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Sample records for airplane control systems

  1. Electric airplane environmental control systems energy requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Buss, L.B.

    1984-05-01

    The electric airplane environmental control system (ECS) design drivers is discussed for an electric airplane from two aspects. The first aspect considered is the type of aircraft. The three examples selected are the 150-passenger commercial airline transport, the military on-station electronic-surveillance patrol aircraft, and the air-defense interceptor fighter. These vehicle examples illustrate the effect of both mission and mission profile on the design requirements of the ECS and the differences that the requirements make on the resulting advantages and disadvantages of electrification. For the commercial transport, the selection of the air source for ventilation will be featured. For the patrol aircraft, the cooling unit will be evaluated. For the fighter, emphasis will be placed on the need for systems integration. The second and more important consideration is the definition of the environmental control system requirements for both energy supply and heat sink thermal management integration from the power plant (engine) that make an electric ECS viable for each type of vehicle.

  2. 76 FR 9265 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System: Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System: Control Surface Position Awareness AGENCY: Federal... rulemaking by sending written comments, data, or views. The most helpful comments reference a specific... certificate for its new Gulfstream Model GVI passenger airplane. Gulfstream later applied for, and was...

  3. MLS: Airplane system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. D.; Stapleton, B. P.; Walen, D. B.; Rieder, P. F.; Moss, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis, modeling, and simulations were conducted as part of a multiyear investigation of the more important airplane-system-related items of the microwave landing system (MLS). Particular emphasis was placed upon the airplane RF system, including the antenna radiation distribution, the cabling options from the antenna to the receiver, and the overall impact of the airborne system gains and losses upon the direct-path signal structure. In addition, effort was expended toward determining the impact of the MLS upon the airplane flight management system and developing the initial stages of a fast-time MLS automatic control system simulation model. Results ot these studies are presented.

  4. Tradeoff studies in multiobjective insensitive design of airplane control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schy, A. A.; Giesy, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    A computer aided design method for multiobjective parameter-insensitive design of airplane control systems is described. Methods are presented for trading off nominal values of design objectives against sensitivities of the design objectives to parameter uncertainties, together with guidelines for designer utilization of the methods. The methods are illustrated by application to the design of a lateral stability augmentation system for two supersonic flight conditions of the Shuttle Orbiter. Objective functions are conventional handling quality measures and peak magnitudes of control deflections and rates. The uncertain parameters are assumed Gaussian, and numerical approximations of the stochastic behavior of the objectives are described. Results of applying the tradeoff methods to this example show that stochastic-insensitive designs are distinctly different from deterministic multiobjective designs. The main penalty for achieving significant decrease in sensitivity is decreased speed of response for the nominal system.

  5. Tradeoff methods in multiobjective insensitive design of airplane control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schy, A. A.; Giesy, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    The latest results of an ongoing study of computer-aided design of airplane control systems are given. Constrained minimization algorithms are used, with the design objectives in the constraint vector. The concept of Pareto optimiality is briefly reviewed. It is shown how an experienced designer can use it to find designs which are well-balanced in all objectives. Then the problem of finding designs which are insensitive to uncertainty in system parameters are discussed, introducing a probabilistic vector definition of sensitivity which is consistent with the deterministic Pareto optimal problem. Insensitivity is important in any practical design, but it is particularly important in the design of feedback control systems, since it is considered to be the most important distinctive property of feedback control. Methods of tradeoff between deterministic and stochastic-insensitive (SI) design are described, and tradeoff design results are presented for the example of the a Shuttle lateral stability augmentation system. This example is used because careful studies have been made of the uncertainty in Shuttle aerodynamics. Finally, since accurate statistics of uncertain parameters are usually not available, the effects of crude statistical models on SI designs are examined.

  6. Flight testing a propulsion-controlled aircraft emergency flight control system on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Burken, John; Maine, Trindel A.

    1994-01-01

    Flight tests of a propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system on an F-15 airplane have been conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The airplane was flown with all flight control surfaces locked both in the manual throttles-only mode and in an augmented system mode. In the latter mode, pilot thumbwheel commands and aircraft feedback parameters were used to position the throttles. Flight evaluation results showed that the PCA system can be used to land an airplane that has suffered a major flight control system failure safely. The PCA system was used to recover the F-15 airplane from a severe upset condition, descend, and land. Pilots from NASA, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace evaluated the PCA system and were favorably impressed with its capability. Manual throttles-only approaches were unsuccessful. This paper describes the PCA system operation and testing. It also presents flight test results and pilot comments.

  7. Status of a digital integrated propulsion/flight control system for the YF-12 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reukauf, P. J.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Holzman, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA Flight Research Center is engaged in a program with the YF-12 airplane to study the control of interactions between the airplane and the propulsion system. The existing analog air data computer, autothrottle, autopilot, and inlet control system are to be converted to digital systems by using a general purpose airborne computer and interface unit. First, the existing control laws will be programmed in the digital computer and flight tested. Then new control laws are to be derived from a dynamic propulsion model and a total force and moment aerodynamic model to integrate the systems. These control laws are to be verified in a real time simulation and flight tested.

  8. Flight test evaluation of a separate surface attitude command control system on a Beech 99 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Jenks, G. E.; Roskam, J.; Stone, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint NASA/university/industry program was conducted to flight evaluate a potentially low cost separate surface implementation of attitude command in a Beech 99 airplane. Saturation of the separate surfaces was the primary cause of many problems during development. Six experienced professional pilots who made simulated instrument flight evaluations experienced improvements in airplane handling qualities in the presence of turbulence and a reduction in pilot workload. For ride quality, quantitative data show that the attitude command control system results in all cases of airplane motion being removed from the uncomfortable ride region.

  9. Highly integrated digital engine control system on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Haering, E. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrated engine/airframe control systems. This system is being used on the F-15 airplane. An integrated flightpath management mode and an integrated adaptive engine stall margin mode are implemented into the system. The adaptive stall margin mode is a highly integrated mode in which the airplane flight conditions, the resulting inlet distortion, and the engine stall margin are continuously computed; the excess stall margin is used to uptrim the engine for more thrust. The integrated flightpath management mode optimizes the flightpath and throttle setting to reach a desired flight condition. The increase in thrust and the improvement in airplane performance is discussed.

  10. Simulator evaluation of a flight-path-angle control system for a transport airplane with direct lift control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    A piloted simulator was used to evaluate the flight path angle control capabilities of a system that employs spoiler direct lift control. The system was designated the velocity vector control system and was compared with a baseline flight path angle control system which used elevator for control. The simulated airplane was a medium jet transport. Research pilots flew a manual instrument landing system glide slope tracking task and a variable flight path angle task in the landing configuration to obtain comparative performance data.

  11. Predicted performance benefits of an adaptive digital engine control system of an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Ray, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrating engine-airframe control systems. Currently this is accomplished on the NASA Ames Research Center's F-15 airplane. The two control modes used to implement the systems are an integrated flightpath management mode and in integrated adaptive engine control system (ADECS) mode. The ADECS mode is a highly integrated mode in which the airplane flight conditions, the resulting inlet distortion, and the available engine stall margin are continually computed. The excess stall margin is traded for thrust. The predicted increase in engine performance due to the ADECS mode is presented in this report.

  12. Predicted performance benefits of an adaptive digital engine control system on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Ray, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrating engine-airframe control systems. Currently this is accomplished on the NASA Ames Research Center's F-15 airplane. The two control modes used to implement the systems are an integrated flightpath management mode and an integrated adaptive engine control system (ADECS) mode. The ADECS mode is a highly integrated mode in which the airplane flight conditions, the resulting inlet distortion, and the available engine stall margin are continually computed. The excess stall margin is traded for thrust. The predicted increase in engine performance due to the ADECS mode is presented in this report.

  13. Flutter analysis of an airplane with multiple structural nonlinearities in the control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breitbach, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    Experience has shown that the flutter prediction process for airplanes can be greatly affected by strong concentrated nonlinearities which may be localized in the linking elements of the control mechanism, in the pivot joints of variable-sweep-wing systems, and in the connecting points between wing and pylon-mounted external stores. The principle of equivalent linearization offers an efficent possibility for solving the related nonlinear flutter equations in the frequency domain as a complement to the well-known time domain procedures. Taking as an example an airplane with nonlinear control characteristics, it is demonstrated how the equivalent linearization approach can be extended to rather complicated systems with multiple sets of strongly interacting, concentrated nonlinearities.

  14. Multiobjective insensitive design of airplane control systems with uncertain parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schy, A. A.; Giesy, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    A multiobjective computer-aided design algorithm has been developed which minimizes the sensitivity of the design objectives to uncertainties in system parameters. The more important uncertain parameters are described by a gaussian random vector with known covariance matrix, and a vector sensitivity objective function is defined as the probabilities that the design objectives will violate specified requirements constraints. Control system parameters are found which minimize the sensitivity vector in a Pareto-optimal sense, using constrained minimization algorithms. Example results are shown for lateral stability augmentation system (SAS) design for three Shuttle flight conditions.

  15. Preliminary Flight Results of a Fly-by-throttle Emergency Flight Control System on an F-15 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Wells, Edward A.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-engine aircraft, with some or all of the flight control system inoperative, may use engine thrust for control. NASA Dryden has conducted a study of the capability and techniques for this emergency flight control method for the F-15 airplane. With an augmented control system, engine thrust, along with appropriate feedback parameters, is used to control flightpath and bank angle. Extensive simulation studies were followed by flight tests. The principles of throttles only control, the F-15 airplane, the augmented system, and the flight results including actual landings with throttles-only control are discussed.

  16. 78 FR 11553 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System: Control Surface Awareness and Mode Annunciation AGENCY: Federal... control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety... a fly-by-wire electronic flight control system and no direct coupling from the flightdeck...

  17. 77 FR 69573 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System: Lateral-Directional and Longitudinal Stability and Low Energy Awareness... airplane will have a novel or unusual design feature(s) associated with an electronic flight control system... features: (1) Lateral-Directional Static Stability: The electronic flight control system on the Model...

  18. Development and Flight Test of an Emergency Flight Control System Using Only Engine Thrust on an MD-11 Transport Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Burken, John J.; Maine, Trindel A.; Fullerton, C. Gordon

    1997-01-01

    An emergency flight control system that uses only engine thrust, called the propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system, was developed and flight tested on an MD-11 airplane. The PCA system is a thrust-only control system, which augments pilot flightpath and track commands with aircraft feedback parameters to control engine thrust. The PCA system was implemented on the MD-11 airplane using only software modifications to existing computers. Results of a 25-hr flight test show that the PCA system can be used to fly to an airport and safely land a transport airplane with an inoperative flight control system. In up-and-away operation, the PCA system served as an acceptable autopilot capable of extended flight over a range of speeds, altitudes, and configurations. PCA approaches, go-arounds, and three landings without the use of any normal flight controls were demonstrated, including ILS-coupled hands-off landings. PCA operation was used to recover from an upset condition. The PCA system was also tested at altitude with all three hydraulic systems turned off. This paper reviews the principles of throttles-only flight control, a history of accidents or incidents in which some or all flight controls were lost, the MD-11 airplane and its systems, PCA system development, operation, flight testing, and pilot comments.

  19. Development and Flight Test of an Augmented Thrust-Only Flight Control System on an MD-11 Transport Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Burken, John J.; Pappas, Drew

    1996-01-01

    An emergency flight control system using only engine thrust, called Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft (PCA), has been developed and flight tested on an MD-11 airplane. In this thrust-only control system, pilot flight path and track commands and aircraft feedback parameters are used to control the throttles. The PCA system was installed on the MD-11 airplane using software modifications to existing computers. Flight test results show that the PCA system can be used to fly to an airport and safely land a transport airplane with an inoperative flight control system. In up-and-away operation, the PCA system served as an acceptable autopilot capable of extended flight over a range of speeds and altitudes. The PCA approaches, go-arounds, and three landings without the use of any non-nal flight controls have been demonstrated, including instrument landing system-coupled hands-off landings. The PCA operation was used to recover from an upset condition. In addition, PCA was tested at altitude with all three hydraulic systems turned off. This paper reviews the principles of throttles-only flight control; describes the MD-11 airplane and systems; and discusses PCA system development, operation, flight testing, and pilot comments.

  20. Airstart performance of a digital electronic engine control system in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Licata, S. J.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The airstart performance of the F100 engine equipped with a digital electronic engine control (DEEC) system was evaluated in an F-15 airplane. The DEEC system incorporates closed-loop airstart logic for improved capability. Spooldown and jet fuel starter-assisted airstarts were made over a range of airspeeds and altitudes. All jet fuel starter-assisted airstarts were successful, with airstart time varying from 35 to 60 sec. All spooldown airstarts at airspeeds of 200 knots and higher were successful; airstart times ranged from 45 sec at 250 knots to 135 sec at 200 knots. The effects of altitude on airstart success and time were small. The flight results agreed closely with previous altitude facility test results. The DEEC system provided successful airstarts at airspeeds at least 50 knots lower than the standard F100 engine control system.

  1. Design and development experience with a digital fly-by-wire control system in an F-8C airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deets, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a digital fly by wire system, the mechanical flight control system of an F-8C airplane was replaced with a digital primary system and an analog backup system. The Apollo computer was used as the heart of the primary system. This paper discusses the experience gained during the design and development of the system and relates it to active control systems that are anticipated for future civil transport applications.

  2. Design and development experience with a digital fly-by-wire control system in an F-8C airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deets, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a digital fly-by-wire system, the mechanical flight control system of an F-8C airplane was replaced with a digital system and an analog backup system. The Apollo computer was used as the heart of the primary system. This paper discusses the experience gained during the design and development of the system and relates it to active control systems that are anticipated for future civil transport applications.

  3. Precision controllability of the F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, T. R.; Matheny, N. W.

    1979-01-01

    A flying qualities evaluation conducted on a preproduction F-15 airplane permitted an assessment to be made of its precision controllability in the high subsonic and low transonic flight regime over the allowable angle of attack range. Precision controllability, or gunsight tracking, studies were conducted in windup turn maneuvers with the gunsight in the caged pipper mode and depressed 70 mils. This evaluation showed the F-15 airplane to experience severe buffet and mild-to-moderate wing rock at the higher angles of attack. It showed the F-15 airplane radial tracking precision to vary from approximately 6 to 20 mils over the load factor range tested. Tracking in the presence of wing rock essentially doubled the radial tracking error generated at the lower angles of attack. The stability augmentation system affected the tracking precision of the F-15 airplane more than it did that of previous aircraft studied.

  4. Development and Flight Evaluation of an Emergency Digital Flight Control System Using Only Engine Thrust on an F-15 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Webb, Lannie Dean

    1996-01-01

    A propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system for emergency flight control of aircraft with no flight controls was developed and flight tested on an F-15 aircraft at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. The airplane has been flown in a throttles-only manual mode and with an augmented system called PCA in which pilot thumbwheel commands and aircraft feedback parameters were used to drive the throttles. Results from a 36-flight evaluation showed that the PCA system can be used to safety land an airplane that has suffered a major flight control system failure. The PCA system was used to recover from a severe upset condition, descend, and land. Guest pilots have also evaluated the PCA system. This paper describes the principles of throttles-only flight control; a history of loss-of-control accidents; a description of the F-15 aircraft; the PCA system operation, simulation, and flight testing; and the pilot comments.

  5. Piloted simulator study of allowable time delay in pitch flight control system of a transport airplane with negative static stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, William D.; Smith, Paul M.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Meyer, Robert T.; Tingas, Stephen A.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted to determine the permissible time delay in the flight control system of a 10-percent statically unstable transport airplane during cruise flight conditions. The math model used for the simulation was a derivative Lockheed L-1011 wide-body jet transport. Data were collected and analyzed from a total of 137 cruising flights in both calm- and turbulent-air conditions. Results of this piloted simulation study verify previous findings that show present military specifications for allowable control-system time delay may be too stringent when applied to transport-size airplanes. Also, the degree of handling-qualities degradation due to time delay is shown to be strongly dependent on the source of the time delay in an advanced flight control system. Maximum allowable time delay for each source of time delay in the control system, in addition to a less stringent overall maximum level of time delay, should be considered for large aircraft. Preliminary results also suggest that adverse effects of control-system time delay may be at least partially offset by variations in control gearing. It is recommended that the data base include different airplane baselines, control systems, and piloting tasks with many pilots participating, so that a reasonable set of limits for control-system time delay can be established to replace the military specification limits currently being used.

  6. 76 FR 31456 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System: Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System: Control Surface Position Awareness AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... design features include an electronic flight control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do... an electronic flight control system and no direct coupling from the cockpit controller to the...

  7. Precision controllability of the YF-17 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, T. R.; Mataeny, N. W.

    1980-01-01

    A flying qualities evaluation conducted on the YF-17 airplane permitted assessment of its precision controllability in the transonic flight regime over the allowable angle of attack range. The precision controllability (tailchase tracking) study was conducted in constant-g and windup turn tracking maneuvers with the command augmentation system (CAS) on, automatic maneuver flaps, and the caged pipper gunsight depressed 70 mils. This study showed that the YF-17 airplane tracks essentially as well at 7 g's to 8 g's as earlier fighters did at 4 g's to 5 g's before they encountered wing rock. The pilots considered the YF-17 airplane one of the best tracking airplanes they had flown. Wing rock at the higher angles of attack degraded tracking precision, and lack of control harmony made precision controllability more difficult. The revised automatic maneuver flap schedule incorporated in the airplane at the time of the tests did not appear to be optimum. The largest tracking errors and greatest pilot workload occurred at high normal load factors at low angles of attack. The pilots reported that the high-g maneuvers caused some tunnel vision and that they found it difficult to think clearly after repeated maneuvers.

  8. Flight test of a propulsion controlled aircraft system on the NASA F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.

    1995-01-01

    Flight tests of the propulsion controlled aircraft (PCA) system on the NASA F-15 airplane evolved as a result of a long series of simulation and flight tests. Initially, the simulation results were very optimistic. Early flight tests showed that manual throttles-only control was much more difficult than the simulation, and a flight investigation was flown to acquire data to resolve this discrepancy. The PCA system designed and developed by MDA evolved as these discrepancies were found and resolved, requiring redesign of the PCA software and modification of the flight test plan. Small throttle step inputs were flown to provide data for analysis, simulation update, and control logic modification. The PCA flight tests quickly revealed less than desired performance, but the extensive flexibility built into the flight PCA software allowed rapid evaluation of alternate gains, filters, and control logic, and within 2 weeks, the PCA system was functioning well. The initial objective of achieving adequate control for up-and-away flying and approaches was satisfied, and the option to continue to actual landings was achieved. After the PCA landings were accomplished, other PCA features were added, and additional maneuvers beyond those originally planned were flown. The PCA system was used to recover from extreme upset conditions, descend, and make approaches to landing. A heading mode was added, and a single engine plus rudder PCA mode was also added and flown. The PCA flight envelope was expanded far beyond that originally designed for. Guest pilots from the USAF, USN, NASA, and the contractor also flew the PCA system and were favorably impressed.

  9. Performance improvements of an F-15 airplane with an integrated engine-flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Lawrence P.; Walsh, Kevin R.

    1988-01-01

    An integrated flight and propulsion control system has been developed and flight demonstrated on the NASA Ames-Dryden F-15 research aircraft. The highly integrated digital control (HIDEC) system provides additional engine thrust by increasing engine pressure ratio (EPR) at intermediate and afterburning power. The amount of EPR uptrim is modulated based on airplane maneuver requirements, flight conditions, and engine information. Engine thrust was increased as much as 10.5 percent at subsonic flight conditions by uptrimming EPR. The additional thrust significantly improved aircraft performance. Rate of climb was increased 14 percent at 40,000 ft and the time to climb from 10,000 to 40,000 ft was reduced 13 percent. A 14 and 24 percent increase in acceleration was obtained at intermediate and maximum power, respectively. The HIDEC logic performed fault free. No engine anomalies were encountered for EPR increases up to 12 percent and for angles of attack and sideslip of 32 and 11 degrees, respectively.

  10. Pareto-optimal multi-objective design of airplane control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schy, A. A.; Johnson, K. G.; Giesy, D. P.

    1980-01-01

    A constrained minimization algorithm for the computer aided design of airplane control systems to meet many requirements over a set of flight conditions is generalized using the concept of Pareto-optimization. The new algorithm yields solutions on the boundary of the achievable domain in objective space in a single run, whereas the older method required a sequence of runs to approximate such a limiting solution. However, Pareto-optimality does not guarantee a satisfactory design, since such solutions may emphasize some objectives at the expense of others. The designer must still interact with the program to obtain a well-balanced set of objectives. Using the example of a fighter lateral stability augmentation system (SAS) design over five flight conditions, several effective techniques are developed for obtaining well-balanced Pareto-optimal solutions. For comparison, one of these techniques is also used in a recently developed algorithm of Kreisselmeier and Steinhauser, which replaces the hard constraints with soft constraints, using a special penalty function. It is shown that comparable results can be obtained.

  11. Fuzzy Logic Decoupled Longitudinal Control for General Aviation Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerksen, Noel

    1996-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a human pilot uses the same set of generic skills to control a wide variety of aircraft. If this is true, then it should be possible to construct an electronic controller which embodies this generic skill set such that it can successfully control difference airplanes without being matched to a specific airplane. In an attempt to create such a system, a fuzzy logic controller was devised to control throttle position and another to control elevator position. These two controllers were used to control flight path angle and airspeed for both a piston powered single engine airplane simulation and a business jet simulation. Overspeed protection and stall protection were incorporated in the form of expert systems supervisors. It was found that by using the artificial intelligence techniques of fuzzy logic and expert systems, a generic longitudinal controller could be successfully used on two general aviation aircraft types that have very difference characteristics. These controllers worked for both airplanes over their entire flight envelopes including configuration changes. The controllers for both airplanes were identical except for airplane specific limits (maximum allowable airspeed, throttle lever travel, etc.). The controllers also handled configuration changes without mode switching or knowledge of the current configuration. This research validated the fact that the same fuzzy logic based controller can control two very different general aviation airplanes. It also developed the basic controller architecture and specific control parameters required for such a general controller.

  12. Fuzzy Logic Decoupled Lateral Control for General Aviation Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duerksen, Noel

    1997-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a human pilot uses the same set of generic skills to control a wide variety of aircraft. If this is true, then it should be possible to construct an electronic controller which embodies this generic skill set such that it can successfully control different airplanes without being matched to a specific airplane. In an attempt to create such a system, a fuzzy logic controller was devised to control aileron or roll spoiler position. This controller was used to control bank angle for both a piston powered single engine aileron equipped airplane simulation and a business jet simulation which used spoilers for primary roll control. Overspeed, stall and overbank protection were incorporated in the form of expert systems supervisors and weighted fuzzy rules. It was found that by using the artificial intelligence techniques of fuzzy logic and expert systems, a generic lateral controller could be successfully used on two general aviation aircraft types that have very different characteristics. These controllers worked for both airplanes over their entire flight envelopes. The controllers for both airplanes were identical except for airplane specific limits (maximum allowable airspeed, throttle ]ever travel, etc.). This research validated the fact that the same fuzzy logic based controller can control two very different general aviation airplanes. It also developed the basic controller architecture and specific control parameters required for such a general controller.

  13. Effect on Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of a Boeing B-29 Airplane of Variations in Stick-Force and Control-Rate Characteristics Obtained Through Use of a Booster in the Elevator-Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, Charles W; Talmage, Donald B; Whitten, James B

    1952-01-01

    A longitudinal stability and control characteristics of a Boeing B-29 airplane have been measured with a booster incorporated in the elevator-control system. Tests were made to determine the effects on the handling qualities of the test airplane of variations in the pilot's control-force gradients as well as the effects of variations in the maximum rate of control motion supplied by the booster. The results of the control-rate investigation indicate that large airplanes may have satisfactory handling qualities with the booster adjusted to give much lower rates of control motion than those normally used by pilots.

  14. Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of a B-29 Airplane with a Booster Incorporated in the Elevator Control System to Provide Various Stick-Force and Control-Rate Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, Charles W.; Talmage, Donald B.; Whitten, James B.

    1948-01-01

    The longitudinal stability and control characteristics of a B-29 airplane have been measured with a booster incorporated in the elevator control system. Tests were made to determine the effects on the handling qualities of the test airplane of variations in pilots control-force gradients as well as the effects of variations in the maximum rate of control motion supplied by the booster system.

  15. Flight Investigation of a Mechanical Feel Device in an Irreversible Elevator Control System of a Large Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, B Porter; Chilton, Robert G; Whitten, James B

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of measurements of the longitudinal stability and control characteristics of a large airplane using a mechanical feel device in combination with a booster incorporated in the elevator-control system. Tests were made to investigate the feasibility of eliminating the aerodynamic control forces through use of a booster and of providing control-feel forces mechanically. The feel device consisted of a centering spring which restrained the control stick through a linkage which was changed as a function of the dynamic pressure. Provisions were made for trimming and for manual adjustment of the force gradient. The system was designed to approximate the control-force characteristics that would result with a conventional elevator control with linear hinge-moment characteristics.

  16. Research on the control of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B Melvill

    1928-01-01

    Our task is to endeavor to obtain precise experimental records of the motion of stalled airplanes, both when left to themselves and when the pilot is trying to control them. The apparatus which we use consists of a box containing tree gyroscopes which are slightly deflected against a spring control when the airplane is turning.

  17. Flight-test of the glide-slope track and flare-control laws for an automatic landing system for a powered-lift STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, D. M.; Hardy, G. H.; Warner, D. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An automatic landing system was developed for the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Airplane to establish the feasibility and examine the operating characteristics of a powered-lift STOL transport flying a steep, microwave landing system (MLS) glide slope to automatically land on a STOL port. The flight test results address the longitudinal aspects of automatic powered lift STOL airplane operation including glide slope tracking on the backside of the power curve, flare, and touchdown. Three different autoland control laws were evaluated to demonstrate the tradeoff between control complexity and the resulting performance. The flight test and simulation methodology used in developing conventional jet transport systems was applied to the powered-lift STOL airplane. The results obtained suggest that an automatic landing system for a powered-lift STOL airplane operating into an MLS-equipped STOL port is feasible. However, the airplane must be provided with a means of rapidly regulation lift to satisfactorily provide the glide slope tracking and control of touchdown sink rate needed for automatic landings.

  18. 75 FR 77569 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System Mode...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System Mode Annunciation AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... design features include an electronic flight control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do... system. This system provides an electronic interface between the pilot's flight controls and ] the...

  19. Control of airplanes at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R Mckinnon

    1923-01-01

    Loss of control over the orientation of an airplane as the incidence approaches and enters the region of stalled flight is a prolific cause of serious accidents. This report discusses methods of landing at slow speeds approaching stall.

  20. Use of active control systems to improve bending and rotor flapping response of a tilt rotor VTOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, H. P.; Cheng, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The results are summarized of an analytical study of the use of active control systems for the purpose of reducing the root mean square response of wing vertical bending and rotor flapping to atmospheric turbulence for a tilt-rotor VTOL airplane. Only the wing/rotor assembly was considered so that results of a wind tunnel test program would be applicable in a subsequent phase of the research. The capabilities and limitations of simple single feedback configurations were identified, and the most promising multiloop feedback configurations were then investigated. Design parameters were selected so as to minimize either wing bending or rotor flapping response. Within the constraints imposed by practical levels of feedback gains and complexity and by considerations of safety, reduction in response due to turbulence of the order of 30 to 50 percent is predicted using the rotor longitudinal cyclic and a trailing edge wing flap as control effectors.

  1. Advances in Thrust-Based Emergency Control of an Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Gray; Burken, John J.; Burcham, Bill

    2003-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center have received a patent on an emergency flight-control method implemented by a propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system. Utilizing the preexisting auto-throttle and engine-pressure-ratio trim controls of the airplane, the PCA system provides pitch and roll control for landing an airplane safely without using aerodynamic control surfaces that have ceased to function because of a primary-flight-control-system failure. The installation of the PCA does not entail any changes in pre-existing engine hardware or software. [Aspects of the method and system at previous stages of development were reported in Thrust-Control System for Emergency Control of an Airplane (DRC-96-07), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 3 (March 2001), page 68 and Emergency Landing Using Thrust Control and Shift of Weight (DRC-96-55), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 58.]. Aircraft flight-control systems are designed with extensive redundancy to ensure low probabilities of failure. During recent years, however, several airplanes have exhibited major flight-control-system failures, leaving engine thrust as the last mode of flight control. In some of these emergency situations, engine thrusts were successfully modulated by the pilots to maintain flight paths or pitch angles, but in other situations, lateral control was also needed. In the majority of such control-system failures, crashes resulted and over 1,200 people died. The challenge lay in creating a means of sufficient degree of thrust-modulation control to safely fly and land a stricken airplane. A thrust-modulation control system designed for this purpose was flight-tested in a PCA an MD-11 airplane. The results of the flight test showed that without any operational control surfaces, a pilot can land a crippled airplane (U.S. Patent 5,330,131). The installation of the original PCA system entailed modifications not only of the flight-control computer (FCC) of the airplane but

  2. 76 FR 14795 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System Mode...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System Mode Annunciation. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... electronic flight control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or...). Novel or Unusual Design Features The GVI will have a fly-by-wire electronic flight control system....

  3. Digital Control Of A Telescope In An Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Ann C.; Snyder, Philip K.

    1991-01-01

    Options for design of aim-stabilizing system analyzed. Report discusses feasibility of digital control system stabilizing aim of 30-in. telescope aboard NASA C141 airplane known as Kuiper Atmospheric Observatory. Proposed digital compensator consists of input analog-to-digital converter, digital controller processor, and output digital-to-analog converter.

  4. Performance improvements of a highly integrated digital electronic control system for an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Andries, M. G.; Kelly, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program is structured to conduct flight research into the benefits of integrating an aircraft flight control system with the engine control system. A brief description of the HIDEC system installed on an F-15 aircraft is provided. The adaptive engine control system (ADECS) mode is described in detail, together with simulation results and analyses that show the significant excess thrust improvements achievable with the ADECS mode. It was found that this increased thrust capability is accompanied by reduced fan stall margin and can be realized during flight conditions where engine face distortion is low. The results of analyses and simulations also show that engine thrust response is improved and that fuel consumption can be reduced. Although the performance benefits that accrue because of airframe and engine control integration are being demonstrated on an F-15 aircraft, the principles are applicable to advanced aircraft such as the advanced tactical fighter and advanced tactical aircraft.

  5. Application of high-alpha control system concepts to a variable-sweep fighter airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Gilbert, W. P.; Gera, J.; Iliff, K. W.; Enevoldson, E. K.

    1980-01-01

    The use of control system design to enhance high-angle-of-attack flying qualities and departure/spin resistance has become an accepted and widely used approach for modern fighter aircraft. NASA and the Navy are currently conducting a joint research program to investigate the application of this technology to the F-14. The paper discusses the results of this program within the context of its contributions to advancing high-alpha control system technology. General topics covered include (1) analysis and design tools, (2) control system design approach, and (3) flight test approach and results.

  6. Practical stability and controllability of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H

    1923-01-01

    The effect of the characteristics of an airplane on balance, stability, and controllability, based on free flight tests, is discussed particularly in respect to the longitudinal motion. It is shown that the amount of longitudinal stability can be varied by changing the position of the center of gravity or by varying the aspect ratio of the tail plane, and that the stability for any particular air speed can be varied by changing the camber of the tail plane. It is found that complete longitudinal stability may be obtained even when the tail plane is at all times a lifting surface. Empirical values are given for the characteristics of a new airplane for producing any desired amount of stability and control, or to correct the faults of an airplane already constructed. (author)

  7. Handling qualities of a wide-body transport airplane utilizing Pitch Active Control Systems (PACS) for relaxed static stability application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, William D.; Person, Lee H., Jr.; Brown, Philip W.; Becker, Lawrence E.; Hunt, George E.; Rising, J. J.; Davis, W. J.; Willey, C. S.; Weaver, W. A.; Cokeley, R.

    1985-01-01

    Piloted simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of two pitch active control systems (PACS) on the flying qualities of a wide-body transport airplane when operating at negative static margins. These two pitch active control systems consisted of a simple 'near-term' PACS and a more complex 'advanced' PACS. Eight different flight conditions, representing the entire flight envelope, were evaluated with emphasis on the cruise flight conditions. These studies were made utilizing the Langley Visual/Motion Simulator (VMS) which has six degrees of freedom. The simulation tests indicated that (1) the flying qualities of the baseline aircraft (PACS off) for the cruise and other high-speed flight conditions were unacceptable at center-of-gravity positions aft of the neutral static stability point; (2) within the linear static stability flight envelope, the near-term PACS provided acceptable flying qualities for static stabilty margins to -3 percent; and (3) with the advanced PACS operative, the flying qualities were demonstrated to be good (satisfactory to very acceptable) for static stabilty margins to -20 percent.

  8. Flight evaluation of a digital electronic engine control system in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. P.; Mackall, K. G.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Walter, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    Benefits provided by a full-authority digital engine control are related to improvements in engine efficiency, performance, and operations. An additional benefit is the capability of detecting and accommodating failures in real time and providing engine-health diagnostics. The digital electronic engine control (DEEC), is a full-authority digital engine control developed for the F100-PW-100 turbofan engine. The DEEC has been flight tested on an F-15 aircraft. The flight tests had the objective to evaluate the DEEC hardware and software over the F-15 flight envelope. A description is presented of the results of the flight tests, which consisted of nonaugmented and augmented throttle transients, airstarts, and backup control operations. The aircraft, engine, DEEC system, and data acquisition and reduction system are discussed.

  9. Integrated Flight-propulsion Control Concepts for Supersonic Transport Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Gelhausen, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    Integration of propulsion and flight control systems will provide significant performance improvements for supersonic transport airplanes. Increased engine thrust and reduced fuel consumption can be obtained by controlling engine stall margin as a function of flight and engine operating conditions. Improved inlet pressure recovery and decreased inlet drag can result from inlet control system integration. Using propulsion system forces and moments to augment the flight control system and airplane stability can reduce the flight control surface and tail size, weight, and drag. Special control modes may also be desirable for minimizing community noise and for emergency procedures. The overall impact of integrated controls on the takeoff gross weight for a generic high speed civil transport is presented.

  10. Dynamic Response of Control Servo System Installed in NAES-Equipped SB2C-5 Airplane (BuAer No. 83135)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smaus, Louis H.; Stewart, Elwood C.

    1950-01-01

    Dynamic--response measurements for various conditions of displacement and rate signal input, sensitivity setting, and simulated hinge moment were made of the three control-surface servo systems of an NAES-equipped remote-controlled airplane while on the ground. The basic components of the servo systems are those of the General Electric Company type G-1 autopilot using electrical signal. sources, solenoid-operated valves, and hydraulic pistons. The test procedures and difficulties are discussed, Both frequency and transient-response data, are presented and comparisons are made. The constants describing the servo system, the undamped natural frequency, and the damping ratio, are determined by several methods. The response of the system with the addition of airframe rate signal is calculated. The transfer function of the elevator surface, linkage, and cable system is obtained. The agreement between various methods of measurement and calculation is considered very good. The data are complete enough and in such form that they may be used directly with the frequency-response data of an airplane to predict the stability of the autopilot-airplane combination.

  11. Flight evaluation of modifications to a digital electronic engine control system in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Zeller, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    The third phase of a flight evaluation of a digital electronic engine control system in an F-15 has recently been completed. It was found that digital electronic engine control software logic changes and augmentor hardware improvements resulted in significant improvements in engine operation. For intermediate to maximum power throttle transients, an increase in altitude capability of up to 8000 ft was found, and for idle to maximum transients, an increase of up to 4000 ft was found. A nozzle instability noted in earlier flight testing was investigated on a test engine at NASA Lewis Research Center, a digital electronic engine control software logic change was developed and evaluated, and no instability occurred in the Phase 3 flight evaluation. The backup control airstart modification was evaluated, and gave an improvement of airstart capability by reducing the minimum airspeed for successful airstarts by 50 to 75 knots.

  12. Simulator study of the effectiveness of an automatic control system designed to improve the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of a fighter airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, W. P.; Nguyen, L. T.; Vangunst, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A piloted, fixed-base simulation was conducted to study the effectiveness of some automatic control system features designed to improve the stability and control characteristics of fighter airplanes at high angles of attack. These features include an angle-of-attack limiter, a normal-acceleration limiter, an aileron-rudder interconnect, and a stability-axis yaw damper. The study was based on a current lightweight fighter prototype. The aerodynamic data used in the simulation were measured on a 0.15-scale model at low Reynolds number and low subsonic Mach number. The simulation was conducted on the Langley differential maneuvering simulator, and the evaluation involved representative combat maneuvering. Results of the investigation show the fully augmented airplane to be quite stable and maneuverable throughout the operational angle-of-attack range. The angle-of-attack/normal-acceleration limiting feature of the pitch control system is found to be a necessity to avoid angle-of-attack excursions at high angles of attack. The aileron-rudder interconnect system is shown to be very effective in making the airplane departure resistant while the stability-axis yaw damper provided improved high-angle-of-attack roll performance with a minimum of sideslip excursions.

  13. Analytical investigation of the landing dynamics of a large airplane with a load-control system in the main landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Carden, H. D.

    1979-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of an active load-control landing gear computer program (ACOLAG) for predicting the landing dynamics of airplanes with passive and active main gears are presented. ACOLAG was used in an analytical investigation of the landing dynamics of a large airplane with both passive and active main gears. It was concluded that the program is valid for predicting the landing dynamics of airplanes with both passive and active main gears. It was shown that the active gear reduces airframe-gear forces and airplane motions following initial impact, and has the potential for significant reductions in structural fatigue damage relative to that which occurs with the passive gear.

  14. 77 FR 57039 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane... conditions for the Embraer S.A. Model EMB-550 airplane. This airplane will have a novel or unusual design..., data, or views. The most helpful comments reference a specific portion of the special...

  15. Brake control system modification, augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Airplane (AWJSRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amberg, R. L.; Arline, J. A.; Jenny, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The braking system for a short takeoff aircraft is discussed and the deficiencies are described. The installation of a Boeing 727 aircraft brake system was made to correct the deficiencies. Tests of the modified system were conducted using an analog computer/hardware simulator. Actual performance tests were conducted and the characteristics of the system were satisfactory.

  16. Airplane takeoff and landing performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B. (Inventor); Srivatsan, Raghavachari (Inventor); Person, Lee H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a real-time takeoff and landing performance monitoring system for an aircraft which provides a pilot with graphic and metric information to assist in decisions related to achieving rotation speed (VR) within the safe zone of a runway, or stopping the aircraft on the runway after landing or take-off abort. The system processes information in two segments: a pretakeoff segment and a real-time segment. One-time inputs of ambient conditions and airplane configuration information are used in the pretakeoff segment to generate scheduled performance data. The real-time segment uses the scheduled performance data, runway length data and transducer measured parameters to monitor the performance of the airplane throughout the takeoff roll. Airplane acceleration and engine-performance anomalies are detected and annunciated. A novel and important feature of this segment is that it updates the estimated runway rolling friction coefficient. Airplane performance predictions also reflect changes in head wind occurring as the takeoff roll progresses. The system provides a head-down display and a head-up display. The head-up display is projected onto a partially reflective transparent surface through which the pilot views the runway. By comparing the present performance of the airplane with a continually predicted nominal performance based upon given conditions, performance deficiencies are detected by the system and conveyed to pilot in form of both elemental information and integrated information.

  17. Airplane takeoff and landing performance monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David B. (Inventor); Srivatsan, Raghavachari (Inventor); Person, Jr., Lee H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a real-time takeoff and landing performance monitoring system for an aircraft which provides a pilot with graphic and metric information to assist in decisions related to achieving rotation speed (V.sub.R) within the safe zone of a runway, or stopping the aircraft on the runway after landing or take-off abort. The system processes information in two segments: a pretakeoff segment and a real-time segment. One-time inputs of ambient conditions and airplane configuration information are used in the pretakeoff segment to generate scheduled performance data. The real-time segment uses the scheduled performance data, runway length data and transducer measured parameters to monitor the performance of the airplane throughout the takeoff roll. Airplane and engine performance deficiencies are detected and annunciated. A novel and important feature of this segment is that it updates the estimated runway rolling friction coefficient. Airplane performance predictions also reflect changes in head wind occurring as the takeoff roll progresses. The system provides a head-down display and a head-up display. The head-up display is projected onto a partially reflective transparent surface through which the pilot views the runway. By comparing the present performance of the airplane with a predicted nominal performance based upon given conditions, performance deficiencies are detected by the system.

  18. Minimum time and fuel flight profiles for an F-15 airplane with a Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, E. A., Jr.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to optimize minimum time and fuel consumption paths for an F-15 airplane powered by two F100 Engine Model Derivative (EMD) engines. The benefits of using variable stall margin (uptrim) to increase performance were also determined. This study supports the NASA Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) program. The basis for this comparison was minimum time and fuel used to reach Mach 2 at 13,716 m (45,000 ft) from the initial conditions of Mach 0.15 at 1524 m (5000 ft). Results were also compared to a pilot's estimated minimum time and fuel trajectory determined from the F-15 flight manual and previous experience. The minimum time trajectory took 15 percent less time than the pilot's estimate for the standard EMD engines, while the minimum fuel trajectory used 1 percent less fuel than the pilot's estimate for the minimum fuel trajectory. The F-15 airplane with EMD engines and uptrim, was 23 percent faster than the pilot's estimate. The minimum fuel used was 5 percent less than the estimate.

  19. Blended Buffet-Load-Alleviation System for Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    The capability of modern fighter airplanes to sustain flight at high angles of attack and/or moderate angles of sideslip often results in immersion of part of such an airplane in unsteady, separated, vortical flow emanating from its forebody or wings. The flows from these surfaces become turbulent and separated during flight under these conditions. These flows contain significant levels of energy over a frequency band coincident with that of low-order structural vibration modes of wings, fins, and control surfaces. The unsteady pressures applied to these lifting surfaces as a result of the turbulent flows are commonly denoted buffet loads, and the resulting vibrations of the affected structures are known as buffeting. Prolonged exposure to buffet loads has resulted in fatigue of structures on several airplanes. Damage to airplanes caused by buffeting has led to redesigns of airplane structures and increased support costs for the United States Air Force and Navy as well as the armed forces of other countries. Time spent inspecting, repairing, and replacing structures adversely affects availability of aircraft for missions. A blend of rudder-control and piezoelectric- actuator engineering concepts was selected as a basis for the design of a vertical-tail buffet-load-alleviation system for the F/A-18 airplane. In this system, the rudder actuator is used to control the response of the first tail vibrational mode (bending at a frequency near 15 Hz), while directional patch piezoelectric actuators are used to control the second tail vibrational mode (tip torsion at a frequency near 45 Hz). This blend of two types of actuator utilizes the most effective features of each. An analytical model of the aeroservoelastic behavior of the airplane equipped with this system was validated by good agreement with measured results from a full-scale ground test, flight-test measurement of buffet response, and an in-flight commanded rudder frequency sweep. The overall performance of the

  20. Flight Test of a Propulsion-Based Emergency Control System on the MD-11 Airplane with Emphasis on the Lateral Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel A.; Feather, John; Goldthorpe, Steven; Kahler, Jeffrey A.

    1996-01-01

    A large, civilian, multi-engine transport MD-11 airplane control system was recently modified to perform as an emergency backup controller using engine thrust only. The emergency backup system, referred to as the propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system, would be used if a major primary flight control system fails. To allow for longitudinal and lateral-directional control, the PCA system requires at least two engines and is implemented through software modifications. A flight-test program was conducted to evaluate the PCA system high-altitude flying characteristics and to demonstrate its capacity to perform safe landings. The cruise flight conditions, several low approaches and one landing without any aerodynamic flight control surface movement, were demonstrated. This paper presents results that show satisfactory performance of the PCA system in the longitudinal axis. Test results indicate that the lateral-directional axis of the system performed well at high attitude but was sluggish and prone to thermal upsets during landing approaches. Flight-test experiences and test techniques are also discussed with emphasis on the lateral-directional axis because of the difficulties encountered in flight test.

  1. 78 FR 63845 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Isolation or Airplane Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...; Isolation or Airplane Electronic System Security Protection From Unauthorized Internal Access AGENCY... diverse set of functions, including: Flight-safety related control and navigation systems, Airline...-550 airplanes. Isolation or Airplane Electronic System Security Protection From Unauthorized...

  2. A Theoretical Investigation of Longitudinal Stability of Airplane with Free Controls Including Effect of Friction in Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Harry; Sternfield, Leonard

    1944-01-01

    The relation between the elevator hinge-moment parameters and the control-forces for changes in forward speed and in maneuvers is shown for several values of static stability and elevator mass balance.

  3. 78 FR 11560 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Electronic Flight Control System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ...; Electronic Flight Control System: Lateral-Directional and Longitudinal Stability and Low Energy Awareness... or unusual design feature(s) associated with an electronic flight control system with respect to... features: (1) Lateral-Directional Static Stability: The electronic flight control system on the Model...

  4. 14 CFR 25.395 - Control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.395 Control system. (a) Longitudinal, lateral, directional, and drag control system and their supporting structures...

  5. 14 CFR 25.395 - Control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.395 Control system. (a) Longitudinal, lateral, directional, and drag control system and their supporting structures...

  6. 14 CFR 25.395 - Control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.395 Control system. (a) Longitudinal, lateral, directional, and drag control system and their supporting structures...

  7. 14 CFR 25.395 - Control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.395 Control system. (a) Longitudinal, lateral, directional, and drag control system and their supporting structures...

  8. 14 CFR 25.395 - Control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.395 Control system. (a) Longitudinal, lateral, directional, and drag control system and their supporting structures...

  9. A comparison of flight and simulation data for three automatic landing system control laws for the Augmentor wing jet STOL research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinreich, B.; Gevaert, G.

    1980-01-01

    Automatic flare and decrab control laws for conventional takeoff and landing aircraft were adapted to the unique requirements of the powered lift short takeoff and landing airplane. Three longitudinal autoland control laws were developed. Direct lift and direct drag control were used in the longitudinal axis. A fast time simulation was used for the control law synthesis, with emphasis on stochastic performance prediction and evaluation. Good correlation with flight test results was obtained.

  10. 77 FR 20572 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Directives; BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... (AD) for certain BAE SYSTEMS (OPERATIONS) LIMITED Model BAe 146 and Model Avro 146-RJ airplanes. This... information identified in this proposed AD, contact BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited, Customer...

  11. 78 FR 58960 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (OPERATIONS) LIMITED Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS... rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all BAE SYSTEMS (OPERATIONS) LIMITED Model BAe 146 series airplanes and Model Avro 146-RJ series airplanes. This proposed...

  12. In-flight investigation of the effects of pilot location and control system design on airplane flying qualities for approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weingarten, N. C.; Chalk, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    The handling qualities of large airplanes in the approach and landing flight phase were studied. The primary variables were relative pilot position with respect to center of rotation, command path time delays and phase shifts, augmentation schemes and levels of augmentation. It is indicated that the approach and landing task with large airplanes is a low bandwidth task. Low equivalent short period frequencies and relatively long time delays are tolerated only when the pilot is located at considerable distance forward of the center of rotation. The control problem experienced by the pilots, when seated behind the center of rotation, tended to occur at low altitude when they were using visual cues of rate of sink and altitude. A direct lift controller improved final flight path control of the shuttle like configurations.

  13. Flight testing and simulation of an F-15 airplane using throttles for flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Maine, Trindel; Wolf, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Flight tests and simulation studies using the throttles of an F-15 airplane for emergency flight control have been conducted at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. The airplane and the simulation are capable of extended up-and-away flight, using only throttles for flight path control. Initial simulation results showed that runway landings using manual throttles-only control were difficult, but possible with practice. Manual approaches flown in the airplane were much more difficult, indicating a significant discrepancy between flight and simulation. Analysis of flight data and development of improved simulation models that resolve the discrepancy are discussed. An augmented throttle-only control system that controls bank angle and flight path with appropriate feedback parameters has also been developed, evaluated in simulations, and is planned for flight in the F-15.

  14. 77 FR 70941 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ...., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... feature(s) associated with the interaction of systems and structures. The applicable airworthiness... primary structure is metal with composite empennage and control surfaces. The Model EMB-550 airplane...

  15. A controls engineering approach for analyzing airplane input-output characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. Douglas

    1991-01-01

    An engineering approach for analyzing airplane control and output characteristics is presented. State-space matrix equations describing the linear perturbation dynamics are transformed from physical coordinates into scaled coordinates. The scaling is accomplished by applying various transformations to the system to employ prior engineering knowledge of the airplane physics. Two different analysis techniques are then explained. Modal analysis techniques calculate the influence of each system input on each fundamental mode of motion and the distribution of each mode among the system outputs. The optimal steady state response technique computes the blending of steady state control inputs that optimize the steady state response of selected system outputs. Analysis of an example airplane model is presented to demonstrate the described engineering approach.

  16. Fault detection and accommodation testing on an F100 engine in an F-15 airplane. [digital engine control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. P.; Baer-Riedhart, J. L.; Maxwell, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The fault detection and accommodation (FDA) methods that can be used for digital engine control systems are presently subjected to a flight test program in the case of the F-15 fighter's F100 engine electronic controls, inducing selected faults and then evaluating the resulting digital engine control responses. In general, flight test results were found to compare well with both ground tests and predictions. It is noted that the inducement of dual-pressure failures was not feasible, since FDA logic was not designed to accommodate them.

  17. Summary of stability and control characteristics of the XB-70 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolowicz, C. H.; Yancey, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The stability and control characteristics of the XB-70 airplane were evaluated for Mach numbers up to 3.0 and altitudes up to 21,300 meters (70,000 feet). The airplane's inherent longitudinal characteristics proved to be generally satisfactory. In the lateral-directional modes, the airplane was characterized by light wheel forces, low static directional stability beyond approximately 2 deg of sideslip, adverse yaw response to aileron inputs throughout the entire Mach number range, and negative effective dihedral with wingtips full down. At subsonic Mach numbers, with the flight augmentation control system off, the light wheel forces and adverse yaw response to aileron inputs caused the pilots to minimize use of the ailerons. At supersonic Mach numbers, with the augmentation system off, the adverse yaw due to aileron and the negative effective dihedral were conducive to pilot-induced oscillations.

  18. Flight evaluation of the transonic stability and control characteristics of an airplane incorporating a supercritical wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matheny, N. W.; Gatlin, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    A TF-8A airplane was equipped with a transport type supercritical wing and fuselage fairings to evaluate predicted performance improvements for cruise at transonic speeds. A comparison of aerodynamic derivatives extracted from flight and wind tunnel data showed that static longitudinal stability, effective dihedral, and aileron effectiveness, were higher than predicted. The static directional stability derivative was slower than predicted. The airplane's handling qualities were acceptable with the stability augmentation system on. The unaugmented airplane exhibited some adverse lateral directional characteristics that involved low Dutch roll damping and low roll control power at high angles of attack and roll control power that was greater than satisfactory for transport aircraft at cruise conditions. Longitudinally, the aircraft exhibited a mild pitchup tendency. Leading edge vortex generators delayed the onset of flow separation, moving the pitchup point to a higher lift coefficient and reducing its severity.

  19. Flight test experience and controlled impact of a large, four-engine, remotely piloted airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, R. W.; Horton, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    A controlled impact demonstration (CID) program using a large, four engine, remotely piloted transport airplane was conducted. Closed loop primary flight control was performed from a ground based cockpit and digital computer in conjunction with an up/down telemetry link. Uplink commands were received aboard the airplane and transferred through uplink interface systems to a highly modified Bendix PB-20D autopilot. Both proportional and discrete commands were generated by the ground pilot. Prior to flight tests, extensive simulation was conducted during the development of ground based digital control laws. The control laws included primary control, secondary control, and racetrack and final approach guidance. Extensive ground checks were performed on all remotely piloted systems. However, manned flight tests were the primary method of verification and validation of control law concepts developed from simulation. The design, development, and flight testing of control laws and the systems required to accomplish the remotely piloted mission are discussed.

  20. Flight test experience and controlled impact of a large, four-engine remotely piloted airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, R. W.; Horton, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    A controlled impact demonstration (CID) program using a large, four engine, remotely piloted transport airplane was conducted. Closed loop primary flight control was performed from a ground based cockpit and digital computer in conjunction with an up/down telemetry link. Uplink commands were received aboard the airplane and transferred through uplink interface systems to a highly modified Bendix PB-20D autopilot. Both proportional and discrete commands were generated by the ground pilot. Prior to flight tests, extensive simulation was conducted during the development of ground based digital control laws. The control laws included primary control, secondary control, and racetrack and final approach guidance. Extensive ground checks were performed on all remotely piloted systems. However, manned flight tests were the primary method of verification and validation of control law concepts developed from simulation. The design development, and flight testing of control laws and the systems required to accomplish the remotely piloted mission are discussed.

  1. 14 CFR 91.219 - Altitude alerting system or device: Turbojet-powered civil airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...: Turbojet-powered civil airplanes. 91.219 Section 91.219 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... system or device: Turbojet-powered civil airplanes. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, no person may operate a turbojet-powered U.S.-registered civil airplane unless that airplane...

  2. 14 CFR 91.219 - Altitude alerting system or device: Turbojet-powered civil airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...: Turbojet-powered civil airplanes. 91.219 Section 91.219 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... system or device: Turbojet-powered civil airplanes. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, no person may operate a turbojet-powered U.S.-registered civil airplane unless that airplane...

  3. Flight investigation of the effect of control centering springs on the apparent spiral stability of a personal-owner airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Hunter, Paul A; Hewes, Donald E; Whitten, James B

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of a flight investigation conducted on a typical high-wing personal-owner airplane to determine the effect of control centering springs on apparent spiral stability. Apparent spiral stability is the term used to describe the spiraling tendencies of an airplane in uncontrolled flight as affected both by the true spiral stability of the perfectly trimmed airplane and by out-of-trim control settings. Centering springs were used in both the aileron and rudder control systems to provide both a positive centering action and a means of trimming the airplane. The springs were preloaded so that when they were moved through neutral they produced a nonlinear force gradient sufficient to overcome the friction in the control surface at the proper setting for trim. The ailerons and rudder control surfaces did not have trim tabs that could be adjusted in flight.

  4. Nonlinear-map model for the control of an airplane schedule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    We study the dynamics and control of an airplane in air transportation between two airports. The dynamic models are presented for the airplane schedule. The dynamics of an airplane is described by the piecewise map and delayed map models. The characteristics of the nonlinear maps are studied analytically and numerically. The airplane displays the complex motion in the unstable region. The motion of the airplane depends on the quantity of goods, the control method, and the delay. It is shown that the control delay has an important effect on the motion.

  5. An Instrument for Recording the Position of Airplane Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronan, K M

    1923-01-01

    N.A.C.A. has developed an instrument which makes a continuous record of the angular position of the control surfaces of an airplane, not only in steady flight but during acrobatics as well. It has proven useful in researches into stability and controllability, and from records obtained from it many otherwise obscure details of piloting technique have been available for the instruction of pilots, from novices to seasoned experts.

  6. Design, Development and Implementation of an Active Control System for Load Alleviation for a Commercial Transport Airplane,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    moment ar. torsion at an outboard wing station obtained from roller coaster maneuvers at 37q (tAS. Also shown are the analytically predicted increments... vertical accelerometers in each wing tip and the fuselage and are input to the computers. The computers perform the control law compu- tations and other...and VERTICAL ACCELEROMETER (TRIPLE) COMPUTER (DUAL/DUAL) AILERON SERIES SERVO (DUAL) (M.E.S.C.) (LEFT AND RIGHT TIPS) 0 SENSOR (TRIPLE) 00 Figure 6

  7. 76 FR 10528 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Systems Security Isolation or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... airplane models. This may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities and increase ] risks... potential security vulnerabilities which could be exploited by unauthorized access to airplane networks and...; Electronic Systems Security Isolation or Protection From Unauthorized Passenger Systems Access...

  8. 76 FR 36861 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Systems Security Isolation or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... airplane models. This may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities and increase risks... potential security vulnerabilities which could be exploited by unauthorized access to airplane networks and...; Electronic Systems Security Isolation or Protection From Unauthorized Passenger Systems Access...

  9. Ground vibration test of the laminar flow control JStar airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, M. W.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Ellison, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A ground vibration test was conducted on a Lockheed JetStar airplane that had been modified for the purpose of conducting laminar flow control experiments. The test was performed prior to initial flight flutter tests. Both sine-dwell and single-point-random excitation methods were used. The data presented include frequency response functions and a comparison of mode frequencies and mode shapes from both methods.

  10. 77 FR 5996 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a... series airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report from the airplane manufacturer that airplanes were assembled with air distribution ducts in the environmental control system (ECS) wrapped with Boeing...

  11. 78 FR 75453 - Special Conditions: Cessna Model 750 Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic System Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... data network and design integration may result in security vulnerabilities from intentional or... than previous airplane models. This may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities and... Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic System Security Isolation or Protection From Internal Access AGENCY:...

  12. 75 FR 65052 - Consensus Standards, Standard Practice for Maintenance of Airplane Electrical Wiring Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Standard Practice for Maintenance of Airplane... Practice for Maintenance of Airplane Electrical Wiring Systems (Standard Practice) as an acceptable means... FAA finds the standards to be acceptable methods and procedures for maintenance of electrical...

  13. Planetary Airplane Extraction System Development and Subscale Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teter, John E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) project will employ an airplane as the science platform from which to collect science data in the previously inaccessible, thin atmosphere of Mars. In order for the airplane to arrive safely in the Martian atmosphere, a number of sequences must occur. A critical element in the entry sequence at Mars is an extraction maneuver to separate the airplane quickly (in less than a second) from its protective backshell to reduce the possibility of re-contact, potentially leading to mission failure. This paper describes the development, testing, and lessons learned from building a 1/3 scale model of this airplane extraction system. This design, based on the successful Mars Exploration Rover (MER) extraction mechanism, employs a series of trucks rolling along tracks located on the surface of the central parachute can. Numerous tests using high speed video were conducted at the Langley Research Center to validate this concept. One area of concern was that that although the airplane released cleanly, a pitching moment could be introduced. While targeted for a Mars mission, this concept will enable environmental surveys by aircraft in other planetary bodies with a sensible atmosphere such as Venus or Saturn's moon, Titan.

  14. Planetary Airplane Extraction System Development and Subscale Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teter, John E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) project employs an airplane as the science platform from which to collect science data in the previously inaccessible, thin atmosphere of Mars. In order for the airplane to arrive safely in the Martian atmosphere a number of sequences must occur. A critical element in the entry sequence at Mars is an extraction maneuver to separate the airplane quickly (in less than a second) from its protective backshell to reduce the possibility of re-contact, potentially leading to mission failure. This paper describes the development, testing, and lessons learned from building a 1/3 scale model of this airplane extraction system. This design, based on the successful Mars Exploration Rover (MER) extraction mechanism, employs a series of trucks rolling along tracks located on the surface of the central parachute can. Numerous tests using high speed video were conducted at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate this concept. One area of concern was that that although the airplane released cleanly, a pitching moment could be introduced. While targeted for a Mars mission, this concept will enable environmental surveys by aircraft in other planetary bodies with a sensible atmosphere such as Venus or Saturn s moon, Titan.

  15. A flight investigation of the stability, control, and handling qualities of an augmented jet flap STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vomaske, R. F.; Innis, R. C.; Swan, B. E.; Grossmith, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    The stability, control, and handling qualities of an augmented jet flap STOL airplane are presented. The airplane is an extensively modified de Havilland Buffalo military transport. The modified airplane has two fan-jet engines which provide vectorable thrust and compressed air for the augmentor jet flap and Boundary-Layer Control (BLC). The augmentor and BLC air is cross ducted to minimize asymmetric moments produced when one engine is inoperative. The modifications incorporated in the airplane include a Stability Augmentation System (SAS), a powered elevator, and a powered lateral control system. The test gross weight of the airplane was between 165,000 and 209,000 N (37,000 and 47,000 lb). Stability, control, and handling qualities are presented for the airspeed range of 40 to 180 knots. The lateral-directional handling qualities are considered satisfactory for the normal operating range of 65 to 160 knots airspeed when the SAS is functioning. With the SAS inoperative, poor turn coordination and spiral instability are primary deficiencies contributing to marginal handling qualities in the landing approach. The powered elevator control system enhanced the controllability in pitch, particularly in the landing flare and stall recovery.

  16. Boeing Satellite Television Airplane Receiving System (STARS) performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertatschitsch, Edward J.; Fitzsimmons, George W.

    1995-01-01

    Boeing Defense and Space Group is developing a Satellite Television Airplane Receiving System (STARS) capable of delivering Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) television to an aircraft in-flight. This enables a new service for commercial airplanes that will make use of existing and future DBS systems. The home entertainment satellites, along with STARS, provide a new mobile satellite communication application. This paper will provide a brief background of the antenna issues associated with STARS for commercial airplanes and then describe the innovative Boeing phased-array solution to these problems. The paper then provides a link budget of the STARS using the Hughes DBS as an example, but the system will work with all of the proposed DBS satellites in the 12.2-12.7 GHz band. It concludes with operational performance calculations of the STARS system, supported by measured test data of an operational 16-element subarray. Although this system is being developed for commercial airplanes, it is well suited for a wide variety of mobile military and other commercial communications systems in air, on land and at sea. The applications include sending high quality video for the digital battlefield and large volumes of data on the information superhighway at rates in excess of 350 Mbps.

  17. A Time History of Control Operation of a C-54 Airplane in Blind Landing Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talmage, Donald B.

    1947-01-01

    Tests were made with a C-54 airplane in which airline pilots made several blind approaches to determine whether any special flying techniques were used in blind landings and whether any special handling-qualities requirements would have to be formulated because of such special techniques. It was found that the airplane was flown at all times in the normal manner; that is, all turns were banked turns that were nearly coordinated by use of the rudder so that the sideslip was held close to zero. The pilot expended considerable physical work in continually moving the controls but this wake was due in part to the large friction in the three control systems. The actual control deflections used were small compared to the maximum deflections available.

  18. Peak-Seeking Control For Reduced Fuel Consumption: Flight-Test Results For The Full-Scale Advanced Systems Testbed FA-18 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    A peak-seeking control algorithm for real-time trim optimization for reduced fuel consumption has been developed by researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center to address the goals of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project to reduce fuel burn and emissions. The peak-seeking control algorithm is based on a steepest-descent algorithm using a time-varying Kalman filter to estimate the gradient of a performance function of fuel flow versus control surface positions. In real-time operation, deflections of symmetric ailerons, trailing-edge flaps, and leading-edge flaps of an F/A-18 airplane are used for optimization of fuel flow. Results from six research flights are presented herein. The optimization algorithm found a trim configuration that required approximately 3 percent less fuel flow than the baseline trim at the same flight condition. This presentation also focuses on the design of the flight experiment and the practical challenges of conducting the experiment.

  19. Reconfigurable multivariable control law for commercial airplane using a direct digital output feedback design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Hueschen, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of a pilot to reconfigure the control surfaces on an airplane after a failure, allowing the airplane to recover to a safe condition for landing, becomes more difficult with increasing airplane complexity. Techniques are needed to stabilize and control the airplane immediately after a failure, allowing the pilot time to make longer range decisions. This paper shows a design of a discrete multivariable control law using four controls for the longitudinal channel of a B-737. Single control element failures are allowed in three of the four controls. The four controls design and failure cases are analyzed by means of a digital airplane simulation, with regard to tracking capability and ability to overcome severe windshear and turbulence during the aproach and landing phase of flight.

  20. A Study of Transport Airplane Crash-Resistant Fuel Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa (Technical Monitor); Robertson, S. H.; Johnson, N. B.; Hall, D. S.; Rimson, I. J.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study, funded by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), of transport airplane crash-resistant fuel system (CRFS). The report covers the historical studies related to aircraft crash fires and fuel containment concepts undertaken by the FAA, NASA, and the U.S. Army, which ultimately led to the current state of the art in CRFS technology. It describes the basic research, testing, field investigations and production efforts which have led to the highly successful military CRFS, which has saved many lives and reduced costs of accidents. Current CRFS technology used in transport category airplanes is defined and compared to the available state-of-the-art technology. The report provides information to the FAA and other government organizations which can help them plan their efforts to improve the state of crash fire protection in the transport airplane fleet. The report provides guidance to designers looking for information about CRFS design problems, analysis tools to use for product improvement, and a summary of current and proposed regulations for transport category airplane fuel systems.

  1. A study of the two-control operation of an airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert T

    1938-01-01

    The two-control operation of a conventional airplane is treated by means of the theory of disturbed motions. The consequences of this method of control are studied with regard to the stability of the airplane in its unconstrained components of motion and the movements set up during turn maneuvers.

  2. Radiated Emissions from a Remote-Controlled Airplane-Measured in a Reverberation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Szatkowski, George N.; Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Mielnik, John J.; Hogge, Edward F.; Hill, Boyd L.; Strom, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    A full-vehicle, subscale all-electric model airplane was tested for radiated emissions, using a reverberation chamber. The mission of the NASA model airplane is to test in-flight airframe damage diagnosis and battery prognosis algorithms, and provide experimental data for other aviation safety research. Subscale model airplanes are economical experimental tools, but assembling their systems from hobbyist and low-cost components may lead to unforseen electromagnetic compatibility problems. This report provides a guide for accommodating the on-board radio systems, so that all model airplane systems may be operated during radiated emission testing. Radiated emission data are provided for on-board systems being operated separately and together, so that potential interferors can be isolated and mitigated. The report concludes with recommendations for EMI/EMC best practices for subscale model airplanes and airships used for research.

  3. Natural laminar flow and airplane stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandam, Cornelis P.

    1986-01-01

    Location and mode of transition from laminar to turbulent boundary layer flow have a dominant effect on the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil section. The influences of these parameters on the sectional lift and drag characteristics of three airfoils are examined. Both analytical and experimental results demonstrate that when the boundary layer transitions near the leading edge as a result of surface roughness, extensive trailing-edge separation of the turbulent boundary layer may occur. If the airfoil has a relatively sharp leading-edge, leading-edge stall due to laminar separation can occur after the leading-edge suction peak is formed. These two-dimensional results are used to examine the effects of boundary layer transition behavior on airplane longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control.

  4. 75 FR 70092 - Special Conditions: Bombardier Inc. Model CL-600-2E25 Airplane, Interaction of Systems and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Panels, No. 25-384-SC, dated August 12, 2009. 4. Exemptions: Exemption No. 7447, hydraulic-systems... flight. Certain elements of the control system, such as mechanical and hydraulic components, may use... Airplane, Interaction of Systems and Structures AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT....

  5. Development of an Active Flow Control Technique for an Airplane High-Lift Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shmilovich, Arvin; Yadlin, Yoram; Dickey, Eric D.; Hartwich, Peter M.; Khodadoust, Abdi

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on Active Flow Control methods used in conjunction with airplane high-lift systems. The project is motivated by the simplified high-lift system, which offers enhanced airplane performance compared to conventional high-lift systems. Computational simulations are used to guide the implementation of preferred flow control methods, which require a fluidic supply. It is first demonstrated that flow control applied to a high-lift configuration that consists of simple hinge flaps is capable of attaining the performance of the conventional high-lift counterpart. A set of flow control techniques has been subsequently considered to identify promising candidates, where the central requirement is that the mass flow for actuation has to be within available resources onboard. The flow control methods are based on constant blowing, fluidic oscillators, and traverse actuation. The simulations indicate that the traverse actuation offers a substantial reduction in required mass flow, and it is especially effective when the frequency of actuation is consistent with the characteristic time scale of the flow.

  6. A Method for Integrating Thrust-Vectoring and Actuated Forebody Strakes with Conventional Aerodynamic Controls on a High-Performance Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, Frederick J.; Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1998-01-01

    A method, called pseudo controls, of integrating several airplane controls to achieve cooperative operation is presented. The method eliminates conflicting control motions, minimizes the number of feedback control gains, and reduces the complication of feedback gain schedules. The method is applied to the lateral/directional controls of a modified high-performance airplane. The airplane has a conventional set of aerodynamic controls, an experimental set of thrust-vectoring controls, and an experimental set of actuated forebody strakes. The experimental controls give the airplane additional control power for enhanced stability and maneuvering capabilities while flying over an expanded envelope, especially at high angles of attack. The flight controls are scheduled to generate independent body-axis control moments. These control moments are coordinated to produce stability-axis angular accelerations. Inertial coupling moments are compensated. Thrust-vectoring controls are engaged according to their effectiveness relative to that of the aerodynamic controls. Vane-relief logic removes steady and slowly varying commands from the thrust-vectoring controls to alleviate heating of the thrust turning devices. The actuated forebody strakes are engaged at high angles of attack. This report presents the forward-loop elements of a flight control system that positions the flight controls according to the desired stability-axis accelerations. This report does not include the generation of the required angular acceleration commands by means of pilot controls or the feedback of sensed airplane motions.

  7. 78 FR 63847 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Airplane Electronic System Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... architecture for the Embraer Model EMB-550 series of airplanes is composed of several connected networks. This... (aircraft control functions); 2. Airline business and administrative support (airline information services... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550...

  8. 75 FR 20518 - Special Conditions: Cirrus Design Corporation Model SF50 Airplane; Full Authority Digital Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... Airplane; Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) System AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... issued for the Cirrus Design Corporation model SF50 airplane. This airplane will have a novel or unusual... Aviation Administration, Aircraft Certification Service, Small Airplane Directorate, ACE-111, 901...

  9. 76 FR 30523 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Airplanes, Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... consequential or cascading effects resulting from the first failure. B. Effects of Systems on Structures 1... airplane's structural performance, either directly or as a result of failure or malfunction. That is, the... failures. The regulations do not anticipate the use of systems that control flutter modes but do...

  10. 78 FR 65155 - Special Conditions: Learjet Model 45 Series Airplanes; Isolation or Security Protection of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... navigation systems (aircraft control domain); 2. Operator business and administrative support (operator... electronic system security protection against, access by unauthorized sources internal to the airplane. The... Airplanes; Isolation or Security Protection of the Aircraft Control Domain and the Airline...

  11. 78 FR 24673 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... unsafe condition for in-service airplanes. For all future delivered airplanes, the replacement batteries... airplanes. That AD currently requires modification of the battery system, or other actions. This AD requires installing main and auxiliary power unit (APU) battery enclosures and environmental control system...

  12. Flight evaluation results for a digital electronic engine control in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Walsh, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A digital electronic engine control (DEEC) system on an F100 engine in an F-15 airplane was evaluated in flight. Thirty flights were flown in a four-phase program from June 1981 to February 1983. Significant improvements in the operability and performance of the F100 engine were developed as a result of the flight evaluation: the augmentor envelope was increased by 15,000 ft, the airstart envelope was improved by 75 knots, and the need to periodically trim the engine was eliminated. The hydromechanical backup control performance was evaluated and was found to be satisfactory. Two system failures were encountered in the test program; both were detected and accommodated successfully. No transfers to the backup control system were required, and no automatic transfers occurred. As a result of the successful DEEC flight evaluation, the DEEC system has entered the full-scale development phase.

  13. 75 FR 76647 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security-Isolation or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... 747-8 Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security--Isolation or Protection From Unauthorized... information services, than previous 747-8 airplane models. This may allow the exploitation of network security... passenger domain computer systems to the airplane critical systems and data networks. The...

  14. Description of an experimental (hydrogen peroxide) rocket system and its use in measuring aileron and rudder effectiveness of a light airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obryan, T. C.; Goode, M. W.; Gregory, F. D.; Mayo, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen peroxide fueled rocket system, which is to be used as a research tool in flight studies of stall and spin maneuvers, was installed on a light, four place general aviation airplane. The pilot controlled rocket system produces moments about either the roll or the yaw body axis to augment or oppose the aerodynamic forces and inertial moments acting on the airplane during various flight maneuvers, including the spin. These controlled moments of a known magnitude can be used in various ways to help analyze and interpret the importance of the various factors which influence airplane maneuvers. The rocket system and its installation in the airplane are described, and the results of flight rests used to measure rudder and aileron effectiveness at airspeeds above the stall are presented. These tests also serve to demonstrate the operational readiness of the rocket system for future research operations.

  15. Lateral and Directional Stability and Control Characteristics of a C-54D Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talmage, Donald B; Reeder, John P

    1949-01-01

    Data are presented showing compliance of C-54D with Army and Navy lateral and directional stability and control specifications. The airplane met requirements except for the rolling effectiveness pb/2V, the aileron forces in rolling, and the rudder forces in the asymmetric power conditions which were marginal. Also, the results of special tests concerning asymmetric power, asymmetric loading, and pitch due to yaw requested by the Airplane Handling Qualities Subcommittee of the Air Transport Association are presented.

  16. An automated airplane detection system for the safeguard against airplane illumination from the laser guide star beacons at the MMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Miguel; Lloyd-Hart, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Laser beams for guide star generation are a potential hazard for aircraft. At the MMT telescope located on Mt. Hopkins in Southern Arizona, a constellation of five Rayleigh guide stars is created with a total of 25 W of projected power at 532 nm wavelength. We report operational results from an automatic system deployed at the MMT that is designed to detect aircraft and shut down the lasers if a collision with the beams appears likely. The system, building on a previous prototype, uses a wide-angle CCD camera mounted with a minimally unobstructed view to the optical support structure at the top of the telescope. A computer program reads the camera once every two seconds and calculates the difference between adjacent image pairs. The anti-collision beacons required on all aircraft by the Federal Aviation Administration appear as streaks in the field. If an airplane is detected, it is located in the field relative to the laser beam and its path is projected. If aircraft are detected near or appear that they will approach the beam, the laser's safety shutter is closed and warning messages are sent to the laser operator. Failsafe operation is assured by a "heart beat" signal continuously sent from the detection system to the laser controller, and by the fact that the safety shutter must be energized to open. In the event of a power failure, the system must be manually reset by the Laser Safety Officer before the laser beam can again be propagated.

  17. 76 FR 14794 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security-Isolation or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8 Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security--Isolation or Protection From Unauthorized Passenger Domain Systems Access... special conditions are issued for Boeing Model 747-8 airplanes. This airplane will have novel or...

  18. Piloted simulation study of the effects of an automated trim system on flight characteristics of a light twin-engine airplane with one engine inoperative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Brown, P. W.; Yenni, K. R.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to investigate the piloting problems associated with failure of an engine on a generic light twin-engine airplane. A primary piloting problem for a light twin-engine airplane after an engine failure is maintaining precise control of the airplane in the presence of large steady control forces. To address this problem, a simulated automatic trim system which drives the trim tabs as an open-loop function of propeller slipstream measurements was developed. The simulated automatic trim system was found to greatly increase the controllability in asymmetric powered flight without having to resort to complex control laws or an irreversible control system. However, the trim-tab control rates needed to produce the dramatic increase in controllability may require special design consideration for automatic trim system failures. Limited measurements obtained in full-scale flight tests confirmed the fundamental validity of the proposed control law.

  19. Flight test results of an automatic support system on board a YF-12A airplane. [for jet engine inlet air control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    An automatic support system concept that isolated faults in an existing nonavionics subsystem was flight tested up to a Mach number of 3. The adaptation of the automated support concept to an existing system (the jet engine automatic inlet control system) caused most of the problems one would expect to encounter in other applications. These problems and their solutions are discussed. Criteria for integrating automatic support into the initial design of new subsystems are included in the paper. Cost effectiveness resulted from both the low maintenance of the automated system and the man-hour saving resulting from the real time diagnosis of the monitored subsystem.

  20. 76 FR 10529 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Systems Security Protection From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... systems and networks may result in security vulnerabilities to the airplane's systems. The applicable... may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities resulting in intentional or...; Electronic Systems Security Protection From Unauthorized External Access AGENCY: Federal...

  1. 14 CFR 23.395 - Control system loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 23.395 Control system loads. (a) Each flight control system and its supporting structure must...

  2. 14 CFR 23.395 - Control system loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 23.395 Control system loads. (a) Each flight control system and its supporting structure must...

  3. 14 CFR 23.395 - Control system loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 23.395 Control system loads. (a) Each flight control system and its supporting structure must...

  4. 14 CFR 23.395 - Control system loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 23.395 Control system loads. (a) Each flight control system and its supporting structure must...

  5. 14 CFR 23.395 - Control system loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 23.395 Control system loads. (a) Each flight control system and its supporting structure must...

  6. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project-longitudinal handling qualities study of a relaxed-stability airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of a piloted simulation of longitudinal handling qualities of an airplane with relaxed static stability are described. This task was performed under the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the NASA Energy Efficient Transport Program. A representative medium range transport airplane, the Boeing Model 757, was simulated. Evaluations were made of the unaugmented airplane and of the airplane with an Essential Pitch Augmented Stability (PAS) System and with a Primary PAS System at various center of gravity (cg) conditions. Level 2 pilot ratings were attained with cg locations aft to about 57% mean aerodynamic chord (MAC) or 6% aft of the neutral point for unaugmented landing approach. For Mach = 0.80, unaugmented cruise Level 2 ratings were attained to 47% MAC or 5% forward of the maneuver point. The augmented airplane model provided handling qualities close to or within the Level 1 boundary at all cg locations for both Essential and Primary PAS. Analyses of the test conditions when compared with existing handling qualities criteria based on classical unaugmented airplane characteristics agreed well with the pilot ratings. The unaugmented results are comparable to those reported by both the Douglas Aircraft Company and Lockheed California Company from simulation investigations of transport configurations with roughly similar dimensional and mass characteristics.

  7. Optimizing Mars Airplane Trajectory with the Application Navigation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Riley, Derek

    2004-01-01

    Planning complex missions requires a number of programs to be executed in concert. The Application Navigation System (ANS), developed in the NAS Division, can execute many interdependent programs in a distributed environment. We show that the ANS simplifies user effort and reduces time in optimization of the trajectory of a martian airplane. We use a software package, Cart3D, to evaluate trajectories and a shortest path algorithm to determine the optimal trajectory. ANS employs the GridScape to represent the dynamic state of the available computer resources. Then, ANS uses a scheduler to dynamically assign ready task to machine resources and the GridScape for tracking available resources and forecasting completion time of running tasks. We demonstrate system capability to schedule and run the trajectory optimization application with efficiency exceeding 60% on 64 processors.

  8. Presentation of flight control design and handling quality commonality by separate surface stability augmentation for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Douglas; Creighton, Thomas; Haddad, Raphael; Hendrich, Louis; Morgan, Louise; Russell, Mark; Swift, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    The methodology and results for a flight control design and implementation for common handling qualities by Separate Surface Stability Augmentation (SSSA) for the family of commuter airplanes are contained. The open and closed loop dynamics and the design results of augmenting for common handling qualities are presented. The physical and technology requirements are presented for implementing the SSSA system. The conclusion of this report and recommendations for changes or improvement are discussed.

  9. 76 FR 36863 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Electronic Systems Security Protection From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... configuration may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities resulting in intentional or...; Electronic Systems Security Protection From Unauthorized External Access AGENCY: Federal Aviation... architecture and connectivity capabilities of the airplane's computer systems and networks, which may...

  10. Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion Baseline Control Law: Flight-Test Results for the Full-scale Advanced Systems Testbed F/A-18 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    A model reference nonlinear dynamic inversion control law has been developed to provide a baseline controller for research into simple adaptive elements for advanced flight control laws. This controller has been implemented and tested in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation and in flight. The flight results agree well with the simulation predictions and show good handling qualities throughout the tested flight envelope with some noteworthy deficiencies highlighted both by handling qualities metrics and pilot comments. Many design choices and implementation details reflect the requirements placed on the system by the nonlinear flight environment and the desire to keep the system as simple as possible to easily allow the addition of the adaptive elements. The flight-test results and how they compare to the simulation predictions are discussed, along with a discussion about how each element affected pilot opinions. Additionally, aspects of the design that performed better than expected are presented, as well as some simple improvements that will be suggested for follow-on work.

  11. An Investigation of a Thermal Ice-Prevention System for a Twin-Engine Transport Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Alun R

    1946-01-01

    Several previously published reports on a comprehensive investigation of a thermal ice-prevention system for a typical twin-engine transport airplane are correlated with some unpublished data to present the entire investigation in one publication. Several previously published reports on a comprehensive investigation of a thermal ice-prevention system for a typical twin-engine transport airplane are correlated with some unpublished data to present the entire investigation in one publication. The thermal system investigated was based upon the transfer of heat from the engine exhaust gas to air, which is then caused to flow along the inner surface of any portion of the airplane for which protection is desired.

  12. Thrust-Vector-Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Control gains computed via matrix Riccati equation. Software-based system controlling aim of gimbaled rocket motor on spacecraft adaptive and optimal in sense it adjusts control gains in response to feedback, according to optimizing algorithm based on cost function. Underlying control concept also applicable, with modifications, to thrust-vector control on vertical-takeoff-and-landing airplanes, control of orientations of scientific instruments, and robotic control systems.

  13. Some data on the static longitudinal stability and control of airplanes : design of control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinov, A; Kolosov, E

    1940-01-01

    In the solution of a number of problems on the stability and controllability of airplanes, there arises the necessity for knowing the characteristics of the tail surfaces of the types in common use today. Of those characteristics, the most important are the effectiveness and hinge moments of the tail surfaces. As has been shown in the present paper, there exists the possibility of determining these characteristics by the formulas obtained with a degree of accuracy sufficient for the purposes of preliminary computation. These formulas take into account a number of fundamental tail characteristics such as tail cut-outs on the control surface and the form of the control surface leading edge.

  14. 77 FR 36127 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... the airplane and possible injury to its occupants. DATES: This AD becomes effective July 23, 2012. The..., with consequent damage to the airplane and possible injury to its occupants. (f) Compliance You are... resulting in a fuel tank rupture, and consequent damage to the aeroplane and injury to its occupants....

  15. 77 FR 69571 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane, Limit Pilot Forces for Sidestick Control

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... features: The Embraer S.A. Model EMB-550 airplane is equipped with a sidestick controller instead of a... The Embraer S.A. Model EMB-550 airplane is equipped with a sidestick controller instead of a... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550...

  16. 78 FR 76248 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Side Stick Controller

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... also appropriate for the Model A350-900 series side stick controller. Applicability As discussed above...; ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Side Stick Controller AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  17. 75 FR 65051 - Consensus Standards, Standard Practice for Inspection of Airplane Electrical Wiring Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... of Airplane Electrical Wiring Systems. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: James Brady, Aerospace... Development and Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and in Conformity Assessment Activities,'' dated February 10, 1998, industry and the FAA have been working with ASTM International to develop...

  18. On the Specification of the Damping Ratio and the Characteristic Frequency for the Longitudinal Control of Airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jikuya, Ichiro; Hodaka, Ichijo

    The singular perturbation approach is applied to the longitudinal motion of airplanes, whose linearlized model has well known two-time scale structure in the presence of a slow (phugoid) mode and a fast (short-period) mode. Such a linearlized model is transformed into the singularly perturbed form via scaling of the state. First the flight control systems are separately designed for each mode via state feedback. Then the slow and fast designs are composed, and are applied to the full model. The composite flight control systems are shown to guarantee the damping ratio and the characteristic frequency specified by JIS W 0402.

  19. Requirements and feasibility study of flight demonstration of Active Controls Technology (ACT) on the NASA 515 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, C. K.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary design study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of the NASA 515 airplane as a flight demonstration vehicle, and to develop plans, schedules, and budget costs for fly-by-wire/active controls technology flight validation in the NASA 515 airplane. The preliminary design and planning were accomplished for two phases of flight validation.

  20. Lateral control required for satisfactory flying qualities based on flight tests of numerous airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilruth, R R; Turner, W N

    1941-01-01

    Report presents the results of an analysis made of the aileron control characteristics of numerous airplanes tested in flight by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. By the use of previously developed theory, the observed values of pb/2v for the various wing-aileron arrangements were examined to determine the effective section characteristics of the various aileron types.

  1. 78 FR 67077 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Side Stick Controllers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Side Stick Controllers AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed special conditions. SUMMARY: This action proposes special conditions for the Airbus Model A350-900...

  2. Design of a Mars Airplane Propulsion System for the Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey (ARES) Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey (ARES) is a Mars exploration mission concept that utilizes a rocket propelled airplane to take scientific measurements of atmospheric, surface, and subsurface phenomena. The liquid rocket propulsion system design has matured through several design cycles and trade studies since the inception of the ARES concept in 2002. This paper describes the process of selecting a bipropellant system over other propulsion system options, and provides details on the rocket system design, thrusters, propellant tank and PMD design, propellant isolation, and flow control hardware. The paper also summarizes computer model results of thruster plume interactions and simulated flight performance. The airplane has a 6.25 m wingspan with a total wet mass of 185 kg and has to ability to fly over 600 km through the atmosphere of Mars with 45 kg of MMH / MON3 propellant.

  3. A closed-form trim solution yielding minimum trim drag for airplanes with multiple longitudinal-control effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Sliwa, Steven M.; Lallman, Frederick J.

    1989-01-01

    Airplane designs are currently being proposed with a multitude of lifting and control devices. Because of the redundancy in ways to generate moments and forces, there are a variety of strategies for trimming each airplane. A linear optimum trim solution (LOTS) is derived using a Lagrange formulation. LOTS enables the rapid calculation of the longitudinal load distribution resulting in the minimum trim drag in level, steady-state flight for airplanes with a mixture of three or more aerodynamic surfaces and propulsive control effectors. Comparisons of the trim drags obtained using LOTS, a direct constrained optimization method, and several ad hoc methods are presented for vortex-lattice representations of a three-surface airplane and two-surface airplane with thrust vectoring. These comparisons show that LOTS accurately predicts the results obtained from the nonlinear optimization and that the optimum methods result in trim drag reductions of up to 80 percent compared to the ad hoc methods.

  4. Review and investigation of unsatisfactory control characteristics involving in stability of pilot-airplane combination and methods for predicting these difficulties from ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, William H; Brown, B Porter; Matthews, James T , Jr

    1953-01-01

    A number of examples are presented of control difficulties not completely covered by existing handling-qualities requirements. 520/3:*:These control difficulties appear to result from a tendency for dynamic instability of the combination of pilot, control system, and airplane. The unsatisfactory characteristics involved have been encountered most frequently with hydraulic-power control systems. The nature of the difficulties may range from a slight interference with the ability of the pilot to hold precisely straight and level flight to a dangerous tendency toward divergent short-period oscillations which require constant attention of the pilot to control. Tests of a bomber and a fighter airplane with experimental power control systems have been made to study this problem further. The results of the investigation show that control difficulties of the type considered have always been associated with a marked phase difference between the pilot's control force and the associated control-surface deflection. The presence of static friction in the control valves of hydraulic-power control systems was found to be the explanation for unsatisfactory characteristics in several airplanes equipped with such systems. The valve friction may cause a phase lag between the pilot's control force and the associated control-surface deflection approaching 180 degrees at small control deflections. Definite limits or simple rules for the tolerable amount of valve friction appear to be difficult to establish because of the large number of variables which may influence the problem.The control characteristics of the airplanes tested were strongly influenced by minor design details of the power control systems.

  5. Investigations on the stability, oscillation, and stress conditions of airplanes with tab control. Second partial report : application of the solutions obtained in the first partial report to tab-controlled airplanes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filzek, B

    1949-01-01

    The first partial report, FB 2000, contained a discussion of the derivation of the equations of motion and their solutions for a tab-controlled airplane; the results obtained there are now to be applied to the longitudinal motion of tab-controlled airplanes. In view of the abundance of structural factors and aerodynamic parameters, a general discussion of the problems is unfeasible. Thus it is demonstrated on the basis of examples what stability, oscillation, and stress conditions are to be expected for tab-controlled airplanes. (author)

  6. An overview of integrated flight-propulsion controls flight research on the NASA F-15 research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Gatlin, Donald H.; Stewart, James F.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has been conducting integrated flight-propulsion control flight research using the NASA F-15 airplane for the past 12 years. The research began with the digital electronic engine control (DEEC) project, followed by the F100 Engine Model Derivative (EMD). HIDEC (Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control) became the umbrella name for a series of experiments including: the Advanced Digital Engine Controls System (ADECS), a twin jet acoustics flight experiment, self-repairing flight control system (SRFCS), performance-seeking control (PSC), and propulsion controlled aircraft (PCA). The upcoming F-15 project is ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles). This paper provides a brief summary of these activities and provides background for the PCA and PSC papers, and includes a bibliography of all papers and reports from the NASA F-15 project.

  7. A spin-recovery parachute system for light general aviation airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    A tail-mounted spin-recovery parachute system has been designed and developed by the NASA Langley Research Center for use on light general aviation airplanes. The system was designed for use on typical airplane configurations, including low-wing, high-wing, single- and twin-engine designs. A mechanically triggered pyrotechnic slug gun is used to forcibly deploy a pilot parachute which extracts a bag that deploys a ring-slot spin-recovery parachute. The total system weighs 8.2 kg (18 lb). System design factors included airplane wake effects on parachute deployment, prevention of premature parachute deployment, positive parachute jettison, compact size, low weight, system reliability, and pilot and ground crew safety. Extensive ground tests were conducted to qualify the system. The recovery parachute has been used successfully in flight 17 times.

  8. A spin-recovery parachute system for light general-aviation airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, C.

    1980-01-01

    A tail mounted spin recovery parachute system was designed and developed for use on light general aviation airplanes. The system was designed for use on typical airplane configurations, including low wing, high wing, single engine and twin engine designs. A mechanically triggered pyrotechnic slug gun is used to forcibly deploy a pilot parachute which extracts a bag that deploys a ring slot spin recovery parachute. The total system weighs 8.2 kg. System design factors included airplane wake effects on parachute deployment, prevention of premature parachute deployment, positive parachute jettison, compact size, low weight, system reliability, and pilot and ground crew safety. Extensive ground tests were conducted to qualify the system. The recovery parachute was used successfully in flight 17 times.

  9. A spin-recovery parachute system for light general-aviation airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, C.

    1980-01-01

    A tail mounted spin recovery parachute system was designed and developed by the NASA Langley Research Center for use on light general aviation airplanes. The system was designed for use on typical airplane configurations, including low wing, single engine, and twin-engine design. A mechanically triggered pyrotechnic slug gun is used to forcibly deploy a pilot parachute which extracts a bag that deploys a ring slot spin recovery parachute. The total system weighs 8.2 kg (18 lb). System design factors included airplane wake effects on parachute deployment, prevention of premature parachute deployment, positive parachute jettison, compact size, low weight, system reliability, and pilot and ground crew safety. Extensive ground tests were conducted to qualify the system. The recovery parachute was used successfully in flight 17 times.

  10. Experimental determination of the navigation error of the 4-D navigation, guidance, and control systems on the NASA B-737 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    Navigation error data from these flights are presented in a format utilizing three independent axes - horizontal, vertical, and time. The navigation position estimate error term and the autopilot flight technical error term are combined to form the total navigation error in each axis. This method of error presentation allows comparisons to be made between other 2-, 3-, or 4-D navigation systems and allows experimental or theoretical determination of the navigation error terms. Position estimate error data are presented with the navigation system position estimate based on dual DME radio updates that are smoothed with inertial velocities, dual DME radio updates that are smoothed with true airspeed and magnetic heading, and inertial velocity updates only. The normal mode of navigation with dual DME updates that are smoothed with inertial velocities resulted in a mean error of 390 m with a standard deviation of 150 m in the horizontal axis; a mean error of 1.5 m low with a standard deviation of less than 11 m in the vertical axis; and a mean error as low as 252 m with a standard deviation of 123 m in the time axis.

  11. Engines-only flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W. (Inventor); Gilyard, Glenn B (Inventor); Conley, Joseph L. (Inventor); Stewart, James F. (Inventor); Fullerton, Charles G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A backup flight control system for controlling the flightpath of a multi-engine airplane using the main drive engines is introduced. The backup flight control system comprises an input device for generating a control command indicative of a desired flightpath, a feedback sensor for generating a feedback signal indicative of at least one of pitch rate, pitch attitude, roll rate and roll attitude, and a control device for changing the output power of at least one of the main drive engines on each side of the airplane in response to the control command and the feedback signal.

  12. A suspended anemometer system for measuring true airspeed on low-speed airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershner, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    A suspended anemometer system for calibrating pitot-static systems on low speed research airplanes is described. The anemometer measures true airspeed when suspended beneath the airplane on a long cable in regions of undisturbed air. The electrical output of the propeller driven tachometer is a sine wave, the frequency of which is proportional to true airspeed. The anemometer measures true airspeed over a range from 20 to 60 m/sec at altitudes to 3000 m, with an accuracy of + or - 0.5 percent of full scale range. This accuracy is exclusive of errors in the recording system. The stability of the suspended system was investigated and was found adequate in the airspeed range. For the purpose of determining the location of the anemometer relative to the airplane, a method is given for calculating the shape assumed by the deployed cable.

  13. Local flow management/profile descent algorithm. Fuel-efficient, time-controlled profiles for the NASA TSRV airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, J. L.; Izumi, K. H.; Markham, C. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Thompson, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Local Flow Management/Profile Descent (LFM/PD) algorithm designed for the NASA Transport System Research Vehicle program is described. The algorithm provides fuel-efficient altitude and airspeed profiles consistent with ATC restrictions in a time-based metering environment over a fixed ground track. The model design constraints include accommodation of both published profile descent procedures and unpublished profile descents, incorporation of fuel efficiency as a flight profile criterion, operation within the performance capabilities of the Boeing 737-100 airplane with JT8D-7 engines, and conformity to standard air traffic navigation and control procedures. Holding and path stretching capabilities are included for long delay situations.

  14. Statistical survey of XB-70 airplane responses and control usage with an illustration of the application to handling qualities criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, B. G.

    1972-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of occurrence of aircraft responses and control inputs during 27 flights of the XB-70 airplane were measured. Exceedance curves are presented for the airplane responses and control usage. A technique is presented which makes use of these exceedance curves to establish or verify handling qualities criteria. This technique can provide a means of incorporating current operational experience in handling qualities requirements for future aircraft.

  15. Effects of control inputs on the estimation of stability and control parameters of a light airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannaday, R. L.; Suit, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique was used to determine the values of stability and control derivatives from flight test data for a low-wing, single-engine, light airplane. Several input forms were used during the tests to investigate the consistency of parameter estimates as it relates to inputs. These consistencies were compared by using the ensemble variance and estimated Cramer-Rao lower bound. In addition, the relationship between inputs and parameter correlations was investigated. Results from the stabilator inputs are inconclusive but the sequence of rudder input followed by aileron input or aileron followed by rudder gave more consistent estimates than did rudder or ailerons individually. Also, square-wave inputs appeared to provide slightly improved consistency in the parameter estimates when compared to sine-wave inputs.

  16. Effects of errors on decoupled control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamer, H. A.; Johnson, K. G.

    1978-01-01

    Various error sources in a decoupled control system are considered in connection with longitudinal control on a simulated externally blown jet-flap STOL aircraft. The system employed the throttle, horizontal tail, and flaps to decouple the forward velocity, pitch angle, and flight-path angle. The errors considered were: (1) imperfect knowledge of airplane aerodynamic and control characteristics; (2) imperfect measurements of airplane state variables; (3) change in flight conditions, and (4) lag in the airplane controls and in engine response. The effects of the various errors on the decoupling process were generally minor. Significant coupling in flight-path angle was caused by control lag during speed-command maneuvers. However, this coupling could be eliminated by including the control lag in the design of the decoupled system. Other error sources affected primarily the commanded response quantity.

  17. 75 FR 2433 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Airplanes, Systems and Data Networks Security--Protection of Airplane Systems and Data Networks From Unauthorized External Access AGENCY... to or by external network sources. Discussion The Model 747-8/-8F architecture and...

  18. Feasibility and benefits of laminar flow control on supersonic cruise airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, A. G.; Agrawal, S.; Lacey, T. R.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation was made of the applicability and benefits of laminar flow control (LFC) technology to supersonic cruise airplanes. Ancillary objectives were to identify the technical issues critical to supersonic LFC application, and to determine how those issues can be addressed through flight and wind-tunnel testing. Vehicle types studied include a Mach 2.2 supersonic transport configuration, a Mach 4.0 transport, and two Mach 2-class fighter concepts. Laminar flow control methodologies developed for subsonic and transonic wing laminarization were extended and applied. No intractible aerodynamic problems were found in applying LFC to airplanes of the Mach 2 class, even ones of large size. Improvements of 12 to 17 percent in lift-drag ratios were found. Several key technical issues, such as contamination avoidance and excresence criteria were identified. Recommendations are made for their resolution. A need for an inverse supersonic wing design methodology is indicated.

  19. A Parametric Study of Accelerations of an Airplane Due to a Wake Vortex System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted using strip theory to systematically investigate the effects of progressively more complete descriptions of the interaction of an airplane with a wake vortex system. The emphasis was in roll-dominant, parallel, vortex encounters. That is, the simulated airplane's longitudinal axis was nearly parallel to the rotation axis of the vortex system for most of the results presented. The study began with a drag-less rectangular wing in the flow field of a single vortex and progressed to a complete airplane with aerodynamic surfaces possessing taper, sweep, dihedral, and stalling and immersed in the flow field of a vortex pair in ground effect. The effects of the pitch, roll, and yaw attitudes of the airplane on the calculated accelerations were also investigated. The airplane had the nominal characteristics of a Boeing 757, and the vortex flow field had the nominal characteristics of the wake of a Boeing 767. The Bumham-Hallock model of a vortex flow field was used throughout the study. The data are presented mainly in terms of contours of equal acceleration in a two-dimensional area centered on the vortex pair and having dimensions of 300 feet by 300 feet.

  20. Flight Investigation of the Effectiveness of an Automatic Aileron Trim Control Device for Personal Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, William H; Kuehnel, Helmut A; Whitten, James B

    1957-01-01

    A flight investigation to determine the effectiveness of an automatic aileron trim control device installed in a personal airplane to augment the apparent spiral stability has been conducted. The device utilizes a rate-gyro sensing element in order to switch an on-off type of control that operates the ailerons at a fixed rate through control centering springs. An analytical study using phase-plane and analog-computer methods has been carried out to determine a desirable method of operation for the automatic trim control.

  1. Wind-tunnel tests of a 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic airplane. 1: Longitudinal stability and control characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlan, C. J.; Kemp, W. B., Jr.; Polhamus, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    A 1/4 scale model of the Bell XS-1 transonic aircraft was tested in the Langley 300 mile-per-hour 7 by 10 foot tunnel to determine its low speed longitudinal stability and control characteristics. Pertinent longitudinal flying qualities expected of the XS-1 research airplane were estimated from the results of these tests including the effects of compressibility likely to be encountered at speeds below the force break. It appears that the static longitudinal stability and elevator control power will be adequate, but that the elevator control force gradient in steady flight will be undesirably low for all configurations. It is suggested that a centering spring be incorporated in the elevator control system of the airplane in order to increase the control force gradient in steady flight and in maneuvers.

  2. Maximum likelihood method for estimating airplane stability and control parameters from flight data in frequency domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.

    1980-01-01

    A frequency domain maximum likelihood method is developed for the estimation of airplane stability and control parameters from measured data. The model of an airplane is represented by a discrete-type steady state Kalman filter with time variables replaced by their Fourier series expansions. The likelihood function of innovations is formulated, and by its maximization with respect to unknown parameters the estimation algorithm is obtained. This algorithm is then simplified to the output error estimation method with the data in the form of transformed time histories, frequency response curves, or spectral and cross-spectral densities. The development is followed by a discussion on the equivalence of the cost function in the time and frequency domains, and on advantages and disadvantages of the frequency domain approach. The algorithm developed is applied in four examples to the estimation of longitudinal parameters of a general aviation airplane using computer generated and measured data in turbulent and still air. The cost functions in the time and frequency domains are shown to be equivalent; therefore, both approaches are complementary and not contradictory. Despite some computational advantages of parameter estimation in the frequency domain, this approach is limited to linear equations of motion with constant coefficients.

  3. 78 FR 77611 - Special Conditions: Airbus, A350-900 Series Airplane; High Speed Protection System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Airbus, A350-900 Series Airplane; High... high-speed protection system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or... maximum diversion time. The A350-900, like Airbus A320, A330, A340 and A380 series aircraft, has a...

  4. 76 FR 28914 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R Series Airplanes, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... of the rudder system design. Rudder pedal sensitivity on Model A300-600 and A310 series airplanes is greater than that of other transport category airplane designs. Such rudder control sensitivity...

  5. 14 CFR 25.397 - Control system loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control system loads. 25.397 Section 25.397... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.397 Control system...) and to be reacted at the attachment of the control system to the control surface horn. (b)...

  6. 14 CFR 25.397 - Control system loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Control system loads. 25.397 Section 25.397... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.397 Control system...) and to be reacted at the attachment of the control system to the control surface horn. (b)...

  7. Summary of flight tests to determine the spin and controllability characteristics of a remotely piloted, large-scale (3/8) fighter airplane model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleman, E. C.

    1976-01-01

    An unpowered, large, dynamically scaled airplane model was test flown by remote pilot to investigate the stability and controllability of the configuration at high angles of attack. The configuration proved to be departure/spin resistant; however, spins were obtained by using techniques developed on a flight support simulator. Spin modes at high and medium high angles of attack were identified, and recovery techniques were investigated. A flight support simulation of the airplane model mechanized with low speed wind tunnel data over an angle of attack range of + or - 90 deg. and an angle of sideslip range of + or - 40 deg. provided insight into the effects of altitude, stability, aerodynamic damping, and the operation of the augmented flight control system on spins. Aerodynamic derivatives determined from flight maneuvers were used to correlate model controllability with two proposed departure/spin design criteria.

  8. Measurement of the handling characteristics of two light airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A flight investigation of the handling characteristics of two single engine general aviation airplanes, one a high wing and the other a low wing, included a variety of measurements of different characteristics of the airplanes. The characteristics included those of the control systems, performance, longitudinal and lateral responses, and stall motions.

  9. Summary of design considerations for airplane spin-recovery parachute systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, S. M., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A compilation of design considerations applicable to spin-recovery parachute systems for military airplanes has been made so that the information will be readily available to persons responsible for the design of such systems. This information was obtained from a study of available documents and from discussions with persons in both government and industry experienced in parachute technology, full-scale and model spin testing, and related systems.

  10. Some effects of adverse weather conditions on performance of airplane antiskid braking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Mccarty, J. L.; Tanner, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of current antiskid braking systems operating under adverse weather conditions was analyzed in an effort to both identify the causes of locked-wheel skids which sometimes occur when the runway is slippery and to find possible solutions to this operational problem. This analysis was made possible by the quantitative test data provided by recently completed landing research programs using fully instrumented flight test airplanes and was further supported by tests performed at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility. The antiskid system logic for brake control and for both touchdown and locked-wheel protection is described and its response behavior in adverse weather is discussed in detail with the aid of available data. The analysis indicates that the operational performance of the antiskid logic circuits is highly dependent upon wheel spin-up acceleration and can be adversely affected by certain pilot braking inputs when accelerations are low. Normal antiskid performance is assured if the tire-to-runway traction is sufficient to provide high wheel spin-up accelerations or if the system is provided a continuous, accurate ground speed reference. The design of antiskid systems is complicated by the necessity for tradeoffs between tire braking and cornering capabilities, both of which are necessary to provide safe operations in the presence of cross winds, particularly under slippery runway conditions.

  11. 14 CFR 25.405 - Secondary control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Secondary control system. 25.405 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.405 Secondary control system. Secondary controls, such as wheel brake, spoiler, and tab controls, must...

  12. 14 CFR 25.405 - Secondary control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Secondary control system. 25.405 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.405 Secondary control system. Secondary controls, such as wheel brake, spoiler, and tab controls, must...

  13. 14 CFR 23.399 - Dual control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dual control system. 23.399 Section 23.399... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 23.399 Dual control system. (a) Each dual control system must be designed to withstand the...

  14. 14 CFR 25.685 - Control system details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control system details. 25.685 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.685 Control system details. (a) Each detail of each control system must be designed and installed to prevent...

  15. 14 CFR 23.679 - Control system locks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Control system locks. 23.679 Section 23.679... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.679 Control system locks. If there is a device to lock the control system on the ground...

  16. 14 CFR 25.399 - Dual control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dual control system. 25.399 Section 25.399... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.399 Dual control system. (a) Each dual control system must be designed for the pilots operating in opposition,...

  17. 14 CFR 23.679 - Control system locks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control system locks. 23.679 Section 23.679... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.679 Control system locks. If there is a device to lock the control system on the ground...

  18. 14 CFR 25.685 - Control system details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Control system details. 25.685 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.685 Control system details. (a) Each detail of each control system must be designed and installed to prevent...

  19. 14 CFR 23.399 - Dual control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dual control system. 23.399 Section 23.399... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 23.399 Dual control system. (a) Each dual control system must be designed to withstand the...

  20. 14 CFR 25.399 - Dual control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dual control system. 25.399 Section 25.399... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.399 Dual control system. (a) Each dual control system must be designed for the pilots operating in opposition,...

  1. Lateral stability and control tests of the XP-77 airplane in the NACA full-scale tunnel, 16 June 1944

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czarnecki, K. R.; Donlan, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were made in the NACA full-scale tunnel to determine the lateral stability and control characteristics of the XP-77 airplane. Measurements were made of the forces and moments on the airplane at various angles of attack and angles of yaw. The measurements were made with the propeller removed and with the propeller installed and operating at various thrust coefficients, and with the landing flaps retracted and deflected. The effects of aileron, elevator, and rudder deflection on control surface effectiveness and hinge moments were determined. The tests were planned to obtain the data required to evaluate as completely as possible the Army Air Force requirements on lateral stability and control for pursuit-type airplanes.

  2. 78 FR 73993 - Special Conditions: Cessna Model 680 Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic System Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... external to the airplane. Discussion The architecture and network configuration in the Cessna Model 680... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Cessna Model 680 Series Airplanes... conditions are issued for the Cessna Model 680 Series airplanes. These airplanes will have a novel or...

  3. Simulated-airline-service flight tests of laminar-flow control with perforated-surface suction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.; Braslow, Albert L.

    1990-01-01

    The effectiveness and practicality of candidate leading edge systems for suction laminar flow control transport airplanes were investigated in a flight test program utilizing a modified JetStar airplane. The leading edge region imposes the most severe conditions on systems required for any type of laminar flow control. Tests of the leading edge systems, therefore, provided definitive results as to the feasibility of active laminar flow control on airplanes. The test airplane was operated under commercial transport operating procedures from various commercial airports and at various seasons of the year.

  4. 14 CFR 23.405 - Secondary control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Secondary control system. 23.405 Section 23... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 23.405 Secondary control system. Secondary controls, such as wheel brakes,...

  5. 14 CFR 25.679 - Control system gust locks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Control system gust locks. 25.679 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.679 Control system gust locks. (a) There must be a device to prevent damage to the control surfaces (including...

  6. 14 CFR 23.405 - Secondary control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Secondary control system. 23.405 Section 23... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 23.405 Secondary control system. Secondary controls, such as wheel brakes,...

  7. 14 CFR 25.679 - Control system gust locks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control system gust locks. 25.679 Section... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 25.679 Control system gust locks. (a) There must be a device to prevent damage to the control surfaces (including...

  8. An Experimental Evaluation of Generalized Predictive Control for Tiltrotor Aeroelastic Stability Augmentation in Airplane Mode of Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Piatak, David J.; Nixon, Mark W.; Langston, Chester W.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Bennett, Richard L.; Brown, Ross K.

    2001-01-01

    The results of a joint NASA/Army/Bell Helicopter Textron wind-tunnel test to assess the potential of Generalized Predictive Control (GPC) for actively controlling the swashplate of tiltrotor aircraft to enhance aeroelastic stability in the airplane mode of flight are presented. GPC is an adaptive time-domain predictive control method that uses a linear difference equation to describe the input-output relationship of the system and to design the controller. The test was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel using an unpowered 1/5-scale semispan aeroelastic model of the V-22 that was modified to incorporate a GPC-based multi-input multi-output control algorithm to individually control each of the three swashplate actuators. Wing responses were used for feedback. The GPC-based control system was highly effective in increasing the stability of the critical wing mode for all of the conditions tested, without measurable degradation of the damping in the other modes. The algorithm was also robust with respect to its performance in adjusting to rapid changes in both the rotor speed and the tunnel airspeed.

  9. 78 FR 78694 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...-223-AD; Amendment 39-17704; AD 2013-25-08] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... series airplanes, and Model A340-200 and -300 series airplanes. AD 2009-24-09 required a repetitive... ] hydraulic systems on airplanes that have had a certain modification embodied during production or...

  10. Flight-determined stability and control coefficients of the F-111A airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, K. W.; Maine, R. E.; Steers, S. T.

    1978-01-01

    A complete set of linear stability and control derivatives of the F-111A airplane was determined with a modified maximum likelihood estimator. The derivatives were determined at wing sweep angles of 26 deg, 35 deg, and 58 deg. The flight conditions included a Mach number range of 0.63 to 1.43 and an angle of attack range of 2 deg to 15 deg. Maneuvers were performed at normal accelerations from 0.9g to 3.8g during steady turns to assess the aeroelastic effects on the stability and control characteristics. The derivatives generally showed consistent trends and reasonable agreement with the wind tunnel estimates. Significant Mach effects were observed for Mach numbers as low as 0.82. No large effects attributable to aeroelasticity were noted.

  11. Pitch Controllability Based on Airplane Model without Short-Period Approximation—Flight Simulator Experiment—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Osamu; Kobayashi, Osamu

    Pitch controllability of an airplane is very important for longitudinal flying qualities, therefore, much research has been conducted. However, it has not been clarified why pitch handling qualities degrades in the low speed, e.g. take-off and landing flight phases. On this topic, this paper investigates the effect of several parameters of the short-period mode and phugoid mode using a flight simulator. The results show the following conclusions: The difference between the initial phase angles in two modal components in the pitch attitude response to elevator step input plays the most important role in the pitch handling qualities among modal parameters; and the difference of the two modal natural frequencies has small effect on the pitch controllability even when flight speed decreases.

  12. Class 2 design update for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creighton, Thomas R.; Hendrich, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the final report of seven on the design of a family of commuter airplanes. This design effort was performed in fulfillment of NASA/USRA grant NGT-8001. Its contents are as follows: (1) the class 1 baseline designs for the commuter airplane family; (2) a study of takeoff weight penalties imposed on the commuter family due to implementing commonality objectives; (3) component structural designs common to the commuter family; (4) details of the acquisition and operating economics of the commuter family, i.e., savings due to production commonality and handling qualities commonality are determined; (5) discussion of the selection of an advanced turboprop propulsion system for the family of commuter airplanes, and (6) a proposed design for an SSSA controller design to achieve similar handling for all airplanes. Final class 2 commuter airplane designs are also presented.

  13. YF-12 cooperative airframe/propulsion control system program, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Connolly, G. F.; Mauro, F. M.; Reukauf, P. J.; Marks, R. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Several YF-12C airplane analog control systems were converted to a digital system. Included were the air data computer, autopilot, inlet control system, and autothrottle systems. This conversion was performed to allow assessment of digital technology applications to supersonic cruise aircraft. The digital system was composed of a digital computer and specialized interface unit. A large scale mathematical simulation of the airplane was used for integration testing and software checkout.

  14. AIRCL: A programmed system for generating NC tapes for airplane models. User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akgerman, N.; Billhardt, C. F.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program is presented which calculates the cutter location file needed to machine models of airplane wings or wing-fuselage combinations on numerically controlled machine tools. Input to the program is a data file consisting of coordinates on the fuselage and wing. From this data file, the program calculates tool offsets, determines the intersection between wing and fuselage tool paths, and generates additional information needed to machine the fuselage and/or wing. Output from the program can be post processed for use on a variety of milling machines. Information on program structure and methodology is given as well as the user's manual for implementation of the program.

  15. 78 FR 65153 - Special Conditions: Learjet Model 45 Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic System Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ...); 2. Operator business and administrative support (operator information services); 3. Passenger... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Learjet Model 45 Series Airplanes... conditions are issued for the Learjet Model 45 series airplanes. These airplanes will have a novel or...

  16. Measurement of Flying Qualities of a Dehavilland Mosquito F-8 Airplane (AAF No. 43-334960) I: Lateral and Directional Stability and Control Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, W.E.; Talmage, D.B.; Crane, H.L.

    1945-01-01

    The data presented have no bearing on performance characteristics of airplane, which were considered exceptionally good in previous tests. Some of the undesirable features of lateral and directional stability and control characteristics of the F-8 are listed. Directional stability, with rudder fixed, did not sufficiently restrict aileron yaw; rudder control was inadequate during take-off and landing, and was insufficient to fly airplane with one engine; in clean condition, power of ailerons was slightly below minimum value specified; it was difficult to trim airplane in rough air.

  17. Subsonic Flight Tests of a 1/7-Scale Radio-Controlled Model of the North American X-15 Airplane with Particular Reference to High Angel-of-Attack Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewes, Donald E.; Hassell, James L., Jr.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation of the subsonic stability and control characteristics of an unpowered 1/7-scale model based on the North American X-15 airplane was conducted by using a radio-controlled model launched from a helicopter and flown in free-gliding flight. At angles of attack below about 20 deg. where the model motions represent those of the X-15 airplane, the model was found to be both longitudinally and laterally stable, and the all-movable tail surfaces were found to be very effective. The model could also be flown at much higher angles of attack where the model motions did not necessarily represent those of the airplane because of slight geometrical differences and Reynolds number effects, but these test results are useful in evaluating the effectiveness at these angles of the type of lateral control system used in the X-15 airplane. In some cases, the model was flown to angles of attack as high as 60 or 70 deg. without encountering divergent or uncontrollable conditions. For some flights in which the model was subjected to rapid maneuvers, spinning motions were generated by application of corrective controls to oppose the direction of rotation. Rapid recoveries from this type of motion were achieved by applying roll control in the direction of rotation.

  18. Investigation of Icing Characteristics of Typical Light Airplane Engine Induction Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.

    1949-01-01

    The icing characteristics of two typical light-airplane engine induction systems were investigated using the carburetors and manifolds of engines in the horsepower ranges from 65 to 85 and 165 to 185. The smaller system consisted of a float-type carburetor with an unheated manifold and the larger system consisted of a single-barrel pressure-type carburetor with an oil-jacketed manifold. Carburetor-air temperature and humidity limits of visible and serious Icing were determined for various engine power conditions. Several.methods of achieving ice-free induction systems are discussed along with estimates of surface heating requirements of the various induct ion-system components. A study was also made of the icing characteristics of a typical light-airplane air scoop with an exposed filter and a modified system that provided a normal ram inlet with the filter located in a position to Induce inertia separation of the free water from the charge air. The principle of operation of float-type carburetors is proved to make them inherently more susceptible to icing at the throttle plate than pressure-type carburetors.. The results indicated that proper jacketing and heating of all parts exposed to the fuel spray can satisfactorily reduce or eliminate icing in the float-type carburetor and the manifold. Pressure-type carburetors can be protected from serious Icing by proper location of the fuel-discharge nozzle combined with suitable application of heat to critical parts.

  19. 76 FR 36870 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Design Roll Maneuver Requirement for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ...; Design Roll Maneuver Requirement for Electronic Flight Controls AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... electronic flight control system that provides roll control of the airplane through pilot inputs to the flight computers. These special conditions contain the additional safety standards that the...

  20. Amphibious Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The airplane pictured is the new Air Shark I, a four-place amphibian that makes extensive use of composite materials and cruises at close to 200 miles per hour under power from a 200-horsepower engine. Air Shark I is a "homebuilt" airplane, assembled from a kit of parts and components furnished by Freedom Master Corporation, Satellite Beach, Florida. The airplane incorporates considerable NASA technology and its construction benefited from research assistance provided by Kennedy Space Center (KSC) In designing the Shark, company president Arthur M. Lueck was able to draw on NASA's aeronautical technology bank through KSC's computerized "recon" library. As a result of his work at KSC, the wing of the Air Shark I is a new airfoil developed by Langley Research Center for light aircraft. In addition, Lueck opted for NASA-developed "winglets," vertical extensions of the wing that reduce drag by smoothing air turbulence at the wingtips. The NASA technology bank also contributed to the hull design. Lueck is considering application of NASA laminar flow technology-means of smoothing the airflow over wing and fuselage-to later models for further improvement of the Shark's aerodynamic efficiency. A materials engineer, Lueck employed his own expertise in designing and selecting the materials for the composite segments, which include all structural members, exposed surfaces and many control components. The materials are fiber reinforced plastics, or FRP They offer a high strength-to-weight ratio, with a nominal strength rating about one and a half times that of structural steel. They provide other advantages: the materials can be easily molded into finished shapes without expensive tooling or machining, and they are highly corrosion resistant. The first homebuilt to be offered by Freedom Master, Air Shark I completed air and water testing in mid-1985 and the company launched production of kits.

  1. 77 FR 29914 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS... rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all BAE SYSTEMS... information identified in this proposed AD, contact BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited, Customer...

  2. 77 FR 54803 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... 2011-NM-229-AD; Amendment 39-17174; AD 2012-17-11] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS... (DOT). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all BAE...) BA20509AM-4 in a horizontal position within the vanity unit. BAE Systems have subsequently been informed...

  3. 78 FR 17285 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... of stiff operation of the elevator pitch control system and jammed elevator controls. This AD... issuing this AD to prevent moisture from collecting and freezing on the elevator control system components... airborne warning and control system (AWACS) airplanes; and line numbers 972 through 974. However,...

  4. The shock-absorbed system of the airplane landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callerio, Pietro

    1940-01-01

    A discussion is given of the behavior of the shock-absorbing system, consisting of elastic struts and tires, under landing, take-off, and taxying conditions, and a general formula derived for obtaining the minimum stroke required to satisfy the conditions imposed on the landing gear. Finally, the operation of some typical shock-absorbing systems are examined and the necessity brought out for taking into account, in dynamic landing-gear tests, the effect of the wing lift at the instant of contact with the ground.

  5. 76 FR 31459 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (OPERATIONS) LIMITED Model BAe 146 and Avro 146-RJ Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ...-208-AD; Amendment 39-16705; AD 2011-11-06] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (OPERATIONS) LIMITED Model BAe 146 and Avro 146-RJ Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA..., prompted by a crack found at the top of the Nose Landing Gear (NLG) oleo, BAE Systems Operations) Ltd...

  6. 75 FR 53855 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Model BAe 146 and Avro 146-RJ Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ...-226-AD; Amendment 39-16423; AD 2010-18-10] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Model BAe 146 and Avro 146-RJ Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... Applicability that have been modified to freighter configuration in accordance with BAE Systems modification...

  7. 76 FR 14341 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 747-8/-8F Airplanes, Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... failure condition includes consequential or cascading effects resulting from the first failure. B. Effects... systems that affect the airplane's structural performance, either directly or as a result of failure or... remain flutter free after certain failures. The regulations do not anticipate the use of systems...

  8. MLS/Airplane system design. RF component design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walen, D. B.; Stapleton, B. P.

    1984-01-01

    Results of analysis and design conducted as part of multiyear Microwave Landing System (MLS) study are reported. Design of airborne radio frequency RF MLS components was performed. MLS omnidirectional antennas are developed using microstrip technology. A remote, low-noise, radio frequency (RF) preamplifier is designed for airborne MLS installations.

  9. 76 FR 73477 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Systems (Operations) Limited has amended the AMM to remove the life limits on shock absorber assemblies, but not the individual shock absorber components, and amend the life limits on the different standards... 104, dated April 15, 2011, to remove life limits on shock absorber assemblies, but not the...

  10. Calculations and Experimental Investigations on the Feed-Power Requirement of Airplanes with Boundary-Layer Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, W.

    1947-01-01

    Calculations and test results are given about the feed-power requirement of airplanes with boundary-layer control. Curves and formulas for the rough estimate of pressure-loss and feed-power requirement are set up for the investigated arrangements which differ structurally and aerodynamically. According to these results the feed power for three different designs is calculated at the end of the report.

  11. Preliminary Results of Stability and Control Investigation of the Bell X-5 Research Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finch, Thomas W; Briggs, Donald W

    1953-01-01

    During the acceptance tests of the Bell X-5 airplane, measurements of the static stability and control characteristics and horizontal-tail loads were obtained by the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station. The results of the stability and control measurements are presented in this paper. A change in sweep angle between 20 deg and 59 deg had a minor effect on the longitudinal trim, with a maximum change of about 2.5 deg in elevator deflection being required at a Mach number near 0.85; however, sweeping the wings produced a total stick-force change of about 40 pounds. At low Mach numbers there was a rapid increase in stability at high normal-force coefficients for both 20 0 and 1100 sweepback, whereas a condition of neutral stability existed for 58 0 sweepback at high normal-force coefficients. At Mach numbers near 0.8 there was an instability at normal-force coefficients above 0.5 for all sweep angles tested. In the low normal-force-coefficient range a high degree of stability resulted in high stick forces which limited the maximum load factors attainable in the demonstration flights to values under 5g for all sweep angles at a Mach number near 0.8 and an altitude of 12,000 feet. The aileron effectiveness at 200 sweepback was found to be low over the Mach number range tested.

  12. Comparison of Wind-Tunnel and Flight Measurements of Stability and Control Characteristics of a Douglas A-26 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayten, Gerald G; Koven, William

    1945-01-01

    Stability and control characteristics determined from tests in the Langley 19-foot pressure tunnel of a 0.2375-scale model of the Douglas XA-26 airplane are compared with those measured in flight tests of a Douglas A-26 airplane. Agreement regarding static longitudinal stability as indicated by the elevator-fixed neutral points and by the variation of elevator deflection in both straight and turning flight was found to be good except at speeds approaching the stall. At these low speeds the airplane possessed noticeably improved stability, which was attributed to pronounced stalling at the root of the production wing. The pronounced root stalling did not occur on the smooth, well-faired model wing. Elevator tab effectiveness determined from model tests agreed well with flight-test tab effectiveness, but control-force variations with speed and acceleration were not in good agreement. The use of model hinge-moment data obtained at zero sideslip appeared to be satisfactory for the determination of aileron forces in sideslip. Fairly good correlation in aileron effectiveness and control forces was obtained; fabric distortion may have been responsible to some extent for higher flight values of aileron force at high speeds. Estimation of sideslip developed in an abrupt aileron roll was fair, but determination of the rudder deflection required to maintain zero sideslip in a rapid aileron roll was not entirely satisfactory.

  13. Design of a Mars Airplane Propulsion System for the Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey (ARES) Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl. Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-Scale Environmental Survey (ARES) is a Mars exploration mission concept with the goal of taking scientific measurements of the atmosphere, surface, and subsurface of Mars by using an airplane as the payload platform. ARES team first conducted a Phase-A study for a 2007 launch opportunity, which was completed in May 2003. Following this study, significant efforts were undertaken to reduce the risk of the atmospheric flight system, under the NASA Langley Planetary Airplane Risk Reduction Project. The concept was then proposed to the Mars Scout program in 2006 for a 2011 launch opportunity. This paper summarizes the design and development of the ARES airplane propulsion subsystem beginning with the inception of the ARES project in 2002 through the submittal of the Mars Scout proposal in July 2006.

  14. 75 FR 49377 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Model Avro 146-RJ and BAe 146 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ...-012-AD; Amendment 39-16387; AD 2010-16-10] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; BAE Systems (Operations) Limited Model Avro 146-RJ and BAe 146 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... has been identified regarding the interchanging of wing links on all BAe 146 & AVRO 146-RJ...

  15. 75 FR 12158 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited Model Avro 146-RJ and BAe 146 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited Model Avro 146-RJ and BAe 146 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... fleet wide problem has been identified regarding the interchanging of wing links on all BAe 146 &...

  16. A computerized self-compensating system for ultrasonic inspection of airplane structures

    SciTech Connect

    Komsky, I.N.; Achenbach, J.D.; Hagemaier, D.

    1993-12-31

    Application of a self-compensating technique for ultrasonic inspection of airplane structures makes it possible not only to detect cracks in the different layers of joints but also to obtain information on crack sizes. A prototype computerized ultrasonic system, which utilizes the self-compensating method, has been developed for non-destructive inspection of multilayered airplane structures with in-between sealants, such as bolted joints in tail connections. Industrial applications of the system would require deployment of commercially available portable modules for data acquisition and processing. A portable ultrasonic flaw detector EPOCH II manual scanners and HandiScan, and SQL and FCS software modules form the PC-based TestPro system have been selected for initial tests. A pair of contact angle-beam transducers were used to generate shear waves in the material. Both hardware and software components of the system have been modified for the application in conjunction with the self-compensating technique. The system has bene tested on two calibration specimens with artificial flaws of different sizes in internal layers of multilayered structures. Ultrasonic signals transmitted through and reflected from the artificial flaws have bene discriminated and characterized using multiple time domain amplitude gates. Then the ratios of the reflection and transmission coefficients, R/T, were calculated for several positions of the transducers. Inspection of measured R/T curves shows it is difficult to visually associate curve shapes with corresponding flaw sizes and orientation. Hence for online classification of these curve shapes, application of an adaptive signal classifier was considered. Several different types and configurations of the classifiers, including a neural network, have been tested. Test results showed that improved performance of the classifier can be achieved by combination of a back-propagation neural network with a signal pre-processing module.

  17. 78 FR 11562 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Flight Envelope Protection: High Speed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ...These special conditions are issued for the Embraer S.A. Model EMB-550 airplane. This airplane will have a novel or unusual design feature, specifically an electronic flight control system which contains fly-by-wire control laws, including envelope protections, for the overspeed protection and roll limiting function. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or......

  18. 14 CFR 25.1161 - Fuel jettisoning system controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel jettisoning system controls. 25.1161 Section 25.1161 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1161 - Fuel jettisoning system controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel jettisoning system controls. 25.1161 Section 25.1161 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1161 - Fuel jettisoning system controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel jettisoning system controls. 25.1161 Section 25.1161 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1161 - Fuel jettisoning system controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel jettisoning system controls. 25.1161 Section 25.1161 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls...

  2. Exploring Venus by Solar Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    A solar-powered airplane is proposed to explore the atmospheric environment of Venus. Venus has several advantages for a solar airplane. At the top of the cloud level, the solar intensity is comparable to or greater than terrestrial solar intensities. The Earthlike atmospheric pressure means that the power required for flight is lower for Venus than that of Mars, and the slow rotation of Venus allows an airplane to be designed for continuous sunlight, with no energy storage needed for night-time flight. These factors mean that Venus is perhaps the easiest planet in the solar system for flight of a long-duration solar airplane.

  3. 78 FR 73995 - Special Conditions: Cessna Model 680 Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic System Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... data busses and networks. A separate Cessna Model 680 project special condition addresses aircraft.... Discussion The integrated network configurations in the Cessna Model 680 series airplanes may allow increased... passenger entertainment and information services than previous airplane models. This may allow...

  4. Propulsion system-flight control integration and optimization: Flight evaluation and technology transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Myers, Lawrence P.

    1990-01-01

    Integration of propulsion and flight control systems and their optimization offers significant performance improvements. Research programs were conducted which have developed new propulsion and flight control integration concepts, implemented designs on high-performance airplanes, demonstrated these designs in flight, and measured the performance improvements. These programs, first on the YF-12 airplane, and later on the F-15, demonstrated increased thrust, reduced fuel consumption, increased engine life, and improved airplane performance; with improvements in the 5 to 10 percent range achieved with integration and with no changes to hardware. The design, software and hardware developments, and testing requirements were shown to be practical.

  5. The Scale Effect in Towing Tests with Airplane-float Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Rudolph

    1937-01-01

    The present report includes a description of the making of three-component measurements on a full-size float mounted on an actual airplane and the comparison of the results with those from two models of the same form but of different size which had been tested in the towing tank. The purpose of the comparison is to determine the effect of the Reynolds Number on the results of model tank tests. Following a brief discussion of previous tests intended to elucidate the problem of scale effect on float systems and a description of the testing equipment, the choice of the reference quantities to be used in the comparison is discussed. The selection of load, speed, and trim as a basis of comparison seems best suited to the practical operation of making this comparison. The quantities affected by scale are then: resistance, trimming moment, and their derivatives; planing number (resistance/weight on water); and position of center of pressure.

  6. Flight and analytical investigations of a structural mode excitation system on the YF-12A airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, E. A.; Murphy, R. C.; Beranek, J. A.; Davis, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    A structural excitation system, using an oscillating canard vane to generate force, was mounted on the forebody of the YF-12A airplane. The canard vane was used to excite the airframe structural modes during flight in the subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes. Structural modal responses generated by the canard vane forces were measured at the flight test conditions by airframe-mounted accelerometers. Correlations of analytical and experimental aeroelastic results were made. Doublet lattice, steady state double lattice with uniform lag, Mach box, and piston theory all produced acceptable analytical aerodynamic results within the restrictions that apply to each. In general, the aerodynamic theory methods, carefully applied, were found to predict the dynamic behavior of the YF-12A aircraft adequately.

  7. 76 FR 22305 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 777-200, -300, and -300ER Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ...) electronics units in certain power management panels; installing airplane information management system 2...) electronics units in certain power management panels; installing airplane information management system 2..., and installing power control circuitry for the center override/jettison and main jettison fuel...

  8. Historical review of C-5A lift distribution control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disney, T. E.; Eckholdt, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental development work on various load alleviation systems for the C-5A is reviewed to trace the development of the technical and hardware concepts to the present time. Variations in system objectives, means of implementation and effects on loads and airplane performance, stability and control are discussed.

  9. Operational requirements for flight control and navigation systems for short haul transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    To provide a background for evaluating advanced STOL systems concepts, a number of short haul and STOL airline operations in the United States and one operation in Canada were studied. A study of flight director operational procedures for an advanced STOL research airplane, the Augmented Wing Jet STOL Research Airplane, was conducted using the STOLAND simulation facility located at the Ames Changes to the advanced digital flight control system (STOLAND) installed in the Augmentor Wing Airplane are proposed to improve the mode sequencing to simplify pilot procedures and reduce pilot workload.

  10. Emergency Flight Control Using Computer-Controlled Thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Stewart, James F.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Conley, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) systems are digital electronic control systems undergoing development to provide limited maneuvering ability through variations of individual engine thrusts in multiple-engine airplanes. Provide landing capability when control surfaces inoperable. Incorporated on existing and future airplanes that include digital engine controls, digital flight controls, and digital data buses, adding no weight for additional hardware to airplane. Possible to handle total failure of hydraulic system, depending on how surfaces respond to loss of hydraulic pressure, and broken control cables or linkages. Future airplanes incorporate data from Global Positioning System for guidance to any suitable emergency runway in world.

  11. CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

    1962-10-30

    A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

  12. Feeling safe in the plane: neural mechanisms underlying superior action control in airplane pilot trainees – a combined EEG/MRS study

    PubMed Central

    Dharmadhikari, Shalmali; Chmielewski, Witold; Glaubitz, Benjamin; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Edden, Richard; Dydak, Ulrike; Beste, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In day-to-day life, we need to apply strategies to cascade different actions for efficient unfolding of behaviour. While deficits in action cascading are examined extensively, almost nothing is known about the neuronal mechanisms mediating superior performance above the normal level. To examine this question, we investigate action control in airplane pilot trainees. We use a stop-change paradigm that is able to estimate the efficiency of action cascading on the basis of mathematical constraints. Behavioural and EEG data is analyzed along these constraints and integrated with neurochemical data obtained using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) from the striatal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) -ergic system. We show that high performance in action cascading, as exemplified in airplane pilot trainees, can be driven by intensified attentional processes, circumventing response selection processes. The results indicate that the efficiency of action cascading and hence the speed of responding as well as attentional gating functions are modulated by striatal GABA and Glutamate + Glutamine concentrations. In superior performance in action cascading similar increases in the concentrations of GABA and Glutamate + Glutamine lead to stronger neurophysiological and behavioural effects as compared to subjects with normal performance in action cascading. PMID:24753040

  13. Feeling safe in the plane: neural mechanisms underlying superior action control in airplane pilot trainees--a combined EEG/MRS study.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ali; Quetscher, Clara; Dharmadhikari, Shalmali; Chmielewski, Witold; Glaubitz, Benjamin; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Edden, Richard; Dydak, Ulrike; Beste, Christian

    2014-10-01

    In day-to-day life, we need to apply strategies to cascade different actions for efficient unfolding of behavior. While deficits in action cascading are examined extensively, almost nothing is known about the neuronal mechanisms mediating superior performance above the normal level. To examine this question, we investigate action control in airplane pilot trainees. We use a stop-change paradigm that is able to estimate the efficiency of action cascading on the basis of mathematical constraints. Behavioral and EEG data is analyzed along these constraints and integrated with neurochemical data obtained using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) from the striatal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) -ergic system. We show that high performance in action cascading, as exemplified in airplane pilot trainees, can be driven by intensified attentional processes, circumventing response selection processes. The results indicate that the efficiency of action cascading and hence the speed of responding as well as attentional gating functions are modulated by striatal GABA and Glutamate + Glutamine concentrations. In superior performance in action cascading similar increases in the concentrations of GABA and Glutamate + Glutamine lead to stronger neurophysiological and behavioral effects as compared to subjects with normal performance in action cascading.

  14. 78 FR 76254 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Control Surface Awareness and Mode...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane... Model A350-900 series airplanes. These airplanes will have a novel or unusual design feature(s... sending written comments, data, or views. The most helpful comments reference a specific portion of...

  15. Giant airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1922-01-01

    It is hardly possible for the most imaginative aeronautical enthusiast to look forward to a time when the airplane will have reached the dimensions commensurate with those already attained by the airship.

  16. Ground-based time-guidance algorithm for control of airplanes in a time-metered air traffic control environment: A piloted simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Imbert, N.

    1986-01-01

    The rapidly increasing costs of flight operations and the requirement for increased fuel conservation have made it necessary to develop more efficient ways to operate airplanes and to control air traffic for arrivals and departures to the terminal area. One concept of controlling arrival traffic through time metering has been jointly studied and evaluated by NASA and ONERA/CERT in piloted simulation tests. From time errors attained at checkpoints, airspeed and heading commands issued by air traffic control were computed by a time-guidance algorithm for the pilot to follow that would cause the airplane to cross a metering fix at a preassigned time. These tests resulted in the simulated airplane crossing a metering fix with a mean time error of 1.0 sec and a standard deviation of 16.7 sec when the time-metering algorithm was used. With mismodeled winds representing the unknown in wind-aloft forecasts and modeling form, the mean time error attained when crossing the metering fix was increased and the standard deviation remained approximately the same. The subject pilots reported that the airspeed and heading commands computed in the guidance concept were easy to follow and did not increase their work load above normal levels.

  17. The Effect of Mass Distribution on the Lateral Stability and Control Characteristics of an Airplane as Determined by Tests of a Model in the Free-flight Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Seacord, Charles L , Jr

    1943-01-01

    The effects of mass distribution on lateral stability and control characteristics of an airplane have been determined by flight tests of a model in the NACA free-flight tunnel. In the investigation, the rolling and yawing moments of inertia were increased from normal values to values up to five times normal. For each moment-of-inertia condition, combinations of dihedral and vertical-tail area representing a variety of airplane configurations were tested. The results of the flight tests of the model were correlated with calculated stability and control characteristics and, in general, good agreement was obtained.

  18. A dynamic pressure generator for checking complete pressure sensing systems installed on an airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarco, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    A portable dynamic pressure generator, how it operates, and a test setup on an airplane are described. The generator is capable of providing a sinusoidal pressure having a peak-to-peak amplitude of 3.5 N/sq cm (5 psi) at frequencies ranging from 100 hertz to 200 hertz. A typical power spectral density plot of data from actual dynamic pressure fluctuation tests within the air inlet of the YF-12 airplane is presented.

  19. Subsonic stability and control derivatives for an unpowered, remotely piloted 3/8-scale F-15 airplane model obtained from flight test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, K. W.; Maine, R. E.; Shafer, M. F.

    1976-01-01

    In response to the interest in airplane configuration characteristics at high angles of attack, an unpowered remotely piloted 3/8-scale F-15 airplane model was flight tested. The subsonic stability and control characteristics of this airplane model over an angle of attack range of -20 to 53 deg are documented. The remotely piloted technique for obtaining flight test data was found to provide adequate stability and control derivatives. The remotely piloted technique provided an opportunity to test the aircraft mathematical model in an angle of attack regime not previously examined in flight test. The variation of most of the derivative estimates with angle of attack was found to be consistent, particularly when the data were supplemented by uncertainty levels.

  20. Blowing-Type Boundary-Layer Control as Applied to the Trailing-Edge Flaps of a 35 Degree Swept-Wing Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Mark W; Anderson, Seth B; Innis, Robert C

    1958-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was made to determine the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of a 35 degree swept-wing airplane of applying blowing-type boundary-layer control to the trailing-edge flaps. Flight tests of a similar airplane were then conducted to determine the effects of boundary-layer control on the handling qualities and operation of the airplane, particularly during landing and take-off. The wind-tunnel and flight tests indicated that blowing over the flaps produced large increases in flap lift increment, and significant increases in maximum lift. The use of blowing permitted reductions in the landing approach speeds of as much as 12 knots.

  1. Quadruplex digital flight control system assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulcare, D. B.; Downing, L. E.; Smith, M. K.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the development and validation of a double fail-operational digital flight control system architecture for critical pitch axis functions. Architectural tradeoffs are assessed, system simulator modifications are described, and demonstration testing results are critiqued. Assessment tools and their application are also illustrated. Ultimately, the vital role of system simulation, tailored to digital mechanization attributes, is shown to be essential to validating the airworthiness of full-time critical functions such as augmented fly-by-wire systems for relaxed static stability airplanes.

  2. Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC) Flight Evaluation in an F-15 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Flight evaluation in an F-15 aircraft by digital electronic engine control (DEEC) was investigated. Topics discussed include: system description, F100 engine tests, effects of inlet distortion on static pressure probe, flight tests, digital electronic engine control fault detection and accommodation flight evaluation, flight evaluation of a hydromechanical backup control, augmentor transient capability of an F100 engine, investigation of nozzle instability, real time in flight thrust calculation, and control technology for future aircraft propulsion systems. It is shown that the DEEC system is a powerful and flexible controller for the F100 engine.

  3. 75 FR 12468 - Airworthiness Directives; Quartz Mountain Aerospace, Inc. Model 11E Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    .... The airplane was operated by a student pilot, who had trouble flying the airplane when this occurred... contamination. This condition, if not corrected, could lead to difficulty controlling the airplane in...

  4. 76 FR 8319 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Design Roll Maneuver Requirement for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... airplanes. These design features include an electronic flight control system that provides roll control of... Design Features The GVI is equipped with an electronic flight control system that provides roll control... of an electronic flight control system. Discussion of Proposed Special Conditions The GVI is...

  5. Control of Initialized Fractional-Order Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartly, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the importance of historical effects in fractional-order systems, this paper presents a general fractional-order control theory that includes the time-varying initialization response. Previous studies have not properly accounted for these historical effects. The initialization response, along with the forced response, for fractional-order systems is determined. Stability properties of fractional-order systems are presented in the complex Airplane, which is a transformation of the s-plane. Time responses are discussed with respect to pole positions in the complex Airplane and frequency response behavior is included. A fractional-order vector space representation, which is a generalization of the state space concept, is presented including the initialization response. Control methods for vector representations of initialized fractional-order systems are shown. Nyquist, root-locus, and other input-output control methods are adapted to the control of fractional-order systems. Finally, the fractional-order differintegral is generalized to continuous order-distributions that have the possibility of including a continuum of fractional orders in a system element.

  6. Analysis of the effects of boundary-layer control in the take-off and power-off landing performance characteristics of a liaison type of airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Elmer A; Loftin, Laurence K; Racisz, Stanley F; Quinn, John

    1951-01-01

    A performance analysis has been made to determine whether boundary-layer control by suction might reduce the minimum take-off and landing distances of a four-place or five-place airplane or a liaison type of airplane below those obtainable with conventional high-lift devices. The airplane was assumed to have a cruise duration of 5 hours at 60-percent power and to be operating from airstrips having a ground friction coefficient of 0.2 or a combined ground and braking coefficient of 0.4. The payload was fixed at 1500 pounds, the wing span was varied from 25 to 100 feet, the aspect ratio was varied from 5 to 15, and the power was varied from 300 to 1300 horsepower. Maximum lift coefficients of 5.0 and 2.8 were assumed for the airplanes with and without boundary-layer-control --equipment weight was included. The effects of the boundary-layer control on total take-off distance, total power-off landing distance, landing and take-off ground run, stalling speed, sinking speed, and gliding speed were determined.

  7. Solar-Powered Airplane with Cameras and WLAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higgins, Robert G.; Dunagan, Steve E.; Sullivan, Don; Slye, Robert; Brass, James; Leung, Joe G.; Gallmeyer, Bruce; Aoyagi, Michio; Wei, Mei Y.; Herwitz, Stanley R.; Johnson, Lee; Arvesen, John C.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental airborne remote sensing system includes a remotely controlled, lightweight, solar-powered airplane (see figure) that carries two digital-output electronic cameras and communicates with a nearby ground control and monitoring station via a wireless local-area network (WLAN). The speed of the airplane -- typically <50 km/h -- is low enough to enable loitering over farm fields, disaster scenes, or other areas of interest to collect high-resolution digital imagery that could be delivered to end users (e.g., farm managers or disaster-relief coordinators) in nearly real time.

  8. Preliminary design study of a lateral-directional control system using thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, F. J.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary design of a lateral-directional control system for a fighter airplane capable of controlled operation at extreme angles of attack is developed. The subject airplane is representative of a modern twin-engine high-performance jet fighter, is equipped with ailerons, rudder, and independent horizontal-tail surfaces. Idealized bidirectional thrust-vectoring engine nozzles are appended to the mathematic model of the airplane to provide additional control moments. Optimal schedules for lateral and directional pseudo control variables are calculated. Use of pseudo controls results in coordinated operation of the aerodynamic and thrust-vectoring controls with minimum coupling between the lateral and directional airplane dynamics. Linear quadratic regulator designs are used to specify a preliminary flight control system to improve the stability and response characteristics of the airplane. Simulated responses to step pilot control inputs are stable and well behaved. For lateral stick deflections, peak stability axis roll rates are between 1.25 and 1.60 rad/sec over an angle-of-attack range of 10 deg to 70 deg. For rudder pedal deflections, the roll rates accompanying the sideslip responses can be arrested by small lateral stick motions.

  9. Motion simulator study of longitudinal stability requirements for large delta wing transport airplanes during approach and landing with stability augmentation systems failed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, C. T.; Fry, E. B.; Drinkwater, F. J., III; Forrest, R. D.; Scott, B. C.; Benefield, T. D.

    1972-01-01

    A ground-based simulator investigation was conducted in preparation for and correlation with an-flight simulator program. The objective of these studies was to define minimum acceptable levels of static longitudinal stability for landing approach following stability augmentation systems failures. The airworthiness authorities are presently attempting to establish the requirements for civil transports with only the backup flight control system operating. Using a baseline configuration representative of a large delta wing transport, 20 different configurations, many representing negative static margins, were assessed by three research test pilots in 33 hours of piloted operation. Verification of the baseline model to be used in the TIFS experiment was provided by computed and piloted comparisons with a well-validated reference airplane simulation. Pilot comments and ratings are included, as well as preliminary tracking performance and workload data.

  10. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transpot project-demonstration act system definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Crumb, C. B.; Flora, C. C.; Macdonald, K. A. B.; Smith, R. D.; Sassi, A. P.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The 1985 ACT airplane is the Final Active Controls Technology (ACT) Airplane with the addition of three-axis fly by wire. Thus it retains all the efficiency features of the full ACT system plus the weight and cost savings accruing from deletion of the mechanical control system. The control system implements the full IAAC spectrum of active controls except flutter-mode control, judged essentially nonbeneficial, and incorporates new control surfaces called flaperons to make the most of wing-load alleviation. This redundant electronic system is conservatively designed to preserve the extreme reliability required of crucial short-period pitch augmentation, which provides more than half of the fuel savings.

  11. 76 FR 39763 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... of any airplane. Section 25.305 requires that supporting structures be able to support limit loads without detrimental permanent deformation, meaning that supporting structures should remain serviceable... higher transient loads on the engine mounts and supporting structures. As a result, modern high...

  12. 78 FR 76251 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Electronic System Security Protection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 25 Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane... conditions for Airbus Model A350- 900 series airplanes. These airplanes will have a novel or unusual design... the comment (or signing the comment for an association, business, labor union, etc.). DOT's...

  13. Digital Control System For Wind-Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoadley, Sherwood T.; Mcgraw, Sandra

    1995-01-01

    Multiple functions performed by multiple coordinated processors for real-time control. Multiple input, multiple-output, multiple-function digital control system developed for wind-tunnel model of advanced fighter airplane with actively controlled flexible wings. Digital control system provides flexibility in selection of control laws, sensors, and actuators, plus some redundancy to accommodate failures in some of its subsystems. Implements feedback control scheme providing simultaneously for suppression of flutter, control of roll angle, roll-rate tracking during maximized roll maneuvers, and alleviation of loads during roll maneuvers.

  14. Treatment of the control mechanisms of light airplanes in the flutter clearance process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breitbach, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    It has become more and more evident that many difficulties encountered in the course of aircraft flutter analyses can be traced to strong localized nonlinearities in the control mechanisms. To cope with these problems, more reliable mathematical models paying special attention to control system nonlinearities were established by means of modified ground vibration test procedures in combination with suitably adapted modal synthesis approaches. Three different concepts are presented.

  15. Flight testing the digital electronic engine control in the F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The digital electronic engine control (DEEC) is a full-authority digital engine control developed for the F100-PW-100 turbofan engine which was flight tested on an F-15 aircraft. The DEEC hardware and software throughout the F-15 flight envelope was evaluated. Real-time data reduction and data display systems were implemented. New test techniques and stronger coordination between the propulsion test engineer and pilot were developed which produced efficient use of test time, reduced pilot work load, and greatly improved quality data. The engine pressure ratio (EPR) control mode is demonstrated. It is found that the nonaugmented throttle transients and engine performance are satisfactory.

  16. 77 FR 65799 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... electrical power generation, could result in reduced control of the airplane. DATES: This AD becomes... total engine flame out, or during a total loss of normal electrical power generation, could possibly... power generation, could result in reduced control of the airplane. (f) Compliance You are...

  17. 78 FR 15279 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... mode, in case of go-around, might lead to a temporary loss of airplane longitudinal control. This AD... an erroneous indication. These tests concluded that with engaged flare and retard mode, in case of go... case of go-around, might lead to a temporary loss of airplane longitudinal control. We are issuing...

  18. Stability and Controls Analysis and Flight Test Results of a 24-Foot Telescoping Nose Boom on an F-15B Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moua, Cheng M.; Cox, Timothy H.; McWherter, Shaun C.

    2008-01-01

    The Quiet Spike(TradeMark) F-15B flight research program investigated supersonic shock reduction using a 24-ft telescoping nose boom on an F-15B airplane. The program goal was to collect flight data for model validation up to 1.8 Mach. In the area of stability and controls, the primary concerns were to assess the potential destabilizing effect of the oversized nose boom on the stability, controllability, and handling qualities of the airplane and to ensure adequate stability margins across the entire research flight envelope. This paper reports on the stability and control analytical methods, flight envelope clearance approach, and flight test results of the F-15B telescoping nose boom configuration. Also discussed are brief pilot commentary on typical piloting tasks and refueling tasks.

  19. 78 FR 64415 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Ground Pivoting Loads

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... airplanes. These airplanes will have a novel or unusual design feature(s) associated with a braking system...-900 series airplane is equipped with a braking system that affects the airplane's pivoting behavior. During pivoting the braking system inhibits braking on some wheels. Title 14 Code of Federal...

  20. 78 FR 53237 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... AD 2013-05-08 incorrectly specify flight control secondary computers (FCSCs), rather than flight control primary computers (FCPCs). This document corrects those errors. In all other respects, the... airplane configuration, modifying three flight control primary computers (FCPCs); modifying two...

  1. 77 FR 46343 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM...-400D, 747-400F, 747SR, and 747SP series airplanes; and certain Model 757-200, -200PF, and -300 series airplanes. The existing AD currently requires replacing the control switches of the forward, aft, and...

  2. An analytical study of the longitudinal response of airplanes to positive wind shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The longitudinal response of jet transport aircraft to vertical variation of the horizontal winds is analyzed. Specific reference is given to the role of the speed (u) stability derivatives in the interaction of the airplane and its environment. The relative importance of the u stability derivatives is determined. The wind shear tolerance factor is found which can be used to determine, in a qualitative manner, the stability (tolerance) of an airplane to wind shear. A further study of the control problem shows that the criteria for good control could be reduced from two to one automatic control systems. Only a speed control system is necessary for good control in wind shear.

  3. Primary electric power generation systems for advanced-technology engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The advantages of the all electric airplane are discussed. In the all electric airplane the generator is the sole source of electric power; it powers the primary and secondary flight controls, the environmentals, and the landing gear. Five candidates for all electric power systems are discussed and compared. Cost benefits of the all electric airplane are discussed.

  4. Subsonic flight test evaluation of a performance seeking control algorithm on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn B.; Orme, John S.

    1992-01-01

    The subsonic flight test evaluation phase of the NASA F-15 (powered by F 100 engines) performance seeking control program was completed for single-engine operation at part- and military-power settings. The subsonic performance seeking control algorithm optimizes the quasi-steady-state performance of the propulsion system for three modes of operation. The minimum fuel flow mode minimizes fuel consumption. The minimum thrust mode maximizes thrust at military power. Decreases in thrust-specific fuel consumption of 1 to 2 percent were measured in the minimum fuel flow mode; these fuel savings are significant, especially for supersonic cruise aircraft. Decreases of up to approximately 100 degree R in fan turbine inlet temperature were measured in the minimum temperature mode. Temperature reductions of this magnitude would more than double turbine life if inlet temperature was the only life factor. Measured thrust increases of up to approximately 15 percent in the maximum thrust mode cause substantial increases in aircraft acceleration. The system dynamics of the closed-loop algorithm operation were good. The subsonic flight phase has validated the performance seeking control technology, which can significantly benefit the next generation of fighter and transport aircraft.

  5. Automated airplane surface generation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Cordero, Y.; Jones, W.

    1996-12-31

    An efficient methodology and software axe presented for defining a class of airplane configurations. A small set of engineering design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, vertical tall, horizontal tail, and canard components. Wing, canard, and tail surface grids axe manifested by solving a fourth-order partial differential equation subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design variables are incorporated into the boundary conditions, and the solution is expressed as a Fourier series. The fuselage is described by an algebraic function with four design parameters. The computed surface grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation and configuration optimizations. Both batch and interactive software are discussed for applying the methodology.

  6. Potential Subjective Effectiveness of Active Interior Noise Control in Propeller Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control technology offers the potential for weight-efficient aircraft interior noise reduction, particularly for propeller aircraft. However, there is little information on how passengers respond to this type of interior noise control. This paper presents results of two experiments that use sound quality engineering practices to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control (ANC) systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two experiments differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons based on preference in the first and numerical category scaling of noisiness in the second. Although the results of the two experiments were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference. The reductions in subjective response due to the ANC conditions were predicted with reasonable accuracy by reductions in measured loudness level. Inclusion of corrections for the sound quality characteristics of tonality and fluctuation strength in multiple regression models improved the prediction of the ANC effects.

  7. Conceptual Design for a Dual-Bell Rocket Nozzle System Using a NASA F-15 Airplane as the Flight Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ruf, Joseph H.; Bui, Trong T.; Martinez, Martel; St. John, Clinton W.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-bell rocket nozzle was first proposed in 1949, offering a potential improvement in rocket nozzle performance over the conventional-bell nozzle. Despite the performance advantages that have been predicted, both analytically and through static test data, the dual-bell nozzle has still not been adequately tested in a relevant flight environment. In 2013 a proposal was constructed that offered a NASA F-15 airplane as the flight testbed, with the plan to operate a dual-bell rocket nozzle during captive-carried flight. If implemented, this capability will permit nozzle operation into an external flow field similar to that of a launch vehicle, and facilitate an improved understanding of dual-bell nozzle plume sensitivity to external flow-field effects. More importantly, this flight testbed can be utilized to help quantify the performance benefit with the dual-bell nozzle, as well as to advance its technology readiness level. This presentation provides highlights of a technical paper that outlines this ultimate goal, including plans for future flights to quantify the external flow field of the airplane near the nozzle experiment, as well as details on the conceptual design for the dual-bell nozzle cold-flow propellant feed system integration within the NASA F-15 Propulsion Flight Test Fixture. The current study shows that this concept of flight research is feasible, and could result in valuable flight data for the dual-bell nozzle.

  8. Conceptual Design for a Dual-Bell Rocket Nozzle System Using a NASA F-15 Airplane as the Flight Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ruf, Joseph H.; Bui, Trong T.; Martinez, Martel; St. John, Clinton W.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-bell rocket nozzle was first proposed in 1949, offering a potential improvement in rocket nozzle performance over the conventional-bell nozzle. Despite the performance advantages that have been predicted, both analytically and through static test data, the dual-bell nozzle has still not been adequately tested in a relevant flight environment. In 2013 a proposal was constructed that offered a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) F-15 airplane as the flight testbed, with the plan to operate a dual-bell rocket nozzle during captive-carried flight. If implemented, this capability will permit nozzle operation into an external flow field similar to that of a launch vehicle, and facilitate an improved understanding of dual-bell nozzle plume sensitivity to external flow-field effects. More importantly, this flight testbed can be utilized to help quantify the performance benefit with the dual-bell nozzle, as well as to advance its technology readiness level. Toward this ultimate goal, this report provides plans for future flights to quantify the external flow field of the airplane near the nozzle experiment, as well as details on the conceptual design for the dual-bell nozzle cold-flow propellant feed system integration within the NASA F-15 Propulsion Flight Test Fixture. The current study shows that this concept of flight research is feasible, and could result in valuable flight data for the dual-bell nozzle.

  9. Conceptual Design for a Dual-Bell Rocket Nozzle System Using a NASA F-15 Airplane as the Flight Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ruf, Joseph H.; Bui, Trong T.; Martinez, Martel; St. John, Clinton W.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-bell rocket nozzle was first proposed in 1949, offering a potential improvement in rocket nozzle performance over the conventional-bell nozzle. Despite the performance advantages that have been predicted, both analytically and through static test data, the dual-bell nozzle has still not been adequately tested in a relevant flight environment. In 2013 a proposal was constructed that offered a NASA F-15 airplane as the flight testbed, with the plan to operate a dual-bell rocket nozzle during captive-carried flight. If implemented, this capability will permit nozzle operation into an external flow field similar to that of a launch vehicle, and facilitate an improved understanding of dual-bell nozzle plume sensitivity to external flow-field effects. More importantly, this flight testbed can be utilized to help quantify the performance benefit with the dual-bell nozzle, as well as to advance its technology readiness level. Toward this ultimate goal, this paper provides plans for future flights to quantify the external flow field of the airplane near the nozzle experiment, as well as details on the conceptual design for the dual-bell nozzle cold-flow propellant feed system integration within the NASA F-15 Propulsion Flight Test Fixture. The current study shows that this concept of flight research is feasible, and could result in valuable flight data for the dual-bell nozzle.

  10. Flight Calibration of four airspeed systems on a swept-wing airplane at Mach numbers up to 1.04 by the NACA radar-phototheodolite method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Jim Rogers; Bray, Richard S; COOPER GEORGE E

    1950-01-01

    The calibrations of four airspeed systems installed in a North American F-86A airplane have been determined in flight at Mach numbers up to 1.04 by the NACA radar-phototheodolite method. The variation of the static-pressure error per unit indicated impact pressure is presented for three systems typical of those currently in use in flight research, a nose boom and two different wing-tip booms, and for the standard service system installed in the airplane. A limited amount of information on the effect of airplane normal-force coefficient on the static-pressure error is included. The results are compared with available theory and with results from wind-tunnel tests of the airspeed heads alone. Of the systems investigated, a nose-boom installation was found to be most suitable for research use at transonic and low supersonic speeds because it provided the greatest sensitivity of the indicated Mach number to a unit change in true Mach number at very high subsonic speeds, and because it was least sensitive to changes in airplane normal-force coefficient. The static-pressure error of the nose-boom system was small and constant above a Mach number of 1.03 after passage of the fuselage bow shock wave over the airspeed head.

  11. 77 FR 29861 - Airworthiness Directives; Fokker Services B.V. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... control panel, which resulted in the absence of pressure and quantity indication of the hydraulic system and accompanying alerts for ``hydraulic system 1 low quantity'' and ``hydraulic system 2 low quantity...). We are issuing this AD to prevent loss of control of the airplane due to incorrect hydraulic...

  12. Measurements of the Longitudinal Stability and Control and Stalling Characteristics of a North American P-51H Airplane (AAF No. 4-64164)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Christopher C., Jr.; Reeder, J. P.

    1948-01-01

    Flight tests have been made to determine the longitudinal stability and control and stalling characteristics of a North American P-51H airplane. The results indicate that the airplane has satisfactory longitudinal stability in all the flight conditions tested at normal loadings up to 25,000 feet altitude. At Mach numbers above 0.7, the elevator push force required for longitudinal trim decreased somewhat because of compressibility effects. The elevator stick force per g in accelerated turns at the forward center-of-gravity position of 24 percent mean aerodynamic chord above 250 miles per hour was in excess of the required limits at both 5,000 and 25,OOO feet altitude. The longitudinal-trim-force changes due to flaps and power were small, but the rudder-trim-force change with power change was high. The stalling characteristics in all the conditions tested were satisfactory.

  13. A revolutionary approach to composite construction and flight management systems for small, general aviation airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, Jan; Wenninger, ED

    1992-01-01

    The design studies for two composite general aviation airplanes are presented. The main consideration for both of the designs was to avoid the typical 'metal replacement' philosophy that has hindered the widespread use of composites in general aviation aircraft. The first design is for a low wing aircraft based on the Smith Aircraft Corporation GT-3 Global Trainer. The second aircraft is a composite version of the Cessna 152. The project was conducted as a graduate level design class under the auspices of the KU/NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program in aeronautics. The results obtained from the Fall semester of 1991 and the Spring semester of 1992 are presented.

  14. Evaluation of an aeroelastic model technique for predicting airplane buffet loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, P. W.

    1973-01-01

    A wind-tunnel technique which makes use of a dynamically scaled aeroelastic model to predict full-scale airplane buffet loads during buffet boundary penetration is evaluated. A 1/8-scale flutter model of a fighter airplane with remotely controllable variable-sweep wings and trimming surfaces was used for the evaluation. The model was flown on a cable-mount system which permitted high lift forces comparable to those in maneuvering flight. Bending moments and accelerations due to buffet were measured on the flutter model and compared with those measured on the full-scale airplane in an independent flight buffet research study. It is concluded that the technique can provide valuable information on airplane buffet load characteristics not available from any other source except flight test.

  15. The airplane: A simulated commercial air transportation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauteuil, Mark; Geniesse, Pete; Hunniford, Michael; Lawler, Kathleen; Quirk, Elena; Tognarelli, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The 'Airplane' is a moderate-range, 70 passenger aircraft. It is designed to serve demands for flights up to 10,000 feet and it cruises at 32 ft/s. The major drivers for the design of the Airplane are economic competitiveness, takeoff performance, and weight minimization. The Airplane is propelled by a single Astro 15 electric motor and a Zinger 12-8 propeller. The wing section is a Spica airfoil which, because of its flat bottom, provides simplicity in manufacturing and thus helps to cut costs. The wing is constructed of a single load bearing mainspar and shape-holding ribs coated with Monokote skin, lending to a light weight structural makeup. The fuselage houses the motor, flight deck and passenger compartments as well as the fuel and control actuating systems. The wing will be attached to the top of the fuselage as will the fuel and control actuator systems for easy disassembly and maintenance. The aircraft is maneuvered about its pitch axis by means of an aft elevator on the flat plate horizontal tail. The twin vertical tail surfaces are also flat plates and each features a rudder for both directional and roll control. Along with wing dihedral, the rudders will be used to roll the aircraft. The Airplane is less costly to operate at its own maximum range and capacity as well as at its maximum range and the HB-40's maximum capacity than the HB-40.

  16. The Effect of Blunt-Trailing-Edge Modifications on the High-Speed Stability and Control Characteristics of a Swept-Wing Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoff, Melvin; Matteson, Frederick H.; Van Dyke, Rudolph D., Jr.

    1954-01-01

    An investigation was conducted on a 35 deg swept-wing fighter airplane to determine the effects of several blunt-trailing-edge modifications to the wing and tail on the high-speed stability and control characteristics and tracking performance. The results indicated significant improvement in the pitch-up characteristics for the blunt-aileron configuration at Mach numbers around 0.90. As a result of increased effectiveness of the blunt-trailing-edge aileron, the roll-off, customarily experienced with the unmodified airplane in wings-level flight between Mach numbers of about 0.9 and 1.0 was eliminated, The results also indicated that the increased effectiveness of the blunt aileron more than offset the large associated aileron hinge moment, resulting in significant improvement in the rolling performance at Mach numbers between 0.85 and 1.0. It appeared from these results that the tracking performance with the blunt-aileron configuration in the pitch-up and buffeting flight region at high Mach numbers was considerably improved over that of the unmodified airplane; however, the tracking errors of 8 to 15 mils were definitely unsatisfactory. A drag increment of about O.OOl5 due to the blunt ailerons was noted at Mach numbers to about 0.85. The drag increment was 0 at Mach numbers above 0.90.

  17. Numerical prediction of airplane trailing vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, M. J.; Crouch, J. D.; Miller, G. D.; Strelets, M.

    2004-11-01

    The accurate prediction of airplane trailing vortices is of great interest for both cruise conditions in conjunction with the formation of contrails as well as approach conditions for reasons of flight safety and active vortex control. A numerical approach is introduced based on a quasi-3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes formulation with a one-equation turbulence model. The numerical results show good agreement with wind-tunnel data out to ten spans for a range of wing and tail loadings typical of commercial airplanes in a landing configuration. The results show a one-, two- and three-pair system in the near-field with only minor changes to the initial lift distribution. The CFD correctly predicts the strength, demise and position of the individual vortex pairs over a range of test cases. The approach is further extended by considering thrust effects. For cruise conditions, far field predictions show the entrainment of the jet plume into the wake and provide the potential for coupling with a micro-physics model to predict the formation and early evolution of contrails. Potential influences of configuration details on the plume entrainment are considered. This numerical method also offers an attractive approach for assessing active schemes designed to accelerate the break-up of airplane trailing vortices.

  18. 78 FR 75511 - Special Conditions: Bombardier Inc., Models BD-500-1A10 and BD-500-1A11 Series Airplanes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... Inc., Models BD-500-1A10 and BD- 500-1A11 Series Airplanes; Electronic Flight Control System: Control... control system. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate safety... control system (EFCS) and no direct coupling from the flightdeck controller to the control surface. As...

  19. Simulator study of vortex encounters by a twin-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A simulator study of vortex encounters was conducted for a twin-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane encountering the vortex flow field of a heavy, four-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane in the final-approach configuration. The encounters were conducted with fixed controls and with a pilot using a state-of-the-art, manual-control system. Piloted encounters with the base-line vortex flow field out of ground effect (unattenuated) resulted in initial bank-angle excursions greater than 40 deg, coupled with initial sideslip-angle excursions greater than 10 deg. The severity of these initial upsets was significantly reduced when the vortex center was moved laterally or vertically away from the flight path of the encountering airplane. Smaller reductions occurred when the flow field was attenuated by the flight spoilers on the generating airplane. The largest reduction in the severity of the initial upsets, however, was from aging in ground effect. The severity of the initial upsets of the following airplane was relatively unaffected by the approach speed. Increasing the lift coefficient of the generating airplane resulted in an increase in the severity of the initial upsets.

  20. 77 FR 25644 - Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ...) that apply to all Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Model ERJ 170 and ERJ 190 airplanes... system (AMS) controller card. Since we issued those ADs, we have determined that replacing the controller... AMS controller processor module with one containing new software, and would require a new AFM...

  1. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  2. 78 FR 76249 - Special Conditions: Airbus, Model A350-900 Series Airplane; Flight Envelope Protection: Normal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... feature(s) associated with a flight control system that prevents the pilot from inadvertently or... unique in that traditional airplanes with conventional flight control systems (mechanical linkages) are... using the Airbus flight control system. Under Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR)...

  3. Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics at Transonic Speeds of a 1/30-Scale Model of the Republic XF-103 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luoma, Arvo A.

    1954-01-01

    The longitudinal stability and control characteristics of a 1/30-scale model of the Republic XF-103 airplane were investigated in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel. The effect of speed brakes located at the end of the fuselage was also investigated. The main part of the investigation was made with internal flow in the model, but some data were obtained with no internal flow. The longitudinal stability and control at transonic-speeds appeared satisfactory. The transonic drag rise was small. The speed brakes had no adverse effects on longitudinal stability.

  4. Initial results from flight testing a large, remotely piloted airplane model. [flight tests of remotely controlled scale model of F-15 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleman, E. C. (Compiler)

    1974-01-01

    The first four flights of a remotely piloted airplane model showed that a flight envelope can be expanded rapidly and that hazardous flight tests can be conducted safely with good results. The flights also showed that aerodynamic data can be obtained quickly and effectively over a wide range of flight conditions, clear and useful impressions of handling and controllability of configurations can be obtained, and present computer and electronic technology provide the capability to close flight control loops on the ground, thus providing a new method of design and flight test for advanced aircraft.

  5. A comparison of the results of dynamic wind-tunnel tests with theoretical predictions for an aeromechanical gust-alleviation system for light airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Redd, L. T.

    1977-01-01

    Dynamic wind tunnel tests have been conducted on a 1/6-scale model of a general aviation airplane equipped with an all-mechanical gust alleviation system which uses auxiliary aerodynamic surfaces to drive the flaps. The longitudinal short period motions were studied under simulated gust conditions in order to verify the mathematical model used in a previous study to predict the performance of the full scale system and determine the amount of normal acceleration alleviation which could be attained. The model responses were measured for different configurations with the system active and without the system active for comparison. The tests confirmed the general relationships between the experimental variables and the model responses predicted by the mathematical model, but there were significant differences in the magnitudes of the responses. The experimental results for the model were used to estimate a reduction of 30 percent in the rms normal acceleration response of a similar full scale airplane in atmospheric turbulence.

  6. Study of industry information requirements for flight control and navigation systems of STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorham, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Answers to specific study questions are used to ascertain the data requirements associated with a guidance, navigation and control system for a future civil STOL airplane. Results of the study were used to recommend changes for improving the outputs of the STOLAND flight experiments program.

  7. 14 CFR 25.904 - Automatic takeoff thrust control system (ATTCS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Automatic takeoff thrust control system (ATTCS). 25.904 Section 25.904 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General §...

  8. 14 CFR 25.904 - Automatic takeoff thrust control system (ATTCS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Automatic takeoff thrust control system (ATTCS). 25.904 Section 25.904 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General §...

  9. 14 CFR 25.904 - Automatic takeoff thrust control system (ATTCS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Automatic takeoff thrust control system (ATTCS). 25.904 Section 25.904 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General §...

  10. Design and Flight Tests of an Adaptive Control System Employing Normal-Acceleration Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeill, Water E.; McLean, John D.; Hegarty, Daniel M.; Heinle, Donovan R.

    1961-01-01

    An adaptive control system employing normal-acceleration command has been designed with the aid of an analog computer and has been flight tested. The design of the system was based on the concept of using a mathematical model in combination with a high gain and a limiter. The study was undertaken to investigate the application of a system of this type to the task of maintaining nearly constant dynamic longitudinal response of a piloted airplane over the flight envelope without relying on air data measurements for gain adjustment. The range of flight conditions investigated was between Mach numbers of 0.36 and 1.15 and altitudes of 10,000 and 40,000 feet. The final adaptive system configuration was derived from analog computer tests, in which the physical airplane control system and much of the control circuitry were included in the loop. The method employed to generate the feedback signals resulted in a model whose characteristics varied somewhat with changes in flight condition. Flight results showed that the system limited the variation in longitudinal natural frequency of the adaptive airplane to about half that of the basic airplane and that, for the subsonic cases, the damping ratio was maintained between 0.56 and 0.69. The system also automatically compensated for the transonic trim change. Objectionable features of the system were an exaggerated sensitivity of pitch attitude to gust disturbances, abnormally large pitch attitude response for a given pilot input at low speeds, and an initial delay in normal-acceleration response to pilot control at all flight conditions. The adaptive system chatter of +/-0.05 to +/-0.10 of elevon at about 9 cycles per second (resulting in a maximum airplane normal-acceleration response of from +/-0.025 g to +/- 0.035 g) was considered by the pilots to be mildly objectionable but tolerable.

  11. 75 FR 10701 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited Model BAe 146 Airplanes and Model Avro...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... certain items and inspections to detect fatigue cracking in certain structures. The original NPRM proposed... inspections to detect fatigue cracking in certain structures. The original NPRM resulted from issuance of a... Control Limitations for the fuel system. We are proposing this supplemental NPRM to ensure that...

  12. 78 FR 63848 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplanes; Sidestick Controllers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... special conditions has been subject to the public comment process in several prior instances with no... features of the sidesstick controller must be demonstrated through flight and simulator tests to...

  13. Ground effects and control effectiveness tests of a .095 scale powered model of a modified T-39 lift/cruise fan V/STOL research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, C. R.; Omar, E.

    1977-01-01

    Wind tunnel test data are analysed to determine ground effects and the effectiveness of the aerodynamic control surfaces to provide a technology base for a Navy type A V/STOL airplane. Three 14CM (5.5 inch) turbopowered simulators were used to power the model which was tested primarily in the following configurations: (1) VTOL with flaps deployed, gear down, and engines tilted to 80 deg, 90 deg, and 95 deg, (2) STOL with flap and gear down and engines tilted to 50 deg; and (3) Loiter with flaps and gear up and L/C nacelles off. Data acquired during the tests are included as an appendix.

  14. Determination of stability and control parameters of a light airplane from flight data using two estimation methods. [equation error and maximum likelihood methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.

    1979-01-01

    Two identification methods, the equation error method and the output error method, are used to estimate stability and control parameter values from flight data for a low-wing, single-engine, general aviation airplane. The estimated parameters from both methods are in very good agreement primarily because of sufficient accuracy of measured data. The estimated static parameters also agree with the results from steady flights. The effect of power different input forms are demonstrated. Examination of all results available gives the best values of estimated parameters and specifies their accuracies.

  15. OPTIMUM SYSTEMS CONTROL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Variational calculus and continuous optimal control, (4) The maximum principle and Hamilton Jacobi theory, (5) Optimum systems control examples, (6...Discrete variational calculus and the discrete maximum principle, (7) Optimum control of distributed parameter systems, (8) Optimum state estimation in

  16. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G [Tijeras, NM; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  17. Design of a multilevel Active Power Filter for More Electrical Airplane variable frequency systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Joel Filipe; Pomilio, Jose Antenor; Busarello, Tiago Davi Curi

    This paper presents the design and simulation of an Aeronautical Active Power Filter (AAPF) for a Variable Speed Variable Frequency (VSVF) advanced aircraft electric power system. The purposes of the AAPF are to mitigate current harmonics, to improve the source power factor and to mitigate the effects of unbalanced loads. Regarding the fact that the Aircraft Electrical Power System (AEPS) frequency may vary between 360 Hz and 900 Hz, and the load dynamics is often modified, an enhanced filtering technique is required. The designed AAPF topology is an asymmetrical multilevel inverter (AMI), which control strategy is based on the Conservative Power Theory (CPT) and synchronized by a Kalman Filter Phase-Locked Loop (KF-PLL). The above configuration renders the AAPF very robust and effective to its purpose. Accurate simulation results on Matlab/Simulink platform verify the feasibility of the proposed AAPF and the high performance of the control strategy during steady-state and dynamic operations.

  18. Multivariable Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-01-01

    one). Examples abound of systems with numerous controlled variables, and the modern tendency is toward ever greater utilization of systems and plants of this kind. We call them multivariable control systems (MCS).

  19. Stability and control of a supersonic transport airplane during landing approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehman, W. I.

    1983-01-01

    Modal control theory was applied to determine feedback gains that provide desirable stability characteristics and satisfactory transient response to aileron deflection input. However, the peak value of lateral acceleration at the pilot's station does not satisfy a proposed criterion during a rolling maneuver. Optimal regulator theory does not provide a significant reduction of the peak lateral acceleration. The weighting matrices in the performance index were given an extreme variation, but the effect on lateral acceleration remained insignificant. Open loop control provided the desired bank angle (30 deg) with the desired roll rate (10 deg/sec), and provided a satisfactory level of lateral acceleration. However, a large adverse sideslip angle was required. In addition, the yawing velocity was negative for about two seconds and lateral acceleration changed sign during the maneuver. The problem persists and perhaps relaxed criteria must be proposed. The criteria could allow any combination of a lower average rolling velocity, a larger adverse sideslip angle excursion, and a higher peak lateral acceleration at the pilot's station.

  20. Ground Simulator Studies of the Effects of Valve Friction, Stick Friction, Flexibility, and Backwash on Power Control System Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, B Porter

    1958-01-01

    Report presents results of tests made on a power control system by means of a ground simulator to determine the effects of various combinations of valve friction and stick friction on the ability of the pilot to control the system. Various friction conditions were simulated with a rigid control system, a flexible system, and a rigid system having some backlash. For the tests, the period and damping of the simulated airplane were held constant.

  1. 78 FR 46306 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... system reviews conducted by the airplane manufacturer. This proposed AD would require removing bulb type... AD requires removal of bulb type maintenance lights for all aeroplanes, installation of the...

  2. Design aspects of long range supersonic LFC airplanes with highly swept wings. [laminar flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, W.; Vemuru, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    Studies on supersonic long-range LFC (laminar flow control) aircraft were performed with the aim of maximizing L/D and alleviating sonic boom during supersonic cruise. It is found that configurations with highly swept LFC wings of very high structural aspect ratio, with the sweep increasing toward the wing root and braced externally by wide chord laminarized struts, appear especially promising. In the supersonic cruise design condition the wing upper surface isobars are swept such that the flow in the direction normal to them is transonic with embedded supersonic zones and practically shock-free over most of the span, with M-perpendicular equal to the two-dimensional design values of advanced SC LFC airfoils, e.g., of the X-787 or X-6 type.

  3. 78 FR 67291 - Special Conditions: Bombardier Inc., Models BD-500-1A10 and BD-500-1A11 Series Airplanes; Design...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... design feature associated with an electronic flight control system that provides roll control of the... requirement, Sec. 25.349, to take into account the effects of an electronic flight control system. ] Type... design features: The airplanes are equipped with an electronic flight control system that...

  4. A unique formulation of elastic airplane longitudinal equations of motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaim, R. L.; Fullman, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    Control-configured vehicle technology has increased the demand for detailed analysis of dynamic stability and control, handling and ride qualities, and control system dynamics at early stages of preliminary design. An approximate, but reasonably accurate, set of equations of motion are needed for these early analyses. Such a formulation is developed for the longitudinal dynamics of elastic airplanes. It makes use of only rigid-body aerodynamic stability derivatives in formulating the forces and moments due to elastic motion. Verification of accuracy using data for the B-1 airplane shows very good agreement. Frequencies and damping ratios of the coupled modes corresponding to complex roots of the characteristic equations agree closely with four symmetric elastic modes included.

  5. A Comparison of Two Flight-Test Procedures for the Determination of Aileron Control Capabilities of an Airplane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-07-01

    roceduraa conelet of perform~ng ru&der- fixed aileron rolls from ~traight unbanked flight and from steady turning fllght; For the airplaneE considered in...aileron rolls . .initiated from straight unbanked flight, Tho resultg of these tebts are usually presented In a curve. of .maxlmum pb/2V as a function...between flight determinationsof maximum pb/2V in rudder-fixedaileron roll~ from straight, unbanked flight and from steady~ turning flight. Clean

  6. Analytical study of ride smoothing benefits of control system configurations optimized for pilot handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to evaluate the relative improvements in aircraft ride qualities that resulted from utilizing several control law configurations that were optimized for pilot handling qualities only. The airplane configuration used was an executive jet transport in the approach configuration. The control law configurations included the basic system, a rate feedback system, three command augmentation systems (rate command, attitude command, and rate command/attitude hold), and a control wheel steering system. Both the longitudinal and lateral directional axes were evaluated. A representative example of each control law configuration was optimized for pilot handling qualities on a fixed base simulator. The root mean square airplane responses to turbulence were calculated, and predictions of ride quality ratings were computed by using three models available in the literature.

  7. 77 FR 60296 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... lack of oxygen in the body), and consequent loss of control of the airplane. DATES: This AD is... incapacitation of the flightcrew due to hypoxia (a lack of oxygen in the body), and consequent loss of control of... oxygen in the body), and consequent loss of control of the airplane. (f) Compliance Comply with this...

  8. 78 FR 4051 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... requires replacing the control switches of the forward, aft, and nose cargo doors of Model 747 airplanes; and requires replacing the control switches of cargo doors 1 and 2 of Model 757 series airplanes. This... continue to require replacing the control switches of the forward, aft, and nose cargo doors of Model...

  9. Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the McDonnell XP-85 Airplane While Attached to the Trapeze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L.

    1947-01-01

    At the request of the Air Materiel Command, Army Air Forces, an investigation of the low-speed, power-off, stability and control characteristics of the McDonnell XP-85 airplane has been conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The results of the portion of the investigation consisting of tests of a 1/10-scale model to study the stability of the XP-85 when attached to the trapeze and during retraction into the B-36 bomb bay are presented herein. In the power-off condition the stability was satisfactory with all oscillations well damped and the nose-restraining collar could be placed in position without difficulty. In a simulated power-on condition the model had a constant-amplitude rolling and sidewise motion and when the collar was layered, a violent motion resulted if the collar struck the model but failed to hold it in the proper manner. Folding of the wings and retraction into the bomb bay offered no problem once the airplane was properly held by the collar. It is recommended that the power be cut immediately after hooking on and that a restricting mechanism be incorporated in the center of the trapeze to eliminate the sidewise motion. It also appears desirable to have the retracting procedure controlled by the XP-85 pilot or an observer in the mother ship to insure that the parasite is in proper position after hooking up before bringing the collar down.

  10. Design, analysis, and control of a large transport aircraft utilizing selective engine thrust as a backup system for the primary flight control. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerren, Donna S.

    1995-01-01

    A study has been conducted to determine the capability to control a very large transport airplane with engine thrust. This study consisted of the design of an 800-passenger airplane with a range of 5000 nautical miles design and evaluation of a flight control system, and design and piloted simulation evaluation of a thrust-only backup flight control system. Location of the four wing-mounted engines was varied to optimize the propulsive control capability, and the time constant of the engine response was studied. The goal was to provide level 1 flying qualities. The engine location and engine time constant did not have a large effect on the control capability. The airplane design did meet level 1 flying qualities based on frequencies, damping ratios, and time constants in the longitudinal and lateral-directional modes. Project pilots consistently rated the flying qualities as either level 1 or level 2 based on Cooper-Harper ratings. However, because of the limited control forces and moments, the airplane design fell short of meeting the time required to achieve a 30 deg bank and the time required to respond a control input.

  11. Modelling and simulation of fuel cell dynamics for electrical energy usage of Hercules airplanes.

    PubMed

    Radmanesh, Hamid; Heidari Yazdi, Seyed Saeid; Gharehpetian, G B; Fathi, S H

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) with hydrogen storage system for generating part of Hercules airplanes electrical energy is presented. Feasibility of using fuel cell (FC) for this airplane is evaluated by means of simulations. Temperature change and dual layer capacity effect are considered in all simulations. Using a three-level 3-phase inverter, FC's output voltage is connected to the essential bus of the airplane. Moreover, it is possible to connect FC's output voltage to airplane DC bus alternatively. PID controller is presented to control flow of hydrogen and oxygen to FC and improve transient and steady state responses of the output voltage to load disturbances. FC's output voltage is regulated via an ultracapacitor. Simulations are carried out via MATLAB/SIMULINK and results show that the load tracking and output voltage regulation are acceptable. The proposed system utilizes an electrolyser to generate hydrogen and a tank for storage. Therefore, there is no need for batteries. Moreover, the generated oxygen could be used in other applications in airplane.

  12. Modelling and Simulation of Fuel Cell Dynamics for Electrical Energy Usage of Hercules Airplanes

    PubMed Central

    Radmanesh, Hamid; Heidari Yazdi, Seyed Saeid; Gharehpetian, G. B.; Fathi, S. H.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) with hydrogen storage system for generating part of Hercules airplanes electrical energy is presented. Feasibility of using fuel cell (FC) for this airplane is evaluated by means of simulations. Temperature change and dual layer capacity effect are considered in all simulations. Using a three-level 3-phase inverter, FC's output voltage is connected to the essential bus of the airplane. Moreover, it is possible to connect FC's output voltage to airplane DC bus alternatively. PID controller is presented to control flow of hydrogen and oxygen to FC and improve transient and steady state responses of the output voltage to load disturbances. FC's output voltage is regulated via an ultracapacitor. Simulations are carried out via MATLAB/SIMULINK and results show that the load tracking and output voltage regulation are acceptable. The proposed system utilizes an electrolyser to generate hydrogen and a tank for storage. Therefore, there is no need for batteries. Moreover, the generated oxygen could be used in other applications in airplane. PMID:24782664

  13. 78 FR 68985 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 777-200, -300, and -300ER Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... maintenance of the airplane. The existing regulations and guidance material did not anticipate these types of... Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic System Security Protection From Unauthorized Internal Access AGENCY... conditions are issued for the Boeing Model 777- 200, -300, and -300ER series airplanes. These airplanes,...

  14. AFTI/F-111 MAW flight control system and redundancy management description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Richard R.

    1987-01-01

    The wing on the NASA F-111 transonic aircraft technology (TACT) airplane was modified to provide flexible leading and trailing edge flaps; this modified wing is known as the mission adaptive wing (MAW). A dual digital primary fly-by-wire flight control system was developed with analog backup reversion for redundancy. This report discusses the functions, design, and redundancy management of the flight control system for these flaps.

  15. Development and flight test results of an autothrottle control system at Mach 3 cruise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, G. B.; Burken, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    Flight test results obtained with the original Mach hold autopilot designed the YF-12C airplane which uses elevator control and a newly developed Mach hold system having an autothrottle integrated with an altitude hold autopilot system are presented. The autothrottle tests demonstrate good speed control at high Mach numbers and high altitudes while simultaneously maintaining control over altitude and good ride qualities. The autothrottle system was designed to control either Mach number or knots equivalent airspeed (KEAS). Excellent control of Mach number or KEAS was obtained with the autothrottle system when combined with altitude hold. Ride qualities were significantly better than with the conventional Mach hold system.

  16. Comparison of flight results with digital simulation for a digital electronic engine control in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. P.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Substantial benefits of a full authority digital electronic engine control on an air breathing engine were demonstrated repeatedly in simulation studies, ground engine tests, and engine altitude test facilities. A digital engine electronic control system showed improvements in efficiency, performance, and operation. An additional benefit of full authority digital controls is the capability of detecting and correcting failures and providing engine health diagnostics.

  17. Implementation of an Adaptive Controller System from Concept to Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Richard R.; Burken, John J.; Butler, Bradley S.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) is conducting ongoing flight research using adaptive controller algorithms. A highly modified McDonnell-Douglas NF-15B airplane called the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) was used for these algorithms. This airplane has been modified by the addition of canards and by changing the flight control systems to interface a single-string research controller processor for neural network algorithms. Research goals included demonstration of revolutionary control approaches that can efficiently optimize aircraft performance for both normal and failure conditions, and to advance neural-network-based flight control technology for new aerospace systems designs. Before the NF-15B IFCS airplane was certified for flight test, however, certain processes needed to be completed. This paper presents an overview of these processes, including a description of the initial adaptive controller concepts followed by a discussion of modeling formulation and performance testing. Upon design finalization, the next steps are: integration with the system interfaces, verification of the software, validation of the hardware to the requirements, design of failure detection, development of safety limiters to minimize the effect of erroneous neural network commands, and creation of flight test control room displays to maximize human situational awareness.

  18. 14 CFR Appendix B to Part 121 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane Flight Recorder Specification B... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Pt. 121, App. B Appendix B to Part 121—Airplane... airplanes that can demonstrate the capability of deriving either the control input on control movement...

  19. 77 FR 38467 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP), Model Gulfstream G280 Airplane; Isolation or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... information services, than previous GALP airplane models. This may allow the exploitation of network security... Gulfstream G280 Airplane; Isolation or Aircraft Electronic System Security Protection From Unauthorized... connectivity of the passenger service computer systems to the airplane critical systems and data networks....

  20. Trade Study of Multiple Thruster Options for the Mars Airplane Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Christopher A.; Gayle, Steven W.; Hunter, Craig A.; Kenney, Patrick S.; Scola, Salvatore; Paddock, David A.; Wright, Henry S.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    A trade study was performed at NASA Langley Research Center under the Planetary Airplane Risk Reduction (PARR) project (2004-2005) to examine the option of using multiple, smaller thrusters in place of a single large thruster on the Mars airplane concept with the goal to reduce overall cost, schedule, and technical risk. The 5-lbf (22N) thruster is a common reaction control thruster on many satellites. Thousands of these types of thrusters have been built and flown on numerous programs, including MILSTAR and Intelsat VI. This study has examined the use of three 22N thrusters for the Mars airplane propulsion system and compared the results to those of the baseline single thruster system.

  1. Experimental investigation of an accelerometer controlled automatic braking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.; Sleeper, R. K.; Nayadley, J. R., Sr.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the feasibility of an automatic braking system for arresting the motion of an airplane by sensing and controlling braked wheel decelerations. The system was tested on a rotating drum dynamometer by using an automotive tire, wheel, and disk-brake assembly under conditions which included two tire loadings, wet and dry surfaces, and a range of ground speeds up to 70 knots. The controlling parameters were the rates at which brake pressure was applied and released and the Command Deceleration Level which governed the wheel deceleration by controlling the brake operation. Limited tests were also made with the automatic braking system installed on a ground vehicle in an effort to provide a more realistic proof of its feasibility. The results of this investigation indicate that a braking system which utilizes wheel decelerations as the control variable to restrict tire slip is feasible and capable of adapting to rapidly changing surface conditions.

  2. 77 FR 25642 - Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier, Inc. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... control of the airplane on the ground, or a jammed nose landing gear (NLG) door that could prevent the NLG... landing gear (NLG) door that could prevent the NLG from retracting or extending. This directive mandates... directional control of the airplane on the ground, or a jammed nose landing gear (NLG) door that could...

  3. Mechanization of and experience with a triplex fly-by-wire backup control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, W. P.; Petersen, W. R.; Whitman, G. B.

    1975-01-01

    A redundant three-axis analog control system was designed and developed to back up a digital fly-by-wire control system for an F-8C airplane. Forty-two flights, involving 58 hours of flight time, were flown by six pilots. The mechanization and operational experience with the backup control system, the problems involved in synchronizing it with the primary system, and the reliability of the system are discussed. The backup control system was dissimilar to the primary system, and it provided satisfactory handling through the flight envelope evaluated. Limited flight tests of a variety of control tasks showed that control was also satisfactory when the backup control system was controlled by a minimum-displacement (force) side stick. The operational reliability of the F-8 digital fly-by-wire control system was satisfactory, with no unintentional downmodes to the backup control system in flight. The ground and flight reliability of the system's components is discussed.

  4. Mechanization of and experience with a triplex fly-by-wire backup control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, W. P.; Petersen, W. R.; Whitman, G. B.

    1976-01-01

    A redundant three axis analog control system was designed and developed to back up a digital fly by wire control system for an F-8C airplane. The mechanization and operational experience with the backup control system, the problems involved in synchronizing it with the primary system, and the reliability of the system are discussed. The backup control system was dissimilar to the primary system, and it provided satisfactory handling through the flight envelope evaluated. Limited flight tests of a variety of control tasks showed that control was also satisfactory when the backup control system was controlled by a minimum displacement (force) side stick. The operational reliability of the F-8 digital fly by wire control system was satisfactory, with no unintentional downmodes to the backup control system in flight. The ground and flight reliability of the system's components is discussed.

  5. 14 CFR Appendix E to Part 91 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... range. 4 This column applies to aircraft manufactured after October 11, 1991. 5 For Pitch Control... Appendix E to Part 91—Airplane Flight Recorder Specifications Parameters Range Installed system 1 minimum... where peaks, ref. to 1g are recorded) 0.03g. Longitudinal Acceleration ±1.0g ±1.5% max. range...

  6. Boiler control systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.

    2005-07-01

    The book provides in-depth coverage on how to safely and reliably control the firing of a boiler. Regardless of the capacity or fuel, certain fundamental control systems are required for boiler control. Large utility systems are more complex due to the number of burners and the overall capacity and equipment. This book covers engineering details on control systems and provides specific examples of boiler control including configuration and tuning. References to requirements are based on the 2004 NFPA 85 along with other ISA standards. Detailed chapters cover: Boiler fundamentals including piping and instrument diagrams (P&IDs) and a design basis checklist; Control of boilers, from strategies and bumpless transfer to interlock circuitry and final control elements; Furnace draft; Feedwater; Coal-fired boilers; Fuel and air control; Steam temperature; Burner management systems; Environment; and Control valve sizing. 2 apps.

  7. Digital Optical Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, David H.; Tipton, Charles A.; Christmann, Charles E.; Hochhausler, Nils P.

    1988-09-01

    We describe the digital optical control system (DOGS), a state-of-the-art controller for electrical feedback in an optical system. The need for a versatile optical controller arose from a number of unique experiments being performed by the Air Force Weapons Laboratory. These experiments use similar detectors and actuator-controlled mirrors, but the control requirements vary greatly. The experiments have in common a requirement for parallel control systems. The DOGS satisfies these needs by allowing several control systems to occupy a single chassis with one master controller. The architecture was designed to allow upward compatibility with future configurations. Combinations of off-the-shelf and custom boards are configured to meet the requirements of each experiment. The configuration described here was used to control piston error to X/80 at a wavelength of 0.51 Am. A peak sample rate of 8 kHz, yielding a closed loop bandwidth of 800 Hz, was achieved.

  8. 77 FR 7007 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... airplanes; Model A330-300 series airplanes, Model A340-200 series airplanes; Model A340-300 series airplanes; Model A340-541 airplanes; and Model A340-642 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports...

  9. Intelligent flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of flight control systems can be enhanced by designing them to emulate functions of natural intelligence. Intelligent control functions fall in three categories. Declarative actions involve decision-making, providing models for system monitoring, goal planning, and system/scenario identification. Procedural actions concern skilled behavior and have parallels in guidance, navigation, and adaptation. Reflexive actions are spontaneous, inner-loop responses for control and estimation. Intelligent flight control systems learn knowledge of the aircraft and its mission and adapt to changes in the flight environment. Cognitive models form an efficient basis for integrating 'outer-loop/inner-loop' control functions and for developing robust parallel-processing algorithms.

  10. Rapid Airplane Parametric Input Design (RAPID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    RAPID is a methodology and software system to define a class of airplane configurations and directly evaluate surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity on and about the configurations. A distinguishing characteristic which separates RAPID from other airplane surface modellers is that the output grids and grid sensitivity are directly applicable in CFD analysis. A small set of design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process which is incorporated into interactive software for 'real time' visual analysis and into batch software for the application of optimization technology. The computed surface grids and volume grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, horizontal tail, and vertical tail components. The double-delta wing and tail components are manifested by solving a fourth order partial differential equation (PDE) subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design parameters are incorporated into the boundary conditions and therefore govern the shapes of the surfaces. The PDE solution yields a smooth transition between boundaries. Surface grids suitable for CFD calculation are created by establishing an H-type topology about the configuration and incorporating grid spacing functions in the PDE equation for the lifting components and the fuselage definition equations. User specified grid parameters govern the location and degree of grid concentration. A two-block volume grid about a configuration is calculated using the Control Point Form (CPF) technique. The interactive software, which runs on Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations, allows design parameters to be continuously varied and the resulting surface grid to be observed in real time. The batch software computes both the surface and volume grids and also computes the sensitivity of the output grid with respect to the input design parameters by applying the precompiler tool

  11. Intermittent Control Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Thomas L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The technique of intermittent control systems for air quality control as developed and used by the Tennessee Valley Authority is investigated. Although controversial, all Tennessee Valley Authority sulfur dioxide elimination programs are scheduled to be operational this year. Existing or anticipated intermittent control systems are identified. (BT)

  12. Linearized aerodynamic and control law models of the X-29A airplane and comparison with flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Flight control system design and analysis for aircraft rely on mathematical models of the vehicle dynamics. In addition to a six degree of freedom nonlinear simulation, the X-29A flight controls group developed a set of programs that calculate linear perturbation models throughout the X-29A flight envelope. The models include the aerodynamics as well as flight control system dynamics and were used for stability, controllability, and handling qualities analysis. These linear models were compared to flight test results to help provide a safe flight envelope expansion. A description is given of the linear models at three flight conditions and two flight control system modes. The models are presented with a level of detail that would allow the reader to reproduce the linear results if desired. Comparison between the response of the linear model and flight measured responses are presented to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of the linear models' ability to predict flight dynamics.

  13. Structured Robust Loop shaping control for HIMAT System Using PSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitwanidvilai, Somyot; Jangwanitlert, Anuwat; Parnichkun, Manukid

    2009-01-01

    Robust loop shaping control is a feasible method for designing a robust controller; however, the controller designed by this method is complicated and difficult to implement practically. To overcome this problem, in this paper, a new design technique of a fixed-structure robust loop shaping controller for a highly maneuverable airplane, HIMAT, is proposed. The performance and robust stability conditions of the designed system satisfying H∞ loop shaping control are formulated as the objective function in the optimization problem. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) technique is adopted to solve this problem and to achieve the control parameters of the proposed controller. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach is numerically efficient and leads to performance comparable to that of the other method.

  14. 78 FR 75451 - Special Conditions: Cessna Model 750 Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic System Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... systems and networks. Connectivity to, or access by, external systems and networks may result in security... configuration may allow the exploitation of network security vulnerabilities resulting in intentional or...; Aircraft Electronic System Security Protection From Unauthorized External Access AGENCY: Federal...

  15. The Airplane Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Lee; Grant, Roderick

    1991-01-01

    Presents an experiment to investigate centripetal force and acceleration that utilizes an airplane suspended on a string from a spring balance. Investigates the possibility that lift on the wings of the airplane accounts for the differences between calculated tension and measured tension on the string. (MDH)

  16. Integrated blending control system

    SciTech Connect

    Cogbill, R.B.; Dodd, T.J.; Heilman, P.W.; Heronemus, D.L.; Sears, L.R.; Berryman, L.N.; Baker, R.L.; Guffee, L.E.; Prucha, D.A.; Roberts, D.M.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes a proppant control system. It comprises: storage bin means for storing particulate material; surge bin means for receiving a flow of the particulate material from the storage bin means; first conveyor means for providing a flow of particulate material to the surge bin means from the storage bin means; second conveyor means for transferring a controllable quantity of the particulate material from the surge bin means; and proppant control means. The control means include: first speed control means for remotely controlling the speed of the first conveyor means; and second speed control means for remotely controlling the speed of the second conveyor means.

  17. 76 FR 41041 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G250 Airplane, Interaction of Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... automatic systems may be inoperative or may operate in a degraded mode with less than full- system authority... have failure modes that allow the system to function in a degraded mode without full authority. These degraded modes are not readily detectable by the flightcrew, therefore monitoring systems are required...

  18. Intelligent Control Systems Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loparo, Kenneth A.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a three phase research program into intelligent control systems are presented. The first phase looked at implementing the lowest or direct level of a hierarchical control scheme using a reinforcement learning approach assuming no a priori information about the system under control. The second phase involved the design of an adaptive/optimizing level of the hierarchy and its interaction with the direct control level. The third and final phase of the research was aimed at combining the results of the previous phases with some a priori information about the controlled system.

  19. Control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Xinsheng, Lou

    2013-02-12

    A system for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input parameter (270) and an output for outputting an output parameter (280), a control system operably connected to the chemical loop and having a multiple controller part (230) comprising a model-free controller. The control system receives the output parameter (280), optimizes the input parameter (270) based on the received output parameter (280), and outputs an optimized input parameter (270) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  20. Modeling of airplane performance from flight-test results and validation with an F-104G airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. T.; Schweikhard, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    A technique of defining an accurate performance model of an airplane from limited flight-test data and predicted aerodynamic and propulsion system characteristics is developed. With the modeling technique, flight-test data from level accelerations are used to define a 1g performance model for the entire flight envelope of an F-104G airplane. The performance model is defined in terms of the thrust and drag of the airplane and can be varied with changes in ambient temperature or airplane weight. The model predicts the performance of the airplane within 5 percent of the measured flight-test data. The modeling technique could substantially reduce the time required for performance flight testing and produce a clear definition of the thrust and drag characteristics of an airplane.

  1. Investigation of the Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/20-Scale Model of the Consolidated Vultee XB-53 Airplane in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles V.

    1947-01-01

    An investigation of the low-speed, power-off stability and control characteristics of a 1/20-scale model of the Consolidated Vultee XB-53 airplane has been conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. In the investigation it was found that with flaps neutral satisfactory flight behavior at low speeds was obtainable with an increase in height of the vertical tail and with the inboard slats opened. In the flap-down slat-open condition the longitudinal stability was satisfactory, but it was impossible to obtain satisfactory lateral-flight characteristics even with the increase in height of the vertical tail because of the negative effective dihedral, low directional stability, and large-adverse yawing moments of the ailerons.

  2. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 135 - Airplane Flight Recorder Specification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane Flight Recorder Specification D.... D Appendix D to Part 135—Airplane Flight Recorder Specification Parameters Range Accuracy sensor.... 3 For airplanes that can demonstrate the capability of deriving either the control input on...

  3. 77 FR 52201 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... installing Aero-Engine database (AEDB) software in the airplane information management system (AIMS) hardware... 3110-BCG-00R-06, media set part number 243W0033-7, in the airplane information management system... Management, P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; phone: 206-544-5000, extension 1;...

  4. 77 FR 36206 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ..., -200LR, -300, and -300ER series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of in-service events related to electrical power system malfunctions resulting in damage to electrical load management system... Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management, P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65,...

  5. 78 FR 23110 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ..., -300ER, and 777F series airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report that during a test of the oxygen system, an operator found that the passenger oxygen masks did not properly flow oxygen, and that a loud... inspection of certain areas of the airplane oxygen system to ensure clamshell couplers are installed...

  6. Design definition study of a lift/cruise fan technology V/STOL airplane: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabinsky, J. M.; Higgins, H. C.

    1975-01-01

    A two-engine three-fan V/STOL airplane was designed to fulfill naval operational requirements. A multimission airplane was developed from study of specific point designs. Based on the multimission concept, airplanes were designed to demonstrate and develop the technology and operational procedures for this class of aircraft. Use of interconnected variable pitch fans led to a good balance between high thrust with responsive control and efficient thrust at cruise speeds. The airplanes and their characteristics are presented.

  7. Free-Flight-Tunnel Investigation of the Dynamic Stability and Control Characteristics of a Chance Vought F7U-3 Airplane in Towed Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, David C.; Shanks, Robert E.

    1952-01-01

    As part of a program to determine the feasibility of using a fighter airplane as a parasite in combination with a Consolidated Vultee RB-36 for long-range reconnaissance missions (project FICON), an experimental investigation has been made in the Langley free-flight tunnel to determine the dynamic stability and control characteristics of a 1/17.5-scale model of a Chance Vought F7U-3 airplane in several tow configurations. The investigation consisted of flight tests in which the model was towed from a strut in the tunnel by a towline and by a direct coupling which provided complete angular freedom. The tests with the direct coupling also included a study of the effect of spring restraint in roll in order to simulate approximately the proposed full-scale arrangement in which the only freedom is that permitted by the flexibility of the launching and retrieving trapeze carried by the-bomber. For the tow configurations in which a towline was used (15 and 38 feet full scale), the model had a very unstable lateral oscillation which could not be controlled. The stability was also unsatisfactory for the tow configuration in Which the model was coupled directly to the strut with complete angular freedom. When spring restraint in roll was added, however, the stability was satisfactory. The use of the yaw damper which increased the damping in yaw to about six times the normal value of the model appeared to have no appreciable effect on the lateral oscillations in the towline configurations, but produced a slight improvement in the case of the direct coupling configurations. The longitudinal stability was satisfactory for those cases in which the lateral stability was good enough to permit study of longitudinal motions.

  8. A Comparison of the Lateral Motion Calculated for Tailless and Conventional Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Charles W.; Jones, Arthur L.

    1947-01-01

    Theoretical analysts of lateral dynamic motion of tailless and conventional airplanes was made for fighter and heavy transport. Their reactions to a lateral gust and control power required by each for simple maneuvers were determined and compared. Both types of airplanes require almost identical aileron control power to perform a given maneuver; tailless airplane requires about 1-2 to 1-3 directional control power of conventional airplane. Tailless airplane also shows greatest displacement for a given disturbance and has least damping in oscillatory mode.

  9. 76 FR 64788 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited Model 4101 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ...-176-AD; Amendment 39-16829; AD 2011-21-06] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS... condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as: * * * BAE Systems (Operations... operators to comply with those instructions. Since the issuance of that AD, BAE Systems (Operations) Ltd...

  10. Landing performance of an air cushion landing system installed on a 1/10-scale dynamic model on the C-8 Buffalo airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the landing behavior of a 1/10-scale dynamic model of the C-8 Buffalo airplane equipped with an air-cushion landing system (ACLS) on a variety of surfaces including both calm and rough water and a smooth hard surface. Taxi runs were made on the hard surface over several obstacles. Landings were made with the model at various pitch and roll attitudes and vertical velocities and at one nominal horizontal velocity. Data from the landings include time histories of the trunk and air-cushion pressures and accelerations at selected locations on the model.

  11. Control system design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Bourassa, Norman; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-05-01

    The ''Control System Design Guide'' (Design Guide) provides methods and recommendations for the control system design process and control point selection and installation. Control systems are often the most problematic system in a building. A good design process that takes into account maintenance, operation, and commissioning can lead to a smoothly operating and efficient building. To this end, the Design Guide provides a toolbox of templates for improving control system design and specification. HVAC designers are the primary audience for the Design Guide. The control design process it presents will help produce well-designed control systems that achieve efficient and robust operation. The spreadsheet examples for control valve schedules, damper schedules, and points lists can streamline the use of the control system design concepts set forth in the Design Guide by providing convenient starting points from which designers can build. Although each reader brings their own unique questions to the text, the Design Guide contains information that designers, commissioning providers, operators, and owners will find useful.

  12. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  13. Cockpit control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesnewski, David; Snow, Russ M.; Paufler, Dave; Schnieder, George; Athousake, Roxanne; Combs, Lisa

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a detail design for the cockpit control system of the Viper PFT. The statement of work for this project requires provisions for control of the ailerons, elevator, rudder, and elevator trim. The system should provide adjustment for pilot stature, rigging, and maintenance. MIL-STD-1472 is used as a model for human factors criterion. The system is designed to the pilot limit loading outlined in FAR part 23.397. The general philosophy behind this design is to provide a simple, reliable control system which will withstand the daily abuse that is experienced in the training environment without excessive cost or weight penalties.

  14. 76 FR 19716 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited Model 4101 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS...: * * * BAE Systems (Operations) Ltd has issued Revision 33 of the AMM to amend Chapter 05-10-10 by adding one..., except Federal holidays. For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact BAE...

  15. 76 FR 36865 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ...; Interaction of Systems and Structures AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... already established for this evaluation. These criteria are only applicable to structure whose failure... as gusts or pilot actions, or lower flutter margins). B. Effects of Systems on Structures 1....

  16. 76 FR 8316 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ...; Interaction of Systems and Structures AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... are only applicable to structure whose failure could prevent continued safe flight and landing... flutter margins). B. Effects of Systems on Structures 1. General. The following criteria will be used...

  17. Control system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittler, W. H.; Collart, R. E.

    1984-08-01

    A three stage process of ground testing of the Space Telescope Pointing Control System is used for verification prior to on-orbit operation. First, development tests are conducted in a laboratory environment using flight/engineering model control sensor and actuators configured with an engineering model of the flight computer and data management system breadboards. These development tests validate the results of computer simulations predicting control system performance. Integration tests bring together flight system elements and software interfaced to a software simulation of vehicle dynamics to confirm closed loop performance. The final ground test phase, flight systems testing, is conducted on the fully assembled Space Telescope, verifies interfaces with the Fine Guidance Sensors and includes a thermal vacuum testing period. During the final test phase, the Point Control System is exercised with the dynamics simulator running in real time.

  18. Drone Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Drones, subscale vehicles like the Firebees, and full scale retired military aircraft are used to test air defense missile systems. The DFCS (Drone Formation Control System) computer, developed by IBM (International Business Machines) Federal Systems Division, can track ten drones at once. A program called ORACLS is used to generate software to track and control Drones. It was originally developed by Langley and supplied by COSMIC (Computer Software Management and Information Center). The program saved the company both time and money.

  19. Limits of localized control in extended nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, Andreas

    We investigate the limits of localized linear control in spatially extended, nonlinear systems. Spatially extended, nonlinear systems can be found in virtually every field of engineering and science. An important category of such systems are fluid flows. Fluid flows play an important role in many commercial applications, for instance in the chemical, pharmaceutical and food-processing industries. Other important fluid flows include air- or water flows around cars, planes or ships. In all these systems, it is highly desirable to control the flow of the respective fluid. For instance control of the air flow around an airplane or car leads to better fuel-economy and reduced noise production. Usually, it is impossible to apply control everywhere. Consider an airplane: It would not be feasibly to cover the whole body of the plane with control units. Instead, one can place the control units at localized regions, such as points along the edge of the wings, spaced as far apart from each other as possible. These considerations lead to an important question: For a given system, what is the minimum number of localized controllers that still ensures successful control? Too few controllers will not achieve control, while using too many leads to unnecessary expenses and wastes resources. To answer this question, we study localized control in a class of model equations. These model equations are good representations of many real fluid flows. Using these equations, we show how one can design localized control that renders the system stable. We study the properties of the control and derive several expressions that allow us to determine the limits of successful control. We show how the number of controllers that are needed for successful control depends on the size and type of the system, as well as the way control is implemented. We find that especially the nonlinearities and the amount of noise present in the system play a crucial role. This analysis allows us to determine under

  20. Simulator study of stall/post-stall characteristics of a fighter airplane with relaxed longitudinal static stability. [F-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. T.; Ogburn, M. E.; Gilbert, W. P.; Kibler, K. S.; Brown, P. W.; Deal, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    A real-time piloted simulation was conducted to evaluate the high-angle-of-attack characteristics of a fighter configuration based on wind-tunnel testing of the F-16, with particular emphasis on the effects of various levels of relaxed longitudinal static stability. The aerodynamic data used in the simulation was conducted on the Langley differential maneuvering simulator, and the evaluation involved representative low-speed combat maneuvering. Results of the investigation show that the airplane with the basic control system was resistant to the classical yaw departure; however, it was susceptible to pitch departures induced by inertia coupling during rapid, large-amplitude rolls at low airspeed. The airplane also exhibited a deep-stall trim which could be flown into and from which it was difficult to recover. Control-system modifications were developed which greatly decreased the airplane susceptibility to the inertia-coupling departure and which provided a reliable means for recovering from the deep stall.

  1. Algorithms and logic for incorporating ILS NASA TCV B-737 airplane area navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The algorithms and logic for use in the implementation of instrument landing system (ILS) localizer deviation signals for the generation of navigation and guidance information are presented. The navigation position estimates, based on range information from a randomly chosen distance measuring equipment (DME) and ILS localizer deviation information, are illustrated. The ILS volumetric coverage and DME geometric checks are described and their addition to area navigation systems with minimum software modification are discussed.

  2. Power Systems Control Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    James Davidson

    2005-01-01

    A diagram provided in the report depicts the complexity of the power systems control architecture used by the national power structure. It shows the structural hierarchy and the relationship of the each system to those other systems interconnected to it. Each of these levels provides a different focus for vulnerability testing and has its own weaknesses. In evaluating each level, of prime concern is what vulnerabilities exist that provide a path into the system, either to cause the system to malfunction or to take control of a field device. An additional vulnerability to consider is can the system be compromised in such a manner that the attacker can obtain critical information about the system and the portion of the national power structure that it controls.

  3. Gordon Bennett Airplane Cup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margoulis, W

    1921-01-01

    The characteristics of the airplanes built for the Gordon Bennet Airplane Cup race that took place on September 28, 1920 are described. The airplanes are discussed from a aerodynamical point of view, with a number of new details concerning the French machines. Also discussed is the regulation of future races. The author argues that there should be no limitations on the power of the aircraft engines. He reasons that in the present state of things, liberty with regard to engine power does not lead to a search for the most powerful engine, but for one which is reliable and light, thus leading to progress.

  4. Digital flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The design of stable feedback control laws for sampled-data systems with variable rate sampling was investigated. These types of sampled-data systems arise naturally in digital flight control systems which use digital actuators where it is desirable to decrease the number of control computer output commands in order to save wear and tear of the associated equipment. The design of aircraft control systems which are optimally tolerant of sensor and actuator failures was also studied. Detection of the failed sensor or actuator must be resolved and if the estimate of the state is used in the control law, then it is also desirable to have an estimator which will give the optimal state estimate even under the failed conditions.

  5. Control Oriented System Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    The research goals for this grant were to obtain algorithms for control oriented system identification is to construct dynamical models of systems...and measured information. Algorithms for this type of nonlinear system identification have been given that produce models suitable for gain scheduled

  6. Desiccant humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amazeen, J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A regenerable sorbent system was investigated for controlling the humidity and carbon dioxide concentration of the space shuttle cabin atmosphere. The sorbents considered for water and carbon dioxide removal were silica gel and molecular sieves. Bed optimization and preliminary system design are discussed along with system optimization studies and weight penalites.

  7. Load Control System Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, Daniel

    2015-04-03

    This report summarizes the results of the Load Control System Reliability project (DOE Award DE-FC26-06NT42750). The original grant was awarded to Montana Tech April 2006. Follow-on DOE awards and expansions to the project scope occurred August 2007, January 2009, April 2011, and April 2013. In addition to the DOE monies, the project also consisted of matching funds from the states of Montana and Wyoming. Project participants included Montana Tech; the University of Wyoming; Montana State University; NorthWestern Energy, Inc., and MSE. Research focused on two areas: real-time power-system load control methodologies; and, power-system measurement-based stability-assessment operation and control tools. The majority of effort was focused on area 2. Results from the research includes: development of fundamental power-system dynamic concepts, control schemes, and signal-processing algorithms; many papers (including two prize papers) in leading journals and conferences and leadership of IEEE activities; one patent; participation in major actual-system testing in the western North American power system; prototype power-system operation and control software installed and tested at three major North American control centers; and, the incubation of a new commercial-grade operation and control software tool. Work under this grant certainly supported the DOE-OE goals in the area of “Real Time Grid Reliability Management.”

  8. IGISOL control system modernization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koponen, J.; Hakala, J.

    2016-06-01

    Since 2010, the IGISOL research facility at the Accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä has gone through major changes. Comparing the new IGISOL4 facility to the former IGISOL3 setup, the size of the facility has more than doubled, the length of the ion transport line has grown to about 50 m with several measurement setups and extension capabilities, and the accelerated ions can be fed to the facility from two different cyclotrons. The facility has evolved to a system comprising hundreds of manual, pneumatic and electronic devices. These changes have prompted the need to modernize also the facility control system taking care of monitoring and transporting the ion beams. In addition, the control system is also used for some scientific data acquisition tasks. Basic guidelines for the IGISOL control system update have been remote control, safety, usability, reliability and maintainability. Legacy components have had a major significance in the control system hardware and for the renewed control system software the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) has been chosen as the architectural backbone.

  9. 78 FR 39567 - Airworthiness Directives; Embraer S.A. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ...-107-AD; Amendment 39-17477; AD 2013-11-17] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Embraer S.A... Embraer S.A. Model ERJ 170 and ERJ 190 airplanes. AD 2010-14-14 currently requires, for certain airplanes... bleed system with a new check valve and new seals, replacing the low pressure check valves (LPCVs),...

  10. SSRF Beamline Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L. F.; Liu, P.; Zhang, Z. H.; Hu, C.; Mi, Q. R.; Wu, Y. F.; Gong, P. R.; Zhu, Z. X.; Li, Z.

    2010-06-23

    There are seven beamlines in the Phase-I of SSRF. Five of them are equipped with Insertion Devices, while two with Bending Magnets. The beamline control system is based on the standard hardware and software architecture. The VME(PowerPC) with VxWorks is used for motion control, while the personal computers with Scientific Linux are the front end controllers of equipment protection and personnel safety systems. The control software is developed under EPICS which makes various experimental programs of Blu-Ice, LabView, VC and SPEC conveniently access Monochromators, mirror chambers and other optical components.

  11. Simulator Evaluation of Simplified Propulsion-Only Emergency Flight Control Systems on Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Kaneshige, John; Bull, John; Maine, Trindel A.

    1999-01-01

    With the advent of digital engine control systems, considering the use of engine thrust for emergency flight control has become feasible. Many incidents have occurred in which engine thrust supplemented or replaced normal aircraft flight controls. In most of these cases, a crash has resulted, and more than 1100 lives have been lost. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has developed a propulsion-controlled aircraft (PCA) system in which computer-controlled engine thrust provides emergency flight control capability. Using this PCA system, an F-15 and an MD-11 airplane have been landed without using any flight controls. In simulations, C-17, B-757, and B-747 PCA systems have also been evaluated successfully. These tests used full-authority digital electronic control systems on the engines. Developing simpler PCA systems that can operate without full-authority engine control, thus allowing PCA technology to be installed on less capable airplanes or at lower cost, is also a desire. Studies have examined simplified ?PCA Ultralite? concepts in which thrust control is provided using an autothrottle system supplemented by manual differential throttle control. Some of these concepts have worked well. The PCA Ultralite study results are presented for simulation tests of MD-11, B-757, C-17, and B-747 aircraft.

  12. 76 FR 53348 - Airworthiness Directives; BAE SYSTEMS (Operations) Limited Model BAe 146 Airplanes and Model Avro...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... life limits on shock absorber assemblies, but not the individual shock absorber components, and amend... BAE Systems (Operations) Limited has amended the AMM to remove the life limits on shock absorber assemblies, but not the individual shock absorber components, and amend the life limits on the...

  13. Flight Test Results for the F-16XL With a Digital Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stachowiak, Susan J.; Bosworth, John T.

    2004-01-01

    In the early 1980s, two F-16 airplanes were modified to extend the fuselage length and incorporate a large area delta wing planform. These two airplanes, designated the F-16XL, were designed by the General Dynamics Corporation (now Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems) (Fort Worth, Texas) and were prototypes for a derivative fighter evaluation program conducted by the United States Air Force. Although the concept was never put into production, the F-16XL prototypes provided a unique planform for testing concepts in support of future high-speed supersonic transport aircraft. To extend the capabilities of this testbed vehicle the F-16XL ship 1 aircraft was upgraded with a digital flight control system. The added flexibility of a digital flight control system increases the versatility of this airplane as a testbed for aerodynamic research and investigation of advanced technologies. This report presents the handling qualities flight test results covering the envelope expansion of the F-16XL with the digital flight control system.

  14. Quantifying and scaling airplane performance in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Johnhenri R.

    This dissertation studies the effects of turbulent wind on airplane airspeed and normal load factor, determining how these effects scale with airplane size and developing envelopes to account for them. The results have applications in design and control of aircraft, especially small scale aircraft, for robustness with respect to turbulence. Using linearized airplane dynamics and the Dryden gust model, this dissertation presents analytical and numerical scaling laws for airplane performance in gusts, safety margins that guarantee, with specified probability, that steady flight can be maintained when stochastic wind gusts act upon an airplane, and envelopes to visualize these safety margins. Presented here for the first time are scaling laws for the phugoid natural frequency, phugoid damping ratio, airspeed variance in turbulence, and flight path angle variance in turbulence. The results show that small aircraft are more susceptible to high frequency gusts, that the phugoid damping ratio does not depend directly on airplane size, that the airspeed and flight path angle variances can be parameterized by the ratio of the phugoid natural frequency to a characteristic turbulence frequency, and that the coefficient of variation of the airspeed decreases with increasing airplane size. Accompanying numerical examples validate the results using eleven different airplanes models, focusing on NASA's hypothetical Boeing 757 analog the Generic Transport Model and its operational 5.5% scale model, the NASA T2. Also presented here for the first time are stationary flight, where the flight state is a stationary random process, and the stationary flight envelope, an adjusted steady flight envelope to visualize safety margins for stationary flight. The dissertation shows that driving the linearized airplane equations of motion with stationary, stochastic gusts results in stationary flight. It also shows how feedback control can enlarge the stationary flight envelope by alleviating

  15. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    Digital techniques are discussed for application to the servo and control systems of large antennas. The tracking loop for an antenna at a STADAN tracking site is illustrated. The augmentation mode is also considered.

  16. Linear Hereditary Control Systems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Relationships between external and internal models for systems with time lags are discussed. The use of various canonical forms for the models in solving optimal control problems is considered. (Author)

  17. The Bristol "Badminton" Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    The Bristol Badminton, Type 99 airplane has a radial aircooled engine (a Bristol Jupiter 9 cylinder 450 HP.) and three fuel tanks. It is a single seat biplane weighing 1,840 lbs. empty and 2,460 lbs. loaded.

  18. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  19. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  20. 78 FR 11556 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ...; Interaction of Systems and Structures AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... systems and structures. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate.... The primary structure is metal with composite empennage and control surfaces. The Model...

  1. Rotor control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Michael P. (Inventor); Maciolek, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A helicopter rotor control system (13) including a stop azimuth controller (32) for establishing the value of a deceleration command (15') to a deceleration controller (23), a transition azimuth predictor (41) and a position reference generator (55), which are effective during the last revolution of said rotor (14) to establish a correction indication (38) to adjust the deceleration command (15') to ensure that one of the rotor blades (27) stops at a predetermined angular position.

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  3. Control of Nonlinear Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-26

    above papers shows how the "finite horizon time" feedback stabilization technique discussed in Section Ill-A can be extended to derive stabilizing ... control laws for the linear differential system with delayed controls: x = Ax(t) - 0 u(t) + B 1u(t - h). The second of the above papers shows how the

  4. Liquid Level Control System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A system for controlling liquid flow from an inlet into a tank comprising a normally closed poppet valve controlled by dual pressure chambers each...containing a diaphragm movable by the pressure of the liquid in the inlet to cause the valve to close. Pressure against the diaphragms is relieved by

  5. Flight Results of the NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) Aircraft with Adaptation to a Longitudinally Destabilized Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive flight control systems have the potential to be resilient to extreme changes in airplane behavior. Extreme changes could be a result of a system failure or of damage to the airplane. The goal for the adaptive system is to provide an increase in survivability in the event that these extreme changes occur. A direct adaptive neural-network-based flight control system was developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration NF-15B Intelligent Flight Control System airplane. The adaptive element was incorporated into a dynamic inversion controller with explicit reference model-following. As a test the system was subjected to an abrupt change in plant stability simulating a destabilizing failure. Flight evaluations were performed with and without neural network adaptation. The results of these flight tests are presented. Comparison with simulation predictions and analysis of the performance of the adaptation system are discussed. The performance of the adaptation system is assessed in terms of its ability to stabilize the vehicle and reestablish good onboard reference model-following. Flight evaluation with the simulated destabilizing failure and adaptation engaged showed improvement in the vehicle stability margins. The convergent properties of this initial system warrant additional improvement since continued maneuvering caused continued adaptation change. Compared to the non-adaptive system the adaptive system provided better closed-loop behavior with improved matching of the onboard reference model. A detailed discussion of the flight results is presented.

  6. Stall-proof Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachmann, G

    1927-01-01

    My lecture has to do with the following questions. Is the danger of stalling necessarily inherent in the airplane in its present form and structure, or can it be diminished or eliminated by suitable means? Do we possess such means or devices and how must they operate? In this connection I will devote special attention to the exhibition of stall-proof airplanes by Fokker under the auspices of the English Air Ministry, which took place in Croyden last April.

  7. 76 FR 73486 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... fuel pumps, the water drain system between certain ribs, a water drain system and the ventilation... history of airplanes subject to those regulations, and existing maintenance practices for fuel tank... System Design Review, Flammability Reduction and Maintenance and Inspection Requirements'' (66 FR...

  8. Flight test report of the NASA icing research airplane: Performance, stability, and control after flight through natural icing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, J. L.; Platz, S. J.; Schinstock, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Flight test results are presented documenting the effect of airframe icing on performance and stability and control of a NASA DHC-6 icing research aircraft. Kohlman System Research, Inc., provided the data acquisition system and data analysis under contract to NASA. Performance modeling methods and MMLE techniques were used to determine the effects of natural ice on the aircraft. Results showed that ice had a significant effect on the drag coefficient of the aircraft and a modest effect on the MMLE derived longitudinal stability coefficients (code version MMLE). Data is also presented on asymmetric power sign slip maneuvers showing rudder floating characteristics with and without ice on the vertical stabilizer.

  9. Flight-determined characteristics of an air intake system on an F-111A airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.; Johnson, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    Flow phenomena of the F-111A air intake system were investigated over a large range of Mach number, altitude, and angle of attack. Boundary-layer variations are shown for the fuselage splitter plate and inlet entrance stations. Inlet performance is shown in terms of pressure recovery, airflow, mass-flow ratio, turbulence factor, distortion factor, and power spectral density. The fuselage boundary layer was found to be not completely removed from the upper portion of the splitter plate at all Mach numbers investigated. Inlet boundary-layer ingestion started at approximately Mach 1.6 near the translating spike and cone. Pressure-recovery distribution at the compressor face showed increasing distortion with increasing angle of attack and increasing Mach number. The time-averaged distortion-factor value approached 1300, which is near the distortion tolerance of the engine at Mach numbers above 2.1.

  10. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; O'Connor, David; Partrick, Richard; Orzechowski, Pawel; Spitter, Connie; Lillie, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  11. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of small computers using digital techniques for operating the servo and control system of large antennas is discussed. The advantages of the system are described. The techniques were evaluated with a forty foot antenna and the Sigma V computer. Programs have been completed which drive the antenna directly without the need for a servo amplifier, antenna position programmer or a scan generator.

  12. The ISOLDE control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloose, I.; Pace, A.

    1994-12-01

    The two CERN isotope separators named ISOLDE have been running on the new Personal Computer (PC) based control system since April 1992. The new architecture that makes heavy use of the commercial software and hardware of the PC market has been implemented on the 1700 geographically distributed control channels of the two separators and their experimental area. Eleven MSDOS Intel-based PCs with approximately 80 acquisition and control boards are used to access the equipment and are controlled from three PCs running Microsoft Windows used as consoles through a Novell Local Area Network. This paper describes the interesting solutions found and discusses the reduced programming workload and costs that have been obtained.

  13. Design of integrated autopilot/autothrottle for NASA TSRV airplane using integral LQG methodology. [transport systems research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminer, Isaac; Benson, Russell A.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated autopilot/autothrottle control system has been developed for the NASA transport system research vehicle using a two-degree-of-freedom approach. Based on this approach, the feedback regulator was designed using an integral linear quadratic regulator design technique, which offers a systematic approach to satisfy desired feedback performance requirements and guarantees stability margins in both control and sensor loops. The resulting feedback controller was discretized and implemented using a delta coordinate concept, which allows for transient free controller switching by initializing all controller states to zero and provides a simple solution for dealing with throttle limiting cases.

  14. CNEOST Control Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhao, H. B.; Xia, Y.; Lu, H.; Li, B.

    2015-03-01

    In 2013, CNEOST (China Near Earth Object Survey Telescope) adapted its hardware system for the new CCD camera. Based on the new system architecture, the control software is re-designed and implemented. The software system adopts the message passing mechanism via WebSocket protocol, and improves its flexibility, expansibility, and scalability. The user interface with responsive web design realizes the remote operating under both desktop and mobile devices. The stable operating of software system has greatly enhanced the operation efficiency while reducing the complexity, and has also made a successful attempt for the future system design of telescope and telescope cloud.

  15. Information Survivability Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    interfaces with higher-level (e.g., Federal Reserve ) and lower-level (e.g., branch) control systems. A hierarchical structure is natural to support...level hierarchical banking system with branch banks at the leaves, money-center banks in the middle, and the Federal Reserve system at the root...center in question, then the check deposit request is routed there. If not, then the check must be routed through the Federal Reserve . Checks for small

  16. It's time to reinvent the general aviation airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Current designs for general aviation airplanes have become obsolete, and avenues for major redesign must be considered. New designs should incorporate recent advances in electronics, aerodynamics, structures, materials, and propulsion. Future airplanes should be optimized to operate satisfactorily in a positive air traffic control environment, to afford safety and comfort for point-to-point transportation, and to take advantage of automated manufacturing techniques and high production rates. These requirements have broad implications for airplane design and flying qualities, leading to a concept for the Modern Equipment General Aviation (MEGA) airplane. Synergistic improvements in design, production, and operation can provide a much needed fresh start for the general aviation industry and the traveling public. In this investigation a small four place airplane is taken as the reference, although the proposed philosophy applies across the entire spectrum of general aviation.

  17. Neural Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2003-01-01

    The Neural Flight Control System (NFCS) was developed to address the need for control systems that can be produced and tested at lower cost, easily adapted to prototype vehicles and for flight systems that can accommodate damaged control surfaces or changes to aircraft stability and control characteristics resulting from failures or accidents. NFCS utilizes on a neural network-based flight control algorithm which automatically compensates for a broad spectrum of unanticipated damage or failures of an aircraft in flight. Pilot stick and rudder pedal inputs are fed into a reference model which produces pitch, roll and yaw rate commands. The reference model frequencies and gains can be set to provide handling quality characteristics suitable for the aircraft of interest. The rate commands are used in conjunction with estimates of the aircraft s stability and control (S&C) derivatives by a simplified Dynamic Inverse controller to produce virtual elevator, aileron and rudder commands. These virtual surface deflection commands are optimally distributed across the aircraft s available control surfaces using linear programming theory. Sensor data is compared with the reference model rate commands to produce an error signal. A Proportional/Integral (PI) error controller "winds up" on the error signal and adds an augmented command to the reference model output with the effect of zeroing the error signal. In order to provide more consistent handling qualities for the pilot, neural networks learn the behavior of the error controller and add in the augmented command before the integrator winds up. In the case of damage sufficient to affect the handling qualities of the aircraft, an Adaptive Critic is utilized to reduce the reference model frequencies and gains to stay within a flyable envelope of the aircraft.

  18. LSST control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Germán; Warner, Michael; Krabbendam, Victor

    2006-06-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a large, wide-field ground-based telescope designed to obtain sequential images of the entire visible sky every few nights. The LSST, in spite of its large field of view and short 15 second exposures, requires a very accurate pointing and tracking performance. The high efficiency specified for the whole system implies that observations will be acquired in blind pointing mode and tracking demands calculated from blind pointing as well. This paper will provide a high level overview of the LSST Control System (LCS) and details of the Telescope Control System (TCS), explaining the characteristics of the system components and the interactions among them. The LCS and TCS will be designed around a distributed architecture to maximize the control efficiency and to support the highly robotic nature of the LSST System. In addition to its control functions, the LCS will capture, organize and store system wide state information, to make it available for monitoring, evaluation and calibration processes. An evaluation of the potential communications middleware software to be utilized for data transport, is also included.

  19. Preliminary Evaluation of the Low-Speed Stability and Control Characteristics of the McDonnell XP-85 Airplane from Tests of an Unballasted 1/5-Scale Model in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John W.; Johnson, Joseph L.

    1947-01-01

    At the request of the Air Material Command, Army Air Forces an investigation of the low-speed, power-off stability and control characteristics of the McDonnell XP-85 airplane is being conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The XP-85 airplane is a jet propelled, parasite fighter with a 34 deg sweepback at the wing quarter chord. It was designed to be carried in a bomb bay of the B-36 air plane. The first portion of the investigation consists of a preliminary evaluation of the stability and control characteristics of the airplane from force and fight tests of an unballasted 1/5-scale model. The second portion of the investigation consists of test of a properly balasted 1/10-scale model which will include a study of the stability of the Xp-85 when attached to the trapeze for retraction into the B-36 bomb bay. The results of the preliminary test with the 1/5-scale model are presented herein. This portion fo the investigation included tests of the model with various center fin arrangements. Both the design nose flap and a stall control vane were investigated.

  20. 75 FR 70090 - Special Conditions: Bombardier Inc. Model CL-600-2E25 Airplane, Operation Without Normal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... continuous electrical power to operate the control system. The current 14 CFR part 25.1351(d), ``Operation without normal electrical power,'' requires safe operation in VFR conditions for at least five minutes... Airplane, Operation Without Normal Electrical Power AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  1. SERVOMOTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    MacNeille, S.M.

    1958-12-01

    Control systems for automatic positioning of an electric motor operated vapor valve are described which is operable under the severe conditions existing in apparatus for electro-magnetlcally separating isotopes. In general, the system includes a rotor for turning the valve comprising two colls mounted mutually perpendicular to each other and also perpendicular to the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus. The coils are furnished with both a-c and d- c current by assoclate control circuitry and a position control is provided for varying the ratlo of the a-c currents in the coils and at the same time, but in an inverse manner, the ratio between the d-c currents in the coils is varied. With the present system the magnitude of the motor torque is constant for all valves of the rotor orientatlon angle.

  2. REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    MacNeill, J.H.; Estabrook, J.Y.

    1960-05-10

    A reactor control system including a continuous tape passing through a first coolant passageway, over idler rollers, back through another parallel passageway, and over motor-driven rollers is described. Discrete portions of fuel or poison are carried on two opposed active sections of the tape. Driving the tape in forward or reverse directions causes both active sections to be simultaneously inserted or withdrawn uniformly, tending to maintain a more uniform flux within the reactor. The system is particularly useful in mobile reactors, where reduced inertial resistance to control rod movement is important.

  3. Optical controlled keyboard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzyński, Łukasz; Długosz, Dariusz; Niewiarowski, Bartosz; Zajkowski, Maciej

    2011-06-01

    Control systems of our computers are common devices, based on the manipulation of keys or a moving ball. Completely healthy people have no problems with the operation of such devices. Human disability makes everyday activities become a challenge and create trouble. When a man can not move his hands, the work becomes difficult or often impossible. Controlled optical keyboard is a modern device that allows to bypass the limitations of disability limbs. The use of wireless optical transmission allows to control computer using a laser beam, which cooperates with the photodetectors. The article presents the construction and operation of non-contact optical keyboard for people with disabilities.

  4. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controllable mixing system (210) in which a plurality of mixing assemblies (10a-10e) are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly (10) employs a central chamber (16) and two outer, upper and lower, chambers (12, 14). Valves (18, 20) are positioned between chambers, and these valves (18, 20) for a given mixing assembly (10) are operated by upper and lower control rotors (29), which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors (270, 270b). Additionally, a hoop (278) is compressed around upper control rotors (29) and a hoop (278b) is compressed around lower control rotors (29) to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors (29) and drive rotors (270, 270b). The drive rollers (270, 270b) are driven by a motor (213).

  5. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  6. Celsius Control system.

    PubMed

    Badjatia, Neeraj

    2004-01-01

    The Celsius Control system (Innercool Therapies, Inc.) is an intravascular cooling catheter system consisting of the Celsius Control catheter,circulating set, and the Celsius Control console. Based on clinical studies, the system has recently received Food and Drug Administration approval for use as a device to induce, maintain, and reverse mild hypothermia in neurosurgical patients in surgery and recovery/intensive care, and is currently being marketed in the 10.7 Fr and 14 Fr catheter sizes. It works to regulate temperature by circulating sterile saline through the Celsius Control console, which contains an integrated assembly comprising a temperature and pressure sensing block,supply and return lines, and a 20-{m} filter with connective tubing and an independent heat exchanger and pump. The system relies on digital core temperature readings from either esophageal or bladder temperature probes. After the system is turned on, approximately 150 mL of sterile saline solution is pumped through the console and is cooled to achieve the preset temperature. This cooled saline subsequently circulates from the console through the catheter in a closed-loop manner. The distal portion of the catheter incorporates a flexible distal metallic heat transfer element that is designed to allow for direct exchange of thermal energy with blood circulating around the catheter.

  7. Synthesis of the unmanned aerial vehicle remote control augmentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, Andrzej

    2014-12-01

    Medium size Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) usually flies as an autonomous aircraft including automatic take-off and landing phases. However in the case of the on-board control system failure, the remote steering is using as an emergency procedure. In this reason, remote manual control of unmanned aerial vehicle is used more often during take-of and landing phases. Depends on UAV take-off mass and speed (total energy) the potential crash can be very danger for airplane and environment. So, handling qualities of UAV is important from pilot-operator point of view. In many cases the dynamic properties of remote controlling UAV are not suitable for obtaining the desired properties of the handling qualities. In this case the control augmentation system (CAS) should be applied. Because the potential failure of the on-board control system, the better solution is that the CAS algorithms are placed on the ground station computers. The method of UAV handling qualities shaping in the case of basic control system failure is presented in this paper. The main idea of this method is that UAV reaction on the operator steering signals should be similar - almost the same - as reaction of the "ideal" remote control aircraft. The model following method was used for controller parameters calculations. The numerical example concerns the medium size MP-02A UAV applied as an aerial observer system.

  8. Synthesis of the unmanned aerial vehicle remote control augmentation system

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczyk, Andrzej

    2014-12-10

    Medium size Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) usually flies as an autonomous aircraft including automatic take-off and landing phases. However in the case of the on-board control system failure, the remote steering is using as an emergency procedure. In this reason, remote manual control of unmanned aerial vehicle is used more often during take-of and landing phases. Depends on UAV take-off mass and speed (total energy) the potential crash can be very danger for airplane and environment. So, handling qualities of UAV is important from pilot-operator point of view. In many cases the dynamic properties of remote controlling UAV are not suitable for obtaining the desired properties of the handling qualities. In this case the control augmentation system (CAS) should be applied. Because the potential failure of the on-board control system, the better solution is that the CAS algorithms are placed on the ground station computers. The method of UAV handling qualities shaping in the case of basic control system failure is presented in this paper. The main idea of this method is that UAV reaction on the operator steering signals should be similar - almost the same - as reaction of the 'ideal' remote control aircraft. The model following method was used for controller parameters calculations. The numerical example concerns the medium size MP-02A UAV applied as an aerial observer system.

  9. Fly-by-light flight control system technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarty, A.; Berwick, J. W.; Griffith, D. M.; Marston, S. E.; Norton, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a four-month, phased effort to develop a Fly-by-Light Technology Development Plan are documented. The technical shortfalls for each phase were identified and a development plan to bridge the technical gap was developed. The production configuration was defined for a 757-type airplane, but it is suggested that the demonstration flight be conducted on the NASA Transport Systems Research Vehicle. The modifications required and verification and validation issues are delineated in this report. A detailed schedule for the phased introduction of fly-by-light system components has been generated. It is concluded that a fiber-optics program would contribute significantly toward developing the required state of readiness that will make a fly-by-light control system not only cost effective but reliable without mitigating the weight and high-energy radio frequency related benefits.

  10. 77 FR 65146 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... and retard mode, in case of go-around, might lead to a temporary loss of airplane longitudinal control... comments by any of the following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov... flare and retard mode, in case of go-around, the situation may lead to a temporary loss of...

  11. 77 FR 60331 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... A321 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of an uncommanded nose landing gear... the landing gear control interface unit (LGCIU). We are proposing this AD to prevent untimely... A320 aeroplane was preparing to initiate taxi, when an uncommanded nose landing gear (NLG)...

  12. 78 FR 41286 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ..., and A321 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report of an uncommanded nose landing gear (NLG) retraction. This AD requires installing a power interruption protection circuit for the landing gear control... uncommanded nose landing gear (NLG) retraction occurred, causing the nose of the aeroplane to hit the...

  13. 78 FR 78294 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by the failure of the generator control unit-constant speed motor...: (202) 493-2251. Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M- ] 30, West Building.... Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200...

  14. Active control system trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yore, E. E.; Gunderson, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The active control concepts which achieve the benefit of improved mission performance and lower cost and generate system trends towards improved dynamic performance, more integration, and digital fly by wire mechanization are described. Analytical issues and implementation requirements and tools and approaches developed to address the analytical and implementation issues are briefly discussed.

  15. Electric turbocompound control system

    DOEpatents

    Algrain, Marcelo C.

    2007-02-13

    Turbocompound systems can be used to affect engine operation using the energy in exhaust gas that is driving the available turbocharger. A first electrical device acts as a generator in response to turbocharger rotation. A second electrical device acts as a motor to put mechanical power into the engine, typically at the crankshaft. Apparatus, systems, steps, and methods are described to control the generator and motor operations to control the amount of power being recovered. This can control engine operation closer to desirable parameters for given engine-related operating conditions compared to actual. The electrical devices can also operate in "reverse," going between motor and generator functions. This permits the electrical device associated with the crankshaft to drive the electrical device associated with the turbocharger as a motor, overcoming deficient engine operating conditions such as associated with turbocharger lag.

  16. Timing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Gordon A. (Inventor); Wells, Jr., George H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not overshoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  17. Timing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Gordon A. (Inventor); Wells, George H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not over shoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  18. Timing control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiker, Gordon A.; Wells, George H., Jr.

    1987-09-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not over shoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  19. Noise abatement technology options for conventional turboprop airplanes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, W.J.; Wilby, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    The practical application of noise control technology to new and derivative conventional turboprop airplanes likely to come into service in the 1980's has been analyzed with a view to determining noise control cost/benefits. The analysis identifies feasible noise control methods, applies them to four study airplanes, and presents the noise reductions in terms of the equivalent perceived noise level at takeoff, sideline and approach locations, and the effect on the area within selected EPNL contours. Noise reductions of up to 8.3 dB for takeoff and 10.7 dB for approach are calculated for the study airplanes but, for most cases, the changes are less than 5 dB. Weight and cost increases associated with the noise control treatments are determined under the assumption there they are no changes to airplane performance or fuel consumption.

  20. Microprocessor control for standardized power control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. G.; Perry, E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of microcomputers in space-oriented power systems as a replacement for existing inflexible analog type controllers has been proposed. This study examines multiprocessor systems, various modularity concepts and presents a conceptualized power system incorporating a multiprocessor controller as well as preliminary results from a breadboard model of the proposed system.

  1. Cryogenic Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Goloborod'ko, S.; /Fermilab

    1989-02-27

    The control system (CS) for the cryogenic arrangement of the DO Liquid Argon Calorimeter consists of a Texas instruments 560/565 Programmable Logical Controller (PLC), two remote bases with Remote Base Controllers and a corresponding set of input/output (I/O) modules, and a PC AST Premium 286 (IBM AT Compatible). The PLC scans a set of inputs and provides a set of outputs based on a ladder logic program and PID control loops. The inputs are logic or analog (current, voltage) signals from equipment status switches or transducers. The outputs are logic or analog (current or voltage) signals for switching solenoids and positioning pneumatic actuators. Programming of the PLC is preformed by using the TISOFT2/560/565 package, which is installed in the PC. The PC communicates to the PLC through a serial RS232 port and provides operator interface to the cryogenic process using Xpresslink software.

  2. Telerobot control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G. (Inventor); Tso, Kam S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to an operator interface for controlling a telerobot to perform tasks in a poorly modeled environment and/or within unplanned scenarios. The telerobot control system includes a remote robot manipulator linked to an operator interface. The operator interface includes a setup terminal, simulation terminal, and execution terminal for the control of the graphics simulator and local robot actuator as well as the remote robot actuator. These terminals may be combined in a single terminal. Complex tasks are developed from sequential combinations of parameterized task primitives and recorded teleoperations, and are tested by execution on a graphics simulator and/or local robot actuator, together with adjustable time delays. The novel features of this invention include the shared and supervisory control of the remote robot manipulator via operator interface by pretested complex tasks sequences based on sequences of parameterized task primitives combined with further teleoperation and run-time binding of parameters based on task context.

  3. Economic impact of applying advanced technologies to transport airplanes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carline, A. J. K.

    1972-01-01

    Various technologies have been studied which could have application to the design of future transport airplanes. These technologies include the use of supercritical aerodynamics, composite materials, and active control systems, together with advanced engine designs that provide lower noise and pollutant levels. The economic impact of each technology is shown for a typical fleet of 195-passenger, transcontinental commercial transports cruising at both 0.9M and 0.98M. Comparisons are made with conventional transports cruising at 0.82M. Effects of combining the technologies are discussed. An R & D program aimed at bringing the technologies to fruition is outlined.

  4. Computer-aided design of control systems to meet many requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schy, A. A.; Adams, W. M., Jr.; Johnson, K. G.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for using nonlinear programing in the computer-aided design of airplane control systems. It is assumed that the quality of such systems depends on many criteria. These criteria are included in the constraints vector (instead of attempting to combine them into a single scalar criterion, as is usually done), and the design proceeds through a sequence of nonlinear programing solutions in which the designer varies the specification of sets of requirements levels. The method is applied to design of a lateral stability augmentation system (SAS) for a fighter airplane, in which the requirements vector is chosen from the official handling qualities specifications. Results are shown for several simple SAS configurations designed to obtain desirable handling qualities over all design flight conditions with minimum feedback gains. The choice of the final design for each case is not unique but depends on the designer's decision as to which achievable set of requirements levels represents the best for that system. Results indicate that it may be possible to design constant parameter SAS which can satisfy the most stringent handling qualities requirements for fighter airplanes in all flight conditions. The role of the designer as a decision maker, interacting with the computer program, is discussed. Advantages of this type of designer-computer interaction are emphasized. Desirable extensions of the method are indicated.

  5. A preliminary investigation of the use of throttles for emergency flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Wolf, Thomas D.; Stewart, James F.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was conducted regarding the use of throttles for emergency flight control of a multiengine aircraft. Several airplanes including a light twin-engine piston-powered airplane, jet transports, and a high performance fighter were studied during flight and piloted simulations. Simulation studies used the B-720, B-727, MD-11, and F-15 aircraft. Flight studies used the Lear 24, Piper PA-30, and F-15 airplanes. Based on simulator and flight results, all the airplanes exhibited some control capability with throttles. With piloted simulators, landings using manual throttles-only control were extremely difficult. An augmented control system was developed that converts conventional pilot stick inputs into appropriate throttle commands. With the augmented system, the B-720 and F-15 simulations were evaluated and could be landed successfully. Flight and simulation data were compared for the F-15 airplane.

  6. Implementation of an Adaptive Controller System from Concept to Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Richard R.; Burken, John J.; Butler, Bradley S.; Yokum, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) is conducting ongoing flight research using adaptive controller algorithms. A highly modified McDonnell-Douglas NF-15B airplane called the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) is used to test and develop these algorithms. Modifications to this airplane include adding canards and changing the flight control systems to interface a single-string research controller processor for neural network algorithms. Research goals include demonstration of revolutionary control approaches that can efficiently optimize aircraft performance in both normal and failure conditions and advancement of neural-network-based flight control technology for new aerospace system designs. This report presents an overview of the processes utilized to develop adaptive controller algorithms during a flight-test program, including a description of initial adaptive controller concepts and a discussion of modeling formulation and performance testing. Design finalization led to integration with the system interfaces, verification of the software, validation of the hardware to the requirements, design of failure detection, development of safety limiters to minimize the effect of erroneous neural network commands, and creation of flight test control room displays to maximize human situational awareness; these are also discussed.

  7. Vertical flight path steering system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a vertical flight path angle steering system for aircraft, utilizing a digital flight control computer which processes pilot control inputs and aircraft response parameters into suitable elevator commands and control information for display to the pilot on a cathode ray tube. The system yields desirable airplane control handling qualities and responses as well as improvements in pilot workload and safety during airplane operation in the terminal area and under windshear conditions.

  8. Dynamitron control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisanti, Thomas F.

    2005-12-01

    The Dynamitron control system utilizes the latest personal computer technology in control circuitry and components. Both the DPC-2000 and newer Millennium series of control systems make use of their modular architecture in both software and hardware to keep up with customer and engineering demands. This also allows the main structure of the software to remain constant for the user while software drivers are easily changed as hardware demands are modified and improved. The system is presented as four units; the Remote I/O (Input/Output), Local Analog and Digital I/O, Operator Interface and the Main Computer. The operator is provided with a selection of many informative screen displays. The control program handles all graphic screen displays and the updating of these screens directly; it does not communicate to a display terminal. This adds to the quick response and excellent operator feedback received while operating the accelerator. The CPU also has the ability to store and record all process variable setpoints for each product that will be treated. All process parameters are printed to a report at regular intervals during a process run for record keeping.

  9. Management control system description

    SciTech Connect

    Bence, P. J.

    1990-10-01

    This Management Control System (MCS) description describes the processes used to manage the cost and schedule of work performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Richland, Washington. Westinghouse Hanford will maintain and use formal cost and schedule management control systems, as presented in this document, in performing work for the DOE-RL. This MCS description is a controlled document and will be modified or updated as required. This document must be approved by the DOE-RL; thereafter, any significant change will require DOE-RL concurrence. Westinghouse Hanford is the DOE-RL operations and engineering contractor at the Hanford Site. Activities associated with this contract (DE-AC06-87RL10930) include operating existing plant facilities, managing defined projects and programs, and planning future enhancements. This document is designed to comply with Section I-13 of the contract by providing a description of Westinghouse Hanford's cost and schedule control systems used in managing the above activities. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Revolution in airplane construction? Grob G110: The first modern fiber glass composition airplane shortly before its maiden flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorpinghaus, R.

    1982-01-01

    A single engine two passenger airplane, constructed completely from fiber reinforced plastic materials is introduced. The cockpit, controls, wing profile, and landing gear are discussed. Development of the airframe is also presented.

  11. Applying face identification to detecting hijacking of airplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xuanwen; Cheng, Qiang

    2004-09-01

    That terrorists hijacked the airplanes and crashed the World Trade Center is disaster to civilization. To avoid the happening of hijack is critical to homeland security. To report the hijacking in time, limit the terrorist to operate the plane if happened and land the plane to the nearest airport could be an efficient way to avoid the misery. Image processing technique in human face recognition or identification could be used for this task. Before the plane take off, the face images of pilots are input into a face identification system installed in the airplane. The camera in front of pilot seat keeps taking the pilot face image during the flight and comparing it with pre-input pilot face images. If a different face is detected, a warning signal is sent to ground automatically. At the same time, the automatic cruise system is started or the plane is controlled by the ground. The terrorists will have no control over the plane. The plane will be landed to a nearest or appropriate airport under the control of the ground or cruise system. This technique could also be used in automobile industry as an image key to avoid car stealth.

  12. Mars Airplane Valles Marineris Terrain Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This is a computer simulation showing a proposed configuration of the Langley Mars Airplane on a flyover of the Valles Marineris system on the planet Mars. The actual flight is scheduled for Dec. 17, 2003, timed to mark the 100th anniversary of the Wright brothers' historic powered flight at Kitty Hawk, N.C.

  13. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... § 36.7 Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes. (a) Applicability. This section applies to all transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes for which an acoustical...

  14. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... § 36.7 Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes. (a) Applicability. This section applies to all transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes for which an acoustical...

  15. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... § 36.7 Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes. (a) Applicability. This section applies to all transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes for which an acoustical...

  16. The UMC control system

    SciTech Connect

    Dallard, K.E.; Adams, R.J.

    1983-05-01

    The control system for the Central Cormorant Underwater Manifold Centre (UMC) is an important step forward in developing the technology of subsea production. It provides reliable, fast operation of over 250 UMC valves and sensors at a distance of 7 kilometres. Included in the paper is an overview of the complete control system with selected components described in more detail. Principal guidelines which shaped the final design configuration are also discussed and problems encountered during design and manufacture are highlighted. The paper stresses the thorough testing that was an essential requirement prior to installation. Finally, general conclusions are drawn about the approach taken which would be of benefit to similar projects in the future.

  17. Performance of two load-limiting subfloor concepts in full-scale general aviation airplane crash tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1984-01-01

    Three six-place, low wing, twin-engine general aviation airplane test specimens were crash tested at the langley Impact Dynamics research Facility under controlled free-flight conditions. One structurally unmodified airplane was the baseline airplane specimen for the test series. The other airplanes were structurally modified to incorporate load-limiting (energy-absorbing) subfloor concepts into the structure for full scale crash test evaluation and comparison to the unmodified airplane test results. Typically, the lowest floor accelerations and anthropomorphic dummy occupant responses, and the least seat crushing of standard and load-limiting seats, occurred in the modified load-limiting subfloor airplanes wherein the greatest structural crushing of the subfloor took place. The better performing of the two load-limiting subfloor concepts reduced the peak airplane floor accelerations at the pilot and four seat/occupant locations to -25 to -30 g's as compared to approximately -50 to -55 g's acceleration magnitude for the unmodified airplane structure.

  18. 77 FR 62182 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called Model A300- 600 series airplanes); and Airbus Model A310 series airplanes. This proposed...

  19. 76 FR 78524 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Final... series airplanes, Model A340-200 and -300 series airplanes, and Model A340-500 and -600 series airplanes..., ANM-116, Transport Airplane Directorate, FAA, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington...

  20. 77 FR 42952 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ...-139-AD; Amendment 39-17127; AD 2012-14-13] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... airplanes; Model A319-111, -112, -115, - 132, and -133 airplanes; Model A320-214, -232, and -233 airplanes; and Model A321-211, -212, -213, and -231 airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of some...

  1. 78 FR 15874 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ...-112-AD; Amendment 39-17372; AD 2013-04-14] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called Model A300- 600 series airplanes); and Model A310 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report of...

  2. 78 FR 9581 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ...-052-AD; Amendment 39-17346; AD 2013-03-11] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes..., and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called A300-600 series airplanes); and Model A310 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of cracking...

  3. 77 FR 59149 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes..., and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called A300-600 series airplanes); and Model A310 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of...

  4. OAJ control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, J. L.; Yanes-Díaz, A.; Rueda-Teruel, S.; Luis-Simoes, R.; Chueca, S.; Lasso-Cabrera, N. M.; Bello, R.; Jiménez, D.; Suárez, O.; Guillén, L.; López-Alegre, G.; Rodríguez, M. A.; de Castro, S.; Nevot, C.; Sánchez-Artigot, J.; Moles, M.; Cenarro, A. J.; Marín-Franch, A.; Ederoclite, A.; Varela, J.; Valdivielso, L.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; López-Sainz, A.; Hernández-Fuertes, J.; Díaz-Martín, M. C.; Iglesias-Marzoa, R.; Abril, J.; Lamadrid, J. L.; Maicas, N.; Rodríguez, S.; Tilve, V.; Civera, T.; Muniesa, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) is a new astronomical facility located at the Sierra de Javalambre (Teruel, Spain) whose primary role will be to conduct all-sky astronomical surveys leveraging two unprecedented telescopes with unusually large fields of view: the JST/T250, a 2.55 m telescope with a 3 deg field of view, and the JAST/T80, an 83 cm telescope with a 2 deg field of view. The immediate objective of these telescopes for the next years is carrying out two unique photometric surveys covering several thousands square degrees: J-PAS and J-PLUS, each of them with a wide range of scientific applications, like e.g. large structure cosmology and Dark Energy, galaxy evolution, supernovae, Milky Way structure and exoplanets. JST and JAST will be equipped with panoramic cameras being developed within the J-PAS collaboration, JPCam and T80Cam respectively, which make use of large format (˜10{k}×10{k}) CCDs covering the entire focal plane. CEFCA engineering team has been designing the OAJ control system as a global concept to manage, monitor, control and service the observatory systems, not only astronomical but also infrastructure and other facilities. We will give an overview of OAJ's control system from an engineering point of view.

  5. Wind-tunnel static and free-flight investigation of high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a model of the EA-6B airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Hahne, David E.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel and the Langley 12-Foot Low-Speed Tunnel to identify factors contributing to a directional divergence at high angles of attack for the EA-6B airplane. The study consisted of static wind-tunnel tests, smoke and tuft flow-visualization tests, and free-flight tests of a 1/8.5-scale model of the airplane. The results of the investigation indicate that the directional divergence of the airplane is brought about by a loss of directional stability and effective dihedral at high angles of attack. Several modifications were tested that significantly alleviate the stability problem. The results of the free-flight study show that the modified configuration exhibits good dynamic stability characteristics and could be flown at angles of attack significantly higher than those of the unmodified configuration.

  6. 78 FR 68986 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 777-200, -300, and -300ER Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... maintenance of the airplane. The existing regulations and guidance material did not anticipate this type of... the safety and maintenance of the airplane. The existing regulations and guidance material did not... Series Airplanes; Aircraft Electronic System Security Protection From Unauthorized External Access...

  7. 77 FR 23166 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... regulations, the service history of airplanes subject to those regulations, and existing maintenance practices... System Component (JASC)/Air Transport Association (ATA) of America Code 28, Fuel. (e) Unsafe...

  8. 77 FR 21422 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... NPRM (76 FR 19278, April 7, 2011) to add a system in the airplane to sound an alarm in the air traffic... experience with GKN windows, the interlayer has not exhibited cracking at the hot and cold...

  9. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The active control technology (ACT) control/guidance system task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the NASA energy efficient transport program was documented. The air traffic environment of navigation and air traffic control systems and procedures were extrapolated. An approach to listing flight functions which will be performed by systems and crew of an ACT configured airplane of the 1990s, and a determination of function criticalities to safety of flight, are the basis of candidate integrated ACT/Control/Guidance System architecture. The system mechanizes five active control functions: pitch augmented stability, angle of attack limiting, lateral/directional augmented stability, gust load alleviation, and maneuver load control. The scope and requirements of a program for simulating the integrated ACT avionics and flight deck system, with pilot in the loop, are defined, system and crew interface elements are simulated, and mechanization is recommended. Relationships between system design and crew roles and procedures are evaluated.

  10. The evolution of airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Charles, J. D.; Lorente, S.

    2014-07-01

    The prevailing view is that we cannot witness biological evolution because it occurred on a time scale immensely greater than our lifetime. Here, we show that we can witness evolution in our lifetime by watching the evolution of the flying human-and-machine species: the airplane. We document this evolution, and we also predict it based on a physics principle: the constructal law. We show that the airplanes must obey theoretical allometric rules that unite them with the birds and other animals. For example, the larger airplanes are faster, more efficient as vehicles, and have greater range. The engine mass is proportional to the body size: this scaling is analogous to animal design, where the mass of the motive organs (muscle, heart, lung) is proportional to the body size. Large or small, airplanes exhibit a proportionality between wing span and fuselage length, and between fuel load and body size. The animal-design counterparts of these features are evident. The view that emerges is that the evolution phenomenon is broader than biological evolution. The evolution of technology, river basins, and animal design is one phenomenon, and it belongs in physics.

  11. Longitudinal balancing of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eteve, Albert

    1923-01-01

    The object of the present communication is to determine the best method for locating the center of lift of an airplane and to provide a method for making corrections. The method employed is very simple, being based on the positions given the elevator during flights at different speeds.

  12. MIRADAS control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosich Minguell, Josefina; Garzón Lopez, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    The Mid-resolution InfRAreD Astronomical Spectrograph (MIRADAS, a near-infrared multi-object echelle spectrograph operating at spectral resolution R=20,000 over the 1-2.5μm bandpass) was selected in 2010 by the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) partnership as the next-generation near-infrared spectrograph for the world's largest optical/infrared telescope, and is being developed by an international consortium. The MIRADAS consortium includes the University of Florida, Universidad de Barcelona, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Institut de Física d'Altes Energies, Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. This paper shows an overview of the MIRADAS control software, which follows the standards defined by the telescope to permit the integration of this software on the GTC Control System (GCS). The MIRADAS Control System is based on a distributed architecture according to a component model where every subsystem is selfcontained. The GCS is a distributed environment written in object oriented C++, which runs components in different computers, using CORBA middleware for communications. Each MIRADAS observing mode, including engineering, monitoring and calibration modes, will have its own predefined sequence, which are executed in the GCS Sequencer. These sequences will have the ability of communicating with other telescope subsystems.

  13. Crawling the Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore Larrieu

    2009-10-01

    Information about accelerator operations and the control system resides in various formats in a variety of places on the lab network. There are operating procedures, technical notes, engineering drawings, and other formal controlled documents. There are programmer references and API documentation generated by tools such as doxygen and javadoc. There are the thousands of electronic records generated by and stored in databases and applications such as electronic logbooks, training materials, wikis, and bulletin boards and the contents of text-based configuration files and log files that can also be valuable sources of information. The obvious way to aggregate all these sources is to index them with a search engine that users can then query from a web browser. Toward this end, the Google "mini" search appliance was selected and implemented because of its low cost and its simple web-based configuration and management. In addition to crawling and indexing electronic documents, the appliance provides an API that has been used to supplement search results with live control system data such as current values of EPICS process variables and graphs of recent data from the archiver.

  14. Model predictive formation control of helicopter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffarian, Mehdi

    In this thesis, a robust formation control framework for formation control of a group of helicopters is proposed and designed. The dynamic model of the helicopter has been developed and verified through simulations. The control framework is constructed using two main control schemes for navigation of a helicopter group in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Two schemes are designed to maintain the position of one helicopter with respect to one or two other neighboring members, respectively. The developed parameters can uniquely define the position of the helicopters with respect to each other and can be used for any other aerial and under water vehicles such as airplanes, spacecrafts and submarines. Also, since this approach is modular, it is possible to use it for desired number and form of the group helicopters. Using the defined control parameters, two decentralized controllers are designed based on Nonlinear Model Predictive Control (NMPC) algorithm technique. The framework performance has been tested through simulation of different formation scenarios.

  15. CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES FOR THE VENTILATION SYSTEM AND A PLC SWITCH FOR AUTOMATIC CO (CARBON MONOXIDE) SYSTEM. THE AIR TESTING SYSTEM IS FREE STANDING AND THE FANS ARE COMPUTER-OPERATED. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  16. Smog control system

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    A smog control system is designed comprised of fans or blowers which are located to introduce air into a smog particle destruction chamber operated with laser energy. The smog particles are broken down and the air is passed into a filtering chamber which may adopt the form of a liquid charcoal chamber. The air may be bubbled through the liquid charcoal and the effluent may then be passed into a freshening agent chamber. The air may then pass as an effluent from the freshening agent chamber. A liquid charcoal supply may be connected to the liquid charcoal chamber and the recovered liquid charcoal which has been spent may be reused for other purposes.

  17. Airflow control system

    DOEpatents

    Motszko, Sean Ronald; McEnaney, Ryan Patrick; Brush, Jeffrey Alan; Zimmermann, Daniel E.

    2007-03-13

    A dual airflow control system for an environment having a first air zone and a second air zone. The system includes a first input device operable to generate a first input signal indicative of a desired airflow to the first zone and a second input device operable to generate a second input signal indicative of a desired airflow to the second zone. First and second flow regulators are configured to regulate airflow to the first and second zones, respectively, such that the first and second regulators selectively provide the airflow to each of the first and second zones based on the first and second input signals. A single actuator is associated with the first and second flow regulators. The actuator is operable to simultaneously actuate the first and second flow regulators based on an input from the first and second input devices to allow the desired airflows to the first and the second zones.

  18. Definition and application of longitudinal stability derivatives for elastic airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, W. B., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A set of longitudinal stability derivatives for elastic airplanes is defined from fundamental principles allowing perturbations in forward speed. Application of these derivatives to longitudinal stability analysis by use of approximate expressions for static stability and control parameters as well as the dynamic equations of motion is illustrated. One commonly used alternative formulation for elastic airplanes is shown to yield significant inaccuracies because of inappropriate interpretation of inertial effects.

  19. NASA B737 flight test results of the total energy control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Kevin R.

    1987-01-01

    The Total Energy Control System (TECS) is an integrated autopilot/autothrottle developed by BCAC that was test flown on NASA Langley's Transport System Research Vehicle (i.e., a highly modified Boeing B737). This systems was developed using principles of total energy in which the total kinetic and potential energy of the airplane was controlled by the throttles, and the energy distribution controled by the elevator. TECS integrates all the control functions of a conventional pitch autopilot and autothrottle into a single generalized control concept. This integration provides decoupled flightpath and maneuver control, as well as a coordinated throttle response for all maneuvers. A mode hierarchy was established to preclude exceeding airplane safety and performance limits. The flight test of TECS took place as a series of five flights over a 33-week period during September 1985 at NASA Langley. Most of the original flight test plan was completed within the first three flights with the system not exhibiting any instabilities or design problems that required any gain adjustment during flight.

  20. 76 FR 69168 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes..., and B4-203 airplanes; Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called A300-600 series airplanes); and Model A310 series airplanes....

  1. Description and theory of operation of the computer by-pass system for the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A triplex digital flight control system was installed in a NASA F-8C airplane to provide fail operate, full authority control. The triplex digital computers and interface circuitry process the pilot commands and aircraft motion feedback parameters according to the selected control laws, and they output the surface commands as an analog signal to the servoelectronics for position control of the aircraft's power actuators. The system and theory of operation of the computer by pass and servoelectronics are described and an automated ground test for each axis is included.

  2. Study of Command and Control (C&C) Structures on Integrating Unmanned Autonomous Systems (UAS) into Manned Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Systems UAV Unmanned Aerial Vehicle UNet- PANDA Underwater Networked Pop-Up Ambient Noise Data Acquisition USV Unmanned Surface Vehicle UUV Unmanned...1 Predator and could easily be mistaken for a “ giant - scale” radio controlled model airplane, some of which have wingspreads greater than 20 feet...cooled, two- cycle, two-cylinder power plant, designed for giant -scale model planes, which produces 16.5 horsepower from just over nine cubic inches

  3. Development of fire test methods for airplane interior materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tustin, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fire tests were conducted in a 737 airplane fuselage at NASA-JSC to characterize jet fuel fires in open steel pans (simulating post-crash fire sources and a ruptured airplane fuselage) and to characterize fires in some common combustibles (simulating in-flight fire sources). Design post-crash and in-flight fire source selections were based on these data. Large panels of airplane interior materials were exposed to closely-controlled large scale heating simulations of the two design fire sources in a Boeing fire test facility utilizing a surplused 707 fuselage section. Small samples of the same airplane materials were tested by several laboratory fire test methods. Large scale and laboratory scale data were examined for correlative factors. Published data for dangerous hazard levels in a fire environment were used as the basis for developing a method to select the most desirable material where trade-offs in heat, smoke and gaseous toxicant evolution must be considered.

  4. 77 FR 69568 - Special Conditions: Bombardier Aerospace, Model BD-500-1A10 and BD-500-1A11 Airplanes; Sidestick...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... Aerospace, Model BD-500-1A10 and BD-500-1A11 Airplanes; Sidestick Controllers AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Bombardier Aerospace Model BD-500-1A10 and BD-500-1A11 airplanes are equipped with a sidestick controller... conditions for the Bombardier Aerospace Model BD-500-1A10 and BD-500-1A11 airplanes. These airplanes...

  5. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system wherein a welding torch having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features include an actively cooled electrode holder which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm, and a weld pool contour detector comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom, being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  6. Pollution control system

    SciTech Connect

    Voliva, B.H.; Bernstein, I.B.

    1984-09-25

    A pollution control system is disclosed wherein condensable pollutants are removed from a high-temperature gas stream by counterflow contact in a vertical tower with downwardly flowing, relatively cool absorbent oil. The absorbent is at a sufficiently low temperature so as to rapidly condense a portion of the pollutants in order to form a fog of fine droplets of pollutant entrained by the gas stream, which fog is incapable of being absorbed by the absorbent. The remainder of the condensable pollutants is removed by downwardly flowing absorbent oil, and the gas and entrained fog are directed from the tower to gas/droplet separation means, such as an electrostatic precipitator. The fog is thereby separated from the gas and substantially pollutant-free gas is discharged to the atmosphere.

  7. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  8. Simulation study of an automatic trim system for reducing the control forces on a light twin after an engine failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Brown, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    An automatic trim system for reducing the control forces after an engine failure on a light twin has been investigated on the Langley General Aviation Simulator. The system schedules open-loop trim tab deflections as a function of differential propeller slipstream dynamic pressure and freestream dynamic pressure. The system is described and the airplane-system static and dynamic characteristics are documented. Three NASA research pilots evaluated the effectiveness of the system for takeoff and landing maneuvers. A variety of off-nominal system characteristics were studied. The system was judged to be generally beneficial, providing a 2 to 3 point improvement in pilot rating for the tasks used in the evaluations.

  9. State of the art of piloted electric airplanes, NASA's centennial challenge data and fundamental design implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, Lori Anne

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current state of the electric airplane as primarily defined by results from NASA's Green Flight Challenge Competition. New equations must be derived in order to determine the endurance and range for electric airplanes since the standard equations depend upon weight change over a flight and the weight of an electric airplane does not change. These new equations could then be solved for the optimal velocity and altitude which were the two driving factors that could change range and endurance for a given airplane configuration. The best velocity for range and endurance is not a function of energy storage or weight change thus the results turn out to be very similar to internal combustion engine airplanes, however, the optimal altitude for the best range and endurance equates to flying as high as reasonably possible. From examining the Green Flight Challenge data of the two fully electric airplanes, the analysis suggests that the electric propulsion system is not the only measure, given today's battery technology, that helps create a viable electric airplane solution. Aerodynamic efficiency becomes very important in order to reduce the required amount of energy. Airplanes that are aerodynamically inefficient make bad electric airplanes because the energy density of batteries is still low and the energy available to carry on board is limited. The more energy wasted on drag, the less the range and endurance of the airplane can be since the addition of more batteries may not be an option.

  10. High-Speed Wind-Tunnel Investigation of the Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of a 0.10-Scale Model of the Grumman XF9F-2 Airplane, TED No. NACA DE301

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, Edward C.; King, Thomas J., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley high-speed 7-by 10-foot tunnel to determine the high-speed longitudinal stability end con&o1 characteristics of a 0.01-scale model of the Grumman XF9F-2 airplane in the Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.85. The results indicated that the lift and drag force breaks occurred at a Mach number of about 0.76. The aerodynamic-center position moved rearward after the force break and control position stability was present for all Mach numbers up to a Mach number of 0.80.

  11. STOL Characteristics of a Propeller-Driven, Aspect-Ratio-10, Straight-Wing Airplane with Boundary-Layer Control Flaps, as Estimated from Large-Scale Wind-Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiberg, James A; Holzhauser, Curt A.

    1961-01-01

    A study is presented of the improvements in take-off and landing distances possible with a conventional propeller-driven transport-type airplane when the available lift is increased by propeller slipstream effects and by very effective trailing-edge flaps and ailerons. This study is based on wind-tunnel tests of a 45-foot span, powered model, with BLC on the trailing-edge flaps and controls. The data were applied to an assumed airplane with four propellers and a wing loading of 50 pounds per square foot. Also included is an examination of the stability and control problems that may result in the landing and take-off speed range of such a vehicle. The results indicated that the landing and take-off distances could be more than halved by the use of highly effective flaps in combination with large amounts of engine power to augment lift (STOL). At the lowest speeds considered (about 50 knots), adequate longitudinal stability was obtained but the lateral and directional stability were unsatisfactory. At these low speeds, the conventional aerodynamic control surfaces may not be able to cope with the forces and moments produced by symmetric, as well as asymmetric, engine operation. This problem was alleviated by BLC applied to the control surfaces.

  12. 76 FR 5505 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 777-200 Series Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... Model 777-200 Series Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... Model 777-200 series airplanes. This proposed AD would require installing a new circuit breaker, relays... for the CSCP, ZMU, passenger address controller, cabin interphone controller, CACP, speaker...

  13. Airplane Airworthiness; Transport Categories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1962-09-01

    4b.16 (b). The operatLg conditions expected in service and following procedure which permits considerable obtainable within the time and geograp -ic...116 (c). It is also assumed that the cowl flaps on the inoperative engine will be closed when the airplane enters the third takeoff climb segment with...as for the third takeoff LAnding gear-retracted. flight path climb segment except that maximum Operating engine(s)-takeoff r. p. m. continuous power is

  14. Thermal control system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Wilbert E.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on thermal control systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: heat rejection; heat acquisition and transport; monitoring and control; passive thermal control; and analysis and test verification.

  15. Environment control system

    DOEpatents

    Sammarone, Dino G.

    1978-01-01

    A system for controlling the environment of an enclosed area in nuclear reactor installations. The system permits the changing of the environment from nitrogen to air, or from air to nitrogen, without the release of any radioactivity or process gas to the outside atmosphere. In changing from a nitrogen to an air environment, oxygen is inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate which the nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture is removed from the enclosed area. The nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture removed from the enclosed area is mixed with hydrogen, the hydrogen recombining with the oxygen present in the gas to form water. The water is then removed from the system and, if it contains any radioactive products, can be utilized to form concrete, which can then be transferred to a licensed burial site. The process gas is purified further by stripping it of carbon dioxide and then distilling it to remove any xenon, krypton, and other fission or non-condensable gases. The pure nitrogen is stored as either a cryogenic liquid or a gas. In changing from an air to nitrogen environment, the gas is removed from the enclosed area, mixed with hydrogen to remove the oxygen present, dried, passed through adsorption beds to remove any fission gases, and reinserted into the enclosed area. Additionally, the nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change, is inserted into the enclosed area, the nitrogen from both sources being inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate as the removal of the gas from the containment area. As designed, the amount of nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change substantially equals that required to replace oxygen removed during an air to nitrogen change.

  16. Flight control system development and flight test experience with the F-111 mission adaptive wing aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The wing on the NASA F-111 transonic aircraft technology airplane was modified to provide flexible leading and trailing edge flaps. This wing is known as the mission adaptive wing (MAW) because aerodynamic efficiency can be maintained at all speeds. Unlike a conventional wing, the MAW has no spoilers, external flap hinges, or fairings to break the smooth contour. The leading edge flaps and three-segment trailing edge flaps are controlled by a redundant fly-by-wire control system that features a dual digital primary system architecture providing roll and symmetric commands to the MAW control surfaces. A segregated analog backup system is provided in the event of a primary system failure. This paper discusses the design, development, testing, qualification, and flight test experience of the MAW primary and backup flight control systems.

  17. Study of an aircraft decoupled longitudinal control system for approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G. K., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A series of ground-based and in-flight simulation studies of the application of steady-state decoupled longitudinal controls to a short take-off and landing (STOL) transport have been made. The externally blown flap STOL was selected for study because it was considered to be a worst-case situation from the control viewpoint. The decoupled longitudinal control system used constant prefilter and feedback gains to provide independent control of flight-path angle, pitch angle, and forward velocity during landing approach. The decoupled controls were compared to a more conventional stability augmentation system. The pilots were enthusiastic about the decoupled controls; the pilot workload was reduced and the landing performance significantly improved. The benefit of the decoupled controls was more dramatic during in-flight simulation using a variable stability airplane than was the case with either fixed- or moving-base, ground-based simulators.

  18. NSLS control system upgrade status

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Tang, Y.; Flannigan, J.; Sathe, S.; Keane, J.; Krinsky, S.

    1993-07-01

    The NSLS control system initially installed in 1978 has undergone several modifications but the basic system architecture remained relatively unchanged. The need for faster response, increased reliability and better diagnostics made the control system upgrade a priority. Since the NSLS runs continuously, major changes to the control system are difficult. The upgrade plan had to allow continuous incremental changes to the control system without having any detrimental effect on operations. The plan had to provide for immediate improvement in a few key areas, such as data access rates, and be complete in a short time. At present, most accelerator operations utilize the upgraded control system.

  19. Summary of spin technology as related to light general-aviation airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, J. S., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A summary was made of all NASA (and NACA) research and experience related to the spin and recovery characteristics of light personal-owner-type general-aviation airplanes. Very little of the research deals with light general-aviation airplanes as such, but many of the airplanes and models tested before and during World War II were similar to present-day light general-aviation airplanes with regard to the factors that are important in spinning. The material is based mainly on the results of spin-tunnel tests of free-spinning dynamically scaled models of about 100 different airplane designs and, whenever possible, includes correlation with full-scale spin tests. The research results are discussed in terms of airplane design considerations and the proper use of controls for recovery.

  20. Airplane dopes and doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W H

    1919-01-01

    Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate are the important constituents of airplane dopes in use at the present time, but planes were treated with other materials in the experimental stages of flying. The above compounds belong to the class of colloids and are of value because they produce a shrinking action on the fabric when drying out of solution, rendering it drum tight. Other colloids possessing the same property have been proposed and tried. In the first stages of the development of dope, however, shrinkage was not considered. The fabric was treated merely to render it waterproof. The first airplanes constructed were covered with cotton fabric stretched as tightly as possible over the winds, fuselage, etc., and flying was possible only in fine weather. The necessity of an airplane which would fly under all weather conditions at once became apparent. Then followed experiments with rubberized fabrics, fabrics treated with glue rendered insoluble by formaldehyde or bichromate, fabrics treated with drying and nondrying oils, shellac, casein, etc. It was found that fabrics treated as above lost their tension in damp weather, and the oil from the motor penetrated the proofing material and weakened the fabric. For the most part the film of material lacked durability. Cellulose nitrate lacquers, however were found to be more satisfactory under varying weather conditions, added less weight to the planes, and were easily applied. On the other hand, they were highly inflammable, and oil from the motor penetrated the film of cellulose nitrate, causing the tension of the fabric to be relaxed.

  1. 78 FR 14155 - Special Conditions: Learjet Inc., Model LJ-200-1A10 Airplane; Use of Automatic Power Reserve (APR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Power Reserve (APR), an Automatic Takeoff Thrust Control System (ATTCS), for Go-Around Performance... airplane will have novel or unusual design features associated with utilizing go-around performance credit...: Federal eRegulations Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov/ and follow the online instructions...

  2. Lateral stability and control derivatives of a jet fighter airplane extracted from flight test data by utilizing maximum likelihood estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Steinmetz, G. G.

    1972-01-01

    A method of parameter extraction for stability and control derivatives of aircraft from flight test data, implementing maximum likelihood estimation, has been developed and successfully applied to actual lateral flight test data from a modern sophisticated jet fighter. This application demonstrates the important role played by the analyst in combining engineering judgment and estimator statistics to yield meaningful results. During the analysis, the problems of uniqueness of the extracted set of parameters and of longitudinal coupling effects were encountered and resolved. The results for all flight runs are presented in tabular form and as time history comparisons between the estimated states and the actual flight test data.

  3. Effects of Ice Formations on Airplane Performance in Level Cruising Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, G. Merritt; Blackman, Calvin C.

    1948-01-01

    A flight investigation in natural icing conditions was conducted by the NACA to determine the effect of ice accretion on airplane performance. The maximum loss in propeller efficiency encountered due to ice formation on the propeller blades was 19 percent. During 87 percent of the propeller icing encounters, losses of 10 percent or less were observed. Ice formations on all of the components of the airplane except the propellers during one icing encounter resulted in an increase in parasite drag of the airplane of 81 percent. The control response of the airplane in this condition was marginal.

  4. Investigation of the Low-Speed Stability and Control Characteristics of a 1/10-Scale Model of the Convair YF-102 Airplane in the Langley Free-Flight Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph L., Jr.; Boisseau, Peter C.

    1953-01-01

    An investigation of the low-speed, power-off stability and control characteristics of a 1/10-scale model of the Convair YF-102 airplane has been made in the Langley free-flight tunnel. The model was flown over a lift-coefficient range from 0.5 to the stall in its basic configuration and with several modifications involving leading-edge slats and increases in vertical-tail size. Only relatively low-altitude conditions were simulated and no attempt was made to determine the effect of freeing the controls. The longitudinal stability characteristics of the model were considered satisfactory for all conditions investigated. The lateral stability characteristics were considered satisfactory for the basic configuration over the speed range investigated except near the stall, where large values of static directional instability caused the model to be directionally divergent. The addition of leading-edge slats or an 8-percent increase in vertical-tail area increased the angle of attack at which the model became directionally divergent. The use of leading-edge slats in combination with a 40-percent increase in vertical-tail size eliminated the directional divergence and produced satisfactory stability characteristics through the stall. The longitudinal and lateral control characteristics were generally satisfactory. Although the adverse sideslip characteristics for the model were considered satisfactory over the angle-of-attack range, analysis indicates that the adverse sideslip characteristics of the airplane may be objectionable at high angles of attack.

  5. Aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Greg T. (Inventor); Morgan, Walter R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A span-loaded, highly flexible flying wing, having horizontal control surfaces mounted aft of the wing on extended beams to form local pitch-control devices. Each of five spanwise wing segments of the wing has one or more motors and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other wing segments, to minimize inter-segment loads. Wing dihedral is controlled by separately controlling the local pitch-control devices consisting of a control surface on a boom, such that inboard and outboard wing segment pitch changes relative to each other, and thus relative inboard and outboard lift is varied.

  6. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... paragraph (b) of this section: (1) Airplanes with high bypass ratio jet engines. For an airplane that has jet engines with a bypass ratio of 2 or more before a change in type design— (i) The airplane,...

  7. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airplanes and jet airplanes. 36.7 Section 36.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... paragraph (b) of this section: (1) Airplanes with high bypass ratio jet engines. For an airplane that has jet engines with a bypass ratio of 2 or more before a change in type design— (i) The airplane,...

  8. Networked control of microgrid system of systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Rahman, Mohamed Saif Ur; AL-Sunni, Fouad M.

    2016-08-01

    The microgrid has made its mark in distributed generation and has attracted widespread research. However, microgrid is a complex system which needs to be viewed from an intelligent system of systems perspective. In this paper, a network control system of systems is designed for the islanded microgrid system consisting of three distributed generation units as three subsystems supplying a load. The controller stabilises the microgrid system in the presence of communication infractions such as packet dropouts and delays. Simulation results are included to elucidate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  9. Systems study for an Integrated Digital-Electric Aircraft (IDEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tagge, G. E.; Irish, L. A.; Bailey, A. R.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the Integrated Digital/Electric Aircraft (IDEA) Study are presented. Airplanes with advanced systems were, defined and evaluated, as a means of identifying potential high payoff research tasks. A baseline airplane was defined for comparison, typical of a 1990's airplane with advanced active controls, propulsion, aerodynamics, and structures technology. Trade studies led to definition of an IDEA airplane, with extensive digital systems and electric secondary power distribution. This airplane showed an improvement of 3% in fuel use and 1.8% in DOC relative to the baseline configuration. An alternate configuration, an advanced technology turboprop, was also evaluated, with greater improvement supported by digital electric systems. Recommended research programs were defined for high risk, high payoff areas appropriate for implementation under NASA leadership.

  10. SRS control system upgrade requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.F.

    1998-08-04

    This document defines requirements for an upgrade of the Sodium Removal System (SRS) control system. The upgrade is being performed to solve a number of maintainability and operability issues. The upgraded system will provide the same functions, controls and interlocks as the present system, and in addition provide enhanced functionality in areas discussed in this document.

  11. System for controlling apnea

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F

    2015-05-05

    An implanted stimulation device or air control device are activated by an external radar-like sensor for controlling apnea. The radar-like sensor senses the closure of the air flow cavity, and associated control circuitry signals (1) a stimulator to cause muscles to open the air passage way that is closing or closed or (2) an air control device to open the air passage way that is closing or closed.

  12. An Investigation of the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an 0.08-Scale Model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 Airplane in the Langley High-Speed 7- by 10-Foot Tunnel. Part III - Longitudinal-Control Characteristics TED No. NACA DE308. Part 3; Longitudinal-Control Characteristics, TED No. NACA DE308

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.; King, Thomas J., Jr.

    1947-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in the Langley high speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.40 to 0.91 to determine the stability and control characteristics of an 0,08-scale model of the Chance Vought XF7U-1 airplane. The longitudinal-control characteristics of the complete model are presented in the present report with a limited analysis of the results.

  13. Controlling crippled aircraft-with throttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Fullerton, C. Gordon

    1991-01-01

    A multiengine crippled aircraft, with most or all of the flight control system inoperative, may use engine thrust for control. A study was conducted of the capability and techniques for emergency flight control. Included were light twin engine piston powered airplanes, an executive jet transport, commercial jet transports, and a high performance fighter. Piloted simulations of the B-720, B-747, B-727, MD-11, C-402, and F-15 airplanes were studied, and the Lear 24, PA-30, and F-15 airplanes were flight tested. All aircraft showed some control capability with throttles and could be kept under control in up-and-away flight for an extended period of time. Using piloted simulators, landings with manual throttles-only control were extremely difficult. However, there are techniques that improve the chances of making a survivable landing. In addition, augmented control systems provide major improvements in control capability and make repeatable landings possible. Control capabilities and techniques are discussed.

  14. Trend of airplane flight characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Koppen, Joachim

    1933-01-01

    This report describes the development of airplane characteristics since the war and indicates the direction development should take in the immediate future. Some of the major topics include: the behavior of an airplane about its lateral, vertical, and longitudinal axes. Behavior at large angles of attack and landing characteristics are also included.

  15. Space Shuttle flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, W. J.; Kubiak, E. T.; Peters, W. H.; Saldana, R. L.; Smith, E. E., Jr.; Stegall, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is a control stabilized vehicle with control provided by an all digital, fly-by-wire flight control system. This paper gives a description of the several modes of flight control which correspond to the Shuttle mission phases. These modes are ascent flight control (including open loop first stage steering, the use of four computers operating in parallel and inertial guidance sensors), on-orbit flight control (with a discussion of reaction control, phase plane switching logic, jet selection logic, state estimator logic and OMS thrust vector control), entry flight control and TAEM (terminal area energy management to landing). Also discussed are redundancy management and backup flight control.

  16. Distributed systems status and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreidler, David; Vickers, David

    1990-01-01

    Concepts are investigated for an automated status and control system for a distributed processing environment. System characteristics, data requirements for health assessment, data acquisition methods, system diagnosis methods and control methods were investigated in an attempt to determine the high-level requirements for a system which can be used to assess the health of a distributed processing system and implement control procedures to maintain an accepted level of health for the system. A potential concept for automated status and control includes the use of expert system techniques to assess the health of the system, detect and diagnose faults, and initiate or recommend actions to correct the faults. Therefore, this research included the investigation of methods by which expert systems were developed for real-time environments and distributed systems. The focus is on the features required by real-time expert systems and the tools available to develop real-time expert systems.

  17. The RHIC cryogenic control system

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, Y.; Sondericker, J.

    1993-08-01

    A cryogenic process control system for the RHIC Project is discussed. It is independent of the main RHIC Control System, consisting of an upgrade of the existing 24.8 Kw helium refrigerator control section with the addition of a ring control section that regulates and monitors all cryogenic signals in the RHIC tunnel. The system is fully automated, which can run without the continuous presence of operators.

  18. 77 FR 55163 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200, A330-300, A340-200, and A340- 300 series airplanes; and Model A340-541 airplanes and Model A340-642 airplanes. That NPRM proposed to require performing...

  19. 77 FR 63716 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ...-180-AD; Amendment 39-17213; AD 2012-20-07] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... -112 airplanes; and all Model A319, A320, and A321 series airplanes. That AD currently requires... incorporate revised fuel maintenance and inspection tasks, and adds airplanes to the applicability. This...

  20. 77 FR 48425 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ...-225-AD; Amendment 39-17152; AD 2012-16-05] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... freighter series airplanes; and Model A340-200, -300, -500, and -600 series airplanes. This AD was prompted... circuit for the fuel pumps for the center fuel tanks for certain airplanes, and center and rear fuel...