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Sample records for airplanes turbine engine

  1. 14 CFR 121.191 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.191 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that...

  2. 14 CFR 121.191 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.191 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that...

  3. 14 CFR 121.191 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.191 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that...

  4. 14 CFR 121.191 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.191 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that...

  5. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered airplane along an intended route unless he...

  6. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered airplane along an intended route unless he...

  7. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered airplane along an intended route unless he...

  8. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered airplane along an intended route unless he...

  9. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  10. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  11. 14 CFR 121.195 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.195 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane...

  12. 14 CFR 121.195 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.195 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane...

  13. 14 CFR 121.195 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.195 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane...

  14. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  15. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff... Limitations § 121.189 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight greater than that listed in...

  16. 14 CFR 121.195 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.195 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered airplane may take off that airplane...

  17. 14 CFR 121.197 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.197 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... turbine engine powered airplane unless (based on the assumptions in § 121.195 (b)) that airplane at...

  18. 14 CFR 121.197 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.197 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... turbine engine powered airplane unless (based on the assumptions in § 121.195 (b)) that airplane at...

  19. 14 CFR 121.197 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.197 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... turbine engine powered airplane unless (based on the assumptions in § 121.195 (b)) that airplane at...

  20. 14 CFR 121.197 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.197 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... turbine engine powered airplane unless (based on the assumptions in § 121.195 (b)) that airplane at...

  1. 14 CFR 121.193 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.193 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations:...

  2. 14 CFR 125.377 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than turbopropeller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered... AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.377 Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than... takeoff a turbine-powered airplane (other than a turbopropeller-powered airplane) unless, considering...

  3. 14 CFR 135.385 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....385 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane may take...

  4. 14 CFR 125.377 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than turbopropeller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered... AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.377 Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than... takeoff a turbine-powered airplane (other than a turbopropeller-powered airplane) unless, considering...

  5. 14 CFR 125.377 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than turbopropeller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered... AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.377 Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than... takeoff a turbine-powered airplane (other than a turbopropeller-powered airplane) unless, considering...

  6. 14 CFR 135.385 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....385 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane may take...

  7. 14 CFR 125.377 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than turbopropeller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered... AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules § 125.377 Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than... takeoff a turbine-powered airplane (other than a turbopropeller-powered airplane) unless, considering...

  8. 14 CFR 135.385 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....385 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane may take...

  9. 14 CFR 135.385 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....385 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane may take...

  10. 14 CFR 135.387 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....387 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... alternate airport for a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane unless (based on...

  11. 14 CFR 135.387 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....387 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... alternate airport for a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane unless (based on...

  12. 14 CFR 135.387 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....387 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... alternate airport for a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane unless (based on...

  13. 14 CFR 135.387 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....387 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate... alternate airport for a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane unless (based on...

  14. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  15. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  16. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  17. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a turbine engine... existing at take- off. (b) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  18. 14 CFR 121.329 - Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 121.329 Section 121.329 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Equipment Requirements § 121.329 Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane, each certificate holder shall equip...

  19. 14 CFR 121.197 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.197 Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations:...

  20. 14 CFR 135.383 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.383 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane along an...

  1. 14 CFR 135.383 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.383 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane along an...

  2. 14 CFR 135.383 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.383 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane along an...

  3. 14 CFR 135.383 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.383 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two...). No person may operate a turbine engine powered large transport category airplane along an...

  4. 14 CFR 91.1037 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....1037 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and alternate airports. (a) No program manager or any other person may permit a turbine engine powered large...

  5. 14 CFR 91.1037 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....1037 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and alternate airports. (a) No program manager or any other person may permit a turbine engine powered large...

  6. 14 CFR 91.1037 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....1037 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and alternate airports. (a) No program manager or any other person may permit a turbine engine powered large...

  7. 14 CFR 91.1037 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....1037 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and alternate airports. (a) No program manager or any other person may permit a turbine engine powered large...

  8. 14 CFR 91.1037 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine....1037 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered; Limitations; Destination and alternate airports. (a) No program manager or any other person may permit a turbine engine powered large...

  9. 14 CFR 121.329 - Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine... Equipment Requirements § 121.329 Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane, each certificate holder shall equip...

  10. 14 CFR 121.329 - Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine... Equipment Requirements § 121.329 Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane, each certificate holder shall equip...

  11. 14 CFR 121.329 - Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine... Equipment Requirements § 121.329 Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane, each certificate holder shall equip...

  12. 14 CFR 121.329 - Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine... Equipment Requirements § 121.329 Supplemental oxygen for sustenance: Turbine engine powered airplanes. (a) General. When operating a turbine engine powered airplane, each certificate holder shall equip...

  13. 14 CFR 135.387 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.387 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations:...

  14. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  15. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  16. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  17. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... Limitations § 135.381 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) No person operating a turbine engine powered large transport category...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1045 - Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooling test procedures for turbine engine powered airplanes. 23.1045 Section 23.1045 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1045 Cooling test procedures for turbine engine...

  3. 14 CFR 135.383 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.383 Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations:...

  4. 14 CFR 121.191 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. 121.191 Section 121.191 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS...

  5. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  6. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  7. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  8. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  9. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  10. 14 CFR 121.645 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered airplanes, other than turbo propeller: Flag and supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered... SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.645 Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered... specifications, no person may release for flight or takeoff a turbine-engine powered airplane (other than a...

  11. 14 CFR 121.645 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered airplanes, other than turbo propeller: Flag and supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered... SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.645 Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered... specifications, no person may release for flight or takeoff a turbine-engine powered airplane (other than a...

  12. 14 CFR 121.645 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered airplanes, other than turbo propeller: Flag and supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered... SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.645 Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered... specifications, no person may release for flight or takeoff a turbine-engine powered airplane (other than a...

  13. 14 CFR 121.645 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered airplanes, other than turbo propeller: Flag and supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered... SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.645 Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered... specifications, no person may release for flight or takeoff a turbine-engine powered airplane (other than a...

  14. 14 CFR 135.379 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. 135.379 Section 135.379 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS...

  15. 14 CFR 125.377 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than turbopropeller.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine-powered airplanes other than turbopropeller. 125.377 Section 125.377 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS CERTIFICATION...

  16. 14 CFR 135.385 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. 135.385 Section 135.385 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION...

  17. 14 CFR 121.195 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Landing limitations: Destination airports. 121.195 Section 121.195 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS...

  18. 14 CFR 121.189 - Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Turbine engine powered: Takeoff limitations. 121.189 Section 121.189 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS:...

  19. 14 CFR 135.381 - Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes: Turbine engine powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. 135.381 Section 135.381 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE:...

  20. 14 CFR 121.645 - Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered airplanes, other than turbo propeller: Flag and supplemental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel supply: Turbine-engine powered airplanes, other than turbo propeller: Flag and supplemental operations. 121.645 Section 121.645 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR...

  1. Advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lays, E. J.; Murray, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    Concepts are discussed that project turbine engine cost savings through use of geometrically constrained components designed for low rotational speeds and low stress to permit manufacturing economies. Aerodynamic development of geometrically constrained components is recommended to maximize component efficiency. Conceptual engines, airplane applications, airplane performance, engine cost, and engine-related life cycle costs are presented. The powerplants proposed offer encouragement with respect to fuel efficiency and life cycle costs, and make possible remarkable airplane performance gains.

  2. 14 CFR 25.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated...

  3. 14 CFR 25.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated...

  4. 14 CFR 25.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated...

  5. 14 CFR 25.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated...

  6. 14 CFR 25.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be investigated...

  7. Factors of airplane engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Victor R

    1921-01-01

    This report is based upon an analysis of a large number of airplane-engine tests. It contains the results of a search for fundamental relations between many variables of engine operation. The data used came from over 100 groups of tests made upon several engines, primarily for military information. The types of engines were the Liberty 12 and three models of the Hispano-Suiza. The tests were made in the altitude chamber, where conditions simulated altitudes up to about 30,000 feet, with engine speeds ranging from 1,200 to 2,200 r.p.m. The compression ratios of the different engines ranged from under 5 to over 8 to 1. The data taken on the tests were exceptionally complete, including variations of pressure and temperature, besides the brake and friction torques, rates of fuel and air consumption, the jacket and exhaust heat losses.

  8. Single rotor turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a turbine engine with a single rotor which cools the engine, functions as a radial compressor, pushes air through the engine to the ignition point, and acts as an axial turbine for powering the compressor. The invention engine is designed to use a simple scheme of conventional passage shapes to provide both a radial and axial flow pattern through the single rotor, thereby allowing the radial intake air flow to cool the turbine blades and turbine exhaust gases in an axial flow to be used for energy transfer. In an alternative embodiment, an electric generator is incorporated in the engine to specifically adapt the invention for power generation. Magnets are embedded in the exhaust face of the single rotor proximate to a ring of stationary magnetic cores with windings to provide for the generation of electricity. In this alternative embodiment, the turbine is a radial inflow turbine rather than an axial turbine as used in the first embodiment. Radial inflow passages of conventional design are interleaved with radial compressor passages to allow the intake air to cool the turbine blades.

  9. Turbine engine interstage seal

    SciTech Connect

    Clevenger, L.L.

    1993-08-10

    A seal structure is described for a turbine engine, the turbine engine including a housing surrounding a centrifugal compressor having a rotor, and a radial inflow turbine including a turbine rotor, the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor being disposed in back-to-back relation, the turbine rotor being drivingly connected with the compressor rotor and axially spaced therefrom to define an annular gap there between, the gap radially bounded at its outer periphery by the housing and at its inner periphery by an annular surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor an annular sealing member disposed in the gap to control air flow from the compressor toward the turbine; the annular sealing member the first axial direction, and a third annular wall portion joining with the second annular wall portion and extending inward therefrom towards the surface intermediate the compressor rotor and the turbine rotor, and biasing means cooperating with the housing for urging the seal structure toward the turbine rotor.

  10. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight, allowing... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.181 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered:...

  11. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.181 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En... person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that airplane at a weight,...

  12. Gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lawlor, Shawn P.; Roberts, II, William Byron

    2016-03-08

    A gas turbine engine with a compressor rotor having compressor impulse blades that delivers gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes a one or more aerodynamic ducts that each have a converging portion and a diverging portion for deceleration of the selected gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure oxidant containing gas to flameholders. The flameholders may be provided as trapped vortex combustors, for combustion of a fuel to produce hot pressurized combustion gases. The hot pressurized combustion gases are choked before passing out of an aerodynamic duct to a turbine. Work is recovered in a turbine by expanding the combustion gases through impulse blades. By balancing the axial loading on compressor impulse blades and turbine impulse blades, asymmetrical thrust is minimized or avoided.

  13. Two-stroke-cycle engines for airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalbert, J

    1926-01-01

    Now that the two-stroke-cycle engine has begun to make its appearance in automobiles, it is important to know what services we have a right to expect of it in aeronautics, what conditions must be met by engines of this type for use on airplanes and what has been accomplished.

  14. Liquid rocket engine turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Criteria for the design and development of turbines for rocket engines to meet specific performance, and installation requirements are summarized. The total design problem, and design elements are identified, and the current technology pertaining to these elements is described. Recommended practices for achieving a successful design are included.

  15. Blade for turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Babu, Michael (Inventor); Murdock, James R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A blade for a turbine engine having a centerline. The blade comprises: a root section extending at an angle relative to the centerline; and an airfoil section extending from the root section. The root section is directly adjacent said airfoil section. In other words, the blade is neckless. The blade is part of a rotor assembly, and is preferably a fan blade.

  16. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.159 Single-engine airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part....

  17. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.159 Single-engine airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part....

  18. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.159 Single-engine airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part....

  19. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.159 Single-engine airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part....

  20. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 23.71 Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical...

  1. 14 CFR 121.159 - Single-engine airplanes prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Single-engine airplanes prohibited. 121.159 Section 121.159 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... airplanes prohibited. No certificate holder may operate a single-engine airplane under this part....

  2. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations,...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations,...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations,...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations,...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1155 - Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller... COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 23.1155 Turbine engine reverse thrust and propeller pitch settings below the flight regime. For turbine engine installations,...

  7. 75 FR 12121 - Extended Operations (ETOPS) of Multi-Engine Airplanes; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ...The Federal Aviation Administration is making a minor amendment to a previously published final rule. That final rule applied to air carrier, commuter, and on-demand turbine powered multi-engine airplanes used in passenger-carrying, and some all-cargo, extended- range operations. This technical amendment corrects an incorrect citation...

  8. Curved centerline air intake for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruehr, W. C.; Younghans, J. L.; Smith, E. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An inlet for a gas turbine engine was disposed about a curved centerline for the purpose of accepting intake air that is flowing at an angle to engine centerline and progressively turning that intake airflow along a curved path into alignment with the engine. This curved inlet is intended for use in under the wing locations and similar regions where airflow direction is altered by aerodynamic characteristics of the airplane. By curving the inlet, aerodynamic loss and acoustic generation and emission are decreased.

  9. Flight evaluation of an extended engine life mode on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Lawrence P.; Conners, Timothy R.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated flight and propulsion control system designed to reduce the rate of engine deterioration was developed and evaluated in flight on the NASA Dryden F-15 research aircraft. The extended engine life mode increases engine pressure ratio while reducing engine airflow to lower the turbine temperature at constant thrust. The engine pressure ratio uptrim is modulated in real time based on airplane maneuver requirements, flight conditions, and engine information. The extended engine life mode logic performed well, significantly reducing turbine operating temperature. Reductions in fan turbine inlet temperature of up to 80 F were obtained at intermediate power and up to 170 F at maximum augmented power with no appreciable loss in thrust. A secondary benefit was the considerable reduction in thrust-specific fuel consumption. The success of the extended engine life mode is one example of the advantages gained from integrating aircraft flight and propulsion control systems.

  10. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and...

  11. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and...

  12. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and...

  13. 14 CFR 23.71 - Glide: Single-engine airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Glide: Single-engine airplanes. 23.71... Glide: Single-engine airplanes. The maximum horizontal distance traveled in still air, in nautical miles... with the engine inoperative, its propeller in the minimum drag position, and landing gear and...

  14. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  15. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  16. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Carruthers, William D.; Boyd, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  17. Fretting in aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Bill, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of fretting in aircraft turbine engines is discussed. Critical fretting can occur on fan, compressor, and turbine blade mountings, as well as on splines, rolling element bearing races, and secondary sealing elements of face type seals. Structural fatigue failures have been shown to occur at fretted areas on component parts. Methods used by designers to reduce the effects of fretting are given.

  18. General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, W. C.

    1983-01-01

    When all the technology studies were done and the accompanying market analyses were complete, the conclusion was that it is indeed possible to reduce the cost of turbine engines by a factor of 3 using low-cost manufacturing techniques and increased production rates. In the interest of reducing engine cost, some performance was sacrificed. Yet we ended up with about a 20 percent predicted improvement in SFC over current technology turboprops. However, even this level of improvement does not match the low SFC of reciprocating powerplants--particularly those advanced concepts described earlier. The 20 percent better SFC and much lower weight of a turboprop does mean that if such a powerplant were installed in a resized small airplane, one could save between 10 and 30 percent fuel relative to existing recip engines, depending on different mission and airplane combinations. The price of the aircraft would go down about 15 percent in the case of a high powered single, or 25 percent in the case of a normal size twin. The operating costs would decrease about 10 percent in the case of the single, and as much as 35 percent in the case of the twin.

  19. 78 FR 21700 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and...) Transportation Airplane and Engine (TAE) Subcommittee to discuss transport airplane and engine issues. DATES: The... and Minutes FAA Report ARAC Report Transport Canada Report EASA Report Flight Controls...

  20. Improved automobile gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofskey, M. G.; Katsanis, T.; Roelke, R. J.; Mclallin, K. L.; Wong, R. Y.; Schumann, L. F.; Galvas, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Upgraded engine delivers 100 hp in 3500 lb vehicle. Improved fuel economy is due to combined effects of reduced weight, reduced power-to-weight ratio, increased turbine inlet pressure, and improved component efficiencies at part power.

  1. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helms, H. E.; Heitman, P. W.; Lindgren, L. C.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    The application of ceramic components to demonstrate improved cycle efficiency by raising the operating temperature of the existing Allison IGI 404 vehicular gas turbine engine is discussed. This effort was called the Ceramic Applications in Turbine Engines (CATE) program and has successfully demonstrated ceramic components. Among these components are two design configurations featuring stationary and rotating caramic components in the IGT 404 engine. A complete discussion of all phases of the program, design, materials development, fabrication of ceramic components, and testing-including rig, engine, and vehicle demonstation test are presented. During the CATE program, a ceramic technology base was established that is now being applied to automotive and other gas turbine engine programs. This technology base is outlined and also provides a description of the CATE program accomplishments.

  2. A remote augmentor lift system with a turbine bypass engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbach, L. H.; Franciscus, L. C.

    1982-01-01

    Two supersonic vertical takeoff or landing (VTOL) aircraft engine types, a conventional medium bypass ratio turbofan, and a turbine bypass turbojet were studied. The aircraft assumed was a clipped delta wing with canard configuration. A VTOL deck launched intercept, DLI, mission with Mach 1.6 dash and cruise segments was used as the design mission. Several alternate missions requiring extended subsonic capabilities were analyzed. Comparisons were made between the turbofan (TF) and the turbine bypass turbojet (TBE) engines in airplane types using a Remote Augmented Lift Systems, RALS and a Lift plus Lift Cruise system (L+LC). The figure of merit was takeoff gross weight for the VTOL DLI mission. The results of the study show that the turbine bypass turbojet and the conventional turbofan are competitive engines for both type of aircraft in terms of takeoff gross weight and range. However, the turbine bypass turbojet would be a simpler engine and may result in more attractive life cycle costs and reduced maintenance. The RALS and L+LC airplane types with either TBE or TF engines have approximately the same aircraft takeoff gross weight.

  3. 14 CFR 121.179 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: All engines operating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.179 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations:...

  4. Pilot Transition Courses for Complex Single-Engine and Light Twin-Engine Airplanes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This publication is intended for use by certificated airplane pilots and provides transitional knowledge and skills for more complex single-engine or light twin-engine airplanes. The training should be conducted by a competent flight instructor certified in the class of airplane and familiar with the make and model. A syllabus outline of ground…

  5. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Turbine Engine Section Technology (HOST) Project Office of the Lewis Research Center sponsored a workshop to discuss current research pertinent to turbine engine hot section durability problems. Presentations were made concerning hot section environment and the behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes.

  6. Turbine pyrometry for advanced engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, W. H.; Strange, R. R.

    1987-06-01

    The turbine pyrometry requirements for advanced engine designs are examined. The practical use of current optical pyrometer systems is limited to situations where the reflected radiation comprises not more than 50 percent of the total signal. Alternative approaches, including techniques known as 'Advanced Dual Spectral Area Pyrometer', 'Active Pyrometry', passive synchronous detection pyrometry, and techniques that use thermographic phosphors, are discussed. It is suggested that the methods that use thermographic phosphors at low temperatures can be extended to high temperatures and gas turbine engine environment and can be adapted to the vane scanning pyrometer application.

  7. 18. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL AREAS; LOOKING EAST - Northwest Airways Hangar & Administration Building, 590 Bayfield Street, St. Paul Downtown Airport (Holman), Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  8. 17. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. MAINTENANCE SHOP, FIRST FLOOR, INTERIOR, ENGINE AND AIRPLANE OVERHAUL AREAS; LOOKING WEST. - Northwest Airways Hangar & Administration Building, 590 Bayfield Street, St. Paul Downtown Airport (Holman), Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  9. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  10. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  11. Gas turbine engine fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A variable orifice system is described that is responsive to compressor inlet pressure and temperature, compressor discharge pressure and rotational speed of a gas-turbine engine. It is incorporated into a hydraulic circuit that includes a zero gradient pump driven at a speed proportional to the speed of the engine. The resulting system provides control of fuel rate for starting, steady running, acceleration and deceleration under varying altitudes and flight speeds.

  12. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1047 - Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... engine powered airplanes. 23.1047 Section 23.1047 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Cooling § 23.1047 Cooling test procedures for reciprocating engine powered airplanes. Compliance with § 23.1041 must be shown for the climb (or, for multiengine airplanes...

  16. Small gas turbine engine technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.; Meitner, Peter L.

    1988-01-01

    Performance of small gas turbine engines in the 250 to 1,000 horsepower size range is significantly lower than that of large engines. Engines of this size are typically used in rotorcraft, commutercraft, general aviation, and cruise missile applications. Principal reasons for the lower efficiencies of a smaller engine are well known: component efficients are lower by as much as 8 to 10 percentage points because of size effects. Small engines are designed for lower cycle pressures and temperatures because of smaller blading and cooling limitations. The highly developed analytical and manufacturing techniques evolved for large engines are not directly transferrable to small engines. Thus, it was recognized that a focused effort addressing technologies for small engies was needed and could significantly impact their performance. Recently, in-house and contract studies were undertaken at the NASA Lewis Research Center to identify advanced engine cycle and component requirements for substantial performance improvement of small gas turbines for projected year 2000 applications. The results of both in-house research and contract studies are presented. In summary, projected fuel savings of 22 to 42 percent could be obtained. Accompanying direct operating cost reductions of 11 to 17 percent, depending on fuel cost, were also estimated. High payoff technologies are identified for all engine applications, and recent results of experimental research to evolve the high payoff technologies are described.

  17. 14 CFR 121.179 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: All engines operating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... engines operating. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS...

  18. Measured Engine Installation Effects of Four Civil Transport Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senzig, David A.; Fleming, Gregg G.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    2001-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration's Integrated Noise Model (INM) is one of the primary tools for land use planning around airports. The INM currently calculates airplane noise lateral attenuation using the methods contained in the Society of Automotive Engineer's Aerospace Information Report No. 1751 (SAE AIR 1751). Researchers have noted that improved lateral attenuation algorithms may improve airplane noise prediction. The authors of SAE AIR 1751 based existing methods on empirical data collected from flight tests using 1960s-technology airplanes with tail-mounted engines. To determine whether the SAE AIR 1751 methods are applicable for predicting the engine installation component of lateral attenuation for airplanes with wing-mounted engines, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored a series of flight tests during September 2000 at their Wallops Flight Facility. Four airplanes, a Boeing 767-400, a Douglas DC-9, a Dassault Falcon 2000, and a Beech KingAir, were flown through a 20 microphone array. The airplanes were flown through the array at various power settings, flap settings, and altitudes to simulate take-off and arrival configurations. This paper presents the preliminary findings of this study.

  19. 14 CFR 121.183 - Part 25 airplanes with four or more engines: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Part 25 airplanes with four or more engines... SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.183 Part 25 airplanes with four or... person may operate an airplane certificated under part 25 and having four or more engines unless—...

  20. Ceramic applications in turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, J. A.; Janovicz, M. A.; Thrasher, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    Development testing activities on the 1900 F-configuration ceramic parts were completed, 2070 F-configuration ceramic component rig and engine testing was initiated, and the conceptual design for the 2265 F-configuration engine was identified. Fabrication of the 2070 F-configuration ceramic parts continued, along with burner rig development testing of the 2070 F-configuration metal combustor in preparation for 1132 C (2070 F) qualification test conditions. Shakedown testing of the hot engine simulator (HES) rig was also completed in preparation for testing of a spin rig-qualified ceramic-bladed rotor assembly at 1132 C (2070 F) test conditions. Concurrently, ceramics from new sources and alternate materials continued to be evaluated, and fabrication of 2070 F-configuration ceramic component from these new sources continued. Cold spin testing of the critical 2070 F-configuration blade continued in the spin test rig to qualify a set of ceramic blades at 117% engine speed for the gasifier turbine rotor. Rig testing of the ceramic-bladed gasifier turbine rotor assembly at 108% engine speed was also performed, which resulted in the failure of one blade. The new three-piece hot seal with the nickel oxide/calcium fluoride wearface composition was qualified in the regenerator rig and introduced to engine operation wiwth marginal success.

  1. 14 CFR 121.179 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: All engines operating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... route limitations: All engines operating. 121.179 Section 121.179 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...) This section does not apply to airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. (c... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.179 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations:...

  2. 14 CFR 121.179 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: All engines operating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... route limitations: All engines operating. 121.179 Section 121.179 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...) This section does not apply to airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. (c... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.179 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations:...

  3. 14 CFR 121.179 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: All engines operating.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... route limitations: All engines operating. 121.179 Section 121.179 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...) This section does not apply to airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. (c... Performance Operating Limitations § 121.179 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations:...

  4. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off that airplane at a weight, allowing... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance...

  5. The calculated performance of airplanes equipped with supercharging engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemble, E C

    1921-01-01

    In part one of this report are presented the theoretical performance curves of an airplane engine equipped with a supercharging compressor. In predicting the gross power of a supercharging engine, the writer uses temperature and pressure correction factors based on experiments made at the Bureau of Standards (NACA report nos. 45 and 46). Means for estimating the temperature rise in the compressor are outlined. Part two of this report presents an estimation of the performance curves of an airplane fitted with a supercharging engine. A supercharging installation suitable for commercial use is described, and it is shown that with the use of the compressor a great saving in fuel and a considerable increase in carrying capacity can be effected simultaneously. In an appendix the writer derives a theoretical formula for the correction of the thrust coefficient of an airscrew to offset the added resistance of the airplane due to the slip-stream effect.

  6. Study of small turbofan engines applicable to single-engine light airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The design, efficiency and cost factors are investigated for application of turbofan propulsion engines to single engine, general aviation light airplanes. A companion study of a hypothetical engine family of a thrust range suitable to such aircraft and having a high degree of commonality of design features and parts is presented. Future turbofan powered light airplanes can have a lower fuel consumption, lower weight, reduced airframe maintenance requirements and improved engine overhaul periods as compared to current piston engined powered airplanes. Achievement of compliance with noise and chemical emission regulations is expected without impairing performance, operating cost or safety.

  7. 14 CFR 121.175 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) No person may take off a reciprocating engine powered airplane from an airport located at an...) No person may take off a reciprocating engine powered airplane for an airport of intended destination... the reciprocating engine powered airplane concerned. (d) No person may take off a reciprocating...

  8. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations. (a) No person may take off a... may take off a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane for an airport of... may take off a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane at a weight more...

  9. 14 CFR 135.373 - Part 25 transport category airplanes with four or more engines: Reciprocating engine powered: En...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Part 25 transport category airplanes with... Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.373 Part 25 transport category airplanes with four or more... operate an airplane certificated under part 25 and having four or more engines unless— (1) There is...

  10. Variable cycle gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Foster, T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A technique, method, and apparatus were designed for varying the bypass ratio and modulating the flow of a gas turbine engine in order to achieve improved mixed mission performance. Embodiments include gas flow control system for management of core and bypass stream pressure comprising diverter valve means downstream of the core engine to selectively mix or separate the core and bypass exhaust streams. The flow control system may also include variable geometry means for maintaining the engine inlet airflow at a matched design level at all flight velocities. Earth preferred embodiment thus may be converted from a high specific thrust mixed flow cycle at supersonic velocities to a lower specific thrust separated flow turbofan system at subsonic velocities with a high degree of flow variability in each mode of operation.

  11. Baseline automotive gas turbine engine development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, C. E. (Editor); Pampreen, R. C. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Tests results on a baseline engine are presented to document the automotive gas turbine state-of-the-art at the start of the program. The performance characteristics of the engine and of a vehicle powered by this engine are defined. Component improvement concepts in the baseline engine were evaluated on engine dynamometer tests in the complete vehicle on a chassis dynamometer and on road tests. The concepts included advanced combustors, ceramic regenerators, an integrated control system, low cost turbine material, a continuously variable transmission, power-turbine-driven accessories, power augmentation, and linerless insulation in the engine housing.

  12. Gas turbine engine control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idelchik, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A control system and method of controlling a gas turbine engine. The control system receives an error signal and processes the error signal to form a primary fuel control signal. The control system also receives at least one anticipatory demand signal and processes the signal to form an anticipatory fuel control signal. The control system adjusts the value of the anticipatory fuel control signal based on the value of the error signal to form an adjusted anticipatory signal and then the adjusted anticipatory fuel control signal and the primary fuel control signal are combined to form a fuel command signal.

  13. Turbine engine variable geometry device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, Casimir (Inventor); Lenz, Herman N. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A variable geometry device for use with the turbine nozzle of a turbine engine of the type having a support housing and a combustion chamber contained within the support housing. A pair of spaced walls in the support housing define an annular and radially extending nozzle passageway. The outer end of the nozzle passageway is open to the combustion chamber while the inner end of the nozzle passageway is open to one or more turbine stages. A plurality of circumferentially spaced nozzle vanes are mounted to one of the spaced walls and protrude across the nozzle passageway. An annular opening is formed around the opposite spaced wall and an annular ring is axially slidably mounted within the opening. A motor is operatively connected to this ring and, upon actuation, axially displaces the ring within the nozzle passageway. In addition, the ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots which register with the nozzle vanes so that the vane geometry remains the same despite axial displacement of the ring.

  14. Staged combustion with piston engine and turbine engine supercharger

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.; O'Brien, Kevin C.

    2011-11-01

    A combustion engine method and system provides increased fuel efficiency and reduces polluting exhaust emissions by burning fuel in a two-stage combustion system. Fuel is combusted in a piston engine in a first stage producing piston engine exhaust gases. Fuel contained in the piston engine exhaust gases is combusted in a second stage turbine engine. Turbine engine exhaust gases are used to supercharge the piston engine.

  15. Staged combustion with piston engine and turbine engine supercharger

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Larry E.; Anderson, Brian L.; O'Brien, Kevin C.

    2006-05-09

    A combustion engine method and system provides increased fuel efficiency and reduces polluting exhaust emissions by burning fuel in a two-stage combustion system. Fuel is combusted in a piston engine in a first stage producing piston engine exhaust gases. Fuel contained in the piston engine exhaust gases is combusted in a second stage turbine engine. Turbine engine exhaust gases are used to supercharge the piston engine.

  16. The Effect of Supercharger Capacity on Engine and Airplane Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schey, O W; Gove, W D

    1930-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the effect of different supercharger capacities on the performance of an airplane and its engine . The tests were conducted on a DH4-M2 airplane powered with a Liberty 12 engine. In this investigation four supercharger capacities, obtained by driving a roots type supercharger at 1.615, 1.957, 2.4, and 3 time engine speed, were used to maintain sea-level pressure at the carburetor to altitudes of 7,000, 11,500, 17,000, and 22,000 feet, respectively. The performance of the airplane in climb and in level flight was determined for each of the four supercharger drive ratios and for the unsupercharged condition. The engine power was measured during these tests by means of a calibrated propeller. It was found that very little sacrifice in sea-level performance was experienced with the larger supercharger drive ratios as compared with performance obtained when using the smaller drive ratios. The results indicate that further increase in supercharger capacity over that obtained when using 3:1 drive ratio would give a slight increase in ceiling and in high-altitude performance but would considerably impair the performance for an appreciable distance below the critical altitude. As the supercharger capacity was increased, the height at which sea-level high speeds could be equaled or improved became a larger percentage of the maximum height of operation of the airplane.

  17. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes....367 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off...

  18. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes....367 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off...

  19. 77 FR 60005 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Airplane and Engine Issues'' (77 FR 59243), in FR Doc. 2012-23709, that published on September 26, 2012... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and...) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. It also withdraws the notice...

  20. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes....367 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations. (a) No person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off...

  1. 14 CFR 121.187 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.187 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing...

  2. 14 CFR 121.175 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.175 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations....

  3. 14 CFR 121.185 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Destination airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.185 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing...

  4. 14 CFR 121.187 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.187 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing...

  5. 14 CFR 121.185 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Destination airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.185 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing...

  6. 14 CFR 121.175 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.175 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations....

  7. 14 CFR 121.177 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.177 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations....

  8. 14 CFR 121.187 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.187 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing...

  9. 14 CFR 121.177 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.177 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations....

  10. 14 CFR 121.187 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.187 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing...

  11. 14 CFR 121.185 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Destination airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.185 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing...

  12. 14 CFR 121.175 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.175 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations....

  13. 14 CFR 121.177 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.177 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations....

  14. 14 CFR 121.185 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Destination airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.185 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing...

  15. 14 CFR 121.175 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.175 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Weight limitations....

  16. 14 CFR 121.187 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.187 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing...

  17. 14 CFR 121.177 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered... AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.177 Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Takeoff limitations....

  18. 75 FR 10551 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and...) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. DATES: The meeting is scheduled for Wednesday..., 2010. ADDRESSES: FAA-Northwest Mountain Region Office, Transport Standards Staff conference room,...

  19. 75 FR 55393 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and...) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. DATES: The meeting is scheduled for Wednesday.... ARAC Executive Committee Report. Transport Canada Report. Airworthiness Assurance Harmonization...

  20. 77 FR 24759 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and...) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. DATES: The meeting is scheduled for Wednesday... Committee Report. Transport Canada Report. EASA Report. Avionics Harmonization Working Group...

  1. 76 FR 60115 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and...) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. DATES: The meeting is scheduled for Wednesday.... ARAC Executive Committee Report. Update on Rulemaking Prioritization Working Group. Transport...

  2. 77 FR 59243 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and...) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. DATES: The meeting is scheduled for Wednesday... ARAC Executive Committee Report Update on Rulemaking Prioritization Working Group Transport...

  3. 75 FR 52807 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issues-New Task

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine... INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeff Gardlin, Airframe/Cabin Safety Branch, ANM-115, Transport Airplane Directorate... obtaining advice and recommendations on flammability requirements for interior materials on...

  4. Numerical Simulation of Tangling in Jet Engine Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendón, David A.; Erice, Borja; Gálvez, Francisco; Sánchez-Gálvez, Vicente

    2012-12-01

    The numerical analysis of certain safety related problems presents serious difficulties, since the large number of components present leads to huge finite element models that can only be solved by using large and expensive computers or by making rough approaches to the problem. Tangling, or clashing, in the turbine of a jet engine airplane is an example of such problems. This is caused by the crash and friction between rotor and stator blades in the turbine after an eventual shaft failure. When facing the study of an event through numerical modelling, the accurate simulation of this problem would require the engineer to model all the rotor and stator blades existing in the turbine stage, using a small element size in all pieces. Given that the number of stator and rotor blades is usually around 200, such simulations would require millions of elements. This work presents a new numerical methodology, specifically developed for the accurate modelling of the tangling problem that, depending on the turbine configuration, is able to reduce the number of nodes up to an order of magnitude without losing accuracy. The methodology, which benefits from the cyclic configuration of turbines, is successfully applied to the numerical analysis of a hypothetical tangling event in a turbine, providing valuable data such as the rotating velocity decrease of the turbine, the braking torque and the damage suffered by the blades. The methodology is somewhat general and can be applied to any problem in which damage caused by the interaction between a rotating and static piece is to be analysed.

  5. Power lever apparatus for a turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    McCombs Jr., H. L.

    1985-05-21

    In a turbine engine having a compressor with a bleed valve and a variable geometry apparatus is responsive to an operational control member for regulating the flow rate of fuel supplied the turbine engine as a function of atmospheric pressure and the temperature of air supplied to the compressor corresponding to movement of a power lever by an operator to a desired operation of the turbine engine. The power lever has an indicator member fluidically connected to a follower member linked to the operational control member. The fluidic connection is responsive to operational parameters of the turbine engine and limits the rotational input to the follower member when the rate of fuel flow could cause stalling and the development of an unacceptable operating temperature or overspeed condition in the turbine engine.

  6. Flight Research Using F100 Engine P680063 in the NASA F-15 Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Conners, Timothy R.; Maxwell, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    The value of flight research in developing and evaluating gas turbine engines is high. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has been conducting flight research on propulsion systems for many years. The F100 engine has been tested in the NASA F-15 research airplane in the last three decades. One engine in particular, S/N P680063, has been used for the entire program and has been flown in many pioneering propulsion flight research activities. Included are detailed flight-to-ground facility tests; tests of the first production digital engine control system, the first active stall margin control system, the first performance-seeking control system; and the first use of computer-controlled engine thrust for emergency flight control. The flight research has been supplemented with altitude facility tests at key times. This paper presents a review of the tests of engine P680063, the F-15 airplanes in which it flew, and the role of the flight test in maturing propulsion technology.

  7. 14 CFR 135.398 - Commuter category airplanes performance operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... all commuter category airplanes notwithstanding their stated applicability to turbine-engine-powered... used, the elevation of the airport, the effective runway gradient, and ambient temperature, and...

  8. 14 CFR 135.398 - Commuter category airplanes performance operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... all commuter category airplanes notwithstanding their stated applicability to turbine-engine-powered... used, the elevation of the airport, the effective runway gradient, and ambient temperature, and...

  9. 14 CFR 135.398 - Commuter category airplanes performance operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... all commuter category airplanes notwithstanding their stated applicability to turbine-engine-powered... used, the elevation of the airport, the effective runway gradient, and ambient temperature, and...

  10. 14 CFR 135.398 - Commuter category airplanes performance operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... all commuter category airplanes notwithstanding their stated applicability to turbine-engine-powered... used, the elevation of the airport, the effective runway gradient, and ambient temperature, and...

  11. 14 CFR 91.611 - Authorization for ferry flight with one engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... determining the operating condition of the operative engines. (4) No person may take off an airplane under... airplane or a turbine-engine-powered airplane equipped with three engines, with one engine inoperative, to a base for the purpose of repairing that engine subject to the following: (1) The airplane model...

  12. 14 CFR 27.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  13. 14 CFR 27.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  14. 14 CFR 27.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  15. 14 CFR 29.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  16. 14 CFR 29.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  17. 14 CFR 27.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  18. 14 CFR 29.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  19. 14 CFR 29.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine operating characteristics....939 Turbine engine operating characteristics. (a) Turbine engine operating characteristics must be... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a...

  20. Static seal for turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Santiago; Gisch, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    A seal structure for a gas turbine engine, the seal structure including first and second components located adjacent to each other and forming a barrier between high and low pressure zones. A seal cavity is defined in the first and second components, the seal cavity extending to either side of an elongated gap extending generally in a first direction between the first and second components. A seal member is positioned within the seal cavity and spans across the elongated gap. The seal member includes first and second side edges extending into each of the components in a second direction transverse to the first direction, and opposing longitudinal edges extending between the side edges generally parallel to the first direction. The side edges include a groove formed therein for effecting a reduction of gas flow around the seal member at the side edges.

  1. Regenerator for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lewakowski, John J.

    1979-01-01

    A rotary disc-type counterflow regenerator for a gas turbine engine includes a disc-shaped ceramic core surrounded by a metal rim which carries a coaxial annular ring gear. Bonding of the metal rim to the ceramic core is accomplished by constructing the metal rim in three integral portions: a driving portion disposed adjacent the ceramic core which carries the ring gear, a bonding portion disposed further away from the ceramic core and which is bonded thereto by elastomeric pads, and a connecting portion connecting the bonding portion to the driving portion. The elastomeric pads are bonded to radially flexible mounts formed as part of the metal rim by circumferential slots in the transition portion and lateral slots extending from one end of the circumferential slots across the bonding portion of the rim.

  2. Integrated gas turbine engine-nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. P.; Sargisson, D. F.; Stotler, C. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A nacelle for use with a gas turbine engine is presented. An integral webbed structure resembling a spoked wheel for rigidly interconnecting the nacelle and engine, provides lightweight support. The inner surface of the nacelle defines the outer limits of the engine motive fluid flow annulus while the outer surface of the nacelle defines a streamlined envelope for the engine.

  3. General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baerst, C. F.; Furst, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of turbine engines for the smaller general aviation aircraft was investigated and a technology program for developing the necessary technology was identified. Major results included the definition of the 1988 general aviation market, the identification of turboprop and turboshaft engines that meet the requirements of the aircraft studies, a benefit analysis showing the superiority of gas turbine engines for portions of the market studied, and detailed plans for the development of the necessary technology.

  4. Italian High-speed Airplane Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bona, C F

    1940-01-01

    This paper presents an account of Italian high-speed engine designs. The tests were performed on the Fiat AS6 engine, and all components of that engine are discussed from cylinders to superchargers as well as the test set-up. The results of the bench tests are given along with the performance of the engines in various races.

  5. Tabulated pressure measurements on a large subsonic transport model airplane with high bypass ratio, powered, fan jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flechner, S. G.; Patterson, J. C., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel investigation to determine the aerodynamic interference and the jet-wake interference associated with the wing, pylon, and high-bypass-ratio, powered, fan-jet model engines has been conducted on a typical high-wing logistics transport airplane configuration. Pressures were measured on the wing and pylons and on the surfaces of the engine fan cowl, turbine cowl, and plug. Combinations of wing, pylons, engines, and flow-through nacelles were tested, and the pressure coefficients are presented in tabular form. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.700 to 0.825 and angles of attack from -2 to 4 deg.

  6. Gas turbine engines with particle traps

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.; Sumner, D. Warren; Sheoran, Yogendra; Judd, Z. Daniel

    1992-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) incorporates a particle trap (46) that forms an entrapment region (73) in a plenum (24) which extends from within the combustor (18) to the inlet (32) of a radial-inflow turbine (52, 54). The engine (10) is thereby adapted to entrap particles that originate downstream from the compressor (14) and are otherwise propelled by combustion gas (22) into the turbine (52, 54). Carbonaceous particles that are dislodged from the inner wall (50) of the combustor (18) are incinerated within the entrapment region (73) during operation of the engine (10).

  7. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.365 Large transport... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane from an airport located at an elevation...

  8. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.365 Large transport... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane from an airport located at an elevation...

  9. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.365 Large transport... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane from an airport located at an elevation...

  10. 14 CFR 135.367 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Takeoff limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... person operating a reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off that... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations §...

  11. 14 CFR 121.185 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Destination airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reciprocating engine powered airplane may take off that airplane, unless its weight on arrival, allowing for... tailwind component. (b) An airplane that would be prohibited from being taken off because it could not meet the requirements of paragraph (a)(2) of this section may be taken off if an alternate airport...

  12. 14 CFR 135.375 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane may take off that airplane, unless its weight on... tailwind component. (b) An airplane that would be prohibited from being taken off because it could not meet paragraph (a)(2) of this section may be taken off if an alternate airport is selected that meets all of...

  13. 75 FR 16902 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issue Area-New Task

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Transport Airplanes'' (70 FR 40166, July 12, 2005). The ARAC working group should provide information that... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine... requirements for low speed alerting in new transport category airplanes. This task is the first phase of...

  14. 14 CFR 135.365 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.365 Large transport... reciprocating engine powered large transport category airplane from an airport located at an elevation...

  15. 14 CFR 135.377 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations: Alternate...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.377 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing...

  16. 14 CFR 135.375 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing limitations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.375 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: Landing...

  17. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.371 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route...

  18. 14 CFR 135.369 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: All...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.369 Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route...

  19. 14 CFR 135.391 - Large nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes: En... AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.391 Large nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. (a) Except...

  20. 14 CFR 121.327 - Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... powered airplanes. 121.327 Section 121.327 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Equipment Requirements § 121.327 Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes. (a) General... airplane unless supplemental oxygen is furnished and used as set forth in paragraphs (b) and (c) of...

  1. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains...

  2. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains...

  3. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains...

  4. 14 CFR 121.161 - Airplane limitations: Type of route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane limitations: Type of route. 121... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Aircraft Requirements § 121.161 Airplane... specifications, no certificate holder may operate a turbine-engine-powered airplane over a route that contains...

  5. Preliminary flight test results of the F100 EMD engine in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. P.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A flight evaluation of the F100 Engine Model Derivative (EMD) is conducted. The F100 EMD is an advanced version of the F100 engine that powers the F15 and F16 airplanes. The F100 EMD features a bigger fan, higher temperature turbine, a Digital Electronic Engine Control system (DEEC), and a newly designed 16 segment afterburner, all of which results in a 15 to 20 percent increase in sea level thrust. The flight evaluations consist of investigation of performance (thrust, fuel flow, and airflow) and operability (transient response and airstart) in the F-15 airplane. The performance of the F100 EMD is excellent. Aircraft acceleration time to Mach 2.0 is reduced by 23 percent with two F100 EMD engines. Several anomalies are discovered in the operability evaluations. A software change to the DEEC improved the throttle, and subsequent Cooper Harper ratings of 3 to 4 are obtained. In the extreme upper left hand corner of the flight enveloped, compressor stalls occurr when the throttle is retarded to idle power. These stalls are not predicted by altitude facility tests or stability for the compressor.

  6. Multi-heat addition turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franciscus, Leo C. (Inventor); Brabbs, Theodore A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A multi-heat addition turbine engine (MHATE) incorporates a plurality of heat addition devices to transfer energy to air and a plurality of turbines to extract energy from the air while converting it to work. The MHATE provides dry power and lower fuel consumption or lower combustor exit temperatures.

  7. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Research and plans concerning aircraft gas turbine engine hot section durability problems were discussed. Under the topics of structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, combustion, turbine heat transfer, and instrumentation specific points addressed were the thermal and fluid environment around liners, blades, and vanes, material coatings, constitutive behavior, stress-strain response, and life prediction methods for the three components.

  8. Gas Turbine Engine Having Fan Rotor Driven by Turbine Exhaust and with a Bypass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Chandler, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has a core engine incorporating a core engine turbine. A fan rotor is driven by a fan rotor turbine. The fan rotor turbine is in the path of gases downstream from the core engine turbine. A bypass door is moveable from a closed position at which the gases from the core engine turbine pass over the fan rotor turbine, and moveable to a bypass position at which the gases are directed away from the fan rotor turbine. An aircraft is also disclosed.

  9. Advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R.; Benstein, E. H.

    1979-01-01

    The small engine technology requirements suitable for general aviation service in the 1987 to 1988 time frame were defined. The market analysis showed potential United States engines sales of 31,500 per year providing that the turbine engine sales price approaches current reciprocating engine prices. An optimum engine design was prepared for four categories of fixed wing aircraft and for rotary wing applications. A common core approach was derived from the optimum engines that maximizes engine commonality over the power spectrum with a projected price competitive with reciprocating piston engines. The advanced technology features reduced engine cost, approximately 50 percent compared with current technology.

  10. Wind Turbine Modeling Overview for Control Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, P. J.; Butterfield, S. B.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate modeling of wind turbine systems is of paramount importance for controls engineers seeking to reduce loads and optimize energy capture of operating turbines in the field. When designing control systems, engineers often employ a series of models developed in the different disciplines of wind energy. The limitations and coupling of each of these models is explained to highlight how these models might influence control system design.

  11. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Daniel E.; Ensign, C. Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project is a NASA-sponsored endeavor to improve the durability of advanced gas turbine engines for commercial and military aircraft. Through improvements in the analytical models and life prediction systems, designs for future hot section components, the combustor and turbine, will be more accurately analyzed and will incorporate features required for longer life in the more hostile operating environment of high performance engines.

  12. Integrated gas turbine engine-nacelle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. P.; Sargisson, D. F.; Stotler, C. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A nacelle for use with a gas turbine engine is provided with an integral webbed structure resembling a spoked wheel for rigidly interconnecting the nacelle and engine. The nacelle is entirely supported in its spacial relationship with the engine by means of the webbed structure. The inner surface of the nacelle defines the outer limits of the engine motive fluid flow annulus, while the outer surface of the nacelle defines a streamlined envelope for the engine.

  13. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST) Project of the NASA Lewis Research Center sponsored a workshop to discuss current research pertinent to turbine engine durability problems. Presentations were made concerning the hot section environment and the behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The presentations were divided into six sessions: Instrumentation, Combustion, Turbine Heat Transfer, Structural Analysis, Fatigue and Fracture, and Surface Protection. Topics discussed included modeling of thermal and fluid-flow phenomena, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, constitutive behavior of materials, stress-strain response, and life-prediction methods. Researchers from industry, academia, and government presented results of their work sponsored by the HOST project.

  14. Gas turbine engine with recirculating bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, A. P. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions in a gas turbine engine are reduced by bleeding hot air from the engine cycle and introducing it back into the engine upstream of the bleed location and upstream of the combustor inlet. As this hot inlet air is recycled, the combustor inlet temperature rises rapidly at a constant engine thrust level. In most combustors, this will reduce carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions significantly. The preferred locations for hot air extraction are at the compressor discharge or from within the turbine, whereas the preferred reentry location is at the compressor inlet.

  15. TMF design considerations in turbine airfoils of advanced turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, C. G.; Zamrik, S. Y.; Adams, J. H.; Frani, N. E.

    A review of thermal-mechanicalfatigue (TMF) in advanced turbine engines is presented. The review includes examples of typical thermal-mechnical loadings encountered in the design of hot section blades and vanes. Specific issues related to TMF behavior are presented and the associated impact on component life analysis and design is discussed.

  16. Design and analysis of a fuel-efficient single-engine, turboprop-powered, business airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, G. L.; Everest, D. E., Jr.; Lovell, W. A.; Price, J. E.; Walkley, K. B.; Washburn, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    The speed, range, payload, and fuel efficiency of a general aviation airplane powered by one turboprop engine was determined and compared to a twin engine turboprop aircraft. An airplane configuration was developed which can carry six people for a noreserve range of 2,408 km at a cruise speed above 154 m/s, and a cruise altitude of about 9,144 m. The cruise speed is comparable to that of the fastest of the current twin turboprop powered airplanes. It is found that the airplane has a cruise specific range greater than all twin turboprop engine airplanes flying in its speed range and most twin piston engine airplanes flying at considerably slower cruise airspeeds.

  17. Investigation of the Muffling Problem for Airplane Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upton, G B; Gage, V R

    1920-01-01

    The experimentation presented in this report falls in two divisions: first, the determination of the relation between back pressure in the exhaust line and consequent power loss, for various combinations of speed and throttle positions of the engine; second, the construction and trial of muffler designs covering both type and size. Report deals with experiments in the development of a muffler designed on the principle which will give the maximum muffling effect with a minimum loss of power. The main body of the work has been done on a Curtiss OX eight-cylinder airplane engine, 4 by 5 inches, rated 70 horsepower at 1,200 revolutions per minute. For estimation of the muffling ability and suppression of "bark" of individual exhausts, the "Ingeco" stationary, single cylinder, 5 1/2 by 10 inch, throttling governed gasoline engine, and occasionally other engines were used.

  18. 14 CFR 34.61 - Turbine fuel specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine fuel specifications. 34.61 Section... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.61 Turbine...

  19. 14 CFR 34.61 - Turbine fuel specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine fuel specifications. 34.61 Section... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.61 Turbine...

  20. 14 CFR 34.61 - Turbine fuel specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine fuel specifications. 34.61 Section... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.61 Turbine...

  1. Design Improvement for Airplane-Engine Nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernon, D. F.; Page, G. S.; Welge, H. R.

    1987-01-01

    Advanced three-dimensional transonic design routine for wingmounted engine nacelles modified to include effects of propellers and wing sweep. Resulting new nacelle shapes introduce less airflow disturbance and less drag. Improvement consists of introduction of boundary conditions in form of nonuniform onset flow in area of wing washed by propeller slipstream. Routine generates nacelle shape as series of cross sections swept, relatively to unperturbed flow, as function of wing shape.

  2. The Way to Increased Airplane Engine Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohrer, Eugen

    1939-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an outline of the present state of development and point out the possibilities available for the further increase in the power/displacement ratio, the economy, and the reliability of the engine. Some of the aspects discussed are methods of increasing take-off power, the various methods of preparation of the fuel mixture and their effect on power, economy, and safety.

  3. 14 CFR 91.605 - Transport category civil airplane weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... than a turbine-engine-powered airplane certificated after September 30, 1958) unless— (1) The takeoff.... (b) No person may operate a turbine-engine-powered transport category airplane certificated after... airport, the runway to be used, the effective runway gradient, the ambient temperature and wind...

  4. 14 CFR 91.605 - Transport category civil airplane weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... than a turbine-engine-powered airplane certificated after September 30, 1958) unless— (1) The takeoff.... (b) No person may operate a turbine-engine-powered transport category airplane certificated after... airport, the runway to be used, the effective runway gradient, the ambient temperature and wind...

  5. 14 CFR 91.605 - Transport category civil airplane weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... than a turbine-engine-powered airplane certificated after September 30, 1958) unless— (1) The takeoff.... (b) No person may operate a turbine-engine-powered transport category airplane certificated after... airport, the runway to be used, the effective runway gradient, the ambient temperature and wind...

  6. 14 CFR 91.605 - Transport category civil airplane weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... than a turbine-engine-powered airplane certificated after September 30, 1958) unless— (1) The takeoff.... (b) No person may operate a turbine-engine-powered transport category airplane certificated after... airport, the runway to be used, the effective runway gradient, the ambient temperature and wind...

  7. 14 CFR 91.605 - Transport category civil airplane weight limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... than a turbine-engine-powered airplane certificated after September 30, 1958) unless— (1) The takeoff.... (b) No person may operate a turbine-engine-powered transport category airplane certificated after... airport, the runway to be used, the effective runway gradient, the ambient temperature and wind...

  8. Gas turbine engine active clearance control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveau, Paul J. (Inventor); Greenberg, Paul B. (Inventor); Paolillo, Roger E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Method for controlling the clearance between rotating and stationary components of a gas turbine engine are disclosed. Techniques for achieving close correspondence between the radial position of rotor blade tips and the circumscribing outer air seals are disclosed. In one embodiment turbine case temperature modifying air is provided in flow rate, pressure and temperature varied as a function of engine operating condition. The modifying air is scheduled from a modulating and mixing valve supplied with dual source compressor air. One source supplies relatively low pressure, low temperature air and the other source supplies relatively high pressure, high temperature air. After the air has been used for the active clearance control (cooling the high pressure turbine case) it is then used for cooling the structure that supports the outer air seal and other high pressure turbine component parts.

  9. Telemetry Boards Interpret Rocket, Airplane Engine Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    For all the data gathered by the space shuttle while in orbit, NASA engineers are just as concerned about the information it generates on the ground. From the moment the shuttle s wheels touch the runway to the break of its electrical umbilical cord at 0.4 seconds before its next launch, sensors feed streams of data about the status of the vehicle and its various systems to Kennedy Space Center s shuttle crews. Even while the shuttle orbiter is refitted in Kennedy s orbiter processing facility, engineers constantly monitor everything from power levels to the testing of the mechanical arm in the orbiter s payload bay. On the launch pad and up until liftoff, the Launch Control Center, attached to the large Vehicle Assembly Building, screens all of the shuttle s vital data. (Once the shuttle clears its launch tower, this responsibility shifts to Mission Control at Johnson Space Center, with Kennedy in a backup role.) Ground systems for satellite launches also generate significant amounts of data. At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, across the Banana River from Kennedy s location on Merritt Island, Florida, NASA rockets carrying precious satellite payloads into space flood the Launch Vehicle Data Center with sensor information on temperature, speed, trajectory, and vibration. The remote measurement and transmission of systems data called telemetry is essential to ensuring the safe and successful launch of the Agency s space missions. When a launch is unsuccessful, as it was for this year s Orbiting Carbon Observatory satellite, telemetry data also provides valuable clues as to what went wrong and how to remedy any problems for future attempts. All of this information is streamed from sensors in the form of binary code: strings of ones and zeros. One small company has partnered with NASA to provide technology that renders raw telemetry data intelligible not only for Agency engineers, but also for those in the private sector.

  10. 14 CFR 34.62 - Test procedure (propulsion engines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.62 Test...

  11. 14 CFR 34.62 - Test procedure (propulsion engines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.62 Test...

  12. 14 CFR 34.62 - Test procedure (propulsion engines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Test Procedures for Engine Exhaust Gaseous Emissions (Aircraft and Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.62 Test...

  13. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  14. Control for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, T.J.

    1992-08-04

    This patent describes a gas turbine engine having fuel metering means for delivering fuel to the engine and including means for controlling the fuel metering means including speed control means and slave-datum control responsive to a speed request signal and limit signal for limiting the fuel metering means for producing a signal that is integrated with respect to time for controlling the speed control means, and slave-datum limit control means for further limiting the slave-datum control so that its output is indicative of the maximum or minimum constraints of the engine during the engine's acceleration and deceleration modes of operation whereby the windup effect on the speed control means is eliminated, the output produced by the slave datum limit control means is a function of the formula: ((maximum constraint) [minus] (KOP [times] 'slave-datum'))/KP + speed feedback, where: maximum constraint is the surge limit of the gas turbine engine. KOP [times] 'slave-datum' is the scheduled engine operating point required for steady state engine operation, KP is the proportional gain of an engine governor, KIP is the slope of an engine operating line and speed feedback is indicative of the rotational speed of the gas turbine engine.

  15. Study of small civil turbofan engines applicable to military trainer airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldenbrand, R. W.; Merrill, G. L.; Burnett, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Small turbofan engine design concepts were applied to military trainer airplanes to establish the potential for commonality between civil and military engines. Several trainer configurations were defined and studied. A ""best'' engine was defined for the trainer mission, and sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the effects on airplane size and efficiency of wing loading, power loading, configuration, aerodynamic quality, and engine quality. It is concluded that a small civil aircraft is applicable to military trainer airplanes. Aircraft designed with these engines are smaller, less costly, and more efficient than existing trainer aircraft.

  16. Gas turbine engine and composite parts

    SciTech Connect

    Prewo, K.M.; Brennan, J.J.

    1988-04-19

    A gas turbine engine core engine component blade, vane, disk, side plate, seal, combustor liner, flap, burner case structure, or turbine case structure, is described comprising a silicon carbide fiber reinforced glass composite consisting essentially of about 30% to about 70% by volume silicon carbide fibers in a glass matrix selected from the group consisting of borosilicate glass, high silica content glass, aluminosilicate glass and mixtures thereof, the composite having a fracture toughness exemplified by a critical stress intensity factor above about 15,000 psi (inch)/sup 1/2/, high temperature strength, high temperature oxidation stability and insulating properties.

  17. Lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics of light, twin-engine, propeller driven airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolowicz, C. H.; Yancey, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical procedures and design data for predicting the lateral-directional static and dynamic stability and control characteristics of light, twin engine, propeller driven airplanes for propeller-off and power-on conditions are reported. Although the consideration of power effects is limited to twin engine airplanes, the propeller-off considerations are applicable to single engine airplanes as well. The procedures are applied to a twin engine, propeller driven, semi-low-wing airplane in the clean configuration through the linear lift range. The calculated derivative characteristics are compared with wind tunnel and flight data. Included in the calculated characteristics are the spiral mode, roll mode, and Dutch roll mode over the speed range of the airplane.

  18. Analysis of the turbojet engine for propulsion of supersonic fighter airplanes / David S. Gabriel, Richard P. Krebs, E.Clinton Wilcox, Stanley L.Koutz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, David S; Krebs, Richard P; Wilcox, E Clinton; Koutz, Stanley L

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made of two supersonic interceptor type airplanes to determine the most desirable turbojet engine characteristics for this application The airplanes were designed differently primarily because of the amount of subsonic flight incorporated in the flight plan--one flight having none and the other, a cruise radius of 400 nautical miles. Several power plant design variables were varied independently to determine the effect of changes in each parameter on airplane performance. These parameters included compressor pressure ratio, compressor efficiency, turbine-inlet temperature, afterburner temperature, engine specific weight, and air-handling capacity. The effects of using a convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle and of changing the design flight Mach number were also investigated.

  19. 76 FR 25648 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    .... These proposed special conditions pertain to their effects on the structural performance of the airplane... load imposed by sudden engine stoppage due to malfunction or structural failure.'' Limit loads are... structures be able to support limit loads without detrimental permanent deformation, meaning that...

  20. 76 FR 44245 - Special Conditions: Gulfstream Model GVI Airplane; Limit Engine Torque Loads for Sudden Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... FR 25648). One supportive comment was received and the special conditions are adopted as proposed... structural performance of the airplane. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or... imposed by sudden engine stoppage due to malfunction or structural failure.'' Limit loads are expected...

  1. Optimization of engines for a commercial Mach 0.98 transport using advanced turbine cooling methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, G. A.; Whitlow, J. B., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of an advanced technology airplane using supercritical aerodynamics. Cruise Mach number was 0.98 at 40,000 feet altitude with a payload of 60,000 pounds and a range of 3000 nautical miles. Separate-flow turbofans were examined parametrically to determine the effect of sea-level-static design turbine-inlet-temperature and noise on takeoff gross weight (TOGW) assuming full-film turbine cooling. The optimum turbine inlet temperature was 2650 F. Two-stage-fan engines, with cruise fan pressure ratio of 2.25, achieved a noise goal of 103.5 EPNdB with todays noise technology while one-stage-fan engines, achieved a noise goal of 98 EPNdB. The take-off gross weight penalty to use the one-stage fan was 6.2 percent.

  2. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111 Section 23.1111 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems,...

  7. Mixer Assembly for a Gas Turbine Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Zhongtao (Inventor); Cohen, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Fotache, Catalin G. (Inventor); Smith, Lance L. (Inventor); Hautman, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A mixer assembly for a gas turbine engine is provided, including a main mixer with fuel injection holes located between at least one radial swirler and at least one axial swirler, wherein the fuel injected into the main mixer is atomized and dispersed by the air flowing through the radial swirler and the axial swirler.

  8. Installation of electric generators on turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demel, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    The installation of generators on turbine aircraft is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the use of the samarium cobalt generator. Potential advantages of an electric secondary power system at the engine level are listed. The integrated generator and the externally mounted generator are discussed. It is concluded that the integrated generator is best used in turbojet and low bypass ratio engines where there is no easy way of placing generators externally without influencing frontal areas.

  9. Engine Damage to a NASA DC-8-72 Airplane From a High-Altitude Encounter With a Diffuse Volcanic Ash Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindle, Thomas J.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) DC-8 airborne sciences research airplane inadvertently flew through a diffuse volcanic ash cloud of the Mt. Hekla volcano in February 2000 during a flight from Edwards Air Force Base (Edwards, California) to Kiruna, Sweden. Although the ash plume was not visible to the flight crew, sensitive research experiments and instruments detected it. In-flight performance checks and postflight visual inspections revealed no damage to the airplane or engine first-stage fan blades; subsequent detailed examination of the engines revealed clogged turbine cooling air passages. The engines were removed and overhauled. This paper presents volcanic ash plume analysis, trajectory from satellites, analysis of ash particles collected in cabin air heat exchanger filters and removed from the engines, and data from onboard instruments and engine conditions.

  10. Hydro-flow supra-turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Neale, A.B.

    1981-08-04

    A turbine engine operates at high pressure and at relatively low temperatures and revolutions per minute through the use of special carburetion, compressor, combustion unit, and turbine arrangements. The system is characterized by the use of water which is vaporized and concurrently reduces the temperature of the vaporized fuel and air mixture as compression occurs, and is not physically intermixed with the combustion gases until after initial combustion takes place. The compressor includes a pair of back-to-back, four stage composite compressors to which synchronized dual carburetion or meter-flow arrangements separately supply water and gasoline or other fuel, along with air. The water absorbs heat from the compression of both of the two compressors, and the resultant vaporous product gases are routed to the jacket of a combustion chamber in which the compressed fuel and air mixture is burned. Following initial ignition and some burning of the fuel, the superheated steam and combustion products are combined, and the combination is supplied to a multistage transverse flow turbine having in the order of 17 pressure stages. The turbine includes arrangements for directing the high pressure gases back and forth through the rotor blades at different radial distances from the axis of the turbine. Exhaust gases from the turbine are applied to a ''floating'' muffler, including a rotatable inner chamber to facilitate mixing exhaust gases with the ambient air, and to disperse the high moisture content of the exhaust gases.

  11. Airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2010-12-21

    An airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine is provided. The airfoil comprises a main body comprising a wall structure defining an inner cavity adapted to receive a cooling air. The wall structure includes a first diffusion region and at least one first metering opening extending from the inner cavity to the first diffusion region. The wall structure further comprises at least one cooling circuit comprising a second diffusion region and at least one second metering opening extending from the first diffusion region to the second diffusion region. The at least one cooling circuit may further comprise at least one third metering opening, at least one third diffusion region and a fourth diffusion region.

  12. 78 FR 57672 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and...) Transport Airplane and Engine (TAE) Subcommittee to discuss TAE issues. DATES: The meeting is scheduled for... Remarks, Review Agenda and Minutes FAA Report ARAC Report Transport Canada Report EASA Report...

  13. 78 FR 60995 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and... Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) Transport Airplane and Engine (TAE) Subcommittee to discuss TAE issues... meeting is as follows: Opening Remarks, Review Agenda and Minutes FAA Report ARAC Report Transport...

  14. 14 CFR 121.331 - Supplemental oxygen requirements for pressurized cabin airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen requirements for pressurized cabin airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes. 121.331 Section 121.331 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE:...

  15. Optical systems for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrigley, Mark

    1986-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a turbine-blade pyrometer transducer for in situ measurements of blade temperature in operating gas-turbine engines are described and illustrated with diagrams, drawings, graphs, and photographs. Consideration is given to the primary components (optical probe, fiber-optic cable, and electronics), the operating environment (extreme temperatures and pressures, vibration, EMI, and liquids), the design specifications, and specific fabrication techniques. It is pointed out that electrooptic transducers of this type reduce the measurement error to + or - 10 C, and that the same sensors can be used to measure blade-tip clearance and shaft speed or to detect flame-out.

  16. Combustion research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.; Claus, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Research on combustion is being conducted at Lewis Research Center to provide improved analytical models of the complex flow and chemical reaction processes which occur in the combustor of gas turbine engines and other aeropropulsion systems. The objective of the research is to obtain a better understanding of the various physical processes that occur in the gas turbine combustor in order to develop models and numerical codes which can accurately describe these processes. Activities include in-house research projects, university grants, and industry contracts and are classified under the subject areas of advanced numerics, fuel sprays, fluid mixing, and radiation-chemistry. Results are high-lighted from several projects.

  17. An Investigation of a Thermal Ice-Prevention System for a Twin-Engine Transport Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Alun R

    1946-01-01

    Several previously published reports on a comprehensive investigation of a thermal ice-prevention system for a typical twin-engine transport airplane are correlated with some unpublished data to present the entire investigation in one publication. Several previously published reports on a comprehensive investigation of a thermal ice-prevention system for a typical twin-engine transport airplane are correlated with some unpublished data to present the entire investigation in one publication. The thermal system investigated was based upon the transfer of heat from the engine exhaust gas to air, which is then caused to flow along the inner surface of any portion of the airplane for which protection is desired.

  18. Casing for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J.; Little, David A.; Charron, Richard C.

    2016-07-12

    A casing for a can annular gas turbine engine, including: a compressed air section (40) spanning between a last row of compressor blades (26) and a first row of turbine blades (28), the compressed air section (40) having a plurality of openings (50) there through, wherein a single combustor/advanced duct assembly (64) extends through each opening (50); and one top hat (68) associated with each opening (50) configured to enclose the associated combustor/advanced duct assembly (64) and seal the opening (50). A volume enclosed by the compressed air section (40) is not greater than a volume of a frustum (54) defined at an upstream end (56) by an inner diameter of the casing at the last row of compressor blades (26) and at a downstream end (60) by an inner diameter of the casing at the first row of turbine blades (28).

  19. More-Electric Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.

    1997-01-01

    A new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) thrust, the more-electric commercial engine, is creating significant interest in industry. This engine would have an integral starter-generator on the gas generator shaft and would be fully supported by magnetic bearings. The NASA/Army emphasis is on a high-temperature magnetic bearing for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of such engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of the bearing times the rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used, resulting in a more efficient, more-electric engine.

  20. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines. Volume 1; Power Metallurgy Rene 95 Rotating Turbine Engine Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfouts, W. R.; Shamblen, C. E.; Mosier, J. S.; Peebles, R. E.; Gorsler, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve methods for producing powder metallurgy aircraft gas turbine engine parts from the nickel base superalloy known as Rene 95. The parts produced were the high pressure turbine aft shaft for the CF6-50 engine and the stages 5 through 9 compressor disk forgings for the CFM56/F101 engines. A 50% cost reduction was achieved as compared to conventional cast and wrought processing practices. An integrated effort involving several powder producers and a major forging source were included.

  1. 76 FR 14115 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Meeting on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a public meeting of the FAA's Aviation Rulemaking Advisory...

  2. 77 FR 40699 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Teleconference on Transport Airplane and Engine Issues

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee Teleconference on Transport... Committee (ARAC) to discuss transport airplane and engine (TAE) issues. DATES: The teleconference...

  3. Fiber sensor design for turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Kenneth W., Jr.; Beshears, David L.; Turley, W. Dale; Lewis, Wilfred, III; Noel, Bruce W.

    1991-12-01

    Determination of blade temperatures in the high-speed and turbulent environment of a turbine engine is difficult using standard pyrometry techniques because of the presence of high- temperature flame and the reflective nature of the inspection surfaces. A technique utilizing thermographic phosphor compounds bonded to engine vanes and turbine blades is presented that mitigates the negative effects of blackbody radiation while potentially allowing near real- time acquisition of blade temperature information. Specialized single and dual fiber-optic probes were designed to interrogate both fixed and rotating surfaces by delivering ultraviolet light from a quadrupled Nd:YAG (266 nm) laser to phosphor coatings consisting of Y2O3:Eu, YVO4, and YAG:Tb ceramic compounds. This technique utilizes the temperature- dependent fluorescent emission of a ceramic phosphor coating to discern the temperature of the interrogated surface. By using these methods, surface temperature measurements to 1200 degree(s)C are achievable in the combustion environment.

  4. Fatigue Reliability of Gas Turbine Engine Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas A.; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    The results of an investigation are described for fatigue reliability in engine structures. The description consists of two parts. Part 1 is for method development. Part 2 is a specific case study. In Part 1, the essential concepts and practical approaches to damage tolerance design in the gas turbine industry are summarized. These have evolved over the years in response to flight safety certification requirements. The effect of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods on these methods is also reviewed. Assessment methods based on probabilistic fracture mechanics, with regard to both crack initiation and crack growth, are outlined. Limit state modeling techniques from structural reliability theory are shown to be appropriate for application to this problem, for both individual failure mode and system-level assessment. In Part 2, the results of a case study for the high pressure turbine of a turboprop engine are described. The response surface approach is used to construct a fatigue performance function. This performance function is used with the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) to determine the probability of failure and the sensitivity of the fatigue life to the engine parameters for the first stage disk rim of the two stage turbine. A hybrid combination of regression and Monte Carlo simulation is to use incorporate time dependent random variables. System reliability is used to determine the system probability of failure, and the sensitivity of the system fatigue life to the engine parameters of the high pressure turbine. 'ne variation in the primary hot gas and secondary cooling air, the uncertainty of the complex mission loading, and the scatter in the material data are considered.

  5. Flameholder for gas turbine engine afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, E.C.; Gulati, A.

    1992-07-14

    This patent describes a flameholder for reducing screech in gas turbine engines. It comprises: an elongated V-shaped member having a pair of opposing elongated walls joined at one end and diverging to respective trailing edges, the apex of the elongated V-shaped member facing upstream; and a plurality of vortex creating members extending from each of the trailing edges in a downstream direction.

  6. Optical monitoring system for a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lemieux, Dennis H; Smed, Jan P; Williams, James P; Jonnalagadda, Vinay

    2013-05-14

    The monitoring system for a gas turbine engine including a viewing tube assembly having an inner end and an outer end. The inner end is located adjacent to a hot gas flow path within the gas turbine engine and the outer end is located adjacent to an outer casing of the gas turbine engine. An aperture wall is located at the inner end of the viewing tube assembly and an optical element is located within the viewing tube assembly adjacent to the inner end and is spaced from the aperture wall to define a cooling and purge chamber therebetween. An aperture is defined in the aperture wall for passage of light from the hot gas flow path to the optical element. Swirl passages are defined in the viewing tube assembly between the aperture wall and the optical element for passage of cooling air from a location outside the viewing tube assembly into the chamber, wherein swirl passages effect a swirling movement of air in a circumferential direction within the chamber.

  7. Closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    North, William Edward

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for providing a closed-loop air cooling system for a turbine engine. The method and apparatus provide for bleeding pressurized air from a gas turbine engine compressor for use in cooling the turbine components. The compressed air is cascaded through the various stages of the turbine. At each stage a portion of the compressed air is returned to the compressor where useful work is recovered.

  8. Gas Path Sealing in Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of gas path seals is presented with particular attention given to sealing clearance effects on engine component efficiency. The effects on compressor pressure ratio and stall margin are pointed out. Various case-rotor relative displacements, which affect gas path seal clearances, are identified. Forces produced by nonuniform sealing clearances and their effect on rotor stability are discussed qualitatively, and recent work on turbine-blade-tip sealing for high temperature is described. The need for active clearance control and for engine structural analysis is discussed. The functions of the internal-flow system and its seals are reviewed.

  9. Heterogeneous reactions in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Lukachko, S. P.; Waitz, I. A.

    2002-05-01

    One-dimensional flow models and unity probability heterogeneous rate parameters are used to estimate the maximum effect of heterogeneous reactions on trace species evolution in aircraft gas turbines. The analysis includes reactions on soot particulates and turbine/nozzle material surfaces. Results for a representative advanced subsonic engine indicate the net change in reactant mixing ratios due to heterogeneous reactions is <10-6 for O2, CO2, and H2O, and <10-10 for minor combustion products such as SO2 and NO2. The change in the mixing ratios relative to the initial values is <0.01%. Since these estimates are based on heterogeneous reaction probabilities of unity, the actual changes will be even lower. Thus, heterogeneous chemistry within the engine cannot explain the high conversion of SO2 to SO3 which some wake models require to explain the observed levels of volatile aerosols. Furthermore, turbine heterogeneous processes will not effect exhaust NOx or NOy levels.

  10. Durability Challenges for Next Generation of Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive fuel burn and carbon dioxide emission reduction goals for future gas turbine engines will require higher overall pressure ratio, and a significant increase in turbine inlet temperature. These goals can be achieved by increasing temperature capability of turbine engine hot section materials and decreasing weight of fan section of the engine. NASA is currently developing several advanced hot section materials for increasing temperature capability of future gas turbine engines. The materials of interest include ceramic matrix composites with 1482 - 1648 C temperature capability, advanced disk alloys with 815 C capability, and low conductivity thermal barrier coatings with erosion resistance. The presentation will provide an overview of durability challenges with emphasis on the environmental factors affecting durability for the next generation of gas turbine engine materials. The environmental factors include gaseous atmosphere in gas turbine engines, molten salt and glass deposits from airborne contaminants, impact from foreign object damage, and erosion from ingestion of small particles.

  11. 14 CFR 121.511 - Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Flight engineers... Operations § 121.511 Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes. (a) In any operation in which one flight engineer is serving the flight time limitations in §§ 121.503 and 121.505 apply to that...

  12. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology (HOST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A two-day workshop on the research and plans for turbine engine hot section durability problems was held on October 25 and 26, 1983, at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Presentations were made during six sessions, including structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, combustion, turbine heat transfer, and instrumentation, that dealt with the thermal and fluid environment around liners, blades, and vanes, and with material coatings, constitutive behavior, stress-strain response, and life prediction methods for the three components. The principal objective of each session was to disseminate the research results to date, along with future plans, in each of the six areas. Contract and government researchers presented results of their work.

  13. TEDANN: Turbine engine diagnostic artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, L.J.; Greitzer, F.L.; Illi, O.J. Jr.

    1994-03-17

    The initial focus of TEDANN is on AGT-1500 fuel flow dynamics: that is, fuel flow faults detectable in the signals from the Electronic Control Unit`s (ECU) diagnostic connector. These voltage signals represent the status of the Electro-Mechanical Fuel System (EMFS) in response to ECU commands. The EMFS is a fuel metering device that delivers fuel to the turbine engine under the management of the ECU. The ECU is an analog computer whose fuel flow algorithm is dependent upon throttle position, ambient air and turbine inlet temperatures, and compressor and turbine speeds. Each of these variables has a representative voltage signal available at the ECU`s J1 diagnostic connector, which is accessed via the Automatic Breakout Box (ABOB). The ABOB is a firmware program capable of converting 128 separate analog data signals into digital format. The ECU`s J1 diagnostic connector provides 32 analog signals to the ABOB. The ABOB contains a 128 to 1 multiplexer and an analog-to-digital converter, CP both operated by an 8-bit embedded controller. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) developed and published the hardware specifications as well as the micro-code for the ABOB Intel EPROM processor and the internal code for the multiplexer driver subroutine. Once the ECU analog readings are converted into a digital format, the data stream will be input directly into TEDANN via the serial RS-232 port of the Contact Test Set (CTS) computer. The CTS computer is an IBM compatible personal computer designed and constructed for tactical use on the battlefield. The CTS has a 50MHz 32-bit Intel 80486DX processor. It has a 200MB hard drive and 8MB RAM. The CTS also has serial, parallel and SCSI interface ports. The CTS will also host a frame-based expert system for diagnosing turbine engine faults (referred to as TED; not shown in Figure 1).

  14. Ground noise measurements during static and flyby operations of the Cessna 02-T turbine powered airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Henderson, H. R.; Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    The field noise measurements on the Cessna 02-T turbine powered propeller aircraft are presented. The objective of the study was to obtain the basic noise characteristics of the aircraft during static ground runs and flyover tests, to identify the sources of the noise, and to correlate the noises with the aircraft operating conditions. The results are presented in the form of a overall noise levels, radiation patterns, and frequency spectra. The noise characteristics of the turbine powered aircraft are compared with those of the reciprocating engine powered aircraft.

  15. Asymmetric flameholder for gas turbine engine afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, A.; Bigelow, E.C.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes an afterburner flameholder for a gas turbine engine, the engine having an afterburner region including a central diffuser cone, a generally cylindrical outer shell and fuel spray means in the region between the shell and the cone. It comprises an annular member having an asymmetric V-shape in cross section, the annular member including a first and a second circular sidewall member, each sidewall member being joined together at one end forming an apex, the annular member adapted to be secured to the engine in the afterburner region with the apex facing upstream in an axial direction towards the fuel spray means, the annular member in cross section forming a V with unequal length sidewall members, the distance between the distal ends of the first and second circular members measured in the direction of the included angle bisector being approximately equal to the distance between the distal ends measured in a direction perpendicular to the bisector.

  16. 14 CFR 135.373 - Part 25 transport category airplanes with four or more engines: Reciprocating engine powered: En...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Part 25 transport category airplanes with four or more engines: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: Two engines inoperative. 135.373 Section 135.373 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS...

  17. Advanced bristle seals for gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabe, Jerry L.

    1993-01-01

    A seven month proof-of-concept program was conducted for an advanced bristle seal, called a bush seal, for use in gas turbine engines. This program was performed as a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase 1 project. Bush seal specimen and a full ring bush seal were designed, evaluated, and manufactured for testing. An analytical study of the potential of the bush seal relative to a labyrinth seal was conducted. Static and dynamic testing of the bush seal was performed to determine the behavior of the bristles under pressurization and during contact with a rotating labyrinth tooth. Stable behavior of the bristle elements was observed during static pressurization of a full ring bush seal. The dynamic testing of various configurations of bush seal against a rotating labyrinth tooth showed minimal wear of the bristles relative to a conventional labyrinth seal. The development and application of the bush seal concept to gas turbine engines has the potential of improving the engine's performance while decreasing the degradation of the seal performance over time.

  18. Phase 2 program on ground test of refanned JT8D turbofan engines and nacelles for the 727 airplane. Volume 4: Airplane evaluation and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The retrofit of JT8D-109 (refan) engines are evaluated on a 727-200 airplane in terms of airworthiness, performance, and noise. Design of certifiable hardware, manufacture, and ground testing of the essential nacelle components is included along with analysis of the certifiable airplane design to ensure airworthiness compliance and to predict the in-flight performance and noise characteristics of the modified airplane. The analyses confirm that the 727 refan airplane is certifiable. The refan airplane range would be 15% less that of the baseline airplane and block fuel would be increased by 1.5% to 3%. However, with this particular 727-200 model, with a brake release gross weight of 172,500 lb (78,245 kg), it is possible to operate the airplane (with minor structural modifications) at higher gross weights and increase the range up to 15% over the 727-200 (baseline) airplane. The refan airplane FAR Part 36 noise levels would be 6 to 8 EPNdB (effective perceived noise in decibels) below the baseline. Noise footprint studies showed that approach noise contour areas are small compared to takeoff areas. The 727 refan realizes a 68% to 83% reduction in annoyance-weighted area when compared to the 727-200 over a range of gross weights and operational procedures.

  19. Gas Turbine Engine Inlet Wall Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florea, Razvan Virgil (Inventor); Matalanis, Claude G. (Inventor); Stucky, Mark B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has an inlet duct formed to have a shape with a first ellipse in one half and a second ellipse in a second half. The second half has an upstream most end which is smaller than the first ellipse. The inlet duct has a surface defining the second ellipse which curves away from the first ellipse, such that the second ellipse is larger at an intermediate location. The second ellipse is even larger at a downstream end of the inlet duct leading into a fan.

  20. Brush seals for turbine engine fuel conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Mike

    1994-07-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate brush seals for replacing labyrinth seals in turboprop engines. The approach taken was to design and procure brush seals with assistance from Sealol, modify and instrument an existing T407 low pressure turbine test rig, replace inner balance piston and outer balance piston labyrinth seals with brush seals, conduct cyclic tests to evaluate seal leakage at operating pressures and temperatures, and evaluate effect of seal pack width and rotor eccentricity. Results are presented in viewgraph format and show that brush seals offer performance advantages over labyrinth seals.

  1. Brush seals for turbine engine fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sousa, Mike

    1994-01-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate brush seals for replacing labyrinth seals in turboprop engines. The approach taken was to design and procure brush seals with assistance from Sealol, modify and instrument an existing T407 low pressure turbine test rig, replace inner balance piston and outer balance piston labyrinth seals with brush seals, conduct cyclic tests to evaluate seal leakage at operating pressures and temperatures, and evaluate effect of seal pack width and rotor eccentricity. Results are presented in viewgraph format and show that brush seals offer performance advantages over labyrinth seals.

  2. Turbine engine component with cooling passages

    DOEpatents

    Arrell, Douglas J.; James, Allister W.

    2012-01-17

    A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

  3. Efficient, Low Pressure Ratio Propulsor for Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Monzon, Byron R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a spool, a turbine coupled to drive the spool, and a propulsor that is coupled to be driven by the turbine through the spool. A gear assembly is coupled between the propulsor and the spool such that rotation of the turbine drives the propulsor at a different speed than the spool. The propulsor includes a hub and a row of propulsor blades that extends from the hub. The row includes no more than 20 of the propulsor blades.

  4. Highly integrated digital engine control system on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Haering, E. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrated engine/airframe control systems. This system is being used on the F-15 airplane. An integrated flightpath management mode and an integrated adaptive engine stall margin mode are implemented into the system. The adaptive stall margin mode is a highly integrated mode in which the airplane flight conditions, the resulting inlet distortion, and the engine stall margin are continuously computed; the excess stall margin is used to uptrim the engine for more thrust. The integrated flightpath management mode optimizes the flightpath and throttle setting to reach a desired flight condition. The increase in thrust and the improvement in airplane performance is discussed.

  5. Highly integrated digital engine control system on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Haering, E. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrated engine-airframe control systems. This system is being used on the F-15 airplane at the Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center. An integrated flightpath management mode and an integrated adaptive engine stall margin mode are being implemented into the system. The adaptive stall margin mode is a highly integrated mode in which the airplane flight conditions, the resulting inlet distortion, and the engine stall margin are continuously computed; the excess stall margin is used to uptrim the engine for more thrust. The integrated flightpath management mode optimizes the flightpath and throttle setting to reach a desired flight condition. The increase in thrust and the improvement in airplane performance is discussed in this paper.

  6. Mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Lynwander, P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines was conducted with shaft speeds to 213 m/s (700 ft/sec), air pressures to 148 Newtons per square centimeter abs. (215 psia), and air temperatures to 412k(282 F). A radial face seal incorporating self-acting geometry for lift augmentation was evaluated. In addition, three conventional carbon seal types (face, circumferential segmented, and rotating ring) were run for comparison. Test results indicated that the conventional seals used in this evaluation may not be satisfactory in future advanced engines because of excessive air leakage. On the other hand, the self-acting face seal was shown to have the potential capability of limiting leakages to one-half that of the conventional face seals and one-fifth that of conventional ring seals. A 150-hour endurance test of the self-acting face seal was conducted.

  7. Combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2013-02-19

    A combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine. The combustor assembly includes a combustor device coupled to a main engine casing, a first fuel injection system, a transition duct, and an intermediate duct. The combustor device includes a flow sleeve for receiving pressurized air and a liner disposed radially inwardly from the flow sleeve. The first fuel injection system provides fuel that is ignited with the pressurized air creating first working gases. The intermediate duct is disposed between the liner and the transition duct and defines a path for the first working gases to flow from the liner to the transition duct. An intermediate duct inlet portion is associated with a liner outlet and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the liner. An intermediate duct outlet portion is associated with a transition duct inlet section and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the transition duct.

  8. ADAPTIVE CLEARANCE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR TURBINE ENGINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, Keith M.

    2004-01-01

    The Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center primarily deals in developing controls, dynamic models, and health management technologies for air and space propulsion systems. During the summer of 2004 I was granted the privilege of working alongside professionals who were developing an active clearance control system for commercial jet engines. Clearance, the gap between the turbine blade tip and the encompassing shroud, increases as a result of wear mechanisms and rubbing of the turbine blades on shroud. Increases in clearance cause larger specific fuel consumption (SFC) and loss of efficient air flow. This occurs because, as clearances increase, the engine must run hotter and bum more fuel to achieve the same thrust. In order to maintain efficiency, reduce fuel bum, and reduce exhaust gas temperature (EGT), the clearance must be accurately controlled to gap sizes no greater than a few hundredths of an inch. To address this problem, NASA Glenn researchers have developed a basic control system with actuators and sensors on each section of the shroud. Instead of having a large uniform metal casing, there would be sections of the shroud with individual sensors attached internally that would move slightly to reform and maintain clearance. The proposed method would ultimately save the airline industry millions of dollars.

  9. 14 CFR 121.327 - Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine... Equipment Requirements § 121.327 Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes. (a) General. Except where supplemental oxygen is provided in accordance with § 121.331, no person may operate...

  10. 14 CFR 121.327 - Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine... Equipment Requirements § 121.327 Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes. (a) General. Except where supplemental oxygen is provided in accordance with § 121.331, no person may operate...

  11. 14 CFR 121.327 - Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine... Equipment Requirements § 121.327 Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes. (a) General. Except where supplemental oxygen is provided in accordance with § 121.331, no person may operate...

  12. 14 CFR 121.327 - Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine... Equipment Requirements § 121.327 Supplemental oxygen: Reciprocating engine powered airplanes. (a) General. Except where supplemental oxygen is provided in accordance with § 121.331, no person may operate...

  13. 14 CFR 121.511 - Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Flight engineers... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.511 Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes. (a) In any operation in which...

  14. 14 CFR 121.511 - Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Flight engineers... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.511 Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes. (a) In any operation in which...

  15. 14 CFR 121.511 - Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Flight engineers... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations: Supplemental Operations § 121.511 Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes. (a) In any operation in which...

  16. General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) Program, Turbine Engine System Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) Program Turbine Engine System Elements is to conduct a shared resource project to develop an affordable gas turbine engine for use on 4 to 6 place, light aircraft that will lead to revitalization of the general aviation industry in the United States, creating many new, high-quality jobs.

  17. Simulator study of vortex encounters by a twin-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, E. C., Jr.; Keyser, G. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A simulator study of vortex encounters was conducted for a twin-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane encountering the vortex flow field of a heavy, four-engine, commercial, jet transport airplane in the final-approach configuration. The encounters were conducted with fixed controls and with a pilot using a state-of-the-art, manual-control system. Piloted encounters with the base-line vortex flow field out of ground effect (unattenuated) resulted in initial bank-angle excursions greater than 40 deg, coupled with initial sideslip-angle excursions greater than 10 deg. The severity of these initial upsets was significantly reduced when the vortex center was moved laterally or vertically away from the flight path of the encountering airplane. Smaller reductions occurred when the flow field was attenuated by the flight spoilers on the generating airplane. The largest reduction in the severity of the initial upsets, however, was from aging in ground effect. The severity of the initial upsets of the following airplane was relatively unaffected by the approach speed. Increasing the lift coefficient of the generating airplane resulted in an increase in the severity of the initial upsets.

  18. Evaluating thermographic phosphors in an operating turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M. ); Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D. ); Beshears, D.L.; Capps, G.J.; Cates, M.R.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W. )

    1989-01-01

    The results of a field test in a commercial turbine engine showed that we can remotely measure the temperature of engine components in operating engines using thermographic phosphors. The remote- measurement method exploits the temperature dependence of the characteristic decay time of the laser-induced fluorescence of thermographic phosphors. This paper summarizes recent work leading up to and including a successful test of the thermographic-phosphor method in an operating turbine engine. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Optimization of engines for a commercial Mach 0.85 transport using advanced turbine cooling methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    A parametric study was made of a group of separate-flow-turbofan engines for use in advanced technology airplanes designed for a cruise Mach number of 0.85 at 40,000 feet. The three-engined airplanes were sized to carry 200 passengers 3000 nautical miles. Supercritical aerodynamics were assumed. Film-cooled turbines were used and sea-level-static turbine-rotor-inlet temperature was always 2600 F. The optimum cycle depends on the noise goal assumed. Without a noise goal the best fan pressure ratio (FPR) is about 1.90. At noise goals of FAR 36, -10 EPNdb, and -20 EPNdb, the best FPR's are 1.85, 1.76, and 1.70, respectively, at cruise. The take-off FPR's are progressively less than the cruise value as the noise goal approaches -20 EPNdb. The penalties in take-off gross weight incurred were 8.5, 19, and 64 percent at goals of FAR 36, -10 EPNdb, and -20 EPNdb, respectively.

  20. Prediction of airplane cabin noise due to engine shock cell excitation using statistical energy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Steven E.

    As part of the effort in the 1980's to design fuel efficient propulsion systems (unducted fan engines) for large commercial airplanes, procedures were developed for predicting interior noise using statistical energy analysis (SEA). Due to stable fuel process and deregulation in the airline industry, the emphasis for propulsion systems on commercial airplanes shifted to higher thrust and lower operating costs. In order to preserve and enhance the knowledge acquired using SEA to predict cabin noise for propeller airplanes, potential noise control applications for more conventional airplane configurations were investigated. The present paper records an effort to extend the experience acquired using statistical energy analysis for unducted fan engines to noise generated by turbofan engine exhaust. The technique is applied to the generic case of a large commercial airplane with twin, wing-mounted engines. Results are presented from an evaluation of the noise source based on an uncommon set of flight test data. Model construction is decribed and prediction results compared to the flight test data. It is then demonstrated how SEA is used to prioritize the transmission paths and judge the merit of the common noise suppression techniques.

  1. A controls engineering approach for analyzing airplane input-output characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. Douglas

    1991-01-01

    An engineering approach for analyzing airplane control and output characteristics is presented. State-space matrix equations describing the linear perturbation dynamics are transformed from physical coordinates into scaled coordinates. The scaling is accomplished by applying various transformations to the system to employ prior engineering knowledge of the airplane physics. Two different analysis techniques are then explained. Modal analysis techniques calculate the influence of each system input on each fundamental mode of motion and the distribution of each mode among the system outputs. The optimal steady state response technique computes the blending of steady state control inputs that optimize the steady state response of selected system outputs. Analysis of an example airplane model is presented to demonstrate the described engineering approach.

  2. Thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine and diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Bailey, M. Murray

    1989-01-01

    The present state of development of thin thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines and thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines is assessed. Although current thermal barrier coatings are flying in certain gas turbine engines, additional advances will be needed for future engines. Thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines have advanced to the point where they are being seriously considered for the next generation of engine. Since coatings for truck engines is a young field of inquiry, continued research and development efforts will be required to help bring this technology to commercialization.

  3. Airfoil for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Liang, George

    2011-05-24

    An airfoil is provided for a turbine of a gas turbine engine. The airfoil comprises: an outer structure comprising a first wall including a leading edge, a trailing edge, a pressure side, and a suction side; an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced from the first wall and at least one intermediate wall; and structure extending between the first and second walls so as to define first and second gaps between the first and second walls. The second wall and the at least one intermediate wall define at least one pressure side supply cavity and at least one suction side supply cavity. The second wall may include at least one first opening near the leading edge of the first wall. The first opening may extend from the at least one pressure side supply cavity to the first gap. The second wall may further comprise at least one second opening near the trailing edge of the outer structure. The second opening may extend from the at least one suction side supply cavity to the second gap. The first wall may comprise at least one first exit opening extending from the first gap through the pressure side of the first wall and at least one second exit opening extending from the second gap through the suction side of the second wall.

  4. Energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thulin, R. D.; Howe, D. C.; Singer, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    The energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine is a single stage system based on technology advancements in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials to achieve high performance, low operating economics and durability commensurate with commercial service requirements. Low loss performance features combined with a low through-flow velocity approach results in a predicted efficiency of 88.8 for a flight propulsion system. Turbine airfoil durability goals are achieved through the use of advanced high-strength and high-temperature capability single crystal materials and effective cooling management. Overall, this design reflects a considerable extension in turbine technology that is applicable to future, energy efficient gas-turbine engines.

  5. Modern Experimental Techniques in Turbine Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bruckner, R. J.; Bencic, T. J.; Braunscheidel, E. P.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes application of two modern experimental techniques, thin-film thermocouples and pressure sensitive paint, to measurement in turbine engine components. A growing trend of using computational codes in turbomachinery design and development requires experimental techniques to refocus from overall performance testing to acquisition of detailed data on flow and heat transfer physics to validate these codes for design applications. The discussed experimental techniques satisfy this shift in focus. Both techniques are nonintrusive in practical terms. The thin-film thermocouple technique improves accuracy of surface temperature and heat transfer measurements. The pressure sensitive paint technique supplies areal surface pressure data rather than discrete point values only. The paper summarizes our experience with these techniques and suggests improvements to ease the application of these techniques for future turbomachinery research and code verifications.

  6. Gas turbine engine with supersonic compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, II, William Byron; Lawlor, Shawn P.

    2015-10-20

    A gas turbine engine having a compressor section using blades on a rotor to deliver a gas at supersonic conditions to a stator. The stator includes one or more of aerodynamic ducts that have converging and diverging portions for deceleration of the gas to subsonic conditions and to deliver a high pressure gas to combustors. The aerodynamic ducts include structures for changing the effective contraction ratio to enable starting even when designed for high pressure ratios, and structures for boundary layer control. In an embodiment, aerodynamic ducts are provided having an aspect ratio of two to one (2:1) or more, when viewed in cross-section orthogonal to flow direction at an entrance to the aerodynamic duct.

  7. Dynamic and Structural Gas Turbine Engine Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Model the interactions between the structural dynamics and the performance dynamics of a gas turbine engine. Generally these two aspects are considered separate, unrelated phenomena and are studied independently. For diagnostic purposes, it is desirable to bring together as much information as possible, and that involves understanding how performance is affected by structural dynamics (if it is) and vice versa. This can involve the relationship between thrust response and the excitation of structural modes, for instance. The job will involve investigating and characterizing these dynamical relationships, generating a model that incorporates them, and suggesting and/or developing diagnostic and prognostic techniques that can be incorporated in a data fusion system. If no coupling is found, at the least a vibration model should be generated that can be used for diagnostics and prognostics related to blade loss, for instance.

  8. Combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2015-04-28

    A combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine includes a combustor device, a fuel injection system, a transition duct, and an intermediate duct. The combustor device includes a flow sleeve for receiving pressurized air and a liner surrounded by the flow sleeve. The fuel injection system provides fuel to be mixed with the pressurized air and ignited in the liner to create combustion products. The intermediate duct is disposed between the liner and the transition duct so as to define a path for the combustion products to flow from the liner to the transition duct. The intermediate duct is associated with the liner such that movement may occur therebetween, and the intermediate duct is associated with the transition duct such that movement may occur therebetween. The flow sleeve includes structure that defines an axial stop for limiting axial movement of the intermediate duct.

  9. Cooled airfoil in a turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Vitt, Paul H; Kemp, David A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2015-04-21

    An airfoil in a gas turbine engine includes an outer wall and an inner wall. The outer wall includes a leading edge, a trailing edge opposed from the leading edge in a chordal direction, a pressure side, and a suction side. The inner wall is coupled to the outer wall at a single chordal location and includes portions spaced from the pressure and suction sides of the outer wall so as to form first and second gaps between the inner wall and the respective pressure and suction sides. The inner wall defines a chamber therein and includes openings that provide fluid communication between the respective gaps and the chamber. The gaps receive cooling fluid that provides cooling to the outer wall as it flows through the gaps. The cooling fluid, after traversing at least substantial portions of the gaps, passes into the chamber through the openings in the inner wall.

  10. Ceramic regenerator systems development program. [for automobile gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. A.; Fucinari, C. A.; Lingscheit, J. N.; Rahnke, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    Ceramic regenerator cores are considered that can be used in passenger car gas turbine engines, Stirling engines, and industrial/truck gas turbine engines. Improved materials and design concepts aimed at reducing or eliminating chemical attack were placed on durability test in Ford 707 industrial gas turbine engines. The results of 19,600 hours of turbine engine durability testing are described. Two materials, aluminum silicate and magnesium aluminum silicate, continue to show promise toward achieving the durability objectives of this program. A regenerator core made from aluminum silicate showed minimal evidence of chemical attack damage after 6935 hours of engine test at 800 C and another showed little distress after 3510 hours at 982 C. Results obtained in ceramic material screening tests, aerothermodynamic performance tests, stress analysis, cost studies, and material specifications are also included.

  11. Distributed control system for turbine engines

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, P.L.

    1999-01-01

    A distributed control system (DCS) for a turbine engine has been demonstrated and tested, consisting of prototype electronic interface units (EIUs) connected to data and power busses. In the DCS, a central control computer communicated with smart sensors and smart actuators via a 2.5 megabit/sec digital data bus, using the Fieldbus protocol. Power was distributed to the smart devices as 100 kHz 100V peak AC, allowing light, simple power converters at each smart device. All smart sensors, smart actuators, and cables were dual redundant. The smart actuators received position demand from the central control computer, exchanged data between channels to provide local redundancy management, closed the position loop locally, and reported actuator position to the central controller. Smart sensors converted sensed signals to digital values in engineering units, and performed local built-in tests. Testing of the DCS was done in a closed-loop simulation with an engine model. Frequency response of the DCS was almost identical with the conventional system.

  12. Crash tests of four identical high-wing single-engine airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, V. L., Jr.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Four identical four place, high wing, single engine airplane specimens with nominal masses of 1043 kg were crash tested at the Langley Impact Dynamics Research Facility under controlled free flight conditions. These tests were conducted with nominal velocities of 25 m/sec along the flight path angles, ground contact pitch angles, and roll angles. Three of the airplane specimens were crashed on a concrete surface; one was crashed on soil. Crash tests revealed that on a hard landing, the main landing gear absorbed about twice the energy for which the gear was designed but sprang back, tending to tip the airplane up to its nose. On concrete surfaces, the airplane impacted and remained in the impact attitude. On soil, the airplane flipped over on its back. The crash impact on the nose of the airplane, whether on soil or concrete, caused massive structural crushing of the forward fuselage. The liveable volume was maintained in both the hard landing and the nose down specimens but was not maintained in the roll impact and nose down on soil specimens.

  13. Augmentor performance of an F100 engine model derivative engine in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, James T.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The transient performance of the F100 engine model derivative (EMD) augmentor was evaluated in an F-15 airplane. The augmentor was a newly designed 16-segment augmentor. It was tested with a segment-1 sprayring with 90 deg fuel injection, and later with a modified segment-1 sprayring with centerline fuel injection. With the 90 deg injection, no-lights occurred at high altitudes with airspeeds of 175 knots or less; however, the results were better than when using the standard F100-PW-100 engine. With the centerline fuel injection, all transients were successful to an altitude of 15,500 meters and an airspeed of 150 knots: no failures to light, blowouts, or stalls occurred. For a first flight evaluation, the augmentor transient performance was excellent.

  14. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Presentations were made concerning the development of design analysis tools for combustor liners, turbine vanes, and turbine blades. Presentations were divided into six sections: instrumentation, combustion, turbine heat transfer, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, constitutive behavior of materials, stress-strain response and life prediction methods.

  15. Full hoop casing for midframe of industrial gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Gerald A.; Charron, Richard C.

    2015-12-01

    A can annular industrial gas turbine engine, including: a single-piece rotor shaft spanning a compressor section (82), a combustion section (84), a turbine section (86); and a combustion section casing (10) having a section (28) configured as a full hoop. When the combustion section casing is detached from the engine and moved to a maintenance position to allow access to an interior of the engine, a positioning jig (98) is used to support the compressor section casing (83) and turbine section casing (87).

  16. Single shaft automotive gas turbine engine characterization test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    An automotive gas turbine incorporating a single stage centrifugal compressor and a single stage radial inflow turbine is described. Among the engine's features is the use of wide range variable geometry at the inlet guide vanes, the compressor diffuser vanes, and the turbine inlet vanes to achieve improved part load fuel economy. The engine was tested to determine its performance in both the variable geometry and equivalent fixed geometry modes. Testing was conducted without the originally designed recuperator. Test results were compared with the predicted performance of the nonrecuperative engine based on existing component rig test maps. Agreement between test results and the computer model was achieved.

  17. Mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Lynwander, P.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental evaluation of mainshaft seals for small gas turbine engines was conducted with shaft speeds to 213 m/sec, air pressures to 215 psia, and air temperatures to 412 K. A radial face seal incorporating self-acting geometry for lift augmentation was evaluated. In addition, three conventional carbon seal types (face, circumferential segmented, and rotating ring) were run for comparison. Test results indicated that the conventional seals used in this evaluation may not be satisfactory in future advanced engines because of excessive air leakage. On the other hand, the self-acting face seal was shown to have the potential capability of limiting leakages to one-half that of the conventional face seals and one-fifth that of conventional ring seals. A 150 hour endurance test of the self-action face seal was conducted at speeds to 145 m/sec, air pressures to 180 psia, and air temperatures to 408 K. The seal wear was not measurable.

  18. Atomic-scale insight and design principles for turbine engine thermal barrier coatings from theory

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Kristen A.; Hinnemann, Berit; Carter, Emily A.

    2011-01-01

    To maximize energy efficiency, gas turbine engines used in airplanes and for power generation operate at very high temperatures, even above the melting point of the metal alloys from which they are comprised. This feat is accomplished in part via the deposition of a multilayer, multicomponent thermal barrier coating (TBC), which lasts up to approximately 40,000 h before failing. Understanding failure mechanisms can aid in designing circumvention strategies. We review results of quantum mechanics calculations used to test hypotheses about impurities that harm TBCs and transition metal (TM) additives that render TBCs more robust. In particular, we discovered a number of roles that Pt and early TMs such as Hf and Y additives play in extending the lifetime of TBCs. Fundamental insight into the nature of the bonding created by such additives and its effect on high-temperature evolution of the TBCs led to design principles that can be used to create materials for even more efficient engines.

  19. "Fish Friendly" Hydropower Turbine Development and Deployment. Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, D.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents the results of a collaborative research project funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and hydropower industry partners with the objective of completing the remaining developmental engineering required for a “fish-friendly” hydropower turbine called the Alden turbine.

  20. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND... the rate of climb for transport category airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air... under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. (2) The all-engines-operating altitude shall be...

  1. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND... the rate of climb for transport category airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air... under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. (2) The all-engines-operating altitude shall be...

  2. 14 CFR 135.371 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: One...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND... the rate of climb for transport category airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air... under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations. (2) The all-engines-operating altitude shall be...

  3. 14 CFR 121.201 - Nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One engine inoperative. 121.201 Section 121.201 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS...

  4. Analysis of VGH data from two types of four-engine airplanes in commercial cargo service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Healy, F. M.

    1972-01-01

    Data are presented for derived gust velocities and for incremental normal accelerations due to gusts, maneuvers, and landing impacts. The data were obtained from NASA VGH recorders installed on three four-engine cargo airplanes operated by three airlines. Continental United States and trans-Pacific routes were covered.

  5. 14 CFR 121.511 - Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight time limitations: Flight engineers: airplanes. 121.511 Section 121.511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Flight Time Limitations:...

  6. Airplane automatic control force trimming device for asymmetric engine failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The difference in dynamic pressure in the propeller slipstreams as measured by sensors is divided by the freestream dynamic pressure generating a quantity proportional to the differential thrust coefficient. This quantity is used to command an electric trim motor to change the position of trim tab thereby retrimming the airplane to the new asymmetric power condition. The change in position of the trim tab produced by the electric trim motor is summed with the pilot's input to produce the actual trim tab position.

  7. CMC Technology Advancements for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    CMC research at NASA Glenn is focused on aircraft propulsion applications. The objective is to enable reduced engine emissions and fuel consumption for more environmentally friendly aircraft. Engine system studies show that incorporation of ceramic composites into turbine engines will enable significant reductions in emissions and fuel burn due to increased engine efficiency resulting from reduced cooling requirements for hot section components. This presentation will describe recent progress and challenges in developing fiber and matrix constituents for 2700 F CMC turbine applications. In addition, ongoing research in the development of durable environmental barrier coatings, ceramic joining integration technologies and life prediction methods for CMC engine components will be reviewed.

  8. Gas turbine engine and its associated air intake system

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, J.R.; Bennett, G.H.; Lee, L.A.

    1984-01-17

    A gas turbine engine and its associated air intake system are disclosed in which the air intake system comprises a generally horizontally extending duct through which an airflow is induced by an ejector pump powered by the engine. A portion of the air passing through the duct is directed through a second duct to the air inlet of the engine. The second duct is connected to the first duct in such a manner that the air directed to the engine air inlet is derived from a vertically upper region of the first duct. The arrangement is intended to reduce the amount of airborne particulate material ingested by the gas turbine engine.

  9. Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of light, twin-engine, propeller-driven airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolowicz, C. H.; Yancey, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Representative state-of-the-art analytical procedures and design data for predicting the longitudinal static and dynamic stability and control characteristics of light, propeller-driven airplanes are presented. Procedures for predicting drag characteristics are also included. The procedures are applied to a twin-engine, propeller-driven airplane in the clean configuration from zero lift to stall conditions. The calculated characteristics are compared with wind-tunnel and flight data. Included in the comparisons are level-flight trim characteristics, period and damping of the short-period oscillatory mode, and windup-turn characteristics. All calculations are documented.

  10. Analytical design of an advanced radial turbine. [automobile engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Large, G. D.; Finger, D. G.; Linder, C. G.

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamic and mechanical potential of a single stage ceramic radial inflow turbine was evaluated for a high temperature single stage automotive engine. The aerodynamic analysis utilizes a turbine system optimization technique to evaluate both radial and nonradial rotor blading. Selected turbine rotor configurations were evaluated mechanically with three dimensional finite element techniques. Results indicate that exceptionally high rotor tip speeds (2300 ft/sec) and performance potential are feasible with radial bladed rotors if the projected ceramic material properties are realized. Nonradial rotors reduced tip speed requirements (at constant turbine efficiency) but resulted in a lower cumulative probability of success due to higher blade and disk stresses.

  11. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF EXHAUST PARTICLES FROM GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A program was conducted to chemically characterize particulate emissions from a current technology, high population, gas turbine engine. Attention was focused on polynuclear aromatic compounds, phenols, nitrosamines and total organics. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were...

  12. High density fuel qualification for a gas turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    Macleod, J.D.; Orbanski, B.; Hastings, P.R. Standard Aero, Ltd., Winnipeg, DND, Ottawa, )

    1992-01-01

    A program for the evaluation of gas turbine engine performance, carried out in the Engine Laboratory of the National Research Council of Canada, is described. Problems under consideration include performance alteration between JP-4 fuel and a high energy density fuel, called strategic military fuel (SMF); performance deterioration during the accelerated endurance test; and emission analysis. The T56 fuel control system is found to be capable of operation on the higher energy density fuel with no detrimental effects regarding control of the engine's normal operating regime. The deterioration of the engine performance during 150-hour endurance tests on SMF was very high, which was caused by an increase in turbine nozzle effective flow area and turbine blade untwist. The most significant performance losses during the endurance tests were on corrected output power, fuel flow, specific fuel consumption and compressor and turbine presure ratio. 9 refs.

  13. Composite hubs for low cost gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed stress analysis was performed using NASTRAN to demonstrate theoretically the adequacy of composite hubs for low cost turbine engine applications. Composite hubs are adequate for this application from the steady state stress view point.

  14. Predicted performance benefits of an adaptive digital engine control system of an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Ray, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrating engine-airframe control systems. Currently this is accomplished on the NASA Ames Research Center's F-15 airplane. The two control modes used to implement the systems are an integrated flightpath management mode and in integrated adaptive engine control system (ADECS) mode. The ADECS mode is a highly integrated mode in which the airplane flight conditions, the resulting inlet distortion, and the available engine stall margin are continually computed. The excess stall margin is traded for thrust. The predicted increase in engine performance due to the ADECS mode is presented in this report.

  15. Predicted performance benefits of an adaptive digital engine control system on an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Ray, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrating engine-airframe control systems. Currently this is accomplished on the NASA Ames Research Center's F-15 airplane. The two control modes used to implement the systems are an integrated flightpath management mode and an integrated adaptive engine control system (ADECS) mode. The ADECS mode is a highly integrated mode in which the airplane flight conditions, the resulting inlet distortion, and the available engine stall margin are continually computed. The excess stall margin is traded for thrust. The predicted increase in engine performance due to the ADECS mode is presented in this report.

  16. 78 FR 5710 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... failure, leading to uncontrolled fire, engine shutdown, and damage to the airplane. FAA's Determination We... service before further flight if one or more burn holes are detected, in certain high-pressure turbine... uncontrolled fire, engine shutdown, and damage to the airplane. DATES: This AD is effective February 12,...

  17. Drag and Propulsive Characteristics of Air-Cooled Engine-Nacelle Installations for Large Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Abe; Wilson, Herbert A , Jr

    1942-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NACA full-scale wind tunnel to determine the drag and the propulsive efficiency of nacelle-propeller arrangements for a large range of nacelle sizes. In contrast with usual tests with a single nacelle, these tests were conducted with nacelle-propeller installations on a large model of a four-engine airplane. Data are presented on the first part of the investigation, covering seven nacelle arrangements with nacelle diameters from 0.53 to 1.5 times the wing thickness. These ratios are similar to those occurring on airplanes weighing from about 20 to 100 tons. The results show the drag, the propulsive efficiency, and the over-all efficiency of the various nacelle arrangements as functions of the nacelle size, the propeller position, and the airplane lift coefficient. The effect of the nacelles on the aerodynamic characteristics of the model is shown for both propeller-removed and propeller-operating conditions.

  18. Abradable compressor and turbine seals, volume 1. [for turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, D. V.; Dennis, R. E.; Hurst, L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The application and advantages of abradable coatings as gas-path seals in a general aviation turbine engine were evaluated for use on the high-pressure compressor, the high-pressure turbine, and the low-pressure turbine shrouds. Topics covered include: (1) the initial selection of candidate materials for interim full-scale engine testing; (2) interim engine testing of the initially selected materials and additional candidate materials; (3) the design of the component required to adapt the hardware to permit full-scale engine testing of the most promising materials; (4) finalization of the fabrication methods used in the manufacture of engine test hardware; and (5) the manufacture of the hardware necessary to support the final full-scale engine tests.

  19. Ceramic applications in turbine engines. [for automotive application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, J. A.; Helms, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    In the past the potential of vehicular gas engines could not be realized because component materials served to limit the turbine operating temperature, thereby restricting fuel economy and initial cost. It was, therefore, not possible for the vehicular gas turbine to compete with more conventional engines. The emergence of low-cost, high-temperature ceramic components has the potential to reverse this situation. For example, the Allison GT404 engine, operating with ceramic components at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2350 F to 2500 F, has the potential of a fuel economy which is better than that of current Diesel engines. The Allison AGT100 engine operating with ceramic components offers the possibility of a 30% improvement in fuel economy over 1985 spark ignition engines. The materials considered for an employment in the ceramic components include silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum silicate, and lithium aluminum silicate.

  20. Ceramic Composite Development for Gas Turbine Engine Hot Section Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; VANrOODE, mARK

    2006-01-01

    The development of ceramic materials for incorporation into the hot section of gas turbine engines has been ongoing for about fifty years. Researchers have designed, developed, and tested ceramic gas turbine components in rigs and engines for automotive, aero-propulsion, industrial, and utility power applications. Today, primarily because of materials limitations and/or economic factors, major challenges still remain for the implementation of ceramic components in gas turbines. For example, because of low fracture toughness, monolithic ceramics continue to suffer from the risk of failure due to unknown extrinsic damage events during engine service. On the other hand, ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with their ability to display much higher damage tolerance appear to be the materials of choice for current and future engine components. The objective of this paper is to briefly review the design and property status of CMC materials for implementation within the combustor and turbine sections for gas turbine engine applications. It is shown that although CMC systems have advanced significantly in thermo-structural performance within recent years, certain challenges still exist in terms of producibility, design, and affordability for commercial CMC turbine components. Nevertheless, there exist some recent successful efforts for prototype CMC components within different engine types.

  1. External combustor for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Santanam, Chandran B.; Thomas, William H.; DeJulio, Emil R.

    1991-01-01

    An external combustor for a gas turbine engine has a cyclonic combustion chamber into which combustible gas with entrained solids is introduced through an inlet port in a primary spiral swirl. A metal draft sleeve for conducting a hot gas discharge stream from the cyclonic combustion chamber is mounted on a circular end wall of the latter adjacent the combustible gas inlet. The draft sleeve is mounted concentrically in a cylindrical passage and cooperates with the passage in defining an annulus around the draft sleeve which is open to the cyclonic combustion chamber and which is connected to a source of secondary air. Secondary air issues from the annulus into the cyclonic combustion chamber at a velocity of three to five times the velocity of the combustible gas at the inlet port. The secondary air defines a hollow cylindrical extension of the draft sleeve and persists in the cyclonic combustion chamber a distance of about three to five times the diameter of the draft sleeve. The hollow cylindrical extension shields the drive sleeve from the inlet port to prevent discharge of combustible gas through the draft sleeve.

  2. Inspection system for a turbine blade region of a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Smed, Jan P.; Lemieux, Dennis H.; Williams, James P.

    2007-06-19

    An inspection system formed at least from a viewing tube for inspecting aspects of a turbine engine during operation of the turbine engine. An outer housing of the viewing tube may be positioned within a turbine engine using at least one bearing configured to fit into an indentation of a support housing to form a ball and socket joint enabling the viewing tube to move during operation as a result of vibrations and other movements. The viewing tube may also include one or more lenses positioned within the viewing tube for viewing the turbine components. The lenses may be kept free of contamination by maintaining a higher pressure in the viewing tube than a pressure outside of the viewing tube and enabling gases to pass through an aperture in a cap at a viewing end of the viewing tube.

  3. Cost/benefit studies of advanced materials technologies for future aircraft turbine engines: Materials for advanced turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, M.; Wilbers, L.

    1982-01-01

    Cost benefit studies were conducted on six advanced materials and processes technologies applicable to commercial engines planned for production in the 1985 to 1990 time frame. These technologies consisted of thermal barrier coatings for combustor and high pressure turbine airfoils, directionally solidified eutectic high pressure turbine blades, (both cast and fabricated), and mixers, tail cones, and piping made of titanium-aluminum alloys. A fabricated titanium fan blisk, an advanced turbine disk alloy with improved low cycle fatigue life, and a long-life high pressure turbine blade abrasive tip and ceramic shroud system were also analyzed. Technologies showing considerable promise as to benefits, low development costs, and high probability of success were thermal barrier coating, directionally solidified eutectic turbine blades, and abrasive-tip blades/ceramic-shroud turbine systems.

  4. Method for detecting gas turbine engine flashback

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Kapil Kumar; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2012-09-04

    A method for monitoring and controlling a gas turbine, comprises predicting frequencies of combustion dynamics in a combustor using operating conditions of a gas turbine, receiving a signal from a sensor that is indicative of combustion dynamics in the combustor, and detecting a flashback if a frequency of the received signal does not correspond to the predicted frequencies.

  5. Study of an advanced General Aviation Turbine Engine (GATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, J. C.; Short, F. R.; Staton, D. V.; Zolezzi, B. A.; Curry, C. E.; Orelup, M. J.; Vaught, J. M.; Humphrey, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The best technology program for a small, economically viable gas turbine engine applicable to the general aviation helicopter and aircraft market for 1985-1990 was studied. Turboshaft and turboprop engines in the 112 to 746 kW (150 to 1000 hp) range and turbofan engines up to 6672 N (1500 lbf) thrust were considered. A good market for new turbine engines was predicted for 1988 providing aircraft are designed to capitalize on the advantages of the turbine engine. Parametric engine families were defined in terms of design and off-design performance, mass, and cost. These were evaluated in aircraft design missions selected to represent important market segments for fixed and rotary-wing applications. Payoff parameters influenced by engine cycle and configuration changes were aircraft gross mass, acquisition cost, total cost of ownership, and cash flow. Significant advantage over a current technology, small gas turbine engines was found especially in cost of ownership and fuel economy for airframes incorporating an air-cooled high-pressure ratio engine. A power class of 373 kW (500 hp) was recommended as the next frontier for technology advance where large improvements in fuel economy and engine mass appear possible through component research and development.

  6. Rocket Engine Turbine Blade Surface Pressure Distributions Experiment and Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Susan T.; Zoladz, Thomas F.; Dorney, Daniel J.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the unsteady aspects of turbine rotor flow fields is critical to successful future turbine designs. A technology program was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to increase the understanding of unsteady environments for rocket engine turbines. The experimental program involved instrumenting turbine rotor blades with miniature surface mounted high frequency response pressure transducers. The turbine model was then tested to measure the unsteady pressures on the rotor blades. The data obtained from the experimental program is unique in two respects. First, much more unsteady data was obtained (several minutes per set point) than has been possible in the past. Also, an extensive steady performance database existed for the turbine model. This allowed an evaluation of the effect of the on-blade instrumentation on the turbine's performance. A three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes analysis was also used to blindly predict the unsteady flow field in the turbine at the design operating conditions and at +15 degrees relative incidence to the first-stage rotor. The predicted time-averaged and unsteady pressure distributions show good agreement with the experimental data. This unique data set, the lessons learned for acquiring this type of data, and the improvements made to the data analysis and prediction tools are contributing significantly to current Space Launch Initiative turbine airflow test and blade surface pressure prediction efforts.

  7. The Combination of Internal-Combustion Engine and Gas Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, K.

    1947-01-01

    While the gas turbine by itself has been applied in particular cases for power generation and is in a state of promising development in this field, it has already met with considerable success in two cases when used as an exhaust turbine in connection with a centrifugal compressor, namely, in the supercharging of combustion engines and in the Velox process, which is of particular application for furnaces. In the present paper the most important possibilities of combining a combustion engine with a gas turbine are considered. These "combination engines " are compared with the simple gas turbine on whose state of development a brief review will first be given. The critical evaluation of the possibilities of development and fields of application of the various combustion engine systems, wherever it is not clearly expressed in the publications referred to, represents the opinion of the author. The state of development of the internal-combustion engine is in its main features generally known. It is used predominantly at the present time for the propulsion of aircraft and road vehicles and, except for certain restrictions due to war conditions, has been used to an increasing extent in ships and rail cars and in some fields applied as stationary power generators. In the Diesel engine a most economical heat engine with a useful efficiency of about 40 percent exists and in the Otto aircraft engine a heat engine of greatest power per unit weight of about 0.5 kilogram per horsepower.

  8. Fuel economy screening study of advanced automotive gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel economy potentials were calculated and compared among ten turbomachinery configurations. All gas turbine engines were evaluated with a continuously variable transmission in a 1978 compact car. A reference fuel economy was calculated for the car with its conventional spark ignition piston engine and three speed automatic transmission. Two promising engine/transmission combinations, using gasoline, had 55 to 60 percent gains over the reference fuel economy. Fuel economy sensitivities to engine design parameter changes were also calculated for these two combinations.

  9. Computational thermo-fluid dynamics contributions to advanced gas turbine engine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Rohlik, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The design practices for the gas turbine are traced throughout history with particular emphasis on the calculational or analytical methods. Three principal components of the gas turbine engine will be considered: namely, the compressor, the combustor and the turbine.

  10. Cf6 jet engine performance improvement: high pressure turbine roundness

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W.D.; Fasching, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    An improved high pressure turbine stator reducing fuel consumption in current CF6-50 turbofan engines was developed. The feasibility of the roundness and clearance response improvements was demonstrated. Application of these improvements will result in a cruise SFC reduction of 0.22 percent for new engines. For high time engines, the improved roundness and response characteristics results in an 0.5 percent reduction in cruise SFC. A basic life capability of the improved HP turbine stator in over 800 simulated flight cycles without any sign of significant distress is shown.

  11. Workshop on Aerosols and Particulates from Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chown Chou (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    In response to the National Research Council (NRC) recommendations, the Workshop on Aerosols and Particulates from Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines was organized by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held on July 29-30, 1997 at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio. The objective is to develop consensus among experts in the field of aerosols from gas turbine combustors and engines as to important issues and venues to be considered. Workshop participants' expertise included engine and aircraft design, combustion processes and kinetics, atmospheric science, fuels, and flight operations and instrumentation.

  12. High Pressure Regenerative Turbine Engine: 21st Century Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. E.; Laganelli, A. L.; Senick, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A novel semi-closed cycle gas turbine engine was demonstrated and was found to meet the program goals. The proof-of-principle test of the High Pressure Regenerative Turbine Engine produced data that agreed well with models, enabling more confidence in designing future prototypes based on this concept. Emission levels were significantly reduced as predicted as a natural attribute of this power cycle. Engine testing over a portion of the operating range allowed verification of predicted power increases compared to the baseline.

  13. CF6 jet engine performance improvement: High pressure turbine roundness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. D.; Fasching, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    An improved high pressure turbine stator reducing fuel consumption in current CF6-50 turbofan engines was developed. The feasibility of the roundness and clearance response improvements was demonstrated. Application of these improvements will result in a cruise SFC reduction of 0.22 percent for new engines. For high time engines, the improved roundness and response characteristics results in an 0.5 percent reduction in cruise SFC. A basic life capability of the improved HP turbine stator in over 800 simulated flight cycles without any sign of significant distress is shown.

  14. Solid fuel combustion system for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Wilkes, Colin; Mongia, Hukam C.

    1993-01-01

    A solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion system for a gas turbine engine includes a carbonizer outside of the engine for gasifying coal to a low Btu fuel gas in a first fraction of compressor discharge, a pressurized fluidized bed outside of the engine for combusting the char residue from the carbonizer in a second fraction of compressor discharge to produce low temperature vitiated air, and a fuel-rich, fuel-lean staged topping combustor inside the engine in a compressed air plenum thereof. Diversion of less than 100% of compressor discharge outside the engine minimizes the expense of fabricating and maintaining conduits for transferring high pressure and high temperature gas and incorporation of the topping combustor in the compressed air plenum of the engine minimizes the expense of modifying otherwise conventional gas turbine engines for solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion.

  15. 14 CFR 29.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a result... drive system associated with critical combinations of power, rotational speed, and control...

  16. 14 CFR 27.939 - Turbine engine operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27... limitations of the rotorcraft and of the engine. (b) The turbine engine air inlet system may not, as a result... drive system associated with critical combinations of power, rotational speed, and control...

  17. Serial cooling of a combustor for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Abreu, Mario E.; Kielczyk, Janusz J.

    2001-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine uses compressed air to cool a combustor liner and uses at least a portion of the same compressed air for combustion air. A flow diverting mechanism regulates compressed air flow entering a combustion air plenum feeding combustion air to a plurality of fuel nozzles. The flow diverting mechanism adjusts combustion air according to engine loading.

  18. Turbine Engine Hot Section Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Presentations were made concerning the hot section environment and behavior of combustion liners, turbine blades, and waves. The presentations were divided into six sessions: instrumentation, combustion, turbine heat transfer, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, and surface properties. The principal objective of each session was to disseminate research results to date, along with future plans. Topics discussed included modeling of thermal and fluid flow phenomena, structural analysis, fatigue and fracture, surface protective coatings, constitutive behavior, stress-strain response, and life prediction methods.

  19. Testing of high-octane fuels in the single-cylinder airplane engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeber, Fritz

    1940-01-01

    One of the most important properties of aviation fuels for spark-ignition engines is their knock rating. The CFR engine tests of fuels of 87 octane and above does not always correspond entirely to the actual behavior of these fuels in the airplane engine. A method is therefore developed which, in contrast to the octane number determination, permits a testing of the fuel under various temperatures and fuel mixture conditions. The following reference fuels were employed: 1) Primary fuels; isooctane and n-heptane; 2) Secondary fuels; pure benzene and synthetic benzine.

  20. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR... the rate of climb for airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations is 0.026 Vso2... part 25 of this chapter and by 0.026 Vso2 for airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil...

  1. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR... the rate of climb for airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations is 0.026 Vso2... part 25 of this chapter and by 0.026 Vso2 for airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil...

  2. 14 CFR 121.181 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR... the rate of climb for airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil Air Regulations is 0.026 Vso2... part 25 of this chapter and by 0.026 Vso2 for airplanes certificated under part 4a of the Civil...

  3. Crash tests of three identical low-wing single-engine airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, C. B.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1983-01-01

    Three identical four place, low wing single engine airplane specimens with nominal masses of 1043 kg were crash tested under controlled free flight conditions. The tests were conducted at the same nominal velocity of 25 m/sec along the flight path. Two airplanes were crashed on a concrete surface (at 10 and 30 deg pitch angles), and one was crashed on soil (at a -30 deg pitch angle). The three tests revealed that the specimen in the -30 deg test on soil sustained massive structural damage in the engine compartment and fire wall. Also, the highest longitudinal cabin floor accelerations occurred in this test. Severe damage, but of lesser magnitude, occurred in the -30 deg test on concrete. The highest normal cabin floor accelerations occurred in this test. The least structural damage and lowest accelerations occurred in the 10 deg test on concrete.

  4. Using the CAE technologies of engineering analysis for designing steam turbines at ZAO Ural Turbine Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloshumova, V. N.; Kortenko, V. V.; Pokhoriler, V. L.; Kultyshev, A. Yu.; Ivanovskii, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    We describe the experience ZAO Ural Turbine Works specialists gained from mastering the series of CAD/CAE/CAM/PDM technologies, which are modern software tools of computer-aided engineering. We also present the results obtained from mathematical simulation of the process through which high-and intermediate-pressure rotors are heated for revealing the most thermally stressed zones, as well as the results from mathematical simulation of a new design of turbine cylinder shells for improving the maneuverability of these turbines.

  5. Turbine bucket for use in gas turbine engines and methods for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-06-03

    A turbine bucket for use with a turbine engine. The turbine bucket includes an airfoil that extends between a root end and a tip end. The airfoil includes an outer wall that defines a cavity that extends from the root end to the tip end. The outer wall includes a first ceramic matrix composite (CMC) substrate that extends a first distance from the root end to the tip end. An inner wall is positioned within the cavity. The inner wall includes a second CMC substrate that extends a second distance from the root end towards the tip end that is different than the first distance.

  6. Turbine Engine with Differential Gear Driven Fan and Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suciu, Gabriel L. (Inventor); Pagluica, Gino J. (Inventor); Duong, Loc Quang (Inventor); Portlock, Lawrence E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A gas turbine engine provides a differential gear system coupling the turbine to the bypass fan and the compressor. In this manner, the power/speed split between the bypass fan and the compressor can be optimized under all conditions. In the example shown, the turbine drives a sun gear, which drives a planet carrier and a ring gear in a differential manner. One of the planet carrier and the ring gear is coupled to the bypass fan, while the other is coupled to the compressor.

  7. Fabrication of ceramic components for advanced gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, F.; Solidum, E.

    1985-01-01

    The AGT101 ceramic gas turbine engine feasibility study has made use of the slip casting of silicon or silicon nitride powders to produce either reaction-bonded or sintered components such as turbine rotors, turbine shrouds, and inner and outer diffusers. Attention is given to the effects of processing parameters on the microstructure and properties of the finished components; the parameters encompass powder particle size distribution, casting slip viscosity, pH, and solid content fraction. The green slip cast components were consolidated by nitriding, sintering, or sinter/HIPping.

  8. Application of selected advanced technologies to high performance, single-engine, business airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, C. S.; Martin, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Improvements in performance and fuel efficiency are evaluated for five new configurations of a six place, single turboprop, business airplane derived from a conventional, aluminum construction baseline aircraft. Results show the greatest performance gains for enhancements in natural laminar flow. A conceptual diesel engine provides greater fuel efficiency but reduced performance. Less significant effects are produced by the utilization of composite materials construction or by reconfiguration from tractor to pusher propeller installation.

  9. High-Speed Tests of a Model Twin-Engine Low-Wing Transport Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, John V; LEONARD LLOYD H

    1942-01-01

    Report presents the results of force tests made of a 1/8-scale model of a twin-engine low-wing transport airplane in the NACA 8-foot high-speed tunnel to investigate compressibility and interference effects of speeds up to 450 miles per hour. In addition to tests of the standard arrangement of the model, tests were made with several modifications designed to reduce the drag and to increase the critical speed.

  10. Use of magnetic compression to support turbine engine rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomfret, Chris J.

    1994-02-01

    Ever since the advent of gas turbine engines, their rotating disks have been designed with sufficient size and weight to withstand the centrifugal forces generated when the engine is operating. Unfortunately, this requirement has always been a life and performance limiting feature of gas turbine engines and, as manufacturers strive to meet operator demands for more performance without increasing weight, the need for innovative technology has become more important. This has prompted engineers to consider a fundamental and radical breakaway from the traditional design of turbine and compressor disks which have been in use since the first jet engine was flown 50 years ago. Magnetic compression aims to counteract, by direct opposition rather than restraint, the centrifugal forces generated within the engine. A magnetic coupling is created between a rotating disk and a stationary superconducting coil to create a massive inwardly-directed magnetic force. With the centrifugal forces opposed by an equal and opposite magnetic force, the large heavy disks could be dispensed with and replaced with a torque tube to hold the blades. The proof of this concept has been demonstrated and the thermal management of such a system studied in detail; this aspect, especially in the hot end of a gas turbine engine, remains a stiff but not impossible challenge. The potential payoffs in both military and commercial aviation and in the power generation industry are sufficient to warrant further serious studies for its application and optimization.

  11. Use of magnetic compression to support turbine engine rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomfret, Chris J.

    1994-01-01

    Ever since the advent of gas turbine engines, their rotating disks have been designed with sufficient size and weight to withstand the centrifugal forces generated when the engine is operating. Unfortunately, this requirement has always been a life and performance limiting feature of gas turbine engines and, as manufacturers strive to meet operator demands for more performance without increasing weight, the need for innovative technology has become more important. This has prompted engineers to consider a fundamental and radical breakaway from the traditional design of turbine and compressor disks which have been in use since the first jet engine was flown 50 years ago. Magnetic compression aims to counteract, by direct opposition rather than restraint, the centrifugal forces generated within the engine. A magnetic coupling is created between a rotating disk and a stationary superconducting coil to create a massive inwardly-directed magnetic force. With the centrifugal forces opposed by an equal and opposite magnetic force, the large heavy disks could be dispensed with and replaced with a torque tube to hold the blades. The proof of this concept has been demonstrated and the thermal management of such a system studied in detail; this aspect, especially in the hot end of a gas turbine engine, remains a stiff but not impossible challenge. The potential payoffs in both military and commercial aviation and in the power generation industry are sufficient to warrant further serious studies for its application and optimization.

  12. Research instrumentation for hot section components of turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englund, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Programs to develop research instrumentation for use on hot section components of turbine engines are discussed. These programs can be separated into two categories: one category includes instruments which can measure the environment within the combustor and turbine components, the other includes instruments which measure the response of engine components to the imposed environment. Included in the first category are instruments to measure total heat flux and fluctuating gas temperature. High temperature strain measuring systems, thin film sensors (e.g., turbine blade thermocouples) and a system to view the interior of a combustor during engine operation are programs which comprise the second category. The paper will describe the state of development of these sensors and measuring systems and, in some cases, show examples of measurements made with this instrumentation. The discussion will cover work done at NASA Lewis and at various contractor facilities.

  13. Micro-combustor for gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Scott M.

    2010-11-30

    An improved gas turbine combustor (20) including a basket (26) and a multiplicity of micro openings (29) arrayed across an inlet wall (27) for passage of a fuel/air mixture for ignition within the combustor. The openings preferably have a diameter on the order of the quenching diameter; i.e. the port diameter for which the flame is self-extinguishing, which is a function of the fuel mixture, temperature and pressure. The basket may have a curved rectangular shape that approximates the shape of the curved rectangular shape of the intake manifolds of the turbine.

  14. The forces and moments on airplane engine mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donely, Philip

    1936-01-01

    A resume of the equations and formulas for the forces and moments on an aircraft-engine mount is presented. In addition, available experimental data have been included to permit the computation of these forces and moments. A sample calculation is made and compared with present design conditions for engine mounts.

  15. Lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The application of lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion to aircraft turbine engine systems can result in benefits in terms of superior combustion performance, improved combustor and turbine durability, and environmentally acceptable pollutant emissions. Lean, premixed prevaporized combustion is particularly attractive for reducing the oxides of nitrogen emissions during high altitude cruise. The NASA stratospheric cruise emission reduction program will evolve and demonstrate lean, premixed, prevaporized combustion technology for aircraft engines. This multiphased program is described. In addition, the various elements of the fundamental studies phase of the program are reviewed, and results to date of many of these studies are summarized.

  16. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for commercial gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Susan Manning; Gupta, Dinesh K.; Sheffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the short history, current status, and future prospects of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines. Particular attention is given to plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited yttria-stabilized (7 wt pct Y2O3) zirconia systems. Recent advances include improvements in the spallation life of thermal barrier coatings, improved bond coat composition and spraying techniques, and improved component design. The discussion also covers field experience, life prediction modeling, and future directions in ceramic coatings in relation to gas turbine engine design.

  17. Performance of a 300-horsepower Hispano-Suiza airplane engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, S W; White, H S

    1921-01-01

    The National Bureau of Standards tested a 300-horsepower Hispano-Suiza engine to determine the characteristic performance of the engine at various altitudes. The engine was operated at the ground, at 25,000 feet, and at intermediate altitudes, both at full loads similar to those that would be imposed upon the engine at various speeds by a propeller whose normal full-load speed was 1,800 r.p.m. Friction horsepower also was determined in order that the mechanical efficiency of the engine might be calculated. From the test data there were computed the brake horsepower, brake mean effective pressure, specific fuel consumption, mixture ratio, jacket loss, exhaust loss, and thermal, mechanical, and volumetric efficiencies. A record of jacket water temperatures, oil temperatures, manifold pressures, etc., shows the conditions under which the test was made.

  18. SMALL SCALE BIOMASS FUELED GAS TURBINE ENGINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new generation of small scale (less than 20 MWe) biomass fueled, power plants are being developed based on a gas turbine (Brayton cycle) prime mover. These power plants are expected to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of generating power from fuels such as wood. The n...

  19. Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, N. S.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this task is to perform a technical assessment of turbine blading for advanced second generation PFBC conditions, identify specific problems/issues, and recommend an approach for solving any problems identified. A literature search was conducted, problems associated with hot corrosion defined and limited experiments performed. Sulfidation corrosion occurs in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines and is due to the presence of condensed alkali (sodium) sulfates. The principle source of the alkali in industrial, marine and aircraft gas turbine engines is sea salt crystals. The principle source of the sulfur is not the liquid fuels, but the same ocean born crystals. Moreover deposition of the corrosive salt occurs primarily by a non-equilibrium process. Sodium will be present in the cleaned combusted gases that enter the PFBC turbine. Although equilibrium condensation is not favored, deposition via impaction is probable. Marine gas turbines operate in sodium chloride rich environments without experiencing the accelerated attack noted in coal fired boilers where condensed chlorides contact metallic surfaces. The sulfates of calcium and magnesium are the products of the reactions used to control sulfur. Based upon industrial gas turbine experience and laboratory tests, calcium and magnesium sulfates are, at temperatures up to 1500 F (815 C), relatively innocuous salts. In this study it is found that at 1650 F (900 C) and above, calcium sulfate becomes an aggressive corrodent.

  20. Gas-turbine engine steady-state behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curnock, Barry

    A set of graphics with explanations illustrating gas turbine engine steady state behavior are presented. Typical combinations of compressors and nozzles which occur in a gas turbine engine are shown. The basic effect of a nozzle is explained by considering a compressor on a test rig: typical compressor, fan, and turbine characteristics are illustrated. The following are discussed: the degrees of freedom of an aeroengine (the flow and the power); the 'working lines' of components (the locus of the off design steady state operating points of a component plotted on a chart of that components characteristics); bleed and whirl; offtakes; P1 effects (performance changes which modify the basic nondimensional behavior an engine (caused by the effect on Reynolds number levels and on engine mechanical configuration of basic engine inlet pressure level)), and T1 effects (performance changes which modify the basic nondimensional behavior of an engine and are caused by the effects of engine inlet temperature level on Reynolds number level, on engine mechanical configuration and on specific heat level); variable nozzles; and turbojet matching.

  1. Subsonic wind tunnel investigation of a twin-engine attack airplane model having nonmetric powered nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, V. E.; Matarazzo, A.

    1974-01-01

    A 1/10-scale powered model of a twin-engine attack airplane was investigated in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel. The study was made at several Mach numbers between 0.225 and 0.75 which correspond to Reynolds numbers, based on the mean aerodynamic chord, of 1.35 million and 3.34 million. Unheated compressed air was used for jet simulation in the nonmetric engine nacelles which were located ahead of and above the horizontal stabilizer.

  2. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  3. Flow Integrating Section for a Gas Turbine Engine in Which Turbine Blades are Cooled by Full Compressor Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, W. Gene

    1999-11-14

    Routing of full compressor flow through hollow turbine blades achieves unusually effective blade cooling and allows a significant increase in turbine inlet gas temperature and, hence, engine efficiency. The invention, ''flow integrating section'' alleviates the turbine dissipation of kinetic energy of air jets leaving the hollow blades as they enter the compressor diffuser.

  4. An overview of aerospace gas turbine technology of relevance to the development of the automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. G.; Miller, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    Technology areas related to gas turbine propulsion systems with potential for application to the automotive gas turbine engine are discussed. Areas included are: system steady-state and transient performance prediction techniques, compressor and turbine design and performance prediction programs and effects of geometry, combustor technology and advanced concepts, and ceramic coatings and materials technology.

  5. Interactive-graphic flowpath plotting for turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corban, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    An engine cycle program capable of simulating the design and off-design performance of arbitrary turbine engines, and a computer code which, when used in conjunction with the cycle code, can predict the weight of the engines are described. A graphics subroutine was added to the code to enable the engineer to visualize the designed engine with more clarity by producing an overall view of the designed engine for output on a graphics device using IBM-370 graphics subroutines. In addition, with the engine drawn on a graphics screen, the program allows for the interactive user to make changes to the inputs to the code for the engine to be redrawn and reweighed. These improvements allow better use of the code in conjunction with the engine program.

  6. Flight test experience and controlled impact of a large, four-engine, remotely piloted airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, R. W.; Horton, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    A controlled impact demonstration (CID) program using a large, four engine, remotely piloted transport airplane was conducted. Closed loop primary flight control was performed from a ground based cockpit and digital computer in conjunction with an up/down telemetry link. Uplink commands were received aboard the airplane and transferred through uplink interface systems to a highly modified Bendix PB-20D autopilot. Both proportional and discrete commands were generated by the ground pilot. Prior to flight tests, extensive simulation was conducted during the development of ground based digital control laws. The control laws included primary control, secondary control, and racetrack and final approach guidance. Extensive ground checks were performed on all remotely piloted systems. However, manned flight tests were the primary method of verification and validation of control law concepts developed from simulation. The design, development, and flight testing of control laws and the systems required to accomplish the remotely piloted mission are discussed.

  7. Flight evaluation of an advanced technology light twin-engine airplane (ATLIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Project organization and execution, airplane description and performance predictions, and the results of the flight evaluation of an advanced technology light twin engine airplane (ATLIT) are presented. The ATLIT is a Piper PA-34-200 Seneca I modified by the installation of new wings incorporating the GA(W)-1 (Whitcomb) airfoil, reduced wing area, roll control spoilers, and full span Fowler flaps. The conclusions for the ATLIT evaluation are based on complete stall and roll flight test results and partial performance test results. The Stalling and rolling characteristics met design expectations. Climb performance was penalized by extensive flow separation in the region of the wing body juncture. Cruise performance was found to be penalized by a large value of zero lift drag. Calculations showed that, with proper attention to construction details, the improvements in span efficiency and zero lift drag would permit the realization of the predicted increases in cruising and maximum rate of climb performance.

  8. Summary of the effects of engine throttle response on airplane formation-flying qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin R.

    1993-01-01

    A flight evaluation was conducted to determine the effect of engine throttle response characteristics on precision formation-flying qualities. A variable electronic throttle control system was developed and flight-tested on a TF-104G airplane with a J79-11B engine at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. This airplane was chosen because of its known, very favorable thrust response characteristics. Ten research flights were flown to evaluate the effects of throttle gain, time delay, and fuel control rate limiting on engine handling qualities during a demanding precision wing formation task. Handling quality effects of lag filters and lead compensation time delays were also evaluated. The Cooper and Harper Pilot Rating Scale was used to assign levels of handling quality. Data from pilot ratings and comments indicate that throttle control system time delays and rate limits cause significant degradations in handling qualities. Threshold values for satisfactory (level 1) and adequate (level 2) handling qualities of these key variables are presented. These results may provide engine manufacturers with guidelines to assure satisfactory handling qualities in future engine designs.

  9. Performance Benefits for Wave Rotor-Topped Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Scott M.; Welch, Gerard E.

    1996-01-01

    The benefits of wave rotor-topping in turboshaft engines, subsonic high-bypass turbofan engines, auxiliary power units, and ground power units are evaluated. The thermodynamic cycle performance is modeled using a one-dimensional steady-state code; wave rotor performance is modeled using one-dimensional design/analysis codes. Design and off-design engine performance is calculated for baseline engines and wave rotor-topped engines, where the wave rotor acts as a high pressure spool. The wave rotor-enhanced engines are shown to have benefits in specific power and specific fuel flow over the baseline engines without increasing turbine inlet temperature. The off-design steady-state behavior of a wave rotor-topped engine is shown to be similar to a conventional engine. Mission studies are performed to quantify aircraft performance benefits for various wave rotor cycle and weight parameters. Gas turbine engine cycles most likely to benefit from wave rotor-topping are identified. Issues of practical integration and the corresponding technical challenges with various engine types are discussed.

  10. Energy efficient engine: High pressure turbine uncooled rig technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Results obtained from testing five performance builds (three vane cascades and two rotating rigs of the Energy Efficient Engine uncooled rig have established the uncooled aerodynamic efficiency of the high-pressure turbine at 91.1 percent. This efficiency level was attained by increasing the rim speed and annulus area (AN(2)), and by increasing the turbine reaction level. The increase in AN(2) resulted in a performance improvement of 1.15 percent. At the design point pressure ratio, the increased reaction level rig demonstrated an efficiency of 91.1 percent. The results of this program have verified the aerodynamic design assumptions established for the Energy Efficient Engine high-pressure turbine component.

  11. Performance of B. M. W. 185-Horsepower Airplane Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, S W

    1923-01-01

    This report deals with the results of a test made upon a B. M. W. Engine in the altitude chamber of the Bureau of Standards, where controlled conditions of temperature and pressure can be made to simulate those of the desired altitude. A remarkably low value of fuel consumption - 041 per B. H. P. hour - is obtained at 1,200 revolutions per minute at an air density of 0.064 pound per cubic foot and a brake thermal efficiency of 33 per cent and an indicated efficiency of 37 per cent at the above speed and density. In spite of the fact that the carburetor adjustment does not permit the air-fuel ratio of maximum economy to be obtained at air densities lower than 0.064, the economy is superior to most engines tested thus far, even at a density lower than 0.064, the economies superior to most engines tested thus far, even at a density (0.03) corresponding to an altitude of 25,000 feet. The brake mean effective pressure even at full throttle is rather low. Since the weight of much of the engine is governed more by its piston displacement than by the power developed, a decreased mean effective pressure usually necessitates increased weight per horsepower. The altitude performance of the engine is, in general, excellent, and its low fuel consumption is the outstanding feature of merit.

  12. Low transient thermal stress turbine engine components

    DOEpatents

    Shi, Jun; Schmidt, Wayde R.

    2011-06-28

    A turbine vane includes a platform; and at least one airfoil mounted to the platform and having a trailing edge and a leading edge, wherein the vane is composed of a functionally graded material having a first material and a second material, wherein the trailing edge includes a greater amount of the first material than the second material, and the leading edge includes a greater amount of the second material than the first material.

  13. Methods of Si based ceramic components volatilization control in a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John; Dion Ouellet, Noemie

    2016-09-06

    A method of controlling volatilization of silicon based components in a gas turbine engine includes measuring, estimating and/or predicting a variable related to operation of the gas turbine engine; correlating the variable to determine an amount of silicon to control volatilization of the silicon based components in the gas turbine engine; and injecting silicon into the gas turbine engine to control volatilization of the silicon based components. A gas turbine with a compressor, combustion system, turbine section and silicon injection system may be controlled by a controller that implements the control method.

  14. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas-Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padture, Nitin P.; Gell, Maurice; Jordan, Eric H.

    2002-04-01

    Hundreds of different types of coatings are used to protect a variety of structural engineering materials from corrosion, wear, and erosion, and to provide lubrication and thermal insulation. Of all these, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have the most complex structure and must operate in the most demanding high-temperature environment of aircraft and industrial gas-turbine engines. TBCs, which comprise metal and ceramic multilayers, insulate turbine and combustor engine components from the hot gas stream, and improve the durability and energy efficiency of these engines. Improvements in TBCs will require a better understanding of the complex changes in their structure and properties that occur under operating conditions that lead to their failure. The structure, properties, and failure mechanisms of TBCs are herein reviewed, together with a discussion of current limitations and future opportunities.

  15. Wind-tunnel Tests of a 2-engine Airplane Model as a Preliminary Study of Flight Conditions Arising on the Failure of the Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, Edwin P

    1938-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a 15-foot-span model of a two-engine low wing transport airplane were made as a preliminary study of the emergency arising from the failure of one engine in flight. Two methods of reducing the initial yawing moment resulting from the failure of one engine were investigated and the equilibrium conditions were explored for two basic modes on one engine, one with zero angle of sideslip and the other with several degrees of sideslip. The added drag resulting from the unsymmetrical attitudes required for flight on one engine was determined for the model airplane. The effects of the application of power upon the stability, controllability, lift, and drag of the model airplane were measured. A dynamic pressure survey of the propeller slipstream was made in the neighborhood of the tail surfaces at three angles of attack. The added parasite drag of the model airplane resulting from the unfavorable conditions of flight on one engine was estimated. From 35 to 50 percent of this added drag was due to the drag of the dead engine propeller and the other 50 to 65 percent was due to the unsymmetrical attitude of the airplane. The mode of flight on one engine in which the angle of sideslip was zero was found to require less power than the mode in which the angle of sideslip was several degrees.

  16. 14 CFR 34.23 - Exhaust Emission Standards for Engines Manufactured on and after July 18, 2012.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.23 Exhaust Emission... emissions from each new aircraft gas turbine engine shall not exceed: (1) For Classes TF, T3 and T8 of...

  17. 14 CFR 34.23 - Exhaust Emission Standards for Engines Manufactured on and after July 18, 2012.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.23 Exhaust Emission... emissions from each new aircraft gas turbine engine shall not exceed: (1) For Classes TF, T3 and T8 of...

  18. Nickel base alloy. [for gas turbine engine stator vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freche, J. C.; Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A nickel base superalloy for use at temperatures of 2000 F (1095 C) to 2200 F (1205 C) was developed for use as stator vane material in advanced gas turbine engines. The alloy has a nominal composition in weight percent of 16 tungsten, 7 aluminum, 1 molybdenum, 2 columbium, 0.3 zirconium, 0.2 carbon and the balance nickel.

  19. Light weight gas turbine engine fuel pumping technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kassel, J.M.; Birdsall, J.

    1989-01-01

    The paper discusses the use of a single high speed centrifugal fuel pump as the only pump in a gas turbine engine fuel system. The characteristics and requirements of the high speed centrifugal fuel pump system are compared with a more traditional fuel pump system. The application of composite technology to the high speed centrifugal pump concept is also reviewed.

  20. A-10/TF34 Turbine Engine Monitoring System (TEMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    The hardware and software development of the A-10/TF34 turbine engine monitoring system (TEMS) is described. The operation and interfaces of the A-10/TF34 TEMS hardware are discussed with particular emphasis on function, capabilities, and limitations. The TEMS data types are defined and the various data acquisition modes are explained. Potential data products are also discussed.

  1. Application of laser anemometry in turbine engine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The application of laser anemometry to the study of flow fields in turbine engine components is reviewed. Included are discussions of optical configurations, seeding requirements, electronic signal processing, and data processing. Some typical results are presented along with a discussion of ongoing work.

  2. Application of laser anemometry in turbine engine research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The application of laser anemometry to the study of flow fields in turbine engine components is reviewed. Included are discussions of optical configurations, seeding requirements, electronic signal processing, and data processing. Some typical results are presented along with a discussion of ongoing work.

  3. Compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Hogberg, Nicholas Alvin

    2015-03-24

    The present application provides a compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine. The compressive stress system may include a first bucket attached to a rotor, a second bucket attached to the rotor, the first and the second buckets defining a shank pocket therebetween, and a compressive stress spring positioned within the shank pocket.

  4. Advanced materials research for long-haul aircraft turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorelli, R. A.; Blankenship, C. P.

    1978-01-01

    The status of research efforts to apply low to intermediate temperature composite materials and advanced high temperature materials to engine components is reviewed. Emerging materials technologies and their potential benefits to aircraft gas turbines were emphasized. The problems were identified, and the general state of the technology for near term use was assessed.

  5. Ceramic component development for the AGT101 gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, W. D.; Smith, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Under DOE/NASA sponsorship, a team is developing the AGT101, a highly efficient gas turbine engine for automotive application. The regenerated engine will operate at a maximum of 1370 C (2500 F) and 100,000 rpm, and will utilize a variety of Si3N4, SiC, lithium aluminum silicate and ceramic fiber insulation components. Engine design has been performed to consider the fabrication and material characteristics of these ceramic materials for both the static and rotating hot section components. Component fabrication has been performed, components have been screened in thermal and mechanical tests, and initial engine testing has been performed.

  6. Advanced controls for airbreathing engines, volume 3: Allison gas turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bough, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    The application of advanced control concepts to airbreathing engines may yield significant improvements in aircraft/engine performance and operability. Screening studies of advanced control concepts for airbreathing engines were conducted by three major domestic aircraft engine manufacturers to determine the potential impact of concepts on turbine engine performance and operability. The purpose of the studies was to identify concepts which offered high potential yet may incur high research and development risk. A target suite of proposed advanced control concepts was formulated and evaluated in a two-phase study to quantify each concept's impact on desired engine characteristics. To aid in the evaluation specific aircraft/engine combinations were considered: a Military High Performance Fighter mission, a High Speed Civil Transport mission, and a Civil Tiltrotor mission. Each of the advanced control concepts considered in the study are defined and described. The concept potential impact on engine performance was determined. Relevant figures of merit on which to evaluate the concepts are determined. Finally, the concepts are ranked with respect to the target aircraft/engine missions. A final report describing the screening studies was prepared by each engine manufacturer. Volume 3 of these reports describes the studies performed by the Allison Gas Turbine Division.

  7. Optimal Discrete Event Supervisory Control of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan (Technical Monitor); Ray, Asok

    2004-01-01

    This report presents an application of the recently developed theory of optimal Discrete Event Supervisory (DES) control that is based on a signed real measure of regular languages. The DES control techniques are validated on an aircraft gas turbine engine simulation test bed. The test bed is implemented on a networked computer system in which two computers operate in the client-server mode. Several DES controllers have been tested for engine performance and reliability.

  8. Turbine engine hot-part temperature measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.G.; Prufert, M.B. )

    1992-07-01

    The paper identifies altitude test facility techniques for nonintrusive acquisition of hot-part temperatures using IR radiance measurements. The techniques discussed are applicable for turbojet and low-bypass turbofan engines. Constraints limiting IR measurements in the altitude ground test facility are discussed. Methods for evaluating altitude ground test data are outlined including review of predictive capabilities which enable the determination of the influence of turbine engine hot-part temperatures on IR emissions. 7 refs.

  9. Fundamental heat transfer research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, D. E. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven experts from industry and the universities joined 24 NASA Lewis staff members in an exchange of ideas on trends in aeropropulsion research and technology, basic analyses, computational analyses, basic experiments, near-engine environment experiments, fundamental fluid mechanics and heat transfer, and hot technology as related to gas turbine engines. The workshop proceedings described include pre-workshop input from participants, presentations of current activity by the Lewis staff, reports of the four working groups, and a workshop summary.

  10. Turbine Engine Clearance Control Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor (HPC) and high pressure turbine (HPT) can provide dramatic reductions in specific fuel consumption (SFC), time-on-wing, compressor stall margin, and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities. Maintenance costs to overhaul large commercial gas turbine engines can easily exceed $1M. Engine removal from service is primarily due to spent exhaust gas temperature (EGT) margin caused mainly by the deterioration of HPT components. Increased blade tip clearance is a major factor in hot section component degradation. As engine designs continue to push the performance envelope with fewer parts and the market drives manufacturers to increase service life, the need for advanced sealing continues to grow. A review of aero gas turbine engine HPT performance degradation and the mechanisms that promote these losses are discussed. Benefits to the HPT due to improved clearance management are identified. Past and present sealing technologies are presented along with specifications for next generation engine clearance control systems.

  11. The Direct Measurement of Engine Power on an Airplane in Flight with a Hub Type Dynamometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gove, W D; Green, M W

    1927-01-01

    This report describes tests made to obtain direct measurements of engine power in flight. Tests were made with a Bendemann hub dynamometer installed on a modified DH-4 Airplane, Liberty 12 Engine, to determine the suitability of this apparatus. This dynamometer unit, which was designed specially for use with a liberty 12 engine, is a special propeller hub in which is incorporated a system of pistons and cylinders interposed between the propeller and the engine crankshaft. The torque and thrust forces are balanced by fluid pressures, which are recorded by instruments in the cockpit. These tests have shown the suitability of this type of hub dynamometer for measurement of power in flight and for the determination of the torque and power coefficients of the propeller. (author)

  12. Noise propagation from a four-engine, propeller-driven airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A flight experiment was conducted to investigate the propagation of periodic low-frequency noise from a propeller-driven airplane. The test airplane was a large four-engine, propeller-driven airplane flown at altitudes from 15 to 500 m over the end of an 1800-m-long, 22-element microphone array. The acoustic data were reduced by a one-third octave-band analysis. The primary propagation quantities computed were lateral attenuation and ground effects, both of which become significant at shallow elevation angles. Scatter in the measured results largely obscured the physics of the low-frequency noise propagation. Variability of the noise source, up to 9.5 dB over a 2-sec interval, was the major contributor to the data scatter. The microphones mounted at ground level produced more consistent results with less scatter than those mounted 1.2 m above ground. The ground noise levels were found to be greater on the port side than on the starboard side.

  13. Materials for advanced turbine engines. Project 2: Rene 150 directionally solidified superalloy turbine blades, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboer, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of the engine testing of Rene 150 Stage 1 high pressure turbine blades in CF6-50 core and fan engines are presented. The core engine test was conducted for 233 hours with a variety of test cycles, and the fan engine test was conducted for 1000 C cycles. Post-test analysis of the core engine test data confirmed the suitability of the Rene 150 HPT blade for fan engine testing. Post-test evaluation and analysis of the fan engine test blades included visual and dimensional inspection as well as metallographic examination of selected blades. The Rene 150 HPT blade met the target goal of this project by demonstrating increased metal temperature capability; however, the post-test analysis revealed several areas that would have to be addressed in designing a long-life Rene 150 CF6-50 HPT blade.

  14. Turbofan gas turbine engine with variable fan outlet guide vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter John (Inventor); Zenon, Ruby Lasandra (Inventor); LaChapelle, Donald George (Inventor); Mielke, Mark Joseph (Inventor); Grant, Carl (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan gas turbine engine includes a forward fan section with a row of fan rotor blades, a core engine, and a fan bypass duct downstream of the forward fan section and radially outwardly of the core engine. The forward fan section has only a single stage of variable fan guide vanes which are variable fan outlet guide vanes downstream of the forward fan rotor blades. An exemplary embodiment of the engine includes an afterburner downstream of the fan bypass duct between the core engine and an exhaust nozzle. The variable fan outlet guide vanes are operable to pivot from a nominal OGV position at take-off to an open OGV position at a high flight Mach Number which may be in a range of between about 2.5-4+. Struts extend radially across a radially inwardly curved portion of a flowpath of the engine between the forward fan section and the core engine.

  15. Fish-Friendly Hydropower Turbine Development & Deployment: Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing

    SciTech Connect

    2011-10-01

    The Alden turbine was developed through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Advanced Hydro Turbine Systems Program (1994-2006) and, more recently, through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the DOE's Wind & Water Power Program. The primary goal of the engineering study described here was to provide a commercially competitive turbine design that would yield fish passage survival rates comparable to or better than the survival rates of bypassing or spilling flow. Although the turbine design was performed for site conditions corresponding to 92 ft (28 m) net head and a discharge of 1500 cfs (42.5 cms), the design can be modified for additional sites with differing operating conditions. During the turbine development, design modifications were identified for the spiral case, distributor (stay vanes and wicket gates), runner, and draft tube to improve turbine performance while maintaining features for high fish passage survival. Computational results for pressure change rates and shear within the runner passage were similar in the original and final turbine geometries, while predicted minimum pressures were higher for the final turbine. The final turbine geometry and resulting flow environments are expected to further enhance the fish passage characteristics of the turbine. Computational results for the final design were shown to improve turbine efficiencies by over 6% at the selected operating condition when compared to the original concept. Prior to the release of the hydraulic components for model fabrication, finite element analysis calculations were conducted for the stay vanes, wicket gates, and runner to verify that structural design criteria for stress and deflections were met. A physical model of the turbine was manufactured and tested with data collected for power and efficiency, cavitation limits, runaway speed, axial and radial thrust, pressure pulsations, and wicket gate torque. All parameters were observed to fall within ranges

  16. Turbine blade structural dynamic analysis. [for space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, E. O.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents structural dynamic analysis and test results for the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine blades. Athough these blades are designed to avoid coincidence of natural frequencies with harmonic excitation forces, the complexity of the turbine hardware, its nonlinearities and lack of information regarding the forcing function have led to fatigue failures. A comparison of single-blade analysis and test modal frequencies, shapes, and stresses is given; analysis techniques to describe the forcing function, compute dynamic responses, and incorporate the nonlinearities of Coulomb-friction dampers are presented. Recommendations are made for new research to improve forcing function computations and structural damping estimates used in the analysis.

  17. Gas turbine engine with radial diffuser and shortened mid section

    SciTech Connect

    Charron, Richard C.; Montgomery, Matthew D.

    2015-09-08

    An industrial gas turbine engine (10), including: a can annular combustion assembly (80), having a plurality of discrete flow ducts configured to receive combustion gas from respective combustors (82) and deliver the combustion gas along a straight flow path at a speed and orientation appropriate for delivery directly onto the first row (56) of turbine blades (62); and a compressor diffuser (32) having a redirecting surface (130, 140) configured to receive an axial flow of compressed air and redirect the axial flow of compressed air radially outward.

  18. Predicting Noise From Aircraft Turbine-Engine Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P.; Mani, R.; Salamah, S.; Coffin, R.; Mehta, Jayesh

    2005-01-01

    COMBUSTOR and CNOISE are computer codes that predict far-field noise that originates in the combustors of modern aircraft turbine engines -- especially modern, low-gaseous-emission engines, the combustors of which sometimes generate several decibels more noise than do the combustors of older turbine engines. COMBUSTOR implements an empirical model of combustor noise derived from correlations between engine-noise data and operational and geometric parameters, and was developed from databases of measurements of acoustic emissions of engines. CNOISE implements an analytical and computational model of the propagation of combustor temperature fluctuations (hot spots) through downstream turbine stages. Such hot spots are known to give rise to far-field noise. CNOISE is expected to be helpful in determining why low-emission combustors are sometimes noisier than older ones, to provide guidance for refining the empirical correlation model embodied in the COMBUSTOR code, and to provide insight on how to vary downstream turbinestage geometry to reduce the contribution of hot spots to far-field noise.

  19. Stationary Engineers Apprenticeship. Related Training Modules. 15.1-15.5 Turbines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This learning module, one in a series of 20 related training modules for apprentice stationary engineers, deals with turbines. addressed in the individual instructional packages included in the module are the following topics: types and components of steam turbines, steam turbine auxiliaries, operation and maintenance of steam turbines, and gas…

  20. 14 CFR 135.369 - Large transport category airplanes: Reciprocating engine powered: En route limitations: All...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airplane may take off that airplane at a weight, allowing for normal consumption of fuel and oil, that does... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large transport category airplanes... DEMAND OPERATIONS AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance...

  1. Fuel-efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplanes

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, R.C.H.

    1982-01-01

    The uses and limitations of typical Pilot Operating Handbook cruise performance data, for constructing cruise performance models suitable for maximizing specific range, are first examined. These data are found to be inadequate for constructing such models. A new model of General Aviation piston-prop airplane cruise performance is then developed. This model consists of two subsystem models: the airframe-propeller-atmosphere subsystem model; and the engine-atmosphere subsystem model. The new model facilitates maximizing specific range; and by virtue of its simplicity and low volume data storage requirements, appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation.

  2. Investigation of Icing Characteristics of Typical Light Airplane Engine Induction Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, W. D.

    1949-01-01

    The icing characteristics of two typical light-airplane engine induction systems were investigated using the carburetors and manifolds of engines in the horsepower ranges from 65 to 85 and 165 to 185. The smaller system consisted of a float-type carburetor with an unheated manifold and the larger system consisted of a single-barrel pressure-type carburetor with an oil-jacketed manifold. Carburetor-air temperature and humidity limits of visible and serious Icing were determined for various engine power conditions. Several.methods of achieving ice-free induction systems are discussed along with estimates of surface heating requirements of the various induct ion-system components. A study was also made of the icing characteristics of a typical light-airplane air scoop with an exposed filter and a modified system that provided a normal ram inlet with the filter located in a position to Induce inertia separation of the free water from the charge air. The principle of operation of float-type carburetors is proved to make them inherently more susceptible to icing at the throttle plate than pressure-type carburetors.. The results indicated that proper jacketing and heating of all parts exposed to the fuel spray can satisfactorily reduce or eliminate icing in the float-type carburetor and the manifold. Pressure-type carburetors can be protected from serious Icing by proper location of the fuel-discharge nozzle combined with suitable application of heat to critical parts.

  3. Turbine engine altitude chamber and flight testing with liquid hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    In the late fifties the Lewis Research Center evaluated experimentally the use of hydrogen using three different turbojet engines in altitude test chambers. One of these engines was later flown experimentally using liquid hydrogen fuel. This paper is a brief overview of the significant aspects of this exploratory research and gives a few implications of the results to modern turbine engines. A subsequent contract dealing with a positive displacement pump operating on liquid hydrogen is discussed and some aspects of liquid hydrogen propellant systems, reflected by rocket booster experience are treated briefly. Areas requiring further research and technology effort are delineated.

  4. Powder metallurgy Rene 95 rotating turbine engine parts, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbers, L. G.; Redden, T. K.

    1981-01-01

    A Rene 95 alloy as-HIP high pressure turbine aft shaft in the CF6-50 engine and a HIP plus forged Rene 95 compressor disk in the CFM56 engine were tested. The CF6-50 engine test was conducted for 1000 C cycles and the CFM56 test for 2000 C cycles. Post test evaluation and analysis of the CF6-50 shaft and the CFM56 compressor disk included visual, fluorescent penetrant, and dimensional inspections. No defects or otherwise discrepant conditions were found. These parts were judged to have performed satisfactorily.

  5. Traction drive automatic transmission for gas turbine engine driveline

    DOEpatents

    Carriere, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    A transaxle driveline for a wheeled vehicle has a high speed turbine engine and a torque splitting gearset that includes a traction drive unit and a torque converter on a common axis transversely arranged with respect to the longitudinal centerline of the vehicle. The drive wheels of the vehicle are mounted on a shaft parallel to the turbine shaft and carry a final drive gearset for driving the axle shafts. A second embodiment of the final drive gearing produces an overdrive ratio between the output of the first gearset and the axle shafts. A continuously variable range of speed ratios is produced by varying the position of the drive rollers of the traction unit. After starting the vehicle from rest, the transmission is set for operation in the high speed range by engaging a first lockup clutch that joins the torque converter impeller to the turbine for operation as a hydraulic coupling.

  6. Turbine engine airfoil and platform assembly

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Christian X.; James, Allister W.; Morrison, Jay A.

    2012-07-31

    A turbine airfoil (22A) is formed by a first process using a first material. A platform (30A) is formed by a second process using a second material that may be different from the first material. The platform (30A) is assembled around a shank (23A) of the airfoil. One or more pins (36A) extend from the platform into holes (28) in the shank (23A). The platform may be formed in two portions (32A, 34A) and placed around the shank, enclosing it. The two platform portions may be bonded to each other. Alternately, the platform (30B) may be cast around the shank (23B) using a metal alloy with better castability than that of the blade and shank, which may be specialized for thermal tolerance. The pins (36A-36D) or holes for them do not extend to an outer surface (31) of the platform, avoiding stress concentrations.

  7. Summary of the effects of engine throttle response on airplane formation-flying qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Kevin R.

    1992-01-01

    A flight evaluation as conducted to determine the effect of engine throttle response characteristics on precision formation-flying qualities. A variable electronic throttle control system was developed and flight-tested on a TF-104G airplane with a J79-11B engine at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. Ten research flights were flown to evaluate the effects of throttle gain, time delay, and fuel control rate limiting on engine handling qualities during a demanding precision wing formation task. Handling quality effects of lag filters and lead compensation time delays were also evaluated. Data from pilot ratings and comments indicate that throttle control system time delays and rate limits cause significant degradations in handling qualities. Threshold values for satisfactory (level 1) and adequate (level 2) handling qualities of these key variables are presented.

  8. Advanced solidification processing of an industrial gas turbine engine component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Mei Ling; Price, Allen; Bellows, Richard S.

    2003-03-01

    This paper will describe the efforts of the Advanced Turbine Airfoil Manufacturing Technology Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Howmet Research Corporation. The purpose of the program is to develop single-crystal and directionally solidified casting technologies to benefit Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) industrial and utility gas turbine engines. The focus is on defining and implementing advanced Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM) furnace enhancements that provide precise control of mold temperatures during solidification. Emphasis was placed on increasing the total magnitude of thermal gradients while minimizing the difference in maximum and minimum gradients produced during the solidification process. Advanced VIM casting techniques were applied to Solar Turbines Incorporated’s Titan 130 First Stage High Pressure Turbine Blade under the ATS program. A comparison of the advanced VIM casting process to the conventional Bridgeman casting process will be presented as it pertains to the thermal gradients achieved during solidification, microstructure, elemental partitioning characterization, and solution heat treat response.

  9. Wave-Rotor-Enhanced Gas Turbine Engine Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack; Synder, Philip H.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, NASA Glenn Research Center, and Rolls-Royce Allison are working collaboratively to demonstrate the benefits and viability of a wave-rotor-topped gas turbine engine. The self-cooled wave rotor is predicted to increase the engine overall pressure ratio and peak temperature by 300% and 25 to 30%. respectively, providing substantial improvements in engine efficiency and specific power. Such performance improvements would significantly reduce engine emissions and the fuel logistics trails of armed forces. Progress towards a planned demonstration of a wave-rotor-topped Rolls-Royce Allison model 250 engine has included completion of the preliminary design and layout of the engine, the aerodynamic design of the wave rotor component and prediction of its aerodynamic performance characteristics in on- and off-design operation and during transients, and the aerodynamic design of transition ducts between the wave rotor and the high pressure turbine. The topping cycle increases the burner entry temperature and poses a design challenge to be met in the development of the demonstrator engine.

  10. Piloted simulation study of the effects of an automated trim system on flight characteristics of a light twin-engine airplane with one engine inoperative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Brown, P. W.; Yenni, K. R.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation study was conducted to investigate the piloting problems associated with failure of an engine on a generic light twin-engine airplane. A primary piloting problem for a light twin-engine airplane after an engine failure is maintaining precise control of the airplane in the presence of large steady control forces. To address this problem, a simulated automatic trim system which drives the trim tabs as an open-loop function of propeller slipstream measurements was developed. The simulated automatic trim system was found to greatly increase the controllability in asymmetric powered flight without having to resort to complex control laws or an irreversible control system. However, the trim-tab control rates needed to produce the dramatic increase in controllability may require special design consideration for automatic trim system failures. Limited measurements obtained in full-scale flight tests confirmed the fundamental validity of the proposed control law.

  11. Determination of Turbine Blade Life from Engine Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry M.

    2013-01-01

    It is probable that no two engine companies determine the life of their engines or their components in the same way or apply the same experience and safety factors to their designs. Knowing the failure mode that is most likely to occur minimizes the amount of uncertainty and simplifies failure and life analysis. Available data regarding failure mode for aircraft engine blades, while favoring low-cycle, thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) as the controlling mode of failure, are not definitive. Sixteen high-pressure turbine (HPT) T-1 blade sets were removed from commercial aircraft engines that had been commercially flown by a single airline and inspected for damage. Each set contained 82 blades. The damage was cataloged into three categories related to their mode of failure: (1) TMF, (2) Oxidation/erosion (O/E), and (3) Other. From these field data, the turbine blade life was determined as well as the lives related to individual blade failure modes using Johnson-Weibull analysis. A simplified formula for calculating turbine blade life and reliability was formulated. The L10 blade life was calculated to be 2427 cycles (11 077 hr). The resulting blade life attributed to O/E equaled that attributed to TMF. The category that contributed most to blade failure was Other. If there were no blade failures attributed to O/E and TMF, the overall blade L(sub 10) life would increase approximately 11 to 17 percent.

  12. Determination of Turbine Blade Life from Engine Field Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry M.

    2012-01-01

    It is probable that no two engine companies determine the life of their engines or their components in the same way or apply the same experience and safety factors to their designs. Knowing the failure mode that is most likely to occur minimizes the amount of uncertainty and simplifies failure and life analysis. Available data regarding failure mode for aircraft engine blades, while favoring low-cycle, thermal mechanical fatigue as the controlling mode of failure, are not definitive. Sixteen high-pressure turbine (HPT) T-1 blade sets were removed from commercial aircraft engines that had been commercially flown by a single airline and inspected for damage. Each set contained 82 blades. The damage was cataloged into three categories related to their mode of failure: (1) Thermal-mechanical fatigue, (2) Oxidation/Erosion, and (3) "Other." From these field data, the turbine blade life was determined as well as the lives related to individual blade failure modes using Johnson-Weibull analysis. A simplified formula for calculating turbine blade life and reliability was formulated. The L(sub 10) blade life was calculated to be 2427 cycles (11 077 hr). The resulting blade life attributed to oxidation/erosion equaled that attributed to thermal-mechanical fatigue. The category that contributed most to blade failure was Other. If there were there no blade failures attributed to oxidation/erosion and thermal-mechanical fatigue, the overall blade L(sub 10) life would increase approximately 11 to 17 percent.

  13. Effect of control logic modifications on airstart performance of F100 engine model derivative engines in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. B.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A series of airstarts were conducted in an F-15 airplane with two prototype Pratt and Whitney F100 Engine Model Derivative engines equipped with Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC) systems. The airstart envelope and the time required for airstarts were defined. Comparisons were made between the original airstart logic, and modified logic which was designed to improve the airstart capability. Spooldown airstarts with the modified logic were more successful at lower altitudes than were those with the original logic. Spooldown airstart times ranged from 33 seconds at 250 knots to 83 seconds at 175 knots. The modified logic improved the airstart time from 31% to 53%, with the most improved times at slower airspeeds. Jet fuel starter (JFS)-assisted airstarts were conducted at 7000 m and airstart times were significantly faster than unassisted airstarts. The effect of altitude on airstart times was small.

  14. Analytical investigation of turbines with adjustable stator blades and effect of these turbines on jet-engine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silvern, David H; Slivka, William R

    1950-01-01

    Adjustable-stator turbines are applied to turbojet engines and probable performance is compared with conventional engines with and without variable-area exhaust nozzles. Variation in stator-exit angle and exhaust area was not excessive for wide ranges of engine output. Variation in turbine efficiency for contemporary turbines equipped with adjustable stators was small. Improvements from 4.5 to 17 percent in over-all engine specific fuel consumption over conventional engines and from 2 to 8.5 percent over engines equipped with only adjustable-area exhaust nozzles were obtained at 60-percent rated power with adjustable-stator turbines and variable-area exhaust nozzles. The improvements depend on design parameters.

  15. Ceramic bearings for use in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1988-01-01

    Three decades of research by U.S. industry and government laboratories have produced a vast body of data related to the use of ceramic rolling element bearings and bearing components for aircraft gas turbine engines. Materials such as alumina, silicon carbide, titanium carbide, silicon nitride, and a crystallized glass ceramic have been investigated. Rolling-element endurance tests and analysis of full-complement bearings have been performed. Materials and bearing design methods have continuously improved over the years. This paper reviews a wide range of data and analyses with emphasis on how early NASA contributions as well as more recent data can enable the engineer or metallurgist to determine just where ceramic bearings are most applicable for gas turbines.

  16. Ceramic bearings for use in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.

    1989-01-01

    Three decades of research by U.S. industry and government laboratories have produced a vast body of data related to the use of ceramic rolling element bearings and bearing components for aircraft gas turbine engines. Materials such as alumina, silicon carbide, titanium carbide, silicon nitride, and a crystallized glass ceramic have been investigated. Rolling-element endurance tests and analysis of full-complement bearings have been performed. Materials and bearing design methods have continuously improved over the years. This paper reviews a wide range of data and analyses with emphasis on how early NASA contributions as well as more recent data can enable the engineer or metallurgist to determine just where ceramic bearings are most applicable for gas turbines.

  17. Damage Tolerance and Reliability of Turbine Engine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a formal method to quantify structural damage tolerance and reliability in the presence of a multitude of uncertainties in turbine engine components. The method is based at the material behavior level where primitive variables with their respective scatter ranges are used to describe behavior. Computational simulation is then used to propagate the uncertainties to the structural scale where damage tolerance and reliability are usually specified. Several sample cases are described to illustrate the effectiveness, versatility, and maturity of the method. Typical results from this method demonstrate that it is mature and that it can be used to probabilistically evaluate turbine engine structural components. It may be inferred from the results that the method is suitable for probabilistically predicting the remaining life in aging or deteriorating structures, for making strategic projections and plans, and for achieving better, cheaper, faster products that give competitive advantages in world markets.

  18. Pre-mixing apparatus for a turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Zuo, Baifang; Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Felling, David Kenton; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2012-04-03

    A pre-mixing apparatus for a turbine engine includes a main body having an inlet portion, an outlet portion and an exterior wall that collectively establish at least one fluid delivery plenum, and a plurality of fluid delivery tubes extending through at least a portion of the at least one fluid delivery plenum. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes at least one fluid delivery opening fluidly connected to the at least one fluid delivery plenum. With this arrangement, a first fluid is selectively delivered to the at least one fluid delivery plenum, passed through the at least one fluid delivery opening and mixed with a second fluid flowing through the plurality of fluid delivery tubes prior to being combusted in a combustion chamber of a turbine engine.

  19. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Saus, Joseph R.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    Lean-burning combustors are susceptible to combustion instabilities. Additionally, due to non-uniformities in the fuel-air mixing and in the combustion process, there typically exist hot areas in the combustor exit plane. These hot areas limit the operating temperature at the turbine inlet and thus constrain performance and efficiency. Finally, it is necessary to optimize the fuel-air ratio and flame temperature throughout the combustor to minimize the production of pollutants. In recent years, there has been considerable activity addressing Active Combustion Control. NASA Glenn Research Center's Active Combustion Control Technology effort aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines. Analysis and experiments are tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. Considerable progress has been shown in demonstrating technologies for Combustion Instability Control, Pattern Factor Control, and Emissions Minimizing Control. Future plans are to advance the maturity of active combustion control technology to eventual demonstration in an engine environment.

  20. A fuel-efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplanes. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, R. C. H.

    1983-01-01

    A fuel-efficient cruise performance model which facilitates maximizing the specific range of General Aviation airplanes powered by spark-ignition piston engines and propellers is presented. Airplanes of fixed design only are considered. The uses and limitations of typical Pilot Operating Handbook cruise performance data, for constructing cruise performance models suitable for maximizing specific range, are first examined. These data are found to be inadequate for constructing such models. A new model of General Aviation piston-prop airplane cruise performance is then developed. This model consists of two subsystem models: the airframe-propeller-atmosphere subsystem model; and the engine-atmosphere subsystem model. The new model facilitates maximizing specific range; and by virtue of its implicity and low volume data storge requirements, appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation.

  1. Erosion-Resistant Nanocoatings for Improved Energy Efficiency in Gas Turbine Engines

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to test and substantiate erosion-resistant (ER) nanocoatings for application on compressor airfoils for gas turbine engines in both industrial gas turbines and commercial aviation.

  2. Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced stress analysis methods applicable to turbine engine structures are investigated. Constructions of special elements which containing traction-free circular boundaries are investigated. New versions of mixed variational principle and version of hybrid stress elements are formulated. A method is established for suppression of kinematic deformation modes. semiLoof plate and shell elements are constructed by assumed stress hybrid method. An elastic-plastic analysis is conducted by viscoplasticity theory using the mechanical subelement model.

  3. Fatigue Failure of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Gregrory R.; Arakere, Nagaraj K.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental validation of finite element modeling of single crystal turbine blades is presented. Experimental results from uniaxial high cycle fatigue (HCF) test specimens and full scale Space Shuttle Main Engine test firings with the High Pressure Fuel Turbopump Alternate Turbopump (HPFTP/AT) provide the data used for the validation. The conclusions show the significant contribution of the crystal orientation within the blade on the resulting life of the component, that the analysis can predict this variation, and that experimental testing demonstrates it.

  4. Sealing technology for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Johnson, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental evaluation under simulated engine conditions revealed that conventional mainshaft seals have disadvantages of high gas leakage rates and wear. An advanced seal concept, the self-acting face seal, has a much lower gas leakage rate and greater pressure and speed capability. In endurance tests (150 hr) to 43,200 rpm the self-acting seal wear was not measurable, indicating that noncontact sealing operation was maintained even at this high rotative speed. A review of published data revealed that the leakage through gas path seals has a significant effect on thrust specific fuel consumption, stall margin, and engine maintenance. Reducing leakages by reducing seal clearances results in rubbing contact, and then the seal thermal response and wear determines the final seal clearances.

  5. Sealing technology for aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Johnson, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental evaluation under simulated engine conditions revealed that conventional mainshaft seals have disadvantages of high gas leakage rates and wear. An advanced seal concept, the self-acting face seal, has a much lower gas leakage rate and greater pressure and speed capability. In endurance tests (150 hr) to 43 200 rpm the self-acting seal wear was not measurable, indicating noncontact sealing operation was maintained even at this high rotative speed. A review of published data revealed that the leakage through gas path seals has a significant effect on TSFC, stall margin and engine maintenance. Reducing leakages by reducing seal clearances results in rubbing contact, and then the seal thermal response and wear determines the final seal clearances. The control of clearances requires a material with the proper combination of rub tolerance (abradability) and erosion resistance. Increased rub tolerance is usually gained at the expense of reduced erosion resistance and vice versa.

  6. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

    2005-09-30

    This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

  7. The 727 airplane target thrust reverser static performance model test for refanned JT8D engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, C. T. P.; Atkey, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a scale model static performance test of target thrust reverser configurations for the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft JT8D-100 series engine are presented. The objective of the test was to select a series of suitable candidate reverser configurations for the subsequent airplane model wind tunnel ingestion and flight controls tests. Test results indicate that adequate reverse thrust performance with compatible engine airflow match is achievable for the selected configurations. Tapering of the lips results in loss of performance and only minimal flow directivity. Door pressure surveys were conducted on a selected number of lip and fence configurations to obtain data to support the design of the thrust reverser system.

  8. New trends in combustion research for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    Research on combustion is being conducted to provide improved analytical models of the complex flow and chemical reaction processes which occur in the combustor of gas turbine engines, in order to enable engine manufacturers to reduce the development time of these concepts. The elements of the combustion fundamentals program is briefly discussed with examples of research projects described more fully. Combustion research will continue to emphasize the development of analytical models and the support of these models with fundamental flow experiments to assess the models accuracy and shortcomings.

  9. Operation of gas turbine engines in volcanic ash clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.G.; Baran, A.J.; Miatech, J.

    1996-10-01

    Results are reported for a technology program designed to determine the behavior of gas turbine engines when operating in particle-laden clouds. There are several ways that such clouds may be created, i.e., explosive volcanic eruption, sand storm, military conflict, etc. The response of several different engines, among them the Pratt and Whitney JT3D turbofan, the Pratt and Whitney J57 turbojet, a Pratt and Whitney engine of the JT9 vintage, and an engine of the General Electric CF6 vintage has been determined. The particular damage mode that will be dominant when an engine experiences a dust cloud depends upon the particular engine (the turbine inlet temperature at which the engine is operating when it encounters the dust cloud), the concentration of foreign material in the cloud, and the constituents of the foreign material (the respective melting temperature of the various constituents). Further, the rate at which engine damage will occur depends upon all of the factors given above, and the damage is cumulative with continued exposure. An important part of the Calspan effort has been to identify environmental warning signs and to determine which of the engine parameters available for monitoring by the flight crew can provide an early indication of impending difficulty. On the basis of current knowledge, if one knows the location of a particle-laden cloud, then that region should be avoided. However, if the cloud location is unknown, which is generally the case, then it is important to know how to recognize when an encounter has occurred and to understand how to operate safely, which is another part of the Calspan effort.

  10. Metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples for gas turbine engines.

    PubMed

    Tougas, Ian M; Amani, Matin; Gregory, Otto J

    2013-01-01

    Temperatures of hot section components in today's gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges) for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today's engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire) thermocouples. PMID:24217356

  11. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus help achieve engine low emission and high efficiency goals. Advanced T/EBCs are being developed for the low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water vapor containing combustion environments. Low conductivity thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are also being developed for metallic turbine airfoil and combustor applications, providing the component temperature capability up to 1650 C (3000 F). In this paper, ceramic coating development considerations and requirements for both the ceramic and metallic components will be described for engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. The underlying coating failure mechanisms and life prediction approaches will be discussed based on the simulated engine tests and fracture mechanics modeling results.

  12. Metallic and Ceramic Thin Film Thermocouples for Gas Turbine Engines

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, Ian M.; Amani, Matin; Gregory, Otto J.

    2013-01-01

    Temperatures of hot section components in today's gas turbine engines reach as high as 1,500 °C, making in situ monitoring of the severe temperature gradients within the engine rather difficult. Therefore, there is a need to develop instrumentation (i.e., thermocouples and strain gauges) for these turbine engines that can survive these harsh environments. Refractory metal and ceramic thin film thermocouples are well suited for this task since they have excellent chemical and electrical stability at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres, they are compatible with thermal barrier coatings commonly employed in today's engines, they have greater sensitivity than conventional wire thermocouples, and they are non-invasive to combustion aerodynamics in the engine. Thin film thermocouples based on platinum:palladium and indium oxynitride:indium tin oxynitride as well as their oxide counterparts have been developed for this purpose and have proven to be more stable than conventional type-S and type-K thin film thermocouples. The metallic and ceramic thin film thermocouples described within this paper exhibited remarkable stability and drift rates similar to bulk (wire) thermocouples. PMID:24217356

  13. Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine

    DOEpatents

    Leto, Anthony

    1983-01-01

    A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

  14. 76 FR 11844 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee; Transport Airplane and Engine Issue Area-Phase 2 of Low...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Issues Group. (The FAA published a notice of Phase 1 task assignment in the Federal Register (75 FR 16902... Airplanes'' (70 FR 40166, July 12, 2005). The ARAC working group should provide information that could lead... Engine Issue Area--Phase 2 of Low Speed Alerting Task AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  15. Energy efficient engine: Turbine transition duct model technology report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, K.; Thurlin, R.

    1982-01-01

    The Low-Pressure Turbine Transition Duct Model Technology Program was directed toward substantiating the aerodynamic definition of a turbine transition duct for the Energy Efficient Engine. This effort was successful in demonstrating an aerodynamically viable compact duct geometry and the performance benefits associated with a low camber low-pressure turbine inlet guide vane. The transition duct design for the flight propulsion system was tested and the pressure loss goal of 0.7 percent was verified. Also, strut fairing pressure distributions, as well as wall pressure coefficients, were in close agreement with analytical predictions. Duct modifications for the integrated core/low spool were also evaluated. The total pressure loss was 1.59 percent. Although the increase in exit area in this design produced higher wall loadings, reflecting a more aggressive aerodynamic design, pressure profiles showed no evidence of flow separation. Overall, the results acquired have provided pertinent design and diagnostic information for the design of a turbine transition duct for both the flight propulsion system and the integrated core/low spool.

  16. Thermal barrier coating on high temperature industrial gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N.; Stoner, B. L.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal barrier coating used was a yttria stabilized zirconia material with a NiCrAlY undercoat, and the base engine used to establish improvements was the P&WA FT50A-4 industrial gas turbine engine. The design benefits of thermal barrier coatings include simplified cooling schemes and the use of conventional alloys in the engine hot section. Cooling flow reductions and improved heating rates achieved with thermal barrier coating result in improved performance. Economic benefits include reduced power production costs and reduced fuel consumption. Over the 30,000 hour life of the thermal barrier coated parts, fuel savings equivalent to $5 million are projected and specific power (megawatts/mass of engine airflow) improvements on the order of 13% are estimated.

  17. Oil cooling system for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A.; Kast, H. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas turbine engine fuel delivery and control system is provided with means to recirculate all fuel in excess of fuel control requirements back to aircraft fuel tank, thereby increasing the fuel pump heat sink and decreasing the pump temperature rise without the addition of valving other than that normally employed. A fuel/oil heat exchanger and associated circuitry is provided to maintain the hot engine oil in heat exchange relationship with the cool engine fuel. Where anti-icing of the fuel filter is required, means are provided to maintain the fuel temperature entering the filter at or above a minimum level to prevent freezing thereof. Fluid circuitry is provided to route hot engine oil through a plurality of heat exchangers disposed within the system to provide for selective cooling of the oil.

  18. Cold-air performance of compressor-drive turbine of department of energy upgraded automobile gas turbine engine. 3: Performance of redesigned turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, R. J.; Haas, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a redesigned compressor drive turbine of the gas turbine engine is determined in air at nominal inlet conditions of 325 K and 0.8 bar absolute. The turbine is designed with a lower flow factor, higher rotor reaction and a redesigned inlet volute compared to the first turbine. Comparisons between this turbine and the originally designed turbine show about 2.3 percentage points improvement in efficiency at the same rotor tip clearance. Two versions of the same rotor are tested: (1) an as cast rotor, and (2) the same rotor with reduced surface roughness. The effect of reducing surface roughness is about one half percentage point improvement in efficiency. Tests made to determine the effect of Reynolds number on the turbine performance show no effect for the range from 100,000 to 500,000.

  19. Performance improvements of single-engine business airplanes by the integration of advanced technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    An assessment is presented of the performance gains and economic impact of the integration in general aviation aircraft of advanced technologies, relating to such aspects of design as propulsion, natural laminar flow, lift augmentation, unconventional configurations, and advanced aluminum and composite structures. All considerations are with reference to a baseline mission of 1300 nm range and 300-knot cruise speed with a 1300-lb payload, and a baseline aircraft with a 40 lb/sq ft wing loading and an aspect ratio of 8. Extensive analytical results are presented from the NASA-sponsored General Aviation Synthesis Program. Attention is given to the relative performance gains to be expected from the single-engined baseline aircraft's use of a low cost general aviation turbine engine, a spark-ignited reciprocating engine, a diesel engine, and a Wankel rotary engine.

  20. Engine Installation Effects of Four Civil Transport Airplanes: Wallops Flight Facility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gregg G.; Senzig, David A.; McCurdy, David A.; Roof, Christopher J.; Rapoza, Amanda S.

    2003-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC), the Environmental Measurement and Modeling Division of the United States Department of Transportation s John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe), and several other organizations (see Appendix A for a complete list of participating organizations and individuals) conducted a noise measurement study at NASA s Wallops Flight Facility (Wallops) near Chincoteague, Virginia during September 2000. This test was intended to determine engine installation effects on four civil transport airplanes: a Boeing 767-400, a McDonnell-Douglas DC9, a Dassault Falcon 2000, and a Beechcraft King Air. Wallops was chosen for this study because of the relatively low ambient noise of the site and the degree of control over airplane operating procedures enabled by operating over a runway closed to other uses during the test period. Measurements were conducted using a twenty microphone U-shaped array oriented perpendicular to the flight path; microphones were mounted such that ground effects were minimized and low elevation angles were observed.

  1. Preliminary flight evaluation of F100 engine model derivative airstart capability in an F-15 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, T. K.; Burcham, F. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A series of airstarts was conducted in an F-15 airplane with two prototype F100 engine model derivative (EMD) engines equipped with digital electronic engine control (DEEC) systems. The airstart envelope and time required for airstarts were defined. The success of an airstart is most heavily dependent on airspeed. Spooldown airstarts at 200 knots and higher were all successful. Spooldown airstart times ranged from 53 sec at 250 knots to 170 sec at 175 knots. Jet fuel starter (JFS) assisted airstarts were conducted at 175 knots at two altitudes, and airstart times were 50 and 60 sec, significantly faster than unassisted airstart. The effect of altitude on airstarts was small. In addition, the airstart characteristics of the two test engines were found to closely resemble each other. The F100 EMD airstart characteristics were very similar to the DEEC equipped F100 engine tested previously. Finally, the time required to spool down from intermediate power compressor rotor speed to a given compressor rotor speed was found to be a strong function of altitude and a weaker function of airspeed.

  2. 14 CFR 121.201 - Nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... category airplane may take off that airplane at a weight that does not allow a rate of climb of at least 50... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: En route...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS...

  3. 14 CFR 121.201 - Nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: En route...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.201 Nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One...

  4. 14 CFR 121.201 - Nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One engine inoperative.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: En route...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 121.201 Nontransport category airplanes: En route limitations: One...

  5. Performance of J33 turbojet engine with shaft-power extraction III : turbine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppert, M C; Nettles, J C

    1949-01-01

    The performance of the turbine component of a J33 turbojet engine was determined over a range of turbine speeds from 8000 to 11,500 rpm.Turbine-inlet temperature was varied from the minimum required to drive the compressor to a maximum of approximately 2000 degrees R at each of several intermediate turbine speeds. Data are presented that show the horsepower developed by the turbine per pound of gas flow. The relation between turbine-inlet stagnation pressure, turbine-outlet stagnation pressure, and turbine-outlet static pressure was established. The turbine-weight-flow parameter varied from 39.2 to 43.6. The maximum turbine efficiency measured was 0.86 at a pressure ratio of 3.5 and a ratio of blade speed to theoretical nozzle velocity of 0.39. A generalized performance map of the turbine-horsepower parameter plotted against the turbine-speed parameter indicated that the best turbine efficiency is obtained when the turbine power is 10 percent greater than the compressor horsepower. The variation of efficiency with the ratio of blade speed to nozzle velocity indicated that the turbine operates at a speed above that for maximum efficiency when the engine is operated normally with the 19-inch-diameter jet nozzle.

  6. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep; Pfefferle, William

    2010-04-01

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE's goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar Turbines

  7. Object-oriented approach for gas turbine engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlett, Brian P.; Felder, James L.

    1995-01-01

    An object-oriented gas turbine engine simulation program was developed. This program is a prototype for a more complete, commercial grade engine performance program now being proposed as part of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulator (NPSS). This report discusses architectural issues of this complex software system and the lessons learned from developing the prototype code. The prototype code is a fully functional, general purpose engine simulation program, however, only the component models necessary to model a transient compressor test rig have been written. The production system will be capable of steady state and transient modeling of almost any turbine engine configuration. Chief among the architectural considerations for this code was the framework in which the various software modules will interact. These modules include the equation solver, simulation code, data model, event handler, and user interface. Also documented in this report is the component based design of the simulation module and the inter-component communication paradigm. Object class hierarchies for some of the code modules are given.

  8. Foreign Object Damage Identification in Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strack, William; Zhang, Desheng; Turso, James; Pavlik, William; Lopez, Isaac

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the collective work of a five-person team from different organizations examining the problem of detecting foreign object damage (FOD) events in turbofan engines from gas path thermodynamic and bearing accelerometer sensors, and determining the severity of damage to each component (diagnosis). Several detection and diagnostic approaches were investigated and a software tool (FODID) was developed to assist researchers detect/diagnose FOD events. These approaches include (1) fan efficiency deviation computed from upstream and downstream temperature/ pressure measurements, (2) gas path weighted least squares estimation of component health parameter deficiencies, (3) Kalman filter estimation of component health parameters, and (4) use of structural vibration signal processing to detect both large and small FOD events. The last three of these approaches require a significant amount of computation in conjunction with a physics-based analytic model of the underlying phenomenon the NPSS thermodynamic cycle code for approaches 1 to 3 and the DyRoBeS reduced-order rotor dynamics code for approach 4. A potential application of the FODID software tool, in addition to its detection/diagnosis role, is using its sensitivity results to help identify the best types of sensors and their optimum locations within the gas path, and similarly for bearing accelerometers.

  9. Materials for advanced rocket engine turbopump turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    A study program was conducted to identify those materials that will provide the greatest benefits as turbine blades for advanced liquid propellant rocket engine turbines and to prepare technology plans for the development of those materials for use in the 1990 through 1995 period. The candidate materials were selected from six classes of materials: single-crystal (SC) superalloys, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) superalloys, rapid solidification processed (RSP) superalloys, directionally solidified eutectic (DSE) superalloys, fiber-reinforced superalloy (FRS) composites, and ceramics. Properties of materials from the six classes were compiled and evaluated and property improvements were projected approximately 5 years into the future for advanced versions of materials in each of the six classes.

  10. Radial inflow gas turbine engine with advanced transition duct

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J

    2015-03-17

    A gas turbine engine (10), including: a turbine having radial inflow impellor blades (38); and an array of advanced transition combustor assemblies arranged circumferentially about the radial inflow impellor blades (38) and having inner surfaces (34) that are adjacent to combustion gases (40). The inner surfaces (34) of the array are configured to accelerate and orient, for delivery directly onto the radial inflow impellor blades (38), a plurality of discrete flows of the combustion gases (40). The array inner surfaces (34) define respective combustion gas flow axes (20). Each combustion gas flow axis (20) is straight from a point of ignition until no longer bound by the array inner surfaces (34), and each combustion gas flow axis (20) intersects a unique location on a circumference defined by a sweep of the radial inflow impellor blades (38).

  11. An artificial neural network system for diagnosing gas turbine engine fuel faults

    SciTech Connect

    Illi, O.J. Jr.; Greitzer, F.L.; Kangas, L.J.; Reeve, T.

    1994-04-01

    The US Army Ordnance Center & School and Pacific Northwest Laboratories are developing a turbine engine diagnostic system for the M1A1 Abrams tank. This system employs Artificial Neural Network (AN) technology to perform diagnosis and prognosis of the tank`s AGT-1500 gas turbine engine. This paper describes the design and prototype development of the ANN component of the diagnostic system, which we refer to as ``TEDANN`` for Turbine Engine Diagnostic Artificial Neural Networks.

  12. Flight evaluation of the effect of winglets on performance and handling qualities of a single-engine general aviation airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Vandam, C. P.; Brown, P. W.; Deal, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    A flight evaluation was conducted to determine the effects of winglets on the performance and handling qualities of a light, single-engine general aviation airplane. The performance measurements were made with a pace airplane to provide calibrated airspeeds; uncalibrated panel instruments in the test airplane were used to provide additional quantitative performance data. These tests were conducted with winglets on and off during the same day to measure relative performance effects. Handling qualities were evaluated by means of pilot comments. Winglets increased cruise speed 8 knots (5.6 percent) at 3962 m (13,000 ft) density altitude and 51 percent maximum continuous power setting. Maximum speed at 3962 m was virtually unchanged. Rate of climb increased approximately 6 percent, or 0.25 m/sec (50 ft/min), at 1524 m (5000 ft). Stall speed was virtually unchanged. Handling qualities were favorably affected.

  13. Drag and Propulsive Characteristics of Air-Cooled Engine-Nacelle Installations for Large Airplanes, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Abe; Wilson, Herbert A., Jr.

    1939-01-01

    An investigation is in progress in the NACA full-scale wind tunnel to determine the drag and propulsive efficiency of nacelle sizes. In contrast with the usual tests with a single nacelle, these tests were conducted with nacelle-propeller installations on a large model of a 4-engine airplane. Data are presented on the first part of the investigation, covering seven nacelle arrangements with nacelle diameters from 0.53 to 1.5 times the wing thickness. These ratios are similar to those occurring on airplane weighing from about 20 to 100 tons. The results show that the drag, the propulsive efficiency, and the overall efficiency of the various nacelle arrangements as functions of the nacelle size, the propeller position, and the airplane lift coefficient. The effect of the nacelles on the aerodynamic characteristics of the model are shown for both propeller-removed and propeller-operating conditions.

  14. Evaluation of the ride quality of a light twin engine airplane using a ride quality meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    1989-01-01

    A ride quality meter was used to establish the baseline ride quality of a light twin-engine airplane planned for use as a test bed for an experimental gust alleviation system. The ride quality meter provides estimates of passenger ride discomfort as a function of cabin noise and vibration (acceleration) in five axes (yaw axis omitted). According to the ride quality meter, in smooth air the cabin noise was the dominant source of passenger discomfort, but the total discomfort was approximately the same as that for the smooth-air condition. The researcher's subjective opinion, however, is that the total ride discomfort was much worse in the moderate turbulence than it was in the smooth air. The discrepancy is explained by the lack of measurement of the low-frequency accelerations by the ride quality meter.

  15. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support project (HVTE-TS): Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This final technical report was prepared by Rolls-Royce Allison summarizing the multiyear activities of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) project. The ATTAP program was initiated in October 1987 and continued through 1993 under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Propulsion Systems, Advanced Propulsion Division. ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the automotive ceramic gas turbine engine. The target application was the prime power unit coupled to conventional transmissions and powertrains. During the early 1990s, hybrid electric powered automotive propulsion systems became the focus of development and demonstration efforts by the US auto industry and the Department of energy. Thus in 1994, the original ATTAP technology focus was redirected to meet the needs of advanced gas turbine electric generator sets. As a result, the program was restructured to provide the required hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support and the project renamed HVTE-TS. The overall objective of the combined ATTAP and HVTE-TS projects was to develop and demonstrate structural ceramic components that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating 3,500 hr in an advanced high temperature turbine engine environment. This report describes materials characterization and ceramic component development, ceramic components, hot gasifier rig testing, test-bed engine testing, combustion development, insulation development, and regenerator system development. 130 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of ceramics for stator application: Gas turbine engine report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trela, W.; Havstad, P. H.

    1978-01-01

    Current ceramic materials, component fabrication processes, and reliability prediction capability for ceramic stators in an automotive gas turbine engine environment are assessed. Simulated engine duty cycle testing of stators conducted at temperatures up to 1093 C is discussed. Materials evaluated are SiC and Si3N4 fabricated from two near-net-shape processes: slip casting and injection molding. Stators for durability cycle evaluation and test specimens for material property characterization, and reliability prediction model prepared to predict stator performance in the simulated engine environment are considered. The status and description of the work performed for the reliability prediction modeling, stator fabrication, material property characterization, and ceramic stator evaluation efforts are reported.

  17. Power recovery from turbine and gas engine exhausts

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, G.L.

    1985-02-01

    Due to the energy consciousness of the United States and to the ever increasing cost of engine fuels, power recovery from turbine and gas engine exhausts has come of age. The addition of waste recovery systems to these exhausts increases the thermal efficiencies of typical systems from the range of 21% to 39% up to the range of 28% to 49%. The new ''expander'' type power recovery system includes a waste heat recovery exchanger which will transfer heat from the engine exhaust into any of numerous thermal fluids. The recovered heat energy now in the thermal fluid medium can, in turn, be used to produce power for any desired application (i.e. gas compression, process refrigeration, electrical power generation, etc.). The particular systems put forth in this paper concentrate on the use of expansion fluids (other than steam) driving ''expanders'' as motive devices.

  18. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine and Diesel Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings under high temperature cyclic conditions are still of major concern. The coating failure depends not only on the coating, but also on the ceramic sintering/creep and bond coat oxidation under the operating conditions. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic transient and steady state temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. This paper presents detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coating systems, thus providing a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  19. Oil cooling system for a gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A.; Kast, H. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas turbine engine fuel delivery and control system is provided with means to recirculate all fuel in excess fuel control requirements back to the aircraft fuel tank. This increases the fuel pump heat sink and decreases the pump temperature rise without the addition of valving other than normally employed. A fuel/oil heat exchanger and associated circuitry is provided to maintain the hot engine oil in heat exchange relationship with the cool engine fuel. Where anti-icing of the fuel filter is required, means are provided to maintain the fuel temperature entering the filter at or above a minimum level to prevent freezing thereof. In one embodiment, a divider valve is provided to take all excess fuel from either upstream or downstream of the fuel filter and route it back to the tanks, the ratio of upstream to downstream extraction being a function of fuel pump discharge pressure.

  20. Assessment of advanced technologies for high performance single-engine business airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohlman, D. L.; Holmes, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    The prospects for significantly increasing the fuel efficiency and mission capability of single engine business aircraft through the incorporation of advanced propulsion, aerodynamics and materials technologies are explored. It is found that turbine engines cannot match the fuel economy of the heavier rotary, diesel and advanced spark reciprocating engines. The rotary engine yields the lightest and smallest aircraft for a given mission requirement, and also offers greater simplicity and a multifuel capability. Great promise is also seen in the use of composite material primary structures in conjunction with laminar flow wing surfaces, a pusher propeller and conventional wing-tail configuration. This study was conducted with the General Aviation Synthesis Program, which can furnish the most accurate mission performance calculations yet obtained.