the cesium

  10. Modeling Reactor Coolant Systems Thermal-Hydraulic Transients

    1999-10-05

    RELAP5/MOD3.2* is used to model reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transients without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal-hydraulic systems. Control system and secondary system components are included to allow modeling of themore » plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems.« less

  11. Steam as turbine blade coolant: Experimental data generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmsen, B.; Engeda, A.; Lloyd, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    Steam as a coolant is a possible option to cool blades in high temperature gas turbines. However, to quantify steam as a coolant, there exists practically no experimental data. This work deals with an attempt to generate such data and with the design of an experimental setup used for the purpose. Initially, in order to guide the direction of experiments, a preliminary theoretical and empirical prediction of the expected experimental data is performed and is presented here. This initial analysis also compares the coolant properties of steam and air.

  12. Corrosion problems with aqueous coolants, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Diegle, R B; Beavers, J A; Clifford, J E

    1980-04-11

    The results of a one year program to characterize corrosion of solar collector alloys in aqueous heat-transfer media are summarized. The program involved a literature review and a laboratory investigation of corrosion in uninhibited solutions. It consisted of three separate tasks, as follows: review of the state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes; study of corrosion in multimetallic systems; and determination of interaction between different waters and chemical antifreeze additives. Task 1 involved a comprehensive review of published literature concerning corrosion under solar collector operating conditions. The reivew also incorporated data from related technologies, specifically, from research performed on automotive cooling systems, cooling towers, and heat exchangers. Task 2 consisted of determining the corrosion behavior of candidate alloys of construction for solar collectors in different types of aqueous coolants containing various concentrations of corrosive ionic species. Task 3 involved measuring the degradation rates of glycol-based heat-transfer media, and also evaluating the effects of degradation on the corrosion behavior of metallic collector materials.

  13. Reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, R.M.; Gross, K.C.; Walsh, M. ); Humenik, K.E. )

    1990-01-01

    In order to reliably and safely operate a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to continuously monitor the performance of numerous subsystems to confirm that the plant state is within its prescribed limits. An important function of a properly designed monitoring system is the detection of incipient faults in all subsystems (with the avoidance of false alarms) coupled with an information system that provides the operators with fault diagnosis, prognosis of fault progression and recommended (either automatic or prescriptive) corrective action. In this paper, such a system is described that has been applied to reactor coolant pumps. This system includes a sensitive pattern-recognition technique based upon the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) that detects incipient faults from validated signals, an expert system embodying knowledge bases on pump and sensor performance, extensive hypertext files containing operating and emergency procedures as well as pump and sensor information and a graphical interface providing the operator with easily perceived information on the location and character of the fault as well as recommended corrective action. This system is in the prototype stage and is currently being validated utilizing data from a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (EBR-II). 3 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Analysis of boron dilution in a four-loop PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.G.; Sha, W.T.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal mixing and boron dilution in a pressurized water reactor were analyzed with COMMIX codes. The reactor system was the four loop Zion reactor. Two boron dilution scenarios were analyzed. In the first scenario, the plant is in cold shutdown and the reactor coolant system has just been filled after maintenance on the steam generators. To flush the air out of the steam generator tubes, a reactor coolant pump (RCP) is started, with the water in the pump suction line devoid of boron and at the same temperature as the coolant in the system. In the second scenario, the plant is at hot standby and the reactor coolant system has been heated up to operating temperature after a long outage. It is assumed that an RCP is started, with the pump suction line filled with cold unborated water, forcing a slug of diluted coolant down the downcomer and subsequently through the reactor core. The subsequent transient thermal mixing and boron dilution that would occur in the reactor system is simulated for these two scenarios. The reactivity insertion rate and the total reactivity are evaluated.

  15. INVESTIGATION OF CLEANER TECHNOLOGIES TO MINIMIZE AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency in cooperation with the State of New Jersey evaluated chemical filtration and distillation technologies designed to recycle automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants. These evaluations addressed the product quality, waste reduction and econo...

  16. Optimized Coolant-Flow Diverter For Increased Bearing Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Maria R.; Butner, Myles F.

    1995-01-01

    Coolant-flow diverter for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic turbopump designed to enhance cooling power of flow in contact with bearings and thereby reduce bearing wear. Delivers jets of coolant as close as possible to hot spots at points of contact between balls and race. Also imparts swirl that enhances beneficial pumping effect. Used with success in end ball bearing of high-pressure-oxidizer turbopump.

  17. Study of extended life coolant with suspended carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overturf, Logan

    Utilizing an experimental facility which was prepared to conduct performance tests on heat exchangers; experiments were completed in an attempt to see verifiable improvements in overall heat transfer coefficient in engine coolant with nanoparticles suspended at different weight percentages. The different fluids tested were: base ELC (Extended Life Coolant), ELC with 0.002 wt% CNT (Carbon Nanotubes), ELC with 0.02 wt% CNT, ELC with 0.02 wt% MWNT's (Multiwalled Nanotubes) and water. The volume percents range from 0.00164 volume% to 0.0164 volume% which seemed quite small, but according to Caterpillar representatives, were the best concentration. These fluids were tested at standard flowrates which this type of heat exchanger would be used in as well as a higher air flowrate and lower coolant flowrates in an attempt to gather more verifiable data. Results were obtained regarding the change in heat transfer ability of engine coolant with suspended nanoparticles. For this system under these specific conditions, there was verifiably no increase in UA as nanoparticles were added to the coolant. The benefits of adding nanoparticles to engine coolant have potential to be great, but the cost of nanoparticles and difficulty keeping them suspended may outweigh any benefits obtainable in this type of set up.

  18. Rollercoaster loop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-11-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  19. Pump, and earth-testable spacecraft capillary heat transport loop using augmentation pump and check valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes heat-generating payload equipment, and a heat transport system with a cold plate thermally coupled to the equipment and a capillary-wick evaporator, for evaporating coolant liquid to cool the equipment. The coolant vapor is coupled to a condenser and in a loop back to the evaporator. A heated coolant reservoir is coupled to the loop for pressure control. If the wick is not wetted, heat transfer will not begin or continue. A pair of check valves are coupled in the loop, and the heater is cycled for augmentation pumping of coolant to and from the reservoir. This augmentation pumping, in conjunction with the check valves, wets the wick. The wick liquid storage capacity allows the augmentation pump to provide continuous pulsed liquid flow to assure continuous vapor transport and a continuously operating heat transport system. The check valves are of the ball type to assure maximum reliability. However, any type of check valve can be used, including designs which are preloaded in the closed position. The check valve may use any ball or poppet material which resists corrosion. For optimum performance during testing on Earth, the ball or poppet would have neutral buoyancy or be configured in a closed position when the heat transport system is not operating. The ball may be porous to allow passage of coolant vapor.

  20. Gas production and behavior in the coolant of the SP-100 Space Nuclear Power System

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, J.M.

    1989-08-01

    The radiologic generation and subsequent behavior of helium gas in the lithium coolant of SP-100 class space nuclear power reactors was investigated analytically in a two part study. Part One of the study consisted of a calculation of coolant radiologic helium gas production rates in a SP-100 class reactor using the discrete ordinates code TWODANT. Cross sections were developed from ENDF/B-V data via the MATXS6s master cross section library. Cross sections were self shielded assuming one homogeneous core region, and doppler broadened to 1300 K using the cross section preparation code TRANSX. Calculations were performed using an S{sub 4}/P{sub 1} approximation and 80 neutron energy groups. Part Two of the study consisted of a theoretical investigation into the behavior of helium gas in the primary loop of lithium cooled space reactors. The SP-100 space power system was used as a representative of such a system. Topics investigated included: (1) heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation; (2) bubble growth/collapse by diffusion, mechanical temperature/pressure effects, and coalescence; and, (3) the effects on bubble distribution of microgravity, magnetic fields, and inertially induced buoyancy. 104 refs., 78 figs., 28 tabs.

  1. LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACIDENT SIMULATIONS IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, W D; Goodman, R L; Heaberlin, S W; Hesson, G M; Nealley, C; Kirg, L L; Marshall, R K; McNair, G W; Meitzler, W D; Neally, G W; Parchen, L J; Pilger, J P; Rausch, W N; Russcher, G E; Schreiber, R E; Wildung, N J; Wilson, C L

    1981-02-01

    Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship among the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. Subsequent experiments establish the fuel rod failure characteristics at selected peak cladding temperatures. Fuel rod cladding pressurization simulates high burnup fission gas pressure levels of modern PWRs. This document contains both an experiment overview of the LOCA simulation program and a review of the safety analyses performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to define the expected operating conditions as well as to evaluate the worst case operating conditions. The primary intent of this document is to supply safety information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to establish the overall safety of the experiment. A hazards review summarizes safety issues, normal operation and three worst case accidents that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

  2. Fluid flow analysis of the SSME high pressure fuel and oxidizer turbine coolant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teal, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to provide improved analysis capability for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high pressure fuel and oxidizer turbine coolant systems. Each of the systems was analyzed to determine fluid flow rate and thermodynamic and transport properties at all key points in the systems. Existing computer codes were used as a baseline for these analyses. These codes were modified to provide improved analysis capability. The major areas of improvement are listed. A review of the drawings was performed, and pertinent geometry changes were included in the models. Improvements were made in the calculation of thermodynamic and transport properties for a mixture of hydrogen and steam. A one-dimensional turbine model for each system is included as a subroutine to each code. This provides a closed loop analysis with a minimum of required boundary conditions as input. An improved labyrinth seal model is included in the high pressure fuel turbine coolant model. The modifications and the analysis results are presented in detail.

  3. Gas production and behavior in the coolant of the SP-100 space nuclear power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGhee, John Morton

    1989-08-01

    The radiologic generation and subsequent behavior of helium gas in the lithium coolant of SP-100 class space nuclear power reactors was investigated analytically in a two part study. Part One of the study consisted of a calculation of coolant radiologic helium gas production rates in a SP-100 class reactor using the discrete ordinates code TWODANT. Cross sections were developed from ENDF/B-V data via the MATXS6s master cross section library. Cross sections were self shielded assuming one homogeneous core region, and Doppler broadened to 1300 K using the cross section preparation code TRANSX. Calculations were performed using an S sub 4/P sub 1 approximation and 80 neutron energy groups. Part Two of the study consisted of a theoretical investigation into the behavior of helium gas in the primary loop of lithium cooled space reactors. The SP-100 space power system was used as a representative of such a system. Topics investigated included: (1) heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation; (2) bubble growth/collapse by diffusion, mechanical temperature/pressure effects, and coalescence; and, (3) the effects on bubble distribution of microgravity, magnetic fields, and inertially induced buoyancy.

  4. Sealing of a shrouded rotor-stator system with pre-swirl coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Oun, Z. B.; Neller, P. H.; Turner, A. B.

    1987-05-01

    Experimental results for a modeled gas turbine rotor-stator system using both preswirled blade coolant and radially outward flowing disc coolant are presented. Although the preswirled coolant flow is found to have little effect on the pressure distribution below the preswirl nozzles, it is shown that considerable contamination of the preswirled coolant by the frictionally heated disc coolant can occur. A clear pressure inversion effect was found when coolant was provided by the preswirl nozzles alone, while the pressure under the rim seal increased with increasing rotational speed. Blade coolant flow increases the sealing flow requirement, except at the lowest flow rates.

  5. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level.

  6. Hydrothermal corrosion of SiC in LWR coolant environments in the absence of irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Kim, Y.-J.; Rebak, R.; Meyer, H. M.; Gerczak, T. J.

    2015-10-01

    Assessment of the thermodynamics of SiC corrosion under light water reactor coolant environments suggests that silica formation is always expected in the range of applicable pH and potential. Autoclave testing of SiC-based materials in the absence of ionizing radiation was performed. The kinetics data from these tests, when compared with kinetics of silica dissolution in water and post-exposure characterization of SiC samples, suggest that oxidation of SiC to form silica is the rate-limiting step for recession of SiC in high temperature water. Oxygen activity in water was determined to play an important role in SiC recession kinetics. A simplified model of a power loop shows the effect of silica dissolution from the hot region (resembling fuel) and deposition in the cold regions.

  7. Use of microPCM fluids as enhanced liquid coolants in automotive EV and HEV vehicles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mulligan, James C.; Gould, Richard D.

    2001-10-31

    Proof-of-concept experiments using a specific microPCM fluid that potentially can have an impact on the thermal management of automotive EV and HEV systems have been conducted. Samples of nominally 20-micron diameter microencapsulated octacosane and glycol/water coolant were prepared for testing. The melting/freezing characteristics of the fluid, as well as the viscosity, were determined. A bench scale pumped-loop thermal system was used to determine heat transfer coefficients and wall temperatures in the source heat exchanged. Comparisons were made which illustrate the enhancements of thermal performance, reductions of pumping power, and increases of heat transfer which occur with the microPCM fluid.

  8. Water Stream "Loop-the-Loop"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefimenko, Oleg

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design of a modified loop-the-loop apparatus in which a water stream is used to illustrate centripetal forces and phenomena of high-velocity hydrodynamics. Included are some procedures of carrying out lecture demonstrations. (CC)

  9. Reactor coolant seal testing under station blackout conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Marsi, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Failures of reactor coolant pump (RCP) seals that could result in a significant loss-of-coolant inventory are of current concern to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Particular attention is being focused on seal behavior during station blackout conditions, when failure of on-site emergency diesel generators occurs simultaneously with loss of all off-site alternating current power. Under these conditions, both seal injection flow and component cooling water flow are lost, and the RCP seals are exposed to full reactor coolant temperature. Overheating of elastomeric components and flashing of coolant across the sealing faces can cause unacceptably high leakage rates, with potential catastrophic consequences. A test program has been conducted that subjects full-scale seal cartridges to typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant system steady-state and transient operation conditions including associated dynamic shaft motions. A special test segment was developed to evaluate seal operation under station blackout conditions. The test program successfully mirrored the severity of an actual loss-of-seal cooling water event under station blackout conditions, and the Byron Jackson{reg sign} N-9000 seal cartridge maintained its integrity.

  10. Stagnation region gas film cooling: Effects of dimensionless coolant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnice, M. A.; Lecuyer, M. R.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to mode the film cooling performance for a turbine vane leading edge using the stagnation region of a cylinder in cross flow. Experiments were conducted with a single row of spanwise angled (25 deg) coolant holes for a range of the coolant blowing ratio and dimensionless coolant temperature with free stream-to-wall temperature ratio approximately 1.7 and Re sub D = 90000. the cylindrical test surface was instrumented with miniature heat flux gages and wall thermocouples to determine the percentage reduction in the Stanton number as a function of the distance downstream from injection (x/d sub 0) and the location between adjacent holes (z/S). Data from local heat flux measurements are presented for injection from a single row located at 5 deg, 22.9 deg, 40.8 deg, from stagnation using a hole spacing ratio of S/d = 5. The film coolant was injected with T sub c T sub w with a dimensionless coolant temperature in the range 1.18 or equal to theta sub c or equal to 1.56. The data for local Stanton Number Reduction (SNR) showed a significant increase in SNR as theta sub c was increased above 1.0.

  11. Nuclear criticality safety assessment of the proposed CFC replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.; Dyer, H.R.

    1993-12-01

    The neutron multiplication characteristics of refrigerant-114 (R-114) and proposed replacement coolants perfluorobutane (C{sub 4}F{sub 10}) and cycloperfluorobutane C{sub 4}F{sub 8}) have been compared by evaluating the infinite media multiplication factors of UF{sub 6}/H/coolant systems and by replacement calculations considering a 10-MW freezer/sublimer. The results of these comparisons demonstrate that R-114 is a neutron absorber, due to its chlorine content, and that the alternative fluorocarbon coolants are neutron moderators. Estimates of critical spherical geometries considering mixtures of UF{sub 6}/HF/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} indicate that the flourocarbon-moderated systems are large compared with water-moderated systems. The freezer/sublimer calculations indicate that the alternative coolants are more reactive than R-114, but that the reactivity remains significantly below the condition of water in the tubes, which was a limiting condition. Based on these results, the alternative coolants appear to be acceptable; however, several follow-up tasks have been recommended, and additional evaluation will be required on an individual equipment basis.

  12. Method for removing cesium from a nuclear reactor coolant

    DOEpatents

    Colburn, R.P.

    1983-08-10

    A method of and system for removing cesium from a liquid metal reactor coolant including a carbon packing trap in the primary coolant system for absorbing a major portion of the radioactive cesium from the coolant flowing therethrough at a reduced temperature. A regeneration subloop system having a secondary carbon packing trap is selectively connected to the primary system for isolating the main trap therefrom and connecting it to the regeneration system. Increasing the temperature of the sodium flowing through the primary trap diffuses a portion of the cesium inventory thereof further into the carbon matrix while simultaneously redispersing a portion into the regeneration system for absorption at a reduced temperature by the secondary trap.

  13. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  14. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  15. The nature and behavior of particulates in PWR primary coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Bridle, D.A.; Butter, K.R.; Cake, P.; Comley, G.C.W.; Mitchell, C.R. )

    1989-12-01

    A study of particle size distributions, nature and behavior of insoluble species carried by PWR coolants has been carried out over a four year period in Belgian reactors. Comparative data was obtained by the use of improved sampling systems designed to overcome the inadequacies of standard facilities. Coolant data is presented from commissioning and early operation of new plant to that in established PWR circuits. Results arising from reactors transients are also included, which refer to shutdown and start-up phases, power changes and scram situations. The information obtained includes chemical and radiochemical characteristics of particulates and their contribution to total activity carried by reactor coolant. The implications for plant operations are discussed. 16 refs., 55 figs., 24 tabs.

  16. Look before You Loop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellis, Marilyn

    1999-01-01

    Explores looping, which involves one teacher staying with the same group of children for more than one year. Recognizes that, with today's changing demographics, looping can be a way to foster a family-like classroom atmosphere. Discusses advantages and disadvantages to looping. Includes a chart of looping opportunities and considerations;…

  17. Spectrophotometric Procedure for Fast Reactor Advanced Coolant Manufacture Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrienko, O. S.; Egorov, N. B.; Zherin, I. I.; Indyk, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a spectrophotometric procedure for fast reactor advanced coolant manufacture control. The molar absorption coefficient of dimethyllead dibromide with dithizone was defined as equal to 68864 ± 795 l·mole-1·cm-1, limit of detection as equal to 0.583 · 10-6 g/ml. The spectrophotometric procedure application range was found to be equal to 37.88 - 196.3 g. of dimethyllead dibromide in the sample. The procedure was used within the framework of the development of the method of synthesis of the advanced coolant for fast reactors.

  18. Code System to Calculate Reactor Coolant System Leak Rate.

    1999-10-19

    Version 00 RCSLK9 was developed to analyze the leak tightness of the primary coolant system for any pressurized water reactor (PWR). From given system conditions, water levels in tanks, and certain system design parameters, RCSLK9 calculates the loss of water from the reactor coolant system (RCS) and the increase of water in the leakage collection system during an arbitrary time interval. The program determines the system leak rates and displays or prints a report ofmore » the results. During the initial application to a specific reactor, RCSLK9 creates a file of system parameters and saves it for future use.« less

  19. Development of Figure of Merits (FOMs) for Intermediate Coolant Characterization and Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Eung Soo Kim; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson

    2011-06-01

    This paper focuses on characterization of several coolant performances in the IHTL. There are lots of choices available for the IHTL coolants; gases, liquid metals, molten salts, and etc. Traditionally, the selection of coolants is highly dependent on engineer's experience and decisions. In this decision, the following parameters are generally considered: melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. The followings are general thermal-hydraulic requirements for the coolant in the IHTL: (1) High heat transfer performance - The IHTL coolant should exhibit high heat transfer performance to achieve high efficiency and economics; (2) Low pumping power - The IHTL coolant requires low pumping power to improve economics through less stringent pump requirements; (3) Low amount of coolant volume - The IHTL coolant requires less coolant volume for better economics; (4) Low amount of structural materials - The IHTL coolant requires less structural material volume for better economics; (5) Low heat loss - The IHTL requires less heat loss for high efficiency; and (6) Low temperature drop - The IHTL should allow less temperature drop for high efficiency. Typically, heat transfer coolants are selected based on various fluid properties such as melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. However, the selection process & results are highly dependent on the engineer's personal experience and skills. In the coolant selection, if a certain coolant shows superior properties with respect to the others, the decision will be very straightforward. However, generally, each coolant material exhibits good characteristics for some properties but poor for the others. Therefore, it will be very useful to have some figures of merits (FOMs), which can represent and quantify various coolant thermal performances in the system of interest. The study summarized in this

  20. PWR full-reactor coolant system decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, R.G.; Pessall, N.; Grand, T.F. )

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the current program is to identify and address all aspects of full system decontamination with the purpose of qualifying at least one process for PWR use. The objective of the current study is to provide baseline data on the performance of materials on the primary side after exposure to one cycle of the LOMI fault testing. This data supplements prior information obtained after exposure to three cycles of LOMI testing. The technical significance of this excursion will be determined in a subsequent task. The general corrosion characteristics of over 39 materials were evaluated for some combinations of material, type of specimen (coupon and creviced coupons), and loop velocity (0, 5, 20 and 150 ft/sec). At velocities of less than or equal to 20 ft/sec, sixteen types of specimens were employed to evaluate localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Specimens were examined after one cycle. Also included in this exposure were specimens added to provide more information on the effect of LOMI fault exposure one: (1) surface roughening of Stellite 156; (2) crevice corrosion of chromium plated 304 stainless steel with the open end gap increased from 3 to {approximately} 9 mils; (3) susceptibility of Inconel X-750 (HTH) to subsequent stress corrosion cracking, (4) loss of chromium plate from threads of 304 stainless steel bolts torqued into stainless steel collars; (5) crack initiation in an Alloy 600 tube known to be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking; and (6) surface alternation of stressed Inconel X-750 springs with the spring temper.

  1. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  2. OPE for super loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro; Wang, Tianheng

    2011-11-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion for Null Polygon Wilson loops to the Mason-Skinner-Caron-Huot super loop dual to non MHV gluon amplitudes. We explain how the known tree level amplitudes can be promoted into an infinite amount of data at any loop order in the OPE picture. As an application, we re-derive all one loop NMHV six gluon amplitudes by promoting their tree level expressions. We also present some new all loops predictions for these amplitudes.

  3. The preprocessed doacross loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.; Mirchandaney, Ravi

    1990-01-01

    Dependencies between loop iterations cannot always be characterized during program compilation. Doacross loops typically make use of a-priori knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies to carry out required synchronizations. A type of doacross loop is proposed that allows the scheduling of iterations of a loop among processors without advance knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies. The method proposed for loop iterations requires that parallelizable preprocessing and postprocessing steps be carried out during program execution.

  4. 14 CFR 23.1063 - Coolant tank tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Coolant tank tests. 23.1063 Section 23.1063 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Liquid Cooling §...

  5. Coolant Characteristics and Control in Direct Chill Casting

    SciTech Connect

    2001-10-01

    This project focuses on understanding the fundamentals of coolant behavior and developing strategies to control the cooling rate of DC casting of aluminum ingots. Project partners will conduct a fundamental study to identify various parameters affecting critical heat flux and boiling transition and evaluate the effects of various additives (impurity particulates, sodium and calcium salts, carbonates, bicarbonates, surfactants, etc.).

  6. Integral coolant channels supply made by melt-out method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escher, W. J. D.

    1964-01-01

    Melt-out method of constructing strong, pressure-tight fluid coolant channels for chambers is accomplished by cementing pins to the surface and by depositing a melt-out material on the surface followed by two layers of epoxy-resin impregnated glass fibers. The structure is heated to melt out the low-melting alloy.

  7. EVALUATION OF FILTRATION AND DISTILLATION METHODS FOR RECYCLING AUTOMOTIVE COOLANT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants at a New Jersey Department of Transportation garage. The specific recycling units evaluated are based on the technologies of filtrat...

  8. AUTOMOTIVE AND HEAVY-DUTY ENGINE COOLANT RECYCLING BY DISTILLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling automotive and heavy-duty engine coolants for a facility such as the New Jersey Department of Transportation garage in Ewing, New Jersey. he specific recycling evaluated is b...

  9. 37. Upper level, chromate tanks (formerly provided coolant to missile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Upper level, chromate tanks (formerly provided coolant to missile guidance section, retractor cables for lock pin in front of ladder at left - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  10. Fuels, Lubricants, and Coolants. FOS: Fundamentals of Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual on fuels, lubricants, and coolants is one of a series of power mechanics tests and visual aids on automotive and off-the-road agricultural and construction equipment. Materials present basic information with illustrations for use by vocational students and teachers as well as shop servicemen and laymen. Focusing on fuels, the first of…

  11. Corrosion of structural materials by lead-based reactor coolants.

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D. P.; Leibowitz, L.; Maroni, V. A.; McDeavitt, S. M.; Raraz, A. G.

    2000-11-16

    Advanced nuclear reactor design has, in recent years, focused increasingly on the use of heavy-liquid-metal coolants, such as lead and lead-bismuth eutectic. Similarly, programs on accelerator-based transmutation systems have also considered the use of such coolants. Russian experience with heavy-metal coolants for nuclear reactors has lent credence to the validity of this approach. Of significant concern is the compatibility of structural materials with these coolants. We have used a thermal convection-based test method to allow exposure of candidate materials to molten lead and lead-bismuth flowing under a temperature gradient. The gradient was deemed essential in evaluating the behavior of the test materials in that should preferential dissolution of components of the test material occur we would expect dissolution in the hotter regions and deposition in the colder regions, thus promoting material transport. Results from the interactions of a Si-rich mild steel alloy, AISI S5, and a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel, HT-9, with the molten lead-bismuth are presented.

  12. Experimental interaction of magma and “dirty” coolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, C. Ian; White, James D. L.; Zimanowski, Bernd; Büttner, Ralf; Sonder, Ingo; Schmid, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    The presence of water at volcanic vents can have dramatic effects on fragmentation and eruption dynamics, but little is known about how the presence of particulate matter in external water will further alter eruptions. Volcanic edifices are inherently “dirty” places, where particulate matter of multiple origins and grainsizes typically abounds. We present the results of experiments designed to simulate non-explosive interactions between molten basalt and various “coolants,” ranging from homogeneous suspensions of 0 to 30 mass% bentonite clay in pure water, to heterogeneous and/or stratified suspensions including bentonite, sand, synthetic glass beads and/or naturally-sorted pumice. Four types of data are used to characterise the interactions: (1) visual/video observations; (2) grainsize and morphology of resulting particles; (3) heat-transfer data from a network of eight thermocouples; and (4) acoustic data from three force sensors. In homogeneous coolants with <~10% bentonite, heat transfer is by convection, and the melt is efficiently fragmented into blocky particles through multiple thermal granulation events which produce associated acoustic signals. For all coolants with >~20% sediment, heat transfer is by forced convection and conduction, and thermal granulation is less efficient, resulting in fewer blocky particles, larger grainsizes, and weaker acoustic signals. Many particles are droplet-shaped or/and “vesicular,” containing bubbles filled with coolant. Both of these particle types indicate significant hydrodynamic magma-coolant mingling, and many of them are rewelded into compound particles. The addition of coarse material to heterogeneous suspensions further slows heat transfer thus reducing thermal granulation, and variable interlocking of large particles prevents efficient hydrodynamic mingling. This results primarily in rewelded melt piles and inefficient distribution of melt and heat throughout the coolant volume. Our results indicate

  13. Mechanism of Improvement Effect of Ultrasonically Activated Coolant on Finished Surface Roughness in Cylindrical Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Haruhisa; Kajiwara, Kunio; Shimizu, Shinji; Ohmori, Shigetoshi

    The use of an ultrasonically activated coolant improves the roughness of a ground surface compared with that of an ordinary coolant. By evaluating the change in working surface conditions, it has been clarified that the ultrasonically activated coolant suppresses loading and wheel wear, and maintains a good the working surface condition. The flushing effect of the ultrasonically activated coolant, promoted by giant vibration acceleration, prevents the deposition and welding of chips on the working surface. Since the density of kinetic energy in the coolant stream increases, the activation helps the coolant to overcome the airflow due to wheel rotation and to reach the grinding point efficiently. This promotes the cooling and lubricating effects of coolant, and then protects the cutting edges from crushing, falling off and dulling. On the basis of the results, it can be said that the effects of coolant activation suppress the generation of scratches, and consequently improve the finished surface roughness.

  14. Modular Porous Plate Sublimator /MPPS/ requires only water supply for coolant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Modular porous plate sublimators, provided for each location where heat must be dissipated, conserve the battery power of a space vehicle by eliminating the coolant pump. The sublimator requires only a water supply for coolant.

  15. Loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the Savannah River new production reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Maloney, K.J.; Pryor, R.J.

    1990-11-01

    This document contains the loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the representative design for the Savannah River heavy water new production reactor. Included in this document are descriptions of the primary system, reactor vessel, and loss-of-coolant accident computer input models, the results of the cold leg and hot leg loss-of-coolant accident analyses, and the results of sensitivity calculations for the cold leg loss-of-coolant accident. 5 refs., 50 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Surface Treatment to Improve Corrosion Resistance in Lead-Alloy Coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R. Allen; Kumar Sridharan; McLean T. Machut; Lizhen Tan

    2007-08-29

    One of the six proposed advanced reactor designs of the Generation IV Initiative, the Leadcooled Fast Reactor (LFR) possesses many characteristics that make it a desirable candidate for future nuclear energy production and responsible actinide management. These characteristics include favorable heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and neutronic performance compared to other candidate coolants. However, the use of a heavy liquid metal coolant presents a challenge for reactor designers in regards to reliable structural and fuel cladding materials in both a highly corrosive high temperature liquid metal and an intense radiation fieldi. Flow corrosion studies at the University of Wisconsin have examined the corrosion performance of candidate materials for application in the LFR concept as well as the viability of various surface treatments to improve the materials’ compatibility. To date this research has included several focus areas, which include the formulation of an understanding of corrosion mechanisms and the examination of the effects of chemical and mechanical surface modifications on the materials’ performance in liquid lead-bismuth by experimental testing in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s DELTA Loop, as well as comparison of experimental findings to numerical and physical models for long term corrosion prediction. This report will first review the literature and introduce the experiments and data that will be used to benchmark theoretical calculations. The experimental results will be followed by a brief review of the underlying theory and methodology for the physical and theoretical models. Finally, the results of theoretical calculations as well as experimentally obtained benchmarks and comparisons to the literature are presented.

  17. Airlock caution and warning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayfield, W. J.; Cork, L. Z.; Malchow, R. G.; Hornback, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    Caution and warning system, used to monitor performance and warn of hazards or out-of-limit conditions on space vehicles, may have application to aircraft and railway transit systems. System consists of caution and warning subsystem and emergency subsystem.

  18. Conveyor with rotary airlock apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-04-11

    An apparatus is described for transferring objects from a first region to a second, the first and second regions having differing atmospheric environments. The apparatus includes a shell having an entrance and an exit, a conveyor belt running through the shell from the entrance to the exit, and a horizontally mounted ``revolving door`` with at least four vanes revolving about its axis. The inner surface of the shell and the top surface of the conveyor belt act as opposing walls of the revolving door. The conveyor belt dips as it passes under but against the revolving vanes so as not to interfere with them but to engage at least two of the vanes and define thereby a moving chamber. Preferably, the conveyor belt has ridges or grooves on its surface that engage the edges of the vanes and act to rotate the vane assembly. Conduits are provided that communicate with the interior of the shell and allow the adjustment of the atmosphere of the moving chamber or recovery of constituents of the atmosphere of the first region from the moving chamber before they escape to the second region. 8 figures.

  19. Conveyor with rotary airlock apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronbert, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus for transferring objects from a first region to a second region, the first and second regions having differing atmospheric environments. The apparatus includes a shell having an entrance and an exit, a conveyer belt running through the shell from the entrance to the exit, and a horizontally mounted `revolving door` with at least four vanes revolving about its axis. The inner surface of the shell and the top surface of the conveyer belt act as opposing walls of the `revolving door`. The conveyer belt dips as it passes under but against the revolving vanes so as not to interfere with them but to engage at least two of the vanes and define thereby a moving chamber. Preferably, the conveyer belt has ridges or grooves on its surface that engage the edges of the vanes and act to rotate the vane assembly. Conduits are provided that communicate with the interior of the shell and allow the adjustment of the atmosphere of the moving chamber or recovery of constituents of the atmosphere of the first region from the moving chamber before they escape to the second region.

  20. Conveyor with rotary airlock apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus for transferring objects from a first region to a second reg, the first and second regions having differing atmospheric environments. The apparatus includes a shell having an entrance and an exit, a conveyor belt running through the shell from the entrance to the exit, and a horizontally mounted "revolving door" with at least four vanes revolving about its axis. The inner surface of the shell and the top surface of the conveyor belt act as opposing walls of the "revolving door." The conveyor belt dips as it passes under but against the revolving vanes so as not to interfere with them but to engage at least two of the vanes and define thereby a moving chamber. Preferably, the conveyor belt has ridges or grooves on its surface that engage the edges of the vanes and act to rotate the vane assembly. Conduits are provided that communicate with the interior of the shell and allow the adjustment of the atmosphere of the moving chamber or recovery of constituents of the atmosphere of the first region from the moving chamber before they escape to the second region.

  1. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high point vents for the reactor coolant system, for the reactor vessel head, and for other systems...

  2. Copper-triazole interaction and coolant inhibitor depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, L.S.; Fritz, P.O.; Pellet, R.J.; Taylor, S.A.; Van de Ven, P.

    1999-08-01

    To a large extent, the depletion of tolyltriazole (TTZ) observed in several field tests may be attributed to the formation of a protective copper-triazole layer. Laboratory aging studies, shown to correlate with field experience, reveal that copper-TTZ layer formation depletes coolant TTZ levels in a fashion analogous to changes observed in the field. XPS and TPD-MS characterization of the complex formed indicates a strong chemical bond between copper and the adsorbed TTZ which can be desorbed thermally only at elevated temperatures. Electrochemical polarization experiments indicate that the layer provides good copper protection even when TTZ is absent from the coolant phase. Examination of copper cooling system components obtained after extensive field use reveals the presence of a similar protective layer.

  3. Health physics aspects of processing EBR-I coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, L.L.; Thalgott, J.O.; Poston, J.W. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    The sodium-potassium reactor coolant removed from the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One after a partial reactor core meltdown had been stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for 40 years. The State of Idaho considered this waste the most hazardous waste stored in the state and required its processing. The reactor coolant was processed in three phases. The first phase converted the alkali metal into a liquid sodium-potassium hydroxide. The second phase converted this caustic to a liquid sodium-potassium carbonate. The third phase solidified the sodium-potassium carbonate into a form acceptable for land disposal. Health physics aspects and dose received during each phase of the processing are discussed.

  4. Hybrid method for numerical modelling of LWR coolant chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatla-Wojcik, Dorota

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive approach is proposed to model radiation chemistry of the cooling water under exposure to neutron and gamma radiation at 300 °C. It covers diffusion-kinetic processes in radiation tracks and secondary reactions in the bulk coolant. Steady-state concentrations of the radiolytic products have been assessed based on the simulated time dependent concentration profiles. The principal reactions contributing to the formation of H2, O2 and H2O2 were indicated. Simulation was carried out depending on the amount of extra hydrogen dissolved in the coolant to reduce concentration of corrosive agents. High sensitivity to the rate of reaction H+H2O=OH+H2 is shown and discussed.

  5. 92. View of transmitter building no. 102 first floor coolant ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. View of transmitter building no. 102 first floor coolant process water tanks (sodium bisulfate solution), stainless steel, for electronic systems cooling in transmitter and MIP rooms. RCA Services Company 29 September, 1960, official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photograph, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-1226 - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Singer, Ralph M.; Humenik, Keith E.

    1993-01-01

    An expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

  7. Evaluation of organic moderator/coolants for fusion breeder blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, J.B.

    1980-03-01

    Organic coolants have several attractive features for fusion breeder blanket design. Their apparent compatibility with lithium and their ideal physical and nuclear properties allows straight-forward, high performance designs. Radiolytic damage can be reduced to about the same order as comparable fission systems by using multiplier/stripper blanket designs. Tritium recovery from the organic should be straightforward, but additional data is needed to make a better assessment of the economics of the process.

  8. Coolant Design System for Liquid Propellant Aerospike Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Miranda; Branam, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engines burn at incredibly high temperatures making it difficult to design an effective coolant system. These particular engines prove to be extremely useful by powering the rocket with a variable thrust that is ideal for space travel. When combined with aerospike engine nozzles, which provide maximum thrust efficiency, this class of rockets offers a promising future for rocketry. In order to troubleshoot the problems that high combustion chamber temperatures pose, this research took a computational approach to heat analysis. Chambers milled into the combustion chamber walls, lined by a copper cover, were tested for their efficiency in cooling the hot copper wall. Various aspect ratios and coolants were explored for the maximum wall temperature by developing our own MATLAB code. The code uses a nodal temperature analysis with conduction and convection equations and assumes no internal heat generation. This heat transfer research will show oxygen is a better coolant than water, and higher aspect ratios are less efficient at cooling. This project funded by NSF REU Grant 1358991.

  9. A Case Study Of Applying Infrared Thermography To Identify A Coolant Leak In A Municipal Ice Skating Rink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Jay R.

    1989-03-01

    This paper deals with the application of infrared imaging radiometry as a diagnostic inspection tool for locating a concealed leak in the refrigeration system supplying glycol coolant to the arena floor of an ice skating rink in a municipal coliseum facility. Scanning approximately 10 miles of black iron tubing embedded in the arena floor resulted in locating a leak within the supply/return side of the system. A secondary disclosure was a restriction to normal coolant flow in some delivery loops caused by sludge build-up. Specific inspection procedures were established to enhance temperature differentials suitable for good thermal imaging. One procedure utilized the temperature and pressure of the city water supply; a second the availability of 130F hot water from the facility's boiler system; and a third the building's own internal ambient temperature. Destructive testing and other data collection equipment confirmed the thermographic findings revealing a section of corrosion damaged pipe. Repair and flushing of the system was quickly completed with a minimum of construction costs and inconvenience. No financial losses were incurred due to the interruption of scheduled revenue events. Probable cause for the shutdown condition was attributed to a flawed installation decision made 15 years earlier during the initial construction stage.

  10. Effect of Coolant Temperature and Mass Flow on Film Cooling of Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier Stokes code has been used to study the effect of coolant temperature, and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness of a film-cooled turbine blade. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with six rows of cooling holes including three rows on the shower head. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. Generally, the adiabatic effectiveness is lower for a higher coolant temperature due to nonlinear effects via the compressibility of air. However, over the suction side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness is higher for a higher coolant temperature than that for a lower coolant temperature when the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio is 5% or more. For a fixed coolant temperature, the effectiveness passes through a minima on the suction side of shower-head holes as the coolant to mainstream mass flow, ratio increases, while on the pressure side of shower-head holes, the effectiveness decreases with increase in coolant mass flow due to coolant jet lift-off. In all cases, the adiabatic effectiveness is highly three-dimensional.

  11. Heat transfer characteristics for some coolant additives used for water cooled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ziyan, H.Z.; Helali, A.H.B.

    1996-12-31

    Engine coolants contain certain additives to prevent engine overheating or coolant freezing in cold environments. Coolants, also, contain corrosion and rust inhibitors, among other additives. As most engines are using engine cooling solutions, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of engine coolants on the boiling heat transfer coefficient. This has its direct impact on radiator size and environment. This paper describes the apparatus and the measurement techniques. Also, it presents the obtained boiling heat transfer results at different parameters. Three types of engine coolants and their mixtures in distilled water are evaluated, under sub-cooled and saturated boiling conditions. A profound effect of the presence of additives in the coolant, on heat transfer, was clear since changes of heat transfer for different coolants were likely to occur. The results showed that up to 180% improvement of boiling heat transfer coefficient is experienced with some types of coolants. However, at certain concentrations other coolants provide deterioration or not enhancement in the boiling heat transfer characteristics. This investigation proved that there are limitations, which are to be taken into consideration, for the composition of engine coolants in different environments. In warm climates, ethylene glycol should be kept at the minimum concentration required for dissolving other components, whereas borax is beneficial to the enhancement of the heat transfer characteristics.

  12. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    DOE PAGES

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y. -J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, III, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-06-29

    In this study, the corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted inmore » the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.« less

  13. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Pint, B. A.; Kim, Y.-J.; Unocic, K. A.; Yang, Y.; Silva, C. M.; Meyer, H. M.; Rebak, R. B.

    2016-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. The maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ∼2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ∼300-500 μm thick cladding.

  14. Large break loss of coolant severe accident sequences at the HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, D.B.; Greene, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    An assessment of many potential HFIR severe accident phenomena was conducted during the HFIR design effort, and many severe accident mitigating features were designed into the plant. These evaluation typically incorporated a bounding'' or highly conservative analysis approach and employed tools and techniques representative of the state of knowledge in the mid-1960s. Recently, programs to address severe accident issues were initiated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support the HFIR probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and equipment qualification and accident management studies. This paper presents the results of environment condition calculations conducted to evaluate a response of HFIR's heat exchanger cell environment to a double-ended rupture of a 0.25 m diameter coolant loop downstream of the circulating pump and check valve. The confinement calculations were performed using an atmospheric fission product source for the heat exchanger cell consistent with, but more conservative than that stipulated in Regulatory Guide 1.89. The results of the calculations indicate that the heat exchanger cell atmospheric temperature peaks at 377 K 225 seconds into the transient and then begins decreasing at approximately 1.7 K per minute. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  15. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998-2014

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 25 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  16. Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ingley, H A

    1980-02-01

    It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)

  17. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998–2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John Alton

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 25 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  18. System Study: High-Pressure Coolant Injection 1998-2012

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCI) at 69 U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCI results.

  19. Cryogenic-coolant He4-superconductor dynamic and static interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspi, S.; Chuang, C.; Kim, Y. I.; Allen, R. J.; Frederking, T. H. E.

    1980-01-01

    A composite superconducting material (NbTi-Cu) was evaluated with emphasis on post quench solid cooling interaction regimes. The quasi-steady runs confirm the existence of a thermodynamic limiting thickness for insulating coatings. Two distinctly different post quench regimes of coated composites are shown to relate to the limiting thickness. Only one regime,, from quench onset to the peak value, revealed favorable coolant states, in particular in He2. Transient recovery shows favorable recovery times from this post quench regime (not drastically different from bare conductors) for both single coated specimens and a coated conductor bundle.

  20. Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition

    SciTech Connect

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-06

    The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and {sup 208}Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

  1. Load following capability of CANDLE reactor by adjusting coolant operation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Sinsuke

    2012-06-01

    The load following capability of CANDLE reactor is investigated in the condition that the control rods are unavailable. Both sodium cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (SFR) and 208Pb cooled metallic fuel fast reactor (LFR) are investigated for their performance in power rate changing by changing its coolant operation condition; either coolant flow rate or coolant inlet temperature. The change by coolant flow rate is difficult especially for SFR because the maximum temperature criteria on cladding material may be violated. The power rate can be changed for its full range easily by changing the coolant temperature at the core inlet. LFR can reduce the same amount of power rate by smaller change of temperature than SFR. However, the coolant output temperature is generally decreased for this method and the thermal efficiency becomes worse.

  2. Aerodynamic effect of coolant ejection in the rear part of transonic rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kost, F. H.; Holmes, A. T.

    1985-09-01

    An investigation of transonic turbine blades designed by Rolls-Royce/Bristol concerning the aerodynamic penalties of coolant flow for two alternative cooling configurations is discussed. Rolls-Royce designed a blade with a thick trailing edge where the coolant is ejected through slots in the trailing edge and a second blade with a thin trailing edge where coolant is ejected through a row of holes on the pressure side and a row of holes on the suction side. Tests were performed in a plane cascade wind tunnel. The results indicate the sensitivity of the blade performance to cooling configuration and coolant flow rate. By combining measured data from blade surface and wake traverses it was possible to separate the various loss mechanisms. Therefore, the separate losses due to the momentum of the coolant, change of base pressure, and change of blade friction could be determined quantitatively as a function of coolant flow rate.

  3. Optimization of the water chemistry of the primary coolant at nuclear power plants with VVER

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, L. F.; Kruglova, T. K.; Sinitsyn, V. P.

    2005-01-15

    Results of the use of automatic hydrogen-content meter for controlling the parameter of 'hydrogen' in the primary coolant circuit of the Kola nuclear power plant are presented. It is shown that the correlation between the 'hydrogen' parameter in the coolant and the 'hydrazine' parameter in the makeup water can be used for controlling the water chemistry of the primary coolant system, which should make it possible to optimize the water chemistry at different power levels.

  4. ACHIEVING THE REQUIRED COOLANT FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM (APT) TUNGSTEN NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    D. SIEBE; K. PASAMEHMETOGLU

    2000-11-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium neutron source consists of clad tungsten targets, which are concentric cylinders with a center rod. These targets are arranged in a matrix of tubes, producing a large number of parallel coolant paths. The coolant flow required to meet thermal-hydraulic design criteria varies with location. This paper describes the work performed to ensure an adequate coolant flow for each target for normal operation and residual heat-removal conditions.

  5. Viscosity of alumina nanoparticles dispersed in car engine coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Madhusree; Dey, T.K.

    2010-09-15

    The present paper, describes our experimental results on the viscosity of the nanofluid prepared by dispersing alumina nanoparticles (<50 nm) in commercial car coolant. The nanofluid prepared with calculated amount of oleic acid (surfactant) was tested to be stable for more than 80 days. The viscosity of the nanofluids is measured both as a function of alumina volume fraction and temperature between 10 and 50 C. While the pure base fluid display Newtonian behavior over the measured temperature, it transforms to a non-Newtonian fluid with addition of a small amount of alumina nanoparticles. Our results show that viscosity of the nanofluid increases with increasing nanoparticle concentration and decreases with increase in temperature. Most of the frequently used classical models severely under predict the measured viscosity. Volume fraction dependence of the nanofluid viscosity, however, is predicted fairly well on the basis of a recently reported theoretical model for nanofluids that takes into account the effect of Brownian motion of nanoparticles in the nanofluid. The temperature dependence of the viscosity of engine coolant based alumina nanofluids obeys the empirical correlation of the type: log ({mu}{sub nf}) = A exp(BT), proposed earlier by Namburu et al. (author)

  6. Development of mobile, on-site engine coolant recycling utilizing reverse-osmosis technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kughn, W.; Eaton, E.R.

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents the history of the development of self-contained, mobile, high-volume, engine coolant recycling by reverse osmosis (R/O). It explains the motivations, created by government regulatory agencies, to minimize the liability of waste generators who produce waste engine coolant by providing an engine coolant recycling service at the customer`s location. Recycling the used engine coolant at the point of origin minimizes the generators` exposure to documentation requirements, liability, and financial burdens by greatly reducing the volume of used coolant that must be hauled from the generator`s property. It describes the inherent difficulties of recycling such a highly contaminated, inconsistent input stream, such as used engine coolant, by reverse osmosis. The paper reports how the difficulties were addressed, and documents the state of the art in mobile R/O technology. Reverse osmosis provides a purified intermediate fluid that is reinhibited for use in automotive cooling systems. The paper offers a review of experiences in various automotive applications, including light-duty, medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles operating on many types of fuel. The authors conclude that mobile embodiments of R/O coolant recycling technology provide finished coolants that perform equivalently to new coolants as demonstrated by their ability to protect vehicles from freezing, corrosion damage, and other cooling system related problems.

  7. An Innovative Hybrid Loop-Pool Design for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang

    2007-11-01

    The existing sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) have two types of designs – loop type and pool type. In the loop type design, such as JOYO (Japan) [1] and MONJU (Japan), the primary coolant is circulated through intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) external to the reactor tank. The major advantages of loop design include compactness and easy maintenance. The disadvantage is higher possibility of sodium leakage. In the pool type design such as EBR-II (USA), BN-600M(Russia), Superphénix (France) and European Fast Reactor [2], the reactor core, primary pumps, IHXs and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) heat exchangers (DHX) all are immersed in a pool of sodium coolant within the reactor vessel, making a loss of primary coolant extremely unlikely. However, the pool type design makes primary system large. In the latest ANL’s Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design [3], the primary system is configured in a pool-type arrangement. The hot sodium at core outlet temperature in hot pool is separated from the cold sodium at core inlet temperature in cold pool by a single integrated structure called Redan. Redan provides the exchange of the hot sodium from hot pool to cold pool through IHXs. The IHXs were chosen as the traditional tube-shell design. This type of IHXs is large in size and hence large reactor vessel is needed.

  8. Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    C. H. Oh; C. Davis; S. Sherman

    2008-08-01

    A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic and cycleefficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. This paper also includes a portion of stress analyses performed on pipe configurations.

  9. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  10. Thermal power loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottschlich, Joseph M.; Richter, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The concept of a thermal power loop (TPL) to transport thermal power over relatively large distances is presented as an alternative to heat pipes and their derivatives. The TPL is compared to heat pipes, and capillary pumped loops with respect to size, weight, conservation of thermal potential, start-up, and 1-g testing capability. Test results from a proof of feasibility demonstrator at the NASA JPL are discussed. This analysis demonstrates that the development of specific thermal power loops will result in substantial weight and cost savings for many spacecraft.

  11. Multiprotein DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose M. G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2006-06-01

    DNA looping plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of biological processes, providing the backbone for long range interactions on DNA. Here we develop the first model for DNA looping by an arbitrarily large number of proteins and solve it analytically in the case of identical binding. We uncover a switchlike transition between looped and unlooped phases and identify the key parameters that control this transition. Our results establish the basis for the quantitative understanding of fundamental cellular processes like DNA recombination, gene silencing, and telomere maintenance.

  12. Natively Unstructured Loops Differ from Other Loops

    PubMed Central

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%–70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein–protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  13. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-07-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  14. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  15. Effect of coolant flow ejection on aerodynamic performance of low-aspect-ratio vanes. 2: Performance with coolant flow ejection at temperature ratios up to 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a 0.5 aspect ratio turbine vane configuration with coolant flow ejection was experimentally determined in a full annular cascade. The vanes were tested at a nominal mean section ideal critical velocity ratio of 0.890 over a range of primary to coolant total temperature ratio from 1.0 to 2.08 and a range of coolant to primary total pressure ratio from 1.0 to 1.4 which corresponded to coolant flows from 3.0 to 10.7 percent of the primary flow. The variations in primary and thermodynamic efficiency and exit flow conditions with circumferential and radial position were obtained.

  16. Measuring flow and pressure of lithium coolant under developmental testing of a high-temperature cooling system of a space nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. Ya.; Sinyavsky, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Sub-megawatt space NPP use lithium as a coolant and niobium alloy as a structural material. In order to refine the lithium-niobium technology of the material and design engineering, lithium-niobium loops were worked out in RSC Energia, and they were tested at a working temperature of lithium equal to 1070-1300 K. In order to measure the lithium flow and pressure, special gauges were developed, which made possible the calibration and checkout of the loops without their dismantling. The paper describes the architecture of the electromagnetic flowmeter and the electromagnetic vibrating-wire pressure transducer (gauge) for lithium coolant in the nuclear power plant cooling systems. The operating principles of these meters are presented. Flowmeters have been developed for channel diameters ranging from 10 to 100 mm, which are capable of measuring lithium flows in the range of 0.1 to 30 L/s with the error of 3% for design calibration and 1% for volume graduation. The temperature error of the pressure transducers does not exceed 0.4% per 100 K; the nonlinearity and hysteresis of the calibration curve do not exceed 0.3 and 0.4%, respectively. The transducer applications are illustrated by the examples of results obtained from tests on the NPP module mockup and heat pipes of a radiation cooler.

  17. Blind loop syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... operations for extreme obesity As a complication of inflammatory bowel disease Diseases such as diabetes or scleroderma may slow down movement in a segment of the intestine, leading to blind loop syndrome.

  18. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Robotic inspection of PWR coolant pump casing welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, W.R.; Alford, J.W.; Davis, J.B.

    1997-12-01

    As of January 1, 1995, the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate began requiring more thorough inspections of cast stainless-steel components in nuclear power plants, including pressurized water reactor (PWR) reactor coolant pump (RCP) casings. The examination requirements are established by fracture mechanics analyses of component weldments and demonstrated test system detection capabilities. This may include full volumetric inspection or some portion thereof. Ringhals station is a four-unit nuclear power plant, owned and operated by the Swedish State Power Board, Vattenfall. Unit 1 is a boiling water reactor. Units 2, 3, and 4 are Westinghouse-designed PWRs, ranging in size from 795 to 925 MW. The RCP casings at the PWR units are made of cast stainless steel and contain four circumferential welds that require inspection. Due to the thickness of the casings at the weld locations and configuration and surface conditions on the outside diameter of the casings, remote inspection from the inside diameter of the pump casing was mandated.

  20. Fusion Blanket Coolant Section Criteria, Methodology, and Results

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, J. A.; Meier, W. R.; Jolodosky, A.; Frantoni, M.; Reyes, S.

    2015-10-02

    The focus of this LDRD was to explore potential Li alloys that would meet the tritium breeding and blanket cooling requirements but with reduced chemical reactivity, while maintaining the other attractive features of pure Li breeder/coolant. In other fusion approaches (magnetic fusion energy or MFE), 17Li- 83Pb alloy is used leveraging Pb’s ability to maintain high TBR while lowering the levels of lithium in the system. Unfortunately this alloy has a number of potential draw-backs. Due to the high Pb content, this alloy suffers from very high average density, low tritium solubility, low system energy, and produces undesirable activation products in particular polonium. The criteria considered in the selection of a tritium breeding alloy are described in the following section.

  1. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2016-04-26

    Cooling apparatuses are provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The cooling apparatus includes the cold plate and a controller. The cold plate couples to one or more electronic components to be cooled, and includes an adjustable physical configuration. The controller dynamically varies the adjustable physical configuration of the cold plate based on a monitored variable associated with the cold plate or the electronic component(s) being cooled by the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the electronic component(s), and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  2. Choking loops on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Tong, Yiying

    2013-08-01

    We present a method for computing "choking" loops--a set of surface loops that describe the narrowing of the volumes inside/outside of the surface and extend the notion of surface homology and homotopy loops. The intuition behind their definition is that a choking loop represents the region where an offset of the original surface would get pinched. Our generalized loops naturally include the usual 2g handles/tunnels computed based on the topology of the genus-g surface, but also include loops that identify chokepoints or bottlenecks, i.e., boundaries of small membranes separating the inside or outside volume of the surface into disconnected regions. Our definition is based on persistent homology theory, which gives a measure to topological structures, thus providing resilience to noise and a well-defined way to determine topological feature size. More precisely, the persistence computed here is based on the lower star filtration of the interior or exterior 3D domain with the distance field to the surface being the associated 3D Morse function. PMID:23744260

  3. A method for measuring cooling air flow in base coolant passages of rotating turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Pollack, F. G.

    1975-01-01

    Method accurately determines actual coolant mass flow rate in cooling passages of rotating turbine blades. Total and static pressures are measured in blade base coolant passages. Mass flow rates are calculated from these measurements of pressure, measured temperature and known area.

  4. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION...

  5. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION...

  6. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION...

  7. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. Each nuclear power reactor must be provided with high... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION...

  8. Nonflammable coolants for space vehicle environmental control systems Compatibility of component materials with selected dielectric fluids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R. T.; Korpolinski, T. S.; Mace, E. W.

    1971-01-01

    This paper summarizes a 4-year effort to evaluate and implement a nonflammable substitute coolant for application in the Saturn instrument unit (IU) environmental control system (ECS). Discussed are candidate material evaluations, detailed investigations of the properties of the coolant selected, and a summary of the implementation into a flight vehicle.

  9. MTR, TRA603. FOUNDATION PLAN, SECTION C THROUGH COOLANT WATER EXIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. FOUNDATION PLAN, SECTION C THROUGH COOLANT WATER EXIT TUNNEL ALONG NORTH SIDE AS IT RETURNS TO MAIN COOLANT TUNNEL LEAVING BUILDING TO THE NORTH. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-35, 5/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-62-098-100591, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Using automatic particle counting to monitor aluminum cold mill coolant{copyright}

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    A comprehensive program of testing and evaluation of aluminum cold rolling coolant conditions has been conducted using an automatic particle counting instrument. The project had three objectives. First, there was a need to know at what level of coolant particle contamination is surface cleanliness of an aluminum sheet affected during the rolling process. Secondly, is application of particle counting technology a reliable tool for troubleshooting coolant filtration systems and finally, what are the advantages of analyzing rolling coolants for contamination levels? A testing program was designed and performed over a two-year period. The test results revealed that mineral seal and synthetic-type coolants can begin to affect aluminum sheet surface cleanliness levels when particle sizes greater than five microns are in excess of 10,000 particles power 100 milliliters of rolling coolant. After performing over 3,000 separate tests, it was very clean that particle count levels are direct indicators of how well a filtration facility is performing. Through the application of particle counting, a number of conditions in coolant filtration facilities can be readily detected. Such items as defective filter valving, torn or fractured filter cloth, damaged filter parts, improper equipment operation and many other factors will directly impact the operation of aluminum cold rolling coolant filters. 11 figs.

  11. Investigations of ice formation in the Space Shuttle Main Engine 0209 main injector coolant cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Charklwick, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Severe main combustion chamber wall and main injector baffle element deterioration occurred during tests of Space Shuttle Main Engine 0209. One of the possible causes considered is ice formation and blockage of coolant to these components, resulting from the mixing of leaking hot turbine exhaust gas (hydrogen rich steam) and hydrogen coolant in the injector coolant cavity. The plausibility of ice blockage is investigated through simple mixing calculations for hot gas and hydrogen, investigation of condensation and water droplet formation, calculation of the freezing times for droplets, and the prediction of ice layer thicknesses. It is concluded that condensation and droplet formation can occur, and small water droplets that form can freeze very quickly when in contact with the cold coolant cavity surfaces. Copnservative analysis predicts, however, that the maximum thickness of the ice layers formed is too small to result in significant blockage of the coolant flow.

  12. Engine coolant compatibility with the nonmetals found in automotive cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Greaney, J.P.; Smith, R.A.

    1999-08-01

    High temperature, short term immersion testing was used to determine the impact of propylene and ethylene glycol base coolants on the physical properties of a variety of elastomeric and thermoplastic materials found in automotive cooling systems. The materials tested are typically used in cooling system hoses, radiator end tanks, and water pump seals. Traditional phosphate or borate-buffered silicated coolants as well as extended-life organic acid formulations were included. A modified ASTM protocol was used to carry out the testing both in the laboratory and at an independent testing facility. Post-test fluid chemistry including an analysis of any solids which may have formed is also reported. Coolant impact on elastomer integrity as well as elastomer-induced changes in fluid chemistry were found to be independent of the coolant`s glycol base.

  13. Solar receiver protection means and method for loss of coolant flow

    DOEpatents

    Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preventing a solar receiver (12) utilizing a flowing coolant liquid for removing heat energy therefrom from overheating after a loss of coolant flow. Solar energy is directed to the solar receiver (12) by a plurality of reflectors (16) which rotate so that they direct solar energy to the receiver (12) as the earth rotates. The apparatus disclosed includes a first storage tank (30) for containing a first predetermined volume of the coolant and a first predetermined volume of gas at a first predetermined pressure. The first storage tank (30) includes an inlet and outlet through which the coolant can enter and exit. The apparatus also includes a second storage tank (34) for containing a second predetermined volume of the coolant and a second predetermined volume of the gas at a second predetermined pressure, the second storage tank (34) having an inlet through which the coolant can enter. The first and second storage tanks (30) and (34) are in fluid communication with each other through the solar receiver (12). The first and second predetermined coolant volumes, the first and second gas volumes, and the first and second predetermined pressures are chosen so that a predetermined volume of the coolant liquid at a predetermined rate profile will flow from the first storage tank (30) through the solar receiver (12) and into the second storage tank (34). Thus, in the event of a power failure so that coolant flow ceases and the solar reflectors (16) stop rotating, a flow rate maintained by the pressure differential between the first and second storage tanks (30) and (34) will be sufficient to maintain the coolant in the receiver (12) below a predetermined upper temperature until the solar reflectors (16) become defocused with respect to the solar receiver (12) due to the earth's rotation.

  14. Solar receiver protection means and method for loss of coolant flow

    DOEpatents

    Glasgow, L.E.

    1980-11-24

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preventing a solar receiver utilizing a flowing coolant liquid for removing heat energy therefrom from overheating after a loss of coolant flow. Solar energy is directed to the solar receiver by a plurality of reflectors which rotate so that they direct solar energy to the receiver as the earth rotates. The apparatus disclosed includes a first storage tank for containing a first predetermined volume of the coolant and a first predetermined volume of gas at a first predetermined pressure. The first storage tank includes an inlet and outlet through which the coolant can enter and exit. The apparatus also includes a second storage tank for containing a second predetermined volume of the coolant and a second predetermined volume of the gas at a second predetermined pressure, the second storage tank having an inlet through which the coolant can enter. The first and second storage tanks are in fluid communication with each other through the solar receiver. The first and second predetermined coolant volumes, the first and second gas volumes, and the first and second predetermined pressures are chosen so that a predetermined volume of the coolant liquid at a predetermined rate profile will flow from the first storage tank through the solar receiver and into the second storage tank. Thus, in the event of a power failure so that coolant flow ceases and the solar reflectors stop rotating, a flow rate maintained by the pressure differential between the first and second storage tanks will be sufficient to maintain the coolant in the receiver below a predetermined upper temperature until the solar reflectors become defocused with respect to the solar receiver due to the earth's rotation.

  15. Characterization of uranium surfaces machined with aqueous propylene glycol-borax or perchloroethylene-mineral oil coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, S.S.; Bennett, R.K. Jr.; Dillon, J.J.; Richards, H.L.; Seals, R.D.; Byrd, V.R.

    1986-12-31

    The use of perchloroethylene (perc) as an ingredient in coolants for machining enriched uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been discontinued because of environmental concerns. A new coolant was substituted in December 1985, which consists of an aqueous solution of propylene glycol with borax (sodium tetraborate) added as a nuclear poison and with a nitrite added as a corrosion inhibitor. Uranium surfaces machined using the two coolants were compared with respects to residual contamination, corrosion or corrosion potential, and with the aqueous propylene glycol-borax coolant was found to be better than that of enriched uranium machined with the perc-mineral oil coolant. The boron residues on the final-finished parts machined with the borax-containing coolant were not sufficient to cause problems in further processing. All evidence indicated that the enriched uranium surfaces machined with the borax-containing coolant will be as satisfactory as those machined with the perc coolant.

  16. Flow in serpentine coolant passages with trip strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, D. G.-N.

    1995-01-01

    Under the subject contract, an effort is being conducted at Scientific Research Associates, Inc. (SRA) to obtain flow field measurements in the coolant passage of a rotating turbine blade with ribbed walls, both in the stationary and rotating frames. The data obtained will be used for validation of computational tools and assessment of turbine blade cooling strategies. The configuration of the turbine blade passage model is given, and the measuring plane locations are given. The model has a four-pass passage with three 180 turns. This geometry was chosen to allow analyses of the velocity measurements corresponding to the heat transfer results obtained by Wagner. Two passes of the passage have a rectangular cross-section of 1.0 in x 0.5 in. Another two passes have a square cross-section of 0.5 in x 0.5 in. Trips with a streamwise pitch to trip height (P/e) = 5 and trip height to coolant passage width (e/Z) = 0.1, were machined along the leading and trailing walls. These dimensions are typical of those used in turbine blade coolant passages. The trips on these walls are staggered by the half-pitch. The trips are skewed at +/- 45 deg, and this allows the effect of trip orientation to be examined. Experiments will be conducted with flow entering the model through the 1.0 in x 0.5 in rectangular passage (Configuration C) and the 0.5 in x 0. 5 in square passage (Configuration D) to examine the effect of passage aspect ratio. Velocity measurements were obtained with a Reynolds number (Re) of 25,000, based on the hydraulic diameter of and bulk mean velocity in the half inch square passage. The coordinate system used in presenting the results for configurations C and D, respectively, is shown. The first, second and third passes of the passage will be referred to as the first, second and third passages, respectively, in later discussion. Streamwise distance (x) from the entrance is normalized by the hydraulic diameter (D). Vertical (y) and tangential (z) distances are

  17. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    SciTech Connect

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  18. Purification of liquid metal systems with sodium coolant from oxygen using getters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, F. A.; Konovalov, M. A.; Sorokin, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    For increasing the safety and economic parameters of nuclear power stations (NPSs) with sodium coolant, it was decided to install all systems contacting radioactive sodium, including purification systems of circuit I, in the reactor vessel. The performance and capacity of cold traps (CTs) (conventional element of coolant purification systems) in these conditions are limited by their volume. It was proposed to use hot traps (HTs) in circuit I for coolant purification from oxygen. It was demonstrated that, at rated parameters of the installation when the temperature of the coolant streamlining the getter (gas absorber) is equal to 550°C, the hot trap can provide the required coolant purity. In shutdown modes at 250-300°C, the performance of the hot trap is reduced by four orders of magnitude. Possible HT operation regimes for shutdown modes and while reaching rated parameters were proposed and analyzed. Basic attention was paid to purification modes at power rise after commissioning and accidental contamination of the coolant when the initial oxygen concentration in it reached 25 mln-1. It was demonstrated that the efficiency of purification systems can be increased using HTs with the getter in the form of a foil or granules. The possibility of implementing the "fast purification" mode in which the coolant is purified simultaneously with passing over from the shutdown mode to the rated parameters was substantiated.

  19. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell performance degradation by coolant leakage and recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ju Hae; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Seung Hyun; Joo, Sang Hoon; Choi, Won Mook; Kim, Junbom

    2013-03-01

    Coolant leakage leads to decrease in performance during the operation of electric vehicles which make use of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). This study examines the effects of various coolant leak conditions in 3-cell stack and single cell. The experimental results show that an irreversible reduction in performance occurs after coolant injection into the anode side of the stack. Poisoning of carbon monoxide (CO) on the platinum (Pt) catalyst is caused by electro-oxidation reaction of EG. Water cleaning is selected because CO poisoning is desorbed to reaction with water molecules. Performance is quickly reduced when the interval between coolant injections is short. Performance reduction is indicated by the experimental results for the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). It shows that performance of the MEA with the GDL exposed to coolant decreased, but it is recovered after water cleaning. In contrast, results for performance of the MEA exposed to coolant for long time could not be reversed after water cleaning. Therefore, we propose that performance degradation of coolant leak on the Pt catalyst surface and GDL can be recovered by the water cleaning simply without disassembly of stack.

  20. The Anderson Current Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F.

    1994-01-01

    Four-wire-probe concept applied to electrical-resistance transducers. Anderson current loop is excitation-and-signal-conditioning circuit suitable for use with strain gauges, resistance thermometers, and other electrical-resistance transducers mounted in harsh environments. Used as alternative to Wheatstone bridge. Simplifies signal-conditioning problem, enabling precise measurement of small changes in resistance of transducer. Eliminates some uncertainties in Wheatstone-bridge resistance-change measurements in flight research. Current loop configuration makes effects of lead-wire and contact resistances insignificantly small. Also provides output voltage that varies linearly with change in gauge resistance, and does so at double sensitivity of Wheatstone bridge.

  1. Wilson-loop instantons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.

    1987-01-01

    Wilson-loop symmetry breaking is considered on a space-time of the form M4 x K, where M4 is a four-dimensional space-time and K is an internal space with nontrivial and finite fundamental group. It is shown in a simple model that the different vacua obtained by breaking a non-Abelian gauge group by Wilson loops are separated in the space of gauge potentials by a finite energy barrier. An interpolating gauge configuration is then constructed between these vacua and shown to have minimum energy. Finally some implications of this construction are discussed.

  2. Loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an "in-a-nutshell" yet self-contained introductory review on loop quantum gravity (LQG) — a background-independent, nonperturbative approach to a consistent quantum theory of gravity. Instead of rigorous and systematic derivations, it aims to provide a general picture of LQG, placing emphasis on the fundamental ideas and their significance. The canonical formulation of LQG, as the central topic of the paper, is presented in a logically orderly fashion with moderate details, while the spin foam theory, black hole thermodynamics, and loop quantum cosmology are covered briefly. Current directions and open issues are also summarized.

  3. Recycling used engine coolant using high-volume stationary, multiple technology equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Haddock, M.E.; Eaton, E.R.

    1999-08-01

    Recycling used engine coolant has become increasingly desirable due to two significant factors. First, engine coolant frequently merits designation as a hazardous waste under the Federal Clean Water Act. Federal and some state environmental protection agencies have instituted strict regulation of the disposal of used engine coolant. In some cases, the disposal of engine coolant requires imposition of waste disposal fees and surcharges. Secondly, ethylene glycol, the principal cost component of engine coolant, has experienced dramatic price fluctuations and occasional shortages in supply. Therefore, there are both environmental and economic pressures to recycle engine coolant and recover the ethylene glycol component in an efficient and cost-effective manner. This paper discusses a multistage apparatus and a process for recycling used engine coolant that employs a combination of filtration, centrifugation (hydrocyclone separation), dissolved air flotation, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, continuous deionization, and ion exchange processes for separating ethylene glycol and water from used engine coolant. The engine coolant is prefiltered through a series of filters. The filters remove particulate contaminates. This filtered fluid is then subjected to dissolved air flotation and centrifugation to remove petroleum. Then it is heated and pressurized prior to being passed over a series of two different sets of semipermeable membranes. The membrane technologies separate the feed stream into a permeate solution of ethylene glycol and water and a concentrate waste solution. The concentrate solution is returned to a concentrate tank for continuous circulation through the apparatus. The permeate solution is subjected to final refining by continuous deionization followed by a cation and anion ion exchange polishing process. The continuous deionization reduces ionic contaminants, and the ion exchange system eliminates any ionic contaminants left by the previous purification

  4. Experience with detection and disposition of PWSCC flaws in PWR pressurizer and reactor coolant system loop Alloy 600 penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, R.S.; Joseph, M.W.; Hall, J.F.

    1996-12-01

    The discovery of cracking of alloy 600 heater sleeve penetrations in a Combustion Engineering (CE) designed pressurizer in 1989, prompted utilities and the designer to form a group to investigate the cracking and address the potential safety concerns. The cause of cracking was determined to be axial primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Its axial orientation made ejection of a penetration highly unlikely. Therefore, PWSCC of alloy 600 penetrations was not considered a safety issue but an economic issue. To manage the issue at the Florida Power and Light Co.`s (FPL`s) two unit St. Lucie Nuclear Power Plant, FPL has: performed visual inspections for evidence of PWSCC (leakage), preventively replaced penetrations based on predictions from industry data, and developed a standardized repair method as a contingency to respond to emergent repairs while minimizing the associated outage time.

  5. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizationsmore » and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.« less

  6. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R. D.

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizations and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.

  7. Single-beam thermal lens measurement of thermal diffusivity of engine coolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Nibu A.; Thomas, Nibu B.; Chacko, Kavya; T, Neethu V.; Hussain Moidu, Haroon; Piyush, K.; David, Nitheesh M.

    2015-04-01

    Automobile engine coolant liquids are commonly used for efficient heat transfer from the engine to the surroundings. In this work we have investigated the thermal diffusivity of various commonly available engine coolants in Indian automobile market. We have used single beam laser induced thermal lens technique for the measurements. Engine coolants are generally available in concentrated solution form and are recommended to use at specified dilution. We have investigated the samples in the entire recommended concentration range for the use in radiators. While some of the brands show an enhanced thermal diffusivity compared to pure water, others show slight decrease in thermal diffusivity.

  8. Computation of Space Shuttle high-pressure cryogenic turbopump ball bearing two-phase coolant flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen

    1990-01-01

    A homogeneous two-phase fluid flow model, implemented in a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver using computational fluid dynamics methodology is described. The application of the model to the analysis of the pump-end bearing coolant flow of the high-pressure oxygen turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine is studied. Results indicate large boiling zones and hot spots near the ball/race contact points. The extent of the phase change of the liquid oxygen coolant flow due to the frictional and viscous heat fluxes near the contact areas has been investigated for the given inlet conditions of the coolant.

  9. Cracked shaft detection on large vertical nuclear reactor coolant pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    Due to difficulty and radiation exposure associated with examination of the internals of large commercial nuclear reactor coolant pumps, it is necessary to be able to diagnose the cause of an excessive vibration problem quickly without resorting to extensive trial and error efforts. Consequently, it is necessary to make maximum use of all available data to develop a consistent theory which locates the problem area in the machine. This type of approach was taken at Three Mile Island, Unit #1, in February 1984 to identify and locate the cause of a continuously climbing vibration level of the pump shaft. The data gathered necessitated some in-depth knowledge of the pump internals to provide proper interpretation and avoid misleading conclusions. Therefore, the raw data included more than just the vibration characteristics. Pertinent details of the data gathered is shown and is necessary and sufficient to show that the cause of the observed vibration problem could logically only be a cracked pump shaft in the shaft overhang below the pump bearing.

  10. Compatibility Issues for a High Temperature Dual Coolant Blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A

    2007-01-01

    One proposed U.S. test blanket module (TBM) for ITER uses ferritic-martensitic alloys with both eutectic Pb-Li and He coolants at {approx}475 C. In order for this blanket concept to operate at higher temperatures ({approx}750 C) for a DEMO-type reactor, several Pb-Li compatibility issues need to be addressed. A SiC/SiC composite flow channel insert is proposed to reduce the steel dissolution rate (and the magnetohydrodynamic pressure drop). Prior capsule testing examined dense, high-purity SiC in Pb-Li at 800-1200 C and found detectable levels of Si in the Pb-Li after 2,000h at 1100 C and 1,000h at 1200 C. Current capsule experiments are examining several different SiC/SiC composite materials at 1000 C. Another issue involves Pb-Li transport between the first wall and heat exchanger. Aluminide coatings on type 316 stainless steel and Al-containing alloys capable of forming an external alumina scale have been studied in capsule experiments at 700 and 800 C for 1,000h. Model aluminide coatings made by chemical vapor deposition reduced the dissolution rate for 316SS at 800 C by a factor of 50.

  11. Tables of thermodynamic properties of helium magnet coolant. Revision A

    SciTech Connect

    McAshan, M.

    1992-07-01

    The most complete treatment of the thermodynamic properties of helium at the present time is the monograph by McCarty: ``Thermodynamic Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K at Pressures to 10{sup 8} Pa``, Robert D. McCarty, Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data, Vol. 2, page 923--1040 (1973). In this work the complete range of data on helium is examined and the P-V-T surface is described by an equation of state consisting of three functions P(r,T) covering different regions together with rules for making the transition from one region to another. From this thermodynamic compilation together with correlations of the transport properties of helium was published the well-known NBS Technical Note: ``Thermophysical Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K with pressures to 1000 Atmospheres``, Robert D. McCarty, US Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards Technical Note 631 (1972). This is the standard reference for helium cryogenics. The NBS 631 tables cover a wide range of temperature and pressure, and as a consequence, the number of points tabulated in the region of the single phase coolant for the SSC magnets are relatively few. The present work sets out to cover the range of interest in more detail in a way that is consistent with NBS 631. This new table is essentially identical to the older one and can be used as an auxiliary to it.

  12. Tables of thermodynamic properties of helium magnet coolant

    SciTech Connect

    McAshan, M.

    1992-07-01

    The most complete treatment of the thermodynamic properties of helium at the present time is the monograph by McCarty: Thermodynamic Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K at Pressures to 10{sup 8} Pa'', Robert D. McCarty, Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data, Vol. 2, page 923--1040 (1973). In this work the complete range of data on helium is examined and the P-V-T surface is described by an equation of state consisting of three functions P(r,T) covering different regions together with rules for making the transition from one region to another. From this thermodynamic compilation together with correlations of the transport properties of helium was published the well-known NBS Technical Note: Thermophysical Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K with pressures to 1000 Atmospheres'', Robert D. McCarty, US Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards Technical Note 631 (1972). This is the standard reference for helium cryogenics. The NBS 631 tables cover a wide range of temperature and pressure, and as a consequence, the number of points tabulated in the region of the single phase coolant for the SSC magnets are relatively few. The present work sets out to cover the range of interest in more detail in a way that is consistent with NBS 631. This new table is essentially identical to the older one and can be used as an auxiliary to it.

  13. Tables of thermodynamic properties of helium magnet coolant, revision A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAshan, M.

    1992-07-01

    The most complete treatment of the thermodynamic properties of helium at the present time is the monograph by McCarty: 'Thermodynamic Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K at Pressures to 10(exp 8) Pa', Robert D. McCarty, Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data, Vol. 2, page 923-1040 (1973). In this work the complete range of data on helium is examined and the P-V-T surface is described by an equation of state consisting of three functions P(r,T) covering different regions together with rules for making the transition from one region to another. From this thermodynamic compilation together with correlations of the transport properties of helium was published the well-known NBS Technical Note: 'Thermophysical Properties of Helium 4 from 2 to 1500 K with pressures to 1000 Atmospheres', Robert D. McCarty, US Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards Technical Note 631 (1972). This is the standard reference for helium cryogenics. The NBS 631 tables cover a wide range of temperature and pressure, and as a consequence, the number of points tabulated in the region of the single phase coolant for the SSC magnets are relatively few. The present work sets out to cover the range of interest in more detail in a way that is consistent with NBS 631. This new table is essentially identical to the older one and can be used as an auxiliary to it.

  14. Closing the Loop Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    Closing the Loop (CTL) is a science curriculum designed to introduce students to integrated waste management through awareness. This document presents five lesson plans focusing on developing an understanding of natural resources, solid wastes, conservation, and the life of landfills. Contents include: (1) "What Are Natural Resources?"; (2)…

  15. Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piguet, O.

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give a short general introduction to Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG), beginning with some motivations for quantizing General Relativity, listing various attempts and then focusing on the case of LQG. Work supported in part by the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq (Brazil).

  16. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  17. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  18. A Looping Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Recounts a teacher's experiences staying with the same group of children for more than one year (looping) as they progress through kindergarten and first grade. Discusses advantages of more stability and less trauma for the child, and more instructional time and less stress for the teacher. Addresses possible disadvantages of children having…

  19. Effects of rotation on coolant passage heat transfer. Volume 2: Coolant passages with trips normal and skewed to the flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.; Steuber, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to investigate heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of rotating multipass passages, for configurations and dimensions typical of modem turbine blades. This experimental program is one part of the NASA Hot Section Technology (HOST) Initiative, which has as its overall objective the development and verification of improved analysis methods that will form the basis for a design system that will produce turbine components with improved durability. The objective of this program was the generation of a data base of heat transfer and pressure loss data required to develop heat transfer correlations and to assess computational fluid dynamic techniques for rotating coolant passages. The experimental work was broken down into two phases. Phase 1 consists of experiments conducted in a smooth wall large scale heat transfer model. A detailed discussion of these results was presented in volume 1 of a NASA Report. In Phase 2 the large scale model was modified to investigate the effects of skewed and normal passage turbulators. The results of Phase 2 along with comparison to Phase 1 is the subject of this Volume 2 NASA Report.

  20. COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, TJ

    2003-10-22

    A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement

  1. The experience in handling of lead-bismuth coolant contaminated by Polonium-210

    SciTech Connect

    Pankratov, D.V.; Gromov, B.F.; Solodjankin, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    During exploitation of lead-bismuth cooled reactors a wide experience in handling of radioactive coolant containing polonium has been gained. By 1990 total time of this reactor operation has reached approximately 60 reactor years.

  2. Computer code for predicting coolant flow and heat transfer in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code was developed to analyze any turbomachinery coolant flow path geometry that consist of a single flow passage with a unique inlet and exit. Flow can be bled off for tip-cap impingement cooling, and a flow bypass can be specified in which coolant flow is taken off at one point in the flow channel and reintroduced at a point farther downstream in the same channel. The user may either choose the coolant flow rate or let the program determine the flow rate from specified inlet and exit conditions. The computer code integrates the 1-D momentum and energy equations along a defined flow path and calculates the coolant's flow rate, temperature, pressure, and velocity and the heat transfer coefficients along the passage. The equations account for area change, mass addition or subtraction, pumping, friction, and heat transfer.

  3. Sodium coolant purification systems for a nuclear power station equipped with a BN-1200 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. V.; Kovalev, Yu. P.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Kozlov, F. A.; Kumaev, V. Ya.; Kondrat'ev, A. S.; Matyukhin, V. V.; Pirogov, E. P.; Sergeev, G. P.; Sorokin, A. P.; Torbenkova, I. Yu.

    2013-05-01

    Both traditional coolant purification methods (by means of traps and sorbents for removing cesium), the use of which supported successful operation of nuclear power installations equipped with fast-neutron reactors with a sodium coolant, and the possibility of removing oxygen from sodium through the use of hot traps are analyzed in substantiating the purification system for a nuclear power station equipped with a BN-1200 reactor. It is shown that a cold trap built into the reactor vessel must be a mandatory component of the reactor plant primary coolant circuit's purification system. The use of hot traps allows oxygen to be removed from the sodium coolant down to permissible concentrations when the nuclear power station operates in its rated mode. The main lines of works aimed at improving the performance characteristics of cold traps are suggested based on the results of performed investigations.

  4. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  5. Hot-Gas-Slide and Coolant-Side Heat Transfer in Liquid Rocket Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Luong, Van

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to develop a multidisciplinary, computational methodology to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in film cooling assisted, regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustors, and to use it in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for a developmental combustor. An integrated numerical model which incorporates computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the liner and coolant channels, was developed. This integrated CFD/thermal model was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods for a 40-k calorimeter thrust chamber and the Space Shuttle Main Engine main combustion chamber. Parametric studies were performed for the advanced main combustion chamber to find a strategy for a proposed coolant channel design.

  6. Study of Compatibility of Stainless Steel Weld Joints with Liquid Sodium-Potassium Coolants for Fission Surface Power Reactors for Lunar and Space Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, Martin; Qualls, Louis

    2015-07-31

    To make a manned mission to the surface of the moon or to Mars with any significant residence time, the power requirements will make a nuclear reactor the most feasible source of energy. To prepare for such a mission, NASA has teamed with the DOE to develop Fission Surface Power technology with the goal of developing viable options. The Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) recommended as the initial baseline design includes a liquid metal reactor and primary coolant system that transfers heat to two intermediate liquid metal heat transfer loops. Each intermediate loop transfers heat to two Stirling heat exchangers that each power two Stirling converters. Both the primary and the intermediate loops will use sodium-potassium (NaK) as the liquid metal coolant, and the primary loop will operate at temperatures exceeding 600°C. The alloy selected for the heat exchangers and piping is AISI Type 316L stainless steel. The extensive experience with NaK in breeder reactor programs and with earlier space reactors for unmanned missions lends considerable confidence in using NaK as a coolant in contact with stainless steel alloys. However, the microstructure, chemical segregation, and stress state of a weld leads to the potential for corrosion and cracking. Such failures have been experienced in NaK systems that have operated for times less than the eight year goal for the FSPS. For this reason, it was necessary to evaluate candidate weld techniques and expose welds to high-temperature, flowing NaK in a closed, closely controlled system. The goal of this project was to determine the optimum weld configuration for a NaK system that will withstand service for eight years under FSPS conditions. Since the most difficult weld to make and to evaluate is the tube to tube sheet weld in the intermediate heat exchangers, it was the focus of this research. A pumped loop of flowing NaK was fabricated for exposure of candidate weld specimens at temperatures of 600°C, the expected

  7. Loss-of-coolant accident analyses of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L. ); Wendel, M.W. )

    1991-01-01

    Currently in the conceptual design stage, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) will operate at a high heat flux, a high mass flux, an a high degree of coolant subcooling. Loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analyses using RELAP5 have been performed as part of an early evaluation of ANSR safety issues. This paper discusses the RELAP5 ANSR conceptual design system model and preliminary LOCA simulation results. Some previous studies were conducted for the preconceptual design. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Measurement of the Coolant Channel Temperatures and Pressures of a Cooled Radial-Inflow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.; Tirres, Lizet

    1994-01-01

    Instrumentation has been installed on the surface of a cooled radial-inflow turbine. Thermocouples and miniature integrated sensor pressure transducers were installed to measure steady state coolant temperatures, blade wall temperatures, and coolant pressures. These measurements will eventually be used to determine the heat transfer characteristics of the rotor. This paper will describe the procedures used to install and calibrate the instrumentation and the testing methods followed. A limited amount of data will compare the measured values to the predicted values.

  9. Real-Time Closed Loop Modulated Turbine Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Culley, Dennis E.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Jones, Scott; Woike, Mark; Cuy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It has been noted by industry that in addition to dramatic variations of temperature over a given blade surface, blade-to-blade variations also exist despite identical design. These variations result from manufacturing variations, uneven wear and deposition over the life of the part as well as limitations in the uniformity of coolant distribution in the baseline cooling design. It is proposed to combine recent advances in optical sensing, actuation, and film cooling concepts to develop a workable active, closed-loop modulated turbine cooling system to improve by 10 to 20 the turbine thermal state over the flight mission, to improve engine life and to dramatically reduce turbine cooling air usage and aircraft fuel burn. A reduction in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) can also be achieved by using the excess coolant to improve mixing in the combustor especially for rotorcraft engines. Recent patents filed by industry and universities relate to modulating endwall cooling using valves. These schemes are complex, add weight and are limited to the endwalls. The novelty of the proposed approach is twofold 1) Fluidic diverters that have no moving parts are used to modulate cooling and can operate under a wide range of conditions and environments. 2) Real-time optical sensing to map the thermal state of the turbine has never been attempted in realistic engine conditions.

  10. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  11. Elevated-pressure mixed-coolants Joule Thomson cryocooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytal, B.-Z.; Nellis, G. F.; Klein, S. A.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of mixed coolants at elevated pressures for Joule-Thomson cryocooling. A numerical model of a Joule-Thomson cryocooler is developed that is capable of simulating operation with mixtures of up to 9 components consisting of hydrocarbons, non-flammable halogenated refrigerants, and inert gases. The numerical model is integrated with a genetic optimization algorithm, which has a high capability for convergence in an environment of discontinuities, constraints and local optima. The genetic optimization algorithm is used to select the optimal mixture compositions that separately maximizes following two objective functions at each elevated pressure for 80, 90 and 95 K cryocooling: the molar specific cooling capacity (the highest attainable is 3200 J/mol) and the produced cooling capacity per thermal conductance which is a measure of the compactness of the recuperator. The optimized cooling capacity for a non-flammable halogenated refrigerant mixture is smaller than for a hydrocarbon mixture; however, the cooling capacity of the two types of mixtures approach one another as pressure becomes higher. The coefficient of performance, the required heat transfer area and the effect of the number of components in the mixture is investigated as a function of the pressure. It is shown that mixtures with more components provide a higher cooling capacity but require larger recuperative heat exchangers. Optimized mixtures for 90 K cryocooling have similar cooling capacity as those for 80 K. Optimized compactness for 80 K is about 50% higher than can be achieved by pure nitrogen. For 90 K, no mixture provides a more compact recuperator than can be achieved using pure argon. The results are discussed in the context of potential applications for closed and open cycle cryocoolers.

  12. Correct numerical simulation of a two-phase coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroshilin, A. E.; Kroshilin, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    Different models used in calculating flows of a two-phase coolant are analyzed. A system of differential equations describing the flow is presented; the hyperbolicity and stability of stationary solutions of the system is studied. The correctness of the Cauchy problem is considered. The models' ability to describe the following flows is analyzed: stable bubble and gas-droplet flows; stable flow with a level such that the bubble and gas-droplet flows are observed under and above it, respectively; and propagation of a perturbation of the phase concentration for the bubble and gas-droplet media. The solution of the problem about the breakdown of an arbitrary discontinuity has been constructed. Characteristic times of the development of an instability at different parameters of the flow are presented. Conditions at which the instability does not make it possible to perform the calculation are determined. The Riemann invariants for the nonlinear problem under consideration have been constructed. Numerical calculations have been performed for different conditions. The influence of viscosity on the structure of the discontinuity front is studied. Advantages of divergent equations are demonstrated. It is proven that a model used in almost all known investigating thermohydraulic programs, both in Russia and abroad, has significant disadvantages; in particular, it can lead to unstable solutions, which makes it necessary to introduce smoothing mechanisms and a very small step for describing regimes with a level. This does not allow one to use efficient numerical schemes for calculating the flow of two-phase currents. A possible model free from the abovementioned disadvantages is proposed.

  13. Reactor coolant pump testing using motor current signatures analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, N.; Bellamy, J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes reactor coolant pump motor testing carried out at Florida Power Corporation`s Crystal River plant using Framatome Technologies` new EMPATH (Electric Motor Performance Analysis and Trending Hardware) system. EMPATH{trademark} uses an improved form of Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA), technology, originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, for detecting deterioration in the rotors of AC induction motors. Motor Current Signature Analysis (MCSA) is a monitoring tool for motor driven equipment that provides a non-intrusive means for detecting the presence of mechanical and electrical abnormalities in the motor and the driven equipment. The base technology was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a means for determining the affects of aging and service wear specifically on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plant safety systems, but it is applicable to a broad range of electric machinery. MCSA is based on the recognition that an electric motor (ac or dc) driving a mechanical load acts as an efficient and permanently available transducer by sensing mechanical load variations, large and small, long-term and rapid, and converting them into variations in the induced current generated in the motor windings. The motor current variations, resulting from changes in load caused by gears, pulleys, friction, bearings, and other conditions that may change over the life of the motor, are carried by the electrical cables powering the motor and are extracted at any convenient location along the motor lead. These variations modulate the 60 Hz carrier frequency and appear as sidebands in the spectral plot.

  14. Analysis of Loss-of-Coolant Accidents in the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Baek J. S.; Cheng L.; Diamond, D.

    2014-05-23

    This report documents calculations of the fuel cladding temperature during loss-of-coolant accidents in the NBSR. The probability of a pipe failure is small and procedures exist to minimize the loss of water and assure emergency cooling water flows into the reactor core during such an event. Analysis in the past has shown that the emergency cooling water would provide adequate cooling if the water filled the flow channels within the fuel elements. The present analysis is to determine if there is adequate cooling if the water drains from the flow channels. Based on photographs of how the emergency water flows into the fuel elements from the distribution pan, it can be assumed that this water does not distribute uniformly across the flow channels but rather results in a liquid film flowing downward on the inside of one of the side plates in each fuel element and only wets the edges of the fuel plates. An analysis of guillotine breaks shows the cladding temperature remains below the blister temperature in fuel plates in the upper section of the fuel element. In the lower section, the fuel plates are also cooled by water outside the element that is present due to the hold-up pan and temperatures are lower than in the upper section. For small breaks, the simulation results show that the fuel elements are always cooled on the outside even in the upper section and the cladding temperature cannot be higher than the blister temperature. The above results are predicated on assumptions that are examined in the study to see their influence on fuel temperature.

  15. Inner mappings of Bruck loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    K-loops have their origin in the theory of sharply 2-transitive groups. In this paper a proof is given that K-loops and Bruck loops are the same. For the proof it is necessary to show that in a (left) Bruck loop the left inner mappings L(b)L(a) L(ab)[minus sign]1 are automorphisms. This paper generalizes results of Glauberman [3], Kist [8] and Kreuzer [9].

  16. Loop Heat Pipes and Capillary Pumped Loops: An Applications Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Theodore; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLS) and loop heat pipes (LHPS) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices which have recently gained increasing acceptance in space applications. Both systems work based on the same principles and have very similar designs. Nevertheless, some differences exist in the construction of the evaporator and the hydro-accumulator, and these differences lead to very distinct operating characteristics for each loop. This paper presents comparisons of the two loops from an applications perspective, and addresses their impact on spacecraft design, integration, and test. Some technical challenges and issues for both loops are also addressed.

  17. Coolant-Flow Calibrations of Three Simulated Porous Gas-Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esger, Jack B.; Lea, Alfred L.

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at the NACA Lewis laboratory to determine whether simulated porous gas-turbine blades fabricated by the Eaton Manufacturing Company of Cleveland, Ohio would be satisfactory with respect to coolant flow for application in gas-turbine engines. These blades simulated porous turbine blades by forcing the cooling air onto the blade surface through a large number of chordwise openings or slits between laminations of sheet metal or wire. This type of surface has a finite number of openings, whereas a porous surface has an almost infinite number of smaller openings for the coolant flow. The investigation showed that a blade made of sheet-metal laminations stacked on a support member that passed up through the coolant passage was completely unsatisfactory because of extremely poor coolant flow distribution over the blade surface. The flow distribution for two wire-wound blades was more uniform, but the pressure drop between the coolant supply pressure and the local pressure on the outside of the blades was too low by a factor ranging from 3 to 3.5 for the required coolant flow rates. The pressure drop could be increased by forcing the wires closer together during blade fabrication.

  18. Analysis of a water-coolant leak into a very high-temperature vitrification chamber.

    SciTech Connect

    Felicione, F. S.

    1998-06-11

    A coolant-leakage incident occurred during non-radioactive operation of the Plasma Hearth Process waste-vitrification development system at Argonne National Laboratory when a stray electric arc ruptured az water-cooling jacket. Rapid evaporation of the coolant that entered the very high-temperature chamber pressurized the normally sub-atmospheric system above ambient pressure for over 13 minutes. Any positive pressurization, and particularly a lengthy one, is a safety concern since this can cause leakage of contaminants from the system. A model of the thermal phenomena that describe coolant/hot-material interactions was developed to better understand the characteristics of this type of incident. The model is described and results for a variety of hypothetical coolant-leak incidents are presented. It is shown that coolant leak rates above a certain threshold will cause coolant to accumulate in the chamber, and evaporation from this pool can maintain positive pressure in the system long after the leak has been stopped. Application of the model resulted in reasonably good agreement with the duration of the pressure measured during the incident. A closed-form analytic solution is shown to be applicable to the initial leak period in which the peak pressures are generated, and is presented and discussed.

  19. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project -2006 Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2006-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. This paper presents a status of the coolant stability over the past year as well as results from destructive analyses of hardware removed from the on-orbit system and the current approach to coolant remediation.

  20. Impact of the propylene glycol-water-borax coolant on material recovery operations

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Taylor, P.A.

    1983-05-01

    The reaction of the propylene glycol-water-borax coolant with nitric acid has now been studied in some detail. This document is intended to provide a summary of the results. Findings are summarized under nine headings. Tests have also been conducted to determine if the new coolant would have any adverse effects on the uranium recycle systems. Experiments were scientifically designed after observation of the production operations so that accurate response to the immediate production concerns could be provided. Conclusions from these studies are: formation of glycol nitrates is very improbable; the reaction of concentrated (70%) nitric acid with pure propylene glycol is very violent and hazardous; dilution of the nitric acid-glycol mixture causes a drastic decrease in the rate and intensity of the reaction; the mechanism of the nitric acid propylene glycol reaction is autocatalytic in nitrous acid; no reaction is observed between coolant and 30% nitric acid unless the solution is heated; the coolant reacts fairly vigorously with 55% nitric acid after a concentration-dependent induction time; experiments showed that the dissolution of uranium chips that had been soaked in coolant proceeded at about the same rate as if the chips had not previously contacted glycol; thermodynamic calculations show that the enthalpy change (heat liberated) by the reaction of nitric acid (30%) with propylene glycol is smaller than if the same amount of nitric acid reacted with uranium. Each of these conclusions is briefly discussed. The effect of new coolant on uranium recycle operations is then briefly discussed.

  1. Closed-loop anesthesia.

    PubMed

    LE Guen, Morgan; Liu, Ngai; Chazot, Thierry; Fischler, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Automated anesthesia which may offer to the physician time to control hemodynamic and to supervise neurological outcome and which may offer to the patient safety and quality was until recently consider as a holy grail. But this field of research is now increasing in every component of general anesthesia (hypnosis, nociception, neuromuscular blockade) and literature describes some successful algorithms - single or multi closed-loop controller. The aim of these devices is to control a predefined target and to continuously titrate anesthetics whatever the patients' co morbidities and surgical events to reach this target. Literature contains many randomized trials comparing manual and automated anesthesia and shows feasibility and safety of this system. Automation could quickly concern other aspects of anesthesia as fluid management and this review proposes an overview of closed-loop systems in anesthesia.

  2. Determinants of RNA hairpin loop-loop complex stability.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, R S; Crothers, D M

    1995-05-19

    Complexes formed by RNA hairpin loops with complementary loop sequences derived from Escherichia coli RNA I and RNA II, which are involved in the control of DNA replication of plasmid ColE1, have been analyzed to determine the sequence and structural elements required to achieve full affinity. Of particular interest is the origin of the enhanced stability of the complex formed by hairpin loops whose loop sequences have been inverted 5' to 3' with respect to wild-type sequences. Full complementarity of the two interacting loops is required to achieve full or enhanced affinity, while the stems of the two hairpins can differ. The major determinant of enhanced affinity lies in the base-pairs formed at positions 1 and 7 of the loops, together with the two base-pairs of each stem which are closest to the loop. Sequence variation in the middle of the loops, or further down the stem away from the loops, exerts only a modest influence on complex stability. We incorporate these results into a model for the loop-loop interaction which accounts for the importance of positions one and seven and the first two nucleotides of the stem, while providing potentially unique structures for recognition by the RNA one modulator protein. PMID:7539081

  3. Determinants of RNA hairpin loop-loop complex stability.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, R S; Crothers, D M

    1995-05-19

    Complexes formed by RNA hairpin loops with complementary loop sequences derived from Escherichia coli RNA I and RNA II, which are involved in the control of DNA replication of plasmid ColE1, have been analyzed to determine the sequence and structural elements required to achieve full affinity. Of particular interest is the origin of the enhanced stability of the complex formed by hairpin loops whose loop sequences have been inverted 5' to 3' with respect to wild-type sequences. Full complementarity of the two interacting loops is required to achieve full or enhanced affinity, while the stems of the two hairpins can differ. The major determinant of enhanced affinity lies in the base-pairs formed at positions 1 and 7 of the loops, together with the two base-pairs of each stem which are closest to the loop. Sequence variation in the middle of the loops, or further down the stem away from the loops, exerts only a modest influence on complex stability. We incorporate these results into a model for the loop-loop interaction which accounts for the importance of positions one and seven and the first two nucleotides of the stem, while providing potentially unique structures for recognition by the RNA one modulator protein.

  4. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  5. In-pile TREAT Test L04: simulating a lead sub-assembly in an unprotected LMFBR loss-of-coolant accident

    SciTech Connect

    Tylka, J.P.; Bauer, T.H.; Wright, A.E.; Davies, A.L.; Herbert, R.; Woods, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Test L04 in the PFR/TREAT series is the first multi-pin, in-pile simulation of a LMFBR transient undercooling/overpower (TUCOP) accident using full length prototypic fuel irradiated in a fast reactor. L04 is a gridded 7-pin bundle test performed in the ANL Mk-III integral loop in a flowing sodium environment and uses prototypic, bottom plenum, UK reactor fuel, preirradiated in the PFR to an axial peak burn-up of 4.2 a/o. The objective of L04 was the study, by simulation, of coolant voiding and fuel motion during the initiating phase of a hypothetical TUCOP accident in a large LMFBR. Test L04 is intended to study the behavior of a centrally located, lead subassembly with the highest power-to-flow ratio.

  6. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  7. Closing the loop.

    PubMed

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2011-02-01

    Closed-loop algorithms can be found in every aspect of everyday modern life. Automation and control are used constantly to provide safety and to improve quality of life. Closed-loop systems and algorithms can be found in home appliances, automobiles, aviation and more. Can one imagine nowadays driving a car without ABS, cruise control or even anti-sliding control? Similar principles of automation and control can be used in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM). The idea of an algorithmic/technological way to control glycaemia is not new and has been researched for more than four decades. However, recent improvements in both glucose-sensing technology and insulin delivery together with advanced control and systems engineering made this dream of an artificial pancreas possible. The artificial pancreas may be the next big step in the treatment of DM since the use of insulin analogues. An artificial pancreas can be described as internal or external devices that use continuous glucose measurements to automatically manage exogenous insulin delivery with or without other hormones in an attempt to restore glucose regulation in individuals with DM using a control algorithm. This device as described can be internal or external; can use different types of control algorithms with bi-hormonal or uni-hormonal design; and can utilise different ways to administer them. The different designs and implementations have transitioned recently from in silico simulations to clinical evaluation stage with practical applications in mind. This may mark the beginning of a new era in diabetes management with the introduction of semi-closed-loop systems that can prevent or minimise nocturnal hypoglycaemia, to hybrid systems that will manage blood glucose (BG) levels with minimal user intervention to finally fully automated systems that will take the user out of the loop. More and more clinical trials will be needed for the artificial pancreas to become a reality but initial encouraging

  8. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  9. Self-driven cooling loop for a large superconducting magnet in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mord, A. J.; Snyder, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    Pressurized cooling loops in which superfluid helium circulation is driven by the heat being removed have been previously demonstrated in laboratory tests. A simpler and lighter version which eliminates a heat exchanger by mixing the returning fluid directly with the superfluid helium bath was analyzed. A carefully designed flow restriction must be used to prevent boiling in this low-pressure system. A candidate design for Astromag is shown that can keep the magnet below 2.0 K during magnet charging. This gives a greater margin against accidental quench than approaches that allow the coolant to warm above the lambda point. A detailed analysis of one candidate design is presented.

  10. Two loop divergences studied with one loop constrained differential renormalization

    SciTech Connect

    Seijas, Cesar . E-mail: cesar@fpaxp1.usc.es

    2007-08-15

    In the context of differential renormalization, using constrained differential renormalization rules at one-loop, we show how to obtain concrete results in two-loop calculations without making use of Ward identities. In order to do that, we obtain a list of integrals with overlapping divergences compatible with CDR that can be applied to various two-loop background field calculations. As an example, we obtain the two-loop coefficient of the beta function of QED, SuperQED and Yang-Mills theory.

  11. Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

    2010-09-01

    This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will

  12. Reactor Coolant Pump seal issues and their applicability to new reactor designs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruger, C.J.; Higgins, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCPs) of various types are used to circulate the primary coolant through the reactor in most reactor designs. RCPs generally contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized reactor coolant along the pump drive shaft into the containment. The relatively large number of RCP seal and seal auxiliary system failures experienced at US operating plants during the 1970`s and early 1980`s raised concerns from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) that gross failures may lead to reactor core uncovery and subsequent core damage. Some seal failure events resulted in a loss of primary coolant to the containment at flow rates greater than the normal makeup capacity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plants. This is an example of RCP seal failures resulting in a small Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). This paper discusses observed and potential causes of RCP seal failure and the recommendations for limiting the likelihood of a seal induced small LOCA. Issues arising out of the research supporting these recommendations and subsequent public comments by the utility industry on them, serve as lessons learned, which are applicable to the design of new reactor plants.

  13. Flatness Control Using Roll Coolant Based on Predicted Flatness Variation in Cold Rolling Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohmae, Yukihiro; Okamura, Yoshihide

    Flatness control for cold rolling mills is one of the important technologies for improving of product quality and productivity. In particular, poor flatness leads to strip tearing in the extreme case and, moreover, it significantly reduces productivity. Therefore, various flatness control system has been developed. The main actuators for flatness control are classified into two types; one is mechanical equipment such as roll bender, the other is roll coolant, which controls thermal expansion of roll. Flatness variation such as center buckle or edge wave is mainly controlled by mechanical actuator which has high response characteristics. On another front, flatness variation of local zone can be controlled by roll coolant although one's response is lower than the response of mechanical actuator. For accomplishing good flatness accuracy in cold rolling mills, it is important to improve the performance of coolant control moreover. In this paper, a new coolant control method based on flatness variation model is described. In proposed method, the state of coolant spray on or off is selected to minimize the flatness deviation by using predicted flatness variation. The effectiveness of developed system has been demonstrated by application in actual plant.

  14. Coolant-side heat-transfer rates for a hydrogen-oxygen rocket and a new technique for data correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the coolant-side, heat transfer coefficients for a liquid cooled, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chamber. Heat transfer rates were determined from measurements of local hot gas wall temperature, local coolant temperature, and local coolant pressure. A correlation incorporating an integration technique for the transport properties needed near the pseudocritical temperature of liquid hydrogen gives a satisfactory prediction of hot gas wall temperatures.

  15. Accelerating the loop expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-07-29

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi/sup 4/ theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs.

  16. Ekpyrotic loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2013-08-01

    We consider the ekpyrotic paradigm in the context of loop quantum cosmology. In loop quantum cosmology the classical big-bang singularity is resolved due to quantum gravity effects, and so the contracting ekpyrotic branch of the universe and its later expanding phase are connected by a smooth bounce. Thus, it is possible to explicitly determine the evolution of scalar perturbations, from the contracting ekpyrotic phase through the bounce and to the post-bounce expanding epoch. The possibilities of having either one or two scalar fields have been suggested for the ekpyrotic universe, and both cases will be considered here. In the case of a single scalar field, the constant mode of the curvature perturbations after the bounce is found to have a blue spectrum. On the other hand, for the two scalar field ekpyrotic model where scale-invariant entropy perturbations source additional terms in the curvature perturbations, the power spectrum in the post-bounce expanding cosmology is shown to be nearly scale-invariant and so agrees with observations.

  17. High temperature storage loop :

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  18. Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 171 -- Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) failure from a loop subsequent to LOCA: Assessment of plant vulnerability and CDF contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guridi, G.; Samanta, P.; Chu, L.; Yang, J.

    1998-03-01

    Generic Safety Issue 171 (GSI-171), Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) from a Loss Of Offsite Power (LOOP) subsequent to a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), deals with an accident sequence in which a LOCA is followed by a LOOP. This issue was later broadened to include a LOOP followed by a LOCA. Plants are designed to handle a simultaneous LOCA and LOOP. In this paper, the authors address the unique issues that are involved i LOCA with delayed LOOP (LOCA/LOOP) and LOOP with delayed LOCA (LOOP/LOCA) accident sequences. LOCA/LOOP accidents are analyzed further by developing event-tree/fault-tree models to quantify their contributions to core-damage frequency (CDF) in a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor (PWR and a BWR). Engineering evaluation and judgments are used during quantification to estimate the unique conditions that arise in a LOCA/LOOP accident. The results show that the CDF contribution of such an accident can be a dominant contributor to plant risk, although BWRs are less vulnerable than PWRs.

  19. Numerical analysis of the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in liquid rocket engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. S.; Luong, V.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to develop computational methods to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer, and to use these methods in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustors. An integrated numerical model which incorporates computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the coolant channels, was developed. The mode was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods. Parametric studies were performed to find a strategy for optimized combustion chamber coolant channel design.

  20. The double loop mattress suture

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone, John; Samuel, Madan; Creagh, Terry; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    An interrupted stitch type with favorable tissue characteristics will reduce local wound complications. We describe a novel high-strength, low-tension repair for the interrupted closure of skin, cartilage, and muscle, the double loop mattress stitch, and compare it experimentally with other interrupted closure methods. The performance of the double loop mattress technique in porcine cartilage and skeletal muscle is compared with the simple, mattress, and loop mattress interrupted sutures in both a novel porcine loading chamber and mechanical model. Wound apposition is assessed by electron microscopy. The performance of the double loop mattress in vivo was confirmed using a series of 805 pediatric laparotomies/laparoscopies. The double loop mattress suture is 3.5 times stronger than the loop mattress in muscle and 1.6 times stronger in cartilage (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, the double loop mattress reduces tissue tension by 66% compared with just 53% for the loop mattress (p ≤ 0.001). Wound gapping is equal, and wound eversion appears significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) compared with the loop mattress in vitro. In vivo, the double loop mattress performs as well as the loop mattress and significantly better than the mattress stitch in assessments of wound eversion and dehiscence. There were no episodes of stitch extrusion in our series of patients. The mechanical advantage of its intrinsic pulley arrangement gives the double loop mattress its favorable properties. Wound dehiscence is reduced because this stitch type is stronger and exerts less tension on the tissue than the mattress stitch. We advocate the use of this novel stitch wherever a high-strength, low-tension repair is required. These properties will enhance wound repair, and its application will be useful to surgeons of all disciplines. PMID:24698436

  1. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  2. Nanomaterials for efficiently lowering the freezing point of anti-freeze coolants.

    PubMed

    Hong, Haiping; Zheng, Yingsong; Roy, Walter

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we report, for the first time, the effect of the lowered freezing point in a 50% water/50% anti-freeze coolant (PAC) or 50% water/50% ethylene glycol (EG) solution by the addition of carbon nanotubes and other particles. The experimental results indicated that the nano materials are much more efficient (hundreds fold) in lowering the freezing point than the regular ionic materials (e.g., NaCl). The possible explanation for this interesting phenomenon is the colligative property of fluid and relative small size of nano material. It is quite certain that the carbon nanotubes and metal oxide nano particles could be a wonderful candidate for the nano coolant application because they could not only increase the thermal conductivity, but also efficiently lower the freezing point of traditional coolants. PMID:18019146

  3. Simulating the corrosion of zirconium alloys in the water coolant of VVER reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Motkova, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    A model for predicting the corrosion of cladding zirconium alloys depending on their composition and operating conditions is proposed. Laws of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics of the reactions through which the multicomponent zirconium alloy is oxidized in the reactor coolant constitute the physicochemical heart of the model. The developed version of the model is verified against the results obtained from tests of fuel rod claddings made of commercial-grade and experimental zirconium alloys carried out by different researchers under autoclave and reactor conditions. It is shown that the proposed model adequately describes the corrosion of alloys in coolants used at nuclear power stations. It is determined that, owing to boiling of coolant and its acidification in a VVER-1200 reactor, Zr-1% Nb alloys with additions of iron and oxygen must be more resistant to corrosion than the commercial-grade alloy E110.

  4. New technique of mechanical pulse jet coolant delivery system for minimal quantity lubricant (MQL) operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazli, Nik; Badrul, Hamdi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) machining is one of the promising solutions to decrease the cutting fluid consumption requirements. This paper describes MQL machining in a range of lubricant consumption of 2.0ml/h, which is 10-100 times smaller than the normal consumption adopted in industries. MQL machining in this range is called pulse jet coolant delivery system in this paper. A specially designed system was used for concentrating small amounts of lubricant onto the cutting interface. The performance of concentrated spraying of lubricant in pulse jet coolant delivery system design was actual simulated and compared with others systems. The concentrated spraying of lubricant with a specially designed of system was quite effective in increasing tool life in the pulse jet coolant delivery system range.

  5. Effects of coolant parameters on steady state temperature distribution in phospheric-acid fuel cell electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkasab, K. A.; Abdul-Aziz, A.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of thermophysical properties and flow rate on the steady-state temperature distribution in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell electrode plate was experimentally investigated. An experimental setup that simulates the operating conditions prevailing in a phosphoric-acid fuel cell stack was used. The fuel cell cooling system utilized three types of coolants to remove excess heat generated in the cell electrode and to maintain a reasonably uniform temperature distribution in the electrode plate. The coolants used were water, engine oil, and air. These coolants were circulated at Reynolds number ranging from 1165 to 6165 for water; 3070 to 6864 for air; and 15 to 79 for oil. Experimental results are presented.

  6. System and method for determining coolant level and flow velocity in a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Brisson, Bruce William; Morris, William Guy; Zheng, Danian; Monk, David James; Fang, Biao; Surman, Cheryl Margaret; Anderson, David Deloyd

    2013-09-10

    A boiling water reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel having a feedwater inlet for the introduction of recycled steam condensate and/or makeup coolant into the vessel, and a steam outlet for the discharge of produced steam for appropriate work. A fuel core is located within a lower area of the pressure vessel. The fuel core is surrounded by a core shroud spaced inward from the wall of the pressure vessel to provide an annular downcomer forming a coolant flow path between the vessel wall and the core shroud. A probe system that includes a combination of conductivity/resistivity probes and/or one or more time-domain reflectometer (TDR) probes is at least partially located within the downcomer. The probe system measures the coolant level and flow velocity within the downcomer.

  7. Measurement of Coolant in a Flat Heat Pipe Using Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Kei; Saito, Yasushi; Goshima, Takashi; Tsutsui, Toshio

    A newly developed flat heat pipe FGHPTM (Morex Kiire Co.) was experimentally investigated by using neutron radiography. The test sample of the FGHP heat spreader was 65 × 65 × 2 mm3 composed of several etched copper plates and pure water was used as the coolant. Neutron radiography was performed at the E-2 port of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). The coolant distributions in the wick area of the FGHP and its heat transfer characteristics were measured at heating conditions. Experimental results show that the coolant distributions depend slightly on its installation posture and that the liquid thickness in the wick region remains constant with increasing heat input to the FGHP. In addition, it is found that the wick surface does not dry out even in the vertical posture at present experimental conditions.

  8. Identification of flow patterns by neutron noise analysis during actual coolant boiling in thin rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kozma, R.; van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E. )

    1992-10-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to introduce results of coolant boiling experiments in a simulated materials test reactor-type fuel assembly with plate fuel in an actual reactor environment. The experiments have been performed in the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) research reactor at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft, The Netherlands. In the analysis, noise signals of self-powered neutron detectors located in the neighborhood of the boiling region and thermocouple in the channel wall and in the coolant are used. Flow patterns in the boiling coolant have been identified by means of analysis of probability density functions and power spectral densities of neutron noise. It is shown that boiling has an oscillating character due to partial channel blockage caused by steam slugs generated periodically between the plates. The observed phenomenon can serve as a basis for a boiling detection method in reactors with plate-type fuels.

  9. New Configurations of Micro Plate-Fin Heat Sink to Reduce Coolant Pumping Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L. A.

    2012-06-01

    The thermal resistance of heat exchangers has a strong influence on the electric power produced by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). In this work, a real TEG device is applied to three configurations of micro plate-fin heat sink. The distance between certain microchannels is varied to find the optimum heat sink configuration. The particular focus of this study is to reduce the coolant mass flow rate by considering the thermal resistances of the heat sinks and, thereby, to reduce the coolant pumping power in the system. The three-dimensional governing equations for the fluid flow and the heat transfer are solved using the finite-volume method for a wide range of pressure drop laminar flows along the heat sink. The temperature and the mass flow rate distribution in the heat sink are discussed. The results, which are in good agreement with previous computational studies, show that using suggested heat sink configurations reduces the coolant pumping power in the system.

  10. Loop-the-Loop: Bringing Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwonjandee, N.; Asavapibhop, B.

    2012-01-01

    During the Thai high-school physics teacher training programme, we used an aluminum loop-the-loop system built by the Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology (IPST) to demonstrate a circular motion and investigate the concept of the conservation of mechanical energy. There were 27 high-school teachers from three provinces,…

  11. Preliminary analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in Fukushima nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    Su'ud, Zaki; Anshari, Rio

    2012-06-06

    Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) especially on Fukushima Nuclear Accident will be discussed in this paper. The Tohoku earthquake triggered the shutdown of nuclear power reactors at Fukushima Nuclear Power station. Though shutdown process has been completely performed, cooling process, at much smaller level than in normal operation, is needed to remove decay heat from the reactor core until the reactor reach cold-shutdown condition. If LOCA happen at this condition, it will cause the increase of reactor fuel and other core temperatures and can lead to reactor core meltdown and exposure of radioactive material to the environment such as in the Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear accident case. In this study numerical simulation has been performed to calculate pressure composition, water level and temperature distribution on reactor during this accident. There are two coolant regulating system that operational on reactor unit 1 at this accident, Isolation Condensers (IC) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV) system. Average mass flow of steam to the IC system in this event is 10 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 3,2 hours and fully uncovered in 4,7 hours later. There are two coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 2, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) System and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of coolant that correspond this event is 20 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 73 hours and fully uncovered in 75 hours later. There are three coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 3, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) system, High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of water that correspond this event is 15 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 37 hours and fully uncovered in 40 hours later.

  12. Preliminary analysis of loss-of-coolant accident in Fukushima nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su'ud, Zaki; Anshari, Rio

    2012-06-01

    Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) especially on Fukushima Nuclear Accident will be discussed in this paper. The Tohoku earthquake triggered the shutdown of nuclear power reactors at Fukushima Nuclear Power station. Though shutdown process has been completely performed, cooling process, at much smaller level than in normal operation, is needed to remove decay heat from the reactor core until the reactor reach cold-shutdown condition. If LOCA happen at this condition, it will cause the increase of reactor fuel and other core temperatures and can lead to reactor core meltdown and exposure of radioactive material to the environment such as in the Fukushima Dai Ichi nuclear accident case. In this study numerical simulation has been performed to calculate pressure composition, water level and temperature distribution on reactor during this accident. There are two coolant regulating system that operational on reactor unit 1 at this accident, Isolation Condensers (IC) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV) system. Average mass flow of steam to the IC system in this event is 10 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 3,2 hours and fully uncovered in 4,7 hours later. There are two coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 2, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) System and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of coolant that correspond this event is 20 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 73 hours and fully uncovered in 75 hours later. There are three coolant regulating system at operational on reactor unit 3, Reactor Core Isolation Condenser (RCIC) system, High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) system and Safety Relief Valves (SRV). Average mass flow of water that correspond this event is 15 kg/s and could keep reactor core from uncovered about 37 hours and fully uncovered in 40 hours later.

  13. Dynamic PID loop control

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  14. Pulse thermal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse thermal loop heat transfer system includes a means to use pressure rises in a pair of evaporators to circulate a heat transfer fluid. The system includes one or more valves that iteratively, alternately couple the outlets the evaporators to the condenser. While flow proceeds from one of the evaporators to the condenser, heating creates a pressure rise in the other evaporator, which has its outlet blocked to prevent fluid from exiting the other evaporator. When the flow path is reconfigured to allow flow from the other evaporator to the condenser, the pressure in the other evaporator is used to circulate a pulse of fluid through the system. The reconfiguring of the flow path, by actuating or otherwise changing the configuration of the one or more valves, may be triggered when a predetermined pressure difference between the evaporators is reached.

  15. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    SciTech Connect

    Chesi, Stefano; Jaffe, Arthur; Loss, Daniel; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  16. The Loop Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evertz, Hans Gerd

    1998-03-01

    Exciting new investigations have recently become possible for strongly correlated systems of spins, bosons, and fermions, through Quantum Monte Carlo simulations with the Loop Algorithm (H.G. Evertz, G. Lana, and M. Marcu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 875 (1993).) (For a recent review see: H.G. Evertz, cond- mat/9707221.) and its generalizations. A review of this new method, its generalizations and its applications is given, including some new results. The Loop Algorithm is based on a formulation of physical models in an extended ensemble of worldlines and graphs, and is related to Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithms. It performs nonlocal changes of worldline configurations, determined by local stochastic decisions. It overcomes many of the difficulties of traditional worldline simulations. Computer time requirements are reduced by orders of magnitude, through a corresponding reduction in autocorrelations. The grand-canonical ensemble (e.g. varying winding numbers) is naturally simulated. The continuous time limit can be taken directly. Improved Estimators exist which further reduce the errors of measured quantities. The algorithm applies unchanged in any dimension and for varying bond-strengths. It becomes less efficient in the presence of strong site disorder or strong magnetic fields. It applies directly to locally XYZ-like spin, fermion, and hard-core boson models. It has been extended to the Hubbard and the tJ model and generalized to higher spin representations. There have already been several large scale applications, especially for Heisenberg-like models, including a high statistics continuous time calculation of quantum critical exponents on a regularly depleted two-dimensional lattice of up to 20000 spatial sites at temperatures down to T=0.01 J.

  17. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study

  18. Polonium release from an ATW burner system with liquid lead-bismuth coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.; Yefimov, E.; Pankratov, D.

    1998-04-01

    The authors analyzed polonium release hazards in a conceptual pool-type ATW burner with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant. Simplified quantitative models are used based on experiments and real NPP experience. They found little Po contamination outside the burner under normal operating conditions with nominal leakage from the gas system. In sudden gas leak and/or coolant spill accidents, the P contamination level can reach above the regulation limit but short exposure would not lead to severe health consequences. They are evaluating and developing mitigation methods.

  19. A Thermoelectric Generator Using Engine Coolant for Light-Duty Internal Combustion Engine-Powered Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Shiho; Park, Soonseo; Kim, Sunkook; Rhi, Seok-Ho

    2011-05-01

    We proposed and fabricated a thermoelectric generator (TEG) using the engine water coolant of passenger vehicles. The experimental results revealed that the maximum output power from the proposed thermoelectric generator was ~75 W, the calculated thermoelectric module efficiency of the TEG was ~2.1%, and the overall efficiency of electric power generation from the waste heat of the engine coolant was ~0.3% in the driving mode at 80 km/h. The conventional radiator can thus be replaced by the proposed TEG without additional devices or redesign of the engine water cooling system of the existing radiator.

  20. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-01-01

    A research program to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly, is discussed. Freon 11 is the working fluid involved. The specific objectives are: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls, (2) examine the effect channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel, and (3) develop an improved data reduction analysis.

  1. Modeling the flow of liquid-metal coolant in the T-shaped mixer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinsky, O. N.; Lobanov, P. D.; Kurdyumov, A. S.; Pribaturin, N. A.

    2016-05-01

    The results of experimental studies on the structure of the temperature field in the tube cross section at the flow of liquid-metal coolant in a T-shaped mixer are presented. Experiments were carried out using the Rose alloy as the working fluid. To determine temperature distribution on the test section wall, infrared thermography was used; to determine temperature distribution in the channel cross section, a mobile thermocouple was used. Considerable temperature maldistribution in the mixing zone of liquid flows with different temperatures on the tube wall and in the coolant melt is shown.

  2. Coolant and ambient temperature control for chillerless liquid cooled data centers

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2016-02-02

    Cooling control methods include measuring a temperature of air provided to a plurality of nodes by an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, measuring a temperature of at least one component of the plurality of nodes and finding a maximum component temperature across all such nodes, comparing the maximum component temperature to a first and second component threshold and comparing the air temperature to a first and second air threshold, and controlling a proportion of coolant flow and a coolant flow rate to the air-to-liquid heat exchanger and the plurality of nodes based on the comparisons.

  3. Design, manufacture, and test of coolant pump-motor assembly for Brayton power conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabacz, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and testing of seven coolant circulating pump-motor assemblies are discussed. The pump-motor assembly is driven by the nominal 44.4-volt, 400-Hz, 3-phase output of a nominal 56-volt dc input inverter. The pump-motor assembly will be used to circulate Dow Corning 200 liquid coolant for use in a Brayton cycle space power system. The pump-motor assembly develops a nominal head of 70 psi at 3.7 gpm with an over-all efficiency of 26 percent. The design description, drawings, photographs, reliability results, and developmental and acceptance test results are included.

  4. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 7.0) Code User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Michael F.

    1999-05-01

    The integrated fuel-coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, three-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a description of IFCI 7.0. The user's manual describes the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 7.0. Appendix A is an input manual provided for the creation of working decks.

  5. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 6.0) code. User`s manual

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.J.; Young, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    The integrated Fuel-Coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, four-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a product of the effort to generate a stand-alone version of IFCI, IFCI 6.0. The User`s Manual describes in detail the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 6.0. Appendix A is an input manual, provided for the creation of working decks.

  6. Development of a cleaning process for uranium chips machined with a glycol-water-borax coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    1984-12-01

    A chip-cleaning process has been developed to remove the new glycol-water-borax coolant from oralloy chips. The process involves storing the freshly cut chips in Freon-TDF until they are cleaned, washing with water, and displacing the water with Freon-TDF. The wash water can be reused many times and still yield clean chips and then be added to the coolant to make up for evaporative losses. The Freon-TDF will be cycled by evaporation. The cleaning facility is currently being designed and should be operational by April 1985.

  7. Simulation experiments on two-phase natural circulation in a freon-113 flow visualization loop

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yong; Ishii, Mamoru

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the two-phase natural circulaton and flow termination during a small break loss of coolant accident in LWR, simulation experiments have been performed using a Freon-113 flow visualization loop. The main focus of the present experiment was placed on the two-phase flow behavior in the hot-leg U-bend typical of B and W LWR systems. The loop was built based on the two-phase flow scaling criteria developed under this program to find out the effect of fluid properties, phase changes and coupling between hydrodynamic and heat transfer phenomena. Significantly different flow behaviors have been observed due to the non-equilibrium phase change phenomena such as the flashing and condensation on the Freon loop in comparison with the previous adiabatic experiment. The phenomena created much more unstable hydrodynamic conditions which lead to cyclic or oscillatory flow behaviors. Also, the void distribution and primary loop flow rate were measured in detail in addition to the important key paramaters, such as the power input, loop friction and the liquid level inside the simulated steam generator.

  8. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  9. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server

    PubMed Central

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm has been greatly improved to enrich the sampling distribution towards near-native conformations. These improvements include a new workflow optimization, MPI-parallelization and fast backbone angle sampling based on neighbor-dependent Ramachandran probability distributions. The server starts by efficiently searching the vast conformational space from only the loop sequence information and the environment atomic coordinates. The generated closed loop models are subsequently ranked using a fast distance-orientation dependent energy filter. Top ranked loops are refined with the Rosetta energy function to obtain accurate all-atom predictions that can be interactively inspected in an user-friendly web interface. Using standard benchmarks, the average root mean squared deviation (RMSD) is 0.8 and 1.4 Å for 8 and 12 residues loops, respectively, in the challenging modeling scenario in where the side chains of the loop environment are fully remodeled. These results are not only very competitive compared to those obtained with public state of the art methods, but also they are obtained ∼10-fold faster. PMID:27151199

  10. Higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-07-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The isotropic and homogeneous cosmological model in n+1 dimensions is quantized by the loop quantization method. Interestingly, we find that the underlying quantum theories are divided into two qualitatively different sectors according to spacetime dimensions. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of n+1 dimensional LQC are obtained. Moreover, our results indicate that the classical big bang singularity is resolved in arbitrary spacetime dimensions by a quantum bounce. We also briefly discuss the similarities and differences between the n+1 dimensional model and the 3+1 dimensional one. Our model serves as a first example of higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology and offers the possibility to investigate quantum gravity effects in higher dimensional cosmology.

  11. Wilson Loop Diagrams and Positroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwala, Susama; Marin-Amat, Eloi

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we study a new application of the positive Grassmannian to Wilson loop diagrams (or MHV diagrams) for scattering amplitudes in N= 4 Super Yang-Mill theory (N = 4 SYM). There has been much interest in studying this theory via the positive Grassmannians using BCFW recursion. This is the first attempt to study MHV diagrams for planar Wilson loop calculations (or planar amplitudes) in terms of positive Grassmannians. We codify Wilson loop diagrams completely in terms of matroids. This allows us to apply the combinatorial tools in matroid theory used to identify positroids (non-negative Grassmannians) to Wilson loop diagrams. In doing so, we find that certain non-planar Wilson loop diagrams define positive Grassmannians. While non-planar diagrams do not have physical meaning, this finding suggests that they may have value as an algebraic tool, and deserve further investigation.

  12. Loop-bed combustion apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer-Yu; Mei, Joseph S.; Slagle, Frank D.; Notestein, John E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a combustion apparatus in the configuration of a oblong annulus defining a closed loop. Particulate coal together with a sulfur sorbent such as sulfur or dolomite is introduced into the closed loop, ignited, and propelled at a high rate of speed around the loop. Flue gas is withdrawn from a location in the closed loop in close proximity to an area in the loop where centrifugal force imposed upon the larger particulate material maintains these particulates at a location spaced from the flue gas outlet. Only flue gas and smaller particulates resulting from the combustion and innerparticle grinding are discharged from the combustor. This structural arrangement provides increased combustion efficiency due to the essentially complete combustion of the coal particulates as well as increased sulfur absorption due to the innerparticle grinding of the sorbent which provides greater particle surface area.

  13. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The start-up transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe start-up behaviors. Topics include the four start-up scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the start-up scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power start-up, and methods to enhance the start-up success. Also addressed are the thermodynamic constraint between the evaporator and reservoir in the loop heat pipe operation, the superheat requirement for nucleate boiling, pressure spike and pressure surge during the start-up transient, and repeated cycles of loop start-up andshutdown under certain conditions.

  14. Endwall Vortex Effects on Turbulent Dispersion of Film Coolant in a Turbine Vane Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yapa, Sayuri D.; Elkins, Christopher J.; Eaton, John K.

    2013-11-01

    Turbine flows include strong secondary flows due to flow turning. The dominant flow feature is the passage vortex, located in the corner between the endwall and the suction surface of the airfoil. This vortex may have a strong effect on scalar transport in the turbine wake. Experiments were conducted to examine the dispersion of coolant emitted along the trailing edge of the airfoil. 3D velocity and concentration measurements were made using magnetic resonance imaging to study turbulent mixing in a realistic film-cooled nozzle vane cascade. The passage vortex has large effects on the flow features in the vane wake and on coolant mixing. A shear layer is created on the vane's suction side and interacts with the passage vortex after shedding from the trailing edge. The resulting vortex pattern forces the coolant jet into a highly distorted shape. A key question is how this distortion affects the turbulent diffusion of coolant. The 3D MRI-based velocity and concentration measurements allows for estimation of turbulent diffusivity. Control volumes are defined using a streamtube that is defined beginning just downstream of the trailing edge. The turbulent diffusivity is determined by integrating the Reynolds-averaged advection-diffusion equation over these control volumes. This work was sponsored by the Army Research Office and General Electric.

  15. MTR, TRA603. SUBBASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. INLET/OUTLET TUNNELS FOR COOLANT WATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. SUB-BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN. INLET/OUTLET TUNNELS FOR COOLANT WATER (NORTH SIDE) AND AIR (SOUTH SIDE). RABBIT CANAL AND BULKHEADS. SUMPS AND DRAINS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-3-7, 3/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100006, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Method and apparatus for removing iodine from a nuclear reactor coolant

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Martin H.

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing iodine-131 and iodine-125 from a liquid sodium reactor coolant. Non-radioactive iodine is dissolved in hot liquid sodium to increase the total iodine concentration. Subsequent precipitation of the iodine in a cold trap removes both the radioactive iodine isotopes as well as the non-radioactive iodine.

  17. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, Wayne H.; Christiansen, David W.

    1987-01-01

    A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  18. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, Wayne H.; Christiansen, David W.

    1987-05-05

    A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  19. RAPID INDUCTION OF HETEROGENEOUS ICE NUCLEATION IN A BIOLOGICALLY COMPATIBLE COOLANT

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Joshua; Bull, Diana; Becker, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Hypothermia is gaining recognition as an important medical treatment. To treat local cases of injury such as stroke, or certain surgical procedures, there is a need to induce local hypothermia. To treat shock or cardiac arrest survivors, there is a need to rapidly induce global hypothermia. Rapid induction of hypothermia has been achieved in animal research, but it has yet to be achieved clinically using a simple, widely practicable method. The clinical need for therapeutic hypothermia represents an engineering opportunity to develop an easy to use coolant that is sterile, biologically compatible, and maximizes coolant heat capacity. Here we present an initial characterization of a prototype platform technology designed to create a sterile, biologically compatible, high heat capacity coolant that has the potential to be used in all of these clinical applications. The coolant is a specially processed micro-particulate ice saline slurry, that can be easily pumped into a patient through surgical tubing, syringes, or minimally invasive surgical instruments. The device induces heterogeneous ice nucleation in a saline stream that has been super-cooled from room temperature to a temperature below the saline freezing point. Currently, the device begins continuous production of ice slurry that contains ~30 % ice by mass within 10 minutes. The nominal ice particle diameter is smaller than 100 μm. This work represents a significant first step toward addressing clinical needs for rapid human cooling. PMID:25954121

  20. Modeling Film-Coolant Flow Characteristics at the Exit of Shower-Head Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, R. E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The coolant flow characteristics at the hole exits of a film-cooled blade are derived from an earlier analysis where the hole pipes and coolant plenum were also discretized. The blade chosen is the VKI rotor with three staggered rows of shower-head holes. The present analysis applies these flow characteristics at the shower-head hole exits. A multi-block three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code with Wilcox's k-omega model is used to compute the heat transfer coefficient on the film-cooled turbine blade. A reasonably good comparison with the experimental data as well as with the more complete earlier analysis where the hole pipes and coolant plenum were also gridded is obtained. If the 1/7th power law is assumed for the coolant flow characteristics at the hole exits, considerable differences in the heat transfer coefficient on the blade surface, specially in the leading-edge region, are observed even though the span-averaged values of h (heat transfer coefficient based on T(sub o)-T(sub w)) match well with the experimental data. This calls for span-resolved experimental data near film-cooling holes on a blade for better validation of the code.

  1. Assembly for facilitating inservice inspection of a reactor coolant pump rotor

    DOEpatents

    Veronesi, Luciano

    1990-01-01

    A reactor coolant pump has an outer casing with an internal cavity holding a coolant and a rotor rotatably mounted in the cavity within the coolant. An assembly for permitting inservice inspection of the pump rotor without first draining the coolant from the casing cavity is attached to an end of the pump. A cylindrical bore is defined through the casing in axial alignment with an end of pump rotor and opening into the internal cavity. An extension attached on the rotor end and rotatable therewith has a cylindrical coupler member extending into the bore. An outer end of the coupler member has an element configured to receive a tool for performance of inservice rotor inspection. A hollow cylindrical member is disposed in the bore and surrounds the coupler member. The cylindrical member is slidably movable relative to the coupler member along the bore between a retracted position wherein the cylindrical member is stored for normal pump operation and an extended position wherein the cylindrical member is extended for permitting inservice rotor inspection. A cover member is detachably and sealably attached to the casing across the bore for closing the bore and retaining the cylindrical member at its retracted position for normal pump operation. Upon detachment of the cover member, the cylindrical member can be extended to permit inservice rotor inspection.

  2. ETR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA645. FOUR SECONDARY COOLANT PUMPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA-645. FOUR SECONDARY COOLANT PUMPS ARE ARRANGED IN A ROW. IN REAR ARE THREE SHUTDOWN EMERGENCY PUMPS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4176. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 12/21/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Effect of glycol-based coolants on the suppression and recovery of platinum fuel cell electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garsany, Yannick; Dutta, Sreya; Swider-Lyons, Karen E.

    2012-10-01

    We use cyclic and rotating disk electrode voltammetry to study glycol-based coolant formulations to show that individual constituents have either negligible or significant poisoning effects on the nanoscale Pt/carbon catalysts used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The base fluid in all these coolants is glycol (1, 3 propanediol), commercially available in a BioGlycol coolant formulation with an ethoxylated nonylphenol surfactant, and azole- and polyol-based non-ionic corrosion inhibitors. Exposure of a Pt/Vulcan carbon electrode to glycol-water or glycol-water-surfactant mixtures causes the loss of Pt electrochemical surface area (ECSA), but the Pt ECSA is fully recovered in clean electrolyte. Only mixtures with the azole corrosion inhibitor cause irreversible losses to the Pt ECSA and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity. The Pt ECSA and ORR activity can only be recovered to within 70% of its initial values after aggressive voltammetric cycling to 1.50 V after azole poisoning. When poisoned with a glycol mixture containing the polyol corrosion inhibitor instead, the Pt ECSA and ORR activity is completely recovered by exposure to a clean electrolyte. The results suggest that prior to incorporation in a fuel cell, voltammetric evaluation of the constituents of coolant formulations is worthwhile.

  4. Natural circulation in a liquid metal one-dimensional loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarantino, M.; De Grandis, S.; Benamati, G.; Oriolo, F.

    2008-06-01

    A wide use of pure lead, as well as its alloys (such as lead-bismuth, lead-lithium), is foreseen in several nuclear-related fields: it is studied as coolant in critical and sub-critical nuclear reactors, as spallation target for neutron generation in several applications and for tritium generation in fusion systems. In this framework, a new facility named NAtural CIrculation Experiment (NACIE), has been designed at ENEA-Brasimone Research Centre. NACIE is a rectangular loop, made by stainless steel pipes. It consists mainly of a cold and hot leg and an expansion tank installed on the top of the loop. A fuel bundle simulator, made by three electrical heaters placed in a triangular lattice, is located in the lower part of the cold leg, while a tube in tube heat exchanger is installed in the upper part of the hot leg. The adopted secondary fluid is THT oil, while the foreseen primary fluid for the tests is lead-bismuth in eutectic composition (LBE). The aim of the facility is to carry out experimental tests of natural circulation and collect data on the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) for heavy liquid metal flowing through rod bundles. The paper is focused on the preliminary estimation of the LBE flow rate along the loop. An analytical methodology has been applied, solving the continuity, momentum and energy transport equations under appropriate hypothesis. Moreover numerical simulations have been performed. The FLUENT 6.2 CFD code has been utilized for the numerical simulations. The main results carried out from the pre-tests simulations are illustrated in the paper, and a comparison with the theoretical estimations is done.

  5. Modeling loop entropy.

    PubMed

    Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    Proteins fold from a highly disordered state into a highly ordered one. Traditionally, the folding problem has been stated as one of predicting "the" tertiary structure from sequential information. However, new evidence suggests that the ensemble of unfolded forms may not be as disordered as once believed, and that the native form of many proteins may not be described by a single conformation, but rather an ensemble of its own. Quantifying the relative disorder in the folded and unfolded ensembles as an entropy difference may therefore shed light on the folding process. One issue that clouds discussions of "entropy" is that many different kinds of entropy can be defined: entropy associated with overall translational and rotational Brownian motion, configurational entropy, vibrational entropy, conformational entropy computed in internal or Cartesian coordinates (which can even be different from each other), conformational entropy computed on a lattice, each of the above with different solvation and solvent models, thermodynamic entropy measured experimentally, etc. The focus of this work is the conformational entropy of coil/loop regions in proteins. New mathematical modeling tools for the approximation of changes in conformational entropy during transition from unfolded to folded ensembles are introduced. In particular, models for computing lower and upper bounds on entropy for polymer models of polypeptide coils both with and without end constraints are presented. The methods reviewed here include kinematics (the mathematics of rigid-body motions), classical statistical mechanics, and information theory.

  6. Desensitization of over tip leakage in an axial turbine rotor by tip surface coolant injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Nikhil Molahally

    Mechanical energy extraction in axial flow turbine rotors occurs through a change in angular momentum of the working fluid. The gap between the turbine rotor and the stationary casing is referred to as the tip gap. High pressure turbine blades are typically un-shrouded and pressure driven flow through the tip gap is termed as over tip leakage. Over tip leakage reduces efficiency of the turbine stage and also causes thermal distress to blade tip surfaces. The gap height typically increases over the operational life of a turbine, leading to increased efficiency drop. The thermal load on the tip surface also increases with increasing gap height and is exacerbated by the radial transport of high temperature fluid found in the core of the combustor exit flow. Thus over tip leakage not only decreases stage efficiency, but also constrains it by limiting the maximum cycle temperature. Reducing the sensitivity of turbine performance to the effects of the tip gap is termed Tip Desensitization. An experimental investigation of tip desensitization through coolant injection from a tip surface trench was conducted in a large scale, low speed, rotating research turbine facility. Five out of twenty nine rotor blades, referred to as cooled blades, are provided with coolant injection at four locations, at 61%, 71%, 81%, and 91% blade tip axial chord length. At each of the first three locations the coolant jets are directed towards the blade pressure-side, while coolant is exhausted radially at the last location. The sensitivity of total pressure defect, due to over tip leakage, to tip gap height is reduced by both coolant injection and roughening of the casing surface. The total pressure defect due to the large gap height of 1.40% blade height is reduced to levels comparable to the defect due to a gap height of 0.72% blade height. The strong total pressure gradient that characterizes the leakage vortex due to the gap height of 1.40% blade height is considerably diminished by both

  7. Rogowski Loop design for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    McCormack, B.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Hatcher, R.

    2000-01-06

    The Rogowski Loop is one of the most basic diagnostics for tokamak operations. On the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), the plasma current Rogowski Loop had the constraints of the very limited space available on the center stack, 5,000 volt isolation, flexibility requirements as it remained a part of the Center Stack assembly after the first phase of operation, and a +120 C temperature requirement. For the second phase of operation, four Halo Current Rogowski Loops under the Center Stack tiles will be installed having +600 C and limited space requirements. Also as part of the second operational phase, up to ten Rogowski Loops will installed to measure eddy currents in the Passive Plate support structures with +350 C, restricted space, and flexibility requirements. This presentation will provide the details of the material selection, fabrication techniques, testing, and installation results of the Rogowski Loops that were fabricated for the high temperature operational and bakeout requirements, high voltage isolation requirements, and the space and flexibility requirements imposed upon the Rogowski Loops. In the future operational phases of NSTX, additional Rogowski Loops could be anticipated that will measure toroidal plasma currents in the vacuum vessel and in the Passive Plate assemblies.

  8. Polonium Issue in Fast Reactor Lead Coolants and One of the Ways of Its Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Khorasanov, G.L.; Ivanov, A.P.; Blokhin, A.I.

    2002-07-01

    One of the main issues in using materials for nuclear facilities is to minimize the production of the most hazardous radionuclides. In the ideal case, all nuclear reactor materials, except a fuel, should be low-activation. The term 'low-activation material' means that this one loses its induced activity in a short time after removal from irradiation. Proposals for building a fusion reactor using low-activation materials are given in Ref.1, 2. For this purpose, low-activation structural materials based on V-Ti-Cr alloys are in the stage of R and D in several countries [3,4]. Another technique to avoid the hazardous activity is in using isotopically enriched materials [5-7]. Although isotopic tailoring option requires tremendous technical efforts and it is too expensive, its application can be first of all assumed for those structural and functional materials which generate very hazardous radionuclides under irradiation. In modern projects of next generation NPPs the preference is given to fast reactors (FRs) with a lead coolant [8]. As it known, the coolant circulating through a FR core is activated, and in the future we should have problems with handling a completed coolant after FR decommissioning or at realization of repair or emergency activities. There, it is desirable to have a low-activation coolant with the low contents of hazardous radionuclides. In papers [9,10] presented at the previous ICONE conferences it was proposed to use lead isotope, Pb-206, as a coolant instead of lead natural, Pb-nat. This paper is devoted to more detailed calculations of accumulating stable bismuth, Bi-209, and polonium radioisotopes, Po-209 (T{sub 1/2}=102 y) and Po-210 (T{sub 1/2}=138 d), in 1 kg of Pb-nat or Pb-206 placed in the core of the BOR-60 type FR. (authors)

  9. Investigating Liquid CO2 as a Coolant for a MTSA Heat Exchanger Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Padilla, Sebastian; Powers, Aaron; Iacomini, Christie

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO 2) control for a future Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. CO 2 removal and rejection is accomplished by driving a sorbent through a temperature swing of approximately 210 K to 280 K . The sorbent is cooled to these sub-freezing temperatures by a Sublimating Heat Exchanger (SHX) with liquid coolant expanded to sublimation temperatures. Water is the baseline coolant available on the moon, and if used, provides a competitive solution to the current baseline PLSS schematic. Liquid CO2 (LCO2) is another non-cryogenic coolant readily available from Martian resources which can be produced and stored using relatively low power and minimal infrastructure. LCO 2 expands from high pressure liquid (5800 kPa) to Mars ambient (0.8 kPa) to produce a gas / solid mixture at temperatures as low as 156 K. Analysis and experimental work are presented to investigate factors that drive the design of a heat exchanger to effectively use this sink. Emphasis is given to enabling efficient use of the CO 2 cooling potential and mitigation of heat exchanger clogging due to solid formation. Minimizing mass and size as well as coolant delivery are also considered. The analysis and experimental work is specifically performed in an MTSA-like application to enable higher fidelity modeling for future optimization of a SHX design. In doing so, the work also demonstrates principles and concepts so that the design can be further optimized later in integrated applications (including Lunar application where water might be a choice of coolant).

  10. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Adam M.; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L.; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A.; Peretz, Fred J.; Robb, Kevin R.; Wilson, Dane F.; Yoder, Jr, Graydon L.

    2015-12-01

    with 3 cm diameter graphite-based fuel pebbles slowly circulating up through the core. Molten salt coolant (FLiBe) at 700°C flows concurrently (at significantly higher velocity) with the pebbles and is used to remove heat generated in the reactor core (approximately 1280 W/pebble), and supply it to a power conversion system. Refueling equipment continuously sorts spent fuel pebbles and replaces spent or damaged pebbles with fresh fuel. By combining greater or fewer numbers of pebble channel assemblies, multiple reactor designs with varying power levels can be offered. The PB-AHTR design is discussed in detail in Reference [1] and is shown schematically in Fig. 1. Fig. 1. PB-AHTR concept (drawing taken from Peterson et al., Design and Development of the Modular PB-AHTR Proceedings of ICApp 08). Pebble behavior within the core is a key issue in proving the viability of this concept. This includes understanding the behavior of the pebbles thermally, hydraulically, and mechanically (quantifying pebble wear characteristics, flow channel wear, etc). The experiment being developed is an initial step in characterizing the pebble behavior under realistic PB-AHTR operating conditions. It focuses on thermal and hydraulic behavior of a static pebble bed using a convective salt loop to provide prototypic fluid conditions to the bed, and a unique inductive heating technique to provide prototypic heating in the pebbles. The facility design is sufficiently versatile to allow a variety of other experimentation to be performed in the future. The facility can accommodate testing of scaled reactor components or sub-components such as flow diodes, salt-to-salt heat exchangers, and improved pump designs as well as testing of refueling equipment, high temperature instrumentation, and other reactor core designs.

  11. Cooling Characteristics of the V-1650-7 Engine. II - Effect of Coolant Conditions on Cylinder Temperatures and Heat Rejection at Several Engine Powers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H.; Bogdan, Louis J.; Chelko, Louis J.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted on a V-1650-7 engine to determine the cylinder temperatures and the coolant and oil heat rejections over a range of coolant flows (50 to 200 gal/min) and oil inlet temperatures (160 to 2150 F) for two values of coolant outlet temperature (250 deg and 275 F) at each of four power conditions ranging from approximately 1100 to 2000 brake horsepower. Data were obtained for several values of block-outlet pressure at each of the two coolant outlet temperatures. A mixture of 30 percent by volume of ethylene glycol and 70-percent water was used as the coolant. The effect of varying coolant flow, coolant outlet temperature, and coolant outlet pressure over the ranges investigated on cylinder-head temperatures was small (0 deg to 25 F) whereas the effect of increasing the engine power condition from ll00 to 2000 brake horsepower was large (maximum head-temperature increase, 110 F).

  12. TACT1- TRANSIENT THERMAL ANALYSIS OF A COOLED TURBINE BLADE OR VANE EQUIPPED WITH A COOLANT INSERT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    As turbine-engine core operating conditions become more severe, designers must develop more effective means of cooling blades and vanes. In order to design reliable, cooled turbine blades, advanced transient thermal calculation techniques are required. The TACT1 computer program was developed to perform transient and steady-state heat-transfer and coolant-flow analyses for cooled blades, given the outside hot-gas boundary condition, the coolant inlet conditions, the geometry of the blade shell, and the cooling configuration. TACT1 can analyze turbine blades, or vanes, equipped with a central coolant-plenum insert from which coolant-air impinges on the inner surface of the blade shell. Coolant-side heat-transfer coefficients are calculated with the heat transfer mode at each station being user specified as either impingement with crossflow, forced convection channel flow, or forced convection over pin fins. A limited capability to handle film cooling is also available in the program. The TACT1 program solves for the blade temperature distribution using a transient energy equation for each node. The nodal energy balances are linearized, one-dimensional, heat-conduction equations which are applied at the wall-outer-surface node, at the junction of the cladding and the metal node, and at the wall-inner-surface node. At the mid-metal node a linear, three-dimensional, heat-conduction equation is used. Similarly, the coolant pressure distribution is determined by solving the set of transfer momentum equations for the one-dimensional flow between adjacent fluid nodes. In the coolant channel, energy and momentum equations for one-dimensional compressible flow, including friction and heat transfer, are used for the elemental channel length between two coolant nodes. The TACT1 program first obtains a steady-state solution using iterative calculations to obtain convergence of stable temperatures, pressures, coolant-flow split, and overall coolant mass balance. Transient

  13. SDO Sees Flourishing Magnetic Loops

    NASA Video Gallery

    A bright set of loops near the edge of the sun’s face grew and shifted quickly after the magnetic field was disrupted by a small eruption on Nov. 25, 2015. Charged particles emitting light in extre...

  14. Automatic blocking of nested loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Robert; Dongarra, Jack J.

    1990-01-01

    Blocked algorithms have much better properties of data locality and therefore can be much more efficient than ordinary algorithms when a memory hierarchy is involved. On the other hand, they are very difficult to write and to tune for particular machines. The reorganization is considered of nested loops through the use of known program transformations in order to create blocked algorithms automatically. The program transformations used are strip mining, loop interchange, and a variant of loop skewing in which invertible linear transformations (with integer coordinates) of the loop indices are allowed. Some problems are solved concerning the optimal application of these transformations. It is shown, in a very general setting, how to choose a nearly optimal set of transformed indices. It is then shown, in one particular but rather frequently occurring situation, how to choose an optimal set of block sizes.

  15. SDO Sees Brightening Magnetic Loops

    NASA Video Gallery

    Two active regions sprouted arches of bundled magnetic loops in this video from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory taken on Nov. 11-12, 2015. Charged particles spin along the magnetic field, tracing...

  16. Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... that acts like a scalpel (surgical knife). An electric current is passed through the loop, which cuts away ... A procedure in which an instrument works with electric current to destroy tissue. Local Anesthesia: The use of ...

  17. Number of cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Olum, Ken D.; Shlaer, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Using recent simulation results, we provide the mass and speed spectrum of cosmic string loops. This is the quantity of primary interest for many phenomenological signatures of cosmic strings, and it can be accurately predicted using recently acquired detailed knowledge of the loop production function. We emphasize that gravitational smoothing of long strings plays a negligible role in determining the total number of existing loops. We derive a bound on the string tension imposed by recent constraints on the stochastic gravitational wave background from pulsar timing arrays, finding Gμ ≤2.8×10-9. We also provide a derivation of the Boltzmann equation for cosmic string loops in the language of differential forms.

  18. Observations of loops and prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Keith T.

    1994-01-01

    We review recent observations by the Yohkoh-SXT (Soft X-ray Telescope) in collaboration with other spacecraft and ground-based observatories of coronal loops and prominences. These new results point to problems that SoHO will be able to address. With a unique combination of rapid-cadence digital imaging (greater than or equal to 32 s full-disk and greater than or equal to 2 s partial-frame images), high spatial resolution (greater than or equal to 2.5 arcsec pixels), high sensitivity (EM less than or equal to 10(exp 42) cm(exp -3)), a low-scatter mirror, and large dynamic range, SXT can observe a vast range of targets on the Sun. Over the first 21 months of Yohkoh operations SXT has taken over one million images of the corona and so is building up an invaluable long-term database on the large-scale corona and loop geometry. The most striking thing about the SXT images is the range of loop sizes and shapes. The active regions are a bright tangle of magnetic field lines, surrounded by a network of large-scale quiet-Sun loops stretching over distances in excess of 105 km. The cross-section of most loops seems to be constant. Loops displaying significant Gamma's are the exception, not the rule, implying the presence of widespread currents in the corona. All magnetic structures show changes. Time scales range from seconds to months. The question of how these structures are formed, become filled with hot plasma, and are maintained is still open. While we see the propagation of brightenings along the length of active-region loops and in X-ray jets with velocities of several hundred km/s, much higher velocities are seen in the quiet Sun. In XBP flares, for example, velocities of over 1000 km/s are common. Active-region loops seem to be in constant motion, moving slowly outward, carrying plasma with them. During flares, loops often produce localized brightenings at the base and later at the apex of the loop. Quiescent filaments and prominences have been observed regularly

  19. Dynamical behaviour in coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisch, Bernhard M.

    1986-01-01

    Rapid variability has been found in two active region coronal loops observed by the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) and the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). There appear to be surprisingly few observations of the short-time scale behavior of hot loops, and the evidence presented herein lends support to the hypothesis that coronal heating may be impulsive and driven by flaring.

  20. THE CORONAL LOOP INVENTORY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S. S.; Paul, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Most coronal physicists now seem to agree that loops are composed of tangled magnetic strands and have both isothermal and multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. As yet, however, there is no information on the relative importance of each of these categories, and we do not know how common one is with respect to the other. In this paper, we investigate these temperature properties for all loop segments visible in the 171-Å image of AR 11294, which was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on 2011 September 15. Our analysis revealed 19 loop segments, but only 2 of these were clearly isothermal. Six additional segments were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within measurement uncertainties. One loop had both isothermal transition region and multithermal coronal solutions. Another five loop segments require multithermal plasma to reproduce the AIA observations. The five remaining loop segments could not be separated reliably from the background in the crucial non-171-Å AIA images required for temperature analysis. We hope that the direction of coronal heating models and the efforts modelers spend on various heating scenarios will be influenced by these results.

  1. The Coronal Loop Inventory Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.; Christian, G. M.; Dhaliwal, R. S. S.; Paul, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Most coronal physicists now seem to agree that loops are composed of tangled magnetic strands and have both isothermal and multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. As yet, however, there is no information on the relative importance of each of these categories, and we do not know how common one is with respect to the other. In this paper, we investigate these temperature properties for all loop segments visible in the 171-Å image of AR 11294, which was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on 2011 September 15. Our analysis revealed 19 loop segments, but only 2 of these were clearly isothermal. Six additional segments were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within measurement uncertainties. One loop had both isothermal transition region and multithermal coronal solutions. Another five loop segments require multithermal plasma to reproduce the AIA observations. The five remaining loop segments could not be separated reliably from the background in the crucial non-171-Å AIA images required for temperature analysis. We hope that the direction of coronal heating models and the efforts modelers spend on various heating scenarios will be influenced by these results.

  2. Study of coolant activation and dose rates with flow rate and power perturbations in pool-type research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, N.M.; Mirza, S.M.; Ahmad, N. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on a computer code using the multigroup diffusion theory based LEOPARD and ODMUG programs that has been developed to calculate the activity in the coolant leaving the core of a pool-type research reactor. Using this code, the dose rates at various locations along the coolant path with varying coolant flow rate and reactor power perturbations are determined. A flow rate decrease from 1000 to 145 m{sup 3}/h is considered. The results indicate that a flow rate decrease leads to an increase in the coolant outlet temperature, which affects the neutron group constants and hence the group fluxes. The activity in the coolant leaving the core increases with flow rate decrease. However, at the inlet of the holdup tank, the total dose rate first increases, then passes through a maximum at {approximately} 500 m{sup 3}/h, and finally decreases with flow rate decrease. The activity at the outlet of the holdup tank is mainly due to {sup 24}Na and {sup 56}Mn, and it increases by {approximately} 2% when the flow rate decreases from 1000 to 145 m{sup 3}/h. In an accidental power rise at constant flow rate, the activity in the coolant increases, and the dose rates at all the points along the coolant path show a slight nonlinear rise as the reactor power density increases.

  3. Effects of Coolant Temperature Changes on Reactivity for Various Coolants in a Liquid Salt Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Casino, William A. Jr.

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform an investigation into the relative merit of various salts and salt compounds being considered for use as coolants in the liquid salt cooled very high temperature reactor platform (LS-VHTR). Most of the non-nuclear properties necessary to evaluate these salts are known, but the neutronic characteristics important to reactor core design are still in need of a more extensive examination. This report provides a two-fold approach to further this investigation. First, a list of qualifying salts is assembled based upon acceptable non-nuclear properties. Second, the effect on system reactivity for a secondary system transient or an off-normal or accident condition is examined for each of these salt choices. The specific incident to be investigated is an increase in primary coolant temperature beyond normal operating parameters. In order to perform the relative merit comparison of each candidate salt, the System Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity is calculated for each candidate salt at various state points throughout the core burn history. (author)

  4. Kalman Orbit Optimized Loop Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Lawrence E.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Under certain conditions of low signal power and/or high noise, there is insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to close tracking loops with individual signals on orbiting Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In addition, the processing power available from flight computers is not great enough to implement a conventional ultra-tight coupling tracking loop. This work provides a method to track GNSS signals at very low SNR without the penalty of requiring very high processor throughput to calculate the loop parameters. The Kalman Orbit-Optimized Loop (KOOL) tracking approach constitutes a filter with a dynamic model and using the aggregate of information from all tracked GNSS signals to close the tracking loop for each signal. For applications where there is not a good dynamic model, such as very low orbits where atmospheric drag models may not be adequate to achieve the required accuracy, aiding from an IMU (inertial measurement unit) or other sensor will be added. The KOOL approach is based on research JPL has done to allow signal recovery from weak and scintillating signals observed during the use of GPS signals for limb sounding of the Earth s atmosphere. That approach uses the onboard PVT (position, velocity, time) solution to generate predictions for the range, range rate, and acceleration of the low-SNR signal. The low- SNR signal data are captured by a directed open loop. KOOL builds on the previous open loop tracking by including feedback and observable generation from the weak-signal channels so that the MSR receiver will continue to track and provide PVT, range, and Doppler data, even when all channels have low SNR.

  5. Belgian experience in applying the {open_quotes}leak-before-break{close_quotes} concept to the primary loop piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gerard, R.; Malekian, C.; Meessen, O.

    1997-04-01

    The Leak Before Break (LBB) concept allows to eliminate from the design basis the double-ended guillotine break of the primary loop piping, provided it can be demonstrated by a fracture mechanics analysis that a through-wall flaw, of a size giving rise to a leakage still well detectable by the plant leak detection systems, remains stable even under accident conditions (including the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE)). This concept was successfully applied to the primary loop piping of several Belgian Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) units, operated by the Utility Electrabel. One of the main benefits is to permit justification of supports in the primary loop and justification of the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel and internals in case of a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in stretch-out conditions. For two of the Belgian PWR units, the LBB approach also made it possible to reduce the number of large hydraulic snubbers installed on the primary coolant pumps. Last but not least, the LBB concept also facilitates the steam generator replacement operations, by eliminating the need for some pipe whip restraints located close to the steam generator. In addition to the U.S. regulatory requirements, the Belgian safety authorities impose additional requirements which are described in details in a separate paper. An novel aspect of the studies performed in Belgium is the way in which residual loads in the primary loop are taken into account. Such loads may result from displacements imposed to close the primary loop in a steam generator replacement operation, especially when it is performed using the {open_quote}two cuts{close_quotes} technique. The influence of such residual loads on the LBB margins is discussed in details and typical results are presented.

  6. Comparison of passive safety and the safety injection systems under loss of coolant accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, M.; Chughtai, I. R.; Lodhi, M. A. K.

    2009-04-01

    A Passive Safety Injection System (PSIS) and a Safety Injection System (SIS) with reference to a typical pressurized water reactor have been studied. The performance of the PSIS has been analyzed for a large break Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in one of the cold leg of reactor coolant system. The SIS is a huge system consisting of many active components needing electrical power to perform its role of core cooling as high head safety injection system under designed accidents. The PSIS consist of passive components and performs its function automatically under gravity. In a reactor transient simulation, the PSIS and the SIS are tested for large break LOCA under the same boundary conditions. Critical thermal hydraulic parameters of both the systems are presented. Results obtained are approximately similar in both cases. Nevertheless, the PSIS would be a better choice for handling such scenarios due to its reduced and passive components.

  7. Compression waves at boiling coolant outflow and peculiarities of their interaction with a barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribaturin, N. A.; Lezhnin, S. I.; Vozhakov, I. S.; Alekseev, M. V.

    2016-10-01

    Numerical simulation of the boiling coolant outflow at a butt-break of high-pressure pipeline was carried out. Interaction between the emerging compression wave and a barrier was studied. The temporal dynamics of the axial pressure profile and pressure in the center of the target were detected. The form of the radial pressure profile on the target was investigated. It has been obtained that in the case of the two-phase outflowing coolant the calculated pressure of the wave reflected from the barrier near the nozzle is less than the theoretical prediction for the ideal gas, and that with an increase in the distance from the nozzle to the barrier the differences between the calculated and theoretical values decrease.

  8. PIV measurements of coolant flow field in a diesel engine cylinder head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwei; Zhang, Zhenyang; Xue, Cheng; Huang, Yunlong

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents experimental measurements of coolant flow field in the water jacket of a diesel engine cylinder head. The test was conducted at three different flow rates using a 2-D PIV system. Appropriate tracing particles were selected and delivery device was designed and manufactured before the test. The flow parameters, such as velocity, vorticity and turbulence, were used to analyze the flow field. The effects of vortex which was located between the intake valve and the exhaust valve were discussed. The experimental results showed an asymmetric distribution of velocity in the water jacket. This led to an asymmetric thermal distribution, which would shorten the service life of the cylinder head. The structure optimization to the water jacket of cylinder head was proposed in this paper. The experimental system, especially the 2-D PIV system, is a great help to study the coolant flow structure and analyze cooling mechanism in the diesel engine cylinder head.

  9. The effect of coolants on the performance of magnetic micro-refrigerators.

    PubMed

    Silva, D J; Bordalo, B D; Pereira, A M; Ventura, J; Oliveira, J C R E; Araújo, J P

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is an alternative cooling technique with envisaged technological applications on micro- and opto-electronic devices. Here, we present a magnetic micro-refrigerator cooling device with embedded micro-channels and based on the magnetocaloric effect. We studied the influence of the coolant fluid in the refrigeration process by numerically simulating the heat transfer processes using the finite element method. This allowed us to calculate the cooling power of the device. Our results show that gallium is the most efficient coolant fluid and, when used with Gd5Si2Ge2, a maximum power of 11.2 W/mm3 at a working frequency of -5 kHz can be reached. However, for operation frequencies around 50 Hz, water is the most efficient fluid with a cooling power of 0.137 W/mm3.

  10. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.; Turknett, Jerry C.; Smith, Alvin

    1989-01-01

    The effects of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in circular coolant channels, which are heated over a fraction of their perimeters, are studied. The variations were examined in both the mean and local (axial, and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls. Improvements were initiated in the present data reduction analysis. These efforts should lead to the development of heat transfer correlations which include effects of single side heat flux and enhancement device configuration. It is hoped that a stage will be set for the study of heat transfer and pressure drop in single sided heated systems under zero gravity conditions.

  11. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    1991-01-01

    Future space exploration and commercialization will require more efficient heat rejection systems. For the required heat transfer rates, such systems must use advanced heat transfer techniques. Forced two phase flow boiling heat transfer with enhancements falls in this category. However, moderate to high quality two phase systems tend to require higher pressure losses. This report is divided into two major parts: (1) Multidimensional wall temperature measurement and heat transfer enhancement for top heated horizontal channels with flow boiling; and (2) Improved analytical heat transfer data reduction for a single side heated coolant channel. Part 1 summarizes over forty experiments which involve both single phase convection and flow boiling in a horizontal channel heated externally from the top side. Part 2 contains parametric dimensionless curves with parameters such as the coolant channel radius ratio, the Biot number, and the circumferential coordinate.

  12. Algebraic grid generation for coolant passages of turbine blades with serpentine channels and pin fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Roelke, R. J.; Steinthorsson, E.

    1991-01-01

    In order to study numerically details of the flow and heat transfer within coolant passages of turbine blades, a method must first be developed to generate grid systems within the very complicated geometries involved. In this study, a grid generation package was developed that is capable of generating the required grid systems. The package developed is based on an algebraic grid generation technique that permits the user considerable control over how grid points are to be distributed in a very explicit way. These controls include orthogonality of grid lines next to boundary surfaces and ability to cluster about arbitrary points, lines, and surfaces. This paper describes that grid generation package and shows how it can be used to generate grid systems within complicated-shaped coolant passages via an example.

  13. Algebraic grid generation for coolant passages of turbine blades with serpentine channels and pin fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, T. I.-P.; Roelke, R. J.; Steinthorsson, E.

    1991-06-01

    In order to study numerically details of the flow and heat transfer within coolant passages of turbine blades, a method must first be developed to generate grid systems within the very complicated geometries involved. In this study, a grid generation package was developed that is capable of generating the required grid systems. The package developed is based on an algebraic grid generation technique that permits the user considerable control over how grid points are to be distributed in a very explicit way. These controls include orthogonality of grid lines next to boundary surfaces and ability to cluster about arbitrary points, lines, and surfaces. This paper describes that grid generation package and shows how it can be used to generate grid systems within complicated-shaped coolant passages via an example.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulation of a Coolant Jet in a Periodic Crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Chirdeep; Acharya, Sumanta

    1998-01-01

    A Direct Numerical Simulation of a coolant jet injected normally into a periodic crossflow is presented. The physical situation simulated represents a periodic module in a coolant hole array with a heated crossflow. A collocated finite difference scheme is used which is fifth-order accurate spatially and second-order accurate temporally. The scheme is based on a fractional step approach and requires the solution of a pressure-Poisson equation. The simulations are obtained for a blowing ratio of 0.25 and a channel Reynolds number of 5600. The simulations reveal the dynamics of several large scale structures including the Counter-rotating Vortex Pair (CVP), the horse-shoe vortex, the shear layer vortex, the wall vortex and the wake vortex. The origins and the interactions of these vortical structures are identified and explored. Also presented are the turbulence statistics and how they relate to the flow structures.

  15. Small-break loss-of-coolant accidents in the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B.E.; Steiner, J.L.; Harmony, S.C.

    1995-09-01

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor developed by Asea Brown Boveri (ABB). A unique feature of the PIUS concept is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is normally controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. ABB submitted the PIUS design to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for preapplication review, and Los Alamos supported the NRC`s review effort. Baseline analyses of small-break initiators at two locations were performed with the system neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis code TRAC-PF1/MOD2. In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept to severe off-normal conditions having a very low probability of occurrence.

  16. Study of the Open Loop and Closed Loop Oscillator Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, George R.; Baker, Benjamin; Riley, Tony; Langbehn, Adam; Aryal, Harishchandra; Benzerga, M. Lamine

    2015-04-11

    This report presents the progress and completion of a five-year study undertaken at Idaho State University of the measurement of very small worth reactivity samples comparing open and closed loop oscillator techniques.The study conclusively demonstrated the equivalency of the two techniques with regard to uncertainties in reactivity values, i.e., limited by reactor noise. As those results are thoroughly documented in recent publications, in this report we will concentrate on the support work that was necessary. For example, we describe in some detail the construction and calibration of a pilot rod for the closed loop system. We discuss the campaign to measure the required reactor parameters necessary for inverse-kinetics. Finally, we briefly discuss the transfer of the open loop technique to other reactor systems.

  17. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, W.H.; Christiansen, D.W.

    1983-11-25

    This patent discloses a method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  18. Method for controlling coolant flow in airfoil, flow control structure and airfoil incorporating the same

    SciTech Connect

    Itzel, Gary Michael; Devine, II, Robert Henry; Chopra, Sanjay; Toornman, Thomas Nelson

    2003-07-08

    A coolant flow control structure is provided to channel cooling media flow to the fillet region defined at the transition between the wall of a nozzle vane and a wall of a nozzle segment, for cooling the fillet region. In an exemplary embodiment, the flow control structure defines a gap with the fillet region to achieve the required heat transfer coefficients in this region to meet part life requirements.

  19. Main-coolant-pump shaft-seal guidelines. Volume 3. Specification guidelines. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, C.E.; Greer, A.O.

    1983-03-01

    This report presents a set of guidelines and criteria to aid in the generation of procurement specifications for Main Coolant Pump Shaft Seals. The noted guidelines are developed from EPRI sponsored nuclear power plant seal operating experience studies, a review of pump and shaft seal literature and discussions with pump and seal designers. This report is preliminary in nature and could be expanded and finalized subsequent to completion of further design, test and evaluation efforts.

  20. Main-coolant-pump shaft-seal guidelines. Volume 2. Operational guidelines. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, C.E.; Greer, A.O.

    1983-03-01

    This report presents a set of guidelines and criteria for improving main coolant pump shaft seal operational reliability. The noted guidelines are developed from EPRI sponsored nuclear power plant seal operating experience studies. Usage procedures/practices and operational environment influence on seal life and reliability from the most recent such survey are summarized. The shaft seal and its auxiliary supporting systems are discussed both from technical and operational related viewpoints.

  1. Advanced Intermediate Heat Transport Loop Design Configurations for Hydrogen Production Using High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Rober Barner; Paul Pickard

    2005-11-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic evaluations and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various

  2. Guidelines to achieve seals with minimal leak rates for HWR-NPR coolant system components

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.

    1991-03-01

    Seal design practices that are acceptable in pressurized-water and boiling-water reactors in the United States are not usable for the Heavy Water Reactor-New Production Reactor (HWR-NPR) because of the stringent requirement on tritium control for the atmosphere within its containment building. To maintain an atmosphere in which workers do not need protective equipment, the components of the coolant system must have a cumulative leak rate less than 0.00026 L/s. Existing technology for seal systems was reviewed with regard to flange, elastomer, valve, and pump design. A technology data base for the designers of the HWR-NPR coolant system was derived from operating experience and seal development work on reactors in the United States, Canada, and Europe. This data base was then used to generate guidelines for the design of seals and/or joints for the HWR-NPR coolant system. Also discussed are needed additional research and development, as well as the necessary component qualification tests for an effective quality control program. 141 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Fuel, Structural Material and Coolant for an Advanced Fast Micro-Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Nascimento, J. A.; Duimarães, L. N. F.; Ono, S.

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials.

  4. Inverse design of a proper number, shapes, sizes, and locations of coolant flow passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.

    1992-01-01

    During the past several years we have developed an inverse method that allows a thermal cooling system designer to determine proper sizes, shapes, and locations of coolant passages (holes) in, say, an internally cooled turbine blade, a scram jet strut, a rocket chamber wall, etc. Using this method the designer can enforce a desired heat flux distribution on the hot outer surface of the object, while simultaneously enforcing desired temperature distributions on the same hot outer surface as well as on the cooled interior surfaces of each of the coolant passages. This constitutes an over-specified problem which is solved by allowing the number, sizes, locations and shapes of the holes to adjust iteratively until the final internally cooled configuration satisfies the over-specified surface thermal conditions and the governing equation for the steady temperature field. The problem is solved by minimizing an error function expressing the difference between the specified and the computed hot surface heat fluxes. The temperature field analysis was performed using our highly accurate boundary integral element code with linearly varying temperature along straight surface panels. Examples of the inverse design applied to internally cooled turbine blades and scram jet struts (coated and non-coated) having circular and non-circular coolant flow passages will be shown.

  5. Parametric study on maximum transportable distance and cost for thermal energy transportation using various coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Su-Jong Yoon; Piyush Sabharwall

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as district heating, desalination, hydrogen production and other process heat applications, etc. The process heat industry/facilities will be located outside the nuclear island due to safety measures. This thermal energy from the reactor has to be transported a fair distance. In this study, analytical analysis was conducted to identify the maximum distance that thermal energy could be transported using various coolants such as molten-salts, helium and water by varying the pipe diameter and mass flow rate. The cost required to transport each coolant was also analyzed. The coolants analyzed are molten salts (such as: KClMgCl2, LiF-NaF-KF (FLiNaK) and KF-ZrF4), helium and water. Fluoride salts are superior because of better heat transport characteristics but chloride salts are most economical for higher temperature transportation purposes. For lower temperature water is a possible alternative when compared with He, because low pressure He requires higher pumping power which makes the process very inefficient and economically not viable for both low and high temperature application.

  6. Chimera grids in the simulation of three-dimensional flowfields in turbine-blade-coolant passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, M. A.; Rimlinger, M. J.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Civinskas, K. C.

    1993-06-01

    When computing flows inside geometrically complex turbine-blade coolant passages, the structure of the grid system used can affect significantly the overall time and cost required to obtain solutions. This paper addresses this issue while evaluating and developing computational tools for the design and analysis of coolant-passages, and is divided into two parts. In the first part, the various types of structured and unstructured grids are compared in relation to their ability to provide solutions in a timely and cost-effective manner. This comparison shows that the overlapping structured grids, known as Chimera grids, can rival and in some instances exceed the cost-effectiveness of unstructured grids in terms of both the man hours needed to generate grids and the amount of computer memory and CPU time needed to obtain solutions. In the second part, a computational tool utilizing Chimera grids was used to compute the flow and heat transfer in two different turbine-blade coolant passages that contain baffles and numerous pin fins. These computations showed the versatility and flexibility offered by Chimera grids.

  7. Chimera grids in the simulation of three-dimensional flowfields in turbine-blade-coolant passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, M. A.; Rimlinger, M. J.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Civinskas, K. C.

    1993-01-01

    When computing flows inside geometrically complex turbine-blade coolant passages, the structure of the grid system used can affect significantly the overall time and cost required to obtain solutions. This paper addresses this issue while evaluating and developing computational tools for the design and analysis of coolant-passages, and is divided into two parts. In the first part, the various types of structured and unstructured grids are compared in relation to their ability to provide solutions in a timely and cost-effective manner. This comparison shows that the overlapping structured grids, known as Chimera grids, can rival and in some instances exceed the cost-effectiveness of unstructured grids in terms of both the man hours needed to generate grids and the amount of computer memory and CPU time needed to obtain solutions. In the second part, a computational tool utilizing Chimera grids was used to compute the flow and heat transfer in two different turbine-blade coolant passages that contain baffles and numerous pin fins. These computations showed the versatility and flexibility offered by Chimera grids.

  8. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented.

  9. Assessment of fiber optic sensors for aging monitoring of industrial liquid coolants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riziotis, Christos; El Sachat, Alexandros; Markos, Christos; Velanas, Pantelis; Meristoudi, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, Aggelos

    2015-03-01

    Lately the demand for in situ and real time monitoring of industrial assets and processes has been dramatically increased. Although numerous sensing techniques have been proposed, only a small fraction can operate efficiently under harsh industrial environments. In this work the operational properties of a proposed photonic based chemical sensing scheme, capable to monitor the ageing process and the quality characteristics of coolants and lubricants in industrial heavy machinery for metal finishing processes is presented. The full spectroscopic characterization of different coolant liquids revealed that the ageing process is connected closely to the acidity/ pH value of coolants, despite the fact that the ageing process is quite complicated, affected by a number of environmental parameters such as the temperature, humidity and development of hazardous biological content as for example fungi. Efficient and low cost optical fiber sensors based on pH sensitive thin overlayers, are proposed and employed for the ageing monitoring. Active sol-gel based materials produced with various pH indicators like cresol red, bromophenol blue and chorophenol red in tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were used for the production of those thin film sensitive layers deposited on polymer's and silica's large core and highly multimoded optical fibers. The optical characteristics, sensing performance and environmental robustness of those optical sensors are presented, extracting useful conclusions towards their use in industrial applications.

  10. Nuclear-radiation-actuated valve. [Patent application; for increasing coolant flow to blanket

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Schively, D.P.

    1982-01-19

    The present invention relates to a breeder reactor blanket fuel assembly coolant system valve which increases coolant flow to the blanket fuel assembly to minimize long-term temperature increases caused by fission of fissile fuel created from fertile fuel through operation of the breeder reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  11. The high-temperature sodium coolant technology in nuclear power installations for hydrogen power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, F. A.; Sorokin, A. P.; Alekseev, V. V.; Konovalov, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    In the case of using high-temperature sodium-cooled nuclear power installations for obtaining hydrogen and for other innovative applications (gasification and fluidization of coal, deep petroleum refining, conversion of biomass into liquid fuel, in the chemical industry, metallurgy, food industry, etc.), the sources of hydrogen that enters from the reactor plant tertiary coolant circuit into its secondary coolant circuit have intensity two or three orders of magnitude higher than that of hydrogen sources at a nuclear power plant (NPP) equipped with a BN-600 reactor. Fundamentally new process solutions are proposed for such conditions. The main prerequisite for implementing them is that the hydrogen concentration in sodium coolant is a factor of 100-1000 higher than it is in modern NPPs taken in combination with removal of hydrogen from sodium by subjecting it to vacuum through membranes made of vanadium or niobium. Numerical investigations carried out using a diffusion model showed that, by varying such parameters as fuel rod cladding material, its thickness, and time of operation in developing the fuel rods for high-temperature nuclear power installations (HT NPIs) it is possible to exclude ingress of cesium into sodium through the sealed fuel rod cladding. However, if the fuel rod cladding loses its tightness, operation of the HT NPI with cesium in the sodium will be unavoidable. Under such conditions, measures must be taken for deeply purifying sodium from cesium in order to minimize the diffusion of cesium into the structural materials.

  12. A {open_quotes}zero waste{close_quotes} coolant management strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Kennicott, M.A.

    1994-04-01

    In June of 1992 the Waste Minimization Program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) began a study to determine the best methods of managing water-based industrial metalworking fluids in the plant`s Tool Manufacturing Shop. The shop was faced with the challenge of managing fluids that could no longer be disposed of in the traditional manner, through the plant`s liquid process waste drains, due to a problem they, were having causing in the Liquid Waste Operations Evaporator. The study`s goal was to reduce the waste coolants being generated and to reduce worker exposure to a serious health risk. Results of this study and those of a subsequent study to determine relative compatibilities of various coolants and metals, led to the application of a {open_quotes}zero waste{close_quotes} machine coolant management program. This program is currently saving the generation of 10,000 gallons of liquid waste annually, has eliminated worker exposure to harmful bacteria and biocides, and should result in extended machine tool life, increased product quality, fewer rejected parts, and decreases labor costs.

  13. Evaluation of the coolant reactivity coefficient influence on the dynamic response of a small LFR system

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzi, S.; Bortot, S.; Cammi, A.; Ponciroli, R.

    2012-07-01

    An assessment of the coolant reactivity feedback influence on a small Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) dynamics has been made aimed at providing both qualitative and quantitative insights into the system transient behavior depending on the sign of the above mentioned coefficient. The need of such an investigation has been recognized since fast reactors cooled by heavy liquid metals show to be characterized by a strong coupling between primary and secondary systems. In particular, the coolant density and radial expansion coefficients have been attested to play a major role in determining the core response to any perturbed condition on the Steam Generator (SG) side. The European Lead-cooled System (ELSY)-based demonstrator (DEMO) has been assumed as the reference LFR case study. As a first step, a zero-dimensional dynamics model has been developed and implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK{sup R} environment; then typical transient scenarios have been simulated by incorporating the actual negative lead density reactivity coefficient and its opposite. In all the examined cases results have shown that the reactor behaves in a completely different way when considering a positive coolant feedback instead of the reference one, the system free dynamics resulting moreover considerably slower due to the core and SG mutually conflicting reactions. The outcomes of the present analysis may represent a useful feedback for both the core and the control system designers. (authors)

  14. The effect of fuel thermal conductivity on the behavior of LWR cores during loss-of-coolant accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Wang, Dean; Ott, Larry J.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of variation in thermal conductivity of light water reactor fuel elements on core response during loss-of-coolant accident scenarios is examined. Initially, a simplified numerical analysis is utilized to determine the time scales associated with dissipation of stored energy from the fuel into the coolant once the fission reaction is stopped. The analysis is then followed by full reactor system thermal-hydraulics analysis of a typical boiling and pressurized water reactor subjected to a large break loss-of-coolant accident scenario using the TRACE code. Accordingly, sensitivity analyses to examine the effect of an increase in fuel thermal conductivity, up to 500%, on fuel temperature evolution during these transients are performed. Given the major differences in thermal-hydraulics design aspects of boiling and pressurized water reactors, different fuel and temperature responses during the simulated loss-of-coolant transients are observed.

  15. Numerical analysis of the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer in liquid rocket engine combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Van, Luong

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this paper are to develop a multidisciplinary computational methodology to predict the hot-gas-side and coolant-side heat transfer and to use it in parametric studies to recommend optimized design of the coolant channels for a regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine combustor. An integrated numerical model which incorporates CFD for the hot-gas thermal environment, and thermal analysis for the liner and coolant channels, was developed. This integrated CFD/thermal model was validated by comparing predicted heat fluxes with those of hot-firing test and industrial design methods for a 40 k calorimeter thrust chamber and the Space Shuttle Main Engine Main Combustion Chamber. Parametric studies were performed for the Advanced Main Combustion Chamber to find a strategy for a proposed combustion chamber coolant channel design.

  16. Waves in Solar Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T. J.

    2016-02-01

    The corona is visible in the optical band only during a total solar eclipse or with a coronagraph. Coronal loops are believed to be plasma-filled closed magnetic flux anchored in the photosphere. Based on the temperature regime, they are generally classified into cool, warm, and hot loops. The magnetized coronal structures support propagation of various types of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves. This chapter reviews the recent progress made in studies based on observations of four types of wave phenomena mainly occurring in coronal loops of active regions, including: flare-excited slow-mode waves; impulsively excited kink-mode waves; propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves; and ubiquitous propagating kink (Alfvénic) waves. This review not only comprehensively discusses these waves and coronal seismology but also topics that are newly emerging or hotly debated in order to provide the reader with useful guidance on further studies.

  17. Criteria for saturated magnetization loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harres, A.; Mikhov, M.; Skumryev, V.; Andrade, A. M. H. de; Schmidt, J. E.; Geshev, J.

    2016-03-01

    Proper estimation of magnetization curve parameters is vital in studying magnetic systems. In the present article, criteria for discrimination non-saturated (minor) from saturated (major) hysteresis loops are proposed. These employ the analysis of (i) derivatives of both ascending and descending branches of the loop, (ii) remanent magnetization curves, and (iii) thermomagnetic curves. Computational simulations are used in order to demonstrate their validity. Examples illustrating the applicability of these criteria to well-known real systems, namely Fe3O4 and Ni fine particles, are provided. We demonstrate that the anisotropy-field value estimated from a visual examination of an only apparently major hysteresis loop could be more than two times lower than the real one.

  18. Digital phase-lock loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Jr., Jess B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved digital phase lock loop incorporates several distinctive features that attain better performance at high loop gain and better phase accuracy. These features include: phase feedback to a number-controlled oscillator in addition to phase rate; analytical tracking of phase (both integer and fractional cycles); an amplitude-insensitive phase extractor; a more accurate method for extracting measured phase; a method for changing loop gain during a track without loss of lock; and a method for avoiding loss of sampled data during computation delay, while maintaining excellent tracking performance. The advantages of using phase and phase-rate feedback are demonstrated by comparing performance with that of rate-only feedback. Extraction of phase by the method of modeling provides accurate phase measurements even when the number-controlled oscillator phase is discontinuously updated.

  19. Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas M. Gerstner

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 “flux traps” (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop’s temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

  20. Many Ways to Loop DNA

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, I developed methods for directly visualizing DNA and DNA-protein complexes using an electron microscope. This made it possible to examine the shape of DNA and to visualize proteins as they fold and loop DNA. Early applications included the first visualization of true nucleosomes and linkers and the demonstration that repeating tracts of adenines can cause a curvature in DNA. The binding of DNA repair proteins, including p53 and BRCA2, has been visualized at three- and four-way junctions in DNA. The trombone model of DNA replication was directly verified, and the looping of DNA at telomeres was discovered. PMID:24005675

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF A MULTI-LOOP FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER FACILITY FOR ADVANCED NUCLEAR REACTOR THERMAL HYDRAULIC AND HYBRID ENERGY SYSTEM STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    James E. O'Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-09-01

    A new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility for advanced nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Molten salts have been identified as excellent candidate heat transport fluids for primary or secondary coolant loops, supporting advanced high temperature and small modular reactors (SMRs). Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed. A preliminary design configuration will be presented, with the required characteristics of the various components. The loop will utilize advanced high-temperature compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) operating at prototypic intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) conditions. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750°C), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa) at a temperature of ~450°C. Experiment design challenges include identification of suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. Corrosion and high temperature creep behavior are major considerations. The facility will include a thermal energy storage capability designed to support scaled process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will also provide important data for code ve

  2. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Terrence C; DeWolf, Travis; Kleinhans, Ashley; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is even more difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the output from the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects the hardware's future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses of neuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loop benchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of "minimal" simulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, while still maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the same benchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchers to explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardware excels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motor control for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we show that an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across a randomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interacting joints to be controlled. PMID:26696820

  3. Closing the Loop with Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altizer, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Conducting exercises provides a critical bridge between the theory of an Emergency Action Plan and its effective implementation. When conducted properly, exercises can fill the gap between training and after-action review to close the preparedness loop--before an actual emergency occurs. Often exercises are planned and conducted on campus based on…

  4. Telomeres thrown for a loop.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2004-11-19

    A remarkable paper from the de Lange lab (Wang et al., 2004) in a recent issue of Cell reveals that homologous recombination can result in the abrupt shortening of telomeres in a process that appears to involve reciprocal crossing over within the t-loop structure that protects chromosome ends.

  5. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Terrence C.; DeWolf, Travis; Kleinhans, Ashley; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is even more difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the output from the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects the hardware's future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses of neuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loop benchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of “minimal” simulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, while still maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the same benchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchers to explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardware excels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motor control for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we show that an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across a randomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interacting joints to be controlled. PMID:26696820

  6. The influence of EI-21 redox ion-exchange resins on the secondary-coolant circuit water chemistry of vehicular nuclear power installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, L. N.; Rakov, V. T.

    2015-06-01

    The results obtained from testing the secondary-coolant circuit water chemistry of full-scale land-based prototype bench models of vehicular nuclear power installations equipped with water-cooled water-moderated and liquid-metal reactor plants are presented. The influence of copper-containing redox ionexchange resins intended for chemically deoxygenating steam condensate on the working fluid circulation loop's water chemistry is determined. The influence of redox ion-exchange resins on the water chemistry is evaluated by generalizing an array of data obtained in the course of extended monitoring using the methods relating to physicochemical analysis of the quality of condensate-feedwater path media and the methods relating to metallographic analysis of the state of a faulty steam generator's tube system surfaces. The deoxygenating effectiveness of the normal state turbine condensate vacuum deaeration system is experimentally determined. The refusal from applying redox ion-exchange resins in the condensate polishing ion-exchange filters is formulated based on the obtained data on the adverse effect of copper-containing redox ionexchange resins on the condensate-feedwater path water chemistry and based on the data testifying a sufficient effect from using the normal state turbine condensate vacuum deaeration system. Data on long-term operation of the prototype bench model of a vehicular nuclear power installation without subjecting the turbine condensate to chemical deoxygenation are presented.

  7. Loop quantum cosmology from quantum reduced loop gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    We show how loop quantum cosmology can be derived as an effective semiclassical description of loop quantum gravity. Using the tools of QRLG, a gauge fixed version of LQG, we take the coherent states of the fundamental microscopic theory suitable to describe a Bianchi I Universe and we find a mapping between the expectation value of the Hamiltonian and the dynamics of LQC. Our results are in agreement with a lattice refinement framework for LQC, thus the so-called “old” and “improved-dynamics” regularization schemes can be reproduced. These amount to different choices of relations between local variables and the smeared ones entering the definition of the coherent states. The leading order of the fundamental theory corresponds to LQC, but we also find different inverse volume corrections, that depend on a purely quantum observable, namely the number of nodes of the states.

  8. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein N.

    1988-01-01

    An improved reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for a sodium cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The sodium cooled nuclear reactor is of the type having a reactor vessel liner separating the reactor hot pool on the upstream side of an intermediate heat exchanger and the reactor cold pool on the downstream side of the intermediate heat exchanger. The improvement includes a flow path across the reactor vessel liner flow gap which dissipates core heat across the reactor vessel and containment vessel responsive to a casualty including the loss of normal heat removal paths and associated shutdown of the main coolant liquid sodium pumps. In normal operation, the reactor vessel cold pool is inlet to the suction side of coolant liquid sodium pumps, these pumps being of the electromagnetic variety. The pumps discharge through the core into the reactor hot pool and then through an intermediate heat exchanger where the heat generated in the reactor core is discharged. Upon outlet from the heat exchanger, the sodium is returned to the reactor cold pool. The improvement includes placing a jet pump across the reactor vessel liner flow gap, pumping a small flow of liquid sodium from the lower pressure cold pool into the hot pool. The jet pump has a small high pressure driving stream diverted from the high pressure side of the reactor pumps. During normal operation, the jet pumps supplement the normal reactor pressure differential from the lower pressure cold pool to the hot pool. Upon the occurrence of a casualty involving loss of coolant pump pressure, and immediate cooling circuit is established by the back flow of sodium through the jet pumps from the reactor vessel hot pool to the reactor vessel cold pool. The cooling circuit includes flow into the reactor vessel liner flow gap immediate the reactor vessel wall and containment vessel where optimum and immediate discharge of residual reactor heat occurs.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Non-Rotating and Rotating Coolant Channel Flow Fields. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.

    2000-01-01

    Future generations of ultra high bypass-ratio jet engines will require far higher pressure ratios and operating temperatures than those of current engines. For the foreseeable future, engine materials will not be able to withstand the high temperatures without some form of cooling. In particular the turbine blades, which are under high thermal as well as mechanical loads, must be cooled. Cooling of turbine blades is achieved by bleeding air from the compressor stage of the engine through complicated internal passages in the turbine blades (internal cooling, including jet-impingement cooling) and by bleeding small amounts of air into the boundary layer of the external flow through small discrete holes on the surface of the blade (film cooling and transpiration cooling). The cooling must be done using a minimum amount of air or any increases in efficiency gained through higher operating temperature will be lost due to added load on the compressor stage. Turbine cooling schemes have traditionally been based on extensive empirical data bases, quasi-one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, and trial and error. With improved capabilities of CFD, these traditional methods can be augmented by full three-dimensional simulations of the coolant flow to predict in detail the heat transfer and metal temperatures. Several aspects of turbine coolant flows make such application of CFD difficult, thus a highly effective CFD methodology must be used. First, high resolution of the flow field is required to attain the needed accuracy for heat transfer predictions, making highly efficient flow solvers essential for such computations. Second, the geometries of the flow passages are complicated but must be modeled accurately in order to capture all important details of the flow. This makes grid generation and grid quality important issues. Finally, since coolant flows are turbulent and separated the effects of turbulence must be modeled with a low Reynolds number

  10. A passively-safe fusion reactor blanket with helium coolant and steel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Crosswait, K.M.

    1994-04-01

    Helium is attractive for use as a fusion blanket coolant for a number of reasons. It is neutronically and chemically inert, nonmagnetic, and will not change phase during any off-normal or accident condition. A significant disadvantage of helium, however, is its low density and volumetric heat capacity. This disadvantage manifests itself most clearly during undercooling accident conditions such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a loss of flow accident (LOFA). This thesis describes a new helium-cooled tritium breeding blanket concept which performs significantly better during such accidents than current designs. The proposed blanket uses reduced-activation ferritic steel as a structural material and is designed for neutron wall loads exceeding 4 MW/m{sup 2}. The proposed geometry is based on the nested-shell concept developed by Wong, but some novel features are used to reduce the severity of the first wall temperature excursion. These features include the following: (1) A ``beryllium-joint`` concept is introduced, which allows solid beryllium slabs to be used as a thermal conduction path from the first wall to the cooler portions of the blanket. The joint concept allows for significant swelling of the beryllium (10 percent or more) without developing large stresses in the blanket structure. (2) Natural circulation of the coolant in the water-cooled shield is used to maintain shield temperatures below 100 degrees C, thus maintaining a heat sink close to the blanket during the accident. This ensures the long-term passive safety of the blanket.

  11. Film-cooling effectiveness with developing coolant flow through straight and curved tubular passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Wang, C. R.; Graham, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    The data were obtained with an apparatus designed to determine the influence of tubular coolant passage curvature on film-cooling performance while simulating the developing flow entrance conditions more representative of cooled turbine blade. Data comparisons were made between straight and curved single tubular passages embedded in the wall and discharging at 30 deg angle in line with the tunnel flow. The results showed an influence of curvature on film-cooling effectiveness that was inversely proportional to the blowing rate. At the lowest blowing rate of 0.18, curvature increased the effectiveness of film cooling by 35 percent; but at a blowing rate of 0.76, the improvement was only 10 percent. In addition, the increase in film-cooling area coverage ranged from 100 percent down to 25 percent over the same blowing rates. A data trend reversal at a blowing rate of 1.5 showed the straight tubular passage's film-cooling effectiveness to be 20 percent greater than that of the curved passage with about 80 percent more area coverage. An analysis of turbulence intensity detain the mixing layer in terms of the position of the mixing interface relative to the wall supported the concept that passage curvature tends to reduce the diffusion of the coolant jet into the main stream at blowing rates below about. Explanations for the film-cooling performance of both test sections were made in terms differences in turbulences structure and in secondary flow patterns within the coolant jets as influenced by flow passage geometry.

  12. Evolution in a Braided Loop Ensemble

    NASA Video Gallery

    This braided loop has several loops near the 'base' that appear to be unwinding with significant apparent outflow. This is evidence of untwisting, and the braided structure also seeming to unwind w...

  13. Noise Performance Of A Digital Tanlock Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, W. J.; Pomalaza-Raez, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    Slight improvement over sinusoidal phase-lock loop achieved. Report discusses theoretical studies and numerical simulations of performance of digital tangent phase-lock loop (DTL), in presence of noise.

  14. The development of Sn-Li coolant/breeding material for APEX/ALPS applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, D.-K.

    1999-07-08

    A Sn-Li alloy has been identified to be a coolant/breeding material for D-T fusion applications. The key feature of this material is its very low vapor pressure, which will be very useful for free surface concepts employed in APEX, ALPS and inertial confinement fission. The vapor is dominated by lithium, which has very low Z. Initial assessment of the material indicates acceptable tritium breeding capability, high thermal conductivity, expected low tritium volubility, and expected low chemical reactivities with water and air. Some key concerns are the high activation and material compatibility issues. The initial assessment of this material, for fission applications, is presented in this paper.

  15. Lamp system with conditioned water coolant and diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene(PTFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis E.; Hackel, Lloyd

    1999-01-01

    A lamp system with a very soft high-intensity output is provided over a large area by water cooling a long-arc lamp inside a diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) white pigment. The water is kept clean and pure by a one micron particulate filter and an activated charcoal/ultraviolet irradiation system that circulates and de-ionizes and biologically sterilizes the coolant water at all times, even when the long-arc lamp is off.

  16. New Hydrophilic, Composite Membranes for Air Removal from Water Coolant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Stephen M. C.; Luo, Qiang; Curtis, Salina S.; Holladay, Jon B.; Clark, Dallas W.

    2004-01-01

    Liquid coolants are commonly used as thermal transport media to increase efficiency and flexibility in aerospace vehicle design. The introduction of gas bubbles into the coolant can have negative consequences, including: loss of centrifugal pump prime, irregular sensor readings, and blockage of coolant flow to remote systems. One solution to mitigate these problems is the development of a passive gas removal device, or gas trap, installed in the flight cooling system. In this study, a new hydrophilic, composite membrane has been developed for passage of the coolant fluid and retention of gas bubbles. The trapped bubbles are subsequently vented from the system by a thin, hydrophobic, microporous membrane. The original design for this work employed a homogeneous membrane that was susceptible to fouling and pore plugging. Spare gas traps of this variety have degraded during storage, and recreation of the membranes has been complicated due to problems with polymer duplication and property variations in the final membranes. In this work, replacements have been developed based on deposition of a hydrophilic polymer on the bore-side of a porous polyethylene (PE) tube. The tube provides excellent chemical and mechanical stability, and the hydrophilic layer provides retention of gas bubbles. Preliminary results have shown that intimate contact is required between the deposited layer and the substrate to overcome material differences. This has been accomplished by presoaking the membrane tube in the solvent to raise its surface energy. Polymer solutions of various concentrations have been used to promote penetration of the polymer layer into the porous substrate and to control separation layer thickness. The resulting composite membranes have shown repeatable decrease in nitrogen permeability, which is indicative of a decrease in membrane pore size. Studies with water permeation have yielded similar results. We have observed some swelling of the added polymer layer, which

  17. Photoelectrochemical protection of stainless alloys from the stress-corrosion cracking in BWR primary coolant environment

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, Masatsune; Iso-o, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Nobuhiko; Fukuda, Takanori; Ayabe, Muneo; Hirano, Kenji

    1995-12-31

    The feasibility of counteracting or preventing the stress-corrosion cracking in the BWR core internals by the photoelectrochemical method has been examined. For the purpose TiO{sub 2} semiconductor is noted for its capability of photo electrochemically inducing the water-oxidizing anodic reaction in low enough potential domain if supplied with a light of a wavelength shorter than 410 nm. This paper offers an empirical proof by showing that Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 600 stainless alloy that have been plasma-spray coated with TiO{sub 2} film will do quite well in environments of BWR primary coolant.

  18. Proceedings of the CSNI specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-01

    A specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions was held in Santa Barbara, CA from January 5-7, 1993. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission in collaboration with the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installation (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the University of California at Santa Barbara. The objectives of the meeting are to cross-fertilize on-going work, provide opportunities for mutual check points, seek to focus the technical issues on matters of practical significance and re-evaluate both the objectives as well as path of future research. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  19. MIC damage in a water coolant header for remote process equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.F.

    1994-09-27

    Stainless steel water piping used to supply coolant for remote chemical separations equipment developed leaks during low flow conditions resulting from an extended interruption of operations. All the leaks occurred at welds in the bottom zone of the pipe, which was blanketed with silt deposits from the unfiltered well water used for cooling. Ultrasonic, radiographic, and metallographic examinations of leak sites revealed worm hole pitting adjacent to the welds. Seepage at the penetrations was strongly acidic and resulted in corrosion on the external pipe surfaces beneath brown crusty deposits which had developed. Analyses of the water and deposits suggest a strong propensity toward microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) and fouling.

  20. MIC damage in a water coolant header for remote process equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.F.

    1996-02-01

    Stainless steel water piping, used to supply coolant for remote chemical separations equipment, developed several leaks during low flow conditions, the result of an extended interruption of operations. All the leaks occurred at welds in the bottom of the pipe, which was blanketed with silt deposits from unfiltered well water used for cooling. Ultrasonic, radiographic, and metallographic examinations of the leak sites revealed worm-hole pitting adjacent to the welds. Seepage at the penetrations was strongly acidic and corroded the external pipe surfaces. Analyses of the water and deposits suggested microbiologically influenced corrosion and fouling.

  1. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers. [coolant passage closing by triode sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Broch, J. W.; Allard, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Procedures for closing out coolant passages in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers by triode sputtering, using post and hollow Cu-0.15 percent Zr cathodes are described. The effects of aluminum composite filler materials, substrate preparation, sputter cleaning, substrate bias current density and system geometry on closeout layer bond strength and structure are evaluated. High strength closeout layers were sputtered over aluminum fillers. The tensile strength and microstructure of continuously sputtered Cu-0.15 percent Zr deposits were determined. These continuous sputtered deposits were as thick as 0.75 cm. Tensile strengths were consistently twice as great as the strength of the material in wrought form.

  2. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible.

  3. Characterization of jet breakup mechanisms observed from simulant experiments of molten fuel penetrating coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.G.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this research program has been to add to our understanding of the breakup of molten fuel jets penetrating reactor coolant. Easily handled working fluids are used to simulate fuel jet breakup, so that detailed observations may be obtained from a relatively large number of experiments. The tools used for observing this behavior are high speed notion picture photography, Flash X-radiography, and X-ray cine. Jet breakup lengths are determined from motion pictures; the mechanisms by which the jets are fragmented may be inferred from radiographs.

  4. The heat transfer characteristic of the reactor coolant pump canned motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, X. Y.; Xu, R.; Tao, G.; Yang, Y. L.; Wang, D. Z.

    2016-05-01

    This paper deals with the heat transfer characteristic of the reactor coolant pump canned motor. The cooling of the canned motor is an important issue for the design of the pump. In order to analyze the heat transfer characteristic of the canned motor, firstly the electromagnetic field of the canned motor is calculated with finite element method, and the magnetic resistance loss is gotten, then the heat distribution of the canned motor is obtained based on the electromagnetic field, finally the flow field and temperature field of the canned motor is calculated with CFD methods. The calculation indicates that the highest temperature and highest temperature rising are both occurred at the end winding.

  5. Analysis of a small break loss-of-coolant accident of pressurized water reactor by APROS

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Falahi, A.; Haennine, M.; Porkholm, K.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the capability of APROS (Advanced PROcess Simulator) code to simulate the real plant thermal-hydraulic transient of a Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) of Loss-Of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT is a scaled model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). This work is a part of a larger validation of the APROS thermal-hydraulic models. The results of SBLOCA transient calculated by APROS showed a reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  6. Fragmentation of cosmic-string loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    The fragmentation of cosmic string loops is discussed, and the results of a simulation of this process are presented. The simulation can evolve any of a large class of loops essentially exactly, including allowing fragments that collide to join together. Such reconnection enhances the production of small fragments, but not drastically. With or without reconnections, the fragmentation process produces a collection of nonself-intersecting loops whose typical length is on the order of the persistence length of the initial loop.

  7. Hard thermal loops in static external fields

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, J.; Takahashi, N.; Pereira, S. H.

    2009-04-15

    We examine, in the imaginary-time formalism, the high temperature behavior of n-point thermal loops in static Yang-Mills and gravitational fields. We show that in this regime, any hard thermal loop gives the same leading contribution as the one obtained by evaluating the loop integral at zero external energies and momenta.

  8. Assessment of ISLOCA risk: Methodology and application to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L.; Auflick, J.L.; Haney, L.N.

    1992-04-01

    Inter-system loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs) have been identified as important contributors to offsite risk for some nuclear power plants. A methodology has been developed for identifying and evaluating plant-specific hardware designs, human factors issues, and accident consequence factors relevant to the estimation of ISLOCA core damage frequency and risk. This report presents a detailed description of the application of this analysis methodology to a Westinghouse four-loop ice condenser plant. This document also includes appendices A through I which provide: System descriptions; ISLOCA event trees; human reliability analysis; thermal hydraulic analysis; core uncovery timing calculations; calculation of system rupture probability; ISLOCA consequences analysis; uncertainty analysis; and component failure analysis.

  9. Microgyroscope with closed loop output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Challoner, A. Dorian (Inventor); Gutierrez, Roman C. (Inventor); Tang, Tony K. (Inventor); Cargille, Donald R. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A micro-gyroscope (10) having closed loop operation by a control voltage (V.sub.TY), that is demodulated by an output signal of the sense electrodes (S1, S2), providing Coriolis torque rebalance to prevent displacement of the micro-gyroscope (10) on the output axis (y-axis). The present invention provides wide-band, closed-loop operation for a micro-gyroscope (10) and allows the drive frequency to be closely tuned to a high Q sense axis resonance. A differential sense signal (S1-S2) is compensated and fed back by differentially changing the voltage on the drive electrodes to rebalance Coriolis torque. The feedback signal is demodulated in phase with the drive axis signal (K.sub..omega..crclbar..sub.x) to produce a measure of the Coriolis force.

  10. The Statistical Loop Analyzer (SLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    The statistical loop analyzer (SLA) is designed to automatically measure the acquisition, tracking and frequency stability performance characteristics of symbol synchronizers, code synchronizers, carrier tracking loops, and coherent transponders. Automated phase lock and system level tests can also be made using the SLA. Standard baseband, carrier and spread spectrum modulation techniques can be accomodated. Through the SLA's phase error jitter and cycle slip measurements the acquisition and tracking thresholds of the unit under test are determined; any false phase and frequency lock events are statistically analyzed and reported in the SLA output in probabilistic terms. Automated signal drop out tests can be performed in order to trouble shoot algorithms and evaluate the reacquisition statistics of the unit under test. Cycle slip rates and cycle slip probabilities can be measured using the SLA. These measurements, combined with bit error probability measurements, are all that are needed to fully characterize the acquisition and tracking performance of a digital communication system.

  11. Lock detection in Costas loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1992-01-01

    Previous analyses of lock detector algorithms for Costas loops have ignored the effects of the inherent correlation between samples of the phase error process. In this paper, both analysis and simulations are used to quantify the effects of phase correlation on lock detection for the 'square law' and 'absolute value' type detectors. Results are obtained which depict the lock detection probability as a function of loop signal-to-noise ratio for a given false alarm rate. It is shown that the square law detector experiences less degradation due to phase jitter than the absolute value detector and that the degradation in detector signal-to-noise ratio is more pronounced for squarewave than for sinewave signals.

  12. Lock detection in Costas loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileant, A.; Hinedi, S.

    1992-03-01

    Previous analyses of lock detector algorithms for Costas loops have ignored the effects of the inherent correlation between samples of the phase error process. In this paper, both analysis and simulations are used to quantify the effects of phase correlation on lock detection for the 'square law' and 'absolute value' type detectors. Results are obtained which depict the lock detection probability as a function of loop signal-to-noise ratio for a given false alarm rate. It is shown that the square law detector experiences less degradation due to phase jitter than the absolute value detector and that the degradation in detector signal-to-noise ratio is more pronounced for squarewave than for sinewave signals.

  13. Loop Diuretics in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Won; Han, Sang Youb

    2015-06-01

    Diuretics are commonly used to control edema across various clinical fields. Diuretics inhibit sodium reabsorption in specific renal tubules, resulting in increased urinary sodium and water excretion. Loop diuretics are the most potent diuretics. In this article, we review five important aspects of loop diuretics, in particular furosemide, which must be considered when prescribing this medicine: (1) oral versus intravenous treatment, (2) dosage, (3) continuous versus bolus infusion, (4) application in chronic kidney disease patients, and (5) side effects. The bioavailability of furosemide differs between oral and intravenous therapy. Additionally, the threshold and ceiling doses of furosemide differ according to the particular clinical condition of the patient, for example in patients with severe edema or chronic kidney disease. To maximize the efficiency of furosemide, a clear understanding of how the mode of delivery will impact bioavailability and the required dosage is necessary.

  14. Loop Diuretics in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se Won

    2015-01-01

    Diuretics are commonly used to control edema across various clinical fields. Diuretics inhibit sodium reabsorption in specific renal tubules, resulting in increased urinary sodium and water excretion. Loop diuretics are the most potent diuretics. In this article, we review five important aspects of loop diuretics, in particular furosemide, which must be considered when prescribing this medicine: (1) oral versus intravenous treatment, (2) dosage, (3) continuous versus bolus infusion, (4) application in chronic kidney disease patients, and (5) side effects. The bioavailability of furosemide differs between oral and intravenous therapy. Additionally, the threshold and ceiling doses of furosemide differ according to the particular clinical condition of the patient, for example in patients with severe edema or chronic kidney disease. To maximize the efficiency of furosemide, a clear understanding of how the mode of delivery will impact bioavailability and the required dosage is necessary. PMID:26240596

  15. Self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown system using induction pump to facilitate sensing of core coolant temperature

    DOEpatents

    Sievers, Robert K.; Cooper, Martin H.; Tupper, Robert B.

    1987-01-01

    A self-actuated shutdown system incorporated into a reactivity control assembly in a nuclear reactor includes pumping means for creating an auxiliary downward flow of a portion of the heated coolant exiting from the fuel assemblies disposed adjacent to the control assembly. The shutdown system includes a hollow tubular member which extends through the outlet of the control assembly top nozzle so as to define an outer annular flow channel through the top nozzle outlet separate from an inner flow channel for primary coolant flow through the control assembly. Also, a latching mechanism is disposed in an inner duct of the control assembly and is operable for holding absorber bundles in a raised position in the control assembly and for releasing them to drop them into the core of the reactor for shutdown purposes. The latching mechanism has an inner flow passage extending between and in flow communication with the absorber bundles and the inner flow channel of the top nozzle for accommodating primary coolant flow upwardly through the control assembly. Also, an outer flow passage separate from the inner flow passage extends through the latching mechanism between and in flow communication with the inner duct and the outer flow channel of the top nozzle for accommodating inflow of a portion of the heated coolant from the adjacent fuel assemblies. The latching mechanism contains a magnetic material sensitive to temperature and operable to cause mating or latching together of the components of the latching mechanism when the temperature sensed is below a known temperature and unmating or unlatching thereof when the temperature sensed is above a given temperature. The temperature sensitive magnetic material is positioned in communication with the heated coolant flow through the outer flow passage for directly sensing the temperature thereof. Finally, the pumping means includes a jet induction pump nozzle and diffuser disposed adjacent the bottom nozzle of the control assembly

  16. Deconfinement and virtual quark loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, T.; Engels, J.; Satz, H.

    1983-12-01

    We calculate paer Monte Carlo evaluation on an 83 × 3 lattice the energy density ɛG of the gluon sector of QCD, including virtual quark loops up to the fourth power in the hopping parameter expansion. For light quarks of one flavour, we observe at T/ΛL 95 +/- 10 a rapid variation of ɛG in T, accompanied by strong fluctuations from iteration to iteration. as clear signal of the deconfinement transition.

  17. DNA Looping, Supercoiling and Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzi, Laura

    2007-11-01

    In complex organisms, activation or repression of gene expression by proteins bound to enhancer or silencer elements located several kilobases away from the promoter is a well recognized phenomenon. However, a mechanistic understanding of any of these multiprotein interactions is still incomplete. Part of the difficulty in characterizing long-range interactions is the complexity of the regulatory systems and also an underestimation of the effect of DNA supercoiling and tension. Supercoiling is expected to promote interactions between DNA sites because it winds the DNA into compact plectonemes in which distant DNA segments more frequently draw close. The idea that DNA is also under various levels of tension is becoming more widely accepted. Forces that stretch the double helix in vivo are the electrostatic repulsion among the negatively charged phosphate groups along the DNA backbone, the action of motor enzymes perhaps acting upon a topologically constrained sequence of DNA or chromosome segregation during cell mitosis following DNA replication. Presently, little is known about the tension acting on DNA in vivo, but characterization of how physiological regulatory processes, such as loop formation, depend on DNA tension in vitro will indicate the stretching force regimes likely to exist in vivo. In this light, the well studied CI protein of bacteriophage l, which was recently found to cause a of 3.8 kbp loop in DNA, is an ideal system in which to characterize long-range gene regulation. The large size of the loop lends itself to single-molecule techniques, which allow characterization of the dynamics of CI-mediated l DNA looping under controlled levels of supercoiling and tension. Such experiments are being used to discover the principles of long-range interactions in l and in more complex systems.

  18. Quantum reduced loop gravity and the foundation of loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesci, Emanuele; Cianfrani, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Quantum reduced loop gravity is a promising framework for linking loop quantum gravity and the effective semiclassical dynamics of loop quantum cosmology. We review its basic achievements and its main perspectives, outlining how it provides a quantum description of the Universe in terms of a cuboidal graph which constitutes the proper framework for applying loop techniques in a cosmological setting.

  19. Two-loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anton E. M.

    1992-07-01

    We prove the existence of a nonrenormalizable infinity in the two-loop effective action of perturbative quantum gravity by means of an explicit calculation. Our final result agrees with that obtained by earlier authors. We use the background-field method in coordinate space, combined with dimensional regularization and a heat kernel representation for the propagators. General covariance is manifestly preserved. Only vacuum graphs in the presence of an on-shell background metric need to be calculated. We extend the background covariant harmonic gauge to include terms nonlinear in the quantum gravitational fields and allow for general reparametrizations of those fields. For a particular gauge choice and field parametrization only two three-graviton and six four-graviton vertices are present in the action. Calculational labor is further reduced by restricting to backgrounds, which are not only Ricci-flat, but satisfy an additional constraint bilinear in the Weyl tensor. To handle the still formidable amount of algebra, we use the symbolic manipulation program FORM. We checked that the on-shell two-loop effective action is in fact independent of all gauge and field redefinition parameters. A two-loop analysis for Yang-Mills fields is included as well, since in that case we can give full details as well as simplify earlier analyses.

  20. Loops in inflationary correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takahiro; Urakawa, Yuko

    2013-12-01

    We review the recent progress regarding the loop corrections to the correlation functions in the inflationary universe. A naive perturbation theory predicts that the loop corrections generated during inflation suffer from various infrared (IR) pathologies. Introducing an IR cutoff by hand is neither satisfactory nor enough to fix the problem of a secular growth, which may ruin the predictive power of inflation models if the inflation lasts sufficiently long. We discuss the origin of the IR divergences and explore the regularity conditions of the loop corrections for the adiabatic perturbation, the iso-curvature perturbation, and the tensor perturbation, in turn. These three kinds of perturbations have qualitative differences, but in discussing the IR regularity there is a feature common to all cases, which is the importance of the proper identification of observable quantities. Genuinely, observable quantities should respect the gauge invariance from the view point of a local observer. Interestingly, we find that the requirement of the IR regularity restricts the allowed quantum states.

  1. An analytical study of the effect of coolant flow variables on the kinetic energy output of a cooled turbine blade row.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prust, H. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Demonstration that the change in output of a cooled turbine blade row relative to the specific output of the uncooled blade row can be positive, negative, or zero, depending on the velocity, injection location, injection angle, and temperature of the coolant. Comparisons between the analytical results and experimental results for four different cases of coolant discharge, all at a coolant temperature ratio of unity, show good agreement for three cases, and rather poor agreement for the other.

  2. Gravitational radiation from realistic cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Paul; Allen, Bruce

    1995-10-01

    We examine the rates at which energy and momentum are radiated into gravitational waves by a large set of realistic cosmic string loops. The string loops are generated by numerically evolving parent loops with different initial conditions forward in time until they self-intersect, fragmenting into two child loops. The fragmentation of the child loops is followed recursively until only non-self-intersecting loops remain. The properties of the final non-self-intersecting loops are found to be independent of the initial conditions of the parent loops. We have calculated the radiated energy and momentum for a total of 11 625 stable child loops. We find that the majority of the final loops do not radiate significant amounts of spatial momentum. The velocity gained due to the rocket effect is typically small compared to the center-of-mass velocity of the fragmented loops. The distribution of gravitatoinal radiation rates in the center of mass frame of the loops, γ0≡(Gμ2)-1ΔE/Δτ, is strongly peaked in the range γ0=45-55 however, there are no loops found with γ0<40. Because the radiated spatial momentum is small, the distribution of gravitational radiation rates appears roughly the same in any reference frame. We conjecture that in the center-of-mass frame there is a lower bound γ0min>0 for the radiation rate from cosmic string loops. In a second conjecture, we identify a candidate for the loop with the minimal radiation rate and suggest that γ0min~=39.003.

  3. Corrosion of Ferritic Steels in High Temperature Molten Salt Coolants for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; El-Dasher, B; de Caro, M S; Ferreira, J

    2008-11-25

    Corrosion of ferritic steels in high temperature molten fluoride salts may limit the life of advanced reactors, including some hybrid systems that are now under consideration. In some cases, the steel may be protected through galvanic coupling with other less noble materials with special neutronic properties such a beryllium. This paper reports the development of a model for predicting corrosion rates for various ferritic steels, with and without oxide dispersion strengthening, in FLiBe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) and FLiNaK (Li-Na-K-F) coolants at temperatures up to 800 C. Mixed potential theory is used to account for the protection of steel by beryllium, Tafel kinetics are used to predict rates of dissolution as a function of temperature and potential, and the thinning of the mass-transfer boundary layer with increasing Reynolds number is accounted for with dimensionless correlations. The model also accounts for the deceleration of corrosion as the coolants become saturated with dissolved chromium and iron. This paper also reports electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of steels at their corrosion potentials in high-temperature molten salt environments, with the complex impedance spectra interpreted in terms of the interfacial charge transfer resistance and capacitance, as well as the electrolyte conductivity. Such in situ measurement techniques provide valuable insight into the degradation of materials under realistic conditions.

  4. BWR primary coolant pressure boundary license renewal industry report; revision 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Braden, D.; Stancavage, P.

    1994-07-01

    The U.S. nuclear power industry, through coordination by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMARC), and sponsorship by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has evaluated age-related degradation effects for a number of major plant systems, structures and components in the license renewal technical Industry Reports (IRs). License renewal applicants may choose to reference these IRs in support of their plant-specific license renewal applications as an equivalent to the integrated plant assessment provisions of the license renewal rule (10 CFR Part 54). This IR provides the technical basis for license renewal for U.S. boiling water reactor (BWR) primary coolant pressure boundaries (PCPB). The report includes requirements on: carbon and stainless steel pipes and fittings; reactor circulation pumps; internal heat exchangers; pressure relief and in line valves; and component supports. These components are in the main steam, recirculation, feedwater, residual heat removal, reactor core isolation cooling, low and high pressure coolant injection, and low and high pressure core spray systems.

  5. Comparison of decontamination techniques for reactor coolant system applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, H.R.; Polentz, L.M.; Allen, R.P.; Skiens, W.E.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents the results of a comparison study of a group of cleaning techniques for possible in-place and off-system decontamination of the subsystems that make up the TMI-2 reactor coolant system. A matrix format was developed which permitted comparison of the techniques using a set of criteria, grading factors, and weighting factors which relate to the performance of the technique and importance of the criteria. Comparisons of applicability are made for the following groupings of reactor coolant system components: heat exchanger tubing; pipe one to 20 in. I.D.; tanks, filter housings, and pipe 28 in. I.D. and larger; tanks with internal components; and valves and pumps. The study indicates that the most promising in-place decontamination techniques are: fluid propelled scrapers, brushes, and pigs; rotating brushes/hones; and pressurized water jets. The most promising techniques for off-system decontamination include: pressurized water jets, ultrasonics, vibratory cleaning, rotating brushes and hones, FREON cleaning, and electropolishing.

  6. Modern Fuel Cladding in Demanding Operation - ZIRLO in Full Life High Lithium PWR Coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kargol, Kenneth; Stevens, Jim; Bosma, John; Iyer, Jayashri; Wikmark, Gunnar

    2007-07-01

    There is an increasing demand to optimize the PWR water chemistry in order to minimize activity build-up in the plants and to avoid CIPS and other fuel related issues. Operation with a constant pH between 7.2 and 7.4 is generally considered an important part in achieving the optimized water chemistry. The extended long cycles currently used in most of the U.S. PWRs implies that the lithium concentration at BOC will be outside the general operating experience with such a coolant chemistry regime. With the purpose to extend the experience of high lithium coolant operation, such water chemistry has been used in a few PWRs, i.e. CPSES Unit 2 and Diablo Canyon Units 1 and 2, all with ZIRLO{sup TM} cladding. Operation with a lithium concentration up to 4.2 ppm does not show any impact of the elevated lithium, while operation with up to 6 ppm possibly produce some limited corrosion acceleration in the region of sub-nucleate boiling but has no detrimental impact under the conditions limited by current operating experience. (authors)

  7. Numerical Analysis of Coolant Flow and Heat Transfer in ITER Diagnostic First Wall

    DOE PAGES

    Khodak, A.; Loesser, G.; Zhai, Y.; Udintsev, V.; Klabacha, J.; Wang, W.; Johnson, D.; Feder, R.

    2015-07-24

    We performed numerical simulations of the ITER Diagnostic First Wall (DFW) using ANSYS workbench. During operation DFW will include solid main body as well as liquid coolant. Thus thermal and hydraulic analysis of the DFW was performed using conjugated heat transfer approach, in which heat transfer was resolved in both solid and liquid parts, and simultaneously fluid dynamics analysis was performed only in the liquid part. This approach includes interface between solid and liquid part of the systemAnalysis was performed using ANSYS CFX software. CFX software allows solution of heat transfer equations in solid and liquid part, and solution ofmore » the flow equations in the liquid part. Coolant flow in the DFW was assumed turbulent and was resolved using Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Shear Stress Transport turbulence model. Meshing was performed using CFX method available within ANSYS. The data cloud for thermal loading consisting of volumetric heating and surface heating was imported into CFX Volumetric heating source was generated using Attila software. Surface heating was obtained using radiation heat transfer analysis. Our results allowed us to identify areas of excessive heating. Proposals for cooling channel relocation were made. Additional suggestions were made to improve hydraulic performance of the cooling system.« less

  8. Numerical Analysis of Coolant Flow and Heat Transfer in ITER Diagnostic First Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Khodak, A.; Loesser, G.; Zhai, Y.; Udintsev, V.; Klabacha, J.; Wang, W.; Johnson, D.; Feder, R.

    2015-07-24

    We performed numerical simulations of the ITER Diagnostic First Wall (DFW) using ANSYS workbench. During operation DFW will include solid main body as well as liquid coolant. Thus thermal and hydraulic analysis of the DFW was performed using conjugated heat transfer approach, in which heat transfer was resolved in both solid and liquid parts, and simultaneously fluid dynamics analysis was performed only in the liquid part. This approach includes interface between solid and liquid part of the systemAnalysis was performed using ANSYS CFX software. CFX software allows solution of heat transfer equations in solid and liquid part, and solution of the flow equations in the liquid part. Coolant flow in the DFW was assumed turbulent and was resolved using Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Shear Stress Transport turbulence model. Meshing was performed using CFX method available within ANSYS. The data cloud for thermal loading consisting of volumetric heating and surface heating was imported into CFX Volumetric heating source was generated using Attila software. Surface heating was obtained using radiation heat transfer analysis. Our results allowed us to identify areas of excessive heating. Proposals for cooling channel relocation were made. Additional suggestions were made to improve hydraulic performance of the cooling system.

  9. Effect of reactor coolant radioactivity upon configuration feasibility for a nuclear electric propulsion vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffer, L.; Wright, G. N.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary shielding analysis was carried out for a conceptual nuclear electric propulsion vehicle designed to transport payloads from low earth orbit to synchronous orbit. The vehicle employed a thermionic nuclear reactor operating at 1575 kilowatts and generated 120 kilowatts of electricity for a round-trip mission time of 2000 hours. Propulsion was via axially directed ion engines employing 3300 pounds of mercury as a propellant. The vehicle configuration permitted a reactor shadow shield geometry using LiH and the mercury propellant for shielding. However, much of the radioactive NaK reactor coolant was unshielded and in close proximity to the power conditioning electronics. An estimate of the radioactivity of the NaK coolant was made and its unshielded dose rate to the power conditioning equipment calculated. It was found that the activated NaK contributed about three-fourths of the gamma dose constraint. The NaK dose was considered a sufficiently high fraction of the allowable gamma dose to necessitate modifications in configuration.

  10. Methods for incorporating effects of LWR coolant environment into ASME code fatigue evaluations.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.

    1999-04-15

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Appendix I to Section HI of the Code specifies design fatigue curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Recent test data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR environments on the fatigue resistance of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs). Under certain loading and environmental conditions, fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels can be a factor of {approx}70 lower in an LWR environment than in air. These results raise the issue of whether the design fatigue curves in Section III are appropriate for the intended purpose. This paper presents the two methods that have been proposed for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations. The mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs in LWR environments are discussed.

  11. In-vessel ITER tubing failure rates for selected materials and coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.D.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    Several materials have been suggested for fabrication of ITER in-vessel coolant tubing: beryllium, copper, Inconel, niobium, stainless steel, titanium, and vanadium. This report generates failure rates for the materials to identify the best performer from an operational safety and availability perspective. Coolant types considered in this report are helium gas, liquid lithium, liquid sodium, and water. Failure rates for the materials are generated by including the influence of ITER`s operating environment and anticipated tubing failure mechanisms with industrial operating experience failure rates. The analyses define tubing failure mechanisms for ITER as: intergranular attack, flow erosion, helium induced swelling, hydrogen damage, neutron irradiation embrittlement, cyclic fatigue, and thermal cycling. K-factors, multipliers, are developed to model each failure mechanism and are applied to industrial operating experience failure rates to generate tubing failure rates for ITER. The generated failure rates identify the best performer by its expected reliability. With an average leakage failure rate of 3.1e-10(m-hr){sup {minus}1}and an average rupture failure rate of 3.1e-11(m-hr){sup {minus}1}, titanium proved to be the best performer of the tubing materials. The failure rates generated in this report are intended to serve as comparison references for design safety and optimization studies. Actual material testing and analyses are required to validate the failure rates.

  12. Application of CFX-10 to the Investigation of RPV Coolant Mixing in VVER Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, Fabio; Melideo, Daniele; Terzuoli, Fulvio; D'Auria, Francesco

    2006-07-01

    Coolant mixing phenomena occurring in the pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor constitute one of the main objectives of investigation by researchers concerned with nuclear reactor safety. For instance, mixing plays a relevant role in reactivity-induced accidents initiated by de-boration or boron dilution events, followed by transport of a de-borated slug into the vessel of a pressurized water reactor. Another example is constituted by temperature mixing, which may sensitively affect the consequences of a pressurized thermal shock scenario. Predictive analysis of mixing phenomena is strongly improved by the availability of computational tools able to cope with the inherent three-dimensionality of such problem, like system codes with three-dimensional capabilities, and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. The present paper deals with numerical analyses of coolant mixing in the reactor pressure vessel of a VVER-1000 reactor, performed by the ANSYS CFX-10 CFD code. In particular, the 'swirl' effect that has been observed to take place in the downcomer of such kind of reactor has been addressed, with the aim of assessing the capability of the codes to predict that effect, and to understand the reasons for its occurrence. Results have been compared against experimental data from V1000CT-2 Benchmark. Moreover, a boron mixing problem has been investigated, in the hypothesis that a de-borated slug, transported by natural circulation, enters the vessel. Sensitivity analyses have been conducted on some geometrical features, model parameters and boundary conditions. (authors)

  13. Component evaluation for intersystem loss-of-coolant accidents in advanced light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.

    1994-07-01

    Using the methodology outlined in NUREG/CR-5603 this report evaluates (on a probabilistic basis) design rules for components in ALWRs that could be subjected to intersystem loss-of-coolant accidents (ISLOCAs). The methodology is intended for piping elements, flange connections, on-line pumps and valves, and heat exchangers. The NRC has directed that the design rules be evaluated for BWR pressures of 7.04 MPa (1025 psig), PWR pressures of 15.4 MPa (2235 psig), and 177{degrees}C (350{degrees}F), and has established a goal of 90% probability that system rupture will not occur during an ISLOCA event. The results of the calculations in this report show that components designed for a pressure of 0.4 of the reactor coolant system operating pressure will satisfy the NRC survival goal in most cases. Specific recommendations for component strengths for BWR and PWR applications are made in the report. A peer review panel of nationally recognized experts was selected to review and critique the initial results of this program.

  14. Premeasured Chordal Loops for Mitral Valve Repair.

    PubMed

    Gillinov, Marc; Quinn, Reed; Kerendi, Faraz; Gaudiani, Vince; Shemin, Richard; Barnhart, Glenn; Raines, Edward; Gerdisch, Marc W; Banbury, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Premeasured expanded polytetrafluoroethylene chordal loops with integrated sutures for attachment to the papillary muscle and leaflet edges facilitate correction of mitral valve prolapse. Configured as a group of 3 loops (length range 12 to 24 mm), the loops are attached to a pledget that is passed through the papillary muscle and tied. Each of the loops has 2 sutures with attached needles; these needles are passed through the free edge of the leaflet and then the sutures are tied to each other, securing the chordal loop to the leaflet. PMID:27549563

  15. Assessment of Candidate Molten Salt Coolants for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.F.

    2006-03-24

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a novel reactor design that utilizes the graphite-matrix high-temperature fuel of helium-cooled reactors, but provides cooling with a high-temperature fluoride salt. For applications at temperatures greater than 900 C the AHTR is also referred to as a Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR). This report provides an assessment of candidate salts proposed as the primary coolant for the AHTR based upon a review of physical properties, nuclear properties, and chemical factors. The physical properties most relevant for coolant service were reviewed. Key chemical factors that influence material compatibility were also analyzed for the purpose of screening salt candidates. Some simple screening factors related to the nuclear properties of salts were also developed. The moderating ratio and neutron-absorption cross-section were compiled for each salt. The short-lived activation products, long-lived transmutation activity, and reactivity coefficients associated with various salt candidates were estimated using a computational model. Table A presents a summary of the properties of the candidate coolant salts. Certain factors in this table, such as melting point, vapor pressure, and nuclear properties, can be viewed as stand-alone parameters for screening candidates. Heat-transfer properties are considered as a group in Sect. 3 in order to evaluate the combined effects of various factors. In the course of this review, it became apparent that the state of the properties database was strong in some areas and weak in others. A qualitative map of the state of the database and predictive capabilities is given in Table B. It is apparent that the property of thermal conductivity has the greatest uncertainty and is the most difficult to measure. The database, with respect to heat capacity, can be improved with modern instruments and modest effort. In general, ''lighter'' (low-Z) salts tend to exhibit better heat

  16. Experimental investigations of heat transfer and temperature fields in models simulating fuel assemblies used in the core of a nuclear reactor with a liquid heavy-metal coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, I. A.; Genin, L. G.; Krylov, S. G.; Novikov, A. O.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, V. G.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this experimental investigation is to obtain information on the temperature fields and heat transfer coefficients during flow of liquid-metal coolant in models simulating an elementary cell in the core of a liquid heavy metal cooled fast-neutron reactor. Two design versions for spacing fuel rods in the reactor core were considered. In the first version, the fuel rods were spaced apart from one another using helical wire wound on the fuel rod external surface, and in the second version spacer grids were used for the same purpose. The experiments were carried out on the mercury loop available at the Moscow Power Engineering Institute National Research University's Chair of Engineering Thermal Physics. Two experimental sections simulating an elementary cell for each of the fuel rod spacing versions were fabricated. The temperature fields were investigated using a dedicated hinged probe that allows temperature to be measured at any point of the studied channel cross section. The heat-transfer coefficients were determined using the wall temperature values obtained at the moment when the probe thermocouple tail end touched the channel wall. Such method of determining the wall temperature makes it possible to alleviate errors that are unavoidable in case of measuring the wall temperature using thermocouples placed in slots milled in the wall. In carrying out the experiments, an automated system of scientific research was applied, which allows a large body of data to be obtained within a short period of time. The experimental investigations in the first test section were carried out at Re = 8700, and in the second one, at five values of Reynolds number. Information about temperature fields was obtained by statistically processing the array of sampled probe thermocouple indications at 300 points in the experimental channel cross section. Reach material has been obtained for verifying the codes used for calculating velocity and temperature fields in channels with

  17. Chemical Looping Technology: Oxygen Carrier Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siwei; Zeng, Liang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Chemical looping processes are characterized as promising carbonaceous fuel conversion technologies with the advantages of manageable CO2 capture and high energy conversion efficiency. Depending on the chemical looping reaction products generated, chemical looping technologies generally can be grouped into two types: chemical looping full oxidation (CLFO) and chemical looping partial oxidation (CLPO). In CLFO, carbonaceous fuels are fully oxidized to CO2 and H2O, as typically represented by chemical looping combustion with electricity as the primary product. In CLPO, however, carbonaceous fuels are partially oxidized, as typically represented by chemical looping gasification with syngas or hydrogen as the primary product. Both CLFO and CLPO share similar operational features; however, the optimum process configurations and the specific oxygen carriers used between them can vary significantly. Progress in both CLFO and CLPO is reviewed and analyzed with specific focus on oxygen carrier developments that characterize these technologies.

  18. Chemical Looping Technology: Oxygen Carrier Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Luo, Siwei; Zeng, Liang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Chemical looping processes are characterized as promising carbonaceous fuel conversion technologies with the advantages of manageable CO2 capture and high energy conversion efficiency. Depending on the chemical looping reaction products generated, chemical looping technologies generally can be grouped into two types: chemical looping full oxidation (CLFO) and chemical looping partial oxidation (CLPO). In CLFO, carbonaceous fuels are fully oxidized to CO2 and H2O, as typically represented by chemical looping combustion with electricity as the primary product. In CLPO, however, carbonaceous fuels are partially oxidized, as typically represented by chemical looping gasification with syngas or hydrogen as the primary product. Both CLFO and CLPO share similar operational features; however, the optimum process configurations and the specific oxygen carriers used between them can vary significantly. Progress in both CLFO and CLPO is reviewed and analyzed with specific focus on oxygen carrier developments that characterize these technologies. PMID:25898071

  19. High-temperature helium-loop facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarz, R.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high-temperature helium loop is a facility for materials testing in ultrapure helium gas at high temperatures. The closed loop system is capable of recirculating high-purity helium or helium with controlled impurities. The gas loop maximum operating conditions are as follows: 300 psi pressure, 500 lb/h flow rate, and 2100/sup 0/F temperature. The two test sections can accept samples up to 3.5 in. diameter and 5 ft long. The gas loop is fully instrumented to continuously monitor all parameters of loop operation as well as helium impurities. The loop is fully automated to operate continuously and requires only a daily servicing by a qualified operator to replenish recorder charts and helium makeup gas. Because of its versatility and high degree of parameter control, the helium loop is applicable to many types of materials research. This report describes the test apparatus, operating parameters, peripheral systems, and instrumentation system.

  20. Hyperstaticity and loops in frictional granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Lam, Edward; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-06-01

    The hyperstatic nature of granular packings of perfectly rigid disks is analyzed algebraically and through numerical simulation. The elementary loops of grains emerge as a fundamental element in addressing hyperstaticity. Loops consisting of an odd number of grains behave differently than those with an even number. For odd loops, the latent stresses are exterior and are characterized by the sum of frictional forces around each loop. For even loops, the latent stresses are interior and are characterized by the alternating sum of frictional forces around each loop. The statistics of these two types of loop sums are found to be Gibbsian with a "temperature" that is linear with the friction coefficient μ when μ<1.

  1. Effect of helix stability on the formation of loop-loop complexes.

    PubMed

    Sehdev, Preeti; Crews, Gordon; Soto, Ana Maria

    2012-12-01

    Kissing loop complexes are loop-loop complexes where two RNA hairpins interact through their complementary loops. In this work, we have investigated the role of the helical stems on the ability of hairpins derived from the ColE1 plasmid to associate as kissing loop complexes in the presence and absence of divalent cations. Our results show that although kissing loop complexes form more readily in the presence of Mg(2+), they are able to form in the presence of 850 mM NaCl, as long as their stems contain at least six base-pairs. Formation of the Na(+) loop-loop complexes is facilitated by changing the sequence at the stem-loop interface to include less stable AU base pairs. We suggest that the conformation at the stem-loop interface is critical in the formation of kissing loop complexes and that in the absence of Mg(2+) the conformation at the stem-loop interface is packed more loosely than with Mg(2+), to allow for a lower charge density. Consistent with this hypothesis, shortening the stems to five base pairs results in unfolding of the hairpins and formation of an extended duplex rather than a kissing loop complex because the short stems are not stable enough to tolerate the necessary conformation at the stem-loop interface to allow the formation of a kissing loop complex. PMID:23094588

  2. Flow tests of a single fuel element coolant channel for a compact fast reactor for space power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springborn, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Water flow tests were conducted on a single-fuel-element cooling channel for a nuclear concept to be used for space power. The tests established a method for measuring coolant flow rate which is applicable to water flow testing of a complete mockup of the reference reactor. The inlet plenum-to-outlet plenum pressure drop, which approximates the overall core pressure drop, was measured and correlated with flow rate. This information can be used for reactor coolant flow and heat transfer calculations. An analytical study of the flow characteristics was also conducted.

  3. Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

  4. Capillary pumped loop application guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullimore, Brent A.

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLs) have undergone extensive development since the late 1970's, and represent a maturing technology that is beginning to appear in spacecraft designs. Perhaps because most CPL literature is intended for CPL and heat pipe dedvelopers, or perhaps because of the myriad of component design and layout options available, many thermal control designers are either unfamiliar with the capabilities offered by CPLs, or are confused about their limitations. This survey paper is targeted toward thermal control designers who must decide when and where to use CPLs, or having chosen a CPL solution, must deal with system-level integration and test issues.

  5. Cygnus Loop: A double bubble?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J.; Safi-Harb, S.; Reichardt, I.; Stil, J.; Kothes, R.; Jaffe, T.; Galfacts Team

    2016-06-01

    The Cygnus Loop is a well-studied supernova remnant (SNR) that has been observed across the electromagnetic spectrum. Although widely believed to be an SNR shell with a blow-out region in the south, we consider the possibility that this object is two SNRs projected along the same line-of-sight by using multi-wavelength images and modelling. Our results show that a model of two objects including some overlap region/interaction between the two objects has the best match to the observed data.

  6. Singularities in loop quantum cosmology.

    PubMed

    Cailleteau, Thomas; Cardoso, Antonio; Vandersloot, Kevin; Wands, David

    2008-12-19

    We show that simple scalar field models can give rise to curvature singularities in the effective Friedmann dynamics of loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We find singular solutions for spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies with a canonical scalar field and a negative exponential potential, or with a phantom scalar field and a positive potential. While LQC avoids big bang or big rip type singularities, we find sudden singularities where the Hubble rate is bounded, but the Ricci curvature scalar diverges. We conclude that the effective equations of LQC are not in themselves sufficient to avoid the occurrence of curvature singularities.

  7. Closed-Loop Neuroscience and Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation: A Tale of Two Loops.

    PubMed

    Zrenner, Christoph; Belardinelli, Paolo; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Ziemann, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop neuroscience is receiving increasing attention with recent technological advances that enable complex feedback loops to be implemented with millisecond resolution on commodity hardware. We summarize emerging conceptual and methodological frameworks that are available to experimenters investigating a "brain in the loop" using non-invasive brain stimulation and briefly review the experimental and therapeutic implications. We take the view that closed-loop neuroscience in fact deals with two conceptually quite different loops: a "brain-state dynamics" loop, used to couple with and modulate the trajectory of neuronal activity patterns, and a "task dynamics" loop, that is the bidirectional motor-sensory interaction between brain and (simulated) environment, and which enables goal-directed behavioral tasks to be incorporated. Both loops need to be considered and combined to realize the full experimental and therapeutic potential of closed-loop neuroscience. PMID:27092055

  8. Optimum conditions for cryoquenching of small tissue blocks in liquid coolants.

    PubMed

    Elder, H Y; Gray, C C; Jardine, A G; Chapman, J N; Biddlecombe, W H

    1982-04-01

    Three approaches were taken with the aim of defining the optimum conditions of rapid cryopreservation in liquid quenchants. In a theoretical approach, two mathematical models were used. The first is of value in defining the absolute maximum rates of cooling which could be achieved at various depths in the tissues. The second highlights the poor thermal properties of liquid coolants and therefore emphasizes the essential requirement for vigorous quenchant mixing and rapid specimen entry. Experimental work with thermocouples showed that fastest cooling rates occur at the leading edge of the object entering coolant. Of five quenchants investigated, cooling rates were in the order, propane greater than Freon 22 greater than Freon 12 greater than liquid nitrogen slush greater than liquid nitrogen. Other considerations, however, may affect the choice of quenchant. For a given quenchant, cooling rate is maximal near the equilibrium freezing point. The consequences of quenching in the presence of thermal gradients either within the coolant or in the gas layer above it are shown. Cooling rate was found to be approximately proportional to entry velocity at least up to approximately 2 m s-1 in our system. Stereological analysis of rapidly quenched, freeze-substituted tissue samples, of geometry which imposed an approximately unidirectional heat flow, revealed four zones: (i) a narrow surface layer (approximately 10 micrometers) of low image contrast and apparent of ice crystals; (ii) a zone of enhanced contrast with ice crystals whose size increased rapidly with depth from the surface (the 'slope'); (iii) a sharply defined zone (the 'ridge') of maximum ice crystal size beyond which there is (iv) an extensive 'plateau' with smaller ice crystals and no marked increase in size with depth. The 'ridge' of maximal ice-crystal damage was consistently found but varied considerably in depth from the surface (approximately 25-120 micrometers) between samples. The existence of the

  9. Study on the effect of the impeller and diffuser blade number on reactor coolant pump performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Y.; Yin, J. L.; Wang, D. Z.; Li, T. B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, CFD approach was employed to study how the blade number of impeller and diffuser influences reactor coolant pump performances. The three-dimensional pump internal flow channel was modelled by pro/E software, Reynolds-averaged Naiver-Stokes equations with the k-ε turbulence model were solved by the computational fluid dynamics software CFX. By post-processing on the numerical results, the performance curves of reactor coolant pump were obtained. The results are as follows, with the blade number of the impeller increasing, the head of the pump with different diffuser universally increases in the 8Q n∼1.2Q n conditions, and at different blade number of the diffuser, the head increases with the blade number of the impeller increasing. In 1.0Q n condition, when the blades number combination of impeller and diffuser chooses 4+16, 7+14 and 6+18, the head curves exist singular points. In 1.2Q n condition, the head curve still exists singular point in 6+18. With the blade number of the impeller increasing, the efficiency of the pump with different diffuser universally decreases in the 0.8Q n and 1.0Q n conditions, but in 1.2Q n condition, the efficiency of the pump with different diffuser universally increases. In 1.0Q n condition, the impellers of 4 and 5 blades are better. When the blade number combination of impeller and diffuser choose 4+11, 4+17, 4+18, 5+12, 5+17 and 5+18, the efficiencies relatively have higher values. With the blade number of the impeller increasing, the hydraulic shaft power of the pump with different diffuser universally increases in the 0.8Q n∼1.2Q n conditions, and with the blade number of the diffuser increasing, the power of different impeller overall has small fluctuation, but tends to be uniform. This means the increase of the diffuser blade number has less influence on shaft power.The influence on the head and flow by the matching relationship of the blades number between impeller and diffuser is very complicated, which

  10. Test Report on ISR Double-Loop, Spray-Cooled Inverter

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S; Coomer, Chester; Campbell, Steven L; Wiles, Randy H; Lowe, Kirk T; McFee, Marshall T

    2007-02-01

    The Isothermal Systems Research, Inc. (ISR) double-loop, two-phase spray cooling system was designed to use 85 C transmission oil to cool a heat exchanger via a second cooling loop. The heat exchanger condenses the working fluid vapor back to liquid inside a sealed enclosure to allow for continuous spray cooling of electronics. In the ORNL tests, 85 C water/ethylene/glycol (WEG), which has better thermal properties than transmission oil, was substituted for the transmission oil. Because the ISR spray-cooling system requires a second cooling loop, the final inverter might be inherently larger than inverters that do not require a second-loop cooling system. The ISR test setup did not include a dc bus capacitor. Because the insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) conduction test indicated that the ISR test setup could not be properly loaded thermally, no switching tests were conducted. Therefore it was not necessary to attach external capacitors outside the test setup. During load situations not exceeding 400A, the WEG inlet temperature was higher than the WEG outlet temperature. This meant that the 85 C WEG heat exchanger was not cooling the inverter and became a thermal load to the inverter. Only when the load was higher than 400A with a higher coolant temperature and the release valve actuated did the WEG heat exchanger start to cool the 2-phase coolant. The inverter relied strongly on the cooling of the huge aluminum enclosure located inside the ventilation chamber. In a hybrid vehicle, the inverter is situated under the hood, where the dependency on cooling provided by the enclosure may become a problem. The IGBT power dissipation with both sides being spray cooled was around 34 W/cm{sup 2} at 403A, with 995W total IGBT loss at 113.5 C projected junction temperature before the release valve was actuated. The current loading could rise higher than 403 A before reaching the 125 C junction temperature limit if the pressure buildup inside the enclosure could be

  11. Safety Analysis of the US Dual Coolant Liquid Lead-Lithium ITER Test Blanket Module

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Brad; Reyes, Susana; Sawan, Mohamed; Wong, Clement

    2006-07-01

    The US is proposing a prototype of a dual coolant liquid lead-lithium (DCLL) DEMO blanket concept for testing in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as an ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM). Because safety considerations are an integral part of the design process to ensure that this TBM does not adversely impact the safety of ITER, a safety assessment has been conducted for this TBM and its ancillary systems as requested by the ITER project. Four events were selected by the ITER International Team (IT) to address specific reactor safety concerns, such as VV pressurization, confinement building pressure build-up, TBM decay heat removal capability, tritium and activation products release from the TBM system, and hydrogen and heat production from chemical reactions. This paper summarizes the results of this safety assessment conducted with the MELCOR computer code.

  12. VICTORIA: A mechanistic model of radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system under severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Heames, T.J. ); Williams, D.A.; Johns, N.A.; Chown, N.M. ); Bixler, N.E.; Grimley, A.J. ); Wheatley, C.J. )

    1990-10-01

    This document provides a description of a model of the radionuclide behavior in the reactor coolant system (RCS) of a light water reactor during a severe accident. This document serves as the user's manual for the computer code called VICTORIA, based upon the model. The VICTORIA code predicts fission product release from the fuel, chemical reactions between fission products and structural materials, vapor and aerosol behavior, and fission product decay heating. This document provides a detailed description of each part of the implementation of the model into VICTORIA, the numerical algorithms used, and the correlations and thermochemical data necessary for determining a solution. A description of the code structure, input and output, and a sample problem are provided. The VICTORIA code was developed upon a CRAY-XMP at Sandia National Laboratories in the USA and a CRAY-2 and various SUN workstations at the Winfrith Technology Centre in England. 60 refs.

  13. Oxidation of SiC cladding under Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Yue, C.; Arnold, R. P.; McKrell, T. J.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    An experimental assessment of Silicon Carbide (SiC) cladding oxidation rate in steam under conditions representative of Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) in light water reactors (LWRs) was conducted. SiC oxidation tests were performed with monolithic alpha phase tubular samples in a vertical quartz tube at a steam temperature of 1140 deg. C and steam velocity range of 1 to 10 m/sec, at atmospheric pressure. Linear weight loss of SiC samples due to boundary layer controlled reaction of silica scale (SiO{sub 2} volatilization) was experimentally observed. The weight loss rate increased with increasing steam flow rate. Over the range of test conditions, SiC oxidation rates were shown to be about 3 orders of magnitude lower than the oxidation rates of zircaloy 4. A SiC volatilization correlation for developing laminar flow in a vertical channel is formulated. (authors)

  14. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  15. Microstructural analysis of MTR fuel plates damaged by a coolant flow blockage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaers, A.; Joppen, F.; Van den Berghe, S.

    2009-10-01

    In 1975, as a result of a blockage of the coolant inlet flow, two plates of a fuel element of the BR2 reactor of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK•CEN) were partially melted. The fuel element consisted of Al-clad plates with 90% 235U enriched UAl x fuel dispersed in an Al matrix. The element had accumulated a burn up of 21% 235U before it was removed from the reactor. Recently, the damaged fuel plates were sent to the hot laboratory for detailed PIE. Microstructural changes and associated temperature markers were used to identify several stages in the progression to fuel melting. It was found that the temperature in the center of the fuel plate had increased above 900-950 °C before the reactor was scrammed. In view of the limited availability of such datasets, the results of this microstructural analysis provide valuable input in the analysis of accident scenarios for research reactors.

  16. Prototypic Thermal-Hydraulic Experiment in NRU to Simulate Loss-of-Coolant Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, C. L.; Hesson, G. M.; Russcher, G. E.; Marsh, R. K.; King, L. L.; Wildung, N. J.; Rausch, W. N.; Bennett, W. D.

    1981-04-01

    Quick-look test results are reported for the initial test series of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation in the National Research Universal {NRU) test program, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This test was devoted to evaluating the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a full-length light water reactor (LWR) fuel bundle during the heatup, reflood, and quench phases of a LOCA. Experimental results from 28 tests cover reflood rates of 0.74 in./sec to 11 in./sec and delay times to initiate reflood of 3 sec to 66 sec. The results indicate that current analysis methods can predict peak temperatures within 10% and measured quench times for the bundle were significantly less than predicted. For reflood rates of 1 in./sec where long quench times were predicted (>2000 sec}, measured quench times of 200 sec were found.

  17. Microbiologically-influenced corrosion damage in a water coolant header for remote process equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C.F.

    1995-10-01

    Stainless steel water piping, used to supply coolant for remote chemical separations equipment, developed several leaks during low-flow conditions resulting from an extended interruption of operations. All the leaks occurred at welds in the bottom zone of the pipe, which was blanketed with silt deposits from the unfiltered well water used for cooling. Ultrasonic, radiographic, and metallographic examinations of the leak sites revealed worm-hole pitting adjacent to the welds. Seepage at the penetrations was strongly acidic and resulted in corrosion on the external pipe surfaces beneath brown crusty deposits which had developed. Analyses of the water and deposits suggested a strong propensity toward microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC) and fouling.

  18. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, William BJ J

    2016-01-01

    A technical basis for peak reactivity boiling water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) methods was recently generated, and the technical basis for extended BWR BUC is now being developed. In this paper, a number of effects related to extended BWR BUC are analyzed, including three major operational effects in BWRs: the coolant density axial distribution, the use of control blades during operation, and the axial burnup profile. Specifically, uniform axial moderator density profiles are analyzed and compared to previous results and an additional temporal fidelity study combing moderator density profiles for three different fuel assemblies is presented. Realistic control blade histories and cask criticality results are compared to previously generated constructed control blade histories. Finally, a preliminary study of the axial burnup profile is provided.

  19. An overview of fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) research at NRC

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Speis, T.P.

    1996-03-01

    An overview of the fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) research programs sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is presented in this paper. A historical perspective of the program is provided with particular reference to in-vessel steam explosion and its consequences on the reactor pressure vessel and the containment integrity. Emphasis is placed on research in the last decade involving fundamentals of FCI phenomenology, namely, premixing, triggering, propagation, and energetics. The status of the current understanding of in-vessel steam explosion-induced containment failure (alpha-mode) issue, and other FCI issues related to reactor vessel and containment integrity are reported, including the extensive review and discussion of these issues at the recently held second Steam Explosion Review Group Workshop (SERG-2). Ongoing NRC research programs are discussed in detail. Future research programs including those recommended at the SERG-2 workshop are outlined.

  20. Validation of advanced NSSS simulator model for loss-of-coolant accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, S.P.; Chang, S.K.; Huang, H.C.

    1995-09-01

    The replacement of the NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) model on the Millstone 2 full-scope simulator has significantly increased its fidelity to simulate adverse conditions in the RCS. The new simulator NSSS model is a real-time derivative of the Nuclear Plant Analyzer by ABB. The thermal-hydraulic model is a five-equation, non-homogeneous model for water, steam, and non-condensible gases. The neutronic model is a three-dimensional nodal diffusion model. In order to certify the new NSSS model for operator training, an extensive validation effort has been performed by benchmarking the model performance against RELAP5/MOD2. This paper presents the validation results for the cases of small-and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA). Detailed comparisons in the phenomena of reflux-condensation, phase separation, and two-phase natural circulation are discussed.

  1. Liquid Cooling of Tractive Lithium Ion Batteries Pack with Nanofluids Coolant.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Xie, Huaqing; Yu, Wei; Li, Jing

    2015-04-01

    The heat generated from tractive lithium ion batteries during discharge-charge process has great impacts on the performances of tractive lithium ion batteries pack. How to solve the thermal abuse in tractive lithium ion batteries pack becomes more and more urgent and important for future development of electrical vehicles. In this work, TiO2, ZnO and diamond nanofluids are prepared and utilized as coolants in indirect liquid cooling of tractive lithium ion batteries pack. The results show that nanofluids present superior cooling performance to that of pure fluids and the diamond nanofluid presents relatively excellent cooling abilities than that of TiO2 and ZnO nanofluids. During discharge process, the temperature distribution of batteries in batteries pack is uniform and stable, due to steady heat dissipation by indirect liquid cooling. It is expected that nanofluids could be considered as a potential alternative for indirect liquid cooling in electrical vehicles. PMID:26353564

  2. Liquid Cooling of Tractive Lithium Ion Batteries Pack with Nanofluids Coolant.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Xie, Huaqing; Yu, Wei; Li, Jing

    2015-04-01

    The heat generated from tractive lithium ion batteries during discharge-charge process has great impacts on the performances of tractive lithium ion batteries pack. How to solve the thermal abuse in tractive lithium ion batteries pack becomes more and more urgent and important for future development of electrical vehicles. In this work, TiO2, ZnO and diamond nanofluids are prepared and utilized as coolants in indirect liquid cooling of tractive lithium ion batteries pack. The results show that nanofluids present superior cooling performance to that of pure fluids and the diamond nanofluid presents relatively excellent cooling abilities than that of TiO2 and ZnO nanofluids. During discharge process, the temperature distribution of batteries in batteries pack is uniform and stable, due to steady heat dissipation by indirect liquid cooling. It is expected that nanofluids could be considered as a potential alternative for indirect liquid cooling in electrical vehicles.

  3. Discrete element method study of fuel relocation and dispersal during loss-of-coolant accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-09-01

    The fuel fragmentation, relocation and dispersal (FFRD) during LOCA transients today retain the attention of the nuclear safety community. The fine fragmentation observed at high burnup may, indeed, affect the Emergency Core Cooling System performance: accumulation of fuel debris in the cladding ballooned zone leads to a redistribution of the temperature profile, while dispersal of debris might lead to coolant blockage or to debris circulation through the primary circuit. This work presents a contribution, by discrete element method, towards a mechanistic description of the various stages of FFRD. The fuel fragments are described as a set of interacting particles, behaving as a granular medium. The model shows qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental observations, such as the packing efficiency in the balloon, which is shown to stabilize at about 55%. The model is then applied to study fuel dispersal, for which experimental parametric studies are both difficult and expensive.

  4. Cobalt-60 simulation of LOCA (loss of coolant accident) radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Buckalew, W.H.

    1989-07-01

    The consequences of simulating nuclear reactor loss of coolant accident (LOCA) radiation effects with Cobalt-60 gamma ray irradiators have been investigated. Based on radiation induced damage in polymer base materials, it was demonstrated that electron/photon induced radiation damage could be related on the basis of average absorbed radiation dose. This result was used to estimate the relative effectiveness of the mixed beta/gamma LOCA and Cobalt-60 radiation environments to damage both bare and jacketed polymer base electrical insulation materials. From the results obtained, it is concluded that present simulation techniques are a conservative method for simulating LOCA radiation effects and that the practices have probably substantially overstressed both bare and jacketed materials during qualification testing. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Wilson loop from a Dyson equation

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, M.; Reinhardt, H.

    2009-12-15

    The Dyson equation proposed for planar temporal Wilson loops in the context of supersymmetric gauge theories is critically analyzed thereby exhibiting its ingredients and approximations involved. We reveal its limitations and identify its range of applicability in nonsupersymmetric gauge theories. In particular, we show that this equation is applicable only to strongly asymmetric planar Wilson loops (consisting of a long and a short pair of loop segments) and as a consequence the Wilsonian potential can be extracted only up to intermediate distances. By this equation the Wilson loop is exclusively determined by the gluon propagator. We solve the Dyson equation in Coulomb gauge for the temporal Wilson loop with the instantaneous part of the gluon propagator and for the spatial Wilson loop with the static gluon propagator obtained in the Hamiltonian approach to continuum Yang-Mills theory and on the lattice. In both cases we find a linearly rising color potential.

  6. Loop anomalies in the causal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, Dan-Radu

    2015-01-01

    We consider gauge models in the causal approach and study one-loop contributions to the chronological products and the anomalies they produce. We prove that in order greater than 4 there are no one-loop anomalies. Next we analyze one-loop anomalies in the second- and third-order of the perturbation theory. We prove that the even parity contributions (with respect to parity) do not produce anomalies; for the odd parity contributions we reobtain the well-known result.

  7. Magnetic monopole in the loop representation

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, Lorenzo; Lopez, Alexander

    2006-01-15

    We quantize, within the Loop Representation formalism, the electromagnetic field in the presence of a static magnetic pole. It is found that the loop-dependent physical wave functionals of the quantum Maxwell theory become multivalued, through a topological phase factor depending on the solid angle subtended at the monopole by a surface bounded by the loop. It is discussed how this fact generalizes what occurs in ordinary quantum mechanics in multiply connected spaces.

  8. Costas loop analysis for coherent optical receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, T. G.

    1986-03-01

    A homodyne Costas loop receiver is analyzed taking both shot and laser phase noise sources into acount. The reciever performance is compared with that of a heterodyne receiver using an electrical Costas loop and that of a coherent receiver using a pilot carrier phase-locked loop. It is shown that, to avoid large performance penalties, beat linewidth to bit-rate ratios smaller than 0.05 percent and 0.5 percent are needed for PSK homodyne and heterodyne systems, respectively.

  9. Wilson loops in open string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, K.

    1988-02-01

    Wilson loop elements on torus are introduced into the partition function of open strings as Polyakov's path integral at one-loop level. Mass spectra from compactification and expected symmetry breaking are illustrated by choosing the correct weight for the contributions from annulus and Mobius strip. The authors show that Jacobi's imaginary transformation connects the mass spectra with the Wilson loops. The application to thermo-partition function and cosmological implications are briefly discussed.

  10. Stochastic simulation of fission product activity in primary coolant due to fuel rod failures in typical PWRs under power transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed Iqbal, M.; Mirza, Nasir M.; Mirza, Sikander M.

    2008-01-01

    During normal operation of PWRs, routine fuel rods failures result in release of radioactive fission products (RFPs) in the primary coolant of PWRs. In this work, a stochastic model has been developed for simulation of failure time sequences and release rates for the estimation of fission product activity in primary coolant of a typical PWR under power perturbations. In the first part, a stochastic approach is developed, based on generation of fuel failure event sequences by sampling the time dependent intensity functions. Then a three-stage model based deterministic methodology of the FPCART code has been extended to include failure sequences and random release rates in a computer code FPCART-ST, which uses state-of-the-art LEOPARD and ODMUG codes as its subroutines. The value of the 131I activity in primary coolant predicted by FPCART-ST code has been found in good agreement with the corresponding values measured at ANGRA-1 nuclear power plant. The predictions of FPCART-ST code with constant release option have also been found to have good agreement with corresponding experimental values for time dependent 135I, 135Xe and 89Kr concentrations in primary coolant measured during EDITHMOX-1 experiments.

  11. Advanced light water reactor requirements document: Chapter 3, Reactor coolant system and reactor non-safety auxiliary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this chapter of the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Plant Requirements Document is to establish utility requirements for the design of the Reactor Coolant System and the Reactor Non-safety Auxiliary Systems of Advanced LWR plants consistent with the objectives and principles of the ALWR program. The scope of this chapter covers the reactor coolant system and reactor non-safety auxiliary systems for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Non-safety auxiliaries include systems which are required for normal operation of the plant but are not required to operate for accident mitigation or to bring the plant to a safe shutdown condition. For PWRs, the reactor coolant system, steam generator system, chemical and volume control system and boron recycle system are included. For BWRs, the reactor coolant system and reactor water cleanup system are included. The chapter also includes requirements for the above systems which are common to BWRs and PWRs and requirements for process sampling for BWRs and PWRs.

  12. A hydrogen-oxygen rocket engine coolant passage design program (RECOP) for fluid-cooled thrust chambers and nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.

    1994-01-01

    The design of coolant passages in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers is critical to the operation and safety of a rocket engine system. Designing a coolant passage is a complex thermal and hydraulic problem requiring an accurate understanding of the heat transfer between the combustion gas and the coolant. Every major rocket engine company has invested in the development of thrust chamber computer design and analysis tools; two examples are Rocketdyne's REGEN code and Aerojet's ELES program. In an effort to augment current design capabilities for government and industry, the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing a computer model to design coolant passages for advanced regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. The RECOP code incorporates state-of-the-art correlations, numerical techniques and design methods, certainly minimum requirements for generating optimum designs of future space chemical engines. A preliminary version of the RECOP model was recently completed and code validation work is in progress. This paper introduces major features of RECOP and compares the analysis to design points for the first test case engine; the Pratt & Whitney RL10A-3-3A thrust chamber.

  13. Enhanced Control of PWR Primary Coolant Water Chemistry Using Selective Separation Systems for Recovery and Recycle of Enriched Boric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Czerwinski; Charels Yeamans; Don Olander; Kenneth Raymond; Norman Schroeder; Thomas Robison; Bryan Carlson; Barbara Smit; Pat Robinson

    2006-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop systems that will allow for increased nuclear energy production through the use of enriched fuels. The developed systems will allow for the efficient and selective recover of selected isotopes that are additives to power water reactors' primary coolant chemistry for suppression of corrosion attack on reactor materials.

  14. Experimental research of temperature and velocity fields in high-temperature flow of liquid heavy metal coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Besnosov, A. V. Savinov, S. Yu. Novozhilova, O. O.; Antonenkov, M. A.

    2011-12-15

    Presented are the results of experimental research of temperature and velocity fields for lead and lead-bismuth coolant flows in channels having circular and annular cross sections under varying oxygen content in the coolant and varying characteristics of insulating coatings. Tests are performed under the following operating conditions: (1) lead-bismuth eutectic-temperature T = 400-520 Degree-Sign C, thermodynamic oxygen activity a = 10{sup -5}-10{sup 0}, average flow velocity of the coolant w = 0.12-1.84 m/s, value of magnetic induction B = 0-0.85 T, Reynolds number Re = (0.24-3.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5}, Hartmann number Ha = 0-500, and Peclet number Pe = 320-4600; (2) lead coolant-T = 400-550 Degree-Sign C, a = 10{sup -5}-10{sup 0}, w = 0.1-1.5 m/s, Re = (2.36-2.99) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5}, and Pe = 500-7000.

  15. Unified framework for systematic loop transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, L.C.; Chen, M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents a formal mathematical framework which unifies the existing loop transformations. This framework also includes more general classes of loop transformations, which can extract more parallelism from a class of programs than the existing techniques. We classify schedules into three classes: uniform, subdomain-variant, and statement-variant. Viewing from the degree of parallelism to be gained by loop transformation, the schedules can also be classified as single-sequential level, multiple-sequential level, and mixed schedules. We also illustrate the usefulness of the more general loop transformation with an example program.

  16. Conservation law for linked cosmic string loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.

    1992-05-01

    Taking a cue from the connection between fluid helicity and the linkage between closed vortices in ordinary turbulent flow, we examine topological restrictions on the linkage of cosmic string loops (or superfluid quantum vortex rings). The analog of helicity in these cases vanishes, but loops (and vortex rings) can link together, the extent of linkage (knotting included) being related to the contorsion of the loops or rings by a topological conservation law. This law is respected by intercommunication. One consequence is that total loop contorsion is quantized in integers.

  17. Multi-instrument observations of coronal loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Jason Terrence

    This document exhibits results of analysis from data collected with multiple EUV satellites (SOHO, TRACE, STEREO, Hinode, and SDO). The focus is the detailed observation of coronal loops using multiple instruments, i.e. filter imagers and spectrometers. Techniques for comparing the different instruments and deriving loop parameters are demonstrated. Attention is given to the effects the different instruments may introduce into the data and their interpretation. The assembled loop parameters are compared to basic energy balance equations and scaling laws. Discussion of the blue-shifted, asymmetric, and line broadened spectral line profiles near the footpoints of coronal loops is made. The first quantitative analysis of the anti-correlation between intensity and spectral line broadening for isolated regions along loops and their footpoints is presented. A magnetic model of an active region shows where the separatrices meet the photospheric boundary. At the boundary, the spectral data reveal concentrated regions of increased blue-shifted outflows, blue wing asymmetry, and line broadening. This is found just outside the footpoints of bright loops. The intensity and line broadening in this region are anti-correlated. A comparison of the similarities in the spectroscopic structure near the footpoints of the arcade loops and more isolated loops suggests the notion of consistent structuring for the bright loops forming an apparent edge of an active region core.

  18. Double dither loop for pseudonoise code tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.

    1977-01-01

    A new type of phase detector for pseudonoise code tracking is introduced and analyzed in comparison with the delay lock loop (DLL) and tau-dither loop (TDL) configurations. It is shown that the double dither loop (DDL) combines the best features of the DLL and the TDL in that the DDL is insensitive to gain and offset imbalances and does not suffer the 3-dB degradation in noise performance typically associated with the TDL. The double dither concept is applicable to other dual channel detectors such as in a Costas-type carrier tracking loop.

  19. Analysis Of Lock Detection In Costas Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileant, Alexander; Hinedi, Sami M.

    1991-01-01

    Report presents analysis of detection of phase lock in Costas loops, used in coherent binary-phase-shift-keying communication systems to track both subcarrier and suppressed carrier signals. Detection of phase lock important part of operation and monitoring of operation of Costas or other tracking loop, provides insight into behavior of loop in real time. Focuses on effects of phase jitter and correlation between samples of phase error in all-digital Costas loop, in which lock detection implemented via algorithm. Applicable to both sinusoidal and square-law carrier signals, incorporates new mathematical models of square-law and absolute-value detectors.

  20. Screened perturbation theory to three loops

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens O.; Braaten, Eric; Strickland, Michael

    2001-05-15

    The thermal physics of a massless scalar field with a {phi}{sup 4} interaction is studied within screened perturbation theory (SPT). In this method the perturbative expansion is reorganized by adding and subtracting a mass term in the Lagrangian. We consider several different mass prescriptions that generalize the one-loop gap equation to two-loop order. We calculate the pressure and entropy to three-loop order and the screening mass to two-loop order. In contrast with the weak-coupling expansion, the SPT-improved approximations appear to converge even for rather large values of the coupling constant.