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Sample records for airplanes structure fatigue

  1. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... evaluation of commuter category airplanes. 23.574 Section 23.574 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes. For commuter category airplanes— (a) Metallic damage tolerance....

  2. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... evaluation of the strength, detail design, and fabrication must show that catastrophic failure due to...

  3. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... evaluation of the strength, detail design, and fabrication must show that catastrophic failure due to...

  4. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... evaluation of the strength, detail design, and fabrication must show that catastrophic failure due to...

  5. 14 CFR 23.574 - Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of commuter category airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.574 Metallic damage tolerance and fatigue... evaluation of the strength, detail design, and fabrication must show that catastrophic failure due to...

  6. Structural integrity of future aging airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, Jack F.; Goranson, Ulf G.

    1992-01-01

    A multitude of design considerations is involved in ensuring the structural integrity of Boeing jet transports that have common design concepts validated by extensive analyses, tests, and three decades of service. As airplanes approach their design service objectives, the incidences of fatigue and corrosion may become widespread. Continuing airworthiness of the aging jet fleet requires diligent performance from the manufacturer, the airlines, and airworthiness authorities. Aging fleet support includes timely development of supplemental structural inspection documents applicable to selected older airplanes, teardown inspections of high-time airframes retired from service, fatigue testing of older airframes, and structural surveys of more than 130 airplanes operated throughout the world. Lessons learned from these activities are incorporated in service bulletin recommendations, production line modifications, and design manual updates. An overview of traditional Boeing fleet support activities and the anticipated benefits for future generations of commercial airplanes based on the continuous design improvement process are presented.

  7. Structural integrity of future aging airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Jack F.; Goranson, Ulf G.

    1992-07-01

    A multitude of design considerations is involved in ensuring the structural integrity of Boeing jet transports that have common design concepts validated by extensive analyses, tests, and three decades of service. As airplanes approach their design service objectives, the incidences of fatigue and corrosion may become widespread. Continuing airworthiness of the aging jet fleet requires diligent performance from the manufacturer, the airlines, and airworthiness authorities. Aging fleet support includes timely development of supplemental structural inspection documents applicable to selected older airplanes, teardown inspections of high-time airframes retired from service, fatigue testing of older airframes, and structural surveys of more than 130 airplanes operated throughout the world. Lessons learned from these activities are incorporated in service bulletin recommendations, production line modifications, and design manual updates. An overview of traditional Boeing fleet support activities and the anticipated benefits for future generations of commercial airplanes based on the continuous design improvement process are presented.

  8. Fatigue Strength of Airplane and Engine Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaes, Kurt

    1934-01-01

    This report was undertaken to give a brief summary of the laws governing the fatigue stresses and of the most important strength coefficients necessary for the correct dimensioning of the structural members.

  9. 77 FR 55105 - Aging Airplane Program: Widespread Fatigue Damage; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ... entitled ``Aging Airplane Program: Widespread Fatigue Damage'' (77 FR 30877), which corrected a final rule published November 15, 2010 (75 FR 69746). In that technical amendment, the FAA intended to correct... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 121 and 129 RIN 2120-AI05 Aging Airplane Program:...

  10. Fatigue of titanium alloys in a supersonic-cruise airplane environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imig, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    The test programs conducted by several aerospace companies and NASA, summarized in this paper, studied several titanium materials previously identified as having high potential for application to supersonic cruise airplane structures. These studies demonstrate that the temperature (560 K) by itself produced no significant degradation of the materials. However, the fatigue resistance of titanium-alloy structures, in which thermal and loading effects are combined, has been studied insufficiently. The predominant topic for future study of fatigue problems in Mach 3 structures should be the influences of thermal stress particularly, the effects of thermal stress on failure location.

  11. 77 FR 30877 - Aging Airplane Program: Widespread Fatigue Damage; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... Airplane Program: Widespread Fatigue Damage,'' (75 FR 69746). In that final rule the FAA revised the... actions (see Damage Tolerance Data for Repairs and Alterations, 72 FR 70486). Change to Table 1 of Sec... Administration 14 CFR Parts 26, 121, and 129 RIN 2120-AI05 Aging Airplane Program: Widespread Fatigue...

  12. Vibration Response of Airplane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, Theodore; Gelalles, A G

    1935-01-01

    This report presents test results of experiments on the vibration-response characteristics of airplane structures on the ground and in flight. It also gives details regarding the construction and operation of vibration instruments developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.

  13. Fatigue handbook: Offshore steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Almarnaess, A.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of Offshore Steel Structures; Loads on Ocean Structures; Fracture Mechanics As a Tool in Fatigue Analysis; Basic Fatigue Properties of Welded Joints; Significance of Defects; Improving the Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints; Effects of Marine Environment and Cathodic Protection on Fatigue of Structural Steels Fatigue of Tubular Joints; Unstable Fracture; Fatigue Life Calculations; and Fatigue in Building Codes Background and Applications.

  14. The structure of airplane fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walen, E Dean

    1920-01-01

    This report prepared by the Bureau of Standards for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics supplies the necessary information regarding the apparatus and methods of testing and inspecting airplane fabrics.

  15. 75 FR 69745 - Aging Airplane Program: Widespread Fatigue Damage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... 17, 2006. \\3\\ 71 FR 19928 The FAA proposed that design approval holders for those airplanes be... the agency's proposal. \\4\\ 69 FR 45936, July 30, 2004. In July 2005, the FAA published a disposition... Airplanes,'' \\6\\ that explains our reasons for adopting requirements for design approval holders. \\5\\ 70...

  16. Residual strength and crack propagation tests on C-130 airplane center wings with service-imposed fatigue damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, H. L.; Reeder, F. L.; Dirkin, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Fourteen C-130 airplane center wings, each containing service-imposed fatigue damage resulting from 4000 to 13,000 accumulated flight hours, were tested to determine their fatigue crack propagation and static residual strength characteristics. Eight wings were subjected to a two-step constant amplitude fatigue test prior to static testing. Cracks up to 30 inches long were generated in these tests. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 56 to 87 percent of limit load. The remaining six wings containing cracks up to 4 inches long were statically tested as received from field service. Residual static strengths of these wings ranged from 98 to 117 percent of limit load. Damage-tolerant structural design features such as fastener holes, stringers, doublers around door cutouts, and spanwise panel splices proved to be effective in retarding crack propagation.

  17. Variable-Structure Control of a Model Glider Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Anderson, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    A variable-structure control system designed to enable a fuselage-heavy airplane to recover from spin has been demonstrated in a hand-launched, instrumented model glider airplane. Variable-structure control is a high-speed switching feedback control technique that has been developed for control of nonlinear dynamic systems.

  18. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 23.573 Section 23.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... operational life of the airplane must be consistent with the initial detectability and subsequent growth...

  19. 14 CFR 25.571 - Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 25.571 Section 25.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... damage, will be avoided throughout the operational life of the airplane. This evaluation must...

  20. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 23.573 Section 23.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... operational life of the airplane must be consistent with the initial detectability and subsequent growth...

  1. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 23.573 Section 23.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... operational life of the airplane must be consistent with the initial detectability and subsequent growth...

  2. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 23.573 Section 23.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... operational life of the airplane must be consistent with the initial detectability and subsequent growth...

  3. 14 CFR 23.573 - Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Damage tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 23.573 Section 23.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... operational life of the airplane must be consistent with the initial detectability and subsequent growth...

  4. Fatigue life estimation program for Part 23 airplanes, `AFS.FOR`

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.K.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce to the general aviation industry a computer program which estimates the safe fatigue life of any Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 23 airplane. The algorithm uses the methodology (Miner`s Linear Cumulative Damage Theory) and the various data presented in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Report No. AFS-120-73-2, dated May 1973. The program is written in FORTRAN 77 language and is executable on a desk top personal computer. The program prompts the user for the input data needed and provides a variety of options for its intended use. The program is envisaged to be released through issuance of a FAA report, which will contain the appropriate comments, instructions, warnings and limitations.

  5. Fittings and Other Structural Parts of Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eydam, P

    1923-01-01

    The strength and reliability of airplanes depend greatly on the careful design and manufacture of fittings, couplings, and other highly stressed parts. The more important parts of the airplane must be occasionally tested for increased loads and in order to avoid the possibility of defects creeping in during subsequent production. Strength tests are discussed for fittings for wing spar joints, fittings for strut connections, internal bracing, control gear, and landing gear.

  6. Design Oriented Structural Modeling for Airplane Conceptual Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livne, Eli

    1999-01-01

    The main goal for research conducted with the support of this grant was to develop design oriented structural optimization methods for the conceptual design of airplanes. Traditionally in conceptual design airframe weight is estimated based on statistical equations developed over years of fitting airplane weight data in data bases of similar existing air- planes. Utilization of such regression equations for the design of new airplanes can be justified only if the new air-planes use structural technology similar to the technology on the airplanes in those weight data bases. If any new structural technology is to be pursued or any new unconventional configurations designed the statistical weight equations cannot be used. In such cases any structural weight estimation must be based on rigorous "physics based" structural analysis and optimization of the airframes under consideration. Work under this grant progressed to explore airframe design-oriented structural optimization techniques along two lines of research: methods based on "fast" design oriented finite element technology and methods based on equivalent plate / equivalent shell models of airframes, in which the vehicle is modelled as an assembly of plate and shell components, each simulating a lifting surface or nacelle / fuselage pieces. Since response to changes in geometry are essential in conceptual design of airplanes, as well as the capability to optimize the shape itself, research supported by this grant sought to develop efficient techniques for parametrization of airplane shape and sensitivity analysis with respect to shape design variables. Towards the end of the grant period a prototype automated structural analysis code designed to work with the NASA Aircraft Synthesis conceptual design code ACS= was delivered to NASA Ames.

  7. 75 FR 9811 - Airworthiness Directives; Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. (EMBRAER) Model ERJ 170 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic... 170 airplane full scale fatigue test, cracks were found in some structural components of the airplane... timely detection of fatigue cracks. Undetected fatigue cracks in these areas could adversely affect...

  8. Fatigue performance of welded aluminum deck structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haagensen, P.J.; Ranes, M.; Kluken, A.O.; Kvale, I.

    1996-12-01

    Aluminum alloys are used increasingly in load carrying structures where low weight and low maintenance costs are at a premium. Helicopter decks, structures for living quarters and personnel transfer bridges between platforms are examples of offshore applications. While these structures are not usually subjected to high fatigue loads, the increasing use of aluminum in high speed ships, and more recently in highway bridge structures, makes the question of fatigue performance more important. In this paper the fatigue properties of small scale weldments in an AA6005 alloy are compared with the results of fatigue tests on full scale sections of welded extrusions in the same material, which were used in an aluminum bridge deck structure. The fatigue performance is also compared with the fatigue clauses in the new British design code BS8118 for aluminium structures and the proposed Eurocode 9. The prospects of using a new joining technique, friction stir welding (FSW), in the production of large scale panels for deck and ship hull structures is discussed. The FSW process is described briefly, and some fatigue test data are presented.

  9. Fatigue studies of polyurethane sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishna, M.; Narasimha Murthy, H. N.; Sathyamoorthy, M.; Bhattacharya, Debes

    2004-10-01

    The fatigue characteristics of polyurethane foam-cored (PUF) composite sandwich structures were investigated using three-point bending tests carried out according to ASTM C 393. Three types of specimens (epoxy/glass-PUF-epoxy/glass, polyester/glass-PUF-polyester/glass, and epoxy/glass-PUF-polyester/glass) were considered for investigation. Experimental results indicate that degradation of stiffness occurs due to debonding and sliding between the skin and the foam during fatigue cycles. Epoxy/glass-PUF-epoxy/glass sandwich structures exhibit higher bending strength along with higher stiffness degradation than the other two types of sandwich panels, due to higher initial fatigue loading. The lowest fatigue properties have been obtained for the polyester/glass-PUF-polyester/glass sandwich panel specimens. Better performance of the epoxy/glass-PUF-epoxy/glass sandwich panels is most likely due to the superior properties of the outer thin skins. Most of the specimens fail within the foam region and not at the skin level. This situation is possibly due to debonding between the foam and the skin. The fatigue damage development in the foam and skin has been investigated using scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic and plastic deformations calculated under variety of loading conditions. Prediction of fatigue-crack-growth lives made with FatigueCrack-Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to initial crack configuration, FASTRAN predicts crack length and other parameters until complete break occurs. Loads are tensile or compressive and of variable or constant amplitude. FASTRAN incorporates linear-elastic fracture mechanics with modifications of load-interaction effects caused by crack closure. FASTRAN considered research tool, because of lengthy calculation times. FASTRAN written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  11. 76 FR 8316 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... systems that affect the structural capability of the airplane. The applicable airworthiness regulations do... are systems that may affect the airplane's structural performance, either directly or as a result of... conditions, and thereby affect its structural capability. These systems may also affect the...

  12. 14 CFR 29.571 - Fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fatigue evaluation of structure. 29.571... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Fatigue Evaluation § 29.571 Fatigue evaluation of structure. (a) General. An evaluation of the strength of...

  13. Correlation and assessment of structural airplane crash data with flight parameters at impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1982-01-01

    Crash deceleration pulse data from a crash dynamics program on general aviation airplanes and from transport crash data were analyzed. Structural airplane crash data and flight parameters at impact were correlated. Uncoupled equations for the normal and longitudinal floor impulses in the cabin area of the airplane were derived, and analytical expressions for structural crushing during impact and horizontal slide out were also determined. Agreement was found between experimental and analytical data for general aviation and transport airplanes over a relatively wide range of impact parameter. Two possible applications of the impulse data are presented: a postcrash evaluation of crash test parameters and an assumed crash scenario.

  14. 76 FR 36865 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... Federal Register on February 14, 2011 (76 FR 8316). Only one comment was received. Clarification of GVI... that affect the structural capability of the airplane. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not... unusual design features. These features are systems that may affect the airplane's structural...

  15. Fatigue Reliability of Gas Turbine Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The results of an investigation are described for fatigue reliability in engine structures. The description consists of two parts. Part 1 is for method development. Part 2 is a specific case study. In Part 1, the essential concepts and practical approaches to damage tolerance design in the gas turbine industry are summarized. These have evolved over the years in response to flight safety certification requirements. The effect of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods on these methods is also reviewed. Assessment methods based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, with regard to both crack initiation and crack growth, are outlined. Limit state modeling techniques from structural reliability theory are shown to be appropriate for application to this problem, for both individual failure mode and system-level assessment. In Part 2, the results of a case study for the high pressure turbine of a turboprop engine are described. The response surface approach is used to construct a fatigue performance function. This performance function is used with the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) to determine the probability of failure and the sensitivity of the fatigue life to the engine parameters for the first stage disk rim of the two stage turbine. A hybrid combination of regression and Monte Carlo simulation is to use incorporate time dependent random variables. System reliability is used to determine the system probability of failure, and the sensitivity of the system fatigue life to the engine parameters of the high pressure turbine. 'ne variation in the primary hot gas and secondary cooling air, the uncertainty of the complex mission loading, and the scatter in the material data are considered.

  16. Aircraft fatigue and crack growth considering loads by structural component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    The indisputable 1968 C-130 fatigue/crack growth data is reviewed to obtain additional useful information on fatigue and crack growth. The proven Load Environment Model concept derived empirically from F-105D multichannel recorder data is refined to a simpler method by going from 8 to 5 variables in the spectra without a decrease in accuracy. This approach provides the true fatigue/crack growth and load environment by structural component for both fatigue and strength design. Methods are presented for defining fatigue scatter and damage at crack initiation. These design tools and criteria may be used for both metal and composite aircraft structure.

  17. Structural response of transport airplanes in crash situations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, R. G.; Caiafa, C.

    1983-01-01

    This report highlights the results of contractural studies of transport accident data undertaken in a joint research program sponsored by the FAA and NASA. From these accident data studies it was concluded that the greatest potential for improved transport crashworthiness is in the reduction of fire related fatalities. Accident data pertaining to fuselage integrity, main landing gear collapse, fuel tank rupture, wing breaks, tearing of tank lower surfaces, and engine pod scrubbing are discussed. In those accidents where the energy absorbing protective capability of the fuselage structure is expended and the airplane experiences major structural damage, trauma caused fatalities are also discussed. The dynamic performance of current seat/restraint systems are examined but it is concluded that the accident data does not adequately define the relationship between occupant response and the dynamic interaction with the seat, floor and fuselage structure.

  18. 14 CFR 27.571 - Fatigue evaluation of flight structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fatigue evaluation of flight structure. 27....571 Fatigue evaluation of flight structure. (a) General. Each portion of the flight structure (the flight structure includes rotors, rotor drive systems between the engines and the rotor hubs,...

  19. 14 CFR 27.571 - Fatigue evaluation of flight structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fatigue evaluation of flight structure. 27....571 Fatigue evaluation of flight structure. (a) General. Each portion of the flight structure (the flight structure includes rotors, rotor drive systems between the engines and the rotor hubs,...

  20. 14 CFR 27.571 - Fatigue evaluation of flight structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fatigue evaluation of flight structure. 27....571 Fatigue evaluation of flight structure. (a) General. Each portion of the flight structure (the flight structure includes rotors, rotor drive systems between the engines and the rotor hubs,...

  1. 14 CFR 27.571 - Fatigue evaluation of flight structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fatigue evaluation of flight structure. 27....571 Fatigue evaluation of flight structure. (a) General. Each portion of the flight structure (the flight structure includes rotors, rotor drive systems between the engines and the rotor hubs,...

  2. 14 CFR 29.571 - Fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fatigue evaluation of structure. 29.571... § 29.571 Fatigue evaluation of structure. (a) General. An evaluation of the strength of principal... (including tolerance to flaws). The structure must be shown by analysis supported by test evidence and,...

  3. Aircraft fatigue failures and tasks of structural reliability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Genkichi

    The aircraft structural inspection pattern and the statistical method of the structural fatigue life prediction are presented. The problems of the aircraft structural life span and the evaluation of fatigue strength are discussed, such as out of plane bending and deformation, and multiple site damage (MSD). The crack data of Boeing 747 section 41 upper deck frame and stringer is listed.

  4. Effect of interaction on landing-gear behavior and dynamic loads in a flexible airplane structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Francis E; Milwitzky, Benjamin

    1956-01-01

    The effects of interaction between a landing gear and a flexible airplane structure on the behavior of the landing gear and the loads in the structure have been studied by treating the equations of motion of the airplane and the landing gear as a coupled system. The landing gear is considered to have nonlinear characteristics typical of conventional gears, namely, velocity-squared damping, polytropic air-compression springing, and exponential tire force-deflection characteristics. For the case where only two modes of the structure are considered, an equivalent three-mass system is derived for representing the airplane and landing-gear combination, which may be used to simulate the effects of structural flexibility in jig drop tests of landing gears. As examples to illustrate the effects of interaction, numerical calculations, based on the structural properties of two large airplanes having considerably different mass and flexibility characteristics, are presented.

  5. The Boeing 747 fatigue integrity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, M. M.

    1972-01-01

    The fatigue integrity program which was established to insure economic operations and to provide foundation data for inspection and maintenance is discussed. Significant features of the 747 fatigue integrity program are: (1) fatigue analyses which are continually updated to reflect design changes, fatigue test results, and static and flight load survey measurements; (2) material selection and detail design by using initial fatigue analyses, service experience, and testing; and (3) fatigue testing to check detail design quality and to verify the analyses, culminated by the test of a structurally complete airframe. Fatigue stress analyses were performed with the aid of experimental as well as analytical procedures. Extensive application was made of the stress severity factor, developed at Boeing, for evaluating peak stresses in complex joints. A frame of reference was established by families of structural fatigue performance curves (S-N curves) encompassing the range of materials and fatigue qualities anticipated for the 747 airplane design.

  6. Structural concepts and experimental considerations for a versatile high-speed research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, L. R.; Kirkham, F. S.; Weidner, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Future aircraft may be hydrogen fueled and fly at hypersonic speeds. The resulting environments will require new structural concepts to satisfy performance goals. Large representative structures will have to be flight tested prior to commitment to a costly vehicle fleet. To perform flight tests, a versatile, economical, high-speed research airplane is defined. Results of this study including experimental considerations for a hypersonic research airplane are reported.

  7. Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep. Fatigue is a lack of energy and motivation. Drowsiness and apathy (a feeling of not caring ... fatigue symptoms, and your lifestyle, habits, and feelings. Tests that may be ordered include the following: Blood ...

  8. Acoustically induced structural fatigue of piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.; Francis, J.T.

    1999-11-01

    Piping systems handling high-pressure and high-velocity steam and various process and hydrocarbon gases through a pressure-reducing device can produce severe acoustic vibration and metal fatigue in the system. It has been previously shown that the acoustic fatigue of the piping system is governed by the relationship between fluid pressure drop and downstream Mach number, and the dimensionless pipe diameter/wall thickness geometry parameter. In this paper, the devised relationship is extended to cover acoustic fatigue considerations of medium and smaller-diameter piping systems.

  9. The characterization of widespread fatigue damage in fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Willard, Scott A.; Miller, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of widespread fatigue damage (WSFD) in fuselage riveted structure were established by detailed nondestructive and destructive examinations of fatigue damage contained in a full size fuselage test article. The objectives of this were to establish an experimental data base for validating emerging WSFD analytical prediction methodology and to identify first order effects that contribute to fatigue crack initiation and growth. Detailed examinations were performed on a test panel containing four bays of a riveted lap splice joint. The panel was removed from a full scale fuselage test article after receiving 60,000 full pressurization cycles. The results of in situ examinations document the progression of fuselage skin fatigue crack growth through crack linkup. Detailed tear down examinations and fractography of the lap splice joint region revealed fatigue crack initiation sites, crack morphology, and crack linkup geometry. From this large data base, distributions of crack size and locations are presented and discussions of operative damage mechanisms are offered.

  10. Structural characterization and magnetic properties of steels subjected to fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.; Tang, F.; Biner, S. B.; Jiles, D. C.

    2000-05-01

    Studies have been made on the effects of residual stress and microstructure on the variations of magnetic properties of steels during fatigue. Strain-controlled fatigue tests have been conducted on 0.2wt% C steel samples which were (1) cold-worked, (2) cold-worked and annealed at 500 °C to relieve residual stress, and (3) annealed at 905 °C to produce a ferrite/pearlite structure. The changes of surface microstructure were studied by SEM replica technique. The dislocation structures of samples fatigued for different numbers of cycle were studied by TEM. In the initial stage of fatigue coercivity was found to behave differently for samples which have different residual stress levels. In the intermediate stage the magnetic hysteresis parameters became stable as the dislocation cell structure developed in the samples. In the final stage the magnetic parameters decreased dramatically. The decrease rate is related to the propagation rate of fatigue cracks observed in the SEM study, which was found to be dependent on the sample microstructure. The present results indicate that the magnetic inspection technique is able to differentiate the residual stress effects from the fatigue damage induced by cyclic loading, and therefore it is possible to detect the onset of fatigue failure in steel components via measurements of the changes in magnetic properties.—This work was sponsored by the National Science Foundation, under grant number CMS-9532056.

  11. 77 FR 58791 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will... principal structural elements (PSEs). We are proposing this AD to detect and correct fatigue cracking of various PSEs, which could adversely affect the structural integrity of these airplanes. DATES: We...

  12. 77 FR 4890 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation for Composite Rotorcraft Structures, and Damage Tolerance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Fatigue Evaluation for Metallic Structures'' (76 FR 75435), published December 2, 2011. In the ``Composite... Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation for Composite Rotorcraft Structures'' (76 FR 74655). On December 2, 2011... Fatigue Evaluation for Composite Rotorcraft Structures, and Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation...

  13. Airplane structure health monitoring by the optical frequency modulation Brillouin distributed measuring method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yari, Takashi; Ishioka, Masato; Nagai, Kanehiro; Sakurai, Tateo

    2005-05-01

    The necessity for Airplane structural health-monitoring technology has been increasing because of improvement of reliability and cost saving. Optical fiber sensor system is an attractive method for structural health monitoring, because of its lightweight, non-electromagnetic interference, and to be embeddable to composite structures. Especially the distributed optical fiber sensor fits the health monitoring for large-sized structures. However, the distributed optical fiber measurement system using the pulse light represented by BOTDR has low spatial resolution and long measurement interval. These performances have been the obstacle of application to airplane structure health monitoring system. Then, the authors have proposed the Brillouin optical frequency modulation method for improvement of the spatial resolution and shortening of measurement intervals. In this work, we conducted basic approach in order to develop Brillouin Optical Frequency Domain Analysis (BOFDA) measurement system, such as pump power property and frequency modulation property for Brillouin stimulated light. We confirmed ability to measure stimulated Brillouin Scattering light in 50mm section. Moreover, We considered the optical fiber sensor installation issue on the airplane structure. The issue is optical fiber sensor birefringence under asymmetric load and durability of installation method. We conducted two confirmatory tests for the issues. The proposed installation method has adequate performance. From these results, it was confirmed that BOFDA system has potential to be applied to an airplane structure health monitoring system.

  14. Fatigue reliability of deck structures subjected to correlated crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, G. Q.; Garbatov, Y.; Guedes Soares, C.

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this work is to analyse fatigue reliability of deck structures subjected to correlated crack growth. The stress intensity factors of the correlated cracks are obtained by finite element analysis and based on which the geometry correction functions are derived. The Monte Carlo simulations are applied to predict the statistical descriptors of correlated cracks based on the Paris-Erdogan equation. A probabilistic model of crack growth as a function of time is used to analyse the fatigue reliability of deck structures accounting for the crack propagation correlation. A deck structure is modelled as a series system of stiffened panels, where a stiffened panel is regarded as a parallel system composed of plates and are longitudinal. It has been proven that the method developed here can be conveniently applied to perform the fatigue reliability assessment of structures subjected to correlated crack growth.

  15. Computational simulation of acoustic fatigue for hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Sutjahjo, Edhi

    1991-01-01

    Predictive methods/computer codes for the computational simulation of acoustic fatigue resistance of hot composite structures subjected to acoustic excitation emanating from an adjacent vibrating component are discussed. Select codes developed over the past two decades at the NASA Lewis Research Center are used. The codes include computation of acoustic noise generated from a vibrating component, degradation in material properties of a composite laminate at use temperature, dynamic response of acoustically excited hot multilayered composite structure, degradation in the first ply strength of the excited structure due to acoustic loading, and acoustic fatigue resistance of the excited structure, including the propulsion environment. Effects of the laminate lay-up and environment on the acoustic fatigue life are evaluated. The results show that, by keeping the angled plies on the outer surface of the laminate, a substantial increase in the acoustic fatigue life is obtained. The effect of environment (temperature and moisture) is to relieve the residual stresses leading to an increase in the acoustic fatigue life of the excited panel.

  16. Computational simulation of acoustic fatigue for hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, S. N.; Nagpal, V. K.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents predictive methods/codes for computational simulation of acoustic fatigue resistance of hot composite structures subjected to acoustic excitation emanating from an adjacent vibrating component. Select codes developed over the past two decades at the NASA Lewis Research Center are used. The codes include computation of (1) acoustic noise generated from a vibrating component, (2) degradation in material properties of the composite laminate at use temperature, (3) dynamic response of acoustically excited hot multilayered composite structure, (4) degradation in the first-ply strength of the excited structure due to acoustic loading, and (5) acoustic fatigue resistance of the excited structure, including propulsion environment. Effects of the laminate lay-up and environment on the acoustic fatigue life are evaluated. The results show that, by keeping the angled plies on the outer surface of the laminate, a substantial increase in the acoustic fatigue life is obtained. The effect of environment (temperature and moisure) is to relieve the residual stresses leading to an increase in the acoustic fatigue life of the excited panel.

  17. 77 FR 57536 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... series airplanes, a full-scale fatigue test article was inspected for skin cracks at similar structural... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will..., positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the...

  18. 77 FR 57541 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... series airplanes, a full-scale fatigue test article was inspected for skin cracks at similar structural... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... small entities under the criteria of the Regulatory Flexibility Act. List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part...

  19. Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemotherapy and radiation Recovering from major surgery Anxiety, stress, or depression Staying up too late Drinking too much alcohol or too many caffeinated drinks Pregnancy One disorder that causes extreme fatigue is chronic ...

  20. 14 CFR 29.571 - Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic Structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Fatigue Evaluation § 29.571 Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic Structure. (a) A fatigue tolerance evaluation...

  1. 30 CFR 250.908 - What are the minimum structural fatigue design requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... prevent catastrophic failure of the platform or structure, The results of a fatigue analysis must indicate... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the minimum structural fatigue design... Platforms and Structures Platform Approval Program § 250.908 What are the minimum structural fatigue...

  2. 30 CFR 250.908 - What are the minimum structural fatigue design requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... prevent catastrophic failure of the platform or structure, The results of a fatigue analysis must indicate... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the minimum structural fatigue design... Platforms and Structures Platform Approval Program § 250.908 What are the minimum structural fatigue...

  3. 30 CFR 250.908 - What are the minimum structural fatigue design requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... prevent catastrophic failure of the platform or structure, The results of a fatigue analysis must indicate... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the minimum structural fatigue design... Platforms and Structures Platform Approval Program § 250.908 What are the minimum structural fatigue...

  4. Nonlinear analyses of composite aerospace structures in sonic fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the semiannual research progress, accomplishments, and future plans performed under the NASA Langley Research Center Grant No. NAG-1-1358. The primary research effort of this project is the development of analytical methods for the prediction of nonlinear random response of composite aerospace structures subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads. The progress, accomplishments, and future plates on four sonic fatigue research topics are described. The sonic fatigue design and passive control of random response of shape memory alloy hybrid composites presented in section 4, which is suited especially for HSCT, is a new initiative.

  5. 76 FR 75435 - Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    .... It was generally agreed, based on in-service experience, that not accounting for damage could be a... intervals based on damage growth, the residual strength evaluation must show that the remaining structure... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 29 RIN 2120-AJ51 Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of...

  6. Advances in Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the advances that have been made in stress analyses of cracked aircraft components, in the understanding of the fatigue and fatigue-crack growth process, and in the prediction of residual strength of complex aircraft structures with widespread fatigue damage. Finite-element analyses of cracked structures are now used to determine accurate stress-intensity factors for cracks at structural details. Observations of small-crack behavior at open and rivet-loaded holes and the development of small-crack theory has lead to the prediction of stress-life behavior for components with stress concentrations under aircraft spectrum loading. Fatigue-crack growth under simulated aircraft spectra can now be predicted with the crack-closure concept. Residual strength of cracked panels with severe out-of-plane deformations (buckling) in the presence of stiffeners and multiple-site damage can be predicted with advanced elastic-plastic finite-element analyses and the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. These advances are helping to assure continued safety of aircraft structures.

  7. Structural fatigue test results for large wind turbine blade sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to provide quantitative information on the operating life capabilities of wind turbine rotor blade concepts for root-end load transfer, a series of cantilever beam fatigue tests was conducted. Fatigue tests were conducted on a laminated wood blade with bonded steel studs, a low cost steel spar (utility pole) with a welded flange, a utility pole with additional root-end thickness provided by a swaged collar, fiberglass spars with both bonded and nonbonded fittings, and, finally, an aluminum blade with a bolted steel fitting (Lockheed Mod-0 blade). Photographs, data, and conclusions for each of these tests are presented. In addition, the aluminum blade test results are compared to field failure information; these results provide evidence that the cantilever beam type of fatigue test is a satisfactory method for obtaining qualitative data on blade life expectancy and for identifying structurally underdesigned areas (hot spots).

  8. Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fatigue can be a symptom of anemia, particularly iron-deficiency anemia . Your body needs iron to make hemoglobin, the substance in red blood ... tissues and to your baby. Your need for iron increases during pregnancy because of the needs of ...

  9. A computer program for cyclic plasticity and structural fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalev, I.

    1980-01-01

    A computerized tool for the analysis of time independent cyclic plasticity structural response, life to crack initiation prediction, and crack growth rate prediction for metallic materials is described. Three analytical items are combined: the finite element method with its associated numerical techniques for idealization of the structural component, cyclic plasticity models for idealization of the material behavior, and damage accumulation criteria for the fatigue failure.

  10. Mechanisms for fatigue and wear of polysilicon structural thinfilms

    SciTech Connect

    Alsem, Daniel Henricus

    2006-12-01

    Fatigue and wear in micron-scale polysilicon structural films can severely impact the reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Despite studies on fatigue and wear behavior of these films, there is still an on-going debate regarding the precise physical mechanisms for these two important failure modes. Although macro-scale silicon does not fatigue, this phenomenon is observed in micron-scale silicon. It is shown that for polysilicon devices fabricated in the MUMPs foundry and SUMMiT process stress-lifetime data exhibits similar trends in ambient air, shorter lifetimes in higher relative humidity environments and no fatigue failure at all in high vacuum. Transmission electron microscopy of the surface oxides of the samples show an approximate four-fold thickening of the oxide at stress concentrations after fatigue failure, but no thickening after fracture in air or after fatigue cycling in vacuo. It is found that such oxide thickening and fatigue failure (in air) occurs in devices with initial oxide thicknesses of {approx}4-20 nm. Such results are interpreted and explained by a reaction layer fatigue mechanism; specifically, moisture-assisted subcritical cracking within a cyclic stress-assisted thickened oxide layer occurs until the crack reaches a critical size to cause catastrophic failure. Polysilicon specimens from the SUMMiT process are used to study wear mechanisms in micron-scale silicon in ambient air. Worn parts are examined by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while temperature changes are monitored using infrared microscopy. These results are compared with the development of values of static coefficients of friction (COF) with number of wear cycles. Observations show amorphous debris particles ({approx}50-100 nm) created by fracture through the silicon grains ({approx}500 nm), which subsequently oxidize, agglomerate into clusters and create plowing tracks. A nano-crystalline layer ({approx}20-200 nm) forms at worn

  11. Mechanisms for fatigue and wear of polysilicon structural thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsem, Daniel Henricus

    Fatigue and wear in micron-scale polysilicon structural films can severely impact the reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Despite studies on fatigue and wear behavior of these films, there is still an on-going debate regarding the precise physical mechanisms for these two important failure modes. Although macro-scale silicon does not fatigue, this phenomenon is observed in micron-scale silicon. It is shown that for polysilicon devices fabricated in the MUMPs foundry and SUMMiT(TM) process stress-lifetime data exhibits similar trends in ambient air, shorter lifetimes in higher relative humidity environments and no fatigue failure at all in high vacuum. Transmission electron microscopy of the surface oxides of the samples show an approximate four-fold thickening of the oxide at stress concentrations after fatigue failure, but no thickening after fracture in air or after fatigue cycling in vacuo . It is found that such oxide thickening and fatigue failure (in air) occurs in devices with initial oxide thicknesses of ˜4-20 nm. Such results are interpreted and explained by a reaction-layer fatigue mechanism; specifically, moisture-assisted subcritical cracking within a cyclic stress-assisted thickened oxide layer occurs until the crack reaches a critical size to cause catastrophic failure. Polysilicon specimens from the SUMMiT(TM) process are used to study wear mechanisms in micron-scale silicon in ambient air. Worn parts are examined by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy, while temperature changes are monitored using infrared microscopy. These results are compared with the development of values of static coefficients of friction (COF) with number of wear cycles. Observations show amorphous debris particles (˜50-100 nm) created by fracture through the silicon grains (˜500 nm), which subsequently oxidize, agglomerate into clusters and create plowing tracks. A nano-crystalline layer (˜20-200 nm) forms at worn regions. No

  12. 77 FR 12989 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ...We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200 series airplanes; Model A330-300 series airplanes; Model A340-200 series airplanes; and Model A340-300 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report that three failures of the retraction bracket occurred during fatigue testing before the calculated life limit of the main landing gear (MLG). This AD......

  13. The Dynairship. [structural design criteria and feasibility analysis of an airplane - airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A feasibility analysis for the construction and use of a combination airplane-airship named 'Dynairship' is undertaken. Payload capacities, fuel consumption, and the structural design of the craft are discussed and compared to a conventional commercial aircraft (a Boeing 747). Cost estimates of construction and operation of the craft are also discussed. The various uses of the craft are examined (i.e, in police work, materials handling, and ocean surveillance), and aerodynamic configurations and photographs are shown.

  14. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2004-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  15. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  16. 75 FR 24501 - Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic Structures; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Notice No. 10-04, Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic Structures (75 FR 11799, 3/12/2010). Comments... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 27 RIN 2120-AJ51 Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic... airworthiness standards for fatigue tolerance evaluation (FTE) of transport category metallic...

  17. 14 CFR 29.571 - Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic Structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic Structure. 29.571 Section 29.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Fatigue Evaluation § 29.571 Fatigue...

  18. Fatigue damage assessment of high-usage in-service aircraft fuselage structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosinyi, Bao Rasebolai

    As the commercial and military aircraft fleets continue to age, there is a growing concern that multiple-site damage (MSD) can compromise structural integrity. Multiple site damage is the simultaneous occurrence of many small cracks at independent structural locations, and is the natural result of fatigue, corrosion, fretting and other possible damage mechanisms. These MSD cracks may linkup and form a fatigue lead crack of critical length. The presence of MSD also reduces the structure's ability to withstand longer cracks. The objective of the current study is to assess, both experimentally and analytically, MSD formation and growth in the lap joint of curved panels removed from a retired aircraft. A Boeing 727-232 airplane owned and operated by Delta Air Lines, and retired at its design service goal, was selected for the study. Two panels removed from the left-hand side of the fuselage crown, near stringer 4L, were subjected to extended fatigue testing using the Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility located at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) William J. Hughes Technical Center. The state of MSD was continuously assessed using several nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods. Damage to the load attachment points of the first panel resulted in termination of the fatigue test at 43,500 fatigue cycles, before cracks had developed in the lap joint. The fatigue test for the second panel was initially conducted under simulated in-service loading conditions for 120,000 cycles, and no cracks were detected in the skin of the panel test section. Artificial damage was then introduced into the panel at selected rivets in the critical (lower) rivet row, and the fatigue loads were increased. Visually detectable crack growth from the artificial notches was first seen after 133,000 cycles. The resulting lead crack grew along the lower rivet row, eventually forming an 11.8" long unstable crack after 141,771 cycles, at which point the

  19. Determination of airplane model structure from flight data using splines and stepwise regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.; Batterson, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of airplane model structure from flight data is presented. The model is based on a polynomial spline representation of the aerodynamic coefficients, and the procedure is implemented by use of a stepwise regression. First, a form of the aerodynamic force and moment coefficients amenable to the utilization of splines is developed. Next, expressions for the splines in one and two variables are introduced. Then the steps in the determination of an aerodynamic model structure and the estimation of parameters are discussed briefly. The focus is on the application to flight data of the techniques developed.

  20. Effects of Range of Stress and of Special Notches on Fatigue Properties of Aluminum Alloys Suitable for Airplane Propellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Thomas J

    1942-01-01

    Laboratory tests were made to obtain information on the load-resisting properties of X76S-T aluminum alloy when subjected to static, impact, and repeated loads. Results are presented from static-load test of unnotched specimens in tension and in torsion and of notched specimens in tension. Charpy impact values obtained from bend tests on notched specimens and tension impact values for both notched and unnotched specimens tested at several different temperatures are included. The endurance limits obtained from repeated bending fatigue tests made on three different types of testing machine are given for unnotched polished specimens, and the endurance limits of notched specimens subjected to six different ranges of bending stress are also reported. The results indicated that: (a) polished rectangular specimens had an endurance limit about 30 percent less than that obtained for round specimens; (b) a comparison of endurance limits obtained from tests on three different types of machine indicated that there was no apparent effect of speed of testing on the endurance limit for the range of speeds used (1,750 to 13,000 rpm). (c) the fatigue strength (endurance limit) of the X76S-T alloy was greatly decreased by the presence of a notch in the specimens; (d) no complete fractures of the entire specimens occurred in notched fatigue specimens when subjected to stress cycles for which the mean stress at the notch during the cycle was a compressive stress; for this test condition a microscopic cracking occurred near the root of the notch and was used as a criterion of failure of the specimen. (e) as the mean stress at the notch was decreased from a tensile (+) stress to a compressive (-) stress, it was found that the alternating stress that could be superimposed on the mean stress in the cycle without causing failure of the specimens was increased.

  1. 77 FR 20522 - Airworthiness Directives; Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ...We are superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD) for all Lockheed Martin Corporation/Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Model L-1011-385-1, L-1011-385-1-14, and L-1011-385-1-15 airplanes. That AD currently requires implementation of a Supplemental Inspection Document (SID) program of structural inspections to detect fatigue cracking, and repair if necessary, to ensure continued......

  2. Determination of airplane model structure from flight data by using modified stepwise regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.; Batterson, J. G.; Murphy, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    The linear and stepwise regressions are briefly introduced, then the problem of determining airplane model structure is addressed. The MSR was constructed to force a linear model for the aerodynamic coefficient first, then add significant nonlinear terms and delete nonsignificant terms from the model. In addition to the statistical criteria in the stepwise regression, the prediction sum of squares (PRESS) criterion and the analysis of residuals were examined for the selection of an adequate model. The procedure is used in examples with simulated and real flight data. It is shown that the MSR performs better than the ordinary stepwise regression and that the technique can also be applied to the large amplitude maneuvers.

  3. A review of the effects of coolant environments on the fatigue life of LWR structural materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2009-04-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code specifies design curves for the fatigue life of structural materials in nuclear power plants. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments were not explicitly considered in the development of the design curves. The existing fatigue-strain-versus-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data indicate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. Under certain environmental and loading conditions, fatigue lives in water relative to those in air can be a factor of 15 lower for austenitic stainless steels and a factor of {approx}30 lower for carbon and low-alloy steels. This paper reviews the current technical basis for the understanding of the fatigue of piping and pressure vessel steels in LWR environments. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to identify the various material, environmental, and loading parameters that influence fatigue crack initiation and to establish the effects of key parameters on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models are presented for estimating fatigue life as a function of material, loading, and environmental conditions. An environmental fatigue correction factor for incorporating the effects of LWR environments into ASME Code fatigue evaluations is described. This paper also presents a critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins of 2 on stress (or strain) and 20 on life and assesses the possible conservatism in the current choice of design margins.

  4. Heat sink structural design concepts for a hypersonic research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    Hypersonic research aircraft design requires careful consideration of thermal stresses. This paper relates some of the problems in a heat sink structural design that can be avoided by appropriate selection of design options including material selection, design concepts, and load paths. Data on several thermal loading conditions are presented on various conventional designs including bulkheads, longerons, fittings, and frames. Results indicate that conventional designs are inadequate and that acceptable designs are possible by incorporating innovative design practices. These include nonintegral pressure compartments, ball-jointed links to distribute applied loads without restraining the thermal expansion, and material selections based on thermal compatibility.

  5. 78 FR 76980 - Special Conditions: Airbus, A350-900 Series Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... Privacy Act Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478... structural performance. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate... features: Systems that affect the airplane's structural performance, either directly or as a result...

  6. 77 FR 70941 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo..., affect its structural performance. Current regulations do not take into account loads for the airplane due to the effects of systems on structural performance including normal operation and...

  7. 78 FR 11556 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A., Model EMB-550 Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... was published in the Federal Register on November 28, 2012, (77 FR 70941). No comments were received..., affect its structural performance. Current regulations do not take into account loads for the airplane due to the effects of systems on structural performance including normal operation and...

  8. Structural health monitoring of wind towers: residual fatigue life estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, M.; Fontanari, V.; Battisti, L.

    2013-04-01

    In a recent paper (Benedetti et al 2011 Smart Mater. Struct. 20 055009), the authors investigated the possibility of detecting cracks in critical sites of onshore wind towers using a radial arrangement of strain sensors around the tower periphery in the vicinity of the base welded joint. Specifically, the strain difference between adjacent strain sensors is used as a damage indicator. The number of sensors to be installed is determined by the minimum crack size to be detected, which in turn depends on the expected extreme wind conditions and programmed inspection/repair schedule. In this companion paper, we address these issues by investigating possible strategies for residual fatigue life assessment and management of onshore wind towers once the crack has been detected. For this purpose, fracture mechanics tests are carried out using welded samples to quantify the resistance to fatigue crack growth as well as the elastic-plastic fracture toughness of the welded joint at the tower base. These material strength characteristics are used to estimate (i) the critical crack size for structural integrity on the basis of fracture toughness tests, elastoplastic finite element analyses and loading spectra under extreme wind conditions, (ii) the residual life before structural collapse, applying a frequency-domain method to typical in-service wind actions and wind directionality.

  9. Structural integrity and fatigue crack propagation life assessment of welded and weld-repaired structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohammad Shah

    2005-11-01

    Structural integrity is the science and technology of the margin between safety and disaster. Proper evaluation of the structural integrity and fatigue life of any structure (aircraft, ship, railways, bridges, gas and oil transmission pipelines, etc.) is important to ensure the public safety, environmental protection, and economical consideration. Catastrophic failure of any structure can be avoided if structural integrity is assessed and necessary precaution is taken appropriately. Structural integrity includes tasks in many areas, such as structural analysis, failure analysis, nondestructive testing, corrosion, fatigue and creep analysis, metallurgy and materials, fracture mechanics, fatigue life assessment, welding metallurgy, development of repairing technologies, structural monitoring and instrumentation etc. In this research fatigue life assessment of welded and weld-repaired joints is studied both in numerically and experimentally. A new approach for the simulation of fatigue crack growth in two elastic materials has been developed and specifically, the concept has been applied to butt-welded joint in a straight plate and in tubular joints. In the proposed method, the formation of new surface is represented by an interface element based on the interface potential energy. This method overcomes the limitation of crack growth at an artificial rate of one element length per cycle. In this method the crack propagates only when the applied load reaches the critical bonding strength. The predicted results compares well with experimental results. The Gas Metal Arc welding processes has been simulated to predict post-weld distortion, residual stresses and development of restraining forces in a butt-welded joint. The effect of welding defects and bi-axial interaction of a circular porosity and a solidification crack on fatigue crack propagation life of butt-welded joints has also been investigated. After a weld has been repaired, the specimen was tested in a universal

  10. Structure-property relations and modeling of small crack fatigue behavior of various magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Jairus Daniel

    Lightweight structural components are important to the automotive and aerospace industries so that better fuel economy can be realized. Magnesium alloys in particular are being examined to fulfill this need due to their attractive stiffness- and strength-to-weight ratios when compared to other materials. However, when introducing a material into new roles, one needs to properly characterize its mechanical properties. Fatigue behavior is especially important considering aerospace and automotive component applications. Therefore, quantifying the structure-property relationships and accurately predicting the fatigue behavior for these materials are vital. This study has two purposes. The first is to quantify the structure-property relationships for the fatigue behavior in an AM30 magnesium alloy. The second is to use the microstructural-based MultiStage Fatigue (MSF) model in order to accurately predict the fatigue behavior of three magnesium alloys: AM30, Elektron 21, and AZ61. While some studies have previously quantified the MSF material constants for several magnesium alloys, detailed research into the fatigue regimes, notably the microstructurally small crack (MSC) region, is lacking. Hence, the contribution of this work is the first of its kind to experimentally quantify the fatigue crack incubation and MSC regimes that are used for the MultiStage Fatigue model. Using a multi-faceted experimental approach, these regimes were explored with a replica method that used a dual-stage silicone based compound along with previously published in situ fatigue tests. These observations were used in calibrating the MultiStage Fatigue model.

  11. Flight and analytical investigations of a structural mode excitation system on the YF-12A airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, E. A.; Murphy, R. C.; Beranek, J. A.; Davis, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    A structural excitation system, using an oscillating canard vane to generate force, was mounted on the forebody of the YF-12A airplane. The canard vane was used to excite the airframe structural modes during flight in the subsonic, transonic, and supersonic regimes. Structural modal responses generated by the canard vane forces were measured at the flight test conditions by airframe-mounted accelerometers. Correlations of analytical and experimental aeroelastic results were made. Doublet lattice, steady state double lattice with uniform lag, Mach box, and piston theory all produced acceptable analytical aerodynamic results within the restrictions that apply to each. In general, the aerodynamic theory methods, carefully applied, were found to predict the dynamic behavior of the YF-12A aircraft adequately.

  12. Acoustic fatigue life prediction for nonlinear structures with multiple resonant modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, R. N.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents an effort to develop practical and accurate methods for estimating the fatigue lives of complex aerospace structures subjected to intense random excitations. The emphasis of the current program is to construct analytical schemes for performing fatigue life estimates for structures that exhibit nonlinear vibration behavior and that have numerous resonant modes contributing to the response.

  13. Dynamic response and acoustic fatigue of stiffened composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soovere, J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of acoustic fatigue and dynamic response tests performed on L-1011 graphite-epoxy (GrE) aileron and panel components are reported. The aileron featured glass microballoons between the GrE skins. Tests yielded random fatigue data from double and single cantilever coupons and modal data from impedance hammer and loudspeaker impulses. Numerical and sample test data were obtained on combined acoustic and shear loads, acoustic and thermal loads, random fatigue and damping of the integrally stiffened and secondary bonded panels. The fatigue data indicate a fatigue life beyond 10 million cycles. The acoustic data suggested that noise transmission could be enhanced in the integrally stiffened panels, which were more acoustic-fatigue resistant than were the secondary bonded panels.

  14. An active control logic to improve the fatigue strength of smart flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosio, Pasquale; Braghin, Francesco; Resta, Ferruccio; Ripamonti, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    In general active vibration control intrinsically implies a fatigue damage reduction. Anyway, this assumption is not always verified. In these cases it is possible to deeper investigate the fatigue phenomena on smart flexible structures and their reduction from a control point of view. In this article, to identify the problem main parameters, a simplified interpretation of fatigue damage is given using the frequency analysis framework. Then, the active control logic is defined as an optimization problem with a quadratic functional taking into account the previously cited parameters. Finally, because of non-linearity of fatigue phenomenon, an adaptive approach is applied and a numerical/experimental validation is carried out.

  15. 14 CFR 27.573 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures. 27.573 Section 27.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Fatigue Evaluation §...

  16. 14 CFR 29.573 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures. 29.573 Section 29.573 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Fatigue Evaluation...

  17. 30 CFR 250.908 - What are the minimum structural fatigue design requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Platform Approval Program § 250.908 What are the minimum structural fatigue design requirements? (a) API RP 2A-WSD, Recommended Practice for Planning, Designing and Constructing Fixed Offshore Platforms (incorporated by reference as specified in 30 CFR 250.198), requires that the design fatigue life of each...

  18. 75 FR 793 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ...This proposal would revise airworthiness standards for type certification requirements of normal and transport category rotorcraft. The amendment would require evaluation of fatigue and residual static strength of composite rotorcraft structures using a damage tolerance evaluation, or a fatigue evaluation, if the applicant establishes that a damage tolerance evaluation is impractical. The......

  19. Structural health management of aerospace hotspots under fatigue loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Sunilkumar

    Sustainability and life-cycle assessments of aerospace systems, such as aircraft structures and propulsion systems, represent growing challenges in engineering. Hence, there has been an increasing demand in using structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques for continuous monitoring of these systems in an effort to improve safety and reduce maintenance costs. The current research is part of an ongoing multidisciplinary effort to develop a robust SHM framework resulting in improved models for damage-state awareness and life prediction, and enhancing capability of future aircraft systems. Lug joints, a typical structural hotspot, were chosen as the test article for the current study. The thesis focuses on integrated SHM techniques for damage detection and characterization in lug joints. Piezoelectric wafer sensors (PZTs) are used to generate guided Lamb waves as they can be easily used for onboard applications. Sensor placement in certain regions of a structural component is not feasible due to the inaccessibility of the area to be monitored. Therefore, a virtual sensing concept is introduced to acquire sensor data from finite element (FE) models. A full three dimensional FE analysis of lug joints with piezoelectric transducers, accounting for piezoelectrical-mechanical coupling, was performed in Abaqus and the sensor signals were simulated. These modeled sensors are called virtual sensors. A combination of real data from PZTs and virtual sensing data from FE analysis is used to monitor and detect fatigue damage in aluminum lug joints. Experiments were conducted on lug joints under fatigue loads and sensor signals collected were used to validate the simulated sensor response. An optimal sensor placement methodology for lug joints is developed based on a detection theory framework to maximize the detection rate and minimize the false alarm rate. The placement technique is such that the sensor features can be directly correlated to damage. The technique accounts for a

  20. Development of advanced structural analysis methodologies for predicting widespread fatigue damage in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA is developing a 'tool box' that includes a number of advanced structural analysis computer codes which, taken together, represent the comprehensive fracture mechanics capability required to predict the onset of widespread fatigue damage. These structural analysis tools have complementary and specialized capabilities ranging from a finite-element-based stress-analysis code for two- and three-dimensional built-up structures with cracks to a fatigue and fracture analysis code that uses stress-intensity factors and material-property data found in 'look-up' tables or from equations. NASA is conducting critical experiments necessary to verify the predictive capabilities of the codes, and these tests represent a first step in the technology-validation and industry-acceptance processes. NASA has established cooperative programs with aircraft manufacturers to facilitate the comprehensive transfer of this technology by making these advanced structural analysis codes available to industry.

  1. Incorporating mesh-insensitive structural stress into the fatigue assessment procedure of common structural rules for bulk carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Min; Kim, Myung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a fatigue assessment procedure using mesh-insensitive structural stress method based on the Common Structural Rules for Bulk Carriers by considering important factors, such as mean stress and thickness effects. The fatigue assessment result of mesh-insensitive structural stress method have been compared with CSR procedure based on equivalent notch stress at major hot spot points in the area near the ballast hold for a 180 K bulk carrier. The possibility of implementing mesh-insensitive structural stress method in the fatigue assessment procedure for ship structures is discussed.

  2. Fatigue crack detection in metallic structures with Lamb waves and 3D laser vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszewski, W. J.; Lee, B. C.; Traynor, R.

    2007-03-01

    The paper presents the application of ultrasonic guided waves for fatigue crack detection in metallic structures. The study involves a simple fatigue test performed to introduce a crack into an aluminium plate. Lamb waves generated by a low-profile, surface-bonded piezoceramic transducer are sensed using a tri-axis, multi-position scanning laser vibrometer. The results demonstrate the potential of laser vibrometry for simple, rapid and robust detection of fatigue cracks in metallic structures. The method could be used in quality inspection and in-service maintenance of metallic structures in aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering industries.

  3. Large Area Nondestructive Evaluation of a Fatigue Loaded Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2016-01-01

    Large area nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspections are required for fatigue testing of composite structures to track damage initiation and growth. Of particular interest is the progression of damage leading to ultimate failure to validate damage progression models. In this work, passive thermography and acoustic emission NDE were used to track damage growth up to failure of a composite three-stringer panel. Fourteen acoustic emission sensors were placed on the composite panel. The signals from the array were acquired simultaneously and allowed for acoustic emission location. In addition, real time thermal data of the composite structure were acquired during loading. Details are presented on the mapping of the acoustic emission locations directly onto the thermal imagery to confirm areas of damage growth leading to ultimate failure. This required synchronizing the acoustic emission and thermal data with the applied loading. In addition, processing of the thermal imagery which included contrast enhancement, removal of optical barrel distortion and correction of angular rotation before mapping the acoustic event locations are discussed.

  4. Experimental research activities in dynamic response and sonic fatigue of hypersonic vehicle structures at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of experimental research activities being pursued at the NASA Langley Research Center for dynamic response and sonic fatigue of hypersonic vehicle structures. The capabilities of the principle test facility, the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus, are first given. Results from recent dynamic response and sonic fatigue tests on candidate hypersonic vehicle structures are then presented.

  5. Probabilistic structural risk assessment for fatigue management using structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiao, Michael; Wu, Y.-T. J.; Ghoshal, Anindya; Ayers, James; Le, Dy

    2012-04-01

    The primary goal of Army Prognostics & Diagnostics is to develop real-time state awareness technologies for primary structural components. In fatigue-critical structural maintenance, the probabilistic structural risk assessment (PSRA) methodology for fatigue life management using conventional nondestructive investigation (NDI) has been developed based on the assumption of independent inspection outcomes. When using the emerging structural health monitoring (SHM) systems with in situ sensors, however, the independent assumption no longer holds, and the existing PSRA methodology must be modified. The major issues currently under investigation are how to properly address the correlated inspection outcomes from the same sensors on the same components and how to quantify its effect in the SHM-based PSRA framework. This paper describes a new SHM-based PSRA framework with a proper modeling of correlations among multiple inspection outcomes of the same structural component. The framework and the associated probabilistic algorithms are based on the principles of fatigue damage progression, NDI reliability assessment and structural reliability methods. The core of this framework is an innovative, computationally efficient, probabilistic method RPI (Recursive Probability Integration) for damage tolerance and risk-based maintenance planning. RPI can incorporate a wide range of uncertainties including material properties, repair quality, crack growth related parameters, loads, and probability of detection. The RPI algorithm for SHM application is derived in detail. The effects of correlation strength and inspection frequency on the overall probability of missing all detections are also studied and discussed.

  6. A class 2 weight assessment for the implementation of commonality and preliminary structural designs for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creighton, Tom; Dragush, George; Hendrich, Louis; Hensley, Doug; Morgan, Louise; Oxendine, Charles; Remen, John; Robinson, Terry; Russell, Mark; Swift, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of commonality objectives are determined. Commonality is discussed in terms of weight penalties that increase the take-off weight of several members of the family of airplanes. Preliminary designs of fuselage structural members and a discussion of weight penalties due to implementation of common fuselage structure throughout the family is examined. Wing torque box designs are discussed along with structural weight penalties incurred. A landing gear design study is contained along with the weight penalties that a common gear system will impose. Implementation of common power plants throughout the family and the weight penalties that occur are discussed. The weight penalties imposed by commonality on all the airplanes in the family are summarized. Class 2 breakdowns are also presented. The feasibility of commonality based on a percentage of take-off weight increase over the Class 2 baseline weights is then assessed.

  7. MLS: Airplane system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. D.; Stapleton, B. P.; Walen, D. B.; Rieder, P. F.; Moss, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis, modeling, and simulations were conducted as part of a multiyear investigation of the more important airplane-system-related items of the microwave landing system (MLS). Particular emphasis was placed upon the airplane RF system, including the antenna radiation distribution, the cabling options from the antenna to the receiver, and the overall impact of the airborne system gains and losses upon the direct-path signal structure. In addition, effort was expended toward determining the impact of the MLS upon the airplane flight management system and developing the initial stages of a fast-time MLS automatic control system simulation model. Results ot these studies are presented.

  8. Designing piping systems against acoustically-induced structural fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Eisinger, F.L.

    1996-12-01

    Piping systems adapted for handling fluids such as steam and various process and hydrocarbon gases through a pressure-reducing device at high pressure and velocity conditions can produce severe acoustic vibration and metal fatigue in the system. It has been determined that such vibrations and fatigue are minimized by relating the acoustic power level (PWL) to being a function of the ratio of downstream pipe inside diameter D{sub 2} to its thickness t{sub 2}. Additionally, such vibration and fatigue can be further minimized by relating the fluid pressure drop and downstream mach number to a function of the ratio of downstream piping inside diameter to the pipe wall thickness, as expressed by M{sub 2} {Delta}p = f(D{sub 2}/t{sub 2}). Pressure-reducing piping systems designed according to these criteria exhibit minimal vibrations and metal fatigue failures and have long operating life.

  9. A high temperature fatigue and structures testing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartolotta, Paul A.; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    As man strives for higher levels of sophistication in air and space transportation, awareness of the need for accurate life and material behavior predictions for advanced propulsion system components is heightened. Such sophistication will require complex operating conditions and advanced materials to meet goals in performance, thrust-to-weight ratio, and fuel efficiency. To accomplish these goals will require that components be designed using a high percentage of the material's ultimate capabilities. This serves only to complicate matters dealing with life and material behavior predictions. An essential component of material behavior model development is the underlying experimentation which must occur to identify phenomena. To support experimentation, the NASA Lewis Research Center's High Temperature Fatigue and Structures Laboratory has been expanded significantly. Several new materials testing systems have been added, as well as an extensive computer system. The intent of this paper is to present an overview of the laboratory, and to discuss specific aspects of the test systems. A limited discussion of computer capabilities will also be presented.

  10. Sliding Contact Fatigue Damage in Layered Ceramic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Joo-Hyung; Thompson, Van P.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Porcelain veneered restorations often chip and fracture from repeated occlusal loading, making fatigue studies relevant. Most fatigue studies are limited to uniaxial loading without sliding motion. We hypothesize that biaxial loading (contact-load-slide-liftoff, simulating a masticatory cycle) as compared to uniaxial loading accelerates the fatigue of layered ceramics. Monolithic glass plates were epoxy joined to polycarbonate substrates as a transparent model for an all-ceramic crown on dentin. Uniaxial and biaxial cyclic contact was applied through a hard sphere in water with a mouth-motion machine. The uniaxial (contact-load-hold-liftoff) and traditional R-ratio fatigue (indenter never leaves the specimen surface) produced a similar lifespan, while biaxial fatigue was more severe. The accelerated crack growth rate in biaxial fatigue is attributed to enhanced tensile stresses at the trailing edges of a moving indenter. Fracture mechanics descriptions for damage evolution in brittle materials loaded repeatedly with a sliding sphere are provided. Clinical relevance is addressed. PMID:17959894

  11. Fatigue damage prognosis of a cruciform structure under biaxial random and flight profile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Peralta, Pedro; Quech, Dan

    2010-04-01

    The accurate estimation of fatigue life of metallic structural components in service environments is still a challenge for the aircraft designer or fleet manager. Majority of the current available fatigue life prediction models has deficiency to accurately predict damage under random or flight profile service loads. The inherent accuracy is due to the stochastic nature of crack propagation in metallic structure. In addition, currently no generic prediction model available accounting the load interaction effects due to variable loading. In the present paper we discus the use of a Generic Bayesian framework based Gaussian process approach to probabilistically predict the fatigue damage under complex random and flight profile loading.

  12. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  13. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  14. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1-0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction. PMID:26706539

  15. An Energy Based Fatigue Life Prediction Framework for In-Service Structural Components

    SciTech Connect

    H. Ozaltun; M. H.H. Shen; T. George; C. Cross

    2011-06-01

    An energy based fatigue life prediction framework has been developed for calculation of remaining fatigue life of in service gas turbine materials. The purpose of the life prediction framework is to account aging effect caused by cyclic loadings on fatigue strength of gas turbine engines structural components which are usually designed for very long life. Previous studies indicate the total strain energy dissipated during a monotonic fracture process and a cyclic process is a material property that can be determined by measuring the area underneath the monotonic true stress-strain curve and the sum of the area within each hysteresis loop in the cyclic process, respectively. The energy-based fatigue life prediction framework consists of the following entities: (1) development of a testing procedure to achieve plastic energy dissipation per life cycle and (2) incorporation of an energy-based fatigue life calculation scheme to determine the remaining fatigue life of in-service gas turbine materials. The accuracy of the remaining fatigue life prediction method was verified by comparison between model approximation and experimental results of Aluminum 6061-T6. The comparison shows promising agreement, thus validating the capability of the framework to produce accurate fatigue life prediction.

  16. Stall-proof Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachmann, G

    1927-01-01

    My lecture has to do with the following questions. Is the danger of stalling necessarily inherent in the airplane in its present form and structure, or can it be diminished or eliminated by suitable means? Do we possess such means or devices and how must they operate? In this connection I will devote special attention to the exhibition of stall-proof airplanes by Fokker under the auspices of the English Air Ministry, which took place in Croyden last April.

  17. Blended Buffet-Load-Alleviation System for Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    The capability of modern fighter airplanes to sustain flight at high angles of attack and/or moderate angles of sideslip often results in immersion of part of such an airplane in unsteady, separated, vortical flow emanating from its forebody or wings. The flows from these surfaces become turbulent and separated during flight under these conditions. These flows contain significant levels of energy over a frequency band coincident with that of low-order structural vibration modes of wings, fins, and control surfaces. The unsteady pressures applied to these lifting surfaces as a result of the turbulent flows are commonly denoted buffet loads, and the resulting vibrations of the affected structures are known as buffeting. Prolonged exposure to buffet loads has resulted in fatigue of structures on several airplanes. Damage to airplanes caused by buffeting has led to redesigns of airplane structures and increased support costs for the United States Air Force and Navy as well as the armed forces of other countries. Time spent inspecting, repairing, and replacing structures adversely affects availability of aircraft for missions. A blend of rudder-control and piezoelectric- actuator engineering concepts was selected as a basis for the design of a vertical-tail buffet-load-alleviation system for the F/A-18 airplane. In this system, the rudder actuator is used to control the response of the first tail vibrational mode (bending at a frequency near 15 Hz), while directional patch piezoelectric actuators are used to control the second tail vibrational mode (tip torsion at a frequency near 45 Hz). This blend of two types of actuator utilizes the most effective features of each. An analytical model of the aeroservoelastic behavior of the airplane equipped with this system was validated by good agreement with measured results from a full-scale ground test, flight-test measurement of buffet response, and an in-flight commanded rudder frequency sweep. The overall performance of the

  18. Al-Li alloy AA2198's very high cycle fatigue crack initiation mechanism and its fatigue thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luopeng; Cao, Xiaojian; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-10-01

    AA2198 alloy is one of the third generation Al-Li alloys which have low density, high elastic modulus, high specific strength and specific stiffness. Compared With the previous two generation Al-Li alloys, the third generation alloys have much improved in alloys strength, corrosion resistance and weldable characteristic. For these advantages, the third generation Al-Li alloys are used as aircraft structures, such as C919 aviation airplane manufactured by China and Russia next generation aviation airplane--MS-21. As we know, the aircraft structures are usually subjected to more than 108 cycles fatigue life during 20-30 years of service, however, there is few reported paper about the third generation Al-Li alloys' very high cycle fatigue(VHCF) which is more than 108 cycles fatigue. The VHCF experiment of AA2198 have been carried out. The two different initiation mechanisms of fatigue fracture have been found in VHCF. The cracks can initiate from the interior of the testing material with lower stress amplitude and more than 108 cycles fatigue life, or from the surface or subsurface of material which is the dominant reason of fatigue failures. During the experiment, the infrared technology is used to monitor the VHCF thermal effect. With the increase of the stress, the temperature of sample is also rising up, increasing about 15 °C for every 10Mpa. The theoretical thermal analysis is also carried out.

  19. Lewis Structures Technology, 1988. Volume 3: Structural Integrity Fatigue and Fracture Wind Turbines HOST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The charter of the Structures Division is to perform and disseminate results of research conducted in support of aerospace engine structures. These results have a wide range of applicability to practioners of structural engineering mechanics beyond the aerospace arena. The specific purpose of the symposium was to familiarize the engineering structures community with the depth and range of research performed by the division and its academic and industrial partners. Sessions covered vibration control, fracture mechanics, ceramic component reliability, parallel computing, nondestructive evaluation, constitutive models and experimental capabilities, dynamic systems, fatigue and damage, wind turbines, hot section technology (HOST), aeroelasticity, structural mechanics codes, computational methods for dynamics, structural optimization, and applications of structural dynamics, and structural mechanics computer codes.

  20. Fatigue Life of Postbuckled Structures with Indentation Damages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Bisagni, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The fatigue life of composite stiffened panels with indentation damage was investigated experimentally using single stringer compression specimens. Indentation damage was induced on one of the two flanges of each stringer. The experiments were conducted using advanced instrumentation, including digital image correlation, passive thermography, and in-situ ultrasonic scanning. Specimens with initial indentation damage lengths of 32 millimeters to 56 millimeters were tested quasi-statically and in fatigue, and the effects of cyclic load amplitude and damage size were studied. A means of comparison of the damage propagation rates and collapse loads based on a stress intensity measure and the Paris law is proposed.

  1. Fatigue Life of Postbuckled Structures with Indentation Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Bisagni, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The fatigue life of composite stiffened panels with indentation damage was investigated experimentally using single stringer compression specimens. Indentation damage was induced on one of the two flanges of the stringer. The experiments were conducted using advanced instrumentation, including digital image correlation, passive thermography, and in-situ ultrasonic scanning. Specimens with initial indentation damage lengths of 37 millimeters to 56 millimeters were tested in fatigue and the effects of cyclic load amplitude and damage size were studied. A means of comparison of the damage propagation rates and collapse loads based on a stress intensity measure and the Paris law is proposed.

  2. Prediction of Fatigue Crack Growth of Repaired Al-alloy Structures with Double Sides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benachour, M.; Benachour, N.; Benguediab, M.; Seriari, F. Z.

    During navigation, aircrafts are subject to fatigue damage. In order to rehabilitate damaged structures some techniques are often used to resolve this problem. Efficient repair technique, called composite patch repair, was used to reinforce the damaged structures and stop cracks. In this paper, effect of composite patch repair (Boron/Epoxy) on fatigue crack growth (FCG) was investigated on 2219 T62 Al-alloy. Effects of double patch repair in single notch tensile specimen (SENT) on FCG were studied and compared to single patch repair. Results show beneficial effect of patch repair on fatigue life and FCGR in comparison with the un-patched specimen. In addition, effect of mean stress characterized by stress ratio was highlighted. Fatigue behavior of investigated Al-alloy was compared.

  3. Fatigue analysis of chevron structures with Z shape arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecpoyotl Torres, Margarita; Cabello Ruiz, Ramón; Vera Dimas, J. G.; Rodriguez Ramirez, J. Alfredo; Escobedo Alatorre, J. Jesus; Ocampo Diaz, Alejandra

    2015-08-01

    Due to the diversity and multiple energy domains involved, Micro-Electromechanical Systems MEMS devices are vulnerable to several mechanical failures such as fatigue. They been widely used in military applications, radio frequency systems, pressure sensors, automotive industry, among several others. Most MEMS devices contain moving parts that are subjected to cyclic loading, which degrade the devicés efficiency. Due to the high importance of MEMS in various applications, it is necessary to know their lifetime to prevent any damage or process discontinuity to which the system is subject. There have been several investigations in particular on the fatigue analysis in presence of cracks, however in terms of lifetime under cycling load, information is not abundant. The fatigue analysis can be performed for characterizing the ability of materials to support many cycles. Some parts of systems are exposed to strong stress level experiences during its usable lifetime, so the analysis must be focused on them. In this paper, a simulated fatigue analysis of classic, Z-shape and optimized chevron with Z shape arms is shown. Simulations are made using Ansys 15.0, to obtain the arms lifetime of the system because they are subjected to greater stresses in the presence of cyclic loading.

  4. An Investigation of High-Cycle Fatigue Models for Metallic Structures Exhibiting Snap-Through Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Sweitzer, Karl A.

    2007-01-01

    A study is undertaken to develop a methodology for determining the suitability of various high-cycle fatigue models for metallic structures subjected to combined thermal-acoustic loadings. Two features of this problem differentiate it from the fatigue of structures subject to acoustic loading alone. Potentially large mean stresses associated with the thermally pre- and post-buckled states require models capable of handling those conditions. Snap-through motion between multiple post-buckled equilibrium positions introduces very high alternating stress. The thermal-acoustic time history response of a clamped aluminum beam structure with geometric and material nonlinearities is determined via numerical simulation. A cumulative damage model is employed using a rainflow cycle counting scheme and fatigue estimates are made for 2024-T3 aluminum using various non-zero mean fatigue models, including Walker, Morrow, Morrow with true fracture strength, and MMPDS. A baseline zero-mean model is additionally considered. It is shown that for this material, the Walker model produces the most conservative fatigue estimates when the stress response has a tensile mean introduced by geometric nonlinearity, but remains in the linear elastic range. However, when the loading level is sufficiently high to produce plasticity, the response becomes more fully reversed and the baseline, Morrow, and Morrow with true fracture strength models produce the most conservative fatigue estimates.

  5. Balance fatigue design of cast steel nodes in tubular steel structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Libin; Jin, Hui; Dong, Haiwei; Li, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cast steel nodes are being increasingly popular in steel structure joint application as their advanced mechanical performances and flexible forms. This kind of joints improves the structural antifatigue capability observably and is expected to be widely used in the structures with fatigue loadings. Cast steel node joint consists of two parts: casting itself and the welds between the node and the steel member. The fatigue resistances of these two parts are very different; the experiment results showed very clearly that the fatigue behavior was governed by the welds in all tested configurations. This paper focuses on the balance fatigue design of these two parts in a cast steel node joint using fracture mechanics and FEM. The defects in castings are simulated by cracks conservatively. The final crack size is decided by the minimum of 90% of the wall thickness and the value deduced by fracture toughness. The allowable initial crack size could be obtained through the integral of Paris equation when the crack propagation life is considered equal to the weld fatigue life; therefore, the two parts in a cast steel node joint will have a balance fatigue life. PMID:24163621

  6. Balance Fatigue Design of Cast Steel Nodes in Tubular Steel Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Libin; Jin, Hui; Li, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cast steel nodes are being increasingly popular in steel structure joint application as their advanced mechanical performances and flexible forms. This kind of joints improves the structural antifatigue capability observably and is expected to be widely used in the structures with fatigue loadings. Cast steel node joint consists of two parts: casting itself and the welds between the node and the steel member. The fatigue resistances of these two parts are very different; the experiment results showed very clearly that the fatigue behavior was governed by the welds in all tested configurations. This paper focuses on the balance fatigue design of these two parts in a cast steel node joint using fracture mechanics and FEM. The defects in castings are simulated by cracks conservatively. The final crack size is decided by the minimum of 90% of the wall thickness and the value deduced by fracture toughness. The allowable initial crack size could be obtained through the integral of Paris equation when the crack propagation life is considered equal to the weld fatigue life; therefore, the two parts in a cast steel node joint will have a balance fatigue life. PMID:24163621

  7. The X-15 airplane - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dana, William H.

    1993-01-01

    The X-15 rocket research airplane flew to an altitude of 354,000 ft and reached Mach 6.70. In almost 200 flights, this airplane was used to gather aerodynamic-heating, structural loads, stability and control, and atmospheric-reentry data. This paper describes the origins, design, and operation of the X-15 airplane. In addition, lessons learned from the X-15 airplane that are applicable to designing and testing the National Aero-Space Plane are discussed.

  8. Analysis of fatigue, fatique-crack propagation, and fracture data. [design of metallic aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaske, C. E.; Feddersen, C. E.; Davies, K. B.; Rice, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for consolidation of fatigue, fatigue-crack propagation, and fracture data for use in design of metallic aerospace structural components. To evaluate these methods, a comprehensive file of data on 2024 and 7075 aluminums, Ti-6A1-4V, and 300M and D6Ac steels was established. Data were obtained from both published literature and unpublished reports furnished by aerospace companies. Fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation analyses were restricted to information obtained from constant-amplitude load or strain cycling of specimens in air at room temperature. Fracture toughness data were from tests of center-cracked tension panels, part-through crack specimens, and compact-tension specimens.

  9. Effects of Aging Structures and Humidity on Fatigue Properties of Maraging Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kousuke; Nagano, Takanori; Moriyama, Michihiko; Wang, Xishu; Kawagoishi, Norio

    Effects of aging structures and humidity on fatigue properties of 350 grade 18% Ni maraging steel were investigated under rotating bending in relative humidity of 25% and 85%. Aging conditions tested were a conventional single aging and a double one which was aged at low temperature after the conventional aging. In each aging, under and peak aged steels were prepared. Tensile strength was increased by the double aging without reduction of the ductility. Proportional relation between fatigue limit and Vickers hardness held until 750HV in low humidity. However fatigue strength was largely decreased by high humidity, especially in the peak aged steel at the single aging. The decrease in fatigue strength by high humidity was mainly caused by the acceleration of a crack initiation due to the anodic dissolution. The acceleration of a crack initiation was larger in the steel peak aged at the single aging with larger precipitated particles.

  10. Relationship between pore structure and mechanical properties of ordinary concrete under bending fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.

    1998-05-01

    Progressive macro damage of concrete under fatigue loading is caused by the change of its internal micro-meso properties such as pore structure. In this study, porosity, pore size distribution, and specific surface area of ordinary concrete at different fatigue stages were investigated using mercury intrusion, helium flow, and nitrogen adsorption (BET) methods. These properties changed with increasing loading cycles and could be taken as micro-meso damage parameters to evaluate macro fatigue damage of concrete. Test results showed that both porosity in mortar (mainly macro pores) and interface between mortar and coarse aggregates (interfacial cracks) developed at a similar rate. The corresponding residual bending fatigue strength and dynamic bending Young`s modulus were also obtained and their relationships with these micro-meso properties were established. The intrinsic bending strength and intrinsic bending Young`s modulus were predicted from these relationships.

  11. Enhancing fatigue life of cylinder-crown integrated structure by optimizing dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Xiaosong; Wang, Zhongren; Yuan, Shijian

    2015-03-01

    Cylinder-crown integrated hydraulic press (CCIHP) is a new press structure. The hemispherical hydraulic cylinder also functions as a main portion of crown, which has lower weight and higher section modulus compared with the conventional hydraulic cylinder and press crown. As a result, the material strength capacity is better utilized. During the engineering design of cylinder-crown integrated structure, in order to increase the fatigue life, structural optimization on the basis of the adaptive macro genetic algorithms (AMGA) is first conducted to both reduce weight and decrease peak stress. It is shown that the magnitude of the maximum principal stress is decreased by 28.6%, and simultaneously the total weight is reduced by 4.4%. Subsequently, strain-controlled fatigue test is carried out, and the stress-strain hysteresis loops and cyclic hardening curve are obtained. Based on linear fit, the fatigue properties are calculated and used for the fatigue life prediction. It is shown that the predicted fatigue life is significantly increased from 157000 to 1070000 cycles after structural optimization. Finally, according to the optimization design, a 6300 kN CCIHP has been manufactured, and priority application has been also suggested.

  12. Creep-fatigue interaction and related structure property correlations of EUROFER97 steel at 550 °C by decoupling creep and fatigue load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorpahl, C.; Möslang, A.; Rieth, M.

    2011-10-01

    Mechanical tests have been performed at 550 °C under vacuum on the ferritic-martensitic steel EUROFER97. These experiments included fatigue tests, creep tests and combined creep-fatigue tests. The latter showed significant cyclic softening in the fatigue stage and a remarkable break-down of creep strength in the creep stage. The cyclic softening behaviour was almost identical for all tests and therefore insensitive to the different strain amplitudes. SEM of the specimen's fracture surfaces and free surfaces revealed that networks of coagulated surface cracks formed during creep-fatigue were not failure relevant. TEM imaging displayed a drastic drop in dislocation density, and a considerable formation of precipitates and subgrain-structures in all tests. Pure fatigue led to the strongest reduction of dislocation density, whereas creep-fatigue induced the most pronounced formation of precipitates. Obviously, the internal softening due to prior cycling led to accelerated creep. Hence, a modified damage model for creep-fatigue load cases was proposed.

  13. Results of a Cyclic Load Test of an RB-47E Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, Wilber B.

    1959-01-01

    Results of a cyclic load test made by NASA on an EB-47E airplane are given. The test reported on is for one of three B-47 airplanes in a test program set up by the U. S. Air Force to evaluate the effect of wing structural reinforcements on fatigue life. As a result of crack development in the upper fuselage longerons of the other two airplanes in the program, a longeron and fuselage skin modification was incorporated early in the test. Fuselage strain-gage measurements made before and after the longeron modification and wing strain-gage measurements made only after wing reinforcement are summarized. The history of crack development and repair is given in detail. Testing was terminated one sequence short of the planned end of the program with the occurrence of a major crack in the lower right wing skin.

  14. A Summary of the Fatigue Properties of Wind Turbine Materials

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, HERBERT J.

    1999-10-07

    Modern wind turbines are fatigue critical machines that are typically used to produce electrical power from the wind. The materials used to construct these machines are subjected to a unique loading spectrum that contains several orders of magnitude more cycles than other fatigue critical structures, e.g., an airplane. To facilitate fatigue designs, a large database of material properties has been generated over the past several years that is specialized to materials typically used in wind turbines. In this paper, I review these fatigue data. Major sections are devoted to the properties developed for wood, metals (primarily aluminum) and fiberglass. Special emphasis is placed on the fiberglass discussion because this material is current the material of choice for wind turbine blades. The paper focuses on the data developed in the U.S., but cites European references that provide important insights.

  15. Excitation, response, and fatigue life estimation methods for the structural design of externally blown flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, E. E.; Chandiramani, K. L.; Barger, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Means for predicting the fluctuating pressures acting on externally blown flap surfaces are developed on the basis of generalizations derived from non-dimensionalized empirical data. Approaches for estimation of the fatigue lives of skin-stringer and honeycomb-core sandwich flap structures are derived from vibration response analyses and panel fatigue data. Approximate expressions for fluctuating pressures, structural response, and fatigue life are combined to reveal the important parametric dependences. The two-dimensional equations of motion of multi-element flap systems are derived in general form, so that they can be specialized readily for any particular system. An introduction is presented of an approach to characterizing the excitation pressures and structural responses which makes use of space-time spectral concepts and promises to provide useful insights, as well as experimental and analytical savings.

  16. Biomechanical and structural response of healing Achilles tendon to fatigue loading following acute injury

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Sarver, Joseph J.; Buckley, Mark R.; Voleti, Pramod B.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Achilles tendon injuries affect both athletes and the general population, and their incidence is rising. In particular, the Achilles tendon is subject to dynamic loading at or near failure loads during activity, and fatigue induced damage is likely a contributing factor to ultimate tendon failure. Unfortunately, little is known about how injured Achilles tendons respond mechanically and structurally to fatigue loading during healing. Knowledge of these properties remains critical to best evaluate tendon damage induction and the ability of the tendon to maintain mechanical properties with repeated loading. Thus, this study investigated the mechanical and structural changes in healing mouse Achilles tendons during fatigue loading. Twenty four mice received bilateral full thickness, partial width excisional injuries to their Achilles tendons (IACUC approved) and twelve tendons from six mice were used as controls. Tendons were fatigue loaded to assess mechanical and structural properties simultaneously after 0, 1, 3, and 6 weeks of healing using an integrated polarized light system. Results showed that the number of cycles to failure decreased dramatically (37-fold, p<0.005) due to injury, but increased throughout healing, ultimately recovering after 6 weeks. The tangent stiffness, hysteresis, and dynamic modulus did not improve with healing (p<0.005). Linear regression analysis was used to determine relationships between mechanical and structural properties. Of tendon structural properties, the apparent birefringence was able to best predict dynamic modulus (R2=0.88–0.92) throughout healing and fatigue life. This study reinforces the concept that fatigue loading is a sensitive metric to assess tendon healing and demonstrates potential structural metrics to predict mechanical properties. PMID:24280564

  17. Adaptive active vibration control to improve the fatigue life of a carbon-epoxy smart structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Cazzulani, Gabriele; Cinquemani, Simone; Resta, Ferruccio; Torti, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    Active vibration controls are helpful in improving fatigue life of structures through limitation of absolute displacements. However, control algorithms are usually designed without explicitly taking into account the fatigue phenomenon. In this paper, an adaptive vibration controller is proposed to increase the fatigue life of a smart structure made of composite material and actuated with piezoelectric patches. The main innovation with respect to the most common solutions is that the control laws are directly linked to a damage driving force, which is correlated to a fatigue damage model for the specific material. The control logic is different depending on the damage state of the structure. If no significant damage affects the structure, the controller decreases the crack nucleation probability by limiting the driving forces in the overall structure. On the contrary, if initiated cracks are present, their further propagation is prevented by controlling the damage driving forces in the already damaged areas. The structural diagnostics is performed through a vibration-based health monitoring technique, while periodical adaptation of the controller is adopted to consider damage-induced changes on the structure state-space model and to give emphasis to the most excited modes. The control algorithm has been numerically validated on the finite element model of a cantilever plate.

  18. Modeling Delamination in Postbuckled Composite Structures Under Static and Fatigue Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisagni, Chiara; Brambilla, Pietro; Bavila, Carlos G.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of the Abaqus progressive Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to model delamination in composite structures was investigated for static, postbuckling, and fatigue loads. Preliminary evaluations were performed using simple Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) and Mixed-Mode Bending (MMB) specimens. The nodal release sequences that describe the propagation of the delamination front were investigated. The effect of using a sudden or a gradual nodal release was evaluated by considering meshes aligned with the crack front as well as misaligned meshes. Fatigue simulations were then performed using the Direct Cyclic Fatigue (DCF) algorithm. It was found that in specimens such as the DCB, which are characterized by a nearly linear response and a pure fracture mode, the algorithm correctly predicts the Paris Law rate of propagation. However, the Abaqus DCF algorithm does not consider different fatigue propagation laws in different fracture modes. Finally, skin/stiffener debonding was studied in an aircraft fuselage subcomponent in which debonding occurs deep into post-buckling deformation. VCCT was shown to be a robust tool for estimating the onset propagation. However, difficulties were found with the ability of the current implementation of the Abaqus progressive VCCT to predict delamination propagation within structures subjected to postbuckling deformations or fatigue loads.

  19. Air resistance measurements on actual airplane parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiselsberger, C

    1923-01-01

    For the calculation of the parasite resistance of an airplane, a knowledge of the resistance of the individual structural and accessory parts is necessary. The most reliable basis for this is given by tests with actual airplane parts at airspeeds which occur in practice. The data given here relate to the landing gear of a Siemanms-Schuckert DI airplane; the landing gear of a 'Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft' airplane (type Roland Dlla); landing gear of a 'Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen' G airplane; a machine gun, and the exhaust manifold of a 269 HP engine.

  20. Effect of Environment on Fatigue Crack Wake Dislocation Structure in Al-Cu-Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Yunjo; Agnew, Sean R.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    2012-07-01

    Fatigue-induced dislocation structure was imaged at the crack surface using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of focused ion beam (FIB)-prepared cross sections of naturally aged Al-4Cu-1.4Mg stressed at a constant stress intensity range (7 MPa√m) concurrent with either ultralow ( 10-8 Pa s) or high-purity (50 Pa s) water vapor exposure at 296 K (23 °C). A 200-to-600-nm-thick recovered-dislocation cell structure formed adjacent to the crack surface from planar slip bands in the plastic zone with the thickness of the cell structure and slip bands decreasing with increasing water vapor exposure. This result suggested lowered plastic strain accumulation in the moist environment relative to the vacuum. The previously reported fatigue crack surface crystallography is explained by the underlying dislocation substructure. For a vacuum, { { 1 1 1} } facets dominate the crack path from localized slip band cracking without resolvable dislocation cells, but cell formation causes some off- { { 1 1 1} } features. With water vapor present, the high level of hydrogen trapped within the developed dislocation structure could promote decohesion manifest as either low-index { { 100} } or { { 1 10} } facets, as well as high-index cracking through the fatigue-formed subgrain structure. These features and damage scenario provide a physical basis for modeling discontinuous environmental fatigue crack growth governed by both cyclic strain range and maximum tensile stress.

  1. Flutter analysis of an airplane with multiple structural nonlinearities in the control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breitbach, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    Experience has shown that the flutter prediction process for airplanes can be greatly affected by strong concentrated nonlinearities which may be localized in the linking elements of the control mechanism, in the pivot joints of variable-sweep-wing systems, and in the connecting points between wing and pylon-mounted external stores. The principle of equivalent linearization offers an efficent possibility for solving the related nonlinear flutter equations in the frequency domain as a complement to the well-known time domain procedures. Taking as an example an airplane with nonlinear control characteristics, it is demonstrated how the equivalent linearization approach can be extended to rather complicated systems with multiple sets of strongly interacting, concentrated nonlinearities.

  2. Structure-phase states evolution in Al-Si alloy under electron-beam treatment and high-cycle fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Konovalov, Sergey Alsaraeva, Krestina Gromov, Victor Semina, Olga; Ivanov, Yurii

    2015-10-27

    By methods of scanning and transmission electron diffraction microscopy the analysis of structure-phase states and defect substructure of silumin subjected to high-intensity electron beam irradiation in various regimes and subsequent fatigue loading up to failure was carried out. It is revealed that the sources of fatigue microcracks are silicon plates of micron and submicron size are not soluble in electron beam processing. The possible reasons of the silumin fatigue life increase under electron-beam treatment are discussed.

  3. Dynamic response and sonic fatigue analysis at NASA Langley for hypersonic vehicle structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Robinson, Jay H.; Chiang, C. K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of three research topics being pursued at the NASA Langley Research Center for dynamic response prediction and sonic fatigue analysis of hypersonic vehicle structures. The first is the development of a numerical simulation procedure within the framework of a finite element analysis for the prediction of the large deflection random response of simple panels. The second topic is an implementation of the equivalent linearization technique in a commercial finite element code for the prediction of large deflection random response of complicated panels. The last area is the calculation of a dynamic stress intensity factor in the frequency domain for use in sonic fatigue crack growth prediction.

  4. Advances in Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Metallic Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the advances that have been made in stress analyses of cracked aircraft components, in the understanding of the fatigue and fatigue-crack growth process, and in the prediction of residual strength of complex aircraft structures with widespread fatigue damage. Finite-element analyses of cracked metallic structures are now used to determine accurate stress-intensity factors for cracks at structural details. Observations of small-crack behavior at open and rivet-loaded holes and the development of small-crack theory has lead to the prediction of stress-life behavior for components with stress concentrations under aircraft spectrum loading. Fatigue-crack growth under simulated aircraft spectra can now be predicted with the crack-closure concept. Residual strength of cracked panels with severe out-of-plane deformations (buckling) in the presence of stiffeners and multiple-site damage can be predicted with advanced elastic-plastic finite-element analyses and the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. These advances are helping to assure continued safety of aircraft structures.

  5. Split mandrel versus split sleeve coldworking: Dual methods for extending the fatigue life of metal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodman, Geoffrey A.; Creager, Matthew

    1994-09-01

    It is common practice to use split sleeve coldworking of fastener holes as a means of extending the fatigue life of metal structures. In search of lower manufacturing costs, the aerospace industry is examining the split mandrel (sleeveless) coldworking process as an alternative method of coldworking fastener holes in metal structures. The split mandrel process (SpM) significantly extends the fatigue life of metal structures through the introduction of a residual compressive stress in a manner that is very similar to the split sleeve system (SpSl). Since the split mandrel process is significantly less expensive than the split sleeve process and more adaptable to robotic automation, it will have a notable influence upon other new manufacture of metal structures which require coldworking a significant number of holes, provided the aerospace community recognizes that the resulting residual stress distributions and fatigue life improvement are the same for both processes. Considerable testing has validated the correctness of that conclusion. The findings presented in this paper represent the results of an extensive research and development program, comprising data collected from over 400 specimens fabricated from 2024-T3 and 7075-T651 aluminum alloys in varied configurations, which quantify the benefits (fatigue enhancement and cost savings) of automating a sleeveless coldworking system.

  6. Split mandrel versus split sleeve coldworking: Dual methods for extending the fatigue life of metal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodman, Geoffrey A.; Creager, Matthew

    1994-01-01

    It is common practice to use split sleeve coldworking of fastener holes as a means of extending the fatigue life of metal structures. In search of lower manufacturing costs, the aerospace industry is examining the split mandrel (sleeveless) coldworking process as an alternative method of coldworking fastener holes in metal structures. The split mandrel process (SpM) significantly extends the fatigue life of metal structures through the introduction of a residual compressive stress in a manner that is very similar to the split sleeve system (SpSl). Since the split mandrel process is significantly less expensive than the split sleeve process and more adaptable to robotic automation, it will have a notable influence upon other new manufacture of metal structures which require coldworking a significant number of holes, provided the aerospace community recognizes that the resulting residual stress distributions and fatigue life improvement are the same for both processes. Considerable testing has validated the correctness of that conclusion. The findings presented in this paper represent the results of an extensive research and development program, comprising data collected from over 400 specimens fabricated from 2024-T3 and 7075-T651 aluminum alloys in varied configurations, which quantify the benefits (fatigue enhancement and cost savings) of automating a sleeveless coldworking system.

  7. The NASA Lewis Research Center High Temperature Fatigue and Structures Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, M. A.; Bartolotta, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    The physical organization of the NASA Lewis Research Center High Temperature Fatigue and Structures Laboratory is described. Particular attention is given to uniaxial test systems, high cycle/low cycle testing systems, axial torsional test systems, computer system capabilities, and a laboratory addition. The proposed addition will double the floor area of the present laboratory and will be equipped with its own control room.

  8. 14 CFR 25.571 - Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 25.571 Section 25.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., manufacturing defects, or accidental damage, will be avoided throughout the operational life of the...

  9. 14 CFR 25.571 - Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 25.571 Section 25.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., manufacturing defects, or accidental damage, will be avoided throughout the operational life of the...

  10. 14 CFR 25.571 - Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Damage-tolerance and fatigue evaluation of structure. 25.571 Section 25.571 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., manufacturing defects, or accidental damage, will be avoided throughout the operational life of the...

  11. Re-assessment of offshore structures using the revised HSE fatigue guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, A.; Sharp, J.V.

    1995-12-31

    The re-assessment of existing North Sea structures is an increasingly important issue as the age of platforms increases. Over 50 from a total of approximately 180 fixed installations in the UK sector are now over 15 years old. Fatigue damage has been the main reason for repairs to North Sea structures and the risk of this continues. The fatigue guidance of the Offshore Safety Division of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has recently been revised and published. Fundamental changes have been made to this guidance with several new recommendations including joint classification, basic design S-N curves for welded joints, the thickness effect, the effects of environment and the treatment of low and high stress ranges. To quantify the effects of the new guidance on the fatigue life assessment of offshore strictures, the HSE commissioned a study which included a deep water and a shallow water fixed steel structure and a twin-pontoon semi-submersible. These structures are typical of those operating in the North Sea. These were re-assessed with respect to fatigue lives and the results compared with predictions based on the 1990 guidance. The results and general conclusions are presented in this paper.

  12. Improving the fatigue resistance of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufenberg, Theodore L.; River, Bryan H.; Murmanis, Lidija L.; Christiansen, Alfred W.

    1988-01-01

    The premature fatigue failure of a laminated wood/epoxy test beam containing a cross section finger joint was the subject of a multi-disciplinary investigation. The primary objectives were to identify the failure mechanisms which occurred during the finger joint test and to provide avenues for general improvements in the design and fabrication of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures.

  13. 77 FR 50576 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures; OMB Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures,'' published in the Federal Register (76 FR... impractical. In a correction document (77 FR 4890), published February 1, 2012, the FAA revised the DATES... requirements in Sec. Sec. 27.573 and 29.573. Issued in Washington, DC, on August 13, 2012. Lirio Liu,...

  14. 77 FR 50576 - Fatigue Tolerance Evaluation of Metallic Structures; OMB Approval of Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... (76 FR 75435) on December 2, 2011. In that rule, the FAA addresses advances in structural fatigue... document (77 FR 4890), published February 1, 2012, the FAA revised the DATES section of the final rule..., 2012. Lirio Liu, Acting Director, Office of Rulemaking. BILLING CODE 4910-13-P...

  15. Fatigue Crack Growth Database for Damage Tolerance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Shivakumar, V.; Cardinal, J. W.; Williams, L. C.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project was to begin the process of developing a fatigue crack growth database (FCGD) of metallic materials for use in damage tolerance analysis of aircraft structure. For this initial effort, crack growth rate data in the NASGRO (Registered trademark) database, the United States Air Force Damage Tolerant Design Handbook, and other publicly available sources were examined and used to develop a database that characterizes crack growth behavior for specific applications (materials). The focus of this effort was on materials for general commercial aircraft applications, including large transport airplanes, small transport commuter airplanes, general aviation airplanes, and rotorcraft. The end products of this project are the FCGD software and this report. The specific goal of this effort was to present fatigue crack growth data in three usable formats: (1) NASGRO equation parameters, (2) Walker equation parameters, and (3) tabular data points. The development of this FCGD will begin the process of developing a consistent set of standard fatigue crack growth material properties. It is envisioned that the end product of the process will be a general repository for credible and well-documented fracture properties that may be used as a default standard in damage tolerance analyses.

  16. 77 FR 26996 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A320-214 and-232 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports that medium-head fasteners were installed in lieu of shear-head fasteners on a certain upper panel which manufacturer fatigue and damage tolerance analyses demonstrated could have an affect on panel fatigue life. This proposed AD would require......

  17. Substrate Creep on The Fatigue Life of A Model Dental Multilayer Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J; Huang, M; Niu, X; soboyejo, W

    2006-10-09

    In this paper, we investigated the effects of substrate creep on the fatigue behavior of a model dental multilayer structure, in which a top glass layer was bonded to a polycarbonate substrate through a dental adhesive. The top glass layers were ground using 120 grit or 600 grit sand papers before bonding to create different sub-surface crack sizes and morphologies. The multilayer structures were tested under cyclic Hertzian contact loading to study crack growth and obtain fatigue life curves. The experiment results showed that the fatigue lives of the multilayer structures were impaired by increasing crack sizes in the sub-surfaces. They were also significantly reduced by the substrate creep when tested at relatively low load levels i.e. P{sub m} < 60 N (Pm is the maximum magnitude of cyclic load). But at relatively high load levels i.e. P{sub m} > 65 N, slow crack growth (SCG) was the major failure mechanisms. A modeling study was then carried out to explore the possible failure mechanisms over a range of load levels. It is found that fatigue life at relatively low load levels can be better estimated by considering the substrate creep effect (SCE).

  18. Application of ultrasonic signature analysis for fatigue detection in complex structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ultrasonic signature analysis shows promise of being a singularly well-suited method for detecting fatigue in structures as complex as aircraft. The method employs instrumentation centered about a Fourier analyzer system, which features analog-to-digital conversion, digital data processing, and digital display of cross-correlation functions and cross-spectra. These features are essential to the analysis of ultrasonic signatures according to the procedure described here. In order to establish the feasibility of the method, the initial experiments were confined to simple plates with simulated and fatigue-induced defects respectively. In the first test the signature proved sensitive to the size of a small hole drilled into the plate. In the second test, performed on a series of fatigue-loaded plates, the signature proved capable of indicating both the initial appearance and subsequent growth of a fatigue crack. In view of these encouraging results it is concluded that the method has reached a sufficiently advanced stage of development to warrant application to small-scale structures or even actual aircraft.

  19. Crash Tests of Protective Airplane Floors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, H. D.

    1986-01-01

    Energy-absorbing floors reduce structural buckling and impact forces on occupants. 56-page report discusses crash tests of energy-absorbing aircraft floors. Describes test facility and procedures; airplanes, structural modifications, and seats; crash dynamics; floor and seat behavior; and responses of anthropometric dummies seated in airplanes. Also presents plots of accelerations, photographs and diagrams of test facility, and photographs and drawings of airplanes before, during, and after testing.

  20. 77 FR 60658 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not... airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of two fatigue cracks on the left-hand and right-hand... proposed AD would require a high frequency eddy current (HFEC) inspection for any cracking on the...

  1. 77 FR 10411 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation...-200 and -300 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of fatigue cracks in the lap... applicable, and repair if necessary. We are proposing this AD to detect and correct such fatigue...

  2. Determination of model structure and parameters of an airplane from pre- and post-stall flight data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.; Batterson, J. G.; Murphy, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure for airplane model structure determination from flight data based on modified stepwise regression (MSR), several decision criteria and postulated aerodynamic model equations is presented. The MSR is constructed to force a linear model for the aerodynamic coefficient first, then select significant nonlinear terms and reject nonsignificant terms from the model. In addition to the statistical criteria in the stepwise regression, the prediction sum of squares (PRESS) criterion and analysis of residuals are examined for the selection of an adequate model. The procedure is used in examples with simulated and real flight data. It is shown that the MSR performs better than the ordinary stepwise regression and that the technique can be also applied to the large amplitude maneuvers.

  3. 14 CFR 23.571 - Metallic pressurized cabin structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metallic pressurized cabin structures. 23... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.571 Metallic pressurized cabin structures. For normal, utility, and...

  4. 14 CFR 23.571 - Metallic pressurized cabin structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Metallic pressurized cabin structures. 23... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation § 23.571 Metallic pressurized cabin structures. Link to an amendment published at 76...

  5. Fracture mechanics. [review of fatigue crack propagation and technology of constructing safe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a rapidly emerging discipline for assessing the residual strength of structures containing flaws due to fatigue, corrosion or accidental damage and for anticipating the rate of which such flaws will propagate if not repaired. The discipline is also applicable in the design of structures with improved resistance to such flaws. The present state of the design art is reviewed using this technology to choose materials, to configure safe and efficient structures, to specify inspection procedures, to predict lives of flawed structures and to develop reliability of current and future airframes.

  6. Ball-Burnishing and Roller-Burnishing to Improve Fatigue Performance of Structural Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lothar; Ludian, Tomasz; Wollmann, Manfred

    The HCF response to burnishing of a number of structural materials is compared and contrasted. It is shown that alloys which exhibit marked work-hardening during burnishing respond very beneficially with regard to HCF performance while others which show little work-hardening may even react with losses in HCF strength. Possible explanations for such behavior are outlined in terms of mean stress and environmental sensitivities of the fatigue strengths of the various materials and microstructures.

  7. Time needed to board an airplane: a power law and the structure behind it.

    PubMed

    Frette, Vidar; Hemmer, Per C

    2012-01-01

    A simple model for the boarding of an airplane is studied. Passengers have reserved seats but enter the airplane in arbitrary order. Queues are formed along the aisle, as some passengers have to wait to reach the seats for which they have reservation. We label a passenger by the number of his or her reserved seat. In most cases the boarding process is much slower than for the optimal situation, where passenger and seat orders are identical. We study this dynamical system by calculating the average boarding time when all permutations of N passengers are given equal weight. To first order, the boarding time for a given permutation (ordering) of the passengers is given by the number s of sequences of monotonically increasing values in the permutation. We show that the distribution of s is symmetric on [1,N], which leads to an average boarding time (N+1)/2. We have found an exact expression for s and have shown that the full distribution of s approaches a normal distribution as N increases. However, there are significant corrections to the first-order results, due to certain correlations between passenger ordering and the substrate (seat ordering). This occurs for some cases in which the sequence of the seats is partially mirrored in the passenger ordering. These cases with correlations have a boarding time that is lower than predicted by the first-order results. The large number of cases with reduced boarding times have been classified. We also give some indicative results on the geometry of the correlations, with sorting into geometry groups. With increasing N, both the number of correlation types and the number of cases belonging to each type increase rapidly. Using enumeration we find that as a result of these correlations the average boarding time behaves like N(α), with α≃0.69, as compared with α=1.0 for the first-order approximation. PMID:22400535

  8. Time needed to board an airplane: A power law and the structure behind it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frette, Vidar; Hemmer, Per C.

    2012-01-01

    A simple model for the boarding of an airplane is studied. Passengers have reserved seats but enter the airplane in arbitrary order. Queues are formed along the aisle, as some passengers have to wait to reach the seats for which they have reservation. We label a passenger by the number of his or her reserved seat. In most cases the boarding process is much slower than for the optimal situation, where passenger and seat orders are identical. We study this dynamical system by calculating the average boarding time when all permutations of N passengers are given equal weight. To first order, the boarding time for a given permutation (ordering) of the passengers is given by the number s of sequences of monotonically increasing values in the permutation. We show that the distribution of s is symmetric on [1,N], which leads to an average boarding time (N+1)/2. We have found an exact expression for s and have shown that the full distribution of s approaches a normal distribution as N increases. However, there are significant corrections to the first-order results, due to certain correlations between passenger ordering and the substrate (seat ordering). This occurs for some cases in which the sequence of the seats is partially mirrored in the passenger ordering. These cases with correlations have a boarding time that is lower than predicted by the first-order results. The large number of cases with reduced boarding times have been classified. We also give some indicative results on the geometry of the correlations, with sorting into geometry groups. With increasing N, both the number of correlation types and the number of cases belonging to each type increase rapidly. Using enumeration we find that as a result of these correlations the average boarding time behaves like Nα, with α≃0.69, as compared with α=1.0 for the first-order approximation.

  9. Nonlinear analyses of composite aerospace structures in sonic fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh

    1992-01-01

    The primary research effort of this project is the development of analytical methods for the prediction of nonlinear random response of composite aerospace structures subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads. The progress, accomplishments, and future plans of three random response research topics are discussed, namely acoustics-structure interactions using boundary/finite element methods, nonlinear vibrations of beams and composite plates under harmonic and random excitations, and numerical simulation of the nonlinear response of composite plates under combined thermal and acoustic loading.

  10. Fatigue in aerostructures--where structural health monitoring can contribute to a complex subject.

    PubMed

    Boller, Christian; Buderath, Matthias

    2007-02-15

    An overview of the aircraft design and maintenance process is given with specific emphasis on the fatigue design as well as the phenomenon of the ageing aircraft observed over the life cycle. The different measures taken to guarantee structural integrity along the maintenance process are addressed. The impact of structural health monitoring as a means of possibly revolutionizing the current aircraft structural monitoring and design process is emphasized and comparison is made to jet engines and helicopters, where health monitoring has already found the respective breakthrough. PMID:17255052

  11. Thermography Inspection for Early Detection of Composite Damage in Structures During Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Parker, F. Raymond; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Wright, Christopher W.; Bly, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composite structures are commonly tested under controlled loading. Understanding the initiation and progression of composite damage under load is critical for validating design concepts and structural analysis tools. Thermal nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is used to detect and characterize damage in composite structures during fatigue loading. A difference image processing algorithm is demonstrated to enhance damage detection and characterization by removing thermal variations not associated with defects. In addition, a one-dimensional multilayered thermal model is used to characterize damage. Lastly, the thermography results are compared to other inspections such as non-immersion ultrasonic inspections and computed tomography X-ray.

  12. Effect of Buckling Modes on the Fatigue Life and Damage Tolerance of Stiffened Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Bisagni, Chiara; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    The postbuckling response and the collapse of composite specimens with a co-cured hat stringer are investigated experimentally and numerically. These specimens are designed to evaluate the postbuckling response and the effect of an embedded defect on the collapse load and the mode of failure. Tests performed using controlled conditions and detailed instrumentation demonstrate that the damage tolerance, fatigue life, and collapse loads are closely tied with the mode of the postbuckling deformation, which can be different between two nominally identical specimens. Modes that tend to open skin/stringer defects are the most damaging to the structure. However, skin/stringer bond defects can also propagate under shearing modes. In the proposed paper, the effects of initial shape imperfections on the postbuckling modes and the interaction between different postbuckling deformations and the propagation of skin/stringer bond defects under quasi-static or fatigue loads will be examined.

  13. Fatigue of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salkind, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    The failure mechanisms in the fatigue of composite materials are analyzed in terms of the requirements for designing fatigue-critical composite structures. Fiber reinforced polymers, fiber reinforced metals, fatigue of composite structures, and composite design considerations are discussed. It is concluded that composite materials offer the engineer the opportunity for tailoring stiffness in different directions for designing dynamic components.

  14. Interfacial failure under thermal fatigue loading in multilayered MEMS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maligno, A. R.; Whalley, D.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2010-06-01

    The reliability of MEMS, and in particular of RF MEMS switches, might be increased by the use of a Physics of Failure (PoF) methodology. A numerical study, based on the finite element method (FEM) and on the representative volume element (RVE) approach was performed to examine the effects of temperature dependent materials properties, temperature variations on failure (e.g. yielding of metals) and to predict interfacial damage in multilayered MEMS structures. The effect of residual stresses, due to electroplating processes of the metal layers was considered in these studies to investigate their effects on MEMS reliability. Numerical results have shown that interfacial damage is mainly concentrated at the plating-base/substrate interface and it is strongly influenced by the temperature dependent material properties and by the presence of residual stresses.

  15. 14 CFR 27.573 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of... Requirements Fatigue Evaluation § 27.573 Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft... practice, the applicant must do a fatigue evaluation in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section....

  16. 14 CFR 29.573 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of... Requirements Fatigue Evaluation § 29.573 Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft... practice, the applicant must do a fatigue evaluation in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section....

  17. A structural health monitoring fastener for tracking fatigue crack growth in bolted metallic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakow, Alexi Schroder

    Fatigue cracks initiating at fastener hole locations in metallic components are among the most common form of airframe damage. The fastener hole site has been surveyed as the second leading initiation site for fatigue related accidents of fixed wing aircraft. Current methods for inspecting airframes for these cracks are manual, whereby inspectors rely on non-destructive inspection equipment or hand-held probes to scan over areas of a structure. Use of this equipment often demands disassembly of the vehicle to search appropriate hole locations for cracks, which elevates the complexity and cost of these maintenance inspections. Improved reliability, safety, and reduced cost of such maintenance can be realized by the permanent integration of sensors with a structure to detect this damage. Such an integrated system of sensors would form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. In this study, an Additive, Interleaved, Multi-layer Electromagnetic (AIME) sensor was developed and integrated with the shank of a fastener to form a SHM Fastener, a new SHM technology targeted at detection of fastener hole cracks. The major advantages of the SHM Fastener are its installation, which does not require joint layer disassembly, its capability to detect inner layer cracks, and its capability to operate in a continuous autonomous mode. Two methods for fabricating the proposed SHM Fastener were studied. The first option consisted of a thin flexible printed circuit film that was bonded around a thin metallic sleeve placed around the fastener shank. The second option consisted of coating sensor materials directly to the shank of a part in an effort to increase the durability of the sensor under severe loading conditions. Both analytical and numerical models were developed to characterize the capability of the sensors and provide a design tool for the sensor layout. A diagnostic technique for crack growth monitoring was developed to complete the SHM system, which consists of the

  18. Evaluating Changes in Tendon Crimp with Fatigue Loading as an ex vivo Structural Assessment of Tendon Damage

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Zuskov, Andrey; Sarver, Joseph J.; Buckley, Mark R.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    The complex structure of tendons relates to their mechanical properties. Previous research has associated the waviness of collagen fibers (crimp) during quasi-static tensile loading to tensile mechanics, but less is known about the role of fatigue loading on crimp properties. In this study (IACUC approved), mouse patellar tendons were fatigue loaded while an integrated plane polariscope simultaneously assessed crimp properties. We demonstrate a novel structural mechanism whereby tendon crimp amplitude and frequency are altered with fatigue loading. In particular, fatigue loading increased the crimp amplitude across the tendon width and length, and these structural alterations were shown to be both region and load dependent. The change in crimp amplitude was strongly correlated to mechanical tissue laxity (defined as the ratio of displacement and gauge length relative to the first cycle of fatigue loading assessed at constant load throughout testing), at all loads and regions evaluated. Together, this study highlights the role of fatigue loading on tendon crimp properties as a function of load applied and region evaluated, and offers an additional structural mechanism for mechanical alterations that may lead to ultimate tendon failure. PMID:25773654

  19. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves for hidden fatigue crack growth monitoring in multi-layer model aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Henry; Masserey, Bernard; Fromme, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Especially for ageing aircraft the development of fatigue cracks at fastener holes due to stress concentration and varying loading conditions constitutes a significant maintenance problem. High frequency guided waves offer a potential compromise between the capabilities of local bulk ultrasonic measurements with proven defect detection sensitivity and the large area coverage of lower frequency guided ultrasonic waves. High frequency guided waves have energy distributed through all layers of the specimen thickness, allowing in principle hidden (2nd layer) fatigue damage monitoring. For the integration into structural health monitoring systems the sensitivity for the detection of hidden fatigue damage in inaccessible locations of the multi-layered components from a stand-off distance has to be ascertained. The multi-layered model structure investigated consists of two aluminium plate-strips with an epoxy sealant layer. During cyclic loading fatigue crack growth at a fastener hole was monitored. Specific guided wave modes (combination of fundamental A0 and S0 Lamb modes) were selectively excited above the cut-off frequencies of higher modes using a standard ultrasonic wedge transducer. Non-contact laser measurements close to the defect were performed to qualify the influence of a fatigue crack in one aluminium layer on the guided wave scattering. Fatigue crack growth monitoring using laser interferometry showed good sensitivity and repeatability for the reliable detection of small, quarter-elliptical cracks. Standard ultrasonic pulse-echo equipment was employed to monitor hidden fatigue damage from a stand-off distance without access to the damaged specimen layer. Sufficient sensitivity for the detection of fatigue cracks located in the inaccessible aluminium layer was verified, allowing in principle practical in situ ultrasonic monitoring of fatigue crack growth.

  20. Comment on "Time needed to board an airplane: a power law and the structure behind it".

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Noam

    2012-08-01

    Frette and Hemmer [Phys. Rev. E 85, 011130 (2012)] recently showed that for a simple model for the boarding of an airplane, the mean time to board scales as a power law with the number of passengers N and the exponent is less than 1. They note that this scaling leads to the prediction that the "back-to-front" strategy, where passengers are divided into groups from contiguous ranges of rows and each group is allowed to board in turn from back to front once the previous group has found their seats, has a longer boarding time than would a single group. Here I extend their results to a larger number of passengers using a sampling approach and explore a scenario where the queue is presorted into groups from back to front, but allowed to enter the plane as soon as they can. I show that the power law dependence on passenger numbers is different for large N and that there is a boarding time reduction for presorted groups, with a power law dependence on the number of presorted groups. PMID:23005813

  1. Comment on ``Time needed to board an airplane: A power law and the structure behind it''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Noam

    2012-08-01

    Frette and Hemmer [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.011130 85, 011130 (2012)] recently showed that for a simple model for the boarding of an airplane, the mean time to board scales as a power law with the number of passengers N and the exponent is less than 1. They note that this scaling leads to the prediction that the “back-to-front” strategy, where passengers are divided into groups from contiguous ranges of rows and each group is allowed to board in turn from back to front once the previous group has found their seats, has a longer boarding time than would a single group. Here I extend their results to a larger number of passengers using a sampling approach and explore a scenario where the queue is presorted into groups from back to front, but allowed to enter the plane as soon as they can. I show that the power law dependence on passenger numbers is different for large N and that there is a boarding time reduction for presorted groups, with a power law dependence on the number of presorted groups.

  2. High and low-cycle fatigue behavior of prestressed concrete in offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gerwick, B.C.; Venuti, W.J.

    1980-03-01

    Although concrete does suffer progressive loss of strength with increasing number of cycles, a comparison of the Woehler curves with the probable distribution of compressive stresses during a service life in an environment such as the North Sea shows extremely low cumulative usage at the high-cycle end of the spectrum. However, significant damage can occur at the low-cycle, high-amplitude end. Repeated excursions of submerged concrete into the crack opening range leads to pumping of water in and out of the crack and hydraulic wedging, leading to splitting of the concrete. Cracking subcects the reinforcing and prestressing steel to cyclic tension. Loss of bond ensues and may lead to eventual fatigue failure. Adequate endurance can be ensured by prestressing, so as to avoid a large number of cycles extending into the crack opening range, and by the provision of adequate percentages of steel across the section plus transverse and confining steel. For the typical concrete sea structure, high-cycle, low-amplitude, cumulative fatigue is not a significant problem. However low-cycle, high-amplitude fatigue requires consideration.

  3. Fatigue life until small cracks in aircraft structures: Durability and damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schijve, J.

    1994-01-01

    Crack initiation in notched elements occurs very early in the fatigue life. This is also true for riveted lap joints, an important fatigue critical element of a pressurized fuselage structure. Crack nucleation in a riveted lap joint can occur at different locations, depending on the riveting operation. It can occur at the edge of the rivet hole, at a small distance away from the hole, but still with subsequent crack growth through the hole, and ahead of the hole with a crack no longer passing through the hole. Moreover, crack nucleation can occur in the top row at the countersunk holes (outer sheet) or in the bottom row at the non-countersunk holes. Fractographic evidence is shown. The initial growth of the small cracks occurs as an (invisible) part through crack. As a consequence, predictions on the crack initiation life are problematic. After a though crack is present, the major part of the fatigue life has been consumed. There is still an apparent lack of empirical data on crack growth and residual strength of riveted lap joints, five years after the Aloha accident. Such data are very much necessary for further developments of prediction models. Some test results are presented.

  4. Improving the fatigue resistance of adhesive joints in laminated wood structures

    SciTech Connect

    Laufenberg, T.L.; River, B.H.; Murmanis, L.L.; Christiansen, A.W.

    1988-08-01

    The premature fatigue failure of a laminated wood/epoxy test beam containing a cross-section finger joint was the subject of a multidisciplinary investigation to assess and advance the technology of adhesive joints in composite wood structures. This investigation, which has wide-spread applicability to all adhesively bonded joints, included (1) analysis of the data collected during fatigue testing, (2) microscopic examination of failed and unfailed surfaces and materials, (3) chemical characterization of the adhesive resin and its cure in the presence of wood and asbestos fibers, (4) testing of the filled adhesive on various adherent systems for its mechanical properties and its performance in prototype finger joints, and (5) analysis of the finger joint's load-carrying capabilities, including the effects of specific design modifications. Four major problem areas were identified which appeared to contribute to the premature fatigue failure. Recommended solutions of these problems would reduce the void content in the veneer-veneer and finger joint bondlines, provide a well-configured finger tip for the joint, improve the adhesive's penetration and bonding to the wood substrate, and provide a cleanly-machined surface. 2 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Comparison of structural response and fatigue endurance of aircraft flap-like box structures subjected to acoustic loading.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; White, R G; Aglietti, G S

    2005-05-01

    The results of an extensive test program to characterize the behavior of typical aircraft structures under acoustic loading and to establish their fatigue endurance are presented. The structures tested were the three flap-like box-type of structures. Each structure consisted of one flat (bottom) and one curved (top) stiffener stiffened skin panel, front, and rear spars, and ribs that divided the structures into three bays. The three structures, constructed from three different materials (aircraft standard aluminum alloy, Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic, and a Glass Fibre Metal Laminate, i.e., GLARE) had the same size and configuration, with only minor differences due to the use of different materials. A first set of acoustic tests with excitations of intensity ranging from 140 to 160 dB were carried out to obtain detailed data on the dynamic response of the three structures. The FE analysis of the structures is also briefly described and the results compared with the experimental data. The fatigue endurance of the structures was then determined using random acoustic excitation with an overall sound pressure level of 161 dB, and details of crack propagation are reported. PMID:15957753

  6. Effect of the fabrication process on fatigue performance of U 3Si 2 fuel plate with sandwich structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi-Shu; Li, Shuang-Shou; Wang, Qing-Yuan; Xu, Yong

    2005-06-01

    U 3Si 2-Al fuel plate is one of the dispersion fuel structure materials recently developed and widely used in research reactors. The mechanical properties of this structural material, especially the fatigue performance, are strongly dependent on its fabrication process. To investigate the effects of these processing technologies, the fatigue tests for the different specimens were carried out. The S- N curves indicate that the fabrication processing technologies of U 3Si 2 fuel plate, such as the addition of U 3Si 2 particles into aluminum powder to form the fuel meat, holding and rolling the processes of meat and cladding of 6061-Al alloy, plays an important role in improving the mechanical properties and fatigue performance of this fuel plate. In addition, some factors that influence the crack initiation and propagation are summarized based on the fatigue images that are in situ observations with SEM. The critical criterion for fatigue damage is proposed based on the fatigue data of the structural material, which were obtained at the different conditions.

  7. Computational predictive methods for fracture and fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, J.; Chang, A. T.; Nelson, N.; Kim, Y.

    1994-09-01

    The damage-tolerant design philosophy as used by aircraft industries enables aircraft components and aircraft structures to operate safely with minor damage, small cracks, and flaws. Maintenance and inspection procedures insure that damages developed during service remain below design values. When damage is found, repairs or design modifications are implemented and flight is resumed. Design and redesign guidelines, such as military specifications MIL-A-83444, have successfully reduced the incidence of damage and cracks. However, fatigue cracks continue to appear in aircraft well before the design life has expired. The F16 airplane, for instance, developed small cracks in the engine mount, wing support, bulk heads, the fuselage upper skin, the fuel shelf joints, and along the upper wings. Some cracks were found after 600 hours of the 8000 hour design service life and design modifications were required. Tests on the F16 plane showed that the design loading conditions were close to the predicted loading conditions. Improvements to analytic methods for predicting fatigue crack growth adjacent to holes, when multiple damage sites are present, and in corrosive environments would result in more cost-effective designs, fewer repairs, and fewer redesigns. The overall objective of the research described in this paper is to develop, verify, and extend the computational efficiency of analysis procedures necessary for damage tolerant design. This paper describes an elastic/plastic fracture method and an associated fatigue analysis method for damage tolerant design. Both methods are unique in that material parameters such as fracture toughness, R-curve data, and fatigue constants are not required. The methods are implemented with a general-purpose finite element package. Several proof-of-concept examples are given. With further development, the methods could be extended for analysis of multi-site damage, creep-fatigue, and corrosion fatigue problems.

  8. Computational predictive methods for fracture and fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordes, J.; Chang, A. T.; Nelson, N.; Kim, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The damage-tolerant design philosophy as used by aircraft industries enables aircraft components and aircraft structures to operate safely with minor damage, small cracks, and flaws. Maintenance and inspection procedures insure that damages developed during service remain below design values. When damage is found, repairs or design modifications are implemented and flight is resumed. Design and redesign guidelines, such as military specifications MIL-A-83444, have successfully reduced the incidence of damage and cracks. However, fatigue cracks continue to appear in aircraft well before the design life has expired. The F16 airplane, for instance, developed small cracks in the engine mount, wing support, bulk heads, the fuselage upper skin, the fuel shelf joints, and along the upper wings. Some cracks were found after 600 hours of the 8000 hour design service life and design modifications were required. Tests on the F16 plane showed that the design loading conditions were close to the predicted loading conditions. Improvements to analytic methods for predicting fatigue crack growth adjacent to holes, when multiple damage sites are present, and in corrosive environments would result in more cost-effective designs, fewer repairs, and fewer redesigns. The overall objective of the research described in this paper is to develop, verify, and extend the computational efficiency of analysis procedures necessary for damage tolerant design. This paper describes an elastic/plastic fracture method and an associated fatigue analysis method for damage tolerant design. Both methods are unique in that material parameters such as fracture toughness, R-curve data, and fatigue constants are not required. The methods are implemented with a general-purpose finite element package. Several proof-of-concept examples are given. With further development, the methods could be extended for analysis of multi-site damage, creep-fatigue, and corrosion fatigue problems.

  9. 78 FR 14719 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all The Boeing Company Model 747SP series airplanes, and certain The Boeing Company Model 747-100B SUD and 747-300 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by an evaluation by the design approval holder (DAH) indicating that the fuselage skin just above certain lap splice locations is subject to widespread fatigue damage (WFD).......

  10. Energy Approach-Based Simulation of Structural Materials High-Cycle Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balayev, A. F.; Korolev, A. V.; Kochetkov, A. V.; Sklyarova, A. I.; Zakharov, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    The paper describes the mechanism of micro-cracks development in solid structural materials based on the theory of brittle fracture. A probability function of material cracks energy distribution is obtained using a probabilistic approach. The paper states energy conditions for cracks growth at material high-cycle loading. A formula allowing to calculate the amount of energy absorbed during the cracks growth is given. The paper proposes a high- cycle fatigue evaluation criterion allowing to determine the maximum permissible number of solid body loading cycles, at which micro-cracks start growing rapidly up to destruction.

  11. The Development of German Army Airplanes During the War

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, Hoff

    1921-01-01

    The author, who was a captain of the Reserves in the Technical Department of the Aviation Division (Board of Airplane Experts) during the war, shows what means were taken for the creation of new airplane types and what tests were employed for trying out their flying properties, capacities and structural reliability. The principal representative types of each of the classes of airplanes are described and the characteristics of the important structural parts are discussed. Data regarding the number of airplanes at the front and the flying efficiency of the various classes of airplanes are given.

  12. The tensile and fatigue deformation structures in a single crystal Ni-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.; Gayda, J.

    1986-01-01

    Dislocation structures produced in Rene N4 crystals of various orientations deformed in tension and low cycle fatigue (LCF) at 760 and 980 degrees C were examined in order to elucidate the observed differences in stress-strain behavior. Specimens tensile tested at 760 degrees C displayed significant crystallographic orientation dependences in mechanical response but comparable inhomogeneous dislocation structures. LCF specimens of various orientations had comparable cyclic stress-strain curves and generally similar somewhat more homogeneous dislocation structures. Tensile specimens at the higher temperature had comparable mechanical response and corresponding similar quite homogeneous dislocation structures with gamma' faulting; and LCF specimens had orientation-dependent mechanical response but comparable homogeneous loose dislocation networks.

  13. Airplane Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huguet, L

    1921-01-01

    The authors argue that the center of gravity has a preponderating influence on the longitudinal stability of an airplane in flight, but that manufacturers, although aware of this influence, are still content to apply empirical rules to the balancing of their airplanes instead of conducting wind tunnel tests. The author examines the following points: 1) longitudinal stability, in flight, of a glider with coinciding centers; 2) the influence exercised on the stability of flight by the position of the axis of thrust with respect to the center of gravity and the whole of the glider; 3) the stability on the ground before taking off, and the influence of the position of the landing gear. 4) the influence of the elements of the glider on the balance, the possibility of sometimes correcting defective balance, and the valuable information given on this point by wind tunnel tests; 5) and a brief examination of the equilibrium of power in horizontal flight, where the conditions of stability peculiar to this kind of flight are added to previously existing conditions of the stability of the glider, and interfere in fixing the safety limits of certain evolutions.

  14. Random Vibration Tests for Prediction of Fatigue Life of Diffuser Structure for Gas Dynamic Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, O. F.; Banaszak, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Static and dynamic strain measurements which were taken during test stand operations of the gas dynamic laser (GDL) for the AF Airborne Laser Laboratory indicated that higher than expected vibrational stress levels may possibly limit the fatigue life of the laser structure. Particularly the diffuser sidewall structure exhibited large amplitude random vibrations which were excited by the internal gas flow. The diffuser structure consists of two layers of brazed stainless steel, AISI-347, panels. Cooling ducts were milled into the outer face sheet. These in turn are backed by the inner face sheet. So called T-rail stiffeners silver-brazed to the outer face sheets add the required stiffness and divide the sidewall into smaller rectangular plate sections.

  15. Laser lock-in thermography for fatigue crack detection in an uncoated metallic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Kim, Ji Min; Sohn, Hoon

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a noncontact laser lock-in thermography (LLT) technique for surface-breaking fatigue crack detection. LLT utilizes a modulated continuous wave (CW) laser as a heat source for lock-in thermography instead of commonly used flash and halogen lamps. LLT has following merits compared to conventional active thermography techniques: (1) the laser heat source can be precisely positioned at a long distance from a target structure thank to its directionality and low energy loss, (2) a large target structure can be inspected using a scanning laser heat source, (3) no special surface treatment is necessary to measure thermal wavefields and (4) background noises reflected from arbitrary surrounding heat sources can be eliminated. The LLT system is developed by integrating and synchronizing a modulated CW laser, galvanometer and infrared camera. Then, a holder exponent filter is proposed for crack identification, localization and quantification. Test results confirm that a surface-breaking fatigue crack on a steel plate is successfully evaluated using the proposed technique without any special surface treatment.

  16. 14 CFR 23.572 - Metallic wing, empennage, and associated structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metallic wing, empennage, and associated structures. 23.572 Section 23.572 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation §...

  17. 14 CFR 23.572 - Metallic wing, empennage, and associated structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Metallic wing, empennage, and associated structures. 23.572 Section 23.572 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Fatigue Evaluation §...

  18. An analytical comparison of two wing structures for Mach 5 cruise airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Cerro, J. A.; Scotti, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    Mach 5 cruise research conducted by NASA is related to aerodynamics, propulsion, and structures. The study of structures includes the propulsion system, fuselage, and wings. Various studies have shown that the achievement of adequate range is largely dependent on a low structural mass fraction. The present investigation is concerned with a study of two wing structure configurations for Mach 5 aircraft. An uprated version (Ti-6242 replacing B-120 titanium) of the YF-12/SR-71 wing structure is considered. The B-120 titanium structure represents the current art of high speed aircraft wing structures. The YF-12 wing structure was designed about 20 years ago when the analytical methods for calculating thermal stresses were limited. The second wing structural configuration studied in the present investigation also used Ti-6242 materials but replaced the corrugated-beaded panels with diffusion bonded honeycomb-core sandwich panels, and replaced the z-stiffened shear webs with sine-wave stiffened shear webs.

  19. 76 FR 39763 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Interaction of Systems and Structures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... structural failure events. Compliance with paragraph (a) includes, by definition, assessment of deformation... added to the special condition to require assessment of deformation for the structural failures defined..., and those rare events resulting from structural failures. Paragraph (a) defines limit load...

  20. Creep-fatigue properties of advanced 316-steel for FBR structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ueta, Masahiro; Nishida, Takashi; Koto, Hiroyuki; Sukekawa, Masayuki; Taguchi, Kosei

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes the creep-fatigue, fatigue and creep rupture properties of advanced 316 steel (316FR) at high temperature. 316FR steel showed excellent creep-fatigue lives which were superior at longer strain hold time conditions compared with conventional type 316, 304 stainless steels. 316 FR steel also indicated higher creep rupture strength and ductility than conventional steels. This paper also describes the effect of microstructure of 316 FR steel on creep-fatigue strength. Finally, the applicability of 316 FR steel for two types of creep-fatigue evaluation methods, time function rule and ductility exhaustion method, was examined.

  1. Structural characterization and anti-fatigue activity of polysaccharides from the roots of Morinda officinalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-Lin; Li, Jun; Li, George; Wang, Dong-mei; Zhu, Long-ping; Yang, De-po

    2009-04-01

    Three polysaccharides MP-1, MP-2, and MP-3 were isolated from hot water extract of Chinese medicine Morinda officinalis through 95% ethanol precipitation and gel-filtration chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B column and Sephadex G-75 or G-100 column). MP-1 was identified as an inulin-type fructan with simple linear (2-->1)-linked structure. Both MP-2 and MP-3 were acidic polysaccharides which consisted predominantly of galacturonic acid, arabinose and galactose. Partial structure characterization of MP-3 was carried out by partial acid hydrolysis and periodate oxidation. The total polysaccharides of the herb were tested in mice weight-loaded swimming model and were found to have anti-fatigue activity. PMID:19150459

  2. Thermomechanical fatigue behavior of the third-generation, single-crystal superalloy TMS-75: Deformation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Ro, Y.; Koizumi, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Harada, H.; Okada, I.

    2004-06-01

    The deformation structure after the out-of-phase thermomechanical fatigue (OP TMF) of the single-crystal (SC), Ni-based superalloy TMS-75 has been studied. Mechanical experiments were performed at temperatures between 400 °C and 900 °C under different total strain ranges with varying hold times in the compression stage. The lives of TMF for samples with hold times of 10 and 60 minutes dropped drastically by one order of magnitude as compared with those without it. Different structures developed during TMF were correlated to the difference in mechanical behavior for the two cases. The dislocations in the γ phase and the stacking faults (SFs) in the γ‧ phase were quantitatively analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This work verified that shearing of the γ‧ precipitates occurred with a single-dislocation mechanism rather than a dislocation-reaction mechanism. The implications of this work on the design of superalloys are presented.

  3. Structural design significance of tension-tension fatigue data on composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Constant cycle tension-tension fatigue and related static tension data have been generated on six single composite material/orientation combinations and twenty-one hybrid composite material/orientation combinations. Anomalies are related to the temperature rise and stopped interval creep, whereas endurance limit stresses (runouts) are associated with static proportional limit values, when they occur, and internal damage. The significance of these room temperature-dry data on the design allowables and weight of aerodynamic structueres is discussed. Such structures are helicopter rotor blades and wing and horizontal stabilizer lower surfaces. Typical criteria for turning these data into preliminary allowables are shown, as are examples of such allowables developed from the data. These values are then compared to those that might be used if the structures were made of metal.

  4. Ambient temperature fatigue tests of elements of an actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, E. L.; Elber, W.

    1977-01-01

    Elements of an actively cooled structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft have been investigated for fatigue characteristics. The study involved a bonded honeycomb sandwich panel with d-shaped coolant tubes. The curved portion of these tubes was embedded in the honeycomb, and the flat portion was bonded or soldered to the inner surface of the outer skin. The elements examined were two plain skin specimens (aluminum alloy); two specimens with skins attached to manifolds and tubes (one specimen was bonded, the other soldered); and a specimen representative of a corner section of the complete cooled sandwich. Sinusoidal loads were applied to all specimens. The honeycomb sandwich specimen was loaded in both tension and compression; the other specimens were loaded in tension only. The cooling tubes were pressurized with oil throughout the fatigue tests. The most significant results of these tests follow: All specimens exceeded their design life of 20,000 cycles without damage. Crack growth rates obtained in the plain skin specimens were used to determine the crack growth characteristics of aluminum alloy. Cracks in skins either bonded or soldered to cooling tubes propagated past the tubes without penetration. The coolant tubes served as crack arresters and temporarily stopped crack growth when a crack reached a tube-skin interface. The honeycomb core demonstrated that it could contain leakage from a tube.

  5. Combining Passive Thermography and Acoustic Emission for Large Area Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.Keywords: Thermal nondestructive evaluation, fatigue damage detection, aerospace composite inspection, acoustic emission, passive thermography

  6. The Light Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driggs, Ivan H.

    1925-01-01

    This report begins with a review and analysis of the work being done to develop light airplanes in the U.S. and abroad. A technical discussion of the construction and innovations in light airplanes is then presented.

  7. Overview Of Structural Behavior and Occupant Responses from Crash Test of a Composite Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa E.; Carden, Huey D.

    1995-01-01

    As part of NASA's composite structures crash dynamics research, a general aviation aircraft with composite wing, fuselage and empennage (but with metal subfloor structure) was crash tested at the NASA Langley Research Center Impact Research Facility. The test was conducted to determine composite aircraft structural behavior for crash loading conditions and to provide a baseline for a similar aircraft test with a modified subfloor. Structural integrity and cabin volume were maintained. Lumbar loads for dummy occupants in energy absorbing seats wer substantially lower than those in standard aircraft seats; however, loads in the standard seats were much higher that those recorded under similar conditions for an all-metallic aircraft.

  8. Reducing fatigue damage for ships in transit through structured decision making

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.M.; Fackler, P.L.; Pacifici, K.; Murphy, K.D.; Nichols, J.D.

    2014-01-01

    Research in structural monitoring has focused primarily on drawing inference about the health of a structure from the structure’s response to ambient or applied excitation. Knowledge of the current state can then be used to predict structural integrity at a future time and, in principle, allows one to take action to improve safety, minimize ownership costs, and/or increase the operating envelope. While much time and effort has been devoted toward data collection and system identification, research to-date has largely avoided the question of how to choose an optimal maintenance plan. This work describes a structured decision making (SDM) process for taking available information (loading data, model output, etc.) and producing a plan of action for maintaining the structure. SDM allows the practitioner to specify his/her objectives and then solves for the decision that is optimal in the sense that it maximizes those objectives. To demonstrate, we consider the problem of a Naval vessel transiting a fixed distance in varying sea-state conditions. The physics of this problem are such that minimizing transit time increases the probability of fatigue failure in the structural supports. It is shown how SDM produces the optimal trip plan in the sense that it minimizes both transit time and probability of failure in the manner of our choosing (i.e., through a user-defined cost function). The example illustrates the benefit of SDM over heuristic approaches to maintaining the vessel.

  9. 75 FR 71346 - Special Conditions: Boeing Model 787-8 Airplane; Lightning Protection of Fuel Tank Structure To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ..., 2009 (74 FR 52698). Several comments were received from two commenters (Cessna and NATCA). Cessna 1.... The Boeing Model 787-8 airplane will incorporate a fuel tank nitrogen generation system (NGS) that... Features The 787 will have a fuel tank NGS that is intended to control fuel tank flammability. This NGS...

  10. Experiences with nonlinear dynamics of panels and membranes considering fluid-structure interaction and acoustic fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Ferman, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    A collection of some highlights of the Author`s experiences with nonlinear dynamics in analyses and tests of Panels and Membranes encountered over the past 40 years is given. The primary focus is placed on a major block of his work since the early 70`s, involving work with fluid-structure interaction with Panels and Membranes, and with efforts in Acoustic Fatigue of Panels. While the Author had encountered nonlinear problems throughout Ins career involving flutter, vibration in general, and dynamic thrust instability; it was the more recent work with panels and membranes that greatly expanded his experience. This was triggered by the advent of highly maneuverable aircraft, powered by large powerful, noisy engines, and new materials in the mid 70`s. The significance of nonlinearity for these applications is most obvious from the results shown here-it simply cannot be ignored for optimal, safe design.

  11. A model for predicting damage induced fatigue life of laminated composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.; Lo, David C.; Georgiou, Ioannis T.; Harris, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a model for predicting the life of laminated composite structural components subjected to fatigue induced microstructural damage. The model uses the concept of continuum damage mechanics, wherein the effects of microcracks are incorporated into a damage dependent lamination theory instead of treating each crack as an internal boundary. Internal variables are formulated to account for the effects of both matrix cracks and internal delaminations. Evolution laws for determining the damage variables as functions of ply stresses are proposed, and comparisons of predicted damage evolution are made to experiment. In addition, predicted stiffness losses, as well as ply stresses are shown as functions of damage state for a variety of stacking sequences.

  12. Fatigue behavior of Fe-48 at.% Al polycrystals with B2 structure at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, H.Y.; Behgozin, A.; Umakoshi, Y.

    1998-12-18

    In FeAl alloys with the B2 structure, slip transition from <111> at low temperature to <001> at high temperature occurs depending on crystal orientation, alloying composition and lattice defects such as excess thermal vacancies. The slip transition strongly influences the strength, ductility and fracture mode in these alloys. According to recent results using FeAl single crystals containing a low density of excess thermal vacancies, yield stress increased with increasing temperature showing an anomalous peak between 823 and 873K. The anomalous strengthening peak corresponded to the slip transition: <111> superlattice dislocations were dominantly operative at temperatures below the peak, while <001> dislocations appeared above the peak. In this article, the authors report on the fatigue behavior of an Fe-48at.%Al polycrystalline alloy deformed at high temperatures, focusing on the effect of anomalous strengthening and the transition in slip direction.

  13. Power Law Versus Exponential Form of Slow Crack Growth of Advanced Structural Ceramics: Dynamic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the strength versus In (stress rate) relation was found to be very reasonable for most of the materials. It was also found that preloading technique was equally applicable for the case of slow crack growth (SCG) parameter n > 30. The major limitation in the exponential crack velocity formulation, however, was that an inert strength of a material must be known priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared to the conventional power-law crack velocity formulation.

  14. LOW CYCLE FATIGUE OF COMPOSITE MATERIALS IN ARMY STRUCTURAL APPLICATIONS: A REVIEW OF LITERATURE AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low cycle fatigue (LCF) of laminate composite structures used in Army applications is assessed to identify the key physical phenomena occurring during LCF processes and to determine their main characteristics. Special attention is given to the LCF conditions inherent in Army stru...

  15. On the Use of Equivalent Linearization for High-Cycle Fatigue Analysis of Geometrically Nonlinear Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of stress predictions from equivalent linearization analyses in the computation of high-cycle fatigue life is examined. Stresses so obtained differ in behavior from the fully nonlinear analysis in both spectral shape and amplitude. Consequently, fatigue life predictions made using this data will be affected. Comparisons of fatigue life predictions based upon the stress response obtained from equivalent linear and numerical simulation analyses are made to determine the range over which the equivalent linear analysis is applicable.

  16. Creep and Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth at Structural Discontinuities and Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. F. W. Brust; Dr. G. M. Wilkowski; Dr. P. Krishnaswamy; Mr. Keith Wichman

    2010-01-27

    The subsection ASME NH high temperature design procedure does not admit crack-like defects into the structural components. The US NRC identified the lack of treatment of crack growth within NH as a limitation of the code and thus this effort was undertaken. This effort is broken into two parts. Part 1, summarized here, involved examining all high temperature creep-fatigue crack growth codes being used today and from these, the task objective was to choose a methodology that is appropriate for possible implementation within NH. The second part of this task, which has just started, is to develop design rules for possible implementation within NH. This second part is a challenge since all codes require step-by-step analysis procedures to be undertaken in order to assess the crack growth and life of the component. Simple rules for design do not exist in any code at present. The codes examined in this effort included R5, RCC-MR (A16), BS 7910, API 579, and ATK (and some lesser known codes). There are several reasons that the capability for assessing cracks in high temperature nuclear components is desirable. These include: (1) Some components that are part of GEN IV reactors may have geometries that have sharp corners - which are essentially cracks. Design of these components within the traditional ASME NH procedure is quite challenging. It is natural to ensure adequate life design by modeling these features as cracks within a creep-fatigue crack growth procedure. (2) Workmanship flaws in welds sometimes occur and are accepted in some ASME code sections. It can be convenient to consider these as flaws when making a design life assessment. (3) Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) and inspection methods after fabrication are limited in the size of the crack or flaw that can be detected. It is often convenient to perform a life assessment using a flaw of a size that represents the maximum size that can elude detection. (4) Flaws that are observed using in-service detection

  17. Strain-cycling fatigue behavior of ten structural metals tested in liquid helium (4 K), in liquid nitrogen (78 K), and in ambient air (300 K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtigall, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Strain-cycling fatigue behavior of 10 different structural alloys and metals was investigated in liquid helium (4 K), in liquid nitrogen (78 K), and in ambient air (300 K). At high cyclic lives, fatigue resistance increased with decreasing temperature for all the materials investigated. At low cyclic lives, fatigue resistance generally decreased with decreasing temperature for the materials investigated. Only for Inconel 718 did fatigue resistance increase with decreasing temperature over the entire life range investigated. Comparison of the experimental fatigue behavior with that predicted by the Manson method of universal slopes showed that the fatigue behavior of these materials can be predicted for cryogenic temperatures by using material tensile properties obtained at those same temperatures.

  18. General problem of the airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Maurice; Richard, Paul

    1922-01-01

    A series of equations relating to airplanes are given and examples listed. Some of the equations listed include: the speed, altitude and carrying capacity of various airplanes; weight of an airplane; weight of various parts of an airplane; the polars of the wings; speeds of airplanes; radius of action.

  19. 77 FR 57529 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... 737-600, -700, -700C, -800, -900, or -900ER series airplanes, a full-scale fatigue test article was... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will..., positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the...

  20. 77 FR 57539 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... 737-600, -700, -700C, -800, -900, or -900ER series airplanes, a full-scale fatigue test article was... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will..., positive or negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria of the...

  1. 78 FR 68693 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ...We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 737-600, -700, -800, -900, and -900ER series airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports that certain seat track bolts were found with severed head bolts due to fatigue. This AD requires replacing titanium seat track bolts with corrosion resistant steel (CRES) bolts, repetitive inspections for cracking of......

  2. 77 FR 55681 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... (76 FR 72863). For certain airplanes, that NPRM proposed to require using redefined flight cycle... on the proposal (76 FR 72863, November 28, 2011) and the FAA's response. Request To Correct Certain Fatigue Cracking Assertions Boeing reported that the NPRM (76 FR 72863, November 28, 2011), in...

  3. Empirical modeling of environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys for component life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richey, Edward, III

    1995-01-01

    This research aims to develop the methods and understanding needed to incorporate time and loading variable dependent environmental effects on fatigue crack propagation (FCP) into computerized fatigue life prediction codes such as NASA FLAGRO (NASGRO). In particular, the effect of loading frequency on FCP rates in alpha + beta titanium alloys exposed to an aqueous chloride solution is investigated. The approach couples empirical modeling of environmental FCP with corrosion fatigue experiments. Three different computer models have been developed and incorporated in the DOS executable program. UVAFAS. A multiple power law model is available, and can fit a set of fatigue data to a multiple power law equation. A model has also been developed which implements the Wei and Landes linear superposition model, as well as an interpolative model which can be utilized to interpolate trends in fatigue behavior based on changes in loading characteristics (stress ratio, frequency, and hold times).

  4. [The structural basis for fatigue failure initiation in glassy polymers]. Progress report, July 1991--October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, A.F.

    1993-12-31

    In this period efforts were devoted to studying the microstructural elements characterizing fatigue failure initiation, their evolution as a function of fatigue history, and role of external variables. Materials studied include polycarbonate (PC) and its derivatives with different relaxation behaviors, and epoxies with different cross-link densities. The majority of the studies were devoted to PC. Techniques used included mechanical testing, volumetry, density, DSC, x-ray scattering, positron annihilation, TEM, etc. Results suggest that craze initiation starts with expansion of ``elementary`` voids; that fatigue failure initiation in bulk, amorphous PC is generation of stable voids or ``proto-crazes``; that sizes of initial voids are generally in the range of tens of nanometers; that growth of proto- crazes into mature crazes occurs through expansion of voids and generation of new ones perpendicular to fatigue stress; and that fatigue craze initiation in bulk, amorphous PC even at below T{sub g} may involve disentanglement of polymer chains.

  5. A novel closure based approach for fatigue crack length estimation using the acoustic emission technique in structural health monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagar, Daniel; Foote, Peter; Irving, Philip

    2014-10-01

    Use of Acoustic Emission (AE) for detecting and locating fatigue cracks in metallic structures is widely reported but studies investigating its potential for fatigue crack length estimation are scarce. Crack growth information enables prediction of the remaining useful life of a component using well established fracture mechanics principles. Hence, the prospects of AE for use in structural health monitoring applications would be significantly improved if it could be demonstrated not only as a means of detecting crack growth but also for estimation of crack lengths. A new method for deducing crack length has been developed based on correlations between AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth and corresponding cyclic loads. A model for crack length calculation was derived empirically using AE data generated during fatigue crack growth tests in 2 mm thick SEN aluminium 2014 T6 specimens subject to a tensile stress range of 52 MPa and an R ratio of 0.1. The model was validated using AE data generated independently in separate tests performed with a stress range of 27 MPa. The results showed that predictions of crack lengths over a range of 10 mm to 80 mm can be obtained with the mean of the normalised absolute errors ranging between 0.28 and 0.4. Predictions were also made using existing AE feature-based methods and the results compared to those obtained with the novel approach developed.

  6. Review and Prospects for Current Studies on Very High Cycle Fatigue of Metallic Materials for Machine Structural Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Tatsuo

    In recent years, mechanical structures such as railway wheels, rails, offshore structures, bridges, engine components, load bearing parts of automobiles, etc. have to endure for a long term up to 108-1010 loading cycles in order to save resources and to reduce the cost together with the environmental load to the globe. Thus, the fatigue behavior of structural materials in the very high cycle regime of 108-1010 cycles has become an important subject of the research. In this paper, a review of the current studies in this area performed by many researchers is described in order to provide a certain milestone in the history of the research on fatigue behavior of the metallic materials in the very high cycle regime.

  7. Application of fracture mechanics and half-cycle theory to the prediction of fatigue life of aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1989-01-01

    The service life of aircraft structural components undergoing random stress cycling was analyzed by the application of fracture mechanics. The initial crack sizes at the critical stress points for the fatigue crack growth analysis were established through proof load tests. The fatigue crack growth rates for random stress cycles were calculated using the half-cycle method. A new equation was developed for calculating the number of remaining flights for the structural components. The number of remaining flights predicted by the new equation is much lower than that predicted by the conventional equation. This report describes the application of fracture mechanics and the half-cycle method to calculate the number of remaining flights for aircraft structural components.

  8. Stochastic model for fatigue crack size and cost effective design decisions. [for aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for making cost effective fatigue design decisions. The methodology is based on a probabilistic model for the stochastic process of fatigue crack growth with time. The development of a particular model for the stochastic process is also discussed in the paper. The model is based on the assumption of continuous time and discrete space of crack lengths. Statistical decision theory and the developed probabilistic model are used to develop the procedure for making fatigue design decisions on the basis of minimum expected cost or risk function and reliability bounds. Selections of initial flaw size distribution, NDT, repair threshold crack lengths, and inspection intervals are discussed.

  9. Effects of fatigue-induced changes in microstructure and stress on domain structure and magnetic properties of Fe-C alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.; Tang, F.; Biner, S. B.; Jiles, D. C.

    2000-05-01

    A study of the effects of microstructural changes on domain structure and magnetic properties as a result of fatigue has been made on Fe-C alloys subjected to either cold work, stress-relief annealing, or heat treatment that produced a ferritic/pearlitic structure. The magnetic properties varied with stress cycling depending on the initial condition of the samples. Variations in coercivity in the initial stage of fatigue were closely related to the changes in dislocation structure. In the intermediate stage of fatigue the observed refinement of domain structures was related to the development of dislocation cell structures and formation of slip bands. In the final stage of fatigue the remanence and maximum permeability decreased dramatically, and this rate of decrease was dependent on the crack propagation rate.

  10. Selective Reinforcement to Improve Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance in Metallic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Newman, John A.; James, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations of the fatigue crack growth and fracture response of aluminum selectively reinforced compact tension specimens were performed. It was shown that selective reinforcement significantly improved these responses primarily through load sharing by the reinforcement. With the appropriate combination of reinforcement architecture and mechanical properties, as well as reinforcement to base aluminum interface properties, fatigue cracks can be arrested using selective reinforcement. Maximum load associated with fracture increased up to 20 percent for the cases investigated and crack growth at maximum load increased as much as 150 percent. For both fatigue crack growth and fracture, the three most influential properties identified within the bounds of this investigation that influence this response are reinforcement width, reinforcement stiffness and interface stiffness. Considerable coupling occurs between the different fiber architecture and material properties and how they influence fatigue crack growth and fracture responses.

  11. 30 CFR 250.908 - What are the minimum structural fatigue design requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... fatigue design requirements? (a) API RP 2A-WSD, Recommended Practice for Planning, Designing and Constructing Fixed Offshore Platforms (incorporated by reference as specified in 30 CFR 250.198), requires...

  12. Evaluation of flawed composite structural components under static and cyclic loading. [fatigue life of graphite-epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of initial defects on the fatigue and fracture response of graphite-epoxy composite laminates are presented. The structural laminates investigated were a typical angle ply laminate, a polar/hoop wound pressure vessel laminate, and a typical engine fan blade laminate. Defects investigated were full and half penetration circular holes, full and half penetration slits, and countersink holes. The effects of the defect size and type on the static fracture strength, fatigue performance, and residual static strength are shown as well as the results of loadings on damage propagation in composite laminates. The data obtained were used to define proof test levels as a qualification procedure in composite structure subjected to cyclic loading.

  13. Combining passive thermography and acoustic emission for large area fatigue damage growth assessment of a composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horne, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.; Burke, Eric R.

    2016-05-01

    Passive thermography and acoustic emission data were obtained for improved real time damage detection during fatigue loading. A strong positive correlation was demonstrated between acoustic energy event location and thermal heating, especially if the structure under load was nearing ultimate failure. An image processing routine was developed to map the acoustic emission data onto the thermal imagery. This required removing optical barrel distortion and angular rotation from the thermal data. The acoustic emission data were then mapped onto thermal data, revealing the cluster of acoustic emission event locations around the thermal signatures of interest. By combining both techniques, progression of damage growth is confirmed and areas of failure are identified. This technology provides improved real time inspections of advanced composite structures during fatigue testing.

  14. Fatigue flaw growth and NDI evaluation for preventing through cracks in spacecraft tankage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, D. E.; Hoeppner, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of parent and welded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy sheet under controlled cyclic stress conditions in room temperature air and 300 F air. Specimens possessing an initial surface defect of controlled dimensions were cycled under constant load amplitude until the propagating fatigue crack penetrated the back surface of the specimen. A series of precracked specimens were prepared to determine optimum penetrant, X-ray, ultrasonic, and eddy current nondestructive inspection procedures.

  15. Fatigue performance of joints executed in pure titanium structures with several diameters.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Pantoja, Juliana Maria Costa; Vaz, Luis Geraldo; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated fatigue strength of CP-Ti laser-welded joints. Sixty (20/diameter) CP-Ti casted dumbbell rods with diameters of 1.5, 2.0, and 3.5 mm were sectioned and welded using two joint openings (0.0 (00) and 0.6 mm (06)). Six groups were formed, amounting to a total of 9 (n=10) with inclusion of intact groups. Welding was executed using 360 V/8 ms (1.5 and 2.0 mm) and 380 V/9 ms (3.5 mm). Joints were finished, polished, and submitted to radiographic examination to visually analyze presence of porosity (PP). Specimens were submitted to cyclic tests, and the number of cycles until failure (NC) was recorded. Fractured surfaces were examined by SEM. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn (α=0.05) tests demonstrated that NC was lower for all diameters with 06, and for 3.5 mm/00. NC and PP were found to have a negative correlation (Spearman Coefficient). For CP-Ti frameworks with thin diameters, laser welding is better when structures are juxtaposed. PMID:22123013

  16. Mechanisms for Fatigue of Micron-Scale Silicon StructuralFilms

    SciTech Connect

    Alsem, Daan Hein; Pierron, Olivier N.; Stach, Eric A.; Muhlstein,Christopher L.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2006-11-03

    Although bulk silicon is not susceptible to fatigue,micron-scale silicon is. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explainthis surprising behavior although the issue remains contentious. Here wedescribe published fatigue results for micron-scale thin siliconfilms andfind that in general they display similar trends, in that lower cyclicstresses result in larger number of cycles to failure in stress-lifetimedata. We further show that one of two classes of mechanisms is invariablyproposed to explain the phenomenon. The first class attributes fatigue toa surface effect caused by subcritical (stable) cracking in thesilicon-oxide layer, e.g., reaction-layer fatigue; the second classproposes that subcritical cracking in the silicon itself is the cause offatigue in Si films. It is our contention that results to date fromsingle and poly crystalline silicon fatigue studies provide no convincingexperimentalevidence to support subcritical cracking in the silicon.Conversely, the reaction-layer mechanism is consistent with existingexperimental results, and moreover provides a rational explanation forthe marked difference in fatigue behavior of bulk and micron-scalesilicon.

  17. Airplane design for gusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houbolt, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    There are two basic approaches used for the structural design of aircraft due to dust encounter. One is a discrete gust approach, the other is based on power spectral techniques. Both of these approaches are explained in this report. Tacit to the above approaches is the assumption that loading on the airplane arises primarily from vertical gusts. A study of atmospheric turbulence was made not only on the vertical component, but on the longitudinal and transverse gust components as well. An analysis was made to establish the loads that develop when explicit consideration is given to both the vertical and head-wind components. The results are reported. Also included in this report are brief comments on gust effects during approach and landing.

  18. Crash tests of four low-wing twin-engine airplanes with truss-reinforced fuselage structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Fasanella, E. L.

    1982-01-01

    Four six-place, low-wing, twin-engine, general aviation airplane test specimens were crash tested under controlled free flight conditions. All airplanes were impacted on a concrete test surface at a nomial flight path velocity of 27 m/sec. Two tests were conducted at a -15 deg flight path angle (0 deg pitch angle and 15 deg pitch angle), and two were conducted at a -30 deg flight path angle (-30 deg pitch angle). The average acceleration time histories (crash pulses) in the cabin area for each principal direction were calculated for each crash test. In addition, the peak floor accelerations were calculated for each test as a function of aircraft fuselage longitudinal station number. Anthropomorphic dummy accelerations were analyzed using the dynamic response index and severity index (SI) models. Parameters affecting the dummy restraint system were studied; these parameters included the effect of no upper torso restraint, measurement of the amount of inertia-reel strap pullout before locking, measurement of dummy chest forward motion, and loads in the restraints. With the SI model, the dummies with no shoulder harness received head impacts above the concussive threshold.

  19. The Airplane Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Lee; Grant, Roderick

    1991-01-01

    Presents an experiment to investigate centripetal force and acceleration that utilizes an airplane suspended on a string from a spring balance. Investigates the possibility that lift on the wings of the airplane accounts for the differences between calculated tension and measured tension on the string. (MDH)

  20. Metal Airplane Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    It has long been thought that metal construction of airplanes would involve an increase in weight as compared with wood construction. Recent experience has shown that such is not the case. This report describes the materials used, treatment of, and characteristics of metal airplane construction.

  1. Experimental Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Initiation from Corroded Hemispherical Notches in Aerospace Structural Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Daniel B.; Forman, Royce; Shindo, David

    2010-01-01

    A test program was developed and executed to evaluate the influence of corroded hemispherical notches on the fatigue crack initiation and propagation in aluminum 7075-T7351, 4340 steel, and D6AC steel. Surface enhancements such as shot peening and laser shock peening were also incorporated as part of the test effort with the intent of improving fatigue performance. In addition to the testing, fracture mechanics and endurance limit based analysis methods were evaluated to characterize the results with the objective of challenging typical assumptions used in modeling fatigue cracks from corrosion pits. The results specifically demonstrate that the aluminum and steel alloys behave differently with respect to fatigue crack initiation from hemispherical corrosion pits. The aluminum test results were bounded by the fracture mechanics and endurance limit models while exhibiting a general insensitivity to the residual stress field generated by shot peening. The steel specimens were better characterized by the endurance limit fatigue properties and did exhibit sensitivities to residual stresses from the shot peening and laser shock peening

  2. Fatigue behaviour of Nitinol peripheral stents: the role of plaque shape studied with computational structural analyses.

    PubMed

    Dordoni, Elena; Meoli, Alessio; Wu, Wei; Dubini, Gabriele; Migliavacca, Francesco; Pennati, Giancarlo; Petrini, Lorenza

    2014-07-01

    Fatigue resistance of Nitinol stents implanted into femoro-popliteal arteries is a critical issue for the particular biomechanical environment of this district. Hip and knee joint movements due to the cyclic daily activity expose the superficial femoral artery (SFA), and therefore the implanted stents, to quite large and cyclic deformations influencing stent fatigue resistance. Objective of this work is to provide a tool based on finite element analysis able to evaluate the biomechanical effect of SFA on stent fatigue resistance. Computer simulations of the treatment of stenotic vessel by angioplasty and stenting and of the subsequent in vivo loading conditions (axial compression and bending) were carried out. Three different stenotic vessel models were defined, by keeping a constant stenosis rate and changing the plaque sharpness and number of stenoses. The fatigue behaviour was analysed comparing the amplitude and mean value distribution of the first principal strain in the whole stent for the different simulated conditions. Results showed that the maximum mean strain is similar in all the models, while the alternating strain is related to both plaque shape and loading conditions. In conclusion, this study confirms the requisite of replicating in vivo loading conditions. It also reveals the importance of taking into account the thickness variation of the vessel in the stenotic zone in the assessment of the stent fatigue resistance. PMID:24721457

  3. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 2: Structural fatigue, thermal cycling, creep, and residual strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blichfeldt, B.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Specimens representative of metal aircraft structural components reinforced with boron filamentary composites were manufactured and tested under cyclic loading, cyclic temperature, or continuously applied loading to evaluate some of the factors that affect structural integrity under cyclic conditions. Bonded, stepped joints were used throughout to provide composite-to-metal transition regions at load introduction points. Honeycomb panels with titanium or aluminum faces reinforced with unidirectional boron composite were fatigue tested at constant amplitude under completely reversed loading. Results indicated that the matrix material was the most fatigue-sensitive part of the design, with debonding initiating in the stepped joints. However, comparisons with equal weight all-metal specimens show a 10 to 50 times improved fatigue life. Fatigue crack propagation and residual strength were studied for several different stiffened panel concepts, and were found to vary considerably depending on the configuration. Composite-reinforced metal specimens were also subjected to creep and thermal cycling tests. Thermal cycling of stepped joint tensile specimens resulted in a ten percent decrease in residual strength after 4000 cycles.

  4. Summary of Information Relating to Gust Loads on Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donely, Philip

    1950-01-01

    Available information on gust structure, airplane reactions, and pertinent operating statistics has been examined. This report attempts to coordinate this information with reference to the prediction of gust loads on airplanes. The material covered represents research up to October 1947. (author)

  5. Assessment of the service life of structural steels by using degradation models with allowance for fatigue and creep of the material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, I. A.; Egunov, V. V.; Igumnov, L. A.; Kazakov, D. A.; Korotkikh, Yu. G.; Mitenkov, F. M.

    2015-11-01

    A mathematical model is developed within the framework of equations of damaged medium mechanics to describe the processes of viscoplastic straining and damage accumulation in structural steels with allowance for fatigue and creep of the material. A model of damage summation due to interaction of low-cycle fatigue and creep of the material is proposed. Material parameters and scalar functions of equations of mechanics of damaged media are determined. Viscoplastic straining and fatigue-induced damage accumulation in 08Kh18N10T and 12Kh18N9 are studied numerically, and the data obtained are compared with available results of physical experiments.

  6. Low-cycle thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review is presented of the field of thermal fatigue. Following a brief historical review, the concept is developed that thermal fatigue can be viewed as processes of unbalanced deformation and cracking. The unbalances refer to dissimilar mechanisms occurring in opposing halves of thermal fatigue loading and unloading cycles. Extensive data summaries are presented and results are interpreted in terms of the unbalanced processes involved. Both crack initiation and crack propagation results are summarized. Testing techniques are reviewed, and considerable discussion is given to a technique for thermal fatigue simulation, known as the bithermal fatigue test. Attention is given to the use of isothermal life prediction methods for the prediction of thermal fatigue lives. Shortcomings of isothermally-based life prediction methods are pointed out. Several examples of analyses and thermal fatigue life predictions of high technology structural components are presented. Finally, numerous dos and don'ts relative to design against thermal fatigue are presented.

  7. Fatigue methodology III; Proceedings of the AHS National Technical Specialists' Meeting on Advanced Rotorcraft Structures, Scottsdale, AZ, Oct. 3-5, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Papers on rotorcraft and fatigue methodology are presented, covering topics such as reliability design for rotorcraft, a comparison between theory and fatigue test data on stress concentration factors, the retirement lives of rolling element bearings, hydrogen embrittlement risk analysis for high hardness steel parts, and rotating system load monitoring with minimum fixed system instrumentation. Additional topics include usage data collection to improve structural integrity of operational helicopters, usage monitory of military helicopters, improvements to the fatigue substantiation of the H-60 composite tail rotor blade, helicopter surviellance programs, and potential application of automotive fatigue technology in rotorcraft design. Also, consideration is given to fatigue evaluation of C/MH-53 E main rotor damper threaded joints, SH-2F airframe fatigue test program, a ply termination concept for improving fracture and fatigue strength of composite laminates, the analysis and testing of composite panels subject to muzzle blast effects, the certification plan for an all-composite main rotor flexbeam, and the effects of stacking sequence on the flexural strength of composite beams.

  8. The calculation of fluid-structure interaction and fatigue analysis for Francis turbine runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. F.; Li, H. L.; Zhu, F. W.

    2012-11-01

    Francis turbine, as a widely used hydro turbine, is especially suited for the hydropower station with high hydraulic head and higher hydraulic head. For such turbine generator units all around the world, the crack streaks usually come out after a long time use and the resulted accidents may cause huge losses. Hence, it is meaningful to refine the design assuring the stability and safety of the Francis turbine. In this paper, the stiffness and strength as well as the fatigue life of the Francis turbine are studied. Concerning on the turbine of one certain hydropower station, the flow field inside the turbine are first simulated and the pressure distribution around the blades are derived. Meanwhile, the stress distributions of the blades are also obtained. Based on these, the fatigue analyses are applied on the turbine. According to the results of fatigue analyses, some optimal designs on the turbine are verified. The results show that with the optimal designs, the hydraulic performances of the turbine do not change too much while the maximum stress on the turbine decrease and the fatigue life increase as well.

  9. Gordon Bennett Airplane Cup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margoulis, W

    1921-01-01

    The characteristics of the airplanes built for the Gordon Bennet Airplane Cup race that took place on September 28, 1920 are described. The airplanes are discussed from a aerodynamical point of view, with a number of new details concerning the French machines. Also discussed is the regulation of future races. The author argues that there should be no limitations on the power of the aircraft engines. He reasons that in the present state of things, liberty with regard to engine power does not lead to a search for the most powerful engine, but for one which is reliable and light, thus leading to progress.

  10. 77 FR 25930 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... slat extension eccentric bolts as principal structural elements (PSE) with replacement due at or before... the loss of structural integrity of the airplane. DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed...

  11. General airplane performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockfeller, W C

    1939-01-01

    Equations have been developed for the analysis of the performance of the ideal airplane, leading to an approximate physical interpretation of the performance problem. The basic sea-level airplane parameters have been generalized to altitude parameters and a new parameter has been introduced and physically interpreted. The performance analysis for actual airplanes has been obtained in terms of the equivalent ideal airplane in order that the charts developed for use in practical calculations will for the most part apply to any type of engine-propeller combination and system of control, the only additional material required consisting of the actual engine and propeller curves for propulsion unit. Finally, a more exact method for the calculation of the climb characteristics for the constant-speed controllable propeller is presented in the appendix.

  12. English airplane construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwencke, D

    1930-01-01

    English airplane construction is presented with a particular emphasis on metal construction techniques. Steel rib and fuselage construction are discussed as well as the use of duralumin in construction.

  13. The Bristol "Badminton" Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    The Bristol Badminton, Type 99 airplane has a radial aircooled engine (a Bristol Jupiter 9 cylinder 450 HP.) and three fuel tanks. It is a single seat biplane weighing 1,840 lbs. empty and 2,460 lbs. loaded.

  14. Airplane Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F; Crook, L H

    1918-01-01

    Report presents stress analysis of individual components of an airplane. Normal and abnormal loads, sudden loads, simple stresses, indirect simple stresses, resultant unit stress, repetitive and equivalent stress, maximum steady load and stress are considered.

  15. 75 FR 39804 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 757 Airplanes, Model 767 Airplanes, and Model...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... Model 757 Airplanes, Model 767 Airplanes, and Model 777-200 and -300 Series Airplanes AGENCY: Federal... directive (AD) for certain Model 757 airplanes, Model 767 airplanes, and Model 777-200 and -300 series...) that would apply to certain Model 757 airplanes, Model 767 airplanes, and Model 777-200 and -300...

  16. Mixed-Mode Fracture and Fatigue Analysis of Cracked 3D Complex Structures using a 3D SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavanam, Sharada

    The aim of this thesis is to numerically evaluate the mixed-mode Stress Intensity Factors (SIFs) of complex 3D structural geometries with arbitrary 3D cracks using the Symmetric Galerkin Boundary Element Method-Finite Element Method (SGBEM-FEM) Alternating Method. Various structural geometries with different loading scenarios and crack configurations were examined in this thesis to understand the behavior and trends of the mixed-mode SIFs as well as the fatigue life for these complex structural geometries. Although some 3D structures have empirical and numerical solutions that are readily available in the open literature, some do not; therefore this thesis presents the results of fracture and fatigue analyses of these 3D complex structures using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method to serve as reference for future studies. Furthermore, there are advantages of using the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method compared to traditional FEM methods. For example, the fatigue-crack-growth and fatigue life can be better estimated for a structure because different fatigue models (i.e. Walker, Paris, and NASGRO) can be used within the same framework of the SGBEM-FEM Alternating Method. The FEM (un-cracked structure)/BEM(crack model) meshes are modeled independently, which speeds up the computation process and reduces the cost of human labor. A simple coarse mesh can be used for all fracture and fatigue analyses of complex structures. In this thesis, simple coarse meshes were used for 3D complex structures, which were below 5000 elements as compared to traditional FEM, which require meshes where the elements range on the order of ˜250,000 to ˜106 and sometimes even more than that.

  17. Abrasion behavior of aluminum and composite skin coupons, stiffened skins and stiffened panels representative of transport airplane structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    A three-phase investigation was conducted to compare the friction and wear response of aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials when subjected to loading conditions similar to those experienced by the skin panels on the underside of a transport airplane during an emergency belly landing on a runway surface. The first phase involved a laboratory test which used a standard belt sander to provide the sliding abrasive surface. Small skin-coupon test specimens were abraded over a range of pressures and velocities to determine the effects of these variables on the coefficient of friction and wear rate. The second phase involved abrading I-beam stiffened skins on actual runway surface over the same range of pressures and velocities used in the first phase. In the third phase, large stiffened panels which most closely resembled transport fuelage skin construction were abraded on a runway surface. This report presents results from each phase of the investigation and shows comparisons between the friction and wear behavior of the aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials.

  18. Fracture and fatigue resistance of Mo-Si-B alloys for ultrahigh-temperature structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, J.J.; Schneibel, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-08-29

    Fracture and fatigue-crack growth properties are examined for a series of Mo-Mo3Si-Mo5SiB2 containing alloys, which utilize a continuous a-Mo matrix to achieve unprecedented room-temperature fracture resistance (>20 MPaAm). Mechanistically, these properties are explained in terms of toughening by crack trapping and crack bridging by the more ductile a-Mo phase.

  19. Class 2 design update for the family of commuter airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creighton, Thomas R.; Hendrich, Louis J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the final report of seven on the design of a family of commuter airplanes. This design effort was performed in fulfillment of NASA/USRA grant NGT-8001. Its contents are as follows: (1) the class 1 baseline designs for the commuter airplane family; (2) a study of takeoff weight penalties imposed on the commuter family due to implementing commonality objectives; (3) component structural designs common to the commuter family; (4) details of the acquisition and operating economics of the commuter family, i.e., savings due to production commonality and handling qualities commonality are determined; (5) discussion of the selection of an advanced turboprop propulsion system for the family of commuter airplanes, and (6) a proposed design for an SSSA controller design to achieve similar handling for all airplanes. Final class 2 commuter airplane designs are also presented.

  20. It's time to reinvent the general aviation airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Current designs for general aviation airplanes have become obsolete, and avenues for major redesign must be considered. New designs should incorporate recent advances in electronics, aerodynamics, structures, materials, and propulsion. Future airplanes should be optimized to operate satisfactorily in a positive air traffic control environment, to afford safety and comfort for point-to-point transportation, and to take advantage of automated manufacturing techniques and high production rates. These requirements have broad implications for airplane design and flying qualities, leading to a concept for the Modern Equipment General Aviation (MEGA) airplane. Synergistic improvements in design, production, and operation can provide a much needed fresh start for the general aviation industry and the traveling public. In this investigation a small four place airplane is taken as the reference, although the proposed philosophy applies across the entire spectrum of general aviation.

  1. 78 FR 78703 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model DC-9-10, DC-9-30, and DC-9-40 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by an evaluation by the design approval holder (DAH) indicating that the aft pressure bulkhead web area is subject to widespread fatigue damage (WFD). This AD requires modifying the aft pressure bulkhead. The modification includes......

  2. 78 FR 24338 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ...We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 737-900 and -900ER series airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of early fatigue cracks at chem-mill areas on the crown skin panels. This AD requires repetitive inspections for cracking of the fuselage skin along chem-mill steps at certain crown skin and shear wrinkle areas, and repair if necessary. We......

  3. 77 FR 3187 - Airworthiness Directives; the Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Model 767-200 and -300 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of fatigue cracking on the lower main sill inner chord of the hatch opening of the overwing emergency exit. This proposed AD would require repetitive inspections for cracking, corrosion damage, and any other irregularity of the lower main sill......

  4. Stresses Produced in Airplane Wings by Gusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussner, Hans Georg

    1932-01-01

    Accurate prediction of gust stress being out of the question because of the multiplicity of the free air movements, the exploration of gust stress is restricted to static method which must be based upon: 1) stress measurements in free flight; 2) check of design specifications of approved type airplanes. With these empirical data the stress must be compared which can be computed for a gust of known intensity and structure. This "maximum gust" then must be so defined as to cover the whole ambit of empiricism and thus serve as prediction for new airplane designs.

  5. Loads and calculations of army airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelmachowski, Ing

    1921-01-01

    By comparing airplanes of known strength that have resisted all the usual and even extreme air loads with those that under like conditions were found to be insufficiently strong, the researchers, aided by scientific investigations, developed standards which are satisfactory for the calculation of airplane structures. Given here are standards applicable to loads on wing trusses, load factors for use in stress analysis, load factors required in sand testing, loads on control surfaces, loads on wing ribs, loads on landing gear, and rigidity of materials.

  6. Influence of microstructure on high-cycle fatigue of Ti-6Al-4V: Bimodal vs. lamellar structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalla, R. K.; Ritchie, R. O.; Boyce, B. L.; Campbell, J. P.; Peters, J. O.

    2002-03-01

    The high-cycle fatigue (HCF) of titanium alloy turbine engine components remains a principal cause of failures in military aircraft engines. A recent initiative sponsored by the United States Air Force has focused on the major drivers for such failures in Ti-6Al-4V, a commonly used turbine blade alloy, specifically for fan and compressor blades. However, as most of this research has been directed toward a single processing/heat-treated condition, the bimodal (solution-treated and overaged (STOA)) microstructure, there have been few studies to examine the role of microstructure. Accordingly, the present work examines how the overall resistance to high-cycle fatigue in Ti-6Al-4V compares between the bimodal microstructure and a coarser lamellar ( β-annealed) microstructure. Several aspects of the HCF problem are examined. These include the question of fatigue thresholds for through-thickness large and short cracks; microstructurally small, semi-elliptical surface cracks; and cracks subjected to pure tensile (mode I) and mixed-mode (mode I+II) loading over a range of load ratios (ratio of minimum to maximum load) from 0.1 to 0.98, together with the role of prior damage due to sub-ballistic impacts (foreign-object damage (FOD)). Although differences are not large, it appears that the coarse lamellar microstructure has improved smooth-bar stress-life (S-N) properties in the HCF regime and superior resistance to fatigue-crack propagation (in pure mode I loading) in the presence of cracks that are large compared to the scale of the microstructure; however, this increased resistance to crack growth compared to the bimodal structure is eliminated at extremely high load ratios. Similarly, under mixed-mode loading, the lamellar microstructure is generally superior. In contrast, in the presence of microstructurally small cracks, there is little difference in the HCF properties of the two microstructures. Similarly, resistance to HCF failure following FOD is comparable in the

  7. Structural response to discrete and continuous gusts of an airplane having wing bending flexibility and a correlation of calculated and flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houbolt, John C; Kordes, Eldon E

    1954-01-01

    An analysis is made of the structural response to gusts of an airplane having the degrees of freedom of vertical motion and wing bending flexibility and basic parameters are established. A convenient and accurate numerical solution of the response equations is developed for the case of discrete-gust encounter, an exact solution is made for the simpler case of continuous-sinusoidal-gust encounter, and the procedure is outlined for treating the more realistic condition of continuous random atmospheric turbulence, based on the methods of generalized harmonic analysis. Correlation studies between flight and calculated results are then given to evaluate the influence of wing bending flexibility on the structural response to gusts of two twin-engine transports and one four-engine bomber. It is shown that calculated results obtained by means of a discrete-gust approach reveal the general nature of the flexibility effects and lead to qualitative correlation with flight results. In contrast, calculations by means of the continuous-turbulence approach show good quantitative correlation with flight results and indicate a much greater degree of resolution of the flexibility effects.

  8. Probabilistic Fatigue: Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue is a primary consideration in the design of aerospace structures for long term durability and reliability. There are several types of fatigue that must be considered in the design. These include low cycle, high cycle, combined for different cyclic loading conditions - for example, mechanical, thermal, erosion, etc. The traditional approach to evaluate fatigue has been to conduct many tests in the various service-environment conditions that the component will be subjected to in a specific design. This approach is reasonable and robust for that specific design. However, it is time consuming, costly and needs to be repeated for designs in different operating conditions in general. Recent research has demonstrated that fatigue of structural components/structures can be evaluated by computational simulation based on a novel paradigm. Main features in this novel paradigm are progressive telescoping scale mechanics, progressive scale substructuring and progressive structural fracture, encompassed with probabilistic simulation. These generic features of this approach are to probabilistically telescope scale local material point damage all the way up to the structural component and to probabilistically scale decompose structural loads and boundary conditions all the way down to material point. Additional features include a multifactor interaction model that probabilistically describes material properties evolution, any changes due to various cyclic load and other mutually interacting effects. The objective of the proposed paper is to describe this novel paradigm of computational simulation and present typical fatigue results for structural components. Additionally, advantages, versatility and inclusiveness of computational simulation versus testing are discussed. Guidelines for complementing simulated results with strategic testing are outlined. Typical results are shown for computational simulation of fatigue in metallic composite structures to demonstrate the

  9. Safety and design in airplane construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teichmann, Alfred

    1934-01-01

    The author gives a survey of the principles of stress analysis and design of airplane structures, and discusses the fundamental strength specifications and their effect on the stress analysis as compared with the safety factors used in other branches of engineering.

  10. 77 FR 63264 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... structure and airplane systems. The related investigative actions include an inspection to determine the... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not... AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM)....

  11. Fatigue failure kinetics and structural changes in lead-free interconnects due to mechanical and thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Brent Alan

    Environmental and human health concerns drove European parliament to mandate the Reduction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) for electronics. This was enacted in July 2006 and has practically eliminated lead in solder interconnects. There is concern in the electronics packaging community because modern lead-free solder is rich in tin. Presently, near-eutectic tin-silver-copper solders are favored by industry. These solders are stiffer than the lead-tin near-eutectic alloys, have a higher melting temperature, fewer slip systems, and form intermetallic compounds (IMC) with Cu, Ni and Ag, each of which tend to have a negative effect on lifetime. In order to design more reliable interconnects, the experimental observation of cracking mechanisms is necessary for the correct application of existing theories. The goal of this research is to observe the failure modes resulting from mode II strain and to determine the damage mechanisms which describe fatigue failures in 95.5 Sn- 4.0 Ag - 0.5 Cu wt% (SAC405) lead-free solder interconnects. In this work the initiation sites and crack paths were characterized for SAC405 ball-grid array (BGA) interconnects with electroless-nickel immersion-gold (ENIG) pad-finish. The interconnects were arranged in a perimeter array and tested in fully assembled packages. Evaluation methods included monotonic and displacement controlled mechanical shear fatigue tests, and temperature cycling. The specimens were characterized using metallogaphy, including optical and electron microscopy as well as energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and precise real-time electrical resistance structural health monitoring (SHM). In mechanical shear fatigue tests, strain was applied by the substrates, simulating dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the board and chip-carrier. This type of strain caused cracks to initiate in the soft Sn-rich solder and grow near the interface between the solder and intermetallic compounds (IMC). The growth near

  12. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Program (FATIG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2012-01-01

    FATIG computes fatigue damage/fatigue life using the stress rms (root mean square) value, the total number of cycles, and S-N curve parameters. The damage is computed by the following methods: (a) traditional method using Miner s rule with stress cycles determined from a Rayleigh distribution up to 3*sigma; and (b) classical fatigue damage formula involving the Gamma function, which is derived from the integral version of Miner's rule. The integration is carried out over all stress amplitudes. This software solves the problem of probabilistic fatigue damage using the integral form of the Palmgren-Miner rule. The software computes fatigue life using an approach involving all stress amplitudes, up to N*sigma, as specified by the user. It can be used in the design of structural components subjected to random dynamic loading, or by any stress analyst with minimal training for fatigue life estimates of structural components.

  13. Creep-Fatigue Interaction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue fives in metals are nominally time independent below 0.5 T(sub Melt). At higher temperatures, fatigue lives are altered due to time-dependent, thermally activated creep. Conversely, creep rates are altered by super. imposed fatigue loading. Creep and fatigue generally interact synergistically to reduce material lifetime. Their interaction, therefore, is of importance to structural durability of high-temperature structures such as nuclear reactors, reusable rocket engines, gas turbine engines, terrestrial steam turbines, pressure vessel and piping components, casting dies, molds for plastics, and pollution control devices. Safety and lifecycle costs force designers to quantify these interactions. Analytical and experimental approaches to creep-fatigue began in the era following World War II. In this article experimental and life prediction approaches are reviewed for assessing creep-fatigue interactions of metallic materials. Mechanistic models are also discussed briefly.

  14. Alternative Computational Approaches for Probalistic Fatigue Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbeler, D. H.; Newlin, L. E.; Sutharshana, S.; Moore, N. R.; Grigoriu, M.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility is discussed for alternative methods of direct Monte Carlo simulation for failure probability computations. First and second order reliability methods are used for fatigue crack growth and low cycle fatigue structural failure modes to illustrate typical problems.

  15. 14 CFR 23.627 - Fatigue strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Fatigue strength. The structure must be designed, as far as practicable, to avoid points of stress concentration where variable stresses above the fatigue limit are likely to occur in normal service....

  16. 14 CFR 23.627 - Fatigue strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Fatigue strength. The structure must be designed, as far as practicable, to avoid points of stress concentration where variable stresses above the fatigue limit are likely to occur in normal service....

  17. 14 CFR 23.627 - Fatigue strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Fatigue strength. The structure must be designed, as far as practicable, to avoid points of stress concentration where variable stresses above the fatigue limit are likely to occur in normal service....

  18. 14 CFR 23.627 - Fatigue strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Fatigue strength. The structure must be designed, as far as practicable, to avoid points of stress concentration where variable stresses above the fatigue limit are likely to occur in normal service....

  19. 14 CFR 23.627 - Fatigue strength.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Fatigue strength. The structure must be designed, as far as practicable, to avoid points of stress concentration where variable stresses above the fatigue limit are likely to occur in normal service....

  20. Study of multiple cracks in airplane fuselage by micromechanics and complex variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denda, Mitsunori; Dong, Y. F.

    1994-01-01

    Innovative numerical techniques for two dimensional elastic and elastic-plastic multiple crack problems are presented using micromechanics concepts and complex variables. The simplicity and the accuracy of the proposed method will enable us to carry out the multiple-site fatigue crack propagation analyses for airplane fuselage by incorporating such features as the curvilinear crack path, plastic deformation, coalescence of cracks, etc.

  1. Fatigue of restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Baran, G; Boberick, K; McCool, J

    2001-01-01

    Failure due to fatigue manifests itself in dental prostheses and restorations as wear, fractured margins, delaminated coatings, and bulk fracture. Mechanisms responsible for fatigue-induced failure depend on material ductility: Brittle materials are susceptible to catastrophic failure, while ductile materials utilize their plasticity to reduce stress concentrations at the crack tip. Because of the expense associated with the replacement of failed restorations, there is a strong desire on the part of basic scientists and clinicians to evaluate the resistance of materials to fatigue in laboratory tests. Test variables include fatigue-loading mode and test environment, such as soaking in water. The outcome variable is typically fracture strength, and these data typically fit the Weibull distribution. Analysis of fatigue data permits predictive inferences to be made concerning the survival of structures fabricated from restorative materials under specified loading conditions. Although many dental-restorative materials are routinely evaluated, only limited use has been made of fatigue data collected in vitro: Wear of materials and the survival of porcelain restorations has been modeled by both fracture mechanics and probabilistic approaches. A need still exists for a clinical failure database and for the development of valid test methods for the evaluation of composite materials. PMID:11603506

  2. The Effect of a Non-Gaussian Random Loading on High-Cycle Fatigue of a Thermally Post-Buckled Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Behnke, marlana N.; Przekop, Adam

    2010-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue of an elastic-plastic beam structure under the combined action of thermal and high-intensity non-Gaussian acoustic loadings is considered. Such loadings can be highly damaging when snap-through motion occurs between thermally post-buckled equilibria. The simulated non-Gaussian loadings investigated have a range of skewness and kurtosis typical of turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations in the vicinity of forward facing steps. Further, the duration and steadiness of high excursion peaks is comparable to that found in such turbulent boundary layer data. Response and fatigue life estimates are found to be insensitive to the loading distribution, with the minor exception of cases involving plastic deformation. In contrast, the fatigue life estimate was found to be highly affected by a different type of non-Gaussian loading having bursts of high excursion peaks.

  3. Fatigue of fiberglass beam substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, J.F.; Combs, D.W.; Samborsky, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    Composite material beams representative of wind turbine blade substructure have been designed, fabricated, and tested under constant amplitude flexural fatigue loading. Beam stiffness, strength, and fatigue life are predicted based on detailed finite element analysis and the materials fatigue database developed using standard test coupons and special high frequency minicoupons.Beam results are in good agreement with predictions when premature adhesive and delamination failures are avoided in the load transfer areas. The results show that fiberglass substructures can be designed and fabricated to withstand maximum strain levels on the order of 8,000 microstrain for about 10{sup 6} cycles with proper structural detail design and the use of fatigue resistant laminate constructions. The study also demonstrates that the materials fatigue database and accurate analysis can be used to predict the fatigue life of composite substructures typical of blades.

  4. Buffet characteristics of the F-8 supercritical wing airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deangelis, V. M.; Monaghan, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The buffet characteristics of the F-8 supercritical wing airplane were investigated. Wing structural response was used to determine the buffet characteristics of the wing and these characteristics are compared with wind tunnel model data and the wing flow characteristics at transonic speeds. The wingtip accelerometer was used to determine the buffet onset boundary and to measure the buffet intensity characteristics of the airplane. The effects of moderate trailing edge flap deflections on the buffet onset boundary are presented. The supercritical wing flow characteristics were determined from wind tunnel and flight static pressure measurements and from a dynamic pressure sensor mounted on the flight test airplane in the vicinity of the shock wave that formed on the upper surface of the wing at transonic speeds. The comparison of the airplane's structural response data to the supercritical flow characteristics includes the effects of a leading edge vortex generator.

  5. The evolution of airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejan, A.; Charles, J. D.; Lorente, S.

    2014-07-01

    The prevailing view is that we cannot witness biological evolution because it occurred on a time scale immensely greater than our lifetime. Here, we show that we can witness evolution in our lifetime by watching the evolution of the flying human-and-machine species: the airplane. We document this evolution, and we also predict it based on a physics principle: the constructal law. We show that the airplanes must obey theoretical allometric rules that unite them with the birds and other animals. For example, the larger airplanes are faster, more efficient as vehicles, and have greater range. The engine mass is proportional to the body size: this scaling is analogous to animal design, where the mass of the motive organs (muscle, heart, lung) is proportional to the body size. Large or small, airplanes exhibit a proportionality between wing span and fuselage length, and between fuel load and body size. The animal-design counterparts of these features are evident. The view that emerges is that the evolution phenomenon is broader than biological evolution. The evolution of technology, river basins, and animal design is one phenomenon, and it belongs in physics.

  6. 77 FR 54848 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain The Boeing Company Model 737-300, -400, -500, -600, -700, - 700C, -800, -900, and -900ER series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a review of the tail strobe light installation, which revealed that the tail strobe light is not electrically bonded to primary structure of the airplane. This proposed AD would require......

  7. High Speed Research Program Sonic Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A. (Technical Monitor); Beier, Theodor H.; Heaton, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this sonic fatigue summary is to provide major findings and technical results of studies, initiated in 1994, to assess sonic fatigue behavior of structure that is being considered for the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). High Speed Research (HSR) program objectives in the area of sonic fatigue were to predict inlet, exhaust and boundary layer acoustic loads; measure high cycle fatigue data for materials developed during the HSR program; develop advanced sonic fatigue calculation methods to reduce required conservatism in airframe designs; develop damping techniques for sonic fatigue reduction where weight effective; develop wing and fuselage sonic fatigue design requirements; and perform sonic fatigue analyses on HSCT structural concepts to provide guidance to design teams. All goals were partially achieved, but none were completed due to the premature conclusion of the HSR program. A summary of major program findings and recommendations for continued effort are included in the report.

  8. Phase 2 program on ground test of refanned JT8D turbofan engines and nacelles for the 727 airplane. Volume 4: Airplane evaluation and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The retrofit of JT8D-109 (refan) engines are evaluated on a 727-200 airplane in terms of airworthiness, performance, and noise. Design of certifiable hardware, manufacture, and ground testing of the essential nacelle components is included along with analysis of the certifiable airplane design to ensure airworthiness compliance and to predict the in-flight performance and noise characteristics of the modified airplane. The analyses confirm that the 727 refan airplane is certifiable. The refan airplane range would be 15% less that of the baseline airplane and block fuel would be increased by 1.5% to 3%. However, with this particular 727-200 model, with a brake release gross weight of 172,500 lb (78,245 kg), it is possible to operate the airplane (with minor structural modifications) at higher gross weights and increase the range up to 15% over the 727-200 (baseline) airplane. The refan airplane FAR Part 36 noise levels would be 6 to 8 EPNdB (effective perceived noise in decibels) below the baseline. Noise footprint studies showed that approach noise contour areas are small compared to takeoff areas. The 727 refan realizes a 68% to 83% reduction in annoyance-weighted area when compared to the 727-200 over a range of gross weights and operational procedures.

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Neutron Diffraction Measurements of a Thermally Fatigued Single Crystal Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guang-Ai; Chen, Bo; Wu, Er-Dong; Li, Jin-Chao; Pirling, T.; Hughes, D.

    2009-08-01

    The thermally fatigued single crystal superalloy DZ125L is investigated by neutron diffraction measurements. The measurements, made using the phi angle oscillating method, provide more detailed and reliable data than those with the phi angle fixed. Diffraction studies show that the influence of thermal fatigue on the lattice parameters of the alloy is very limited. The stress analysis reveals that triaxial elastic hydrostatic stress plays a major role during thermal fatigue. The magnitude of the macrostress increases with the fatigue cycles, with the stress of the γ phase increasing more significantly than that of the γ' phase, and becoming fragile after many cycles. The changes in the microstrain are dependent on the reflection planes. The microstrains at the center of the sample are released by the thermal fatigue in comparison with those at the outlying locations, which has been attributed to the advance of the dislocation slips.

  10. Automated airplane surface generation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Cordero, Y.; Jones, W.

    1996-12-31

    An efficient methodology and software axe presented for defining a class of airplane configurations. A small set of engineering design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, vertical tall, horizontal tail, and canard components. Wing, canard, and tail surface grids axe manifested by solving a fourth-order partial differential equation subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design variables are incorporated into the boundary conditions, and the solution is expressed as a Fourier series. The fuselage is described by an algebraic function with four design parameters. The computed surface grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation and configuration optimizations. Both batch and interactive software are discussed for applying the methodology.

  11. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that ... activities. The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You ...

  12. Testing airplane fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proll, A

    1924-01-01

    The following considerations determine the strength of airplane fabrics: 1. maximum air forces acting on the surfaces (including local stresses); 2. tensions produced in the fabrics, in the directions of both warp and filling; 3. factor of safety required. The question of the permissible depression of the fabric as affecting the aerodynamic requirements in regard to the maintenance of shape of the section, the tenacity and extensibility of the layer of dope, its strength and its permeability to water is almost as important.

  13. Dynamic Breaking Tests of Airplane Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertel, Heinrich

    1933-01-01

    The static stresses of airplane parts, the magnitude of which can be determined with the aid of static load assumptions, are mostly superposed by dynamic stresses, the magnitude of which has been but little explored. The object of the present investigation is to show how the strength of airplane parts can best be tested with respect to dynamic stresses with and without superposed static loading, and to what extent the dynamic strength of the parts depends on their structural design. Experimental apparatus and evaluation methods were developed and tried for the execution of vibration-strength tests with entire structural parts both with and without superposed static loading. Altogether ten metal spars and spar pieces and two wooden spars were subjected to vibration breaking tests.

  14. Airplane dopes and doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W H

    1919-01-01

    Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate are the important constituents of airplane dopes in use at the present time, but planes were treated with other materials in the experimental stages of flying. The above compounds belong to the class of colloids and are of value because they produce a shrinking action on the fabric when drying out of solution, rendering it drum tight. Other colloids possessing the same property have been proposed and tried. In the first stages of the development of dope, however, shrinkage was not considered. The fabric was treated merely to render it waterproof. The first airplanes constructed were covered with cotton fabric stretched as tightly as possible over the winds, fuselage, etc., and flying was possible only in fine weather. The necessity of an airplane which would fly under all weather conditions at once became apparent. Then followed experiments with rubberized fabrics, fabrics treated with glue rendered insoluble by formaldehyde or bichromate, fabrics treated with drying and nondrying oils, shellac, casein, etc. It was found that fabrics treated as above lost their tension in damp weather, and the oil from the motor penetrated the proofing material and weakened the fabric. For the most part the film of material lacked durability. Cellulose nitrate lacquers, however were found to be more satisfactory under varying weather conditions, added less weight to the planes, and were easily applied. On the other hand, they were highly inflammable, and oil from the motor penetrated the film of cellulose nitrate, causing the tension of the fabric to be relaxed.

  15. 77 FR 50644 - Airworthiness Directives; Cessna Airplane Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... 1134104-5 air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor; and (2) are certificated in any category. (d) Subject... certain Cessna Airplane Company Model 525 airplanes equipped with certain part number (P/N) air conditioning (A/C) compressor motors. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of smoke and/or fire in...

  16. Fatigue: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Thomas C; Majeroni, Barbara A; Pretorius, Richard; Malik, Khalid

    2008-11-15

    Fatigue, a common presenting symptom in primary care, negatively impacts work performance, family life, and social relationships. The differential diagnosis of fatigue includes lifestyle issues, physical conditions, mental disorders, and treatment side effects. Fatigue can be classified as secondary to other medical conditions, physiologic, or chronic. The history and physical examination should focus on identifying common secondary causes (e.g., medications, anemia, pregnancy) and life-threatening problems, such as cancer. Results of laboratory studies affect management in only 5 percent of patients, and if initial results are normal, repeat testing is generally not indicated. Treatment of all types of fatigue should include a structured plan for regular physical activity that consists of stretching and aerobic exercise, such as walking. Caffeine and modafinil may be useful for episodic situations requiring alertness. Short naps are proven performance enhancers. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline, may improve energy in patients with depression. Patients with chronic fatigue may respond to cognitive behavior therapy. Scheduling regular follow-up visits, rather than sporadic urgent appointments, is recommended for effective long-term management. PMID:19035066

  17. Fatigue of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dauskardt, R.H.; Ritchie, R.O. . Center for Advanced Materials); Cox, B.N. )

    1993-08-01

    The development of toughened ceramics over the past 10 to 15 years is arguably one of the most important materials breakthroughs of this century. Monolithic and composite ceramic materials having fracture toughnesses up to an order of magnitude higher than those available 20 years ago have been produced using technologies based on scientific understanding and micromechanical models for in situ phase transformation, fiber bridging, ductile-particle toughening, and other toughening mechanisms. The irony of this, however, is that although ceramics can now be seriously considered for many structural applications, they can also, contrary to popular belief, be susceptible to degradation under cyclic fatigue loading. This is true even when the loading is fully compressive. As a result, a great deal of attention is now being paid to ceramic fatigue, largely because of the importance of cyclic loading in many of the potential applications for ceramics, such as gas-turbine and reciprocating engines. However, because the field is in its infancy, only limited fatigue property data have been documented, understanding of salient fatigue mechanisms has not been achieved, and the design of ceramic microstructures for optimum fatigue resistance has yet to be attempted.

  18. Nitinol Fatigue Life for Variable Strain Amplitude Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z.; Pike, K.; Schlun, M.; Zipse, A.; Draper, J.

    2012-12-01

    Nitinol fatigue testing results are presented for variable strain amplitude cycling. The results indicate that cycles smaller than the constant amplitude fatigue limit may contribute to significant fatigue damage when they occur in a repeating sequence of large and small amplitude cycles. The testing utilized two specimen types: stent-like diamond specimens and Z-shaped wire specimens. The diamond specimens were made from nitinol tubing with stent-like manufacturing processes and the Z-shaped wire specimens were made from heat set nitinol wire. The study explored the hypothesis that duty cycling can have an effect on nitinol fatigue life. Stent-like structures were subjected to different in vivo loadings in order to create more complex strain amplitudes. The main focus in this study was to determine whether a combination of small and large amplitudes causes additional damage that alters the fatigue life of a component.

  19. Structural Reliability of Ceramics at High Temperature: Mechanisms of Fracture and Fatigue Crack Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    2005-08-01

    Final report of our DOE funded research program. Aim of the research program was to provide a fundamental basis from which the mechanical reliability of layered structures may be understood, and to provide guidelines for the development of technologically relevant layered material structures with optimum resistance to fracture and subcritical debonding. Progress in the program to achieve these goals is described.

  20. Trend of airplane flight characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Koppen, Joachim

    1933-01-01

    This report describes the development of airplane characteristics since the war and indicates the direction development should take in the immediate future. Some of the major topics include: the behavior of an airplane about its lateral, vertical, and longitudinal axes. Behavior at large angles of attack and landing characteristics are also included.

  1. Influence of UFG structure formation on mechanical and fatigue properties in Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakova, V. V.; Anumalasetty, V. N.; Semenova, I. P.; Valiev, R. Z.

    2014-08-01

    Ultrafine-grained (UFG) Ti alloys have potential applications in osteosynthesis and orthopedics due to high bio-compatibility and increased weight-to- strength ratio. In current study, Ti6Al7Nb ELI alloy is processed through equal channel angular pressing-conform (ECAP-Conform) and subsequent thermomechanical processing to generate a UFG microstructure. The fatigue properties of UFG alloys are compared to coarse grained (CG) alloys. Our study demonstrates that the UFG alloys with an average grain size of ~180 nm showed 35% enhancement of fatigue endurance limit as compared to coarse-grained alloys. On the fracture surfaces of the UFG and CG samples fatigue striations and dimpled relief were observed. However, the fracture surface of the UFG sample looks smoother; fewer amounts of secondary micro-cracks and more ductile rupture were also observed, which testifies to the good crack resistance in the UFG alloy after high-cyclic fatigue tests.

  2. Identification of multiple open and fatigue cracks in beam-like structures using wavelets on deflection signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreaus, Ugo; Casini, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    A novel method for damage detection of multi-cracked beam-like structures by analyzing the static deflection is presented. The damage incurred produces a change in the stiffness of the beam. This causes a localized singularity which can be identified by a wavelet analysis of the displacement response. The existence and location of the cracks can be revealed by positions of the peaks in the continuous wavelet transform (CWT). To achieve this, the static profile of beams is analyzed with Gauss2 wavelet to identify the cracks. Beams under some ideal boundary and prescribed load conditions are considered. The deflected shape of the beam with open and fatigue cracks has been simulated under static loading using lumped crack models adopted from fracture mechanics and involving various degrees of complexity. The deflection of cracked beam in closed form for several cases of loads, crack sizes, and crack locations is calculated, and an explicit expression for the damage index (DI), based on CWT, is developed; it is demonstrated that the proposed damage index does not depend on mechanical properties of a homogeneous beam, and that the DI of one crack does not depend on the size and location of other cracks in a multiple cracked beam. Hence, the obtained expression for the DI can be used to find the size of each crack independently. Numerical results show that the method can detect cracks of small depth and is also applicable under the presence of measurement noise.

  3. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories. (a) The normal category is limited to airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding...

  4. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories. (a) The normal category is limited to airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding...

  5. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories... airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding pilot seats, of nine or less, a maximum...

  6. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories. (a) The normal category is limited to airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding...

  7. 14 CFR 23.3 - Airplane categories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane categories. 23.3 Section 23.3... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES General § 23.3 Airplane categories. (a) The normal category is limited to airplanes that have a seating configuration, excluding...

  8. 76 FR 74655 - Damage Tolerance and Fatigue Evaluation of Composite Rotorcraft Structures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... degradation of the chemical bonds in a new regulation (Sec. 2x.605 for parts 27 and 29); and that information..., April 5, 2000 (65 FR 17936). Recommend revisions to FAA Regulations/Joint Aviation Regulations (JAR... for this composite structures rule in the Federal Register on January 6, 2010 (75 FR 793). The...

  9. 77 FR 15291 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not... B4-622R airplanes; Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes; and Model A300 F4-600R series airplanes... B4-603, B4-605R, and B4- 622R airplanes; Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes; and Model A300...

  10. Structure and Composition of Air-Plane Soots and Surrogates Analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy and Laser/Ions Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ismael; Chazallon, Bertrand; Carpentier, Yvain; Irimiea, Cornelia; Focsa, Cristian; Ouf, François-Xavier; Salm, François; Delhaye, David; Gaffié, Daniel; Yon, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion [1]. An aircraft exhaust plume contains species emitted by the engines, species formed in the plume from the emitted species and atmospheric species that become entrained into the plume. The majority of emitted species (gases and soot particles) are produced by the combustion of kerosene with ambient air in the combustion chamber of the engine. Emissions of soot particles by air-planes produce persistent contrails in the upper troposphere in ice-supersaturated air masses that contribute to cloudiness and impact the radiative properties of the atmosphere. These aerosol-cloud interactions represent one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models [2]. Though the formation of atmospheric ice particles has been studied since many years [3], there are still numerous opened questions on nucleation properties of soot particles [4], as the ice nucleation experiments showed a large spread in results depending on the nucleation mode chosen and origin of the soot produced. Most likely one of the reasons behind these discrepancies resides in the different physico-chemical properties (composition, structure) of soot particles produced in different conditions, e.g. with respect to fuel or combustion techniques. In this work, we use Raman microscopy (266, 514 and 785 nm excitation) and ablation techniques (SIMS, Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, and Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry) to characterize soot particles produced from air-plane at different engine regimes simulating a landing and taking-off (LTO) cycle. First, the spectral parameters of the first-order Raman band of various soot samples, collected from three different sources in the frame of the MERMOSE project (http://mermose.onera.fr/): PowerJet SaM-146 turbofan (four engine regimes), CAST generator (propane fuel, four different global equivalence ratios), and Kerosene laboratory flame

  11. Surface Relief and Internal Structure in Fatigued Stainless Sanicro 25 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polák, Jaroslav; Mazánová, Veronika; Kuběna, Ivo; Heczko, Milan; Man, Jiří

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution images of persistent slip markings developed on the surface of Sanicro 25 stainless steel during cyclic loading obtained from the FIB-produced surface lamella in TEM simultaneously with the underlying dislocation structure are reported. Extrusions, intrusions, incipient cracks, and the dislocation arrangement corresponding to the bands of intensive cyclic slip are documented and discussed in relation to the models of surface relief formation in cyclic loading.

  12. Statistical analysis of the time and fatigue strength of aircraft wing structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Hans W

    1941-01-01

    The results from stress measurements in flight operation afford data for analyzing the frequency of appearance of certain parts of the static breaking strength during a specified number of operating hours. Appropriate frequency evaluations furnish data for the prediction of the required strength under repeated stress in the wing structures of aircraft of the different stress categories for the specified number of operating hours demanded during the life of a component.

  13. The revised HSE fatigue guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, A.; Sharp, J.V.

    1995-12-31

    Fatigue cracking has been a principal cause of damage to North Sea structures and consequently considerable attention has been given to the development of guidance for the prediction of fatigue performance. The fatigue guidance of the Offshore Safety Division of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) was recently revised and published, following a significant offshore industry review in the period 1987 to 1990, and is based on the results of a considerable amount of research and development work on the fatigue behavior of welded tubular and plated joints. As a result of this review, the revised fatigue guidance incorporates several new clauses and recommendations. The revised recommendations apply to joint classification, basic design S-N curves for welded joints and cast or forged steel components, the thickness effect, the effects of environment and the treatment of low and high stress ranges. Additionally, a new appendix on the derivation of stress concentration factors is included. The new clauses cover high strength steels, bolts and threaded connectors, moorings, repaired joints and the use of fracture mechanics analysis. This paper presents an overview of the revisions to the fatigue guidance, the associated background technical information and aspects of the fatigue behavior of offshore structures which are considered to require further investigation. 67 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Creep-fatigue modelling in structural steels using empirical and constitutive creep methods implemented in a strip-yield model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Benjamin J.

    The phenomena of creep and fatigue have each been thoroughly studied. More recently, attempts have been made to predict the damage evolution in engineering materials due to combined creep and fatigue loading, but these formulations have been strictly empirical and have not been used successfully outside of a narrow set of conditions. This work proposes a new creep-fatigue crack growth model based on constitutive creep equations (adjusted to experimental data) and Paris law fatigue crack growth. Predictions from this model are compared to experimental data in two steels: modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and AISI 316L stainless steel. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a high-strength steel used in the construction of pressure vessels and piping for nuclear and conventional power plants, especially for high temperature applications. Creep-fatigue and pure creep experimental data from the literature are compared to model predictions, and they show good agreement. Material constants for the constitutive creep model are obtained for AISI 316L stainless steel, an alloy steel widely used for temperature and corrosion resistance for such components as exhaust manifolds, furnace parts, heat exchangers and jet engine parts. Model predictions are compared to pure creep experimental data, with satisfactory results. Assumptions and constraints inherent in the implementation of the present model are examined. They include: spatial discretization, similitude, plane stress constraint and linear elasticity. It is shown that the implementation of the present model had a non-trivial impact on the model solutions in 316L stainless steel, especially the spatial discretization. Based on these studies, the following conclusions are drawn: 1. The constitutive creep model consistently performs better than the Nikbin, Smith and Webster (NSW) model for predicting creep and creep-fatigue crack extension. 2. Given a database of uniaxial creep test data, a constitutive material model such as the one developed for

  15. 75 FR 70092 - Special Conditions: Bombardier Inc. Model CL-600-2E25 Airplane, Interaction of Systems and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...-2D24. The CL-600-2E25 will have a CBW rudder-control system that will affect the structural performance... effects of this system and its failures on structural performance. The special conditions defined herein... that will affect the structural performance of the airplane. The airplane will use a CBW Rudder...

  16. Developing Dislocation Subgrain Structures and Cyclic Softening During High-Temperature Creep-Fatigue of a Nickel Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, M. C.; Carroll, L. J.

    2013-08-01

    The complex cyclic deformation response of Alloy 617 under creep-fatigue conditions is of practical interest both in terms of the observed detriment in failure life and the considerable cyclic softening that occurs. At the low strain ranges investigated, the inelastic strain is the sole predictor of the failure life without taking into consideration a potentially significant environmental influence. The tensile-hold creep-fatigue peak stress response can be directly correlated to the evolving dislocation substructure, which consists of a relatively homogenous distribution of subgrains. Progressive high-temperature cycling with a static hold allows for the rearrangement of loose tangles of dislocations into well-ordered hexagonal dislocation networks. The cyclic softening during tensile-hold creep-fatigue deformation is attributable to two factors: the rearrangement of dislocation substructures into lower-energy configurations, which includes a decreasing dislocation density in subgrain interiors through integration into the subgrain boundaries, and the formation of surface grain boundary cracks and cavity formation or separation at interior grain boundaries, which occurs perpendicular to the stress axis. Effects attributable to the tensile character of the hold cycle are further analyzed through variations in the creep-fatigue waveform and illuminate the effects of the hold-time character on the overall creep-fatigue behavior and evolution of the dislocation substructure.

  17. Fatigue-loaded fiber optic strain gauges performance in reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten J.; Nasta, Manish H.; Claus, Richard O.; Masri, Sami F.

    1994-02-01

    This paper reports the performance of short gage length optical fiber sensors embedded in a reinforced concrete specimen for the quantitative measurement of periodic strain. We report the use of practical, short gage length relative and absolute strain sensors for the measurement of strain in a reinforced concrete specimen. Both types of fiber sensors were attached to steel reinforcement rods prior to filling with concrete, and were collocated with conventional foil strain gages to allow direct comparison of output signals. The relative fiber sensors were of the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric type operating at a wavelength of 1300 nm and the absolute strain sensors used wavelength information to measure absolute strain. The results of this work show that such optical fiber elements may be considered for long term quantitative evaluation of civil structure components.

  18. Fatigue of insect cuticle.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Parle, Eoin; Taylor, David

    2013-05-15

    Many parts of the insect exoskeleton experience repeated cyclic loading. Although the cuticle of insects and other arthropods is the second most common natural composite material in the world, so far nothing is known about its fatigue properties, despite the fact that fatigue undoubtedly limits the durability of body parts in vivo. For the first time, we here present experimental fatigue data of insect cuticle. Using force-controlled cyclic loading, we determined the number of cycles to failure for hind legs (tibiae) and hind wings of the locust Schistocerca gregaria, as a function of the applied cyclic stress. Our results show that, although both are made from cuticle, these two body parts behave very differently. Wing samples showed a large fatigue range, failing after 100,000 cycles when we applied 46% of the stress needed for instantaneous failure [the ultimate tensile strength (UTS)]. Legs, in contrast, were able to sustain a stress of 76% of the UTS for the same number of cycles to failure. This can be explained by the difference in the composition and structure of the material, two factors that, amongst others, also affect the well-known behaviour of engineering composites. Final failure of the tibiae occurred via one of two different failure modes--propagation in tension or buckling in compression--indicating that the tibia is 'optimized' by evolution to resist both failure modes equally. These results are further discussed in relation to the evolution and normal use of these two body parts. PMID:23393276

  19. Gamma rays at airplane altitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J.; Koss, T.; Lord, J.; Strausz, S.; Wilkes, J.; Woosley, J. )

    1990-03-20

    An examination of the gamma ray flux above 1 TeV in the atmosphere is needed to better understand the anomalous showers from point sources. Suggestions are made for future experiments on board airplanes.

  20. Airplane Upset Training Evaluation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawron, Valerie J.; Jones, Patricia M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Airplane upset accidents are a leading factor in hull losses and fatalities. This study compared five types of airplane-upset training. Each group was composed of eight, non-military pilots flying in their probationary year for airlines operating in the United States. The first group, 'No aero / no upset,' was made up of pilots without any airplane upset training or aerobatic flight experience; the second group, 'Aero/no upset,' of pilots without any airplane-upset training but with aerobatic experience; the third group, 'No aero/upset,' of pilots who had received airplane-upset training in both ground school and in the simulator; the fourth group, 'Aero/upset,' received the same training as Group Three but in addition had aerobatic flight experience; and the fifth group, 'In-flight' received in-flight airplane upset training using an instrumented in-flight simulator. Recovery performance indicated that clearly training works - specifically, all 40 pilots recovered from the windshear upset. However few pilots were trained or understood the use of bank to change the direction of the lift vector to recover from nose high upsets. Further, very few thought of, or used differential thrust to recover from rudder or aileron induced roll upsets. In addition, recovery from icing-induced stalls was inadequate.

  1. An analysis of life expectancy of airplane wings in normal cruising flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, Abbott A

    1945-01-01

    In order to provide a basis for judging the relative importance of wing failure by fatigue and by single intense gusts, an analysis of wing life for normal cruising flight was made based on data on the frequency of atmospheric gusts. The independent variables considered in the analysis included stress-concentration factor, stress-load relation, wing loading, design and cruising speeds, design gust velocity, and airplane size. Several methods for estimating fatigue life from gust frequencies are discussed. The procedure selected for the analysis is believed to be simple and reasonably accurate, though slightly conservative.

  2. Determination of aerodynamic parameters of a fighter airplane from flight data at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.; Batterson, J. G.; Abbasy, I.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for the estimation of airplane model structure and parameters is applied to data from a modern fighter airplane operating within an angle of attack range of 5 to 60 deg. The paper briefly describes the airplane, flight and wind tunnel data available, and the estimation method. The results presented contain basic longitudinal characteristics of the airplane and the estimates of aerodynamic parameters in the yawing-moment equations. These estimates are obtained from small and large amplitude maneuvers. Because the latter set of data was not suitable for airplane identification, some of the large amplitude maneuvers were joined together and then partitioned into subsets according to the values of angle of attack. Each subset was then analyzed as a separate data set. Most of the estimated parameters and functions are in good agreement with the wind tunnel measurements. The estimated lateral parameters in the model equations also demonstrate good prediction capabilities.

  3. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acoustical change: Transport category large... § 36.7 Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes. (a) Applicability. This section applies to all transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes for which an acoustical...

  4. Rotor fatigue monitoring data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    1993-01-01

    The 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) had a requirement to monitor rotor fatigue during a test. This test subjected various rotor components to stress levels higher than their structural fatigue limits. A data acquisition system was developed to monitor the cumulative fatigue damage of rotor components using National Instruments hardware and LabVIEW software. A full description of the data acquisition system including its configuration and salient features, is presented in this paper.

  5. Steady properly-banked turns of turbojet-propelled airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, Angelo

    1955-01-01

    The problem of a jet-propelled airplane held in a steady turn is treated both in the very general case and also in the particular case when the polar curve can be approximated by a parabola. Once the general solution has been obtained, some typical maneuvers are next studied such as, the turn of maximum bank, of maximum angular velocity, and of minimum radius of curvature. After a brief comparison is made between the turning characteristics of conventional airplanes and jet airplanes, and after the effect of compressibility upon the turn is examined, the effects of the salient aerodynamic and structural parameters upon the behavior of the plane in curvilinear flight are summarized in the conclusions.

  6. Fatigue Investigation of Full-Scale Wing Panels of 7075 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, Claude B.; Ward, John F.

    1961-01-01

    Results are presented of a fatigue investigation conducted using 18 outer wing panels of T-29A airplanes. Constant-amplitude tests were performed using the resonant-frequency method at three different alternating load levels superposed on a 1 g, or level-flight mean load. Information is presented concerning crack location, cycles to crack initiation, crack propagation, and residual static strength.

  7. 78 FR 78705 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...We are superseding Airworthiness Directive (AD) 2010-24-07 for all Airbus Model A318 series airplanes, Model A319 series airplanes, Model A320 series airplanes, and Model A321 series airplanes. AD 2010- 24-07 required repetitive inspections of the 80VU rack lower lateral fittings for damage, repetitive inspections of the 80VU rack lower central support for cracking, and corrective action if......

  8. 78 FR 18529 - Airworthiness Directives; Learjet Inc. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Learjet Inc. Model 45 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report that the fire barrier seal on the external baggage door does not seal the surrounding door structure due to incorrect positioning...

  9. 76 FR 72863 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... issued AD 85-12-01, Amendment 39-5073 (50 FR 26690, June 28, 1985), for Model 707 and 720 airplanes, as revised (AD 85-12-01 R1, Amendment 39-5439 (51 FR 36002, October 8, 1986). That AD requires structural...-5439 (51 FR 36002, October 8, 1986). Differences Between the Proposed AD and Service...

  10. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in §...

  11. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93...

  12. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in §...

  13. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93...

  14. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in §...

  15. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93...

  16. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in §...

  17. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93...

  18. 78 FR 68347 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... (74 FR 7549, February 18, 2009). Airbus also stated that for Model A340-541 and A340-642 airplanes.... Airbus stated that this requirement for Model A330 MRTT airplanes is equivalent to one in the NPRM (78 FR... (f) of AD 2009-04-07, Amendment 39-15813 (74 FR 7549, February 18, 2009). For all airplanes...

  19. 78 FR 28152 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ..., Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010), exempted airplanes on which Airbus Modification 34804..., Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010). Except for Model A318-121 and -122 airplanes, and except...) of AD 2010-24-07, Amendment 39-16526 (75 FR 75878, December 7, 2010). Except for airplanes on...

  20. 76 FR 77934 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... series airplanes. Since we issued AD 2005-23-02, Amendment 39-14360 (70 FR 69067, November 14, 2005), The... certain ACT equipped airplanes, produced after AD 2005-23-02, Amendment 39-14360 (70 FR 69067, November 14...-14360 (70 FR 69067, November 14, 2005). Applicability (c) This AD applies to Airbus airplanes listed...

  1. 77 FR 51717 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... visual inspection of the forward fitting at frame (FR) 40 on both sides of the airplane for cracks, and..., Amendment 39-16229 (75 FR cycles. 11435, March 11, 2010)), whichever occurs later; except, for airplanes... inspection for cracks of the forward fitting at FR 40 without nut removal on both sides of the airplane,...

  2. 76 FR 79560 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... airplanes; Model A330-223F and -243F airplanes; and Model A340-200, -300, -500, and -600 series...

  3. 77 FR 75833 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... fitting at frame (FR) 40 on both sides of the airplane for cracks, and repair if necessary. This new AD...-time detailed visual inspection of the forward fitting at FR 40 on both sides of the airplane, in..., Amendment 39- 16229 (75 FR 11435, March 11, 2010)), whichever occurs later; except, for airplanes that,...

  4. 77 FR 66772 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... date of AD 96-13-11, Amendment 39-9679 (61 FR 35122, July 5, 1996)). (2) For airplanes that have..., Amendment 39-16698 (76 FR 27875, May 13, 2011). (1) For airplanes identified in paragraph (c)(1) of this AD... FR 27875, May 13, 2011). For airplanes identified in paragraph (c)(3) of this AD: Within 3...

  5. 78 FR 70003 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... series airplanes; Airbus Model A300 B4-600, B4-600R, and F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300...

  6. 14 CFR 125.93 - Airplane limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane limitations. 125.93 Section 125.93...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Requirements § 125.93...

  7. 14 CFR 121.605 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 121.605 Section 121.605..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.605 Airplane equipment. No person may dispatch or release an airplane unless it is airworthy and is equipped as prescribed in §...

  8. Information obtained from airplane flight tests in the year 1927-1928

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubner, W

    1929-01-01

    The information obtained from flight tests in 1927-1928 covers chiefly the effect of the structural features of an airplane on its stability, controllability, maneuverability and spinning characteristics.

  9. Probabilistic Fatigue And Flaw-Propagation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Nicholas; Newlin, Laura; Ebbeler, Donald; Sutharshana, Sravan; Creager, Matthew

    1995-01-01

    Probabilistic Failure Assessment for Fatigue and Flaw Propagation (PFAFAT II) package of software utilizing probabilistic failure-assessment (PFA) methodology to model flaw-propagation and low-cycle-fatigue modes of failure of structural components. Comprises one program for performing probabilistic crack-growth analysis and two programs for performing probabilistic low-cycle-fatigue analysis. These programs perform probabilistic fatigue and crack-propagation analysis by means of Monte Carlo simulation. PFAFAT II is extension of, rather than replacement for, PFAFAT software (NPO-18965). Written in FORTRAN 77.

  10. Exploring the optimal pre-sintering temperature on compressive strength and anti-fatigue property of graded zirconia-based glass/zirconia structure.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haixin; Cui, Chang; Su, Tingshu; Zhang, Fuqiang; Sun, Jian

    2016-01-01

    To explore the optimal pre-sintering temperature for graded glass/zirconia material, glass/zirconia specimens were prepared and pre-sintered at 900, 1,000 and 1,100°C respectively, glass infiltration and densification at 1,450°C. Monolith Y-TZP specimens were sintered at 1,450°C. Nanoindentation was used to test Young's modulus and Hardness. Compressive strength test and cycling fatigue test were conducted. Nanoindentation test showed graded change of Young's modulus in glass/zirconia structure. The compressive strength and the number of cycles to failure of specimens pre-sintered at 1,000°C were significantly higher than those of Y-TZP and the specimens pre-sintered at 900 and 1,000°C (p<0.05). It is concluded that when the pre-sintering temperature is set at 1,000°C, the graded glass/zirconia structure exhibits the most optimal compressive strength and anti-fatigue property. PMID:27251987

  11. 76 FR 3561 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Model 777-200 and -300 Series Airplanes Equipped...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), and 3. Will not have a significant economic... structural damage to the airplane, damage to other airplanes, or possible injury to people on the ground... thrust operation. If a thrust reverser inner wall overheats, separated components could cause...

  12. A Micromechanics-Based Method for Multiscale Fatigue Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John Allan

    An estimated 80% of all structural failures are due to mechanical fatigue, often resulting in catastrophic, dangerous and costly failure events. However, an accurate model to predict fatigue remains an elusive goal. One of the major challenges is that fatigue is intrinsically a multiscale process, which is dependent on a structure's geometric design as well as its material's microscale morphology. The following work begins with a microscale study of fatigue nucleation around non- metallic inclusions. Based on this analysis, a novel multiscale method for fatigue predictions is developed. This method simulates macroscale geometries explicitly while concurrently calculating the simplified response of microscale inclusions. Thus, providing adequate detail on multiple scales for accurate fatigue life predictions. The methods herein provide insight into the multiscale nature of fatigue, while also developing a tool to aid in geometric design and material optimization for fatigue critical devices such as biomedical stents and artificial heart valves.

  13. Development of a fatigue-life methodology for composite structures subjected to out-of-plane load components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumich, Mark; Kedward, Keith T.

    1991-01-01

    The efforts to identify and implement a fatigue life methodology applicable to demonstrate delamination failures for use in certifying composite rotor blades are presented. The RSRA/X-Wing vehicle was a proof-of-concept stopped rotor aircraft configuration which used rotor blades primarily constructed of laminated carbon fiber. Delamination of the main spar during ground testing demonstrated that significant interlaminar stresses were produced. Analysis confirmed the presence of out-of-plane load components. The wear out (residual strength) methodology and the requirements for its implementation are discussed.

  14. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin

    2000-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of bonded composite skin/stringer structures based on delamination fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element analyses. Results were compared to fatigue tests on stringer flange/skin specimens to verify the approach.

  15. Preliminary Fatigue Studies on Aluminum Alloy Aircraft Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1938-01-01

    Preliminary information on the complex subject of the fatigue strength of fabricated structural members for aircraft is presented in the test results obtained on several different types of airship girders subjected to axial tension and compression in a resonance fatigue machine. A description of this machine as well as numerous photographs of the fatigue failures are given. There is also presented an extended bibliography on the subject of fatigue strength.

  16. Low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. D. (Editor); Kaisand, L. R. (Editor); Halford, G. R. (Editor); Leis, B. N. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on various aspects of low cycle fatigue, including cyclic deformation, crack propagation, high-temperature low cycle fatigue, microstructural defects, multiaxial and variable amplitude loading, and life prediction. Papers are presented on the low cycle fatigue of some aluminum alloys, prediction of crack growth under creep-fatigue loading conditions, high-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior and lifetime prediction of a nickel-base ODS alloy, and an integrated approach to creep-fatigue life prediction. Other topics discussed include thermal fatigue testing of coated monocrystalline superalloys, low cycle fatigue of Al-Mg-Si alloys, and the effect of superimposed stresses at high frequency on low cycle fatigue.

  17. Coupled modeling of a directly heated tubular solar receiver for supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle: Structural and creep-fatigue evaluation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ortega, Jesus; Khivsara, Sagar; Christian, Joshua; Ho, Clifford; Dutta, Pradip

    2016-06-06

    A supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) Brayton cycle is an emerging high energy-density cycle undergoing extensive research due to the appealing thermo-physical properties of sCO2 and single phase operation. Development of a solar receiver capable of delivering sCO2 at 20 MPa and 700 °C is required for implementation of the high efficiency (~50%) solar powered sCO2 Brayton cycle. In this work, extensive candidate materials are review along with tube size optimization using the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Moreover, temperature and pressure distribution obtained from the thermal-fluid modeling (presented in a complementary publication) are used to evaluate the thermal andmore » mechanical stresses along with detailed creep-fatigue analysis of the tubes. For resulting body stresses were used to approximate the lifetime performance of the receiver tubes. A cyclic loading analysis is performed by coupling the Strain-Life approach and the Larson-Miller creep model. The structural integrity of the receiver was examined and it was found that the stresses can be withstood by specific tubes, determined by a parametric geometric analysis. The creep-fatigue analysis display the damage accumulation due to cycling and the permanent deformation on the tubes showed that the tubes can operate for the full lifetime of the receiver.« less

  18. Sonic fatigue of launch vehicle components

    SciTech Connect

    Wentz, K.R.; Camden, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    Wright Laboratory has long been a leader in the technologies required for aerospace structures. One of these driving technology areas is that of the dynamic environments of acoustics and vibration to which structures are exposed and required to survive. This paper presents an overview of sonic fatigue of launch vehicle components. An experimental program to develop sonic fatigue design criteria for a proposed thermal protection system is reviewed. Wright Laboratory{close_quote}s experimental facilities utilized to subject structures to simulated launch vehicle environments which are necessary to generate the experimental data required to provide sonic fatigue design criteria are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. The Testing of Airplane Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schraivogel, Karl

    1932-01-01

    This report considers the determining factors in the choice of airplane fabrics, describes the customary methods of testing and reports some of the experimental results. To sum up briefly the results obtained with the different fabrics, it may be said that increasing the strength of covering fabrics by using coarser yarns ordinarily offers no difficulty, because the weight increment from doping is relatively smaller.

  20. Paper Airplanes: A Classroom Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Richard A.

    1976-01-01

    A learning experience is described for upper elementary or junior high students involving the manufacture, transportation, and marketing of a product for consumers. Steps are given and roles are assigned for students to convert raw material (paper) to a finished product (paper airplanes) and to sell it. (AV)

  1. Testing a Windmill Airplane ("autogiro")

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiferth, R

    1927-01-01

    In order to clear up the matter ( In the Spanish report it was stated that the reference surface for the calculation of the coefficients c(sub a) and c(sub w) was the area of all four wings, instead of a single wing), the model of a windwill airplane was tested in the Gottingen wind tunnel.

  2. Glues Used in Airplane Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, S W; Truax, T R

    1920-01-01

    This report was prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and presents the results of investigations conducted by the Forest Products Laboratory of the United States Forest Service on the manufacture, preparation, application, testing and physical properties of the different types of glues used in wood airplane parts.

  3. 78 FR 15112 - Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane Performance and Handling Characteristics-New Task

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane Performance and... guidance material for airplane performance and handling characteristics in new transport category airplanes...: Joe Jacobsen, Airplane & Flight Crew Interface Branch, ANM-111, Transport Airplane...

  4. The airplane: A simulated commercial air transportation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauteuil, Mark; Geniesse, Pete; Hunniford, Michael; Lawler, Kathleen; Quirk, Elena; Tognarelli, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The 'Airplane' is a moderate-range, 70 passenger aircraft. It is designed to serve demands for flights up to 10,000 feet and it cruises at 32 ft/s. The major drivers for the design of the Airplane are economic competitiveness, takeoff performance, and weight minimization. The Airplane is propelled by a single Astro 15 electric motor and a Zinger 12-8 propeller. The wing section is a Spica airfoil which, because of its flat bottom, provides simplicity in manufacturing and thus helps to cut costs. The wing is constructed of a single load bearing mainspar and shape-holding ribs coated with Monokote skin, lending to a light weight structural makeup. The fuselage houses the motor, flight deck and passenger compartments as well as the fuel and control actuating systems. The wing will be attached to the top of the fuselage as will the fuel and control actuator systems for easy disassembly and maintenance. The aircraft is maneuvered about its pitch axis by means of an aft elevator on the flat plate horizontal tail. The twin vertical tail surfaces are also flat plates and each features a rudder for both directional and roll control. Along with wing dihedral, the rudders will be used to roll the aircraft. The Airplane is less costly to operate at its own maximum range and capacity as well as at its maximum range and the HB-40's maximum capacity than the HB-40.

  5. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations....

  6. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations....

  7. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations....

  8. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations....

  9. 14 CFR 121.207 - Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Provisionally certificated airplanes... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.207 Provisionally certificated airplanes: Operating limitations....

  10. Self-Repairing Fatigue Damage in Metallic Structures for Aerospace Vehicles Using Shape Memory Alloy Self-healing (SMASH) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. Clara; Manuel, Michele; Wallace, Terryl; Newman, Andy; Brinson, Kate

    2015-01-01

    This DAA is for the Phase II webinar presentation of the ARMD-funded SMASH technology. A self-repairing aluminum-based composite system has been developed using liquid-assisted healing theory in conjunction with the shape memory effect of wire reinforcements. The metal matrix composite was thermodynamically designed to have a matrix with a relatively even dispersion of low-melting phase, allowing for repair of cracks at a pre-determined temperature. Shape memory alloy wire reinforcements were used within the composite to provide crack closure. Investigators focused the research on fatigue cracks propagating through the matrix in order to optimize and computer model the SMASH technology for aeronautical applications.

  11. Development and characterization of fatigue resistant Aramid reinforced aluminium laminates (ARALL) for fatigue Critical aircraft components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiser, M. H.; Umar, S.; Nauman, S.

    2014-06-01

    The structural weight of an aircraft has always been a controlling parameter that governs its fuel efficiency and transport capacity. In pursuit of achieving light-weight aircraft structures, high design stress levels have to be adopted and materials with high specific strength such as Aluminum etc. are to be deployed. However, an extensive spectrum of fatigue load exists at the aircraft wings and other aerodynamic components that may cause initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks and concludes in a catastrophic rupture. Fatigue is therefore the limiting design parameter in such cases and materials with high fatigue resistance are then required. A major improvement in the fatigue behavior was observed by laminating Kevlar fibers with Aluminum using epoxy. ARALL (Aramid Reinforced ALuminum Laminates) is a fatigue resistant hybrid composite that consists of layers of thin high strength aluminum alloy sheets surface bonded with aramid fibers. The intact aramid fibers tie up the fatigue cracks, thus reducing the stress intensity factor at the crack tip as a result of which the fatigue properties of can be enhanced with orders of magnitude as compared to monolithic high strength Aluminum alloy sheets. Significant amount of weight savings can be achieved in fatigue critical components in comparison with the traditional materials used in aircraft.

  12. Annoyance caused by propeller airplane flyover noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, D. A.; Powell, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide information on quantifying the annoyance response of people to propeller airplane noise. The items of interest were current noise metrics, tone corrections, duration corrections, critical band corrections, and the effects of engine type, operation type, maximum takeoff weight, blade passage frequency, and blade tip speed. In each experiment, 64 subjects judged the annoyance of recordings of propeller and jet airplane operations presented at d-weighted sound pressure levels of 70, 80, and 90 dB in a testing room which simulates the outdoor acoustic environment. The first experiment examined 11 propeller airplanes with maximum takeoff weights greater than or equal to 5700 kg. The second experiment examined 14 propeller airplanes weighting 5700 kg or less. Five jet airplanes were included in each experiment. For both the heavy and light propeller airplanes, perceived noise level and perceived level (Stevens Mark VII procedure) predicted annoyance better than other current noise metrics.

  13. Design definition study of a NASA/Navy lift/cruise fan technology V/STOL airplane: Risk assessment addendum to the final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabinsky, J. M.; Burnham, R. W.; Flora, C. C.; Gotlieb, P.; Grande, D. L.; Gunnarson, D. W.; Howard, W. M.; Hunt, D.; Jakubowski, G. W.; Johnson, P. E.

    1975-01-01

    An assessment of risk, in terms of delivery delays, cost overrun, and performance achievement, associated with the V/STOL technology airplane is presented. The risk is discussed in terms of weight, structure, aerodynamics, propulsion, mechanical drive, and flight controls. The analysis ensures that risks associated with the design and development of the airplane will be eliminated in the course of the program and a useful technology airplane that meets the predicted cost, schedule, and performance can be produced.

  14. Fatigue crack propagation in aerospace aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Piascik, R. S.; Dicus, D. L.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews fracture mechanics based, damage tolerant characterizations and predictions of fatigue crack growth in aerospace aluminum alloys. The results of laboratory experimentation and modeling are summarized in the areas of: (1) fatigue crack closure, (2) the wide range crack growth rate response of conventional aluminum alloys, (3) the fatigue behavior of advanced monolithic aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites, (4) the short crack problem, (5) environmental fatigue, and (6) variable amplitude loading. Remaining uncertainties and necessary research are identified. This work provides a foundation for the development of fatigue resistant alloys and composites, next generation life prediction codes for new structural designs and extreme environments, and to counter the problem of aging components.

  15. Multiscale Fatigue Life Prediction for Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue life prediction capabilities have been incorporated into the HyperSizer Composite Analysis and Structural Sizing Software. The fatigue damage model is introduced at the fiber/matrix constituent scale through HyperSizer s coupling with NASA s MAC/GMC micromechanics software. This enables prediction of the micro scale damage progression throughout stiffened and sandwich panels as a function of cycles leading ultimately to simulated panel failure. The fatigue model implementation uses a cycle jumping technique such that, rather than applying a specified number of additional cycles, a specified local damage increment is specified and the number of additional cycles to reach this damage increment is calculated. In this way, the effect of stress redistribution due to damage-induced stiffness change is captured, but the fatigue simulations remain computationally efficient. The model is compared to experimental fatigue life data for two composite facesheet/foam core sandwich panels, demonstrating very good agreement.

  16. Continuous fatigue crack monitoring of bridges: Long-Term Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (LTEFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshier, Monty A.; Nelson, Levi; Brinkerhoff, Ryan; Miceli, Marybeth

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue cracks in steel bridges degrade the load-carrying capacity of these structures. Fatigue damage accumulation caused by the repetitive loading of everyday truck traffic can cause small fatigue cracks initiate. Understanding the growth of these fatigue cracks is critical to the safety and reliability of our transportation infrastructure. However, modeling fatigue in bridges is difficult due to the nature of the loading and variations in connection integrity. When fatigue cracks reach critical lengths failures occur causing partial or full closures, emergency repairs, and even full structural failure. Given the aging US highway and the trend towards asset management and life extension, the need for reliable, cost effective sensors and monitoring technologies to alert bridge owners when fatigue cracks are growing is higher than ever. In this study, an innovative Long-Term Electrochemical Fatigue Sensor (LTEFS) has been developed and introduced to meet the growing NDT marketplace demand for sensors that have the ability to continuously monitor fatigue cracks. The performance of the LTEFS has been studied in the laboratory and in the field. Data was collected using machined specimens with different lengths of naturally initiated fatigue cracks, applied stress levels, applied stress ratios, and for both sinusoidal and real-life bridge spectrum type loading. The laboratory data was evaluated and used to develop an empirically based algorithm used for crack detection. Additionally, beta-tests on a real bridge structure has been completed. These studies have conclusively demonstrated that LTEFS holds great potential for long-term monitoring of fatigue cracks in steel structures

  17. [Fatigue in neuromuscular disease].

    PubMed

    Van Engelen, B G M; Kalkman, J S; Schillings, M L; Van Der Werf, S P; Bleijenberg, G; Zwarts, M J

    2004-07-01

    Chronic fatigue is a symptom of diseases such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's and cerebrovascular disease. Fatigue can also be present in people with no demonstrable somatic disease. If certain criteria are met, chronic-fatigue syndrome may be diagnosed in these cases. Fatigue is a multi-dimensional concept with physiological and psychological dimensions. The 'Short Fatigue Questionnaire' consisting of 4 questions is a tool to measure fatigue with a high degree of reliability and validity. Within the group of neuromuscular disorders, fatigue has been reported by patients with post-polio syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. The percentage of neuromuscular patients suffering from severe fatigue (64%) is comparable with that of patients with multiple sclerosis, a disease in which fatigue is an acknowledged symptom. Now that reliable psychological and clinical neurophysiological techniques are available, a multidisciplinary approach to fatigue in patients with well-defined neuromuscular disorders may contribute towards the elucidation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of chronic fatigue, with the ultimate goal being to develop methods of treatment for fatigue in neuromuscular patients. PMID:15283024

  18. Analysis of Stresses in German Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, Wilhelm

    1923-01-01

    This report contains an account of the origin of the views and fundamental principles underlying the construction of German airplanes during the war. The report contains a detailed discussion of the aerodynamic principles and their use in determining the strength of airplanes, the analysis of the strength qualities of materials and in the construction, the calculated strength of air flows and a description of tests made in determining the strength of airplanes.

  19. 78 FR 29666 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200 and -300 series airplanes; Model A340-200 and -300 series airplanes; and Model A340-541 and -642 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of wing tip brakes (WTBs) losing their braking function in service due to heavy wear on the brake discs. WTBs are designed to stop and hold the mechanical......

  20. 77 FR 65812 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ...We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A330-200 freighter series airplanes; Model A330-200 and - 300 series airplanes; and Model A340-200 and -300 series airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of ram air turbine (RAT) pump failure. This AD requires inspecting the RAT pump anti-stall valve for correct setting, re-identifying the RAT pump, performing a......

  1. 77 FR 40830 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Airbus Model A330-200 freighter series airplanes; Model A330-200 and - 300 series airplanes; and Model A340-200 and -300 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of ram air turbine (RAT) pump failure. This proposed AD would require inspecting the RAT pump anti- stall valve for correct setting, re-identifying the......

  2. Fatigue and fracture research in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1982-01-01

    The fatigue, fracture, and impact behavior of composite materials are investigated. Bolted and bonded joints are included. The solutions developed are generic in scope and are useful for a wide variety of structural applications. The analytical tools developed are used to demonstrate the damage tolerance, impact resistance, and useful fatigue life of structural composite components. Standard tests for screening improvements in materials and constituents are developed.

  3. Cognitive and Physical Fatigue Tasks Enhance Pain, Cognitive Fatigue and Physical Fatigue in People with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Dana L; Keffala, Valerie J; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia is a condition characterized by chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The primary objective of this study was to determine if pain, perceived cognitive fatigue, and perceived physical fatigue were enhanced in participants with fibromyalgia compared to healthy controls during a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task and a dual fatigue task. Methods Twenty four people with fibromyalgia and 33 healthy controls completed pain, fatigue and function measures. A cognitive fatigue task (Controlled Oral Word Association Test) and physical fatigue task (Valpar peg test) were done individually and combined for a dual fatigue task. Resting pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue were assessed during each task using visual analogue scales. Function was assessed with shoulder range of motion and grip. Results People with fibromyalgia had significantly higher increases in pain, cognitive fatigue and physical fatigue when compared to healthy controls after completion of a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task, or a dual fatigue task (p<0.01). People with fibromyalgia performed equivalently on measures of physical performance and cognitive performance on the physical and cognitive fatigue tasks, respectively. Conclusions These data show that people with fibromyalgia show larger increases in pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue to both cognitive and physical fatigue tasks compared to healthy controls. The increases in pain and fatigue during cognitive and physical fatigue tasks could influence subject participation in daily activities and rehabilitation. PMID:25074583

  4. The Anti-fatigue Mechanisms on Alterations of Structures and Performances of Alloy Welded Joints with Ultrasonic Impact Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. M.; Zhu, Y. L.; Du, X. K.

    The specimens of aluminum alloy welded joint were prepared by gas tungsten arc welding using 2A12 sheets and ER5356 welding wires. Some specimens were full coverage strengthened by ultrasonic impact treatment and the others were not strengthened. The surface layer microstructures of the ultrasonic impact treated and untreated specimens were investigated by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The surface layer hardness and residual stress distributions along the thickness direction were measured by micro-hardness tester and X-ray diffraction method. The results showed that a grain refinement layer which depth extended up to about 150∼200 μm was produced by ultrasonic impact treatment. The average hardness value of the treated specimens was up to 110 HV, increasing by 45% compared with 76 HV of the untreated specimen. A residual compressive stress layer was also produced by ultrasonic impact treatment, and the depth was close to 900 μm. The maximum residual compressive stress was -285 MPa. At the same time, the anti-fatigue mechanisms on grain refinement, work hardening and residual compressive stress of aluminum alloy welded joint with ultrasonic impact treatment were also discussed.

  5. Improving mechanical fatigue resistance by optimizing the nanoporous structure of inkjet-printed Ag electrodes for flexible devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung-Joon; Haas, Thomas; Friederich, Andreas; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Nam, Dae-Hyun; Binder, Joachim R.; Bauer, Werner; Choi, In-Suk; Joo, Young-Chang; Gruber, Patric A.; Kraft, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    The development of highly conductive metallic electrodes with long-term reliability is in great demand for real industrialization of flexible electronics, which undergo repeated mechanical deformation during service. In the case of vacuum-deposited metallic electrodes, adequate conductivity is provided, but it degrades gradually during cyclic mechanical deformation. Here, we demonstrate a long-term reliable Ag electrode by inkjet printing. The electrical conductivity and the mechanical reliability during cyclic bending are investigated with respect to the nanoporous microstructure caused by post heat treatment, and are compared to those of evaporated Ag films of the same thickness. It is shown that there is an optimized nanoporous microstructure for inkjet-printed Ag films, which provides a high conductivity and improved reliability. It is argued that the nanoporous microstructure ensures connectivity within the particle network and at the same time reduces plastic deformation and the formation of fatigue damage. This concept provides a new guideline to develop an efficient method for highly conductive and reliable metallic electrodes for flexible electronics.

  6. Supersonic airplane study and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson

    1993-01-01

    A supersonic airplane creates shocks which coalesce and form a classical N-wave on the ground, forming a double bang noise termed sonic boom. A recent supersonic commercial transport (the Concorde) has a loud sonic boom (over 100 PLdB) and low aerodynamic performance (cruise lift-drag ratio 7). To enhance the U.S. market share in supersonic transport, an airframer's market risk for a low-boom airplane has to be reduced. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used to design airplanes to meet the dual constraints of low sonic boom and high aerodynamic performance. During the past year, a research effort was focused on three main topics. The first was to use the existing design tools, developed in past years, to design one of the low-boom wind-tunnel configurations (Ames Model 3) for testing at Ames Research Center in April 1993. The second was to use a Navier-Stokes code (Overflow) to support the Oblique-All-Wing (OAW) study at Ames. The third was to study an optimization technique applied on a Haack-Adams body to reduce aerodynamic drag.

  7. Fatigue strength of adhesive bonded section beams under torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Tomioka, Noboru; Kakiage, Masashi; Niisawa, Junetsu; Kitagawa, Hideo

    1995-11-01

    Fatigue strength of adhesive bonded box beams was investigated. From results of the fatigue tests, it was seen that the fatigue strength of bonded beams was higher than that of spot welded beams. Fatigue strength of bonded beams was independent of plate thickness and partition. The flexural rigidity of the box beams in the plane of partition can increase without decrease of torsional rigidity and torsional fatigue strength, if the partition is jointed by adhesive bonding instead of spot welding. Since the fatigue strength and rigidity of adhesive bonded joints can be higher than the spot welded joints in the weight saving structures, it is expected that the structural adhesive joints will be employed more in the automobile body structure. For assuring the introduction of this joint more into the automobile body structures, it is necessary that the fatigue tests on the model members of the actual members used in the automobile body structure are conducted, in addition to those of the simple joints such as tension shear and T-type tension, and the property of the fatigue strength on the adhesive bonded members is known. But, the authors now have little data on fatigue tests of the adhesive bonded members. In the present research to be reported, the fatigue tests on adhesive bonded box beams under torsion, which are typical members in automobile body structure, were carried out and the effects of the presence of longitudinal partition and plate thickness on fatigue strength were investigated. Comparing the results of fatigue tests on adhesive bonded box beams with those on spot welded box beams, the property of fatigue strength on these adhesive bonded box beams was cleared.

  8. Light airplane crash tests at three pitch angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, V. L., Jr.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1979-01-01

    Three similar twin-engine general aviation airplane specimens were crash tested at an impact dynamics research facility at 27 m/sec, a flight path angle of -15 deg, and pitch angles of -15 deg, 0 deg, and 15 deg. Other crash parameters were held constant. The test facility, instrumentation, test specimens, and test method are briefly described. Structural damage and accelerometer data for each of the three impact conditions are presented and discussed.

  9. Light airplane crash tests at three flight-path angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, C. B.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1978-01-01

    Three similar twin engine general aviation airplane specimens were crash tested at Langley impact dynamics research facility at 27 m/sec and at flight-path angles of -15 deg, -30 deg, and -45 deg. Other flight parameters were held constant. The test facility, instrumentation, test specimens, and test method are briefly described. Structural damage and accelerometer data for each of the three impact conditions are presented and discussed.

  10. Light airplane crash tests at three roll angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, C. B.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1979-01-01

    Three similar twin engine general aviation airplanes were crash tested at the Langley impact dynamics research facility at 27 m/sec and at nominal roll angles of 0 deg, -15 deg, and -30 deg. Other flight parameters were held constant. The test facility, instrumentation, test specimens, and test method are briefly described. Structural damage and accelerometer data for each of the three impact conditions are presented and discussed.

  11. Fatigue Life Methodology for Bonded Composite Skin/Stringer Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Paris, Isabelle L.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Minguet, Pierre J.

    2001-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the fatigue life of composite structures based on fatigue characterization data and geometric nonlinear finite element (FE) analyses. To demonstrate the approach, predicted results were compared to fatigue tests performed on specimens which represented a tapered composite flange bonded onto a composite skin. In a first step, tension tests were performed to evaluate the debonding mechanisms between the flange and the skin. In a second step, a 2D FE model was developed to analyze the tests. To predict matrix cracking onset, the relationship between the tension load and the maximum principal stresses transverse to the fiber direction was determined through FE analysis. Transverse tension fatigue life data were used to -enerate an onset fatigue life P-N curve for matrix cracking. The resulting prediction was in good agreement with data from the fatigue tests. In a third step, a fracture mechanics approach based on FE analysis was used to determine the relationship between the tension load and the critical energy release rate. Mixed mode energy release rate fatigue life data were used to create a fatigue life onset G-N curve for delamination. The resulting prediction was in good agreement with data from the fatigue tests. Further, the prediction curve for cumulative life to failure was generated from the previous onset fatigue life curves. The results showed that the methodology offers a significant potential to Predict cumulative fatigue life of composite structures.

  12. Understanding and Treating Fatigue in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Jopson, Laura; Dyson, Jessica K; Jones, David E J

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue is a significant problem for patients with primary biliary cirrhosis and although experienced less by patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, a minority still report significant fatigue. Fatigue is the symptom with the greatest impact on quality of life, particularly when associated with social dysfunction. The pathogenesis of fatigue in cholestatic liver disease is complex, poorly understood, and probably has central and peripheral components. Managing fatigue in cholestatic liver disease presents a challenge for clinicians given the complexity and its numerous associations. This article presents a structured approach to managing fatigue in cholestatic liver disease to improve fatigue severity and quality of life. PMID:26593295

  13. On fatigue crack growth under random loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. Q.; Lin, Y. K.; Lei, Y.

    1992-09-01

    A probabilistic analysis of the fatigue crack growth, fatigue life and reliability of a structural or mechanical component is presented on the basis of fracture mechanics and theory of random processes. The material resistance to fatigue crack growth and the time-history of the stress are assumed to be random. Analytical expressions are obtained for the special case in which the random stress is a stationary narrow-band Gaussian random process, and a randomized Paris-Erdogan law is applicable. As an example, the analytical method is applied to a plate with a central crack, and the results are compared with those obtained from digital Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Fatigue experience from tests carried out with forged beam and frame structures in the development of the Saab aircraft Viggen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    A part of the lower side of the main wing at the joint of the main spar with the fuselage frame was investigated. This wing beam area was simulated by a test specimen consisting of a spar boom of AZ 74 forging (7075 aluminum alloy modified with 0.3 percent Ag) and a portion of a honeycomb sandwich panel attached to the boom flange with steel bolts. The cross section was reduced to half scale. However, the flange thickness, the panel height, and the bolt size were full scale. Further, left and right portions of the fuselage frame intended to carry over the bending moment of the main wing were tested. Each of these frame halves consisted of a forward and a rear forging (7079 aluminum alloy, overaged) connected by an outer and inner skin (Alclad 7075) creating a box beam. These test specimens were full scale and were constructed principally of ordinary aircraft components. The test load spectrum was common to both types of specimens with regard to percentage levels. It consisted of maneuver and gust loads, touchdown loads, and loads due to ground roughness. A load history of 200 hours of flight with 15,000 load cycles was punched on a tape. The loads were randomized in groups according to the flight-by-flight principle. The highest positive load level was 90 percent of limit load and the largest negative load was -27 percent. A total of 20 load levels were used. Both types of specimens were provided with strain gages and had a nominal stress of about 300 MN/sq m in some local areas. As a result of the tests, steps were taken to reduce the risk of fatigue damage in aircraft. Thus stress levels were lowered, radii were increased, and demands on surface finish were sharpened.

  15. Crash tests of four identical high-wing single-engine airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, V. L., Jr.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Four identical four place, high wing, single engine airplane specimens with nominal masses of 1043 kg were crash tested at the Langley Impact Dynamics Research Facility under controlled free flight conditions. These tests were conducted with nominal velocities of 25 m/sec along the flight path angles, ground contact pitch angles, and roll angles. Three of the airplane specimens were crashed on a concrete surface; one was crashed on soil. Crash tests revealed that on a hard landing, the main landing gear absorbed about twice the energy for which the gear was designed but sprang back, tending to tip the airplane up to its nose. On concrete surfaces, the airplane impacted and remained in the impact attitude. On soil, the airplane flipped over on its back. The crash impact on the nose of the airplane, whether on soil or concrete, caused massive structural crushing of the forward fuselage. The liveable volume was maintained in both the hard landing and the nose down specimens but was not maintained in the roll impact and nose down on soil specimens.

  16. Research on the control of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, B Melvill

    1928-01-01

    Our task is to endeavor to obtain precise experimental records of the motion of stalled airplanes, both when left to themselves and when the pilot is trying to control them. The apparatus which we use consists of a box containing tree gyroscopes which are slightly deflected against a spring control when the airplane is turning.

  17. 77 FR 73343 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... 39-16634 (76 FR 15805, March 22, 2011)] had been accomplished on this seat, but due to seizure, the... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not... F4-600R series airplanes, and Model A300 C4-605R Variant F airplanes (collectively called Model...

  18. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355...

  19. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355...

  20. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355...

  1. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355...

  2. 78 FR 40057 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and 4. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... A321 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of certain sliding windows that...

  3. 78 FR 37498 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and 4. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... Freighter, and -300 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report that a certain wire...

  4. 76 FR 72350 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ..., A319, A320, and A321 airplanes. Since we issued AD 2008-08-04, Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975, April..., Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975, April 14, 2008), With Revised Affected Airplanes Referenced Conditions (j... proposed AD. Discussion On March 31, 2008, we issued AD 2008-08-04, Amendment 39-15456 (73 FR 19975,...

  5. 78 FR 72834 - Airworthiness Directives; SOCATA Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Directives; SOCATA Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... (AD) for SOCATA Model TBM 700 airplanes. This proposed AD results from mandatory...

  6. 77 FR 69391 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Directives; Airbus Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... A310-204, -222, -304, -322, and -324 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by the manufacturer...

  7. 77 FR 60331 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes... A321 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report of an uncommanded nose landing...

  8. 77 FR 51729 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes..., A340-200 and A340-300 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a report that revealed...

  9. 77 FR 66760 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes...-200, A330-300, A340-200, A340- 300, A340-500, and A340-600 series airplanes. This proposed AD...

  10. 14 CFR 125.355 - Airplane equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane equipment. 125.355 Section 125.355...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.355...

  11. 77 FR 66762 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes..., -304, -322, and -324 airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by a design review of the fuel...

  12. Multiaxial fatigue low cycle fatigue testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamrik, S. Y.

    1985-01-01

    Multiaxial testing methods are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of each type test is discussed. Significant multiaxial data available in the literature is analyzed. The yield theories are compared for multiaxial fatigue analysis.

  13. High dose thiamine improves fatigue in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Antonio; Nappo, Agostino; Pala, Maria Immacolata; Zappone, Antonietta

    2013-01-01

    The majority of the patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience fatigue. Some observations indicate that fatigue and related manifestations concomitant with MS could be associated with an intracellular mild thiamine deficiency. We recruited 15 patients with MS who also experience fatigue and assessed the severity of the fatigue using the Fatigue Severity Scale. Although blood thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate levels were within normal limit in all the patients, high-dose thiamine therapy administered orally or parenterally led to an appreciable improvement of the fatigue. The absence of apparent decrease in blood thiamine despite the presence of symptoms referable to a mild thiamine deficiency suggests that these patients may have a dysfunction of the mechanisms of intracellular transport or structural enzymatic abnormalities. The administration of large quantities of thiamine was effective in reversing the fatigue in MS, suggesting that the abnormalities in thiamine-dependent processes could be overcome by diffusion-mediated transport at supranormal thiamine concentrations. PMID:23861280

  14. Elevated temperature effects on fatigue and fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Piascik, R.S.; Gangloff, R.P.; Saxena, A.

    1997-12-31

    The intent of this meeting was to reinforce the recent merger of ASTM Committees E09 on Fatigue and E24 on Fracture Mechanics, forming Committee E08 on Fatigue and Fracture. This special technical publication highlights a topical subset of the meeting, that is, research on the critical effect of temperature on the fatigue and fracture of structural materials. Papers highlighted: Integration of damage evolution, from the distributed form to that focused at a crack tip; High-resolution experimental probes of fatigue and fracture processes; Measurement and modeling of the important role of time in microstructural degradation, damage evolution, and crack growth; Models that provide quantitative predictions and are tested by high-quality experimentation; and Performance of next-generation structural metals and composites, characterized within a framework useful in component life prediction. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Fatigue and fracture research in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Davidson, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Fatigue and fracture research on monolithic and laminated metals is discussed. The research concentrated on three areas: stress analyses of two and three dimensional cracked bodies, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. Analytical methods were developed to predict fatigue crack growth and fracture strengths of cracked specimens. Such specimens represent typical aircraft structural details (such as cracks from holes). These specimens were subjected to simple constant amplitude loading and to more complex flight load histories. Test data from both in house tests and from the literature are used to substantiate the analytical methods. These analyses extended the theory of fracture mechanics to deal with fatigue crack growth and fracture of complex crack configurations that are typical of aircraft materials and structural details.

  16. Probabilistic fatigue methodology and wind turbine reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, C.H.

    1996-05-01

    Wind turbines subjected to highly irregular loadings due to wind, gravity, and gyroscopic effects are especially vulnerable to fatigue damage. The objective of this study is to develop and illustrate methods for the probabilistic analysis and design of fatigue-sensitive wind turbine components. A computer program (CYCLES) that estimates fatigue reliability of structural and mechanical components has been developed. A FORM/SORM analysis is used to compute failure probabilities and importance factors of the random variables. The limit state equation includes uncertainty in environmental loading, gross structural response, and local fatigue properties. Several techniques are shown to better study fatigue loads data. Common one-parameter models, such as the Rayleigh and exponential models are shown to produce dramatically different estimates of load distributions and fatigue damage. Improved fits may be achieved with the two-parameter Weibull model. High b values require better modeling of relatively large stress ranges; this is effectively done by matching at least two moments (Weibull) and better by matching still higher moments. For this purpose, a new, four-moment {open_quotes}generalized Weibull{close_quotes} model is introduced. Load and resistance factor design (LRFD) methodology for design against fatigue is proposed and demonstrated using data from two horizontal-axis wind turbines. To estimate fatigue damage, wind turbine blade loads have been represented by their first three statistical moments across a range of wind conditions. Based on the moments {mu}{sub 1}{hor_ellipsis}{mu}{sub 3}, new {open_quotes}quadratic Weibull{close_quotes} load distribution models are introduced. The fatigue reliability is found to be notably affected by the choice of load distribution model.

  17. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  18. 14 CFR 125.75 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 125.75 Section 125... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved Airplane Flight Manual...

  19. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  20. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  1. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  2. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  3. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  4. 14 CFR 21.5 - Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. 21.5... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.5 Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. (a) With each airplane or rotorcraft not type certificated with an Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual...

  5. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  6. 14 CFR 125.75 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 125.75 Section 125... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved Airplane Flight Manual...

  7. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  8. 14 CFR 125.75 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 125.75 Section 125... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved Airplane Flight Manual...

  9. 14 CFR 125.75 - Airplane flight manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane flight manual. 125.75 Section 125... OPERATIONS: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6... Airplane flight manual. (a) Each certificate holder shall keep a current approved Airplane Flight Manual...

  10. 14 CFR 91.821 - Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits... Noise Limits § 91.821 Civil supersonic airplanes: Noise limits. Except for Concorde airplanes having... airplane that does not comply with Stage 2 noise limits of part 36 in effect on October 13, 1977,...

  11. 14 CFR 91.853 - Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes... Noise Limits § 91.853 Final compliance: Civil subsonic airplanes. Except as provided in § 91.873, after... airplane subject to § 91.801(c) of this subpart, unless that airplane has been shown to comply with Stage...

  12. 14 CFR 21.5 - Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. 21.5... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.5 Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight Manual. (a) With each airplane or rotorcraft that was not type certificated with an Airplane or Rotorcraft Flight...

  13. Current research on fatigue cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Jono, M.; Komai, K.

    1987-01-01

    This first volume of CJMR (Current Japanese Materials Research), contains thirteen chapters concerning the above three themes of fatigue cracks. Each chapter is not a single paper as appearing in many academic journals and transactions, but a systematic review of the current achievement by each author with the emphasis on important points. The common feature is that the elaborated experimental techniques and theoretical approaches, some of which are quite unique, are introduced by respective authors to make clear the difficulty arising in the observation of small cracks and analysis of data. Theoretical models are proposed from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics to link the two thresholds of fatigue limit and crack growth, and intensive discussions are made for further development of the theory. Threshold stress intensity factors and the growth rate of medium and long sized cracks are also discussed, together with their opening behavior. The influencing factors are plastic zone size, the stress ratio and residual stress distribution occurring in welded joints. Mode II crack growth is of great significance since the initial fatigue cracks propagate mainly in shear mode. The problems of fatigue crack growth in corrosive environment is highly important since its retardation and enhancement take place in structural steels affected by the variety of factors. Life prediction in such environments poses another important problem. These are systematically discussed in this book.

  14. Prolonging Microgravity on Parabolic Airplane Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David W.

    2003-01-01

    Three techniques have been proposed to prolong the intervals of time available for microgravity experiments aboard airplanes flown along parabolic trajectories. Typically, a pilot strives to keep an airplane on such a trajectory during a nominal time interval as long as 25 seconds, and an experimental apparatus is released to float freely in the airplane cabin to take advantage of the microgravitational environment of the trajectory for as long as possible. It is usually not possible to maintain effective microgravity during the entire nominal time interval because random aerodynamic forces and fluctuations in pilot control inputs cause the airplane to deviate slightly from a perfect parabolic trajectory, such that the freely floating apparatus bumps into the ceiling, floor, or a wall of the airplane before the completion of the parabola.

  15. 76 FR 25648 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    .... These proposed special conditions pertain to their effects on the structural performance of the airplane... load imposed by sudden engine stoppage due to malfunction or structural failure.'' Limit loads are... structures be able to support limit loads without detrimental permanent deformation, meaning that...

  16. 14 CFR 129.23 - Transport category cargo service airplanes: Increased zero fuel and landing weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... fuel and landing weights. (a) Notwithstanding the applicable structural provisions of the transport... fuel weight (maximum weight of the airplane with no disposable fuel and oil) and the structural landing... Administrator finds that— (1) The increase is not likely to reduce seriously the structural strength; (2)...

  17. 14 CFR 129.23 - Transport category cargo service airplanes: Increased zero fuel and landing weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... fuel and landing weights. (a) Notwithstanding the applicable structural provisions of the transport... fuel weight (maximum weight of the airplane with no disposable fuel and oil) and the structural landing... Administrator finds that— (1) The increase is not likely to reduce seriously the structural strength; (2)...

  18. 14 CFR 129.23 - Transport category cargo service airplanes: Increased zero fuel and landing weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... fuel and landing weights. (a) Notwithstanding the applicable structural provisions of the transport... fuel weight (maximum weight of the airplane with no disposable fuel and oil) and the structural landing... Administrator finds that— (1) The increase is not likely to reduce seriously the structural strength; (2)...

  19. 14 CFR 129.23 - Transport category cargo service airplanes: Increased zero fuel and landing weights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... fuel and landing weights. (a) Notwithstanding the applicable structural provisions of the transport... fuel weight (maximum weight of the airplane with no disposable fuel and oil) and the structural landing... Administrator finds that— (1) The increase is not likely to reduce seriously the structural strength; (2)...

  20. 76 FR 41041 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Aerospace LP (GALP) Model G250 Airplane, Interaction of Systems...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... effects on structural ] performance of this system and its failures. Discussion Active flight control... controls and are given sufficient control authority to maneuver the airplane to its structural design.... Therefore, it is necessary to determine the structural factors of safety and operating margins such that...

  1. Corrosion and fatigue of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Implants for the treatment of femoral fractures, mechanisms leading to the failure or degradation of such structures, and current perspectives on surgical implants are discussed. Under the first heading, general usage, materials and procedures, environmental conditions, and laboratory analyses of implants after service are considered. Corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion, pitting corrosion, fatigue, and corrosion fatigue are the principal degradation mechanisms described. The need for improvement in the reliability of implants is emphasized.

  2. Investigations on the stability, oscillation, and stress conditions of airplanes with tab control. Second partial report : application of the solutions obtained in the first partial report to tab-controlled airplanes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filzek, B

    1949-01-01

    The first partial report, FB 2000, contained a discussion of the derivation of the equations of motion and their solutions for a tab-controlled airplane; the results obtained there are now to be applied to the longitudinal motion of tab-controlled airplanes. In view of the abundance of structural factors and aerodynamic parameters, a general discussion of the problems is unfeasible. Thus it is demonstrated on the basis of examples what stability, oscillation, and stress conditions are to be expected for tab-controlled airplanes. (author)

  3. The Pressure Distribution over the Wings and Tail Surfaces of a PW-9 Pursuit Airplane in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, Richard

    1931-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine (1) the magnitude and distribution of aerodynamic loads over the wings and tail surfaces of a pursuit-type airplane in the maneuvers likely to impose critical loads on the various subassemblies of the airplane structure. (2) To study the phenomenon of center of pressure movement and normal force coefficient variation in accelerated flight, and (3) to measure the normal accelerations at the center of gravity, wing-tip, and tail, in order to determine the nature of the inertia forces acting simultaneously with the critical aerodynamic loads. The results obtained throw light on a number of important questions involving structural design. Some of the more interesting results are discussed in some detail, but in general the report is for the purpose of making this collection of airplane-load data obtained in flight available to those interested in airplane structures.

  4. Subrupture Tendon Fatigue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Laudier, Damien M.; Shine, Jean H.; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Jepsen, Karl J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Flatow, Evan L.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical and microstructural bases of tendon fatigue, by which damage accumulates and contributes to degradation, are poorly understood. To investigate the tendon fatigue process, rat flexor digitorum longus tendons were cyclically loaded (1–16 N) until reaching one of three levels of fatigue damage, defined as peak clamp-to-clamp strain magnitudes representing key intervals in the fatigue life: i) Low (6.0%–7.0%); ii) Moderate (8.5%–9.5%); and iii) High (11.0%–12.0%). Stiffness, hysteresis, and clamp-to-clamp strain were assessed diagnostically (by cyclic loading at 1–8 N) before and after fatigue loading and following an unloaded recovery period to identify mechanical parameters as measures of damage. Results showed that tendon clamp-to-clamp strain increased from pre- to post-fatigue loading significantly and progressively with the fatigue damage level (p≤0.010). In contrast, changes in both stiffness and hysteresis were significant only at the High fatigue level (p≤0.043). Correlative microstructural analyses showed that Low level of fatigue was characterized by isolated, transverse patterns of kinked fiber deformations. At higher fatigue levels, tendons exhibited fiber dissociation and localized ruptures of the fibers. Histomorphometric analysis showed that damage area fraction increased significantly with fatigue level (p≤0.048). The current findings characterized the sequential, microstructural events that underlie the tendon fatigue process and indicate that tendon deformation can be used to accurately assess the progression of damage accumulation in tendons. PMID:18683881

  5. Review of sonic fatigue technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarkson, B. L.

    1994-01-01

    From the early-1960s until the mid-1980s, there was very little theoretical development for sonic fatigue prediction. Design nomographs based on simple theoretical models and results of specially designed tests were developed for most common aircraft structures. The use of advanced composites in the 1980s, however, generated an increased interest in development of more sophisticated theoretical models because of the possibilities for a much wider range of structural designs. The purpose of this report is to review sonic fatigue technology and, in particular, to assess recent developments. It also suggests a plan for a coordinated program of theoretical and experimental work to meet the anticipated needs of future aerospace vehicles.

  6. Compassion fatigue in nurses.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Elizabeth A

    2010-11-01

    Compassion fatigue, trigger situations, and coping strategies were investigated in hospital and home care nurses. The Professional Quality of Life Scale measured compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, and burnout. Narrative questions elicited trigger situations and coping strategies. Compassion fatigue scores were significantly different between nurses who worked 8- or 12-hour shifts. Fifteen percent of the participants had scores indicating risk of the compassion fatigue. There were significant differences in compassion satisfaction, depending on the unit worked and time as a nurse. The most common category of trigger situations was caring for the patient. Work-related and personal coping strategies were identified. PMID:21035028

  7. Landing and Braking of Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breguet, Louis

    1929-01-01

    In the numerical examples, we have considered an airplane landing in calm air in a fixed direction after crossing the border (with its obstacles) at a height of 30 m. Its stopping point is at a distance D from the obstacle, comprising: a distance D(sub 1) in regular gliding flight; a distance D(sub 2) in levelling off; a distance D(sub 3) in taxying on the ground. The calculations enable us to make out the following table, which gives an idea of the improvements to be expected in the use of various possible methods of braking in the air and on the ground.

  8. Consolidation of fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation data for design use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. C.; Davies, K. B.; Jaske, C. E.; Feddersen, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical methods developed for consolidation of fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation data for use in design of metallic aerospace structural components are evaluated. A comprehensive file of data on 2024 and 7075 aluminums, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and 300M steel was established by obtaining information from both published literature and reports furnished by aerospace companies. Analyses are restricted to information obtained from constant-amplitude load or strain cycling of specimens in air at room temperature. Both fatigue and fatigue-crack-propagation data are analyzed on a statistical basis using a least-squares regression approach. For fatigue, an equivalent strain parameter is used to account for mean stress or stress ratio effects and is treated as the independent variable; cyclic fatigue life is considered to be the dependent variable. An effective stress-intensity factor is used to account for the effect of load ratio on fatigue-crack-propagation and treated as the independent variable. In this latter case, crack-growth rate is considered to be the dependent variable. A two term power function is used to relate equivalent strain to fatigue life, and an arc-hyperbolic-tangent function is used to relate effective stress intensity to crack-growth rate.

  9. Fatigue and fracture mechanics: Twenty-ninth volume

    SciTech Connect

    Panontin, T.L. . Ames Research Center); Sheppard, S.D. )

    1999-01-01

    The twenty ninth National Symposium on Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics met at Stanford University in Stanford, California on June 24--25, 1997. Information was exchanged on recent developments on modeling and analyzing fatigue and fracture processes; on applications to real structures and new materials; and on directions for future research. Papers were presented on fracture mechanics with mathematical modeling and new materials, fatigue with crack growth models and improved fatigue test methods, and structural applications covering a variety of materials and their performance. Fifty papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Fatigue behavior and recommended design rules for an automotive composite

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Ruggles, M.B.

    1998-11-01

    Fatigue curves (stress vs cycles to failure) were generated under a variety of conditions (temperatures, fluid environments, mean stresses, block loadings) for a candidate automotive structural composite. The results were used to (1) develop observations regarding basic fatigue behavioral characteristics and (2) establish fatigue design rules. The composite was a structural reaction injection-molded polyurethane reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. Tensile fatigue tests on specimens from a single plaque at {minus}40 F, room temperature, and 250 F provided the basic behavioral characteristics. It was found that when stress was normalized by the at-temperature ultimate tensile strength, the fatigue curves at the three temperatures collapsed into a single master curve. An assessment of the individual stress-strain loops throughout each test showed a progressive loss in stiffness and an increase in permanent strain, both of which are indicative of increasing damage. Fatigue tests on specimens from several plaques were used to develop a design fatigue curve, which was established by using a reduction factor of 20 on average cycles to failure. This factor assures that the stiffness loss during the design life is no greater than 10 percent. Fatigue reduction factors were established to account for various fluids. Reversed stress fatigue tests allowed a mean stress rule to be validated, and block loading tests were used to demonstrate the adequacy of Miner`s rule for cumulative fatigue damage.

  11. Research and application of ORACLE performance optimizing technologies for building airplane environment resource database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianjun; Sun, Jianyong; Cheng, Conggao

    2013-03-01

    Many problems exist in processing experimental aircraft vibration (temperature, humidity) data and generating the intermediate calculations during the construction of airplane environment resource database, such as the need to deal with both structural and non-structural data, weak capacity of the client browser for data processing and massive network data transferring etc. To solve the above problems, some strategies on tuning and optimization performance of database are employed base on Oracle11g, which include data storage structure tuning, the memory configuration of the server, the disk I/O tuning and SQL statement tuning. The experimental results show that the performance of airplane environment resource database is enhanced about 80% compared with the database developed in the initial demonstration and validation phase. The application of new optimization strategies to the database construction can lay a sound foundation for finishing building airplane environment resource database.

  12. Double Linear Damage Rule for Fatigue Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G.; Manson, S.

    1985-01-01

    Double Linear Damage Rule (DLDR) method for use by structural designers to determine fatigue-crack-initiation life when structure subjected to unsteady, variable-amplitude cyclic loadings. Method calculates in advance of service how many loading cycles imposed on structural component before macroscopic crack initiates. Approach eventually used in design of high performance systems and incorporated into design handbooks and codes.

  13. Performance analysis of bonded composite doublers on aircraft structures

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.

    1995-08-01

    Researchers contend that composite repairs (or structural reinforcement doublers) offer numerous advantages over metallic patches including corrosion resistance, light weight, high strength, elimination of rivets, and time savings in installation. Their use in commercial aviation has been stifled by uncertainties surrounding their application, subsequent inspection and long-term endurance. The process of repairing or reinforcing airplane structures is time consuming and the design is dependent upon an accompanying stress and fatigue analysis. A repair that is too stiff may result in a loss of fatigue life, continued growth of the crack being repaired, and the initiation of a new flaw in the undesirable high stress field around the patch. Uncertainties in load spectrums used to design repairs exacerbates these problems as does the use of rivets to apply conventional doublers. Many of these repair or structural reinforcement difficulties can be addressed through the use of composite doublers. Primary among unknown entities are the effects of non-optimum installations and the certification of adequate inspection procedures. This paper presents on overview of a program intended to introduce composite doubler technology to the US commercial aircraft fleet. In this project, a specific composite application has been chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Through the use of laboratory test structures and flight demonstrations on an in-service L-1011 airplane, this study is investigating composite doubler design, fabrication, installation, structural integrity, and non-destructive evaluation. In addition to providing an overview of the L-1011 project, this paper focuses on a series of fatigue and strength tests which have been conducted in order to study the damage tolerance of composite doublers. Test results to-date are presented.

  14. Comparison of the effects of gamma radiation and low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization on the molecular structure, fatigue resistance, and wear behavior of UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M; Pruitt, L

    1998-06-01

    The effects of gamma radiation and low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (HPGP) sterilization on structure and cyclic mechanical properties were examined for orthopedic grade ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and compared to each other as well as to no sterilization (control). Density was monitored with a density gradient column and was found to be directly influenced by the sterilization method employed: Gamma radiation led to an increase, while plasma did not. Oxidation of the polymer was studied by observing changes in the carbonyl peak with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and was found to be strongly affected by both gamma radiation and subsequent aging, while plasma sterilization had little effect. Gamma radiation resulted in embrittlement of the polymer and a decreased resistance to fatigue crack propagation. This mechanical degradation was a direct consequence of postradiation oxidation and molecular evolution of the polymer and was not observed in the plasma-sterilized polymer. Both gamma radiation and plasma sterilization led to improved wear performance of the UHMWPE compared to the nonsterile control material. PMID:9570068

  15. Flexural fatigue life prediction of closed hat-section using materially nonlinear axial fatigue characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaq, Zia

    1989-01-01

    Straight or curved hat-section members are often used as structural stiffeners in aircraft. For instance, they are employed as stiffeners for the dorsal skin as well as in the aerial refueling adjacent area structure in F-106 aircraft. The flanges of the hat-section are connected to the aircraft skin. Thus, the portion of the skin closing the hat-section interacts with the section itself when resisting the stresses due to service loads. The flexural fatigue life of such a closed section is estimated using materially nonlinear axial fatigue characteristics. It should be recognized that when a structural shape is subjected to bending, the fatigue life at the neutral axis is infinity since the normal stresses are zero at that location. Conversely, the fatigue life at the extreme fibers where the normal bending stresses are maximum can be expected to be finite. Thus, different fatigue life estimates can be visualized at various distances from the neural axis. The problem becomes compounded further when significant portions away from the neutral axis are stressed into plastic range. A theoretical analysis of the closed hat-section subjected to flexural cyclic loading is first conducted. The axial fatigue characteristics together with the related axial fatigue life formula and its inverted form given by Manson and Muralidharan are adopted for an aluminum alloy used in aircraft construction. A closed-form expression for predicting the flexural fatigue life is then derived for the closed hat-section including materially nonlinear action. A computer program is written to conduct a study of the variables such as the thicknesses of the hat-section and the skin, and the type of alloy used. The study has provided a fundamental understanding of the flexural fatigue life characteristics of a practical structural component used in aircraft when materially nonlinear action is present.

  16. Automated visual inspection of an airplane exterior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovančević, Igor; Orteu, Jean-José; Sentenac, Thierry; Gilblas, Rémi

    2015-04-01

    This paper deals with the inspection of an airplane using a Pan-Tilt-Zoom camera mounted on a mobile robot moving around the airplane. We present image processing methods for detection and inspection of four different types of items on the airplane exterior. Our detection approach is focused on the regular shapes such as rounded corner rectangles and ellipses, while inspection relies on clues such as uniformity of isolated image regions, convexity of segmented shapes and periodicity of the image intensity signal. The initial results are promising and demonstrate the feasibility of the envisioned robotic system.

  17. Shuttle Laser Technology Experiment Facility (LTEF)-to-airplane lasercom experiment: Airplane considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalil, Ford

    1990-01-01

    NASA is considering the use of various airplanes for a Shuttle Laser Technology Experiment Facility (LTEF)-to-Airplane laser communications experiment. As supporting documentation, pertinent technical details are included about the potential use of airplanes located at Ames Research Center and Wallops Flight Facility. The effects and application of orbital mechanics considerations are also presented, including slant range, azimuth, elevation, and time. The pros and cons of an airplane equipped with a side port with a bubble window versus a top port with a dome are discussed.

  18. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A three year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for non-proportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved undertanding were through several critical non-proportional loading experiments. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C.

  19. 76 FR 44245 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... FR 25648). One supportive comment was received and the special conditions are adopted as proposed... structural performance of the airplane. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or... imposed by sudden engine stoppage due to malfunction or structural failure.'' Limit loads are expected...

  20. 78 FR 41684 - Special Conditions: Embraer S.A. Model EMB-550 Airplanes, Sudden Engine Stoppage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... airplane, was published in the Federal Register on September 25, 2012 (77 FR 58970). No comments were... auxiliary power unit (APU) installations, the APU mounts and adjacent supporting airframe structure must be... imposed by each of the following: (a) Sudden APU deceleration due to malfunction or structural...

  1. New Albatross commercial airplane "L 58"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, G

    1923-01-01

    The "L 58" is a monoplane with cantilever wings joined directly to the fuselage. It accordingly belongs to the new school of airplane construction, as founded and developed in Germany. A list of performance characteristics is included.

  2. Fire prevention on airplanes. Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatier, J

    1929-01-01

    Various methods for preventing fires in airplanes are presented with most efforts centering around prevention of backfires, new engine and carburetor designs, as well as investigations on different types of fuels.

  3. Precision controllability of the F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, T. R.; Matheny, N. W.

    1979-01-01

    A flying qualities evaluation conducted on a preproduction F-15 airplane permitted an assessment to be made of its precision controllability in the high subsonic and low transonic flight regime over the allowable angle of attack range. Precision controllability, or gunsight tracking, studies were conducted in windup turn maneuvers with the gunsight in the caged pipper mode and depressed 70 mils. This evaluation showed the F-15 airplane to experience severe buffet and mild-to-moderate wing rock at the higher angles of attack. It showed the F-15 airplane radial tracking precision to vary from approximately 6 to 20 mils over the load factor range tested. Tracking in the presence of wing rock essentially doubled the radial tracking error generated at the lower angles of attack. The stability augmentation system affected the tracking precision of the F-15 airplane more than it did that of previous aircraft studied.

  4. The Kiln Drying of Wood for Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiemann, Harry D

    1919-01-01

    This report is descriptive of various methods used in the kiln drying of woods for airplanes and gives the results of physical tests on different types of woods after being dried by the various kiln-drying methods.

  5. Notes on New French Commercial Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    This document discusses the types of commercial planes ordered by Air France. Characteristics of the Wibault 670, the Dewoitine D.620, Bloch 300, and the Potez 620 airplanes are included. Pictures and diagrams of these aircraft are also included.

  6. Development of light and small airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachmann, G

    1926-01-01

    The author has endeavored to select only the most important lines of development and has limited the description of individual airplanes to a few typical examples. Comparisons are presented between German and foreign accomplishments.

  7. Identifying Clinically Meaningful Fatigue with the Fatigue Symptom Inventory

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kristine A.; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Small, Brent J.; Munster, Pamela N.; Andrykowski, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The Fatigue Symptom Inventory (FSI) has been used extensively to assess and measure fatigue in a number of clinical populations. The purpose of the present study was to further establish its utility by examining its operating characteristics and determining the optimal cutoff score for identifying clinically meaningful fatigue. The SF-36 Vitality scale, a measure widely used to identify individuals with significant fatigue-related disability, was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the FSI. Results indicate that a score of 3 or greater on those items assessing fatigue in the past week is the optimal cutoff score for identifying clinically meaningful fatigue. Individuals who scored at or above the cutoff also reported significantly greater fatigue interference, more days of fatigue on average, and fatigue a greater proportion of each day in the past week. Findings suggest that the FSI can be used to discriminate effectively between individuals with and without clinically meaningful fatigue. PMID:18495413

  8. Fatigue life prediction under service load considering strengthening effect of loads below fatigue limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihui; Zheng, Songlin; Feng, Jinzhi

    2014-11-01

    Lightweight design requires an accurate life prediction for structures and components under service loading histories. However, predicted life with the existing methods seems too conservative in some cases, leading to a heavy structure. Because these methods are established on the basis that load cycles would only cause fatigue damage, ignore the strengthening effect of loads. Based on Palmgren-Miner Rule (PMR), this paper introduces a new method for fatigue life prediction under service loadings by taking into account the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit. In this method, the service loadings are classified into three categories: damaging load, strengthening load and none-effect load, and the process for fatigue life prediction is divided into two stages: stage I and stage II, according to the best strengthening number of cycles. During stage I, fatigue damage is calculated considering both the strengthening and damaging effect of load cycles. While during stage II, only the damaging effect is considered. To validate this method, fatigue lives of automobile half shaft and torsion beam rear axle are calculated based on the new method and traditional methods, such as PMR and Modified Miner Rule (MMR), and fatigue tests of the two components are conducted under service loading histories. The tests results show that the percentage errors of the predicted life with the new method to mean life of tests for the two components are -3.78% and -1.76% separately, much lesser than that with PMR and MMR. By considering the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit, the new method can significantly improve the accuracy for fatigue life prediction. Thus lightweight design can be fully realized in the design stage.

  9. Fatigue life prediction under service load considering strengthening effect of loads below fatigue limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lihui; Zheng, Songlin; Feng, Jinzhi

    2014-09-01

    Lightweight design requires an accurate life prediction for structures and components under service loading histories. However, predicted life with the existing methods seems too conservative in some cases, leading to a heavy structure. Because these methods are established on the basis that load cycles would only cause fatigue damage, ignore the strengthening effect of loads. Based on Palmgren-Miner Rule (PMR), this paper introduces a new method for fatigue life prediction under service loadings by taking into account the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit. In this method, the service loadings are classified into three categories: damaging load, strengthening load and none-effect load, and the process for fatigue life prediction is divided into two stages: stage I and stage II, according to the best strengthening number of cycles. During stage I, fatigue damage is calculated considering both the strengthening and damaging effect of load cycles. While during stage II, only the damaging effect is considered. To validate this method, fatigue lives of automobile half shaft and torsion beam rear axle are calculated based on the new method and traditional methods, such as PMR and Modified Miner Rule (MMR), and fatigue tests of the two components are conducted under service loading histories. The tests results show that the percentage errors of the predicted life with the new method to mean life of tests for the two components are -3.78% and -1.76% separately, much lesser than that with PMR and MMR. By considering the strengthening effect of loads below the fatigue limit, the new method can significantly improve the accuracy for fatigue life prediction. Thus lightweight design can be fully realized in the design stage.

  10. A study of commuter airplane design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roskam, J.; Wyatt, R. D.; Griswold, D. A.; Hammer, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Problems of commuter airplane configuration design were studied to affect a minimization of direct operating costs. Factors considered were the minimization of fuselage drag, methods of wing design, and the estimated drag of an airplane submerged in a propellor slipstream; all design criteria were studied under a set of fixed performance, mission, and stability constraints. Configuration design data were assembled for application by a computerized design methodology program similar to the NASA-Ames General Aviation Synthesis Program.

  11. 78 FR 78294 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Airbus Model A330-200, A330-200 Freighter, and A330-300 series airplanes; and Model A340-200, A340-300, A340-500, and A340-600 series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by the failure of the generator control unit-constant speed motor/generator (GCU-CSM/G) during a final assembly operational test. This proposed AD would......

  12. 78 FR 64156 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... ADs for Model A340 airplanes. AD 2003-14-11, Amendment 39-13230 (68 FR 41521, July 14, 2003). AD 2004-11-08, Amendment 39-13654 (69 FR 31874, June 8, 2004). AD 2004-13-25, Amendment 39-13707 (69 FR 41394...) through (i)(7) of this AD for Model A340 airplanes only. (1) AD 2003-14-11, Amendment 39-13230 (68...

  13. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for nonproportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved understanding were through several critical nonproportional loading experiments. The direction of cracking observed on failed specimens was also recorded and used to guide the development of the theory. Cyclic deformation responses were permanently recorded digitally during each test. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C. In contrast to some other metals, loading path in nonproportional loading had little effect on fatigue lives. Strain rate had a small effect on fatigue lives at 649 C. Of the various correlating parameters the modified plastic work and octahedral shear stress were the most successful.

  14. Factors of airplane engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Victor R

    1921-01-01

    This report is based upon an analysis of a large number of airplane-engine tests. It contains the results of a search for fundamental relations between many variables of engine operation. The data used came from over 100 groups of tests made upon several engines, primarily for military information. The types of engines were the Liberty 12 and three models of the Hispano-Suiza. The tests were made in the altitude chamber, where conditions simulated altitudes up to about 30,000 feet, with engine speeds ranging from 1,200 to 2,200 r.p.m. The compression ratios of the different engines ranged from under 5 to over 8 to 1. The data taken on the tests were exceptionally complete, including variations of pressure and temperature, besides the brake and friction torques, rates of fuel and air consumption, the jacket and exhaust heat losses.

  15. Effect of the Fine-Grained Structure on the Fatigue Properties of the Heat-Resistant Nickel-Iron Alloy Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtarov, Sh. Kh.; Shakhov, R. V.

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that ultrafine-grained nickel alloys with average grain sizes d = 0.1-1 μm possess improved hot workability and can be used for superplastic forming or rolling. However, microstructure refinement can worsen some performance characteristics of the alloy, for example, heat-resistant or fatigue properties. In the present work, fatigue characteristics of the fine-grained alloy Inconel 718 are investigated. Ultrafine-grained alloys with average grain sizes d = 0.1-1 μm were manufactured by multiple forging with stage-by-stage deformation temperature decrease. During standard heat treatment of the alloy performed to obtain the desired properties, the γ-grain size was controlled by precipitations of δ-phase particles along the boundaries. Results of low-cycle fatigue tests of the fine-grained alloy at room and elevated temperatures are compared with the properties of the coarse-grained alloy.

  16. Effects of laser-weld joint opening size on fatigue strength of Ti-6Al-4V structures with several diameters.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Pantoja, J M C; Vaz, L G; Nóbilo, M A A; Henriques, G E P; Mesquita, M F

    2011-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the fatigue strength of Ti-6Al-4V laser-welded joints with several diameters and joint openings. Sixty dumbbell rods were machined in Ti-6Al-4V alloy with central diameters of 1·5, 2·0 and 3·5 mm. The specimens were sectioned and then welded using two joint openings (0·0 and 0·6 mm). The combination of variables created six groups, which when added to the intact groups made a total of nine groups (n = 10). Laser welding was executed as follows: 360 V per 8 ms (1·5 and 2·0 mm) and 380 V per 9 ms (3·5 mm) with focus and frequency regulated to zero. The joints were finished, polished and submitted to radiographic examination to be analysed visually for the presence of porosity. The specimens were then subjected to a mechanical cyclic test, and the number of cycles until failure was recorded. The fracture surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn test (α = 0·05) indicated that the number of cycles required for fracture was lower for all specimens with joint openings of 0·6 mm, and for 3·5-mm-diameter specimens with joint openings of 0·0 mm. The Spearman correlation coefficient (α = 0·05) indicated that there was a negative correlation between the number of cycles and the presence of porosity. So, laser welding of Ti-6Al-4V structures with a thin diameter provides the best conditions for the juxtaposition of parts. Radiographic examination allows for the detection of internal voids in titanium joints. PMID:20678101

  17. Piezoelectric Bolt Breakers and Bolt Fatigue Testers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Barengoltz, Jack; Heckman, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    A proposed family of devices for inducing fatigue in bolts in order to break the bolts would incorporate piezoelectric actuators into resonant fixtures as in ultrasonic/ sonic drills/corers and similar devices described in numerous prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. These devices were originally intended primarily for use as safer, more-reliable, more-versatile alternatives to explosive bolts heretofore used to fasten spacecraft structures that must subsequently be separated from each other quickly on command during flight. On Earth, these devices could be used for accelerated fatigue testing of bolts. Fatigue theory suggests that a bolt subjected to both a constant-amplitude dynamic (that is, oscillatory) stress and a static tensile stress below the ultimate strength of the bolt material will fail faster than will a bolt subjected to only the dynamic stress. This suggestion would be applied in a device of the proposed type. The device would be designed so that the device and the bolt to be fatigue-tested or broken would be integral parts of an assembly (see figure). The static tension in the tightened bolt would apply not only the clamping force to hold the joined structures (if any) together but also the compression necessary for proper operation of the piezoelectric actuators as parts of a resonant structural assembly. The constant-amplitude dynamic stress would be applied to the bolt by driving the piezoelectric actuators with a sinusoidal voltage at the resonance frequency of longitudinal vibration of the assembly. The amplitude of the excitation would be made large enough so that the vibration would induce fatigue in the bolt within an acceptably short time. In the spacecraft applications or in similar terrestrial structural-separation applications, devices of the proposed type would offer several advantages over explosive bolts: Unlike explosive bolts, the proposed devices would be reusable, could be tested before final use, and would not be subject to

  18. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Stage 1 airplane prior to the change in type design, in addition to the provisions of paragraph (b) of... the change in type design, may not exceed either (A) each Stage 3 noise limit by more than 3 EPNdB, or... bypass ratio of 2 or more before a change in type design— (i) The airplane may not be a Stage 1...

  19. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Stage 1 airplane prior to the change in type design, in addition to the provisions of paragraph (b) of... the change in type design, may not exceed either (A) each Stage 3 noise limit by more than 3 EPNdB, or... bypass ratio of 2 or more before a change in type design— (i) The airplane may not be a Stage 1...

  20. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Stage 1 airplane prior to the change in type design, in addition to the provisions of paragraph (b) of... the change in type design, may not exceed either (A) each Stage 3 noise limit by more than 3 EPNdB, or... bypass ratio of 2 or more before a change in type design— (i) The airplane may not be a Stage 1...

  1. 14 CFR 36.7 - Acoustical change: Transport category large airplanes and jet airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Stage 1 airplane prior to the change in type design, in addition to the provisions of paragraph (b) of... the change in type design, may not exceed either (A) each Stage 3 noise limit by more than 3 EPNdB, or... bypass ratio of 2 or more before a change in type design— (i) The airplane may not be a Stage 1...

  2. Topology optimization in damage governed low cycle fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmorat, Boris; Desmorat, Rodrigue

    2008-05-01

    Topology optimization is applied here to discuss an optimization problem of fatigue resistance. Fatigue lifetime is maximized by optimizing the shape of a structure in cyclic plasticity combined with Lemaitre damage law. The topology optimization algorithm is detailed. A 3D numerical example is given. To cite this article: B. Desmorat, R. Desmorat, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  3. Summary of V-G and VGH Data Collected on Lockheed Electra Airplanes During Airplane Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewel, Joseph W., Jr.; Fetner, Mary W.

    1961-01-01

    Data obtained by NASA VGH and V-G recorders on several Lockheed Electra airplanes operated over three domestic routes have been analyzed to determine the in-flight accelerations, airspeed practices, and landing accelerations experienced by this particular airplane. The results indicate that the accelerations caused by gusts and maneuvers are comparable to corresponding results for piston-engine transport airplanes. Oscillatory accelerations (apparently caused by the autopilot or control system) appear to occur about one-tenth as frequently as accelerations due to gusts. Airspeed operating practices in rough air generally follow the trends shown by piston-engine transports in that there is no significant difference between the average airspeed in rough or smooth air. Placard speeds were exceeded more frequently by the Electra airplane than by piston-engine transport airplanes. Generally, the landing-impact accelerations were higher than those for piston-engine transports.

  4. Ditching Tests of Two Models of the Army B-36 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Cederborg, Gibson, A.

    1948-01-01

    The ditching characteristics of the Army B-36 airplane were determined by testing 1/20- and 1/30-scale dynamic models in calm water in Langley tank no. 2 and at the outdoor catapult. The scope of the tests consisted of ditching the models at various conditions of simulated damage, landing attitudes, and speeds, with various flap settings using several degrees of restraint of the flap hinges. The ditching behavior was evaluated from recordings of deceleration, length of run, and motions of the models. The results showed that the airplane should be ditched at an attitude of about 9 deg with flaps full down. The probable ditching behavior will be a smooth run with a maximum longitudinal deceleration of 3g to 4g and a landing run of 4 to 5 fuselage lengths. Structural failure of the underside of the fuselage will not seriously affect the behavior of the airplane.

  5. Brain Tumors and Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... tiredness. You may experience a profound lack of energy that can come on suddenly and bring dramatic ... to manage the severity. Respect the Fatigue The energy you’re accustomed to having has been transferred ...

  6. Chronic fatigue syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduction techniques can help manage chronic (long-term) pain and fatigue. They are not used as the primary treatment for CFS. Relaxation techniques include: Biofeedback Deep breathing exercises Hypnosis Massage therapy Meditation Muscle relaxation techniques Yoga Newer ...

  7. Fatigue and Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Fatigue - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area ... help* daily life for: positive-mom* The National MS Society is Here to Help Need More Information? ...

  8. The Pressure Distribution Over the Horizontal Tail Surfaces of an Airplane I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H

    1923-01-01

    This work was undertaken to determine as completely as possible the distribution of pressure over the horizontal tail surfaces of an airplane, and to analyze the relation of this pressure to the structural loads and the longitudinal stability. The investigation is divided into three parts, of which this the first. The first part of the investigation is for the purpose of determining the pressure distribution over two horizontal tail surfaces in uniform free flight; the second part to conduct tests of similar tail planes in the wind tunnel; and the third part to determine the pressure distribution on the horizontal tail surfaces during accelerated flight on the full-size airplane.

  9. Design study of technology requirements for high performance single-propeller-driven business airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Hammer, J.

    1985-01-01

    Developments in aerodyamic, structural and propulsion technologies which influence the potential for significant improvements in performance and fuel efficiency of general aviation business airplanes are discussed. The advancements include such technolgies as natural laminar flow, composite materials, and advanced intermittent combustion engines. The design goal for this parameter design study is a range of 1300 nm at 300 knots true airspeed with a payload of 1200lbs at 35,000 ft cruise altitude. The individual and synergistic effects of various advanced technologies on the optimization of this class of high performance, single engine, propeller driven business airplanes are identified.

  10. 78 FR 53078 - Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will..., which, if the chord severs, could result in reduced structural integrity of the diagonal brace load path... hours. The cracking was due to fatigue from normal operating loads. The chords are the main load...

  11. Fatigue Crack Length Sizing Using a Novel Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ruifang; Chen, Dixiang; Pan, Mengchun; Tian, Wugang; Wu, Xuezhong; Zhou, Weihong; Tang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The eddy current probe, which is flexible, array typed, highly sensitive and capable of quantitative inspection is one practical requirement in nondestructive testing and also a research hotspot. A novel flexible planar eddy current sensor array for the inspection of microcrack presentation in critical parts of airplanes is developed in this paper. Both exciting and sensing coils are etched on polyimide films using a flexible printed circuit board technique, thus conforming the sensor to complex geometric structures. In order to serve the needs of condition-based maintenance (CBM), the proposed sensor array is comprised of 64 elements. Its spatial resolution is only 0.8 mm, and it is not only sensitive to shallow microcracks, but also capable of sizing the length of fatigue cracks. The details and advantages of our sensor design are introduced. The working principal and the crack responses are analyzed by finite element simulation, with which a crack length sizing algorithm is proposed. Experiments based on standard specimens are implemented to verify the validity of our simulation and the efficiency of the crack length sizing algorithm. Experimental results show that the sensor array is sensitive to microcracks, and is capable of crack length sizing with an accuracy within ±0.2 mm. PMID:26703608

  12. Fatigue Crack Length Sizing Using a Novel Flexible Eddy Current Sensor Array.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruifang; Chen, Dixiang; Pan, Mengchun; Tian, Wugang; Wu, Xuezhong; Zhou, Weihong; Tang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    The eddy current probe, which is flexible, array typed, highly sensitive and capable of quantitative inspection is one practical requirement in nondestructive testing and also a research hotspot. A novel flexible planar eddy current sensor array for the inspection of microcrack presentation in critical parts of airplanes is developed in this paper. Both exciting and sensing coils are etched on polyimide films using a flexible printed circuit board technique, thus conforming the sensor to complex geometric structures. In order to serve the needs of condition-based maintenance (CBM), the proposed sensor array is comprised of 64 elements. Its spatial resolution is only 0.8 mm, and it is not only sensitive to shallow microcracks, but also capable of sizing the length of fatigue cracks. The details and advantages of our sensor design are introduced. The working principal and the crack responses are analyzed by finite element simulation, with which a crack length sizing algorithm is proposed. Experiments based on standard specimens are implemented to verify the validity of our simulation and the efficiency of the crack length sizing algorithm. Experimental results show that the sensor array is sensitive to microcracks, and is capable of crack length sizing with an accuracy within ±0.2 mm. PMID:26703608

  13. 75 FR 8479 - Airworthiness Directives; Airbus Model A340-541 and -642 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... condition on an aviation product. The MCAI describes the unsafe condition as: During the A340-600 full scale... condition for the specified products. The MCAI states: During the A340-600 full scale fatigue test, cracks... not corrected, can affect the aircraft structural integrity. Further to this full scale fatigue...

  14. Fatigue life prediction of bonded primary joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The validation of a proposed fatigue life prediction methodology was sought through the use of aluminum butt and scarf joint and graphite/epoxy butt joint specimens in a constant amplitude fatigue environment. The structural properties of the HYSOL 9313 adhesive system were obtained by mechanical test of molded heat adhesive specimens. Aluminum contoured double cantilever beam specimens were used to generate crack velocity versus stress intensity factor data. The specific objectives were: (1) to ascertain the feasibility of predicting fatigue failure of an adhesive in a primary bonded composite structure by incorporating linear elastic crack growth behavior; and (2) to ascertain if acoustic emission and/or compliance measurement techniques can be used to detect flaws.

  15. Fatigue loading of tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries, often called tendinopathies, are debilitating and painful conditions, generally considered to develop as a result of tendon overuse. The aetiology of tendinopathy remains poorly understood, and whilst tendon biopsies have provided some information concerning tendon appearance in late-stage disease, there is still little information concerning the mechanical and cellular events associated with disease initiation and progression. Investigating this in situ is challenging, and numerous models have been developed to investigate how overuse may generate tendon fatigue damage and how this may relate to tendinopathy conditions. This article aims to review these models and our current understanding of tendon fatigue damage. We review the strengths and limitations of different methodologies for characterizing tendon fatigue, considering in vitro methods that adopt both viable and non-viable samples, as well as the range of different in vivo approaches. By comparing data across model systems, we review the current understanding of fatigue damage development. Additionally, we compare these findings with data from tendinopathic tissue biopsies to provide some insights into how these models may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. Fatigue-induced damage consistently highlights the same microstructural, biological and mechanical changes to the tendon across all model systems and also correlates well with the findings from tendinopathic biopsy tissue. The multiple testing routes support matrix damage as an important contributor to tendinopathic conditions, but cellular responses to fatigue appear complex and often contradictory. PMID:23837793

  16. Early stage fatigue damage occurs in bovine tendon fascicles in the absence of changes in mechanics at either the gross or micro-structural level.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Riley, Graham P; Screen, Hazel R C

    2014-10-01

    Many tendon injuries are believed to result from repetitive motion or overuse, leading to the accumulation of micro-damage over time. In vitro fatigue loading can be used to characterise damage during repeated use and investigate how this may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. This study considered the effect of fatigue loading on fascicles from two functionally distinct bovine tendons: the digital extensor and deep digital flexor. Micro-scale extension mechanisms were investigated in fascicles before or after a period of cyclic creep loading, comparing two different measurement techniques - the displacement of a photo-bleached grid and the use of nuclei as fiducial markers. Whilst visual damage was clearly identified after only 300 cycles of creep loading, these visual changes did not affect either gross fascicle mechanics or fascicle microstructural extension mechanisms over the 900 fatigue cycles investigated. However, significantly greater fibre sliding was measured when observing grid deformation rather than the analysis of nuclei movement. Measurement of microstructural extension with both techniques was localised and this may explain the absence of change in microstructural deformation in response to fatigue loading. Alternatively, the data may demonstrate that fascicles can withstand a degree of matrix disruption with no impact on mechanics. Whilst use of a photo-bleached grid to directly measure the collagen is the best indicator of matrix deformation, nuclei tracking may provide a better measure of the strain perceived directly by the cells. PMID:25001495

  17. Early stage fatigue damage occurs in bovine tendon fascicles in the absence of changes in mechanics at either the gross or micro-structural level

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H.; Riley, Graham P.; Screen, Hazel R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Many tendon injuries are believed to result from repetitive motion or overuse, leading to the accumulation of micro-damage over time. In vitro fatigue loading can be used to characterise damage during repeated use and investigate how this may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. This study considered the effect of fatigue loading on fascicles from two functionally distinct bovine tendons: the digital extensor and deep digital flexor. Micro-scale extension mechanisms were investigated in fascicles before or after a period of cyclic creep loading, comparing two different measurement techniques – the displacement of a photo-bleached grid and the use of nuclei as fiducial markers. Whilst visual damage was clearly identified after only 300 cycles of creep loading, these visual changes did not affect either gross fascicle mechanics or fascicle microstructural extension mechanisms over the 900 fatigue cycles investigated. However, significantly greater fibre sliding was measured when observing grid deformation rather than the analysis of nuclei movement. Measurement of microstructural extension with both techniques was localised and this may explain the absence of change in microstructural deformation in response to fatigue loading. Alternatively, the data may demonstrate that fascicles can withstand a degree of matrix disruption with no impact on mechanics. Whilst use of a photo-bleached grid to directly measure the collagen is the best indicator of matrix deformation, nuclei tracking may provide a better measure of the strain perceived directly by the cells. PMID:25001495

  18. Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Yu, Xinghua; Erdman, III, Donald L.; Wang, Yanli; Kelly, Steve; Hou, Wenkao; Yan, Benda; Wang, Zhifeng; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Reported herein is technical progress on a U.S. Department of Energy CRADA project with industry cost-share aimed at developing the technical basis and demonstrate the viability of innovative in-situ weld residual stresses mitigation technology that can substantially improve the weld fatigue performance and durability of auto-body structures. The developed technology would be costeffective and practical in high-volume vehicle production environment. Enhancing weld fatigue performance would address a critical technology gap that impedes the widespread use of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials for auto body structure light-weighting. This means that the automotive industry can take full advantage of the AHSS in strength, durability and crashworthiness without the concern of the relatively weak weld fatigue performance. The project comprises both technological innovations in weld residual stress mitigation and due-diligence residual stress measurement and fatigue performance evaluation. Two approaches were investigated. The first one was the use of low temperature phase transformation (LTPT) weld filler wire, and the second focused on novel thermo-mechanical stress management technique. Both technical approaches have resulted in considerable improvement in fatigue lives of welded joints made of high-strength steels. Synchrotron diffraction measurement confirmed the reduction of high tensile weld residual stresses by the two weld residual stress mitigation techniques.

  19. Calculation of Airplane Performances Without the Aid of Polar Diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrenk, Martin

    1928-01-01

    For good profiles the profile-drag coefficient is almost constant in the whole range which comes into consideration for practical flight. This is manifest in the consideration of the Gottingen airfoil tests and is confirmed by the investigations of the writer (measurements of the profile drag during flight by the Betz method), concerning which a detailed report will soon be published. The following deductions proceed from this fact. The formulas developed on the assumptions of a constant profile-drag coefficient afford an extensive insight into the influences exerted on flight performances by the structure of the airplane.

  20. Fatigue evaluation of ASME Class 1 components considering the environmental effects

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, M.M.; Maneschy, E.

    1995-12-01

    A discussion considering fatigue design basis (FDB) and fatigue operating basis (FOB) approaches is presented. These two concepts are applied to evaluate the lifetime of typical ASME 3 class 1 components through simplified and detailed stress analysis. The cumulative usage factor (CUF) calculated using S-N fatigue curves available in the ASME 3 are compared to those obtained by S-N curves modified by the reactor environment. Some recommendations are presented to assess the fatigue in nuclear power plants structures.