Science.gov

Sample records for airport ground operations

  1. Analysis and Modeling of Ground Operations at Hub Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, Stephen (Technical Monitor); Andersson, Kari; Carr, Francis; Feron, Eric; Hall, William D.

    2000-01-01

    Building simple and accurate models of hub airports can considerably help one understand airport dynamics, and may provide quantitative estimates of operational airport improvements. In this paper, three models are proposed to capture the dynamics of busy hub airport operations. Two simple queuing models are introduced to capture the taxi-out and taxi-in processes. An integer programming model aimed at representing airline decision-making attempts to capture the dynamics of the aircraft turnaround process. These models can be applied for predictive purposes. They may also be used to evaluate control strategies for improving overall airport efficiency.

  2. Surveillance of ground vehicles for airport security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Wang, Zhonghai; Shen, Dan; Ling, Haibin; Chen, Genshe

    2014-06-01

    Future surveillance systems will work in complex and cluttered environments which require systems engineering solutions for such applications such as airport ground surface management. In this paper, we highlight the use of a L1 video tracker for monitoring activities at an airport. We present methods of information fusion, entity detection, and activity analysis using airport videos for runway detection and airport terminal events. For coordinated airport security, automated ground surveillance enhances efficient and safe maneuvers for aircraft, unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) operating within airport environments.

  3. Airport surface operations requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, John L.; Vonbokern, Greg J.; Wray, Rick L.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Airport Surface Operations Requirements Analysis (ASORA) study. This study was conducted in response to task 24 of NASA Contract NAS1-18027. This study is part of NASA LaRC's Low Visibility Surface Operations program, which is designed to eliminate the constraints on all-weather arrival/departure operations due to the airport/aircraft ground system. The goal of this program is to provide the capability for safe and efficient aircraft operations on the airport surface during low visibility conditions down to zero. The ASORA study objectives were to (1) develop requirements for operation on the airport surface in visibilities down to zero; (2) survey and evaluate likely technologies; (3) develop candidate concepts to meet the requirements; and (4) select the most suitable concept based on cost/benefit factors.

  4. English for Airport Ground Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  5. Integrated Airport Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczo, S.

    1998-01-01

    The current air traffic environment in airport terminal areas experiences substantial delays when weather conditions deteriorate to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Research activity at NASA has culminated in the development, flight test and demonstration of a prototype Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) system. A NASA led industry team and the FAA developed the system which integrated airport surface surveillance systems, aeronautical data links, DGPS navigation, automation systems, and controller and flight deck displays. The LVLASO system was demonstrated at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport using a Boeing 757-200 aircraft during August, 1997. This report documents the contractors role in this testing particularly in the area of data link and DGPS navigation.

  6. Surface Operations Systems Improve Airport Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Ames Research Center, Mosaic ATM of Leesburg, Virginia created software to analyze surface operations at airports. Surface surveillance systems, which report locations every second for thousands of air and ground vehicles, generate massive amounts of data, making gathering and analyzing this information difficult. Mosaic?s Surface Operations Data Analysis and Adaptation (SODAA) tool is an off-line support tool that can analyze how well the airport surface operation is working and can help redesign procedures to improve operations. SODAA helps researchers pinpoint trends and correlations in vast amounts of recorded airport operations data.

  7. Planning, Management, and Economics of Airport Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, J.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the role of the airport in the transportation complex and in the community is presented. The establishment of the airport including its requirements in regional planning and the operation of the airport as a social and economic force are discussed.

  8. Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, Randy

    2000-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Integrated Space Transportation; 2) Fourth Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Research; 3) Ground Operations; 4) Ground Operations Technologies; 5) Sensors; and 6) Umbilicals. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  9. Airport noise impact reduction through operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1981-01-01

    The airport-noise levels and annoyance model (ALAMO) developed at NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of a system of computer programs which is capable of quantifying airport community noise impact in terms of noise level, population distribution, and human subjective response to noise. The ALAMO can be used to compare the noise impact of an airport's current operating scenario with the noise impact which would result from some proposed change in airport operations. The relative effectiveness of number of noise-impact reduction alternatives is assessed for a major midwest airport. Significant reductions in noise impact are predicted for certain noise abatement strategies while others are shown to result in relatively little noise relief.

  10. Airport noise impact reduction through operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of various aeronautical, operational, and land-use noise impact reduction alternatives are assessed for a major midwestern airport. Specifically, the relative effectiveness of adding sound absorbing material to aircraft engines, imposing curfews, and treating houses with acoustic insulation are examined.

  11. Radar returns from ground clutter in vicinity of airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raemer, H. R.; Rahgavan, R.; Bhattacharya, A.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a dynamic simulation of the received signals from natural and man-made ground features in the vicinity of airports. The simulation is run during landing and takeoff stages of a flight. Vugraphs of noteworthy features of the simulation, ground clutter data bases, the development of algorithms for terrain features, typical wave theory results, and a gravity wave height profile are given.

  12. 75 FR 9017 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... CFR Sec. 93.227 (DCA); 74 FR 51648 (Oct. 7, 2009) (EWR); 74 FR 51650 (Oct. 7, 2009) (JFK); 74 FR 51653... Airport, LaGuardia Airport and Newark Liberty International Airport; High Density Rule at Reagan National... Density Rule and orders limiting scheduled operations at the airports, slots must be used at least...

  13. 19 CFR 122.12 - Operation of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Administration in 14 CFR part 91. (2) Customs and Border Protection. CBP, based on security or other risk... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Operation of international airports. 122.12...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.12 Operation of...

  14. 19 CFR 122.12 - Operation of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Administration in 14 CFR part 91. (2) Customs and Border Protection. CBP, based on security or other risk... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operation of international airports. 122.12...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.12 Operation of...

  15. 19 CFR 122.12 - Operation of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Administration in 14 CFR part 91. (2) Customs and Border Protection. CBP, based on security or other risk... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Operation of international airports. 122.12...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.12 Operation of...

  16. 19 CFR 122.12 - Operation of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Administration in 14 CFR part 91. (2) Customs and Border Protection. CBP, based on security or other risk... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Operation of international airports. 122.12...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.12 Operation of...

  17. 19 CFR 122.12 - Operation of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Administration in 14 CFR part 91. (2) Customs and Border Protection. CBP, based on security or other risk... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Operation of international airports. 122.12...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.12 Operation of...

  18. 49 CFR 1560.111 - Covered airport operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Covered airport operators. 1560.111 Section 1560.111 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY... Transmission of Secure Flight Passenger Data for Watch List Matching § 1560.111 Covered airport operators....

  19. 49 CFR 1560.111 - Covered airport operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Covered airport operators. 1560.111 Section 1560.111 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY... Transmission of Secure Flight Passenger Data for Watch List Matching § 1560.111 Covered airport operators....

  20. 75 FR 61612 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ...The FAA is amending its airports and locations special operating restrictions regulation to clarify a minor discrepancy in terminology. This amendment standardizes the language used to describe the altitude at which aircraft operating within 30 nautical miles of the listed airports are required to be equipped with an altitude encoding transponder. This action is not making any substantive......

  1. 48 CFR 1252.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) 48 CFR 1236.570, insert the following clause: Special Precautions for Work at Operating Airports (OCT... Contractor. The maximum speed allowed at the airport shall be established by airport management....

  2. Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) New R&D Simulator for Airport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorighi, Nancy S.

    1997-01-01

    A new simulator, the Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) is under construction at the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Jointly funded by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NASA, the SDTF will be a testbed for airport surface automation technologies of the future. The SDTF will be operational in the third quarter of 1998. The SDTF will combine a virtual tower with simulated ground operations to allow evaluation of new technologies for safety, effectiveness, reliability, and cost benefit. The full-scale level V tower will provide a seamless 360 degree high resolution out-the-window view, and a full complement of ATC (air traffic control) controller positions. The imaging system will be generated by two fully-configured Silicon Graphics Onyx Infinite Reality computers, and will support surface movement of up to 200 aircraft and ground vehicles. The controller positions, displays and consoles can be completely reconfigured to match the unique layout of any individual airport tower. Dedicated areas will accommodate pseudo-airport ramp controllers, pseudo-airport operators, and pseudo-pilots. Up to 33 total personnel positions will be able to participate in simultaneous operational scenarios. A realistic voice communication infrastructure will emulate the intercom and telephone communications of a real airport tower. Multi-channel audio and video recording and a sophisticated data acquisition system will support a wide variety of research and development areas, such as evaluation of automation tools for surface operations, human factors studies, integration of terminal area and airport technologies, and studies of potential airport physical and procedural modifications.

  3. Optimizing integrated airport surface and terminal airspace operations under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosson, Christabelle S.

    In airports and surrounding terminal airspaces, the integration of surface, arrival and departure scheduling and routing have the potential to improve the operations efficiency. Moreover, because both the airport surface and the terminal airspace are often altered by random perturbations, the consideration of uncertainty in flight schedules is crucial to improve the design of robust flight schedules. Previous research mainly focused on independently solving arrival scheduling problems, departure scheduling problems and surface management scheduling problems and most of the developed models are deterministic. This dissertation presents an alternate method to model the integrated operations by using a machine job-shop scheduling formulation. A multistage stochastic programming approach is chosen to formulate the problem in the presence of uncertainty and candidate solutions are obtained by solving sample average approximation problems with finite sample size. The developed mixed-integer-linear-programming algorithm-based scheduler is capable of computing optimal aircraft schedules and routings that reflect the integration of air and ground operations. The assembled methodology is applied to a Los Angeles case study. To show the benefits of integrated operations over First-Come-First-Served, a preliminary proof-of-concept is conducted for a set of fourteen aircraft evolving under deterministic conditions in a model of the Los Angeles International Airport surface and surrounding terminal areas. Using historical data, a representative 30-minute traffic schedule and aircraft mix scenario is constructed. The results of the Los Angeles application show that the integration of air and ground operations and the use of a time-based separation strategy enable both significant surface and air time savings. The solution computed by the optimization provides a more efficient routing and scheduling than the First-Come-First-Served solution. Additionally, a data driven analysis is

  4. Airports, Hotel, and Ground Transportation Information | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Airports in and near Washington, DC Reagan National Approximate 30 minute drive from Rockville* Has its own Metro stop on the blue and yellow lines in Virginia NOTE: This airport may be the closest and easiest option if not renting a car or do not want to pay for an airport cab/shuttle.   Dulles International Approximate 1 hour drive from Rockville* |

  5. NASA Research on an Integrated Concept for Airport Surface Operations Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Surface operations at airports in the US are based on tactical operations, where departure aircraft primarily queue up and wait at the departure runways. There have been attempts to address the resulting inefficiencies with both strategic and tactical tools for metering departure aircraft. This presentation gives an overview of Spot And Runway Departure Advisor with Collaborative Decision Making (SARDA-CDM): an integrated strategic and tactical system for improving surface operations by metering departure aircraft. SARDA-CDM is the augmentation of ground and local controller advisories through sharing of flight movement and related operations information between airport operators, flight operators and air traffic control at the airport. The goal is to enhance the efficiency of airport surface operations by exchanging information between air traffic control and airline operators, while minimizing adverse effects on stakeholders and passengers. The presentation motivates the need for departure metering, and provides a brief background on the previous work on SARDA. Then, the concept of operations for SARDA-CDM is described. Then the preliminary results from testing the concept in a real-time automated simulation environment are described. Results indicate benefits such as reduction in taxiing delay and fuel consumption. Further, the preliminary implementation of SARDA-CDM seems robust for two minutes delay in gate push-back times.

  6. Multi-modal cockpit interface for improved airport surface operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J. (Inventor); Bailey, Randall E. (Inventor); Prinzel, III, Lawrence J. (Inventor); Kramer, Lynda J. (Inventor); Williams, Steven P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for multi-modal cockpit interface during surface operation of an aircraft comprises a head tracking device, a processing element, and a full-color head worn display. The processing element is configured to receive head position information from the head tracking device, to receive current location information of the aircraft, and to render a virtual airport scene corresponding to the head position information and the current aircraft location. The full-color head worn display is configured to receive the virtual airport scene from the processing element and to display the virtual airport scene. The current location information may be received from one of a global positioning system or an inertial navigation system.

  7. 14 CFR 382.105 - What is the responsibility of carriers at foreign airports at which airport operators have...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What is the responsibility of carriers at foreign airports at which airport operators have responsibility for enplaning, deplaning, and connecting assistance? 382.105 Section 382.105 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS)...

  8. 77 FR 68196 - Orders Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ... CFR 93.227 (DCA); 74 FR 51648 (Oct. 7, 2009) (EWR); 74 FR 51650 (Oct. 7, 2009) (JFK); 77 FR 30585 (May...Guardia Airport, and Newark Liberty International Airport; High Density Rule at Reagan Washington National... operations took several days after the storm. FAA Analysis Under the FAA's High Density Rule at DCA...

  9. Cost Benefit Analysis Modeling Tool for Electric vs. ICE Airport Ground Support Equipment – Development and Results

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort; Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard

    2007-02-01

    This report documents efforts to develop a computer tool for modeling the economic payback for comparative airport ground support equipment (GSE) that are propelled by either electric motors or gasoline and diesel engines. The types of GSE modeled are pushback tractors, baggage tractors, and belt loaders. The GSE modeling tool includes an emissions module that estimates the amount of tailpipe emissions saved by replacing internal combustion engine GSE with electric GSE. This report contains modeling assumptions, methodology, a user’s manual, and modeling results. The model was developed based on the operations of two airlines at four United States airports.

  10. 14 CFR 121.637 - Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) No pilot may take off from an alternate airport unless the weather conditions are at least equal to... operations. (a) No pilot may takeoff an airplane from an airport that is not listed in the operations specifications unless— (1) The airport and related facilities are adequate for the operation of the airplane;...

  11. 14 CFR 121.637 - Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) No pilot may take off from an alternate airport unless the weather conditions are at least equal to... operations. (a) No pilot may takeoff an airplane from an airport that is not listed in the operations specifications unless— (1) The airport and related facilities are adequate for the operation of the airplane;...

  12. 48 CFR 1252.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Provisions and Clauses 1252.236-70 Special precautions for work at operating airports. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1236.570, insert the following clause: Special Precautions for Work at Operating Airports (OCT... work at operating airports. 1252.236-70 Section 1252.236-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  13. 48 CFR 3052.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... work at operating airports. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3036.570, insert the following clause: Special Precautions for Work at Operating Airports (DEC 2003) (a) When work is to be performed at an... work at operating airports. 3052.236-70 Section 3052.236-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  14. 48 CFR 1252.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Provisions and Clauses 1252.236-70 Special precautions for work at operating airports. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1236.570, insert the following clause: Special Precautions for Work at Operating Airports (OCT... work at operating airports. 1252.236-70 Section 1252.236-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  15. 48 CFR 3052.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... work at operating airports. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3036.570, insert the following clause: Special Precautions for Work at Operating Airports (DEC 2003) (a) When work is to be performed at an... work at operating airports. 3052.236-70 Section 3052.236-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  16. 14 CFR 61.325 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and D airspace, or in... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.325 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and...

  17. 14 CFR 61.325 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and D airspace, or in... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.325 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and...

  18. 14 CFR 61.325 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and D airspace, or in... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.325 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and...

  19. 14 CFR 61.325 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and D airspace, or in... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.325 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and...

  20. 14 CFR 61.325 - How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and D airspace, or in... CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.325 How do I obtain privileges to operate a light-sport aircraft at an airport within, or in airspace within, Class B, C, and...

  1. Analysis and Prediction of Weather Impacted Ground Stop Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2014-01-01

    When the air traffic demand is expected to exceed the available airport's capacity for a short period of time, Ground Stop (GS) operations are implemented by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Traffic Flow Management (TFM). The GS requires departing aircraft meeting specific criteria to remain on the ground to achieve reduced demands at the constrained destination airport until the end of the GS. This paper provides a high-level overview of the statistical distributions as well as causal factors for the GSs at the major airports in the United States. The GS's character, the weather impact on GSs, GS variations with delays, and the interaction between GSs and Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) at Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) are investigated. The machine learning methods are used to generate classification models that map the historical airport weather forecast, schedule traffic, and other airport conditions to implemented GS/GDP operations and the models are evaluated using the cross-validations. This modeling approach produced promising results as it yielded an 85% overall classification accuracy to distinguish the implemented GS days from the normal days without GS and GDP operations and a 71% accuracy to differentiate the GS and GDP implemented days from the GDP only days.

  2. Streamlining shuttle ground operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimbold, R. L.; Reichert, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    To meet NASA Space Transportation System goals the Shuttle Processing Contractors have to reduce Space Transportation System ground processing time and ground processing costs. These objectives must be met without compromising safety of flight or safety during assembly, test, and service operations. Ground processing requirements are analyzed to determine critical serial flow paths and costly labor-intensive tasks. Processing improvements are realized by improvements in processing methodology, by application of computer-aided technology, and by modernization of KSC facilities. Ongoing improvement efforts are outlined and progress-to-date is described.

  3. Study Results on Knowledge Requirements for Entry-Level Airport Operations and Management Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilty, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper identifies important topical knowledge areas required of individuals employed in airport operations and management positions. A total of 116 airport managers and airfield operations personnel responded to a survey that sought to identify the importance of various subject matter for entry level airport operations personnel. The results from this study add to the body of research on aviation management curriculum development and can be used to better develop university curriculum and supplemental training focused on airport management and operations. Recommendations are made for specialized airport courses within aviation management programs. Further, this study identifies for job seekers or individuals employed in entry level positions those knowledge requirements deemed important by airport managers and operations personnel at different sized airports.

  4. 78 FR 57674 - Order Limiting Operations at Newark Liberty International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... waivers to the usage requirement except under the most unusual circumstances. \\1\\ 78 FR 28280, 28281 (May... Federal Aviation Administration Order Limiting Operations at Newark Liberty International Airport AGENCY... authorizations (slots) at Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) due to construction at the airport...

  5. 14 CFR 105.23 - Parachute operations over or onto airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parachute operations over or onto airports... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 105.23 Parachute operations over or onto airports. No person may conduct a parachute operation, and no pilot...

  6. 14 CFR 105.23 - Parachute operations over or onto airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parachute operations over or onto airports... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 105.23 Parachute operations over or onto airports. No person may conduct a parachute operation, and no pilot...

  7. 14 CFR 105.23 - Parachute operations over or onto airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Parachute operations over or onto airports... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 105.23 Parachute operations over or onto airports. No person may conduct a parachute operation, and no pilot...

  8. 14 CFR 105.23 - Parachute operations over or onto airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Parachute operations over or onto airports... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 105.23 Parachute operations over or onto airports. No person may conduct a parachute operation, and no pilot...

  9. 14 CFR 105.23 - Parachute operations over or onto airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Parachute operations over or onto airports... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 105.23 Parachute operations over or onto airports. No person may conduct a parachute operation, and no pilot...

  10. SARDA: An Integrated Concept for Airport Surface Operations Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Gautam; Hoang, Ty; Jung, Yoon Chul

    2013-01-01

    The Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) is an integrated decision support tool for airlines and air traffic control tower enabling surface collaborative decision making (CDM) and departure metering in order to enhance efficiency of surface operations at congested airports. The presentation describes the concept and architecture of the SARDA as a CDM tool, and the results from a human-in-the-loop simulation of the tool conducted in 2012 at the FutureFlight Central, the tower simulation facility. Also, presented is the current activities and future plan for SARDA development. The presentation was given at the meeting with the FAA senior advisor of the Surface Operations Office.

  11. Research Of Airborne Precision Spacing to Improve Airport Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Baxley, Brian T.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In September 2004, the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL) and the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation to mutually develop, modify, test, and evaluate systems, procedures, facilities, and devices to meet the need for safe and efficient air navigation and air traffic control in the future. In the United States and Europe, these efforts are defined within the architectures of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Program and Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) Program respectively. Both programs have identified Airborne Spacing as a critical component, with Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) as a key enabler. Increased interest in reducing airport community noise and the escalating cost of aviation fuel has led to the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures to reduce noise, emissions, and fuel usage compared to current procedures. To provide these operational enhancements, arrival flight paths into terminal areas are planned around continuous vertical descents that are closer to an optimum trajectory than those in use today. The profiles are designed to be near-idle descents from cruise altitude to the Final Approach Fix (FAF) and are typically without any level segments. By staying higher and faster than conventional arrivals, CDAs also save flight time for the aircraft operator. The drawback is that the variation of optimized trajectories for different types and weights of aircraft requires the Air Traffic Controller to provide more airspace around an aircraft on a CDA than on a conventional arrival procedure. This additional space decreases the throughput rate of the destination airport. Airborne self-spacing concepts have been developed to increase the throughput at high-demand airports by managing the inter-arrival spacing to be more precise and consistent using on-board guidance. It has been proposed that the

  12. 14 CFR 121.637 - Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.637 Section 121.637 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.637 Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and...

  13. 14 CFR 121.637 - Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.637 Section 121.637 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.637 Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and...

  14. 14 CFR 121.637 - Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.637 Section 121.637 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.637 Takeoffs from unlisted and alternate airports: Domestic and...

  15. 14 CFR 121.621 - Alternate airport for destination: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate airport for destination: Flag... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.621 Alternate airport for destination: Flag operations. (a) No person may dispatch an...

  16. 14 CFR 121.621 - Alternate airport for destination: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate airport for destination: Flag... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.621 Alternate airport for destination: Flag operations. (a) No person may dispatch an...

  17. 14 CFR 121.621 - Alternate airport for destination: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate airport for destination: Flag... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.621 Alternate airport for destination: Flag operations. (a) No person may dispatch an...

  18. 14 CFR 121.621 - Alternate airport for destination: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate airport for destination: Flag... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.621 Alternate airport for destination: Flag operations. (a) No person may dispatch an...

  19. 14 CFR 121.621 - Alternate airport for destination: Flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate airport for destination: Flag... OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Dispatching and Flight Release Rules § 121.621 Alternate airport for destination: Flag operations. (a) No person may dispatch an...

  20. Ground-water and surface-water elevations in the Fairbanks International Airport area, Alaska, 1990-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claar, D.V.; Lilly, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water elevation data were collected at 52 sites from 1990 to 1994 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, Fairbanks International Airport. Water elevations were measured in 32 ground-water observation wells and at 20 surface-water sites to help characterize the geohydrology of the Fairbanks International Airport area. From 1990 to 1993, data were collected in the vicinity of the former fire-training area at the airport. From 1993 to 1994, the data-collection area was expanded to include the entire airport area.

  1. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  2. Virtual Airport Simulation Technology: Perceptions of Airport Operations Initial Training Program Variables and Effectiveness for Airside Professional Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCarlo, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Air travel is expected to grow by a factor of 2 to 3 times by 2025 and people working in the aviation system, including airport personnel, pilots, and air traffic controllers, must be able to safely and efficiently operate in this arena ("NextGen"). In response to the personnel training and education requirements concomitant with "NextGen,"…

  3. Operational Characteristics Identification and Simulation Model Verification for Incheon International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, Yeonju; Jeon, Daekeun; Lee, Hanbong; Zhu, Zhifan; Jung, Yoon C.; Jeong, Myeongsook; Kim, Hyounkyong; Oh, Eunmi; Hong, Sungkwon; Lee, Junwon

    2016-01-01

    Incheon International Airport (ICN) is one of the hub airports in East Asia. Airport operations at ICN have been growing more than 5 percent per year in the past five years. According to the current airport expansion plan, a new passenger terminal will be added and the current cargo ramp will be expanded in 2018. This expansion project will bring 77 new stands without adding a new runway to the airport. Due to such continuous growth in airport operations and future expansion of the ramps, it will be highly likely that airport surface traffic will experience more congestion, and therefore, suffer from efficiency degradation. There is a growing awareness in aviation research community of need for strategic and tactical surface scheduling capabilities for efficient airport surface operations. Specific to ICN airport operations, a need for A-CDM (Airport - Collaborative Decision Making) or S-CDM (Surface - Collaborative Decision Making), and controller decision support tools for efficient air traffic management has arisen since several years ago. In the United States, there has been independent research efforts made by academia, industry, and government research organizations to enhance efficiency and predictability of surface operations at busy airports. Among these research activities, the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) developed and tested by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a decision support tool to provide tactical advisories to the controllers for efficient surface operations. The effectiveness of SARDA concept, was successfully verified through the human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations for both spot release and runway operations advisories for ATC Tower controllers of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in 2010 and 2012, and gate pushback advisories for the ramp controller of Charlotte-Douglas International Airport (CLT) in 2014. The SARDA concept for tactical surface scheduling is further enhanced and is being

  4. Operational Characteristics Identification and Simulation Model Verification for Incheon International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, Yeonju; Jeon, Daekeun; Lee, Hanbong; Zhu, Zhifan; Jung, Yoon C.; Jeong, Myeongsook; Kim, Hyounkyong; Oh, Eunmi; Hong, Sungkwon; Lee, Junwon

    2016-01-01

    Incheon International Airport (ICN) is one of the hub airports in East Asia. Airport operations at ICN have been growing more than 5% per year in the past five years. According to the current airport expansion plan, a new passenger terminal will be added and the current cargo ramp will be expanded in 2018. This expansion project will bring 77 new stands without adding a new runway to the airport. Due to such continuous growth in airport operations and future expansion of the ramps, it will be highly likely that airport surface traffic will experience more congestion, and therefore, suffer from efficiency degradation. There is a growing awareness in aviation research community of need for strategic and tactical surface scheduling capabilities for efficient airport surface operations. Specific to ICN airport operations, a need for A-CDM (Airport - Collaborative Decision Making) or S-CDM(Surface - Collaborative Decision Making), and controller decision support tools for efficient air traffic management has arisen since several years ago. In the United States, there has been independent research efforts made by academia, industry, and government research organizations to enhance efficiency and predictability of surface operations at busy airports. Among these research activities, the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) developed and tested by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a decision support tool to provide tactical advisories to the controllers for efficient surface operations. The effectiveness of SARDA concept, was successfully verified through the human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations for both spot release and runway operations advisories for ATC Tower controllers of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in 2010 and 2012, and gate pushback advisories for the ramp controller of Charlotte/Douglas International Airport (CLT) in 2014. The SARDA concept for tactical surface scheduling is further enhanced and is being integrated into

  5. 48 CFR 3036.570 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... clause at (HSAR) 48 CFR 3052.236-70, Special Precautions for Work at Operating Airports, in solicitations... work at operating airports. 3036.570 Section 3036.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND SECURITY ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) SPECIAL CATEGORIES...

  6. IFR Operations at Non-Towered, Non-Radar Airports: Can we do Better Than One-at-a-Time?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, K.; Williams, D.; Consiglio, M.; Adams, C.; Abbott, T.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a new concept for operations in non-radar terminal airspace around small, nontowered airports. Currently, air traffic operations in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) at airfields without control towers and radar service are severely constrained by what is known as the one-in/one-out paradigm. Under these conditions only one operation (either arrival or departure) is allowed to occur at a time. Since these operations can take over 15 minutes to complete, capacity at these airports is severely restricted in IMC. The proposed concept is an attempt to break this current paradigm by applying emerging airborne and ground-based technologies to enable simultaneous operations by multiple aircraft in nonradar terminal airspace around small non-towered airports in IMC. The general philosophy underlying this concept of operations is the establishment of a newly defined area surrounding these airports called a Self-Controlled Area (SCA). Aircraft operating within the SCA are required to have a specified minimum level of equipage. Within the SCA, pilots are responsible for separating themselves from other similarly equipped aircraft through the use of new onboard systems and procedures. This concept also takes advantage of newly developed automation at the airport, which provides appropriate sequencing information to the pilots for safe and improved operations. Such operations would enhance the opportunity for point-to-point air taxi or charter operations into smaller airfields that are closer to a traveler s origin and destination. A description of this concept of operations and a simulation environment used for evaluation is provided in this paper.

  7. Safely Conducting Airport Surface Trajectory-Based Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Barnes, James R.

    2014-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) to evaluate the ability to safely conduct surface trajectory-based operations (STBO) by assessing the impact of providing traffic intent information, conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) system capability, and the display of STBO guidance to the flight crew on both head-down and head-up displays (HUD). Nominal and off-nominal conflict scenarios were conducted using 12 airline crews operating in a simulated Memphis International Airport terminal environment. The flight crews met their required time-of-arrival at route end within 10 seconds on 98 percent of the trials, well within the acceptable performance bounds of 15 seconds. Traffic intent information was found to be useful in determining the intent of conflict traffic, with graphical presentation preferred. The CD&R system was only minimally effective during STBO because the prevailing visibility was sufficient for visual detection of incurring traffic. Overall, the pilots indicated STBO increased general situation awareness but also negatively impacted workload, reduced the ability to watch for other traffic, and increased head-down time.

  8. Electric Ground Support Equipment Advanced Battery Technology Demonstration Project at the Ontario Airport

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler Gray; Jeremy Diez; Jeffrey Wishart; James Francfort

    2013-07-01

    The intent of the electric Ground Support Equipment (eGSE) demonstration is to evaluate the day-to-day vehicle performance of electric baggage tractors using two advanced battery technologies to demonstrate possible replacements for the flooded lead-acid (FLA) batteries utilized throughout the industry. These advanced battery technologies have the potential to resolve barriers to the widespread adoption of eGSE deployment. Validation testing had not previously been performed within fleet operations to determine if the performance of current advanced batteries is sufficient to withstand the duty cycle of electric baggage tractors. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. This report summarizes the work performed and data accumulated during this demonstration in an effort to validate the capabilities of advanced battery technologies. The demonstration project also grew the relationship with Southwest Airlines (SWA), our demonstration partner at Ontario International Airport (ONT), located in Ontario, California. The results of this study have encouraged a proposal for a future demonstration project with SWA.

  9. Grimsvotn ash plume detection by ground-based elastic Lidar at Dublin Airport on May 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, S.; Martucci, G.; O'Dowd, C.; sauvage, L.; Nolan, P.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic emissions comprising steam, ash, and gases are injected into the atmosphere and produce effects affecting Earth's climate. Volcanic ash is composed of non-spherical mineral and metal (particles spanning a large size range. The largest ones are likely to sediment quickly close to the eruption site. The ash component, and sulphate formed by subsequent oxidation of the SO2 occurring in clouds, poses a variety of hazards to humans and machinery on the ground, as well as damage to the aircrafts which fly through the ash layers. To mitigate such hazards the Irish Aviation Authority (IAA) equipped with an ALS Lidar, produced by LEOSPHERE, deployed at Dublin Airport, which provides real-time range-corrected backscatter signal and depolarization ratio profiles allowing the detection and monitoring of ash plumes. On May, 21st 2011, the Grimsvotn Icelandic volcano erupted, sending a plume of ash, smoke and steam 12 km into the air and causing flights to be disrupted at Iceland's main Keflavik airport and at a number of North European airports. Due to upper level global circulation, the ash plume moved from Iceland towards Ireland and North of Scotland, and was detected a number of times by the ALS Lidar above Dublin Airport between May, 21st and 25th. A preliminary analysis of the detected volcanic plume is presented here as well as a preliminary intercomparison of the microphysical and optical characteristics with the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in 2010.

  10. A Concept and Implementation of Optimized Operations of Airport Surface Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoon C.; Hoang, Ty; Montoya, Justin; Gupta, Gautam; Malik, Waqar; Tobias, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept of optimized surface operations at busy airports to improve the efficiency of taxi operations, as well as reduce environmental impacts. The suggested system architecture consists of the integration of two decoupled optimization algorithms. The Spot Release Planner provides sequence and timing advisories to tower controllers for releasing departure aircraft into the movement area to reduce taxi delay while achieving maximum throughput. The Runway Scheduler provides take-off sequence and arrival runway crossing sequence to the controllers to maximize the runway usage. The description of a prototype implementation of this integrated decision support tool for the airport control tower controllers is also provided. The prototype decision support tool was evaluated through a human-in-the-loop experiment, where both the Spot Release Planner and Runway Scheduler provided advisories to the Ground and Local Controllers. Initial results indicate the average number of stops made by each departure aircraft in the departure runway queue was reduced by more than half when the controllers were using the advisories, which resulted in reduced taxi times in the departure queue.

  11. 48 CFR 3052.236-70 - Special precautions for work at operating airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... work at operating airports. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3036.570, insert the following clause... within the existing aprons shall be the electric type of not less than 100 watts intensity placed...

  12. Airport Viz - a 3D Tool to Enhance Security Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In the summer of 2000, the National Safe Skies Alliance (NSSA) awarded a project to the Applied Visualization Center (AVC) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) to develop a 3D computer tool to assist the Federal Aviation Administration security group, now the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), in evaluating new equipment and procedures to improve airport checkpoint security. A preliminary tool was demonstrated at the 2001 International Aviation Security Technology Symposium. Since then, the AVC went on to construct numerous detection equipment models as well as models of several airports. Airport Viz has been distributed by the NSSA to a number of airports around the country which are able to incorporate their own CAD models into the software due to its unique open architecture. It provides a checkpoint design and passenger flow simulation function, a layout design and simulation tool for checked baggage and cargo screening, and a means to assist in the vulnerability assessment of airport access points for pedestrians and vehicles.

  13. Ground clutter measurements using the NASA airborne doppler radar: Description of clutter at the Denver and Philadelphia airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrah, Steven D.; Delnore, Victor E.; Goodrich, Michael S.; Vonhagel, Chris

    1992-01-01

    Detection of hazardous wind shears from an airborne platform, using commercial sized radar hardware, has been debated and researched for several years. The primary concern has been the requirement for 'look-down' capability in a Doppler radar during the approach and landing phases of flight. During 'look-down' operation, the received signal (weather signature) will be corrupted by ground clutter returns. Ground clutter at and around urban airports can have large values of Normalized Radar Cross Section (NRCS) producing clutter returns which could saturate the radar's receiver, thus disabling the radar entirely, or at least from its intended function. The purpose of this research was to investigate the NRCS levels in an airport environment (scene), and to characterize the NRCS distribution across a variety of radar parameters. These results are also compared to results of a similar study using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of the same scenes. This was necessary in order to quantify and characterize the differences and similarities between results derived from the real-aperature system flown on the NASA 737 aircraft and parametric studies which have previously been performed using the NASA airborne radar simulation program.

  14. Ground Deformation Analysis of Blast-Induced Liquefaction at a Simulated Airport Infrastructure Using High Resolution 3D Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasian, D.; Kayen, R.; Ashford, S.; Kawamata, Y.; Sugano, T.

    2008-12-01

    In October 2007, the Port and Airport Research Institute (PARI) of the Japan Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation conducted a large-scale blast-induced liquefaction experiment in Ishikari, Hokkaido, Japan. Approximately 24,000 m2 of ground was liquefied using controlled blasting techniques to investigate the performance of airport infrastructure. The USGS and Oregon State University participated in the study and measured topographic changes in ground level using 3D laser scanning techniques (terrestrial lidar), as well as changes in shear wave velocity of the between the pre- and post-liquefied soil. This poster focuses on the lidar results. The overall objective of the PARI experiment is to assess the performance of airport infrastructure subjected to liquefaction. Specifically, the performance of pipelines and large concrete utility raceways located beneath runway pavements is of interest, as well as the performance of pavements and embankments with and without soil improvement techniques. At the site, 5-7 m of loose silty sand was placed as hydraulic fill on natural alluvial sand as an expansion of the Ishikari port facility. On a portion of the liquefied site, three 20 m by 50 m test sections were constructed to investigate the performance of improved ground beneath asphalt runways, concrete runway aprons, and open areas. Pipelines and concrete utility conduits were also buried in each section. The three ground improvement techniques investigated were sand-cement mixing, vertical drains, and colloidal silica injection. The PARI experiment provided an excellent opportunity to conduct terrestrial lidar measurements - a revolutionary tool for accurate characterization of fine-scale changes of topography and identification of subtle deformations. Lidar was used for characterizing post-blast deformations both immediately after the charges were used, and subsequently over time at intervals of 2 days, 4 days, and 5 months after blasting. Settlement

  15. Air Traffic and Operational Data on Selected US Airports with Parallel Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Thomas M.; McGee, Frank G.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents information on a number of airports in the country with parallel runways and focuses on those that have at least one pair of parallel runways closer than 4300 ft. Information contained in the report describes the airport's current operational activity as obtained through contact with the facility and from FAA air traffic tower activity data for FY 1997. The primary reason for this document is to provide a single source of information for research to determine airports where Airborne Information for Lateral Spacing (AILS) technology may be applicable.

  16. Operational Guidelines for Grounds Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    APPA: Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers, Alexandria, VA.

    This book offers guidelines intended to help both new and experienced grounds managers create operational and staffing-level plans that can be the basis of discussion with all grounds management stakeholders. In its various chapters, the book: (1) explains the differences between zone and broadcast maintenance practices that are essential to plan…

  17. Initial Investigation of Operational Concept Elements for NASA's NextGen-Airportal Project Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary; Lee, Jonathan; Poage, James L.; Tobias, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    The NextGen-Airportal Project is organized into three research focus areas: Safe and Efficient Surface Operations, Coordinated Arrival/Departure Operations Management, and Airportal Transition and Integration Management. The content in this document was derived from an examination of constraints and problems at airports for accommodating future increases in air traffic, and from an examination of capabilities envisioned for NextGen. The concepts are organized around categories of constraints and problems and therefore do not precisely match, but generally reflect, the research focus areas. The concepts provide a framework for defining and coordinating research activities that are, and will be, conducted by the NextGen-Airportal Project. The concepts will help the research activities function as an integrated set focused on future needs for airport operations and will aid aligning the research activities with NextGen key capabilities. The concepts are presented as concept elements with more detailed sub-elements under each concept element. For each concept element, the following topics are discussed: constraints and problems being addressed, benefit descriptions, required technology and infrastructure, and an initial list of potential research topics. Concept content will be updated and more detail added as the research progresses. The concepts are focused on enhancing airportal capacity and efficiency in a timeframe 20 to 25 years in the future, which is similar to NextGen's timeframe.

  18. 76 FR 19517 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ....\\1\\ \\1\\ 75 FR 9017 (Feb. 26, 2010). ATA also stated the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...\\ 14 CFR 93.227 (DCA); 74 FR 51648 (Oct. 7, 2009) (EWR); 74 FR 51650 (Oct. 7, 2009) (JFK); 74 FR 51653... Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and Newark Liberty International Airport; High Density Rule at Reagan...

  19. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions D Appendix D to Part 91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, App. D Appendix D to Part...

  20. 14 CFR 121.635 - Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.635 Section 121.635 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL... airports: Domestic and flag operations. No person may dispatch an airplane to or from a refueling...

  1. 14 CFR 121.635 - Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.635 Section 121.635 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL... airports: Domestic and flag operations. No person may dispatch an airplane to or from a refueling...

  2. 14 CFR 121.635 - Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.635 Section 121.635 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL... airports: Domestic and flag operations. No person may dispatch an airplane to or from a refueling...

  3. 14 CFR 121.635 - Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.635 Section 121.635 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL... airports: Domestic and flag operations. No person may dispatch an airplane to or from a refueling...

  4. 14 CFR 121.635 - Dispatch to and from refueling or provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provisional airports: Domestic and flag operations. 121.635 Section 121.635 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL... airports: Domestic and flag operations. No person may dispatch an airplane to or from a refueling...

  5. Effect of Traffic Position Accuracy for Conducting Safe Airport Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Barnes, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept proposes many revolutionary operational concepts and technologies, such as display of traffic information and movements, airport moving maps (AMM), and proactive alerts of runway incursions and surface traffic conflicts, to deliver an overall increase in system capacity and safety. A piloted simulation study was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center to evaluate the ability to conduct safe and efficient airport surface operations while utilizing an AMM displaying traffic of various position accuracies as well as the effect of traffic position accuracy on airport conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capability. Nominal scenarios and off-nominal conflict scenarios were conducted using 12 airline crews operating in a simulated Memphis International Airport terminal environment. The data suggest that all traffic should be shown on the airport moving map, whether qualified or unqualified, and conflict detection and resolution technologies provide significant safety benefits. Despite the presence of traffic information on the map, collisions or near collisions still occurred; when indications or alerts were generated in these same scenarios, the incidences were averted.

  6. Simulation studies of STOL airplane operations in metropolitan downtown and airport air traffic control environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, R. H.; Mclaughlin, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    The operating problems and equipment requirements for STOL airplanes in terminal area operations in simulated air traffic control (ATC) environments were studied. These studies consisted of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) arrivals and departures in the New York area to and from a downtown STOL port, STOL runways at John F. Kennedy International Airport, or STOL runways at a hypothetical international airport. The studies were accomplished in real time by using a STOL airplane flight simulator. An experimental powered lift STOL airplane and two in-service airplanes having high aerodynamic lift (i.e., STOL) capability were used in the simulations.

  7. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    GOAL, is a test engineer oriented language designed to be used to standardize procedure terminology and as the test programming language to be used for ground checkout operations in a space vehicle launch environment. The material presented concerning GOAL includes: (1) a historical review, (2) development objectives and requirements, (3) language scope and format, and (4) language capabilities.

  8. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (Baltimore Washington International Airport) Boston, MA (General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport) Chantilly, VA (Washington Dulles International Airport) Charlotte, NC (Charlotte/Douglas International...) Honolulu, HI (Honolulu International Airport) Houston, TX (George Bush Intercontinental...

  9. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (Baltimore Washington International Airport) Boston, MA (General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport) Chantilly, VA (Washington Dulles International Airport) Charlotte, NC (Charlotte/Douglas International...) Honolulu, HI (Honolulu International Airport) Houston, TX (George Bush Intercontinental...

  10. 14 CFR 121.623 - Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Supplemental operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... over-the-top: Supplemental operations. 121.623 Section 121.623 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.623 Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Supplemental... operation under IFR or over-the-top shall list at least one alternate airport for each destination...

  11. 14 CFR 121.623 - Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Supplemental operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... over-the-top: Supplemental operations. 121.623 Section 121.623 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.623 Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Supplemental... operation under IFR or over-the-top shall list at least one alternate airport for each destination...

  12. 14 CFR 121.623 - Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Supplemental operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... over-the-top: Supplemental operations. 121.623 Section 121.623 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.623 Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Supplemental... operation under IFR or over-the-top shall list at least one alternate airport for each destination...

  13. 14 CFR 121.623 - Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Supplemental operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... over-the-top: Supplemental operations. 121.623 Section 121.623 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.623 Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Supplemental... operation under IFR or over-the-top shall list at least one alternate airport for each destination...

  14. 14 CFR 121.623 - Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Supplemental operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... over-the-top: Supplemental operations. 121.623 Section 121.623 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.623 Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Supplemental... operation under IFR or over-the-top shall list at least one alternate airport for each destination...

  15. Integrated Mode Choice, Small Aircraft Demand, and Airport Operations Model User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yackovetsky, Robert E. (Technical Monitor); Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2004-01-01

    A mode choice model that generates on-demand air travel forecasts at a set of GA airports based on changes in economic characteristics, vehicle performance characteristics such as speed and cost, and demographic trends has been integrated with a model to generate itinerate aircraft operations by airplane category at a set of 3227 airports. Numerous intermediate outputs can be generated, such as the number of additional trips diverted from automobiles and schedule air by the improved performance and cost of on-demand air vehicles. The total number of transported passenger miles that are diverted is also available. From these results the number of new aircraft to service the increased demand can be calculated. Output from the models discussed is in the format to generate the origin and destination traffic flow between the 3227 airports based on solutions to a gravity model.

  16. Improved Airport Noise Modeling for High Altitudes and Flexible Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsyth, David W.; Follet, Jesse I.

    2006-01-01

    The FAA's Integrated Noise Model (INM) is widely used to estimate noise in the vicinity of airports. This study supports the development of standards by which the fleet data in the INM can be updated. A comparison of weather corrections to noise data using INM Spectral Classes is made with the Boeing integrated method. The INM spectral class method is shown to work well, capturing noise level differences due to weather especially at long distances. Two studies conducted at the Denver International Airport are included in the appendices. The two studies adopted different approaches to modeling flight operations at the airport. When compared to the original, year 2000, results, it is apparent that changes made to the INM in terms of modeling processes and databases have resulted in improved agreement between predicted and measured noise levels.

  17. 77 FR 27857 - Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC-Operation Exemption-Kingman Airport Authority, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC--Operation Exemption--Kingman Airport Authority, Inc. Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC (KTRR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of....--Continuance in Control Exemption--Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC, Docket No. FD 35619, wherein...

  18. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Restrictions D Appendix D to Part 91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF.... D Appendix D to Part 91—Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions Section 1. Locations at..., Feb. 11, 1994, appendix D to part 91 was amended in sections 1 and 3 in the Denver, CO entry...

  19. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Restrictions D Appendix D to Part 91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF.... D Appendix D to Part 91—Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions Section 1. Locations at which the requirements of § 91.215(b)(2) and § 91.225(d)(2) apply. The requirements of §§...

  20. 14 CFR 93.343 - Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... in 49 CFR part 1562, subpart A; (2) Before departing, the pilot files an IFR or DC FRZ or DC SFRA... from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or Washington Executive/Hyde Field Airport. 93.343 Section... Special Flight Rules Area § 93.343 Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park...

  1. 14 CFR 93.343 - Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... in 49 CFR part 1562, subpart A; (2) Before departing, the pilot files an IFR or DC FRZ or DC SFRA... from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or Washington Executive/Hyde Field Airport. 93.343 Section... Special Flight Rules Area § 93.343 Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park...

  2. 14 CFR 93.343 - Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in 49 CFR part 1562, subpart A; (2) Before departing, the pilot files an IFR or DC FRZ or DC SFRA... from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or Washington Executive/Hyde Field Airport. 93.343 Section... Special Flight Rules Area § 93.343 Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park...

  3. 14 CFR 93.343 - Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in 49 CFR part 1562, subpart A; (2) Before departing, the pilot files an IFR or DC FRZ or DC SFRA... from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or Washington Executive/Hyde Field Airport. 93.343 Section... Special Flight Rules Area § 93.343 Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park...

  4. 14 CFR 93.343 - Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in 49 CFR part 1562, subpart A; (2) Before departing, the pilot files an IFR or DC FRZ or DC SFRA... from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or Washington Executive/Hyde Field Airport. 93.343 Section... Special Flight Rules Area § 93.343 Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park...

  5. Use of Ground Penetrating Radar at the FAA's National Airport Pavement Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Injun, Song

    2015-04-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the United States has used a ground-coupled Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) at the National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF) since 2005. One of the primary objectives of the testing at the facility is to provide full-scale pavement response and failure information for use in airplane landing gear design and configuration studies. During the traffic testing at the facility, a GSSI GPR system was used to develop new procedures for monitoring Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) pavement density changes that is directly related to pavement failure. After reviewing current setups for data acquisition software and procedures for identifying different pavement layers, dielectric constant and pavement thickness were selected as dominant parameters controlling HMA properties provided by GPR. A new methodology showing HMA density changes in terms of dielectric constant variations, called dielectric sweep test, was developed and applied in full-scale pavement test. The dielectric constant changes were successfully monitored with increasing airplane traffic numbers. The changes were compared to pavement performance data (permanent deformation). The measured dielectric constants based on the known HMA thicknesses were also compared with computed dielectric constants using an equation from ASTM D4748-98 Standard Test Method for Determining the Thickness of Bound Pavement Layers Using Short-Pulse Radar. Six inches diameter cylindrical cores were taken after construction and traffic testing for the HMA layer bulk specific gravity. The measured bulk specific gravity was also compared to monitor HMA density changes caused by aircraft traffic conditions. Additionally this presentation will review the applications of the FAA's ground-coupled GPR on embedded rebar identification in concrete pavement, sewer pipes in soil, and gage identifications in 3D plots.

  6. Fuel Consumption and Emissions from Airport Taxi Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Developed a method to calculate fuel consumption and emissions of phases of taxi operations. Results at DFW showed that up to 18% of fuel can be saved by eliminating stop-and-go situations. Developed an energy efficient and environmentally friendly surface concept: Spot and Runway Departure Advisory (SARDA) tool. The SARDA tool has been identified as a potential candidate for a technology transfer to the FAA.

  7. 76 FR 65773 - Petition for Waiver of the Terms of the Order Limiting Scheduled Operations at LaGuardia Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... operating authorizations (slots) at LaGuardia Airport (LGA). 76 FR 63702 (Oct. 13, 2011) (the Waiver). The... 0800 Daily 1150 0800 Daily 1056 0900 Daily 1030 1000 Daily 1083 1000 Daily 1223 1100 Daily 1027...

  8. Conducting Safe and Efficient Airport Surface Operations in a NextGen Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Barnes, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) vision proposes many revolutionary operational concepts, such as surface trajectory-based operations (STBO) and technologies, including display of traffic information and movements, airport moving maps (AMM), and proactive alerts of runway incursions and surface traffic conflicts, to deliver an overall increase in system capacity and safety. A piloted simulation study was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center to evaluate the ability of a flight crew to conduct safe and efficient airport surface operations while utilizing an AMM. Position accuracy of traffic was varied, and the effect of traffic position accuracy on airport conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capability was measured. Another goal was to evaluate the crew's ability to safely conduct STBO by assessing the impact of providing traffic intent information, CD&R system capability, and the display of STBO guidance to the flight crew on both head-down and head-up displays (HUD). Nominal scenarios and off-nominal conflict scenarios were conducted using 12 airline crews operating in a simulated Memphis International Airport terminal environment. The data suggest that all traffic should be shown on the airport moving map, whether qualified or unqualified, and conflict detection and resolution technologies provide significant safety benefits. Despite the presence of traffic information on the map, collisions or near-collisions still occurred; when indications or alerts were generated in these same scenarios, the incidents were averted. During the STBO testing, the flight crews met their required time-of-arrival at route end within 10 seconds on 98 percent of the trials, well within the acceptable performance bounds of 15 seconds. Traffic intent information was found to be useful in determining the intent of conflicting traffic, with graphical presentation preferred. The CD&R system was only

  9. Evaluation of Pushback Decision-Support Tool Concept for Charlotte Douglas International Airport Ramp Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Miwa; Hoang, Ty; Jung, Yoon C.; Malik, Waqar; Lee, Hanbong; Dulchinos, Victoria L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new departure pushback decision-support tool (DST) for airport ramp-tower controllers. It is based on NASA's Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) collaborative decision-making concept, except with the modification that the gate releases now are controlled by tactical pushback (or gate-hold) advisories instead of strategic pre-assignments of target pushback times to individual departure flights. The proposed ramp DST relies on data exchange with the airport traffic control tower (ATCT) to coordinate pushbacks with the ATCT's flow-management intentions under current operational constraints, such as Traffic Management Initiative constraints. Airlines would benefit in reduced taxi delay and fuel burn. The concept was evaluated in a human-in-the-loop simulation experiment with current ramp-tower controllers at the Charlotte Douglas International Airport as participants. The results showed that the tool helped reduce taxi time by one minute per flight and overall departure flight fuel consumption by 10-12% without reducing runway throughput. Expect Departure Clearance Time (EDCT) conformance also was improved when advisories were provided. These benefits were attained without increasing the ramp-tower controllers' workload. Additionally, the advisories reduced the ATCT controllers' workload.

  10. Ground-water and surface-water elevations in the Fairbanks International Airport area, Alaska, 1990-96, and selected geohydrologic report references

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claar, David V.; Lilly, Michael R.

    1997-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water elevation data were collected at 61 sites from 1990 to 1996 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, Fairbanks International Airport. Water-surface elevations were measured in 41 ground-water observation wells and at 20 surface-water sites to help characterize the geohydrology of the Fairbanks International Airport area. From 1990 to 1993, data were collected in the vicinity of the former fire-training area at the airport. From 1993 to 1996, the data-collection area was expanded to include the entire airport area. The total number of data-collection sites varied each year because of changing project objectives and increased understanding of the geohydrology in the area.

  11. 14 CFR 121.619 - Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Domestic operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... over-the-top: Domestic operations. 121.619 Section 121.619 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.619 Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Domestic operations. (a) No person may dispatch an airplane under IFR or over-the-top unless he lists at least...

  12. 14 CFR 121.619 - Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Domestic operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... over-the-top: Domestic operations. 121.619 Section 121.619 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.619 Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Domestic operations. (a) No person may dispatch an airplane under IFR or over-the-top unless he lists at least...

  13. 14 CFR 121.619 - Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Domestic operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... over-the-top: Domestic operations. 121.619 Section 121.619 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.619 Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Domestic operations. (a) No person may dispatch an airplane under IFR or over-the-top unless he lists at least...

  14. 14 CFR 121.619 - Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Domestic operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... over-the-top: Domestic operations. 121.619 Section 121.619 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.619 Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Domestic operations. (a) No person may dispatch an airplane under IFR or over-the-top unless he lists at least...

  15. 14 CFR 121.619 - Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Domestic operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... over-the-top: Domestic operations. 121.619 Section 121.619 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Flight Release Rules § 121.619 Alternate airport for destination: IFR or over-the-top: Domestic operations. (a) No person may dispatch an airplane under IFR or over-the-top unless he lists at least...

  16. Considerations on symbology, data requirements, and operational concept for integral NOTAM visualization on airport moving map displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleken, Christoph; Urvoy, Carole; Klingauf, Uwe

    2008-04-01

    Surface Movement is one of the most challenging phases of flight. To support the flight crew in this critical flight phase and to prevent serious incidents and accidents, of which Runway Incursions are the by far most safety-critical, the electronic airport moving map display has evolved as the key technology to increase the flight crew's situational awareness on the airport surface over the past decade. However, the airport moving map is limited to quasi-static airport information due to the envisaged 28 day update cycle of the underlying Aerodrome Mapping Database (AMDB), and thus does not include information on safety-relevant short-term and temporary changes such as runway closures or restrictions. Currently, these are conveyed on paper through the Pre-Flight Information Bulletin (PIB), a plain-language compilation of current Notices to Airmen (NOTAM) and other information of urgent character. In this context, the advent of airport moving map technology leads to a disparity in the conspicuousness of information, resulting in the danger that e.g. a runway that is not displayed as closed on the airport moving map might be perceived as open even if contrary NOTAM information exists on paper elsewhere in the cockpit. This calls for an integrated representation of PIB/NOTAM and airport moving map information. Piloted evaluations conducted by the Institute of Flight Systems and Automatic Control have already confirmed the high operational relevance of presenting runway closures on an airport moving map. Based on the results of these trials, this paper expands our previous work by addressing the various pre-requisites of an integral NOTAM visualization, ranging from the development of appropriate symbology to an operational concept enabling the transition from conventional to electronic, machine-readable NOTAM information without shifting responsibility and workload from the dispatcher to the flight deck. Employing Synthetic Vision techniques, a complete symbology set

  17. Intelligent resources for satellite ground control operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a cooperative approach to the design of intelligent automation and describes the Mission Operations Cooperative Assistant for NASA Goddard flight operations. The cooperative problem solving approach is being explored currently in the context of providing support for human operator teams and also in the definition of future advanced automation in ground control systems.

  18. 76 FR 63702 - Petition for Waiver of the Terms of the Order Limiting Scheduled Operations at LaGuardia Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... carriers operating insufficient frequencies and therefore unable to mount an effective response and provide... Regulations, by telephone at (202) 267-3073 or by electronic mail at rebecca.macpherson@faa.gov... New York LaGuardia Airport, 71 FR 77,854 (Dec. 27, 2006); 72 FR 63,224 (Nov. 8, 2007)...

  19. 14 CFR 91.127 - Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class E airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airport in Class E airspace. 91.127 Section 91.127 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... pilot in command may operate that aircraft and land if weather conditions are at or above basic VFR weather minimums, visual contact with the tower is maintained, and a clearance to land is received. If...

  20. 14 CFR 91.127 - Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class E airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airport in Class E airspace. 91.127 Section 91.127 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... pilot in command may operate that aircraft and land if weather conditions are at or above basic VFR weather minimums, visual contact with the tower is maintained, and a clearance to land is received. If...

  1. 14 CFR 91.127 - Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class E airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airport in Class E airspace. 91.127 Section 91.127 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... pilot in command may operate that aircraft and land if weather conditions are at or above basic VFR weather minimums, visual contact with the tower is maintained, and a clearance to land is received. If...

  2. 14 CFR 91.127 - Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class E airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airport in Class E airspace. 91.127 Section 91.127 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... pilot in command may operate that aircraft and land if weather conditions are at or above basic VFR weather minimums, visual contact with the tower is maintained, and a clearance to land is received. If...

  3. 14 CFR 91.127 - Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class E airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airport in Class E airspace. 91.127 Section 91.127 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... pilot in command may operate that aircraft and land if weather conditions are at or above basic VFR weather minimums, visual contact with the tower is maintained, and a clearance to land is received. If...

  4. Autonomy for SOHO Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Netreba, Nick; Ginn, Don; Mandutianu, Sanda; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The SOLAR and HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY (SOHO) project [SOHO Web Page] is being carried out by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a cooperative effort between the two agencies in the framework of the Solar Terrestrial Science Program (STSP) comprising SOHO and other missions. SOHO was launched on December 2, 1995. The SOHO spacecraft was built in Europe by an industry team led by Matra, and instruments were provided by European and American scientists. There are nine European Principal Investigators (PI's) and three American ones. Large engineering teams and more than 200 co-investigators from many institutions support the PI's in the development of the instruments and in the preparation of their operations and data analysis. NASA is responsible for the launch and mission operations. Large radio dishes around the world, which form NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN), are used to track the spacecraft beyond the Earths orbit. Mission control is based at Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. The agent group at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, in collaboration with JPL, is currently involved with the design and development of an agent-based system to provide intelligent interactions with the control center personnel for SOHO. The basic approach that is being taken is to develop a sub-community of agents for each major subsystem of SOHO and to integrate these sub-communities into an overall SOHO community. Agents in all sub-communities will be capable of advanced understanding (deep reasoning) of the associated spacecraft subsystem.

  5. 14 CFR 139.329 - Pedestrians and ground vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pedestrians and ground vehicles. 139.329... OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.329 Pedestrians and ground vehicles. In a manner authorized by the... pedestrians and ground vehicles necessary for airport operations; (b) Establish and implement procedures...

  6. 14 CFR 139.329 - Pedestrians and ground vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pedestrians and ground vehicles. 139.329... OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.329 Pedestrians and ground vehicles. In a manner authorized by the... pedestrians and ground vehicles necessary for airport operations; (b) Establish and implement procedures...

  7. 14 CFR 139.329 - Pedestrians and ground vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pedestrians and ground vehicles. 139.329... OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.329 Pedestrians and ground vehicles. In a manner authorized by the... pedestrians and ground vehicles necessary for airport operations; (b) Establish and implement procedures...

  8. 14 CFR 139.329 - Pedestrians and ground vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pedestrians and ground vehicles. 139.329... OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.329 Pedestrians and ground vehicles. In a manner authorized by the... pedestrians and ground vehicles necessary for airport operations; (b) Establish and implement procedures...

  9. 14 CFR 139.329 - Pedestrians and ground vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pedestrians and ground vehicles. 139.329... OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.329 Pedestrians and ground vehicles. In a manner authorized by the... pedestrians and ground vehicles necessary for airport operations; (b) Establish and implement procedures...

  10. Operational Considerations when Designing New Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walyus, Keith; Barbahenn, George; Crabb, William; Miebach, Manfred; Pataro, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) launched in April of 1991 with a nominal 15-year old mission. Since then, the HST mission life has been extended to 2010. As is true for all NASA missions, HST is being asked to decrease its operational costs for the remainder of its mission life. Various techniques are being incorporated for cost reductions, with one of the core means being the design of a new and more efficient ground system for HST operations. This new ground system, "Vision 2000", will reduce operational and maintenance costs and also provide the HST Project with added flexibility to react to future changes. Vision 2000 began supporting HST Operations in January of 1999 and will support the mission for the remainder of the mission life. Upgrading a satellite's ground system is a popular approach for reducing costs, but it is also inherently risky. Validating a new ground system can be a severe distraction to a flight team while operating a satellite. Mission data collection and health and safety requirements are rarely, if ever, relaxed during this validation period, forcing flight teams to undertake an additional task while operating the satellite. Additionally, flight teams must usually undergo extensive training to effectively utilize the new system. Once again, this training usually occurs as an additional task, in addition to the nominal satellite operations. While operating the spacecraft, the Flight Team typically assists in the design, validation, and verification of a new ground system. This is a distraction and strain on the Flight Team, but the benefit of using the Flight Team in all phases of ground system development far outweigh the negative aspects. Finally, above the cost of the new system, the integration into the facility with the current control center system are resources and costs not normally taken into account in the design phase of the new system. In addition to the standard issues faced by a Project when upgrading its ground system, the

  11. FBM Ground Segment and Operations Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, P.; Gonçalves, L.; Ambrósio, A.; Carvalho, H.

    The French-Brazilian Micro-satellite (FBM) Mission is a cooperative program between the French Space Agency ("Centre National d`Estudes Spatiales" - CNES - France) and the National Institute for Space Research (INPE - Brazil). This mission consists in developing, launching, and controlling a scientific/technologic micro-satellite as well as the payload data dissemination. Five Brazilian and four French technological and scientific experiments will fly onboard the FBM. The task division among INPE and CNES is as follows: INPE is responsible for the Satellite System, Power Supply, Structure and Thermal Control Subsystem, Ground Segment and Operations. CNES provides the AOCS, TT&C and OBDH Subsystems. This paper presents the Ground Segment architecture, and describes its development process, along with the Mission Operations Concept, adopted for the joint program. The Ground Segment is being developed under the directive of maximum re-use of existing systems in Brazil, and the constraints imposed by the Command &Control Interface Specifications; Ground to Board Interface Definition applicable to the subsystems provided by CNES. In addition, a maximum commonality between processes and elements of AIT and operations (Control Center/Ground Station) was sought for risk and costs reduction reasons. Mission Operations were conceived as a trade-off between operational autonomy of the satellite and ground segment, and a fast reaction under contingency situations foreseen for the scientific payload equipment. Scheduled to be launched by early 2004, FBM aims at being a valuable tool for both the French and Brazilian scientific and technological communities, and provides a rich framework of technical cooperation between both countries.

  12. 77 FR 1549 - Order Limiting Scheduled Operations at Newark Liberty International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... runway construction project at John F. Kennedy International Airport.\\1\\ \\1\\ 74 FR 52838 (Oct. 14, 2009... grant general waivers to the usage requirement except under the most unusual circumstances. \\3\\ 76...

  13. Commonality of Ground Systems in Launch Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Shawn M.

    2008-01-01

    NASA is examining the utility of requiring a certain degree of commonality in both flight and ground systems in the Constellation Program. While the benefits of commonality seem obvious in terms of minimizing upfront development and long-term operations and maintenance costs, success in real, large-scale engineering systems used to support launch operations is relatively unknown. A broad literature review conducted for this paper did not yield a single paper specifically addressing the application of commonality for ground systems at any launch site in the United States or abroad. This paper provides a broad overview of the ground systems, captures historical and current application of commonality at the launch site, and offers suggestions for additional research to further develop commonality approaches.

  14. Spatial Differences and Costs of Emissions at U.S. Airport Hubs.

    PubMed

    Nahlik, Matthew J; Chester, Mikhail V; Ryerson, Megan S; Fraser, Andrew M

    2016-04-19

    As local governments plan to expand airport infrastructure and build air service, monetized estimates of damages from air pollution are important for balancing environmental impacts. While it is well-known that aircraft emissions near airports directly affect nearby populations, it is less clear how the airport-specific aircraft operations and impacts result in monetized damages to human health and the environment. We model aircraft and ground support equipment emissions at major U.S. airports and estimate the monetized human health and environmental damages of near airport (within 60 miles) emissions. County-specific unit damage costs for PM, SOx, NOx, and VOCs and damage valuations for CO and CO2 are used along with aircraft emissions estimations at airports to determine impacts. We find that near-airport emissions at major U.S. airports caused a total of $1.9 billion in damages in 2013, with airports contributing between $720 thousand and $190 million each. These damages vary by airport from $1 to $9 per seat per one-way flight and costs per passenger are often greater than airport charges levied on airlines for infrastructure use. As the U.S. aviation system grows, it is possible to minimize human and environmental costs by shifting aircraft technologies and expanding service into airports where fewer impacts are likely to occur. PMID:27007187

  15. Predictive Models of Duration of Ground Delay Programs in New York Area Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Initially planned GDP duration often turns out to be an underestimate or an overestimate of the actual GDP duration. This, in turn, results in avoidable airborne or ground delays in the system. Therefore, better models of actual duration have the potential of reducing delays in the system. The overall objective of this study is to develop such models based on logs of GDPs. In a previous report, we described descriptive models of Ground Delay Programs. These models were defined in terms of initial planned duration and in terms of categorical variables. These descriptive models are good at characterizing the historical errors in planned GDP durations. This paper focuses on developing predictive models of GDP duration. Traffic Management Initiatives (TMI) are logged by Air Traffic Control facilities with The National Traffic Management Log (NTML) which is a single system for automated recoding, coordination, and distribution of relevant information about TMIs throughout the National Airspace System. (Brickman, 2004 Yuditsky, 2007) We use 2008-2009 GDP data from the NTML database for the study reported in this paper. NTML information about a GDP includes the initial specification, possibly one or more revisions, and the cancellation. In the next section, we describe general characteristics of Ground Delay Programs. In the third section, we develop models of actual duration. In the fourth section, we compare predictive performance of these models. The final section is a conclusion.

  16. Distributed operating system for NASA ground stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, John F.

    1987-01-01

    NASA ground stations are characterized by ever changing support requirements, so application software is developed and modified on a continuing basis. A distributed operating system was designed to optimize the generation and maintenance of those applications. Unusual features include automatic program generation from detailed design graphs, on-line software modification in the testing phase, and the incorporation of a relational database within a real-time, distributed system.

  17. Estimate of contribution of jet aircraft operations to trace element concentration at or near airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fordyce, J. S.; Sheibley, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    Samples of ASTM type A jet fuel were analyzed for trace-element content by instrumental neutron activation techniques. Forty-nine elements were sought. Only ten, aluminum, gold, indium, lanthanum, titanium, vandium, barium, dysprosium, tellurium, and uranium, were observed at levels above the detection limits encountered; of these only aluminum, titanium, and barium were present at concentrations greater than 0.1 ppm. Estimates of exhaust gas concentrations are made, and the ambient contribution at or near airports is calculated by using the Los Angeles International Airport dispersion model. It is shown that the ambient contribution is about an order of magnitude below typical urban levels for virtually all elements sought.

  18. Estimate of contribution of jet aircraft operations to trace element concentration at or near airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fordyce, J. S.; Sheibley, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Samples of ASTM type A jet fuel were analyzed for trace element content by instrumental neutron activation techniques. Forty-nine elements were sought. Only ten, aluminum, gold, indium, lanthanum, titanium, vanadium, barium, dysprosium, tellurium, and uranium, were observed at levels above the detection limits encountered; of these only aluminum, titanium, and barium were present at concentrations greater than 0.1 ppm. Estimates of exhaust gas concentrations are made, and the ambient contribution at or near airports is calculated by using the Los Angeles International Airport dispersion model. It is shown that the ambient contribution is about an order of magnitude below typical urban levels for virtually all elements sought.

  19. Airport Surface Movement Technologies: Atlanta Demonstrations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted in August 1997 at the Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) International Airport as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. This research was aimed at investigating technology to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft movements on the surface during the operational phases of roll-out, turnoff, and taxi in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. The system tested at ATL was composed of airborne and ground-based components that were integrated to provide both the flight crew and controllers with supplemental information to enable safe, expedient surface operations. Experimental displays were installed on a Boeing 757-200 research aircraft in both headup and head-down formats. On the ground, an integrated system maintained surveillance of the airport surface and a controller interface provided routing and control instructions. While at ATL, the research aircraft performed a series of flight and taxi operations to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. The concept was demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the LVLASO system and ATL test activities.

  20. Kennedy Space Center Orion Processing Team Planning for Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Topics in this presentation are: Constellation Ares I/Orion/Ground Ops Elements Orion Ground Operations Flow Orion Operations Planning Process and Toolset Overview, including: 1 Orion Concept of Operations by Phase 2 Ops Analysis Capabilities Overview 3 Operations Planning Evolution 4 Functional Flow Block Diagrams 5 Operations Timeline Development 6 Discrete Event Simulation (DES) Modeling 7 Ground Operations Planning Document Database (GOPDb) Using Operations Planning Tools for Operability Improvements includes: 1 Kaizen/Lean Events 2 Mockups 3 Human Factors Analysis

  1. Airport Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan Paluska/Flickr Denver Airport Security Screening Introduction With air travel regaining popularity and increased secu- rity measures, airport security screening has become an area of interest for ...

  2. LH2 airport requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the facilities and equipment which will be required at a representative airport is provided so liquid hydrogen LH2 can be used as fuel in long range transport aircraft in 1995-2000. A complete facility was conceptually designed, sized to meet the projected air traffic requirement. The facility includes the liquefaction plant, LH2, storage capability, and LH2 fuel handling system. The requirements for ground support and maintenance for the LH2 fueled aircraft were analyzed. An estimate was made of capital and operating costs which might be expected for the facility. Recommendations were made for design modifications to the reference aircraft, reflecting results of the analysis of airport fuel handling requirements, and for a program of additional technology development for air terminal related items.

  3. Shuttle Ground Operations Efficiencies/Technologies (SGOE/T) study. Volume 2: Ground Operations evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, A. L.; Hart, M. T.; Lowry, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The Ground Operations Evaluation describes the breath and depth of the various study elements selected as a result of an operational analysis conducted during the early part of the study. Analysis techniques used for the evaluation are described in detail. Elements selected for further evaluation are identified; the results of the analysis documented; and a follow-on course of action recommended. The background and rationale for developing recommendations for the current Shuttle or for future programs is presented.

  4. Air pollution from aircraft operations at San Jose Municipal Airport, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, E. T.

    1978-01-01

    The amount of air pollution discharged by arriving and departing aircraft at the San Jose Municipal Airport was estimated. These estimates were made for each one hour interval of a summer weekday in 1977. The contributions of both general aviation (personal and business aircraft) and certified air carriers (scheduled airliners) were considered. The locations at which the pollutants were discharged were estimated by approximating the flight paths of arriving and departing aircraft. Three types of pollutants were considered: carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen.

  5. Spheres: from Ground Development to ISS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2016-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES National Lab Facility aboard ISS is managed and operated by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. SPHERES has served to mature the adaptability of control algorithms of future formation flight missions in microgravity (6 DOF (Degrees of Freedom) / long duration microgravity), demonstrate key close-proximity formation flight and rendezvous and docking maneuvers, understand fault diagnosis and recovery, improve the field of human telerobotic operation and control, and lessons learned on ISS have significant impact on ground robotics, mapping, localization, and sensing in three-dimensions - among several other areas of study.

  6. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papasin, Richard; Gawdiak, Yuri; Maluf, David A.; Leidich, Christopher; Tran, Peter B.

    2001-01-01

    Remote Tower Sensor Systems (RTSS) are proof-of-concept prototypes being developed by NASA/Ames Research Center (NASA/ARC) with collaboration with the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NOAA (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration). RTSS began with the deployment of an Airport Approach Zone Camera System that includes real-time weather observations at San Francisco International Airport. The goal of this research is to develop, deploy, and demonstrate remotely operated cameras and sensors at several major airport hubs and un-towered airports. RTSS can provide real-time weather observations of airport approach zone. RTSS will integrate and test airport sensor packages that will allow remote access to realtime airport conditions and aircraft status.

  7. 14 CFR 331.37 - What will happen to any remaining funds if operators and providers at the three Maryland airports...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What will happen to any remaining funds if operators and providers at the three Maryland airports make reimbursable claims totaling less than $5... § 331.37 What will happen to any remaining funds if operators and providers at the three...

  8. Modeling Weather Impact on Ground Delay Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao; Kulkarni, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Scheduled arriving aircraft demand may exceed airport arrival capacity when there is abnormal weather at an airport. In such situations, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) institutes ground-delay programs (GDP) to delay flights before they depart from their originating airports. Efficient GDP planning depends on the accuracy of prediction of airport capacity and demand in the presence of uncertainties in weather forecast. This paper presents a study of the impact of dynamic airport surface weather on GDPs. Using the National Traffic Management Log, effect of weather conditions on the characteristics of GDP events at selected busy airports is investigated. Two machine learning methods are used to generate models that map the airport operational conditions and weather information to issued GDP parameters and results of validation tests are described.

  9. Simulating Global AeroMACS Airport Ground Station Antenna Power Transmission Limits to Avoid Interference With Mobile Satellite Service Feeder Uplinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS), which is based upon the IEEE 802.16e mobile wireless standard, is expected to be implemented in the 5091 to 5150 MHz frequency band. As this band is also occupied by Mobile Satellite Service feeder uplinks, AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. The aspects of AeroMACS operation that present potential interference are under analysis in order to enable the definition of standards that assure that such interference will be avoided. In this study, the cumulative interference power distribution at low Earth orbit from transmitters at global airports was simulated with the Visualyse Professional software. The dependence of the interference power on antenna distribution, gain patterns, duty cycle, and antenna tilt was simulated. As a function of these parameters, the simulation results are presented in terms of the limitations on transmitter power from global airports required to maintain the cumulative interference power under the established threshold.

  10. CONNECTICUT AIRPORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer that includes all of the airports that appear on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7½ minute topographic quadrangle maps that cover the State of Connecticut. It includes the perimeter of airport, heliport, and seaplane landing areas as depicted...

  11. Evaluation and abatement of noise from aircraft auxiliary power units and airport ground power units. Technical report (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Staiano, M.A.; Samis, R.A.; Toth, S.

    1980-10-07

    APUs and GPUs provide essential service to aircraft during ground operations. Sound levels near these devices range from 80 to 87 dBA at 30 m for APUs, 83 to 103 dBA at 10 m for turbine-engined GPUs, and 71 to 80 dBA at 10 m for piston-engined GPUs. Procedures are provided for: (1) estimating community sound levels due to APUs and GPUs, (2) estimating their exposures in terms of day-night sound levels, and (3) assessing the desirability of noise abatement by comparison to recommended levels for acceptability. Noise abatement options include: operational changes, equipment movement, equipment substitution, equipment quieting, and sound barrier usage.

  12. An Analysis of Delay and Travel Times at Sao Paulo International Airport (AISP/GRU): Planning Based on Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santana, Erico Soriano Martins; Mueller, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of flight delays in Brazil, mostly verified at the ground (airfield), is responsible for serious disruptions at the airport level but also for the unchaining of problems in all the airport system, affecting also the airspace. The present study develops an analysis of delay and travel times at Sao Paulo International Airport/ Guarulhos (AISP/GRU) airfield based on simulation model. Different airport physical and operational scenarios had been analyzed by means of simulation. SIMMOD Plus 4.0, the computational tool developed to represent aircraft operation in the airspace and airside of airports, was used to perform these analysis. The study was mainly focused on aircraft operations on ground, at the airport runway, taxi-lanes and aprons. The visualization of the operations with increasing demand facilitated the analyses. The results generated in this work certify the viability of the methodology, they also indicated the solutions capable to solve the delay problem by travel time analysis, thus diminishing the costs for users mainly airport authority. It also indicated alternatives for airport operations, assisting the decision-making process and in the appropriate timing of the proposed changes in the existing infrastructure.

  13. Hydrocarbon emissions from in-use commercial aircraft during airport operations.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Scott C; Rogers, Todd; Dunlea, Edward J; Jayne, John T; Miake-Lye, Richard; Knighton, Berk

    2006-07-15

    The emissions of selected hydrocarbons from in-use commercial aircraft at a major airport in the United States were characterized using proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and tunable infrared differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) to probe the composition of diluted exhaust plumes downwind. The emission indices for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, and toluene, as well as other hydrocarbon species, were determined through analysis of 45 intercepted plumes identified as being associated with specific aircraft. As would have been predicted for high bypass turbine engines, the hydrocarbon emission index was greater in idle and taxiway acceleration plumes relative to approach and takeoff plumes. The opposite was seen in total NOy emission index, which increased from idle to takeoff. Within the idle plumes sampled in this study, the median emission index for formaldehyde was 1.1 g of HCHO per kg of fuel. For the subset of hydrocarbons measured in this work, the idle emissions levels relative to formaldehyde agree well with those of previous studies. The projected total unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) deduced from the range of in-use idle plumes analyzed in this work is greater than a plausible range of engine types using the defined idle condition (7% of rated engine thrust) in the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) databank reference. PMID:16903278

  14. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units Testing Plans and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.; Currin, Kelly M.; Orozco-Smith, Evelyn M.

    2012-01-01

    Cryogenic propellant loading operations with their associated flight and ground systems are some of the most complex, critical activities in launch operations. Consequently, these systems and operations account for a sizeable portion of the life cycle costs of any launch program. NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite advances in cryogenics, system health management and command and control technologies. This project was developed to mature, integrate and demonstrate advancement in the current state of the art in these areas using two distinct integrated ground operations demonstration units (GODU): GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage (IRAS) and GODU Autonomous Control

  15. Launch and Landing Effects Ground Operations (LLEGO) Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    LLEGO is a model for understanding recurring launch and landing operations costs at Kennedy Space Center for human space flight. Launch and landing operations are often referred to as ground processing, or ground operations. Currently, this function is specific to the ground operations for the Space Shuttle Space Transportation System within the Space Shuttle Program. The Constellation system to follow the Space Shuttle consists of the crewed Orion spacecraft atop an Ares I launch vehicle and the uncrewed Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The Constellation flight and ground systems build upon many elements of the existing Shuttle flight and ground hardware, as well as upon existing organizations and processes. In turn, the LLEGO model builds upon past ground operations research, modeling, data, and experience in estimating for future programs. Rather than to simply provide estimates, the LLEGO model s main purpose is to improve expenses by relating complex relationships among functions (ground operations contractor, subcontractors, civil service technical, center management, operations, etc.) to tangible drivers. Drivers include flight system complexity and reliability, as well as operations and supply chain management processes and technology. Together these factors define the operability and potential improvements for any future system, from the most direct to the least direct expenses.

  16. Airport cleanup rises above problems

    SciTech Connect

    Pressly, N.; Lucas, B.; Frumer, B.; Roth, R.

    1996-07-01

    Engineers used a treatment combination to improve the in-situ bioremediation system`s efficiency in removing underground fuel leaks at JFK Airport. John F. Kennedy International Airport, in New York City, on Jamaica Bay, has an above-ground storage capacity of about 32 million gallons of jet fuel, which flow through about 50 miles of high-pressure underground pipe to the central terminal area. EAch terminal`s fuel hydrant system was the major source os subsurface contamination at the site. The site is covered by 1 to 1.5 feet of reinforced concrete pavement. Liquid phase jet fuel (free product) was measured on the water table with true thickness ranging from less than 1 inch to 1 foot. After analysis of core samples, contamination was found adsorbed to the soil with maximum levels at the water table. This article describes the clean up, covering the following topics: microbial conditions during system operation; above-ground treatment challenges: free product emulsification, presence of biomass; evaluation of enhancements: dissolved air floatation, coagulation and flocculation, retention time adjustments; conclusions.

  17. Evaluation of Improved Pushback Forecasts Derived from Airline Ground Operations Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Francis; Theis, Georg; Feron, Eric; Clarke, John-Paul

    2003-01-01

    Accurate and timely predictions of airline pushbacks can potentially lead to improved performance of automated decision-support tools for airport surface traffic, thus reducing the variability and average duration of costly airline delays. One factor which affects the realization of these benefits is the level of uncertainty inherent in the turn processes. To characterize this inherent uncertainty, three techniques are developed for predicting time-to-go until pushback as a function of available ground-time; elapsed ground-time; and the status (not-started/in-progress/completed) of individual turn processes (cleaning, fueling, etc.). These techniques are tested against a large and detailed dataset covering approximately l0(exp 4) real-world turn operations obtained through collaboration with Deutsche Lufthansa AG. Even after the dataset is filtered to obtain a sample of turn operations with minimal uncertainty, the standard deviation of forecast error for all three techniques is lower-bounded away from zero, indicating that turn operations have a significant stochastic component. This lower-bound result shows that decision-support tools must be designed to incorporate robust mechanisms for coping with pushback demand stochasticity, rather than treating the pushback demand process as a known deterministic input.

  18. Lessons learned for improving spacecraft ground operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Michael; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena

    NASA has a unique history in processing the Space Shuttle fleet for launches. Some of this experience has been captured in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). This tool provides a convenient way for design engineers to review lessons from the past to prevent problems from reoccurring and incorporate positive lessons in new designs. At the Kennedy Space Center, the LLIS is being used to design ground support equipment for the next generation of launch and crewed vehicles. This paper describes the LLIS process and offers some examples.

  19. Lessons Learned for Improving Spacecraft Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Michael A.; Stambolian, Damon B.; Henderson, Gena M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has a unique history in processing the Space Shuttle fleet for launches. Some of this experience has been captured in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). This tool provides a convenient way for design engineers to review lessons from the past to prevent problems from reoccurring and incorporate positive lessons in new designs. At the Kennedy Space Center, the LLIS is being used to design ground support equipment for the next generation of launch and crewed vehicles. This paper describes the LLIS process and offers some examples.

  20. Design and ground verification of proximity operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, A.; Ankersen, F.; Fehse, W.; Pauvert, C.; Pairot, J.

    This paper describes the approach to guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) design and verification for proximity operations. The most critical part of the rendezvous mission is the proximity operations phase when the distance between chaser and target is below approximately 20 m. Safety is the overriding consideration in the design of the GNC system. Requirements on the GNC system also stem from the allocation of performance between proximity operations and the mating process, docking, or capture for berthing. Whereas the design process follows a top down approach, the verification process goes bottom up in a stepwise way according to the development stage.

  1. Remote Operations and Ground Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Barry S.; Lankford, Kimberly; Pitts, R. Lee

    2004-01-01

    The Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center supports the International Space Station (ISS) through remote interfaces around the world. The POIC was originally designed as a gateway to space for remote facilities; ranging from an individual user to a full-scale multiuser environment. This achievement was accomplished while meeting program requirements and accommodating the injection of modern technology on an ongoing basis to ensure cost effective operations. This paper will discuss the open POIC architecture developed to support similar and dissimilar remote operations centers. It will include technologies, protocols, and compromises which on a day to day basis support ongoing operations. Additional areas covered include centralized management of shared resources and methods utilized to provide highly available and restricted resources to remote users. Finally, the effort of coordinating the actions of participants will be discussed.

  2. Apparatus and method for grounding compressed fuel fueling operator

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Joseph Perry; Farese, David John; Xu, Jianguo

    2002-06-11

    A safety system for grounding an operator at a fueling station prior to removing a fuel fill nozzle from a fuel tank upon completion of a fuel filling operation is provided which includes a fuel tank port in communication with the fuel tank for receiving and retaining the nozzle during the fuel filling operation and a grounding device adjacent to the fuel tank port which includes a grounding switch having a contact member that receives physical contact by the operator and where physical contact of the contact member activates the grounding switch. A releasable interlock is included that provides a lock position wherein the nozzle is locked into the port upon insertion of the nozzle into the port and a release position wherein the nozzle is releasable from the port upon completion of the fuel filling operation and after physical contact of the contact member is accomplished.

  3. The IUE Science Operations Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Ronald E.; Arquilla, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) Science Operations System provides full realtime operations capabilities and support to the operations staff and astronomer users. The components of this very diverse and extremely flexible hardware and software system have played a major role in maintaining the scientific efficiency and productivity of the IUE. The software provides the staff and user with all the tools necessary for pre-visit and real-time planning and operations analysis for any day of the year. Examples of such tools include the effects of spacecraft constraints on target availability, maneuver times between targets, availability of guide stars, target identification, coordinate transforms, e-mail transfer of Observatory forms and messages, and quick-look analysis of image data. Most of this extensive software package can also be accessed remotely by individual users for information, scheduling of shifts, pre-visit planning, and actual observing program execution. Astronomers, with a modest investment in hardware and software, may establish remote observing sites. We currently have over 20 such sites in our remote observers' network.

  4. Design requirements for operational earth resources ground data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, C. J.; Bradford, L. H.; Burnett, E. S.; Hutson, D. E.; Kinsler, B. A.; Kugle, D. R.; Webber, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    Realistic tradeoff data and evaluation techniques were studied that permit conceptual design of operational earth resources ground processing systems. Methodology for determining user requirements that utilize the limited information available from users is presented along with definitions of sensor capabilities projected into the shuttle/station era. A tentative method is presented for synthesizing candidate ground processing concepts.

  5. An intelligent ground operator support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goerlach, Thomas; Ohlendorf, Gerhard; Plassmeier, Frank; Bruege, Uwe

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents first results of the project 'Technologien fuer die intelligente Kontrolle von Raumfahrzeugen' (TIKON). The TIKON objective was the demonstration of feasibility and profit of the application of artificial intelligence in the space business. For that purpose a prototype system has been developed and implemented for the operation support of the Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT), a scientific spacecraft designed to perform the first all-sky survey with a high-resolution X-ray telescope and to investigate the emission of specific celestial sources. The prototype integrates a scheduler and a diagnosis tool both based on artificial intelligence techniques. The user interface is menu driven and provides synoptic displays for the visualization of the system status. The prototype has been used and tested in parallel to an already existing operational system.

  6. Ground operation of robotics on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojcik, Z. Alex; Hunter, David G.; Cantin, Marc R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reflects work carried out on Ground Operated Telerobotics (GOT) in 1992 to refine further the ideas, procedures, and technologies needed to test the procedures in a high latency environment, and to integrate GOT into Space Station Freedom operations. Space Station Freedom (SSF) will be in operation for 30 years, and will depend on robots to carry out a significant part of the assembly, maintenance, and utilization workload. Current plans call for on-orbit robotics to be operated by on-board crew members. This approach implies that on-orbit robotics operations use up considerable crew time, and that these operations cannot be carried out when SSF is unmanned. GOT will allow robotic operations to be operated from the ground, with on-orbit crew interventions only when absolutely required. The paper reviews how GOT would be implemented, how GOT operations would be planned and supported, and reviews GOT issues, critical success factors, and benefits.

  7. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Movement Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Atlanta Hartsfield International Airport in Atlanta, GA. The test aircraft was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. Qualitative and quantitative results are discussed.

  8. Flight Testing of an Airport Surface Guidance, Navigation, and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 (B-757) research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport (ATL) in Atlanta, GA. The B-757 was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range (RVR) of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. The integrated ground and airborne components resulted in a system that has the potential to significantly improve the safety and efficiency of airport surface movements particularly as weather conditions deteriorate. Several advanced technologies were employed to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate flight simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. Results show that while the maturity of some of the technologies does not permit immediate implementation, the operational concept is valid and the performance is more than adequate in many areas.

  9. Application of a method for the automatic detection and Ground-Based Velocity Track Display (GBVTD) analysis of a tornado crossing the Hong Kong International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, P. W.; Wurman, J.; Shun, C. M.; Robinson, P.; Kosiba, K.

    2012-03-01

    A weak tornado with a maximum Doppler velocity shear of about 40 m s - 1 moved across the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) during the evening of 20 May 2002. The tornado caused damage equivalent to F0 on the Fujita Scale, based on a damage survey. The Doppler velocity data from the Hong Kong Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) are studied using the Ground-Based Velocity Track Display (GBVTD) method of single Doppler analysis. The GBVTD analysis is able to clearly depict the development and decay of the tornado though it appears to underestimate its magnitude. In the pre-tornadic state, the wind field is characterized by inflow toward the center near the ground and upward motion near the center. When the tornado attains its maximum strength, an eye-like structure with a downdraft appears to form in the center. Several minutes later the tornado begins to decay and outflow dominates at low levels. Assuming cyclostrophic balance, the pressure drop 200 m from the center of the tornado at its maximum strength is calculated to be about 6 hPa. To estimate the maximum ground-relative wind speed of the tornado, the TDWR's Doppler velocities are adjusted for the ratio of the sample-volume size of the radar and the radius of the tornado, resulting in a peak wind speed of 28 m s - 1 , consistent with the readings from a nearby ground-based anemometers and the F0 damage observed. An automatic tornado detection algorithm based on Doppler velocity difference (delta-V) and temporal and spatial continuity is applied to this event. The locations and the core flow radii of the tornado as determined by the automatic method and by subjective analysis agree closely.

  10. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... water or marsh lands adjacent to the airport that are crossed by the approach and departure flight paths... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport emergency plan. 139.325 Section 139... AIRPORTS Operations § 139.325 Airport emergency plan. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator,...

  11. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... water or marsh lands adjacent to the airport that are crossed by the approach and departure flight paths... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airport emergency plan. 139.325 Section 139... AIRPORTS Operations § 139.325 Airport emergency plan. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator,...

  12. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... water or marsh lands adjacent to the airport that are crossed by the approach and departure flight paths... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airport emergency plan. 139.325 Section 139... AIRPORTS Operations § 139.325 Airport emergency plan. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator,...

  13. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  14. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  15. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  16. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  17. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  18. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport emergency plan. 139.325 Section 139... AIRPORTS Operations § 139.325 Airport emergency plan. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must develop and maintain an airport emergency plan designed to minimize the...

  19. 76 FR 18616 - Operating Limitations at New York LaGuardia Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... the Government Printing Office's Web page at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . You also may....\\2\\ \\1\\ 33 FR 17896 (Dec. 3, 1968). The FAA codified the rules for operating at high density traffic...\\ 71 FR 51360 (August 29, 2006); Docket FAA-2006-25709. The FAA subsequently published a...

  20. 78 FR 28278 - Operating Limitations at New York LaGuardia Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ...://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . You also may obtain a copy by sending a request to the Federal... LGA operations terminated as of January 1, 2007.\\2\\ \\1\\ 33 FR 17896 (Dec. 3, 1968). The FAA codified..., on October 7, 2009,\\8\\ and on April 4, 2011.\\9\\ \\3\\ 71 FR 51360 (August 29, 2006); Docket...

  1. LANDSAT-D ground segment operations plan, revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, B.

    1982-01-01

    The basic concept for the utilization of LANDSAT ground processing resources is described. Only the steady state activities that support normal ground processing are addressed. This ground segment operations plan covers all processing of the multispectral scanner and the processing of thematic mapper through data acquisition and payload correction data generation for the LANDSAT 4 mission. The capabilities embedded in the hardware and software elements are presented from an operations viewpoint. The personnel assignments associated with each functional process and the mechanisms available for controlling the overall data flow are identified.

  2. Lights Out Operations of a Space, Ground, Sensorweb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Tran, Daniel; Johnston, Mark; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Castano, Rebecca; Rabideau, Gregg; Cichy, Benjamin; Doubleday, Joshua; Pieri, David; Scharenbroich, Lucas; Kedar, Sharon; Chao, Yi; Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stuart; Song, WenZhan; Kyle, Philip; LaHusen, Rick; Cappelaere, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We have been operating an autonomous, integrated sensorweb linking numerous space and ground sensors in 24/7 operations since 2004. This sensorweb includes elements of space data acquisition (MODIS, GOES, and EO-1), space asset retasking (EO-1), integration of data acquired from ground sensor networks with on-demand ground processing of data into science products. These assets are being integrated using web service standards from the Open Geospatial Consortium. Future plans include extension to fixed and mobile surface and subsurface sea assets as part of the NSF's ORION Program.

  3. Some New Caves under Airport in Dubrovnik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasic, Mladen; Garasic, Davor

    2013-04-01

    Till today six speleological sites are known to exist at the premises of the Dubrovnik Airport in Croatia. This is a highly weathered area that has been in the focus of attention of speleologists ever since the airport was built in 1961/62. Two vertical caves measuring 31 m and 10.5 m in depth were discovered at that time. These two caves are now situated right underneath the new control tower of the Dubrovnik Airport. A tunnel entrance to the cave that has been known to local population for a long time is situated in the immediate vicinity of the control tower. In late 1950's the entrance to the cave was closed with concrete because of a military airport construction, but a tunnel was built so as to enable access to the cave. The cave is about 200 meters long and it fully occupies the space underneath the concrete runways of the Dubrovnik Airport. Thanks to efforts made by speleologists in 2006-2010 the cave was adapted to enable tourist visits, and it is now the world's only tourist cave underneath an operating airport. During apron extension activities in May 2012, three additional speleological sites were discovered and examined, together with other previously discovered caves, from the standpoint of geophysics, geology and speleology. Results of exploration shows that there are several faults zones in karstified limestones. The water flow in the caverns varies depending on climatic conditions on the ground surface. Water reaches the caverns via joints directly from the ground surface (to a lesser extent) or in deeper parts via joints and paraclases from other parts of Cretaceous carbonate formations (in most cases). The weathering zone depth in the area of these speleological features, are estimated at 300 to 500 meters (included under sea levels) , and the zone of vertical circulation varies from 50 to 150 m. It is followed by the zone of horizontal circulation in which the ground water is carried via Cretaceous limestones toward submarine springs in the

  4. 49 CFR 37.33 - Airport transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... systems operated by public airport operators, which provide designated public transportation and connect.... Public airports which operate fixed route transportation systems are subject to the requirements of this... part. (b) Fixed-route transportation systems operated by public airport operators between the...

  5. 78 FR 28276 - Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ...://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . You also may obtain a copy by sending a request to the Federal..., 2011.\\8\\ \\1\\ 33 FR 17896 (Dec. 3, 1968). The FAA codified the rules for operating at high density... 106-181 (Apr. 5, 2000), 49 U.S.C. 41715(a)(2). \\3\\ 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008), as amended by 73...

  6. Orion Pad Abort 1 Flight Test - Ground and Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackenbergy, Davis L.; Hicks, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the ground and flight operations aspects to the Pad Abort 1 launch. The paper details the processes used to plan all operations. The paper then discussions the difficulties of integration and testing, while detailing some of the lessons learned throughout the entire launch campaign. Flight operational aspects of the launc are covered in order to provide the listener with the full suite of operational issues encountered in preparation for the first flight test of the Orion Launch Abort System.

  7. Economics in ground operations of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The physical configuration, task versatility, and typical mission profile of the Space Shuttle are illustrated and described, and a comparison of shuttle and expendable rocket costs is discussed, with special emphasis upon savings to be achieved in ground operations. A review of economies achieved by engineering design improvements covers the automated checkout by onboard shuttle systems, the automated launch processing system, the new maintenance concept, and the analogy of Space Shuttle and airline repetitive operations. The Space Shuttle is shown to represent a new level in space flight technology, particularly, the sophistication of the systems and procedures devised for its support and ground operations.

  8. 14 CFR 91.126 - Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class G airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airport in Class G airspace. 91.126 Section 91.126 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... or certification, the pilot in command of a civil turbojet-powered aircraft must use, as a final flap setting, the minimum certificated landing flap setting set forth in the approved performance...

  9. 14 CFR 91.126 - Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class G airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airport in Class G airspace. 91.126 Section 91.126 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... or certification, the pilot in command of a civil turbojet-powered aircraft must use, as a final flap setting, the minimum certificated landing flap setting set forth in the approved performance...

  10. 14 CFR 91.126 - Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class G airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airport in Class G airspace. 91.126 Section 91.126 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... or certification, the pilot in command of a civil turbojet-powered aircraft must use, as a final flap setting, the minimum certificated landing flap setting set forth in the approved performance...

  11. 14 CFR 91.126 - Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class G airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airport in Class G airspace. 91.126 Section 91.126 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... or certification, the pilot in command of a civil turbojet-powered aircraft must use, as a final flap setting, the minimum certificated landing flap setting set forth in the approved performance...

  12. 75 FR 7306 - Petition for Waiver of the Terms of the Order Limiting Scheduled Operations at LaGuardia Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... Transportation's complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register at 65 FR 19,477-78 (Apr. 11, 2000... New York LaGuardia Airport, 71 FR 77,854 (Dec. 27, 2006); 72 FR 63,224 (Nov. 8, 2007) (transfer, minimum usage, and withdrawal amendments); 72 FR 48,428 (Aug. 19, 2008) (reducing the...

  13. Ground controlled robotic assembly operations for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    A number of dextrous robotic systems and associated positioning and transportation devices are available on Space Station Freedom (SSF) to perform assembly tasks that would otherwise need to be performed by extravehicular activity (EVA) crewmembers. The currently planned operating mode for these robotic systems during the assembly phase is teleoperation by intravehicular activity (IVA) crewmembers. While this operating mode is less hazardous and expensive than manned EVA operations, and has insignificant control loop time delays, the amount of IVA time available to support telerobotic operations is much less than the anticipated requirements. Some alternative is needed to allow the robotic systems to perform useful tasks without exhausting the available IVA resources; ground control is one such alternative. The issues associated with ground control of SSF robotic systems to alleviate onboard crew time availability constraints are investigated. Key technical issues include the effect of communication time delays, the need for safe, reliable execution of remote operations, and required modifications to the SSF ground and flight system architecture. Time delay compensation techniques such as predictive displays and world model-based force reflection are addressed and collision detection and avoidance strategies to ensure the safety of the on-orbit crew, Orbiter, and SSF are described. Although more time consuming and difficult than IVA controlled teleoperations or manned EVA, ground controlled telerobotic operations offer significant benefits during the SSF assembly phase, and should be considered in assembly planning activities.

  14. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Operating Limitations for Unscheduled Operations at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (14 CFR, part 93, subpart k), unscheduled flights under Special Traffic Management Programs, and the O... Charter” is defined in 14 CFR 380.2 as a one-way or roundtrip charter flight to be performed by one or...” is defined in 14 CFR 380.2 as a U.S. or foreign public charter operator. “Reservation” is...

  15. 76 FR 21420 - Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue; Policy Regarding Airport Rates and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ...This notice requests comments on a petition to accept an air service incentive program at McCarran International Airport (Airport) as consistent with Federal law and policies on the use of airport revenue and on airport rates and charges. The petitioner Clark County Department of Aviation is the owner and operator of the Airport. The petitioner is the recipient of Federal grants under the......

  16. Web Application Software for Ground Operations Planning Database (GOPDb) Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanham, Clifton; Kallner, Shawn; Gernand, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    A Web application facilitates collaborative development of the ground operations planning document. This will reduce costs and development time for new programs by incorporating the data governance, access control, and revision tracking of the ground operations planning data. Ground Operations Planning requires the creation and maintenance of detailed timelines and documentation. The GOPDb Web application was created using state-of-the-art Web 2.0 technologies, and was deployed as SaaS (Software as a Service), with an emphasis on data governance and security needs. Application access is managed using two-factor authentication, with data write permissions tied to user roles and responsibilities. Multiple instances of the application can be deployed on a Web server to meet the robust needs for multiple, future programs with minimal additional cost. This innovation features high availability and scalability, with no additional software that needs to be bought or installed. For data governance and security (data quality, management, business process management, and risk management for data handling), the software uses NAMS. No local copy/cloning of data is permitted. Data change log/tracking is addressed, as well as collaboration, work flow, and process standardization. The software provides on-line documentation and detailed Web-based help. There are multiple ways that this software can be deployed on a Web server to meet ground operations planning needs for future programs. The software could be used to support commercial crew ground operations planning, as well as commercial payload/satellite ground operations planning. The application source code and database schema are owned by NASA.

  17. Components of the airport access system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The organizations and agencies which make up or influence the airport access system are examined. These include the airport, the airline industry, the public and private transit agencies which provide ground access to the airport, and the regulatory agencies which affect all of these organizations and their actions. Each component, with the exception of the regulatory agencies is described in terms of its legal status, its sources of funds, and the nature of its relationship with the other components. Conclusions regarding the system components' effects on airport access and recommendations for changes which appear practical are presented.

  18. 78 FR 19356 - Notice of Schedule Information Submission Deadline for O'Hare International Airport, San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... International Airport, 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18620 (Apr. 4, 2011); Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport, 73 FR 29550 (May 21, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18618 (Apr. 4... International Airport, San Francisco International Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, and...

  19. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ground-water pathway,'' which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  20. The IXV Ground Segment design, implementation and operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci di Scarfizzi, Giovanni; Bellomo, Alessandro; Musso, Ivano; Bussi, Diego; Rabaioli, Massimo; Santoro, Gianfranco; Billig, Gerhard; Gallego Sanz, José María

    2016-07-01

    The Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) is an ESA re-entry demonstrator that performed, on the 11th February of 2015, a successful re-entry demonstration mission. The project objectives were the design, development, manufacturing and on ground and in flight verification of an autonomous European lifting and aerodynamically controlled re-entry system. For the IXV mission a dedicated Ground Segment was provided. The main subsystems of the IXV Ground Segment were: IXV Mission Control Center (MCC), from where monitoring of the vehicle was performed, as well as support during pre-launch and recovery phases; IXV Ground Stations, used to cover IXV mission by receiving spacecraft telemetry and forwarding it toward the MCC; the IXV Communication Network, deployed to support the operations of the IXV mission by interconnecting all remote sites with MCC, supporting data, voice and video exchange. This paper describes the concept, architecture, development, implementation and operations of the ESA Intermediate Experimental Vehicle (IXV) Ground Segment and outlines the main operations and lessons learned during the preparation and successful execution of the IXV Mission.

  1. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford operations

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work

  2. SILEX ground segment control facilities and flight operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demelenne, Benoit; Tolker-Nielsen, Toni; Guillen, Jean-Claude

    1999-04-01

    The European Space Agency is going to conduct an inter orbit link experiment which will connect a low Earth orbiting satellite and a Geostationary satellite via optical terminals. This experiment has been called SILEX (Semiconductor Inter satellite Link Experiment). Two payloads have been built. One called PASTEL (PASsager de TELecommunication) has been embarked on the French Earth observation satellite SPOT4 which has been launched successfully in March 1998. The future European experimental data relay satellite ARTEMIS (Advanced Relay and TEchnology MISsion), which will route the data to ground, will carry the OPALE terminal (Optical Payload Experiment). The European Space Agency is responsible for the operation of both terminals. Due to the complexity and experimental character of this new optical technology, the development, preparation and validation of the ground segment control facilities required a long series of technical and operational qualification tests. This paper is presenting the operations concept and the early results of the PASTEL in orbit operations.

  3. CATIA V5 Virtual Environment Support for Constellation Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This summer internship primarily involved using CATIA V5 modeling software to design and model parts to support ground operations for the Constellation program. I learned several new CATIA features, including the Imagine and Shape workbench and the Tubing Design workbench, and presented brief workbench lessons to my co-workers. Most modeling tasks involved visualizing design options for Launch Pad 39B operations, including Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) access and internal access to the Ares I rocket. Other ground support equipment, including a hydrazine servicing cart, a mobile fuel vapor scrubber, a hypergolic propellant tank cart, and a SCAPE (Self Contained Atmospheric Protective Ensemble) suit, was created to aid in the visualization of pad operations.

  4. Airport surface moving map displays: OpEval-2 evaluation results and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livack, Garret; McDaniel, James I.; Battiste, Vernol

    2001-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), in cooperation with the Cargo Airline Association (CAA) and three of its member airlines (Airborne Express, Federal Express, and United Parcel Service), have embarked upon an aggressive yet phased approach to introduce new Free Flight-enabling technologies into the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS). General aviation is also actively involved, represented primarily by the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA). These new technologies being evaluated include advanced cockpit avionics and a complimentary ground infrastructure. In support of this initiative, a series of operational evaluations (OpEvals) have been conducted or are planned. The OpEvals have evaluated in-flight as well as airport surface movement applications. Results from the second OpEval, conducted at Louisville, Kentucky in October 2000, indicated that runway incursions might be significantly reduced with the introduction of a cockpit-based moving map system derived from emerging technologies. An additional OpEval is planned to evaluate the utility of an integrated cockpit and airport surface architecture that provides enhanced pilot and controller awareness of airport surface operations. It is believed that the combination of such an airborne and a ground-based system best addresses many of the safety issues surrounding airport surface operations. Such a combined system would provide both flight crews and controllers with a common awareness, or shared picture of airport surface operations.

  5. Airport Economics: Management Control Financial Reporting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchbinder, A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of management control financial reporting systems for airport operation is discussed. The operation of the system to provide the reports required for determining the specific revenue producing facilities of airports is described. The organization of the cost reporting centers to show the types of information provided by the system is analyzed.

  6. ALLY: An operator's associate for satellite ground control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushman, J. B.; Mitchell, Christine M.; Jones, P. M.; Rubin, K. S.

    1991-01-01

    The key characteristics of an intelligent advisory system is explored. A central feature is that human-machine cooperation should be based on a metaphor of human-to-human cooperation. ALLY, a computer-based operator's associate which is based on a preliminary theory of human-to-human cooperation, is discussed. ALLY assists the operator in carrying out the supervisory control functions for a simulated NASA ground control system. Experimental evaluation of ALLY indicates that operators using ALLY performed at least as well as they did when using a human associate and in some cases even better.

  7. Satellite Ground Operations Automation: Lessons Learned and Future Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catena, John; Frank, Lou; Saylor, Rick; Weikel, Craig; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Reducing spacecraft ground system operations costs is a major goal in all missions. The Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) flight operations team at the NASA/Goddard Spacecraft Flight Center developed in-house scripts and procedures to automate monitoring of critical spacecraft functions. The initial staffing profile of 16x7 was reduced first to 8x5 and then to 'lights out'. Operations functions became an offline review of system performance and the generation of future science plans for subsequent upload to the spacecraft. Lessons learned will be applied to the challenging Triana mission, where 24x7 contact with the spacecraft will be necessary at all times.

  8. Requirement for a standard language for test and ground operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medlock, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The basic requirements for a standard test and checkout language applicable to all phases of the space shuttle test and ground operations are determined. The general characteristics outlined here represent the integration of selected ideas and concepts from operational elements within Kennedy Space Center (KSC) that represent diverse disciplines associated with space vehicle testing and launching operations. Special reference is made to two studies conducted in this area for KSC as authorized by the Advanced Development Element of the Office of Manned Space Flight (MSF). Information contained in reports from these studies have contributed significantly to the final selection of language features depicted in this technical report.

  9. Airport Surface Network Architecture Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thanh C.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Bretmersky, Steven C.; Lawas-Grodek, Fran; Ellis, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, airport surface communications are fragmented across multiple types of systems. These communication systems for airport operations at most airports today are based dedicated and separate architectures that cannot support system-wide interoperability and information sharing. The requirements placed upon the Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) systems in airports are rapidly growing and integration is urgently needed if the future vision of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) 2025 concept are to be realized. To address this and other problems such as airport surface congestion, the Space Based Technologies Project s Surface ICNS Network Architecture team at NASA Glenn Research Center has assessed airport surface communications requirements, analyzed existing and future surface applications, and defined a set of architecture functions that will help design a scalable, reliable and flexible surface network architecture to meet the current and future needs of airport operations. This paper describes the systems approach or methodology to networking that was employed to assess airport surface communications requirements, analyze applications, and to define the surface network architecture functions as the building blocks or components of the network. The systems approach used for defining these functions is relatively new to networking. It is viewing the surface network, along with its environment (everything that the surface network interacts with or impacts), as a system. Associated with this system are sets of services that are offered by the network to the rest of the system. Therefore, the surface network is considered as part of the larger system (such as the NAS), with interactions and dependencies between the surface network and its users, applications, and devices. The surface network architecture includes components such as addressing/routing, network management, network

  10. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration for Responsive Space Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.

    2013-01-01

    Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration Units (IGODU) project developed to mature, integrate and demonstrate advancements in cryogenics, system health management and command and control technologies. Two Distinct Testing Environments: a) GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage - GODU LH2; b) GODU Autonomous Control - GODU LO2. Scope: I. GODU LH2: a) Investigate alternative storage and distribution architecture for future cryogenic propellant operations. b) Demonstrate advanced cryogenic propellant handling operations (liquefaction, storage and distribution) of normal boiling point and sub-cooled cryogenic propellants. II. GODU L02: a) Develop and demonstrate advanced control and health management technologies and techniques to autonomously control cryogenic propellant servicing operations. b) Investigate modern COTS hardware and control systems in an effort to reduce the "standing army" of engineers associated with maintaining and operating ground systems through the use of health management and autonomous control technologies. Goals: a) Raise Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) and Integration Readiness Levels (IRL) of several key technology development areas. b) Reduce operations lifecycle costs of future test programs and launch complexes. c) Demonstrate technologies for future exploration beyond low earth orbit. d) Serve as test environments for extraterrestrial surface operations.

  11. The Interim : until you achieve an operationally responsive ground system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendlandt, Bob; Clarke, Kelly; Lei, Jordan; Miyamoto, Charles; Owen-Mankovich, Kyran

    2008-01-01

    Everyone wants to achieve a 'Responsive' Ground Data System (GDS), but that takes time. What do you do in the interim? Our group, called the Integration, Test and Deployment Team (ITD), is a group of responsive engineers whose primary focus is to assist JPL projects to successfully adapt, test, integrate and deploy their ground data system. The team configures and adapts the GDS for a project, so that analysts, engineers and scientist do not need to be experts in the GDS to operate it. The team has developed a human interface to accommodate all types of users. It provides Graphical User Interfaces (GUI's) for those that want GUI's, command line interfaces for those that want control, and selection button interfaces for other users. The cornerstone of a responsive Ground Data System is responsive people. Without individuals who can be aware of a project's changing needs and requirements, how can the GDS become responsive

  12. The Interim: Until You Achieve an Operationally Responsive Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendlandt, Bob; Clarke, Kelly; Miyamoto, Charles; Lei, Jordan; Owen-Mankovich, Kyran

    2008-01-01

    Everyone wants to achieve a 'Responsive' Ground Data System (GDS), but that takes time. What do you do in the interim? Our group, called the Integration, Test and Deployment Team (ITD), is a group of responsive engineers whose primary focus is to assist JPL projects to successfully adapt, test, integrate and deploy their ground data system. The team configures and adapts the GDS for a project, so that analysts, engineers and scientist do not need to be experts in the GDS to operate it. The team has developed a human interface to accommodate all types of users. It provides Graphical User Interfaces (GUI's) for those that want GUI's, command line interfaces for those that want control, and selection button interfaces for other users. The cornerstone of a responsive Ground Data System is responsive people. Without individuals who can be aware of a project's changing needs and requirements, how can the GDS become responsive?.

  13. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  14. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  15. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  16. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  17. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  18. Tailored fog climatology for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leander, R.

    2010-07-01

    Like many airports, Amsterdam Airport Schiphol is vulnerable to climate change. The airport is situated in a complex and fragile urban area where fundamental changes take place in design and use of the region. To maintain its competitive position, the airport is beginning to respond to changes in weather and climate by formulating adaptation strategies, based on tailored climate information. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), Amsterdam Airport Schiphol (AAS) and Air Trafic Control the Netherlands (LVNL) are working together to provide just that type of information. Due to safety regulations, reduced horizontal visibility on airports can have an immediate impact on the availability of runways and hence the airport capacity. Fog is therefore one of the most relevant meteorological phenomena to airport operations. A study has started in which the statistics of fog occurrence and visibility at Amsterdam Airport are assessed. The aim is describing the current climate (from 1970 onward) as well as making projections into the future (up to 2040). For the latter, the identification and attribution of trends is relevant. Another point of interrest is the spatial pattern of fog potential over the airport, in particular the related questions whether some runways are more prone to fog occurrence than others and whether these runways require a separate forecast. To answer these questions it is crucial to distinguish between large-scale and local influences. The preliminary results of this study are presented here.

  19. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  20. Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen Initial Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Swanger, A. M.; Tomsik, T.

    2015-01-01

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project has designed, assembled, and started testing of a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The system is unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. This paper will present and discuss the results of the initial phase of testing of the GODU LH2 system.

  1. Ground operations demonstration unit for liquid hydrogen initial test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Johnson, W. L.; Swanger, A. M.; Tomsik, T.

    2015-12-01

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project has designed, assembled, and started testing of a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives including zero loss storage and transfer, liquefaction of gaseous hydrogen, and densification of liquid hydrogen. The system is unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. This paper will present and discuss the results of the initial phase of testing of the GODU LH2 system.

  2. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 3: Data bank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The GOAL (Ground Operations Aerospace Language) test programming language was developed for use in ground checkout operations in a space vehicle launch environment. To insure compatibility with a maximum number of applications, a systematic and error-free method of referencing command/response (analog and digital) hardware measurements is a principle feature of the language. Central to the concept of requiring the test language to be independent of launch complex equipment and terminology is that of addressing measurements via symbolic names that have meaning directly in the hardware units being tested. To form the link from test program through test system interfaces to the units being tested the concept of a data bank has been introduced. The data bank is actually a large cross-reference table that provides pertinent hardware data such as interface unit addresses, data bus routings, or any other system values required to locate and access measurements.

  3. Integrated Ground Operations Demonstration for Responsive Space Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Robert G.; Notardonato, William U.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program has a three year project to develop and demonstrate technologies to fundamentally change the way ground servicing activities support future access to space architectures. The AES Integrated Ground Operation Demonstration Units (IGODU) project has created two test beds for investigating and maturing two key elements of spaceport processing activities. The first is the GODU Integrated Refrigeration and Storage test bed that is demonstrating zero-loss storage of liquid hydrogen propellants and studying the storage and transfer of densified propellants. The second activity is the GODU Autonomous Control test bed that is implementing health management technologies and autonomous control capability of the propellant loading process to reduce the standing army of experts historically needed to ensure safe propellant loading operations. This presentation will give an overview of the activities at the Kennedy Space Center on these two test beds and its potential impact on future access to space programs.

  4. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Leidichj, Christopher; Papasin, Richard; Tran, Peter B.; Bass, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Networks of video cameras, meteorological sensors, and ancillary electronic equipment are under development in collaboration among NASA Ames Research Center, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These networks are to be established at and near airports to provide real-time information on local weather conditions that affect aircraft approaches and landings. The prototype network is an airport-approach-zone camera system (AAZCS), which has been deployed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and San Carlos Airport (SQL). The AAZCS includes remotely controlled color video cameras located on top of SFO and SQL air-traffic control towers. The cameras are controlled by the NOAA Center Weather Service Unit located at the Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center and are accessible via a secure Web site. The AAZCS cameras can be zoomed and can be panned and tilted to cover a field of view 220 wide. The NOAA observer can see the sky condition as it is changing, thereby making possible a real-time evaluation of the conditions along the approach zones of SFO and SQL. The next-generation network, denoted a remote tower sensor system (RTSS), will soon be deployed at the Half Moon Bay Airport and a version of it will eventually be deployed at Los Angeles International Airport. In addition to remote control of video cameras via secure Web links, the RTSS offers realtime weather observations, remote sensing, portability, and a capability for deployment at remote and uninhabited sites. The RTSS can be used at airports that lack control towers, as well as at major airport hubs, to provide synthetic augmentation of vision for both local and remote operations under what would otherwise be conditions of low or even zero visibility.

  5. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 2: Compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The principal elements and functions of the Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL) compiler are presented. The technique used to transcribe the syntax diagrams into machine processable format for use by the parsing routines is described. An explanation of the parsing technique used to process GOAL source statements is included. The compiler diagnostics and the output reports generated during a GOAL compilation are explained. A description of the GOAL program package is provided.

  6. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 1: Study overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A series of NASA and Contractor studies sponsored by NASA/KSC resulted in a specification for the Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). The Cape Kennedy Facility of the IBM Corporation was given the responsibility, under existing contracts, to perform an analysis of the Language Specification, to design and develop a GOAL Compiler, to provide a specification for a data bank, to design and develop an interpretive code translator, and to perform associated application studies.

  7. Prediction of Weather Impacted Airport Capacity using Ensemble Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2011-01-01

    Ensemble learning with the Bagging Decision Tree (BDT) model was used to assess the impact of weather on airport capacities at selected high-demand airports in the United States. The ensemble bagging decision tree models were developed and validated using the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation System Performance Metrics (ASPM) data and weather forecast at these airports. The study examines the performance of BDT, along with traditional single Support Vector Machines (SVM), for airport runway configuration selection and airport arrival rates (AAR) prediction during weather impacts. Testing of these models was accomplished using observed weather, weather forecast, and airport operation information at the chosen airports. The experimental results show that ensemble methods are more accurate than a single SVM classifier. The airport capacity ensemble method presented here can be used as a decision support model that supports air traffic flow management to meet the weather impacted airport capacity in order to reduce costs and increase safety.

  8. Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, James

    2014-01-01

    The Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management plays a key role for future ground operations at NASA. The software that is integrated into this system is called G2 2011 Gensym. The purpose of this report is to describe the Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management with the use of the G2 Gensym software and the G2 NASA toolkit for Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) which is a Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI). The decision rationale for the use of the G2 platform is to develop a modular capability for ISHM and AC. Toolkit modules include knowledge bases that are generic and can be applied in any application domain module. That way, there's a maximization of reusability, maintainability, and systematic evolution, portability, and scalability. Engine modules are generic, while application modules represent the domain model of a specific application. Furthermore, the NASA toolkit, developed since 2006 (a set of modules), makes it possible to create application domain models quickly, using pre-defined objects that include sensors and components libraries for typical fluid, electrical, and mechanical systems.

  9. Aircraft engine exhaust emissions and other airport-related contributions to ambient air pollution: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiol, Mauro; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-10-01

    Civil aviation is fast-growing (about +5% every year), mainly driven by the developing economies and globalisation. Its impact on the environment is heavily debated, particularly in relation to climate forcing attributed to emissions at cruising altitudes and the noise and the deterioration of air quality at ground-level due to airport operations. This latter environmental issue is of particular interest to the scientific community and policymakers, especially in relation to the breach of limit and target values for many air pollutants, mainly nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, near the busiest airports and the resulting consequences for public health. Despite the increased attention given to aircraft emissions at ground-level and air pollution in the vicinity of airports, many research gaps remain. Sources relevant to air quality include not only engine exhaust and non-exhaust emissions from aircraft, but also emissions from the units providing power to the aircraft on the ground, the traffic due to the airport ground service, maintenance work, heating facilities, fugitive vapours from refuelling operations, kitchens and restaurants for passengers and operators, intermodal transportation systems, and road traffic for transporting people and goods in and out to the airport. Many of these sources have received inadequate attention, despite their high potential for impact on air quality. This review aims to summarise the state-of-the-art research on aircraft and airport emissions and attempts to synthesise the results of studies that have addressed this issue. It also aims to describe the key characteristics of pollution, the impacts upon global and local air quality and to address the future potential of research by highlighting research needs.

  10. Functional design for operational earth resources ground data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, C. J. (Principal Investigator); Bradford, L. H.; Hutson, D. E.; Jugle, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Study emphasis was on developing a unified concept for the required ground system, capable of handling data from all viable acquisition platforms and sensor groupings envisaged as supporting operational earth survey programs. The platforms considered include both manned and unmanned spacecraft in near earth orbit, and continued use of low and high altitude aircraft. The sensor systems include both imaging and nonimaging devices, operated both passively and actively, from the ultraviolet to the microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  11. FAA Airport Design Competition for Universities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Raise awareness of the importance of airports to the National Airspace System infrastructure. Increase the involvement of the academic community in addressing airport operations and infrastructure issues and needs. Engage U.S. students in the conceptualization of applications, systems and equipment capable of addressing related challenges in a robust, reliable and comprehensive manner. Encourage U.S. undergraduate and graduate students to contribute innovative ideas and solutions to airport and runway safety issues. Provide the framework and incentives for quality educational experiences for university students. d Develop an awareness of and an interest in airports as a vital and interesting area for engineering and technology careers.

  12. Productivity Analysis of Public and Private Airports: A Causal Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasigh, Bijan; Gorjidooz, Javad

    2007-01-01

    Around the world, airports are being viewed as enterprises, rather than public services, which are expected to be managed efficiently and provide passengers with courteous customer services. Governments are, increasingly, turning to the private sectors for their efficiency in managing the operation, financing, and development, as well as providing security for airports. Operational and financial performance evaluation has become increasingly important to airport operators due to recent trends in airport privatization. Assessing performance allows the airport operators to plan for human resources and capital investment as efficiently as possible. Productivity measurements may be used as comparisons and guidelines in strategic planning, in the internal analysis of operational efficiency and effectiveness, and in assessing the competitive position of an airport in transportation industry. The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate the operational and financial efficiencies of 22 major airports in the United States and Europe. These airports are divided into three groups based on private ownership (7 British Airport Authority airports), public ownership (8 major United States airports), and a mix of private and public ownership (7 major European Union airports. The detail ownership structures of these airports are presented in Appendix A. Total factor productivity (TFP) model was utilized to measure airport performance in terms of financial and operational efficiencies and to develop a benchmarking tool to identify the areas of strength and weakness. A regression model was then employed to measure the relationship between TFP and ownership structure. Finally a Granger causality test was performed to determine whether ownership structure is a Granger cause of TFP. The results of the analysis presented in this paper demonstrate that there is not a significant relationship between airport TFP and ownership structure. Airport productivity and efficiency is

  13. A model-based approach to adjust microwave observations for operational applications: results of a campaign at Munich Airport in winter 2011/2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güldner, J.

    2013-10-01

    In the frame of the project "LuFo iPort VIS" which focuses on the implementation of a site-specific visibility forecast, a field campaign was organised to offer detailed information to a numerical fog model. As part of additional observing activities, a 22-channel microwave radiometer profiler (MWRP) was operating at the Munich Airport site in Germany from October 2011 to February 2012 in order to provide vertical temperature and humidity profiles as well as cloud liquid water information. Independently from the model-related aims of the campaign, the MWRP observations were used to study their capabilities to work in operational meteorological networks. Over the past decade a growing quantity of MWRP has been introduced and a user community (MWRnet) was established to encourage activities directed at the set up of an operational network. On that account, the comparability of observations from different network sites plays a fundamental role for any applications in climatology and numerical weather forecast. In practice, however, systematic temperature and humidity differences (bias) between MWRP retrievals and co-located radiosonde profiles were observed and reported by several authors. This bias can be caused by instrumental offsets and by the absorption model used in the retrieval algorithms as well as by applying a non-representative training data set. At the Lindenberg observatory, besides a neural network provided by the manufacturer, a measurement-based regression method was developed to reduce the bias. These regression operators are calculated on the basis of coincident radiosonde observations and MWRP brightness temperature (TB) measurements. However, MWRP applications in a network require comparable results at just any site, even if no radiosondes are available. The motivation of this work is directed to a verification of the suitability of the operational local forecast model COSMO-EU of the Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD) for the calculation of model

  14. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units,...

  15. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  16. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units,...

  17. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  18. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  19. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135.229 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder...

  20. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135.229 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder...

  1. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135.229 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder...

  2. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135.229 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder...

  3. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135.229 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder...

  4. Intelligent Command and Control Systems for Satellite Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1999-01-01

    This grant, Intelligent Command and Control Systems for Satellite Ground Operations, funded by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, has spanned almost a decade. During this time, it has supported a broad range of research addressing the changing needs of NASA operations. It is important to note that many of NASA's evolving needs, for example, use of automation to drastically reduce (e.g., 70%) operations costs, are similar requirements in both government and private sectors. Initially the research addressed the appropriate use of emerging and inexpensive computational technologies, such as X Windows, graphics, and color, together with COTS (commercial-off-the-shelf) hardware and software such as standard Unix workstations to re-engineer satellite operations centers. The first phase of research supported by this grant explored the development of principled design methodologies to make effective use of emerging and inexpensive technologies. The ultimate performance measures for new designs were whether or not they increased system effectiveness while decreasing costs. GT-MOCA (The Georgia Tech Mission Operations Cooperative Associate) and GT-VITA (Georgia Tech Visual and Inspectable Tutor and Assistant), whose latter stages were supported by this research, explored model-based design of collaborative operations teams and the design of intelligent tutoring systems, respectively. Implemented in proof-of-concept form for satellite operations, empirical evaluations of both, using satellite operators for the former and personnel involved in satellite control operations for the latter, demonstrated unequivocally the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed modeling and design strategy underlying both research efforts. The proof-of-concept implementation of GT-MOCA showed that the methodology could specify software requirements that enabled a human-computer operations team to perform without any significant performance differences from the standard two-person satellite

  5. Space station operations task force. Panel 2 report: Ground operations and support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Ground Operations Concept embodied in this report provides for safe multi-user utilization of the Space Station, eases user integration, and gives users autonomy and flexibility. It provides for meaningful multi-national participation while protecting U.S. interests. The concept also supports continued space operations technology development by maintaining NASA expertise and enabling technology evolution. Given attention here are pre/post flight operations, logistics, sustaining engineering/configuration management, transportation services/rescue, and information systems and communication.

  6. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  7. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  8. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  9. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  10. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  11. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  12. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  13. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  14. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  15. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  16. Air quality and public health impacts of UK airports. Part II: Impacts and policy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Steve H. L.; Stettler, Marc E. J.; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2013-03-01

    The potential adverse human health impacts of emissions from UK airports have become a significant issue of public concern. We produce an inventory of UK airport emissions - including emissions from aircraft landing and takeoff operations, aircraft auxiliary power units (APUs) and ground support equipment (GSE) - with quantified uncertainty. Emissions due to more than 95% of UK passenger enplanements are accounted for. We apply a multi-scale air quality modelling approach to assess the air quality impacts of UK airports. Using a concentration-response function we estimate that 110 (90% CI: 72-160) early deaths occur in the UK each year (based on 2005 data) due to UK airport emissions. We estimate that up to 65% of the health impacts of UK airports could be mitigated by desulphurising jet fuel, electrifying GSE, avoiding use of APUs and use of single engine taxiing. Two plans for the expansion of UK airport capacity are examined - expansion of London Heathrow and new hub airport in the Thames Estuary. Even if capacity is constrained, we find that the health impacts of UK airports still increases by 170% in 2030 due to an increasing and aging population, increasing emissions, and a changing atmosphere. We estimate that if Heathrow were to be expanded as per previous UK Government plans, UK-wide health impacts in 2030 would increase by 4% relative to the 2030 constrained case, but this increase could become a 48% reduction if emissions mitigation measures were employed. We calculate that 24% of UK-wide aviation-attributable early deaths could be avoided in 2030 if Heathrow were replaced by a new airport in Thames Estuary because the location is downwind of London, where this reduction occurs notwithstanding the increase in aircraft emissions. A Thames hub airport would (isolated from knock-on effects at other airports) cause 60-70% fewer early deaths than an expanded Heathrow, or 55-63% fewer early deaths than an unexpanded Heathrow. Finally, replacing Heathrow by a

  17. 76 FR 56868 - Notice of Submission Deadline for Schedule Information for O'Hare International Airport, John F...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Airport, 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18620 (Apr. 4, 2011); Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport, 73 FR 29550 (May 21, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18618 (Apr. 4, 2011). The FAA... International Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, and Newark Liberty International Airport for...

  18. Operationally Efficient Propulsion System Study (OEPSS) data book. Volume 1: Generic ground operations data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, Raymond J.

    1990-01-01

    This study was initiated to identify operations problems and cost drivers for current propulsion systems and to identify technology and design approaches to increase the operational efficiency and reduce operations costs for future propulsion systems. To provide readily usable data for the Advance Launch System (ALS) program, the results of the Operationally Efficient Propulsion System Study (OEPSS) were organized into a series of OEPSS Data Books as follows: Volume 1, Generic Ground Operations Data; Volume 2, Ground Operations Problems; Volume 3, Operations Technology; Volume 4, OEPSS Design Concepts; and Volume 5, OEPSS Final Review Briefing, which summarizes the activities and results of the study. This volume presents ground processing data for a generic LOX/LH2 booster and core propulsion system based on current STS experience. The data presented includes: top logic diagram, process flow, activities bar-chart, loaded timelines, manpower requirements in terms of duration, headcount and skill mix per operations and maintenance instruction (OMI), and critical path tasks and durations.

  19. Engineering a Multimission Approach to Navigation Ground Data System Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerasimatos, Dimitrios V.; Attiyah, Ahlam A.

    2012-01-01

    The Mission Design and Navigation (MDNAV) Section at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) supports many deep space and earth orbiting missions from formulation to end of mission operations. The requirements of these missions are met with a multimission approach to MDNAV ground data system (GDS) infrastructure capable of being shared and allocated in a seamless and consistent manner across missions. The MDNAV computing infrastructure consists of compute clusters, network attached storage, mission support area facilities, and desktop hardware. The multimission architecture allows these assets, and even personnel, to be leveraged effectively across the project lifecycle and across multiple missions simultaneously. It provides a more robust and capable infrastructure to each mission than might be possible if each constructed its own. It also enables a consistent interface and environment within which teams can conduct all mission analysis and navigation functions including: trajectory design; ephemeris generation; orbit determination; maneuver design; and entry, descent, and landing analysis. The savings of these efficiencies more than offset the costs of increased complexity and other challenges that had to be addressed: configuration management, scheduling conflicts, and competition for resources. This paper examines the benefits of the multimission MDNAV ground data system infrastructure, focusing on the hardware and software architecture. The result is an efficient, robust, scalable MDNAV ground data system capable of supporting more than a dozen active missions at once.

  20. Mission Operations Support Area (MOSA) for ground network support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Robert D.; Moser, Susan A.

    1993-01-01

    The Mission Operations Support Area (MOSA) has been designed utilizing numerous commercial off the shelf items allowing for easy maintenance and upgrades. At its inception, all equipment was at the forefront of technology. The system was created to provide the operator with a 'State of the Art' replacement for equipment that was becoming antiquated and virtually impossible to repair because new parts were no longer available. Although the Mini-NOCC provided adequate support to the Network for a number of years, it was quickly becoming ineffectual for higher data rate and non-standard missions. The MOSA will prove to be invaluable in the future as more and more missions require Ground Network support.

  1. SPHERES: From Ground Development to Operations on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katterhagen, A.

    2015-01-01

    SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) is an internal International Space Station (ISS) Facility that supports multiple investigations for the development of multi-spacecraft and robotic control algorithms. The SPHERES Facility on ISS is managed and operated by the SPHERES National Lab Facility at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) at Moffett Field California. The SPHERES Facility on ISS consists of three self-contained eight-inch diameter free-floating satellites which perform the various flight algorithms and serve as a platform to support the integration of experimental hardware. To help make science a reality on the ISS, the SPHERES ARC team supports a Guest Scientist Program (GSP). This program allows anyone with new science the possibility to interface with the SPHERES team and hardware. In addition to highlighting the available SPHERES hardware on ISS and on the ground, this presentation will also highlight ground support, facilities, and resources available to guest researchers. Investigations on the ISS evolve through four main phases: Strategic, Tactical, Operations, and Post Operations. The Strategic Phase encompasses early planning beginning with initial contact by the Principle Investigator (PI) and the SPHERES program who may work with the PI to assess what assistance the PI may need. Once the basic parameters are understood, the investigation moves to the Tactical Phase which involves more detailed planning, development, and testing. Depending on the nature of the investigation, the tactical phase may be split into the Lab Tactical Phase or the ISS Tactical Phase due to the difference in requirements for the two destinations. The Operations Phase is when the actual science is performed; this can be either in the lab, or on the ISS. The Post Operations Phase encompasses data analysis and distribution, and generation of summary status and reports. The SPHERES Operations and Engineering teams at ARC is composed of

  2. Three-track runway and taxiway profiles measured at international airports G and H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Three-track runway and taxiway profiles are presented for use in studies of airplane response to ground roughness. This report presents the tabulated and plotted data for two international airports (designated airports G and H).

  3. Three-track runway and taxiway profiles measured at International Airports E and F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    Three-track runway and taxiway profiles are presented for use in studies of airplane response to ground roughness. This report presents the tabulated and plotted data for two international airports (designed airports E and F).

  4. Noise monitoring in airport communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, W. K.

    Current noise monitoring practices at airports are surveyed, with emphasis placed on extent, implementation, and rationale. It is noted that contemporary aircraft monitoring systems can perform a wide variety of functions in support of an airport noise abatement program. In establishing a system, the importance of developing the program before locating the stations and specifying functions is stressed. Among the basic design considerations are the location and type of the central station, the number and locations of the remote stations, the type of data output, the amount of data to be stored, and the operating costs.

  5. Implementing Solar Technologies at Airports

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-07-01

    Federal agencies, such as the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security, as well as numerous private entities are actively pursuing the installation of solar technologies to help reduce fossil fuel energy use and associated emissions, meet sustainability goals, and create more robust or reliable operations. One potential approach identified for siting solar technologies is the installation of solar energy technologies at airports and airfields, which present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to large amounts of open land. This report focuses largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) policies toward siting solar technologies at airports.

  6. Assuring Ground-Based Detect and Avoid for UAS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen W.; Pai, Ganeshmadhav Jagadeesh; Berthold, Randall; Fladeland, Matthew; Storms, Bruce; Sumich, Mark

    2014-01-01

    One of the goals of the Marginal Ice Zones Observations and Processes Experiment (MIZOPEX) NASA Earth science mission was to show the operational capabilities of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) when deployed on challenging missions, in difficult environments. Given the extreme conditions of the Arctic environment where MIZOPEX measurements were required, the mission opted to use a radar to provide a ground-based detect-and-avoid (GBDAA) capability as an alternate means of compliance (AMOC) with the see-and-avoid federal aviation regulation. This paper describes how GBDAA safety assurance was provided by interpreting and applying the guidelines in the national policy for UAS operational approval. In particular, we describe how we formulated the appropriate safety goals, defined the processes and procedures for system safety, identified and assembled the relevant safety verification evidence, and created an operational safety case in compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements. To the best of our knowledge, the safety case, which was ultimately approved by the FAA, is the first successful example of non-military UAS operations using GBDAA in the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS), and, therefore, the first nonmilitary application of the safety case concept in this context.

  7. 14 CFR 93.253 - Nonstop operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport... between Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and another airport that is more than 1,250 miles away from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport....

  8. 14 CFR 93.253 - Nonstop operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport... between Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport and another airport that is more than 1,250 miles away from Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport....

  9. Achieving Recognition as a World Class Airport through Education and Training. Sorenson Best Paper Award Recipient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilty, Stephen M.

    2003-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization has standards for airport certification that require education and training of personnel. The American Association of Airport Executives offers accreditation and certification in airport operations and safety that can meet the needs of world-class airports. (Contains 18 references.) (SK)

  10. Siting Solar Photovoltaics at Airports: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-06-01

    Airports present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to their open land; based on a 2010 Federal Aviation Administration study, the US Department of Agriculture, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service, there's potential for 116,704 MW of solar photovoltaics (PV) on idle lands at US airports. PV has a low profile and likely low to no impact on flight operations. This paper outlines guidance for implementing solar technologies at airports and airfields, focusing largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's policies. The paper also details best practices for siting solar at airports, provides information on the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool, and highlights a case study example where solar has been installed at an airport.

  11. Stepped leaders observed in ground operations of ADELE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. M.; Kelley, N.; Lowell, A.; Martinez-McKinney, F.; Dwyer, J. R.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Cramer, E. S.; Levine, S.; Cummer, S. A.; Lu, G.; Shao, X.; Ho, C.; Eastvedt, E. M.; Trueblood, J.; Edens, H. E.; Hunyady, S. J.; Winn, W. P.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2010-12-01

    While the Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) was designed primarily to study high-energy radiation associated with thunderstorms at aircraft altitude, it can also be used as a mobile ground-based instrument when mounted in a van. ADELE contains scintillation detectors optimized for faint and bright events and a flat-plate antenna measuring dE/dt. In July and August 2010, ADELE was brought to Langmuir Laboratory in New Mexico as a stationary detector and to the Florida peninsula (based at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne) for rapid-response (storm-chasing) operations. In ten days of chasing, stepped-leader x-ray emission was observed from at least four close CG flashes, a much higher rate of success than can be achieved from a stationary detector or array. We will present these four events as well as the results of a study of candidate events of lesser statistical significance. We will also discuss the optimization of lightning-chasing strategies, science goals for future ground campaigns, and what additional instrumentation would be most scientifically beneficial. In the latter category, a proximity sensor (comparing flash and thunder arrival times) and a field mill are particularly important.

  12. Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL). Volume 5: Application Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The Ground Operations Aerospace Language (GOAL) was designed to be used by test oriented personnel to write procedures which would be executed in a test environment. A series of discussions between NASA LV-CAP personnel and IBM resulted in some peripheral tasks which would aid in evaluating the applicability of the language in this environment, and provide enhancement for future applications. The results of these tasks are contained within this volume. The GOAL vocabulary provides a high degree of readability and retainability. To achieve these benefits, however, the procedure writer utilizes words and phrases of considerable length. Brief form study was undertaken to determine a means of relieving this burden. The study resulted in a version of GOAL which enables the writer to develop a dialect suitable to his needs and satisfy the syntax equations. The output of the compiler would continue to provide readability by printing out the standard GOAL language. This task is described.

  13. Insects, vegetation, and the control of laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) at Kennedy International Airport, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckley, P.A.; McCarthy, M.

    1994-01-01

    1. In response to a purported 'bird-strike problem' at J.F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, we examined short (5 cm) and long (45 cm) grass heights as gull deterrents, in a randomized-block experiment. 2. Vegetative cover, numbers of adult insects and of larval beetles (suspected on-airport food of the gulls) were sampled in the six-block, 36-plot study area, as well as gut contents of adult and downy young gulls in the immediately adjacent colony in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge. 3. We found that (i) Oriental beetle larvae were the most numerous and concentrated in one experimental block; (ii) beetle larvae numbers were uncorrelated with grass height; (iii) adult beetles were also uncorrelated with grass height; (iv) laughing gulls were distributed across blocks irrespective of percentage cover; (v) within blocks, laughing gulls were selecting short grass and avoiding long grass plots; (vi) laughing gull numbers were positively associated with numbers of Oriental beetle larvae; (vii) adult laughing gulls on the airport were eating lower-nutrition food of terrestrial origin (74-83% adult beetles, mostly Oriental plus green June and ground beetles); (viii) on the other hand, gull chicks in the adjacent breeding colony were being fed more easily digested, higher-protein food of marine origin (86-88% fishes, crustacea and molluscs); (ix) laughing gulls on the airport were taking their adult beetles only in short-grass plots, ignoring large numbers in adjacent long grass; (x) during the summer, on-airport gulls shifted from performing largely maintenance activities on pavement to feeding actively for beetles on newly mown short grass, the change coinciding with adult beetle emergence; (xi) standing water on the airport attracted significantly more gulls than dry areas all summer long. 4. We recommend a series of ecologically compatible, but aggressive habitat management actions for controlling laughing gulls on Kennedy Airport by rendering the airport

  14. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  15. Investigation Into The Needs of Part 135 Operators to Access Airports Restricted Under FAR Part 135 Sections 135.213, 135.219 and/or 135.225

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, Clifford A.; Stough, H. P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA and the FAA have joint interests and responsibilities for developing guidelines and standards for cockpit displays of Flight Information Services (FIS) information and for developing enhancements to the planned FAA Data Link (FISDL) services. NASA and the FAA have established responsibilities in connection with development tasks for enhancements to the FISDL project. This report is the result of NASA Task 2, "Weather Support Concept- Part 135 Operations." The objective of the task was to determine the needs of Part 135 operators as they relate to FAA Part 135 Sections 135.213, 135.219 and 135.225, which pertain to weather reporting requirements at destination airports. This report discusses the results of two questionnaires completed by volunteer Part 135 operators that questioned their operations, their needs for flying to airports without weather reporting compatibilities, and suggestions for modifying FARs 135.213, 135.219 and 135.225. The operators pointed out airports in areas of the CONUS that were needed for IFR operations but lacked weather reporting capabilities and they offered practical suggestions for changes to the FARs. Related to operators's needs, and discussed in this report, were the Fractional Ownership NPRM and the possible impact of GPS WAAS and LAAS approaches.

  16. Anomaly Detection for Next-Generation Space Launch Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirkovska, Lilly; Iverson, David L.; Hall, David R.; Taylor, William M.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Brown, Barbara; Ferrell, Bob A.; Waterman, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing new capabilities that will enable future human exploration missions while reducing mission risk and cost. The Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) project aims to demonstrate the utility of integrated vehicle health management (IVHM) tools in the domain of ground support equipment (GSE) to be used for the next generation launch vehicles. In addition to demonstrating the utility of IVHM tools for GSE, FDIR aims to mature promising tools for use on future missions and document the level of effort - and hence cost - required to implement an application with each selected tool. One of the FDIR capabilities is anomaly detection, i.e., detecting off-nominal behavior. The tool we selected for this task uses a data-driven approach. Unlike rule-based and model-based systems that require manual extraction of system knowledge, data-driven systems take a radically different approach to reasoning. At the basic level, they start with data that represent nominal functioning of the system and automatically learn expected system behavior. The behavior is encoded in a knowledge base that represents "in-family" system operations. During real-time system monitoring or during post-flight analysis, incoming data is compared to that nominal system operating behavior knowledge base; a distance representing deviation from nominal is computed, providing a measure of how far "out of family" current behavior is. We describe the selected tool for FDIR anomaly detection - Inductive Monitoring System (IMS), how it fits into the FDIR architecture, the operations concept for the GSE anomaly monitoring, and some preliminary results of applying IMS to a Space Shuttle GSE anomaly.

  17. 14 CFR 91.126 - Operating on or in the vicinity of an airport in Class G airspace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT... parachute must avoid the flow of fixed-wing aircraft. (c) Flap settings. Except when necessary for...

  18. Space Mission Operations Ground Systems Integration Customer Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    , and cultural differences, to ensure an efficient response to customer issues using a small Customer Service Team (CST) and adaptability, constant communication with customers, technical expertise and knowledge of services, and dedication to customer service. The HOSC Customer Support Team has implemented a variety of processes, and procedures that help to mitigate the potential problems that arise when integrating ground system services for a variety of complex missions and the lessons learned from this experience will lead the future of customer service in the space operations industry.

  19. Lightning Impacts on Airports - Challenges of Balancing Safety & Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Matthias; Deierling, Wiebke; Nelson, Eric; Stone, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Thunderstorms and lightning pose a safety risk to personnel working outdoors, such as people maintaining airport grounds (e.g., mowing grass or repairing runway lighting) or servicing aircraft on ramps (handling baggage, food service, refueling, tugging and guiding aircraft from/to gates, etc.). Since lightning strikes can cause serious injuries or death, it is important to provide timely alerts to airport personnel so that they can get to safety when lightning is imminent. This presentation discusses the challenges and uncertainties involved in using lightning information and stakeholder procedures to ensure safety of outdoor personnel while keeping ramp operations as efficient as possible considering thunderstorm impacts. The findings presented are based on extensive observations of airline operators under thunderstorm impacts. These observations reveal a complex picture with substantial uncertainties related to the (1) source of lightning information (e.g., sensor type, network, data processing) used to base ramp closure decisions on, (2) uncertainties involved in the safety procedures employed by various stakeholders across the aviation industry (yielding notably different rules being applied by multiple airlines even at a single airport), and (3) human factors issues related to the use of decision support tools and the implementation of safety procedures. This research is supported by the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official policy or position of the FAA.

  20. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2010-01-01

    A Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pilot reaction to conflict events in the TMA near the airport, different alert timings for various scenarios, alerting display concepts, and directive alerting concepts. This paper gives an overview of the conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) concept, simulation study, and test results

  1. Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Walker, Mark; Wilkins, Kim; Johnson, Robert; Sass, Jared; Youney, Justin

    2014-01-01

    An intelligent autonomous control capability has been developed and is currently being validated in ground cryogenic fluid management operations. The capability embodies a physical architecture consistent with typical launch infrastructure and control systems, augmented by a higher level autonomous control (AC) system enabled to make knowledge-based decisions. The AC system is supported by an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability that detects anomalies, diagnoses causes, determines effects, and could predict future anomalies. AC is implemented using the concept of programmed sequences that could be considered to be building blocks of more generic mission plans. A sequence is a series of steps, and each executes actions once conditions for the step are met (e.g. desired temperatures or fluid state are achieved). For autonomous capability, conditions must consider also health management outcomes, as they will determine whether or not an action is executed, or how an action may be executed, or if an alternative action is executed instead. Aside from health, higher level objectives can also drive how a mission is carried out. The capability was developed using the G2 software environment (www.gensym.com) augmented by a NASA Toolkit that significantly shortens time to deployment. G2 is a commercial product to develop intelligent applications. It is fully object oriented. The core of the capability is a Domain Model of the system where all elements of the system are represented as objects (sensors, instruments, components, pipes, etc.). Reasoning and decision making can be done with all elements in the domain model. The toolkit also enables implementation of failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), which are represented as root cause trees. FMEA's are programmed graphically, they are reusable, as they address generic FMEA referring to classes of subsystems or objects and their functional relationships. User interfaces for integrated awareness by

  2. Airport Pricing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pels, Eric; Verhoef, Erik T.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional economic wisdom suggests that congestion pricing would be an appropriate response to cope with the growing congestion levels currently experienced at many airports. Several characteristics of aviation markets, however, may make naive congestion prices equal to the value of marginal travel delays a non-optimal response. This paper has developed a model of airport pricing that captures a number of these features. The model in particular reflects that airlines typically have market power and are engaged in oligopolistic competition at different sub-markets; that part of external travel delays that aircraft impose are internal to an operator and hence should not be accounted for in congestion tolls. We presented an analytical treatment for a simple bi-nodal symmetric network, which through the use of 'hyper-networks' would be readily applicable to dynamic problems (in discrete time) such as peak - off-peak differences, and some numerical exercises for the same symmetric network, which was only designed to illustrate the possible comparative static impacts of tolling, in addition to marginal equilibrium conditions as could be derived for the general model specification. Some main conclusions are that second-best optimal tolls are typically lower than what would be suggested by congestion costs alone and may even be negative, and that the toll as derived by Brueckner (2002) may not lead to an increase in total welfare. While Brueckner (2002) has made clear that congestion tolls on airports may be smaller than expected when congestion costs among aircraft are internal for a firm, our analysis adds to this that a further downward adjustment may be in order due to market power. The presence of market power (which causes prices to exceed marginal costs) may cause the pure congestion toll to be suboptimal, because the resulting decrease in demand is too high (the pure congestion tall does not take into account the decrease in consumer surplus). The various

  3. Overview of environmental and hydrogeologic conditions at the Merle K. "Mudhole" Smith Airport near Cordova, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorava, J.M.; Sokup, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Air service to Cordova, Alaska and the surrounding region is provided by the Merle K. "Mudhole" Smith Airport, 21 kilometers east of the townsite. The Federal Aviation Administration owns or operates support facilities at the airport and wishes to consider the environmental setting and hydro- geologic conditions when evaluating options for remediation of potential contamination at these facilities. The airport is within the Copper River Delta wetlands area and the Chugach National Forest. Silts, sands, and gravels of fluvial origin underlie the airport. Potential flooding may be caused by outbursts of glacier-dammed lakes, glacier icemelt, snowmelt runoff, or precipitation. Surface spills and disposal of hazardous materials in conjunction with precipitation or flooding may adversely affect the quality of ground water. Drinking water at the airport is currently supplied by wells. Alternative drinking-water sources include local rivers and streams, transporting city water from Cordova, or undiscovered aquifers. Each alternative source, however, would likely cost significantly more to develop than using the existing shallow aquifer supply.

  4. 75 FR 32988 - Notice on Waiver of the Terms of the Order Limiting Scheduled Operations at LaGuardia Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ...) Carrier's authorized representative.\\1\\ \\1\\ 75 FR 26,322 at 26,337 (May 11, 2010). On June 3, 2010, Delta.... If you wish to review the background documents or comments received in this proceeding, you may go to... docket. You may also go to the U.S. Department of Transportation's Docket Operations in Room W12-140...

  5. Aircraft and airport noise control prospective outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, N.

    1982-01-01

    In a perspective look at aircraft and airport noise control over the past ten years or more - or more is added here because the Federal Aviation Regulation Part 36 of 1969 is a more significant milestone for the air transportation system than is the Noise Control Act of 1972 - we see an appreciable reduction in the noise emitted by newly designed and newly produced airplanes, particularly those powered by the new high bypass engines, but only, at best, a moderate alleviation of airport noise. The change in airport noise exposure was the consequence of the introduction of some new, quieter airplanes into the airlines fleets and some operational modifications or restrictions at the airports.

  6. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 2: part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls Study addresses both ground operational data and technical requirements that span the Tug planning phase and operations phase. A similar study covering mission operations (by others) provides the complimentary flight operations details. The two studies provide the planning data requirements, resource allocation, and control milestones for supporting the requirements of the STS program. This Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls Study incorporates the basic ground operations requirements and concepts provided by previous studies with the interrelationships of the planning, IUS transition, and Tug fleet operations phases. The interrelationships of these phases were studied as a system to optimize overall program benefits and minimize operational risk factors.

  7. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure. This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  8. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deWit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure, This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  9. NASA's Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles -- Effective Space Operations Through Efficient Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Singer, Christopher E.; Onken, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) plans to return to the Moon by 2020, with the development of a new human-rated space transportation system to replace the Space Shuttle, which is due for retirement in 2010 after it completes its missions of building the International Space Station and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Powering the future of space-based scientific exploration will be the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, which will transport the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to orbit where it will rendezvous with the Lunar Lander. which will be delivered by the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle. This new transportation infrastructure, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), will allow astronauts to leave low-Earth orbit for extended lunar exploration and preparation for the first footprint on Mars. All space-based operations begin and are controlled from Earth. NASA's philosophy is to deliver safe, reliable, and cost-effective solutions to sustain a multi-billion-dollar program across several decades. Leveraging 50 years of lessons learned, NASA is partnering with private industry, while building on proven hardware experience. This paper will discuss how the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is working with the Ares Projects Office to streamline ground operations concepts and reduce costs. Currently, NASA's budget is around $17 billion, which is less than 1 percent of the U.S. Federal budget. Of this amount, NASA invests approximately $4.5 billion each year in Space Shuttle operations, regardless of whether the spacecraft is flying or not. The affordability requirement is for the Ares I to reduce this expense by 50 percent, in order to allow NASA to invest more in space-based scientific operations. Focusing on this metric, the Engineering Directorate provides several solutions-oriented approaches, including Lean/Six Sigma practices and streamlined hardware testing and integration, such as assembling major hardware

  10. Amsterdam's Airport Library Serves Passengers in 30 Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    In the summer of 2010, Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam started offering the world's first library in an airport. This article describes Airport Library which is no ordinary library. It holds more than 1,200 items, but it lends nothing. It operates 24/7, yet it's only staffed by volunteers for 2 or 3 hours a day. It offers just nine public-access…

  11. Securing Ground Data System Applications for Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pajevski, Michael J.; Tso, Kam S.; Johnson, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence and sophistication of cyber attacks has prompted the Multimission Ground Systems and Services (MGSS) Program Office at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to initiate the Common Access Manager (CAM) effort to protect software applications used in Ground Data Systems (GDSs) at JPL and other NASA Centers. The CAM software provides centralized services and software components used by GDS subsystems to meet access control requirements and ensure data integrity, confidentiality, and availability. In this paper we describe the CAM software; examples of its integration with spacecraft commanding software applications and an information management service; and measurements of its performance and reliability.

  12. Avanex Unique Endophyte Technology: Reduced Insect Food Source at Airports.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Christopher G L; Popay, Alison J; Rolston, M Philip; Townsend, Richard J; Lloyd-West, Catherine M; Card, Stuart D

    2016-02-01

    Birds and other forms of wildlife are a major issue for airport authorities worldwide, as they can create hazards to operating aircraft. Wildlife "strikes," the majority caused by birds, can cause damage to operating aircraft and in severe cases lead to a loss of human life. Many airfields contain large areas of ground cover herbage alongside their runways that consist of mixtures of grasses, legumes, and weeds that can harbor many invertebrates. Many airfields use insecticides to control insect populations; however, mounting pressure from regional councils and water boards aim to reduce this practice due to ground water runoff and contamination concerns. Avanex Unique Endophyte Technology, a product specifically developed to reduce the attractiveness of airports and surrounding areas to birds, is based on a novel association between a selected strain of Epichloë endophyte and a turf-type tall fescue cultivar. This grass-endophyte association acts through a direct mechanism whereby a negative response in birds is created through taste aversion and postingestion feedback as well as an indirect mechanism by deterring many invertebrates, a food source of many bird species. PMID:26374758

  13. A Ground Systems Architecture Transition for a Distributed Operations System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, Donna; Pitts, Lee; Bryant, Barry

    2003-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Ground Systems Department (GSD) recently undertook an architecture change in the product line that serves the ISS program. As a result, the architecture tradeoffs between data system product lines that serve remote users versus those that serve control center flight control teams were explored extensively. This paper describes the resulting architecture that will be used in the International Space Station (ISS) payloads program, and the resulting functional breakdown of the products that support this architecture. It also describes the lessons learned from the path that was followed, as a migration of products cause the need to reevaluate the allocation of functions across the architecture. The result is a set of innovative ground system solutions that is scalable so it can support facilities of wide-ranging sizes, from a small site up to large control centers. Effective use of system automation, custom components, design optimization for data management, data storage, data transmissions, and advanced local and wide area networking architectures, plus the effective use of Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) products, provides flexible Remote Ground System options that can be tailored to the needs of each user. This paper offers a description of the efficiency and effectiveness of the Ground Systems architectural options that have been implemented, and includes successful implementation examples and lessons learned.

  14. Introductions to Mission Operations and Ground Data Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Helen J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses how in the early concept studies the communications architecture plays an important part: The communications architecture is the arrangement, or configuration of satellites and ground systems in a space system, and the network of communications links that transfers information between them.

  15. Expanding Regional Airport Usage to Accommodate Increased Air Traffic Demand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carl R.

    2009-01-01

    Small regional airports present an underutilized source of capacity in the national air transportation system. This study sought to determine whether a 50 percent increase in national operations could be achieved by limiting demand growth at large hub airports and instead growing traffic levels at the surrounding regional airports. This demand scenario for future air traffic in the United States was generated and used as input to a 24-hour simulation of the national airspace system. Results of the demand generation process and metrics predicting the simulation results are presented, in addition to the actual simulation results. The demand generation process showed that sufficient runway capacity exists at regional airports to offload a significant portion of traffic from hub airports. Predictive metrics forecast a large reduction of delays at most major airports when demand is shifted. The simulation results then show that offloading hub traffic can significantly reduce nationwide delays.

  16. Future of Colombo Airport (CMB) as an Airline Hub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayalath, J. T. D.; Bandara, J. M. S. J.

    2001-01-01

    Aviation throughout the world has seen profound changes within the last two decades. Today more and more airports are looking for hub operations. However, as the success of hub operation would depend on a number of parameters such as geographic location, route network, facilities available, passengers' acceptance etc., not all airports would be able to operate as successful hubs. This paper investigates the possibility for (he Bandaranayake international airport, Colombo, Sri Lanka (CMB) to emerge as a hub airport in the South Asian region. It is found that CMB is situated in a geographically advantageous position in the region with respect to the airline route network. Comparison of travel distances between CMB and prominent O-D pairs and evaluation of airline schedules at relevant established hub airports indicates that CMB could operate as a directional hub serving the South Asian market if the number of destinations with daily flights could be increased.

  17. The Opportunities and Threats of Turning Airports into Hubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, Andreas; Koch, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the opportunities and threats which arise when turning origin/destination airports into hubs. The analysis focuses on market development trends, competitive structures, especially in the light of airline network strategies and the growing rivalry between airports, and finally the potential financial impacts for the airport, including both investment efforts and the financial results from hub operations. We argue that in most cases a decision against converting a traditional origin/destination airport into a major transfer point is preferable to the transformation into a hub.

  18. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): FAA Technical Center, Operable Unit 5, Atlantic County, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ, August 17, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The decision document presents the no further action decision for Area I, the Former Incinerator Building location, and Area Q, the Fire Station Area, at the FAA Technical Center, Atlantic City International Airport, New Jersey. The Federal Aviation Administration and EPA have determined that no remedial actions are necessary at Areas I and Q to ensure protection of human health and the environment.

  19. The Earth Observing System (EOS) Ground System: Leveraging an Existing Operational Ground System Infrastructure to Support New Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardison, David; Medina, Johnny; Dell, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The Earth Observer System (EOS) was officially established in 1990 and went operational in December 1999 with the launch of its flagship spacecraft Terra. Aqua followed in 2002 and Aura in 2004. All three spacecraft are still operational and producing valuable scientific data. While all are beyond their original design lifetime, they are expected to remain viable well into the 2020s. The EOS Ground System is a multi-mission system based at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that supports science and spacecraft operations for these three missions. Over its operational lifetime to date, the EOS Ground System has evolved as needed to accommodate mission requirements. With an eye towards the future, several updates are currently being deployed. Subsystem interconnects are being upgraded to reduce data latency and improve system performance. End-of-life hardware and operating systems are being replaced to mitigate security concerns and eliminate vendor support gaps. Subsystem hardware is being consolidated through the migration to Virtual Machine based platforms. While mission operations autonomy was not a design goal of the original system concept, there is an active effort to apply state-of-the-art products from the Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) to facilitate automation where possible within the existing heritage architecture. This presentation will provide background information on the EOS ground system architecture and evolution, discuss latest improvements, and conclude with the results of a recent effort that investigated how the current system could accommodate a proposed new earth science mission.

  20. Some loading conditions imposed by ground turning maneuvers with three jet transport airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Some loading conditions imposed during ground turning maneuvers are presented for arrival and departure operations at several airports with C-141A, 727, and DC-9 airplanes. The data presented for a total of 809 turns include: ground speed, lateral acceleration, the number of turns required during arrival and departure, and the magnitude of the turns.

  1. Software Architecture of the NASA Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator - SGOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert P.; Lostroscio, Charles T.

    2005-01-01

    The SGOS executive and its subsystems have been an integral component of the Shuttle Launch Safety Program for almost thirty years. It is usable (via the LAN) by over 2000 NASA employees at the Kennedy Space Center and 11,000 contractors. SGOS supports over 800 models comprised of several hundred thousand lines of code and over 1,000 MCP procedures. Yet neither language has a for loop!! The simulation software described in this paper is used to train ground controllers and to certify launch countdown readiness.

  2. NASA's Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles--Effective Space Operations Through Efficient Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Christopher E.; Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Lyles, Gary M.; Onken, Jay F.

    2008-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) is charting a renewed course for lunar exploration, with the fielding of a new human-rated space transportation system to replace the venerable Space Shuttle, which will be retired after it completes its missions of building the International Space Station (ISS) and servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Powering the future of space-based scientific exploration will be the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle, which will transport the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to orbit where it will rendezvous with the Altair Lunar Lander, which will be delivered by the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle (fig. 1). This configuration will empower rekindled investigation of Earth's natural satellite in the not too distant future. This new exploration infrastructure, developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), will allow astronauts to leave low-Earth orbit (LEO) for extended lunar missions and preparation for the first long-distance journeys to Mars. All space-based operations - to LEO and beyond - are controlled from Earth. NASA's philosophy is to deliver safe, reliable, and cost-effective architecture solutions to sustain this multi-billion-dollar program across several decades. Leveraging SO years of lessons learned, NASA is partnering with private industry and academia, while building on proven hardware experience. This paper outlines a few ways that the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is working with the Constellation Program and its project offices to streamline ground operations concepts by designing for operability, which reduces lifecycle costs and promotes sustainable space exploration.

  3. Intelligent command and control systems for satellite ground operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1994-01-01

    The Georgia Tech portion of the Intelligent Control Center project includes several complementary activities. Two major activities entail thesis level research; the other activities are either support activities or preliminary explorations (e.g., task analyses) to support the research. The first research activity is the development of principles for the design of active interfaces to support monitoring during real-time supports. It is well known that as the operator's task becomes less active, i.e., more monitoring and less active control, there is concern that the operator will be less involved and less able to rapidly identify anomalous or failure situations. The research project to design active monitoring interfaces is an attempt to remediate this undesirable side-effect of increasingly automated control systems that still depend ultimately on operator supervision. The second research activity is the exploration of the use of case-based reasoning as a way to accumulate operator experience and make it available in computational form.

  4. Characteristics of a maritime interdiction operations unmanned ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoa G.; Baker, Mendel

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Navy conducts thousands of Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIOs) every year around the globe. Navy Visit, Board, Search, and Seizure (VBSS) teams regularly board suspect ships and perform search operations, often in hostile environments. There is a need for a small tactical robot that can be deployed ahead of the team to provide enhanced situational awareness in these boarding, breaching, and clearing operations. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) performed a market survey, identified and obtained a number of throwable robots that may be useful in these situations, and conducted user evaluations with Navy VBSS team members, taking each of these robots through all applicable steps of the VBSS operation in realistic training environments. From these tests, we verified the requirements and defined the key performance parameters for an MIO robot. This paper describes the tests conducted and the identified characteristics of this robot.

  5. Inguinal Hernia and Airport Scanners: An Emerging Indication for Repair?

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O.; Maharaj, Ravi; Dan, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The use of advanced imaging technology at international airports is increasing in popularity as a corollary to heightened security concerns across the globe. Operators of airport scanners should be educated about common medical disorders such as inguinal herniae in order to avoid unnecessary harassment of travelers since they will encounter these with increasing frequency. PMID:24368923

  6. 14 CFR 135.219 - IFR: Destination airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false IFR: Destination airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.219 IFR: Destination airport weather... latest weather reports or forecasts, or any combination of them, indicate that weather conditions at...

  7. 14 CFR 135.219 - IFR: Destination airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false IFR: Destination airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.219 IFR: Destination airport weather... latest weather reports or forecasts, or any combination of them, indicate that weather conditions at...

  8. 14 CFR 135.219 - IFR: Destination airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false IFR: Destination airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.219 IFR: Destination airport weather... latest weather reports or forecasts, or any combination of them, indicate that weather conditions at...

  9. 78 FR 3311 - Safety Enhancements, Certification of Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ...) on Safety Enhancements Part 139, Certification of Airports (76 FR 5510). In the NPRM, the FAA... period until May 13, 2011, (76 FR 20570) because we learned that a number of airport operators were not... again reopened the comment period until July 5, 2011, (76 FR 32105) because several industry...

  10. 75 FR 62008 - Safety Management System for Certificated Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you... commensurate with its class of Airport Operating Certificate (AOC). DATES: Send your comments on or before... development at smaller airports with a Class II, III, or IV AOC.\\9\\ \\9\\ For definitions of classes of...

  11. 14 CFR 135.219 - IFR: Destination airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false IFR: Destination airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.219 IFR: Destination airport weather... latest weather reports or forecasts, or any combination of them, indicate that weather conditions at...

  12. 14 CFR 135.219 - IFR: Destination airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false IFR: Destination airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.219 IFR: Destination airport weather... latest weather reports or forecasts, or any combination of them, indicate that weather conditions at...

  13. Ground Systems Development Environment (GSDE) interface requirements analysis: Operations scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, Victor E.; Phillips, John

    1991-01-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the functional and data interface requirements to the link between the GSDE GS/SPF (Amdahl) and the Space Station Control Center (SSCC) and Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) Integration, Verification, and Test Environments (IVTE's). These interfaces will be involved in ground software development of both the control center and the simulation and training systems. Our understanding of the configuration management (CM) interface and the expected functional characteristics of the Amdahl-IVTE interface is described. A set of assumptions and questions that need to be considered and resolved in order to complete the interface functional and data requirements definitions are presented. A listing of information items defined to describe software configuration items in the GSDE CM system is included. It also includes listings of standard reports of CM information and of CM-related tools in the GSDE.

  14. Integrated Procedures for Flight and Ground Operations Using International Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, John

    2011-01-01

    Imagine astronauts using the same Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETM's) as the ground personnel who assemble or maintain their flight hardware, and having all of that data interoperable with design, logistics, reliability analysis, and training. Modern international standards and their corresponding COTS tools already used in other industries provide a good foundation for streamlined technical publications in the space industry. These standards cover everything from data exchange to product breakdown structure to business rules flexibility. Full Product Lifecycle Support (PLCS) is supported. The concept is to organize, build once, reuse many ways, and integrate. This should apply to all future and some current launch vehicles, payloads, space stations/habitats, spacecraft, facilities, support equipment, and retrieval ships.

  15. Onboard Autonomy and Ground Operations Automation for the Intelligent Payload Experiment (IPEX) CubeSat Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Ortega, Kevin; Tran, Daniel; Bellardo, John; Williams, Austin; Piug-Suari, Jordi; Crum, Gary; Flatley, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The Intelligent Payload Experiment (IPEX) is a cubesat manifested for launch in October 2013 that will flight validate autonomous operations for onboard instrument processing and product generation for the Intelligent Payload Module (IPM) of the Hyperspectral Infra-red Imager (HyspIRI) mission concept. We first describe the ground and flight operations concept for HyspIRI IPM operations. We then describe the ground and flight operations concept for the IPEX mission and how that will validate HyspIRI IPM operations. We then detail the current status of the mission and outline the schedule for future development.

  16. 77 FR 19410 - Notice of Schedule Information Submission Deadline for O'Hare International Airport, San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Airport, 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18620 (Apr. 4, 2011); Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport, 73 FR 29550 (May 21, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18618 (Apr. 4, 2011). The FAA... Liberty International Airport for the Winter 2012-2013 Scheduling Season AGENCY: Department...

  17. Emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants from commercial aircraft at international airports in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sang-Keun; Shon, Zang-Ho

    2012-12-01

    The emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and air pollutants from aircraft in the boundary layer at four major international airports in Korea over a two-year period (2009-2010) were estimated using the Emissions and Dispersion Modeling System (EDMS) (i.e. activity-based (Landing/Take-Off (LTO) cycle) methodology). Both domestic and international LTOs and ground support equipment at the airports were considered. The average annual emissions of GHGs (CO2, N2O, CH4 and H2O) at all four airports during the study period were 1.11 × 103, 1.76 × 10-2, -1.85 × 10-3 and 3.84 × 108 kt yr-1, respectively. The emissions of air pollutants (NOx, CO, VOCs and particulate matter) were 5.20, 4.12, 7.46 × 10-1 and 3.37 × 10-2 kt yr-1, respectively. The negative CH4 emission indicates the consumption of atmospheric CH4 in the engine. The monthly and daily emissions of GHGs and air pollutants showed no significant variations at all airports examined. The emissions of GHGs and air pollutants for each aircraft operational mode differed considerably, with the largest emission observed in taxi-out mode.

  18. Ground Systems Development and Operations: Exploration Begins Here

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Mary; Phillips, Pepper; VanNes, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Hunger Hydraulik of Lohr, Germany has been selected as the vendor to build replacement Jacking, Leveling and Equalization cylinders for one Crawler Transporter. A site visit has been scheduled and a overview of how the Crawler Transporter fits into KSC launch operations will be presented as information. The presentation will be presented on July 11, 2012 by Pepper Phillips, the Program Manager for GSDO.

  19. Integrated payload and mission planning, phase 3. Volume 3: Ground real-time mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    The payloads tentatively planned to fly on the first two Spacelab missions were analyzed to examine the cost relationships of providing mission operations support from onboard vs the ground-based Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The quantitative results indicate that use of a POCC, with data processing capability, to support real-time mission operations is the most cost effective case.

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Tucson International Airport Area, Operable Unit 3 (AFP 44), Tucson, AZ, September 28, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-05-01

    Air Force Plant 44 (AFP 44) is located within the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund Site, Tucson, Arizona, and is identified as such on the National Priorities List. The Air Force has decided that excavation and offsite disposal in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Class I landfill with solidification/stabilization (S/S) is the preferred remedy for excavated metals-contaminated materials under CERCLA for these three specific sites and sources.

  1. Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO): Exploration Begins Here [Grades K-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Presentation to inform the non-NASA general public and school children of ground systems development and operations activities at Kennedy Space Center, particularly on what GSDO is and does, in a high level overview.

  2. Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Education 101: Exploration Begins Here [Grades 9-12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Presentation to inform the non-NASA general public and school children of ground systems development and operations activities at Kennedy Space Center, particularly on what GSDO is and does, in a high level overview.

  3. TITLE MICROBIOLOGICAL IMPACT OF CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEED OPERATIONS (CAFOS) ON SURFACE AND GROUND WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: This research will focus on the microbiological impact of concentrated animal feed operations (CAFOs) on surface and ground water quality. The specific sites of study will be Turkey Creek Watershed and Canton River in Northwestern Oklahoma. The microbiological source...

  4. Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO): Exploration Begins Here [Grades 5-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Presentation to inform the non-NASA general public and school students of ground systems development and operations activities at Kennedy Space Center, particularly on what GSDO is and does, in a high level overview.

  5. SCAILET: An intelligent assistant for satellite ground terminal operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahidi, A. K.; Crapo, J. A.; Schlegelmilch, R. F.; Reinhart, R. C.; Petrik, E. J.; Walters, J. L.; Jones, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has applied artificial intelligence to an advanced ground terminal. This software application is being deployed as an experimenter interface to the link evaluation terminal (LET) and was named Space Communication Artificial Intelligence for the Link Evaluation Terminal (SCAILET). The high-burst-rate (HBR) LET provides 30-GHz-transmitting and 20-GHz-receiving, 220-Mbps capability for wide band communications technology experiments with the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS). The HBR-LET terminal consists of seven major subsystems. A minicomputer controls and monitors these subsystems through an IEEE-488 or RS-232 protocol interface. Programming scripts (test procedures defined by design engineers) configure the HBR-LET and permit data acquisition. However, the scripts are difficult to use, require a steep learning curve, are cryptic, and are hard to maintain. This discourages experimenters from utilizing the full capabilities of the HBR-LET system. An intelligent assistant module was developed as part of the SCAILET software. The intelligent assistant addresses critical experimenter needs by solving and resolving problems that are encountered during the configuring of the HBR-LET system. The intelligent assistant is a graphical user interface with an expert system running in the background. In order to further assist and familiarize an experimenter, an on-line hypertext documentation module was developed and included in the SCAILET software.

  6. The MER/CIP Portal for Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Louise; Desai, Sanjay; DOrtenzio, Matthew; Filman, Robtert E.; Heher, Dennis M.; Hubbard, Kim; Johan, Sandra; Keely, Leslie; Magapu, Vish; Mak, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    We developed the Mars Exploration Rover/Collaborative Information Portal (MER/CIP) to facilitate MER operations. MER/CIP provides a centralized, one-stop delivery platform integrating science and engineering data from several distributed heterogeneous data sources. Key issues for MER/CIP include: 1) Scheduling and schedule reminders; 2) Tracking the status of daily predicted outputs; 3) Finding and analyzing data products; 4) Collaboration; 5) Announcements; 6) Personalization.

  7. Operations Research Flight Ground Service Education/Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a nutritional biochemistry assessment of astronauts in preflight, in-flight, and post-flight operations. In-flight collections of blood and urine samples from astronauts to test the effects of Vitamin K, Pro K, Vitamin D, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Iron, and Sodium in spaceflight is shown. A demonstration of a 1-carbon metabolism pathway that determines the existence of enzymes and polymorphisms is also presented.

  8. Achieving Lights-Out Operation of SMAP Using Ground Data System Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The approach used in the SMAP ground data system to provide reliable, automated capabilities to conduct unattended operations has been presented. The impacts of automation on the ground data system architecture were discussed, including the three major automation patterns identified for SMAP and how these patterns address the operations use cases. The architecture and approaches used by SMAP will set the baseline for future JPL Earth Science missions.

  9. Electronic System for Preventing Airport Runway Incursions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, Richard; Elrod, Susan

    2009-01-01

    A proposed system of portable illuminated signs, electronic monitoring equipment, and radio-communication equipment for preventing (or taking corrective action in response to) improper entry of aircraft, pedestrians, or ground vehicles onto active airport runways is described. The main overall functions of the proposed system would be to automatically monitor aircraft ground traffic on or approaching runways and to generate visible and/or audible warnings to affected pilots, ground-vehicle drivers, and control-tower personnel when runway incursions take place.

  10. Third International Symposium on Space Mission Operations and Ground Data Systems, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James L. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Under the theme of 'Opportunities in Ground Data Systems for High Efficiency Operations of Space Missions,' the SpaceOps '94 symposium included presentations of more than 150 technical papers spanning five topic areas: Mission Management, Operations, Data Management, System Development, and Systems Engineering. The papers focus on improvements in the efficiency, effectiveness, productivity, and quality of data acquisition, ground systems, and mission operations. New technology, techniques, methods, and human systems are discussed. Accomplishments are also reported in the application of information systems to improve data retrieval, reporting, and archiving; the management of human factors; the use of telescience and teleoperations; and the design and implementation of logistics support for mission operations.

  11. A scientific operations plan for the NASA space telescope. [ground support systems, project planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, D. K.; Costa, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    A ground system is described which is compatible with the operational requirements of the space telescope. The goal of the ground system is to minimize the cost of post launch operations without seriously compromising the quality and total throughput of space telescope science, or jeopardizing the safety of the space telescope in orbit. The resulting system is able to accomplish this goal through optimum use of existing and planned resources and institutional facilities. Cost is also reduced and efficiency in operation increased by drawing on existing experience in interfacing guest astronomers with spacecraft as well as mission control experience obtained in the operation of present astronomical spacecraft.

  12. Central airport energy systems using alternate energy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop the concept of a central airport energy system designed to supply energy for aircraft ground support and terminal complex utility systems using municipal waste as a fuel. The major task was to estimate the potential for reducing aircraft and terminal fuel consumption by the use of alternate renewable energy sources. Additional efforts included an assessment of indirect benefits of reducing airport atmospheric and noise pollution.

  13. Objective Lightning Probability Forecasts for East-Central Florida Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winfred C.

    2013-01-01

    The forecasters at the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL, (NWS MLB) identified a need to make more accurate lightning forecasts to help alleviate delays due to thunderstorms in the vicinity of several commercial airports in central Florida at which they are responsible for issuing terminal aerodrome forecasts. Such forecasts would also provide safer ground operations around terminals, and would be of value to Center Weather Service Units serving air traffic controllers in Florida. To improve the forecast, the AMU was tasked to develop an objective lightning probability forecast tool for the airports using data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). The resulting forecast tool is similar to that developed by the AMU to support space launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) for use by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) in previous tasks (Lambert and Wheeler 2005, Lambert 2007). The lightning probability forecasts are valid for the time periods and areas needed by the NWS MLB forecasters in the warm season months, defined in this task as May-September.

  14. TRIZ Tool for Optimization of Airport Runway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Venkata; Selladurai, V.; Saravanan, R.

    TRIZ tool is used for conceptual design and layout of the novel ascending and descending runway model for the effective utilization of short length airports. Handling bigger aircrafts at smaller airports become the necessity for economic consideration and for the benefit of vast airliners and the aspiring air travelers of the region. The authors’ proposal of ascending and descending runway would enable the operational need of wide body aircrafts such as Boeing 747 and Airbus A380-800. Negotiating take-off and landing of bigger aircrafts at less than 10000 feet runway is an optimization solution. This conceptual model and the theoretical design with its layout is dealt in this paper as Part - I. The computer-aided design and analysis using MATLAB with Simulink tool box to confirm the adequacy of the runway length for the bigger aircrafts at smaller airports is however dealt in subsequent papers.

  15. 49 CFR 27.71 - Airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Access Act rules (49 CFR part 382) for carriers. (g) If an airport operator who receives Federal... 305 of the U.S. Department of Justice's 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design, 28 CFR 35.104 (defining the “2010 Standards” for title II as the requirements set forth in appendices B and D to 36...

  16. Synthetic aperture radar imagery of airports and surrounding areas: Philadelphia Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.

    1990-01-01

    The statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area is addressed. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data were collected at the Philadelphia Airport. These data and the results of the clutter study are described. This 13 km x 10 km scene was imaged at 9.38 GHz and HH-polarization and contained airport grounds and facilities (6 percent), industrial (14 percent), residential (14 percent), fields (10 percent), forest (8 percent), and water (33 percent). Incidence angles ranged from 40 to 84 deg. Even at the smallest incidence angles, the distributed targets such as forest, fields, water, and residential rarely had mean scattering coefficients greater than -10 dB. Eighty-seven percent of the image had scattering coefficients less than -17.5 dB. About 1 percent of the scattering coefficients exceeded 0 dB, with about 0.1 percent above 10 dB. Sources which produced the largest cross sections were largely confined to the airport grounds and areas highly industrialized. The largest cross sections were produced by observing broadside large buildings surrounded by smooth surfaces.

  17. EFFECTS OF CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS (CAFOS) ON GROUND WATER QUALITY (GWERD TASK 5823)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research focuses on the potential for ground water contamination from swine CAFOs in Oklahoma. Three CAFOs have been selected for study, including a new farrowing sow operation, an existing nursery operation, and a closed combined facility. For the sow and combined facilitie...

  18. The Design of Ground Operation Control System Based on Red5 & Flex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilin, Zhou; Chunlin, Li; Houyi

    According to the ground production of Beijing branch of China Southern Airlines, a production monitoring ground system was designed. The system is mainly used for ground monitoring of aircraft loading and production activities at the airfield, and use the event mechanism to coordinate the production work of SOC, CGS, cargo and aircraft maintenance factory. The system will provide strong support for SOC's work and has great significance for the protection of normal flights and investigation of delays. This innovative design proposed the online games conception and architecture to deal the production problems, and satisfy the front-line operational unit's strong demand of real-time, ease use and ease deployment.

  19. The technical evolution of ground flight dynamics system utilized for spacecraft operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrou, J. P.; Campan, G.; Fourcade, J.; Folliard, J.

    1992-08-01

    The development of technologies for ground-control systems for space mechanics systems at CNES is reviewed in the context of three experimental stages. The period 1965-74 focused on operational issues such as orbit determination and concepts for mission analysis such as launcher and satellite parameters. The preoperational phase of 1975-86 emphasized the development of satellites and ground-segment support for telecommunications, direct broadcasting, and earth observation. The developments led to the operational and commercial space ventures that characterize current projects, and a computer operation system for station acquisition is described for present satellite activities. A strategy is outlined for coping with the commercialization of space by developing the Oremus computer system which is based on the Mercator system that is demonstrated effective in satellite ground control.

  20. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery of Airports and Surrounding Areas: Denver Stapleton International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.

    1990-01-01

    This is the third in a series of three reports which address the statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data were collected at the Denver Stapleton Airport using a set of parameters which closely match those which are anticipated to be utilized by an aircraft on approach to an airport. These data and the results of the clutter study are described. Scenes of 13 x 10 km were imaged at 9.38 GHz and HH-, VV-, and HV-polarizations, and contain airport grounds and facilities (up to 14 percent), cultural areas (more than 50 percent), and rural areas (up to 6 percent). Incidence angles range from 40 to 84 deg. At the largest depression angles the distributed targets, such as forest, fields, water, and residential, rarely had mean scattering coefficients greater than -10 dB. From 30 to 80 percent of an image had scattering coefficients less than -20 dB. About 1 to 10 percent of the scattering coefficients exceeded 0 dB, and from 0 to 1 percent above 10 dB. In examining the average backscatter coefficients at large angles, the clutter types cluster according to the following groups: (1) terminals (-3 dB), (2) city and industrial (-7 dB), (3) warehouse (-10 dB), (4) urban and residential (-14 dB), and (5) grass (-24 dB).

  1. Shuttle Ground Operations Efficiencies/Technologies (SGOE/T) study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, A. L.; Hart, M. T.; Lowry, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Methods and technolgoy were defined to reduce the overall operations cost of a major space program. Space Shuttle processing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) was designed as the working model that would be the source of the operational information. Methods of improving efficiency of ground operations were assessed and technology elements that could reduce cost identified. Emphasis is on: (1) specific technology items and (2) management approaches required to develop and support efficient ground operations. Prime study results are to be recommendations on how to achieve more efficient operations and identification of existing or new technology that would make vehicle processing in both the current program and future programs more efficient and, therefore, less costly.

  2. Spaceflight Systems Training: A Comparison and Contrasting of Techniques for Training Ground Operators and Onboard Crewmembers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balmain, Clinton; Fleming, Mark

    2009-01-01

    When developing techniques and products for instruction on manned spaceflight systems, training organizations are often faced with two very different customers: ground operators and onboard crewmembers. Frequently, instructional development focuses on one of these customers with the assumption that the other s needs will be met by default. Experience teaches us that differing approaches are required when developing training tailored to the specific needs of each customer. As a rule, ground operators require focused instruction on specific areas of expertise. Their knowledge should be of the details of the hardware, software, and operational techniques associated with that system. They often benefit from historical knowledge of how their system has operated over its lifetime. Since several different ground operators may be interfacing with the same system, each individual operator must understand the agreed-to principles by which that system will be run. In contrast, onboard crewmembers require a more broad, hands-on awareness of their operational environment. Their training should be developed with an understanding of the physical environment in which they live and work and the day-to-day tasks they are most likely to perform. Rarely do they require a deep understanding of the details of a system; it is often sufficient to teach them just enough to maintain situational awareness and perform basic tasks associated with maintenance and operation of onboard systems. Crewmembers may also develop unique onboard operational techniques that differ from preceding crews. They should be taught what flexibility they have in systems operations and how their specific habits can be communicated to ground support personnel. This paper will explore the techniques that can be employed when developing training for these unique customers. We will explore the history of International Space Station training development and how past efforts can guide us in creating training for users of

  3. Supersonics--Airport Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2007-01-01

    At this, the first year-end meeting of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, an overview of the Airport Noise discipline of the Supersonics Project leads the presentation of technical plans and achievements in this area of the Project. The overview starts by defining the Technical Challenges targeted by Airport Noise efforts, and the Approaches planned to meet these challenges. These are fleshed out in Elements, namely Prediction, Diagnostics, and Engineering, and broken down into Tasks. The Tasks level is where individual researchers' work is defined and from whence the technical presentations to follow this presentation come. This overview also presents the Milestones accomplished to date and to be completed in the next year. Finally, the NASA Research Announcement cooperative agreement activities are covered and tied to the Tasks and Milestones.

  4. Operationally Efficient Propulsion System Study (OEPSS) data book. Volume 2: Ground operations problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldrop, Glen S.

    1990-01-01

    Operations problems and cost drivers were identified for current propulsion systems and design and technology approaches were identified to increase the operational efficiency and to reduce operations costs for future propulsion systems. To provide readily usable data for the ALS program, the results of the OEPSS study were organized into a series of OEPSS Data Books. This volume presents a detailed description of 25 major problems encountered during launch processing of current expendable and reusable launch vehicles. A concise description of each problem and its operational impact on launch processing is presented, along with potential solutions and technology recommendation.

  5. The Next Generation of Ground Operations Command and Control; Scripting in C no. and Visual Basic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, George; Pedoto, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Scripting languages have become a common method for implementing command and control solutions in space ground operations. The Systems Test and Operations Language (STOL), the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Scripting Language Processor (SLP), and the Spacecraft Control Language (SCL) offer script-commands that wrap tedious operations tasks into single calls. Since script-commands are interpreted, they also offer a certain amount of hands-on control that is highly valued in space ground operations. Although compiled programs seem to be unsuited for interactive user control and are more complex to develop, Marshall Space flight Center (MSFC) has developed a product called the Enhanced and Redesign Scripting (ERS) that makes use of the graphical and logical richness of a programming language while offering the hands-on and ease of control of a scripting language. ERS is currently used by the International Space Station (ISS) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) Cadre team members. ERS integrates spacecraft command mnemonics, telemetry measurements, and command and telemetry control procedures into a standard programming language, while making use of Microsoft's Visual Studio for developing Visual Basic (VB) or C# ground operations procedures. ERS also allows for script-style user control during procedure execution using a robust graphical user input and output feature. The availability of VB and C# programmers, and the richness of the languages and their development environment, has allowed ERS to lower our "script" development time and maintenance costs at the Marshall POIC.

  6. Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ``ground-water pathway,`` which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

  7. 1997 annual ground control operating plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This plan presents background information and a working guide to assist Mine Operations and Engineering in developing strategies for addressing ground control issues at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). With the anticipated receipt of waste in late 1997, this document provides additional detail to Panel 1 activities and options. The plan also serves as a foundation document for development and revision of the annual long-term ground control plan. Section 2.0 documents the current status of all underground excavations with respect to location, geology, geometry, age, ground support, operational use, projected life, and physical conditions. Section 3.0 presents the methods used to evaluate ground conditions, including visual observations of the roof, ribs, and floor, inspection of observation holes, and review of instrumentation data. Section 4.0 lists several ground support options and specific applications of each. Section 5.0 discusses remedial ground control measures that have been implemented to date. Section 6.0 presents projections and recommendations for ground control actions based on the information in Sections 2.0 through 5.0 of this plan and on a rating of the critical nature of each specific area. Section 7.0 presents a summary statement, and Section 8.0 includes references. Appendix A provides an overview and critique of ground control systems that have been, or may be, used at the site. Because of the dynamic nature of the underground openings and associated geotechnical activities, this plan will be revised as additional data are incorporated.

  8. Third International Symposium on Space Mission Operations and Ground Data Systems, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James L. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Under the theme of 'Opportunities in Ground Data Systems for High Efficiency Operations of Space Missions,' the SpaceOps '94 symposium included presentations of more than 150 technical papers spanning five topic areas: Mission Management, Operations, Data Management, System Development, and Systems Engineering. The symposium papers focus on improvements in the efficiency, effectiveness, and quality of data acquisition, ground systems, and mission operations. New technology, methods, and human systems are discussed. Accomplishments are also reported in the application of information systems to improve data retrieval, reporting, and archiving; the management of human factors; the use of telescience and teleoperations; and the design and implementation of logistics support for mission operations. This volume covers expert systems, systems development tools and approaches, and systems engineering issues.

  9. Improving INPE'S balloon ground facilities for operation of the protoMIRAX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiello-Francisco, F.; Rinke, E.; Fernandes, J. O.; Cardoso, L.; Cardoso, P.; Braga, J.

    2014-10-01

    The system requirements for reusing the scientific balloon ground facilities available at INPE were a challenge to the ground system engineers involved in the protoMIRAX X-ray astronomy experiment. A significant effort on software updating was required for the balloon ground station. Considering that protoMIRAX is a pathfinder for the MIRAX satellite mission, a ground infrastructure compatible with INPE's satellite operation approach would be useful and highly recommended to control and monitor the experiment during the balloon flights. This approach will make use of the SATellite Control System (SATCS), a software-based architecture developed at INPE for satellite commanding and monitoring. SATCS complies with particular operational requirements of different satellites by using several customized object-oriented software elements and frameworks. We present the ground solution designed for protoMIRAX operation, the Control and Reception System (CRS). A new server computer, properly configured with Ethernet, has extended the existing ground station facilities with switch, converters and new software (OPS/SERVER) in order to support the available uplink and downlink channels being mapped to TCP/IP gateways required by SATCS. Currently, the CRS development is customizing the SATCS for the kernel functions of protoMIRAX command and telemetry processing. Design-patterns, component-based libraries and metadata are widely used in the SATCS in order to extend the frameworks to address the Packet Utilization Standard (PUS) for ground-balloon communication, in compliance with the services provided by the data handling computer onboard the protoMIRAX balloon.

  10. Case Studies on the Impact of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) on Ground Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a series of case studies involving commercial swine, poultry, dairy, and beef CAFO operations where ground water contamination by nitrate and ammonia has occurred to ascertain whether other stressors in CAFO wastes are also being transported through the vado...

  11. MICROBIOLOGICAL IMPACT OF CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEED OPERATIONS (CAFOS) ON SURFACE AND GROUND WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation seeks to determine the microbiological impact of agricultural activities and confined animal feed operations (CAFOs) on surface and ground water in the Northwest Central Oklahoma. The first phase of the investigation will be carried on in collaboration with U...

  12. The CYGNSS ground segment; innovative mission operations concepts to support a micro-satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D.; Vincent, M.; Rose, R.; Ruf, C.

    Hurricane track forecasts have improved in accuracy by ~50% since 1990, while in that same period there has been essentially no improvement in the accuracy of intensity prediction. One of the main problems in addressing intensity occurs because the rapidly evolving stages of the tropical cyclone (TC) life cycle are poorly sampled in time by conventional polar-orbiting, wide-swath surface wind imagers. NASA's most recently awarded Earth science mission, the NASA EV-2 Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) has been designed to address this deficiency by using a constellation of micro-satellite-class Observatories designed to provide improved sampling of the TC during its life cycle. Managing a constellation of Observatories has classically resulted in an increased load on the ground operations team as they work to create and maintain schedules and command loads for multiple Observatories. Using modern tools and technologies at the Mission Operations Center (MOC) in conjunction with key components implemented in the flight system and an innovative strategy for pass execution coordinated with the ground network operator, the CYGNSS mission reduces the burden of constellation operations to a level commensurate with the low-cost mission concept. This paper focuses on the concept of operations for the CYGNSS constellation as planned for implementation at the CYGNSS MOC in conjunction with the selected ground network operator.

  13. 14 CFR 121.590 - Use of certificated land airports in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., obstructions, and lighting. (2) For an airplane carrying passengers at night, the pilot may not take off from... under 14 CFR part 380 are covered by the statutory requirements to operate to and from part 139 airports..., flag type operation, or supplemental type operation, an airplane at a land airport in any State of...

  14. 14 CFR 121.590 - Use of certificated land airports in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., obstructions, and lighting. (2) For an airplane carrying passengers at night, the pilot may not take off from... under 14 CFR part 380 are covered by the statutory requirements to operate to and from part 139 airports..., flag type operation, or supplemental type operation, an airplane at a land airport in any State of...

  15. Modified Universal Design Survey: Enhancing Operability of Launch Vehicle Ground Crew Worksites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blume, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Operability is a driving requirement for next generation space launch vehicles. Launch site ground operations include numerous operator tasks to prepare the vehicle for launch or to perform preflight maintenance. Ensuring that components requiring operator interaction at the launch site are designed for optimal human use is a high priority for operability. To promote operability, a Design Quality Evaluation Survey based on Universal Design framework was developed to support Human Factors Engineering (HFE) evaluation for NASA s launch vehicles. Universal Design per se is not a priority for launch vehicle processing however; applying principles of Universal Design will increase the probability of an error free and efficient design which promotes operability. The Design Quality Evaluation Survey incorporates and tailors the seven Universal Design Principles and adds new measures for Safety and Efficiency. Adapting an approach proven to measure Universal Design Performance in Product, each principle is associated with multiple performance measures which are rated with the degree to which the statement is true. The Design Quality Evaluation Survey was employed for several launch vehicle ground processing worksite analyses. The tool was found to be most useful for comparative judgments as opposed to an assessment of a single design option. It provided a useful piece of additional data when assessing possible operator interfaces or worksites for operability.

  16. 78 FR 57677 - Notice of Submission Deadline for Schedule Information for O'Hare International Airport, San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    .... Kennedy International Airport, 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008) as amended 78 FR 28276 (May 14, 2013); Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport, 73 FR 29550 (May 21, 2008) as amended 78 FR 28280 (May 14... Liberty International Airport for the Summer 2014 Scheduling Season AGENCY: Federal...

  17. Toxicity and chemical analyses of airport runoff waters in Poland.

    PubMed

    Sulej, Anna Maria; Polkowska, Zaneta; Wolska, Lidia; Cieszynska, Monika; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicological effects of various compounds in complex airport effluents using a chemical and ecotoxicological integrated strategy. The present work deals with the determination of sum of PCBs, PAHs, pesticides, cations, anions, phenols, anionic, cationic, non-ionic detergents, formaldehyde and metals--as well as TOC and conductivity--in runoff water samples collected from 2009 to 2011 at several locations on two Polish international airports. Two microbiotests (Vibrio fischeri bacteria and the crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus) have been used to determine the ecotoxicity of airport runoff waters. The levels of many compounds exceeded several or even several tens of times the maximum permissible levels. Analysis of the obtained data shows that samples that displayed maximum toxicity towards the bioindicators Vibrio fischeri were not toxic towards Thamnocephalus platyurus. Levels of toxicity towards T. platyurus are strongly correlated with pollutants that originate from the technological operations related to the maintenance of airport infrastructure. The integrated (chemical-ecotoxicological) approach to environmental contamination assessment in and around airports yields extensive information on the quality of the environment. These methodologies can be then used as tools for tracking the environmental fate of these compounds and for assessing the environmental effect of airports. Subsequently, these data will provide a basis for airport infrastructure management. PMID:24668023

  18. Ground Taxi Navigation Problems and Training Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Cheryl; Walter, Kim E.; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Adverse weather conditions can put considerable strain on the National Airspace System. Even small decreases in visibility on the airport surface can create delays, hinder safe movement and lead to errors. Studies of Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) surface movement incidents support the need for technologies and procedures to improve ground operations in low-visibility conditions. This study examined 139 ASRS reports of low-visibility surface movement incidents at 10 major U.S. airports. Errors were characterized in terms of incident type, contributing factors and consequences. The incidents in the present sample were comprised of runway transgressions, taxiway excursions and ground conflicts. The primary contributing factors were Airport Layout and Markings, Communication and Distraction. In half the incidents the controller issued a new clearance or the flight crew took an evasive action and in the remaining half, no recovery attempt was made because the error was detected after the fact. By gaining a better understanding the factors that affect crew navigation in low visibility and the types of errors that are likely to occur, it will be possible to develop more robust technologies to aid pilots in the ground taxi task. Implications for crew training and procedure development for low-visibility ground taxi are also discussed.

  19. 78 FR 7476 - Airport Improvement Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Improvement Program AGENCY: Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration. ACTION: Invitation to comment on draft FAA Order 5100-38, Airport Improvement...-38D, Airport Improvement Program Handbook. When finalized, this Order will replace Order...

  20. Transformational Spaceport and Range Concept of Operations: A Vision to Transform Ground and Launch Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Transformational Concept of Operations (CONOPS) provides a long-term, sustainable vision for future U.S. space transportation infrastructure and operations. This vision presents an interagency concept, developed cooperatively by the Department of Defense (DoD), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for the upgrade, integration, and improved operation of major infrastructure elements of the nation s space access systems. The interagency vision described in the Transformational CONOPS would transform today s space launch infrastructure into a shared system that supports worldwide operations for a variety of users. The system concept is sufficiently flexible and adaptable to support new types of missions for exploration, commercial enterprise, and national security, as well as to endure further into the future when space transportation technology may be sufficiently advanced to enable routine public space travel as part of the global transportation system. The vision for future space transportation operations is based on a system-of-systems architecture that integrates the major elements of the future space transportation system - transportation nodes (spaceports), flight vehicles and payloads, tracking and communications assets, and flight traffic coordination centers - into a transportation network that concurrently accommodates multiple types of mission operators, payloads, and vehicle fleets. This system concept also establishes a common framework for defining a detailed CONOPS for the major elements of the future space transportation system. The resulting set of four CONOPS (see Figure 1 below) describes the common vision for a shared future space transportation system (FSTS) infrastructure from a variety of perspectives.

  1. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 2: part 2, addenda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study to assess the tug safing requirements at postlanding are presented. The study considered the normal (green light) conditions from orbiter landing to completion of preparations for the next launch. Normal tug ground turnaround operations include handling and transportation activities and the performance of inspections, tests, and checkout functions. These activities dictate that hazards to ground personnel, the tug, GSE, facilities, and ecology be reduced to the lowest practical level consistent with program objectives, cost, and schedules. During flight operations, the tug contains energy sources that constitute potential hazards but are required for mission accomplishment. These potential hazards have been reduced to an acceptable level for flight operation by design features and by providing for control of energy sources.

  2. The effect of operations on the ground noise footprints associated with a large multibladed, nonbanging helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Henderson, H. R.; Maglieri, D. J.; Bigler, W. B., II

    1978-01-01

    In order to expand the data base of helicopter external noise characteristics, a flyover noise measurement program was conducted utilizing the NASA Civil Helicopter Research Aircraft. The remotely operated multiple array acoustics range (ROMAAR) and a 2560-m linear microphone array were utilized for the purpose of documenting the noise characteristics of the test helicopter during flyby and landing operations. By utilizing both ROMAAR concept and the linear array, the data necessary to plot the ground noise footprints and noise radiation patterns were obtained. Examples of the measured noise signature of the test helicopter, the ground noise footprint or contours, and the directivity patterns measured during level flyby and landing operations of a large, multibladed, nonbanging helicopter, the CH-53, are presented.

  3. Development of a Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notardonato, W. U.

    NASA operations for handling cryogens in ground support equipment have not changed substantially in 50 years, despite major technology advances in the field of cryogenics. NASA loses approximately 50% of the hydrogen purchased because of a continuous heat leak into ground and flight vessels, transient chill down of warm cryogenic equipment, liquid bleeds, and vent losses. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) needs to develop energy-efficient cryogenic ground systems to minimize propellant losses, simplify operations, and reduce cost associated with hydrogen usage. The GODU LH2 project will design, assemble, and test a prototype storage and distribution system for liquid hydrogen that represents an advanced end-to-end cryogenic propellant system for a ground launch complex. The project has multiple objectives and will culminate with an operational demonstration of the loading of a simulated flight tank with densified propellants. The system will be unique because it uses an integrated refrigeration and storage system (IRAS) to control the state of the fluid. The integrated refrigerator is the critical feature enabling the testing of the following three functions: zero-loss storage and transfer, propellant densification/conditioning, and on-site liquefaction. This paper will discuss the test objectives, the design of the system, and the current status of the installation.

  4. The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite /SMS/ system. [subsystems and ground facilities design and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fordyce, D. V.; Wirth, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the fundamental design criteria and operational features of the spacecraft subsystems and ground facilities comprising the SMS program. The main objectives of the program are to provide day and night information on the earth's weather by means of earth imaging, retransmission of imaged data, data collection, data relay, and space environment monitoring. Attention is given to the launch and orbital station-keeping functions, onboard sensors used to provide remote imagery, data transmission from the satellite to command and regional ground stations, and examples of meteorological services resulting from use of this satellite.

  5. NASA's next generation tracking and data relay satellite system (TDRSS): Launch and operational ground segment architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald A.; Berndt, Allen K.

    1996-01-01

    The next generation's tracking and data relay satellite system (TDRSS) spacecraft currently under development for user support into the next century, is reported. Modifications will be made to the TDRSS ground terminals required for user support, the control of the TDRSS and the support of transfer orbit operations. The modifications will be made while ensuring compatibility with the present generation of TDRSS. The capabilities of the new spacecraft are described and compared with those of the existing generation. The architecture of the modified ground terminals and that of a new terminal, are detailed.

  6. Shuttle Ground Operations Efficiencies/Technologies Study (SGOE/T). Volume 5: Technical Information Sheets (TIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, A. L.; Hart, M. T.; Lowry, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The Technology Information Sheet was assembled in database format during Phase I. This document was designed to provide a repository for information pertaining to 144 Operations and Maintenance Instructions (OMI) controlled operations in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF), Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), and PAD. It provides a way to accumulate information about required crew sizes, operations task time duration (serial and/or parallel), special Ground Support Equipment (GSE). required, and identification of a potential application of existing technology or the need for the development of a new technolgoy item.

  7. The airport gate assignment problem: a survey.

    PubMed

    Bouras, Abdelghani; Ghaleb, Mageed A; Suryahatmaja, Umar S; Salem, Ahmed M

    2014-01-01

    The airport gate assignment problem (AGAP) is one of the most important problems operations managers face daily. Many researches have been done to solve this problem and tackle its complexity. The objective of the task is assigning each flight (aircraft) to an available gate while maximizing both conveniences to passengers and the operational efficiency of airport. This objective requires a solution that provides the ability to change and update the gate assignment data on a real time basis. In this paper, we survey the state of the art of these problems and the various methods to obtain the solution. Our survey covers both theoretical and real AGAP with the description of mathematical formulations and resolution methods such as exact algorithms, heuristic algorithms, and metaheuristic algorithms. We also provide a research trend that can inspire researchers about new problems in this area. PMID:25506074

  8. The Airport Gate Assignment Problem: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleb, Mageed A.; Salem, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    The airport gate assignment problem (AGAP) is one of the most important problems operations managers face daily. Many researches have been done to solve this problem and tackle its complexity. The objective of the task is assigning each flight (aircraft) to an available gate while maximizing both conveniences to passengers and the operational efficiency of airport. This objective requires a solution that provides the ability to change and update the gate assignment data on a real time basis. In this paper, we survey the state of the art of these problems and the various methods to obtain the solution. Our survey covers both theoretical and real AGAP with the description of mathematical formulations and resolution methods such as exact algorithms, heuristic algorithms, and metaheuristic algorithms. We also provide a research trend that can inspire researchers about new problems in this area. PMID:25506074

  9. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center (Area B Navy Fire Test Facility), Atlantic County, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ, September 20, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for Area B, the Navy Fire Test Facility, at the FAA Technical Center, Atlantic City Internatioal Airport, New Jersey. The selected remedy for Area B includes: Installation of additional monitoring wells; Continued ground water and surface water monitoring; Installation and operation of air sparging wells, vapor extraction wells and monitoring probes; On-site vapor treatment (if necessary); and Five year reviews.

  10. The Envisat Mission Extension 2010- Implications for On-Ground and On-Board Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diekmann, Frank-Jugen; Mesples, Daniel; Ventimiglia, Luca; Milsson, M.; Kuijper, Dirk Berger, Jean-Noel

    2010-12-01

    ESA's Earth Observation (EO) satellite ENVISAT was launched in 2002 with a nominal mission lifetime of five years. Given the excellent performance of the platform and the nine actively controlled instruments, the mission was extended until the end of 2010, when most of the onboard hydrazine will be exhausted. A concept for extending the Envisat mission has been defined in 2008, which is based on an altitude lowering and a new orbit control concept which will allow a continuation of the routine operations until end of 2013. ESA's control centre ESOC in Darmstadt, Germany, will be responsible to implement the orbit change, conduct a mini-commissioning phase following the altitude lowering and resume nominal operations afterwards. The actual orbit change manoeuvres will be carefully planned and executed, aiming at an optimization of fuel consumption. The manoeuvre strategy will allow achieving a reliable estimate of the residual fuel after the thruster firing sequences. One of the immediate consequences after the Envisat orbit change will be S-Band interferences during overlapping ENVISAT and ERS-2 ground station passes, affecting commanding, telemetry and ranging for the two missions operated from ESOC. This will require a dynamic allocation of ground station facilities, also being used by other Earth Observation satellites operated from ESOC. The ENVISAT and ERS2 operators will be supported during this new operations phase by an automation tool taking care of a number of Envisat routine activities. This paper summarizes the Envisat orbit change activities, the impact on routine operations and the conflict resolution strategies.

  11. The Cluster Ground Segment and Operations - maintaining the high quality of services at lower cost -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpp, J.

    The Cluster ground segment mostly consists of that which was built in the early 1990s for the original Cluster mission which was destroyed in 1996 The four Cluster spacecraft were rebuilt and launched in Summer 2000 The Cluster mission has been in its routine operational phase since February 2001 After a data extension phase which added the upgraded Maspalomas terminal as a second Cluster dedicated ground station to the original VILSPA-1 station the mission is in its second extension phase and preparing to fly up to end 2009 The operational concept of Cluster is presented with emphasis on services to the user community such as response time monitoring of quality of operational service such as publishing the science data return ratio and anomalies in the space and ground segment With a considerable re-design and upgrade of the ground segment the annual mission costs for the additional 4 mission years could be reduced by 25 while maintaining the prime requirements of the mission The re-design and upgrade is subject of the paper presented It is shown how a combination of greatly differing measures can lead to this considerable reduction in cost Moving the ground station support from VILSPA-1 to Perth takes advantage of the orbit evolution and allows reducing significantly the staffing of Spacecraft controllers By making use of redundancies and margins in the space segment sharing of the Perth station with the XMM project is possible To share the station between two projects is facilitated by the migration from the old telemetry processors

  12. Software Tools to Support Research on Airport Departure Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Francis; Evans, Antony; Feron, Eric; Clarke, John-Paul

    2003-01-01

    A simple, portable and useful collection of software tools has been developed for the analysis of airport surface traffic. The tools are based on a flexible and robust traffic-flow model, and include calibration, validation and simulation functionality for this model. Several different interfaces have been developed to help promote usage of these tools, including a portable Matlab(TM) implementation of the basic algorithms; a web-based interface which provides online access to automated analyses of airport traffic based on a database of real-world operations data which covers over 250 U.S. airports over a 5-year period; and an interactive simulation-based tool currently in use as part of a college-level educational module. More advanced applications for airport departure traffic include taxi-time prediction and evaluation of "windowing" congestion control.

  13. Three-track runway and taxiway profiles measured at international airports I and J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    Three-track runway and taxiway profiles are presented for use in studies of airplane response to ground roughness. Tabulated and plotted data for two international airports, (designated I and J), are included.

  14. UAV-guided navigation for ground robot tele-operation in a military reconnaissance environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jessie Y C

    2010-08-01

    A military reconnaissance environment was simulated to examine the performance of ground robotics operators who were instructed to utilise streaming video from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to navigate his/her ground robot to the locations of the targets. The effects of participants' spatial ability on their performance and workload were also investigated. Results showed that participants' overall performance (speed and accuracy) was better when she/he had access to images from larger UAVs with fixed orientations, compared with other UAV conditions (baseline- no UAV, micro air vehicle and UAV with orbiting views). Participants experienced the highest workload when the UAV was orbiting. Those individuals with higher spatial ability performed significantly better and reported less workload than those with lower spatial ability. The results of the current study will further understanding of ground robot operators' target search performance based on streaming video from UAVs. The results will also facilitate the implementation of ground/air robots in military environments and will be useful to the future military system design and training community. PMID:20658388

  15. Automating the SMAP Ground Data System to Support Lights-Out Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is a first tier mission in NASA's Earth Science Decadal Survey. SMAP will provide a global mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw states. This mapping will be used to enhance the understanding of processes that link the terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles, and to enhance weather and forecast capabilities. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been selected as the lead center for the development and operation of SMAP. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has an extensive history of successful deep space exploration. JPL missions have typically been large scale Class A missions with significant budget and staffing. SMAP represents a new area of JPL focus towards low cost Earth science missions. Success in this new area requires changes to the way that JPL has traditionally provided the Mission Operations System (MOS)/Ground Data System (GDS) functions. The operation of SMAP requires more routine operations activities and support for higher data rates and data volumes than have been achieved in the past. These activities must be addressed by a reduced operations team and support staff. To meet this challenge, the SMAP ground data system provides automation that will perform unattended operations, including automated commanding of the SMAP spacecraft.

  16. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This study presents Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls plan. This plan was developed and optimized out of a combination of individual Tug program phased subplans, special emphasis studies, contingency analyses and sensitivity analyses. The subplans cover the Tug program phases: (1) Tug operational, (2) Interim Upper Stage (IUS)/Tug fleet utilization, (3) and IUS/Tug payload integration, (4) Tug site activation, (5) IUS/Tug transition, (6) Tug acquisition. Resource requirements (facility, GSE, TSE, software, manpower, logistics) are provided in each subplan, as are appropriate Tug processing flows, active and total IUS and Tug fleet requirements, fleet management and Tug payload integration concepts, facility selection recommendations, site activation and IUS to Tug transition requirements. The impact of operational concepts on Tug acquisition is assessed and the impact of operating Tugs out of KSC and WTR is analyzed and presented showing WTR as a delta. Finally, cost estimates for fleet management and ground operations of the DDT&E and operational phases of the Tug program are given.

  17. NASA Planning for Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Orion Ground Processing Team was originally formed by the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Constellation (Cx) Project Office's Orion Division to define, refine and mature pre-launch and post-landing ground operations for the Orion human spacecraft. The multidisciplined KSC Orion team consisted of KSC civil servant, SAIC, Productivity Apex, Inc. and Boeing-CAPPS engineers, project managers and safety engineers, as well as engineers from Constellation's Orion Project and Lockheed Martin Orion Prime contractor. The team evaluated the Orion design configurations as the spacecraft concept matured between Systems Design Review (SDR), Systems Requirement Review (SRR) and Preliminary Design Review (PDR). The team functionally decomposed prelaunch and post-landing steps at three levels' of detail, or tiers, beginning with functional flow block diagrams (FFBDs). The third tier FFBDs were used to build logic networks and nominal timelines. Orion ground support equipment (GSE) was identified and mapped to each step. This information was subsequently used in developing lower level operations steps in a Ground Operations Planning Document PDR product. Subject matter experts for each spacecraft and GSE subsystem were used to define 5th - 95th percentile processing times for each FFBD step, using the Delphi Method. Discrete event simulations used this information and the logic network to provide processing timeline confidence intervals for launch rate assessments. The team also used the capabilities of the KSC Visualization Lab, the FFBDs and knowledge of the spacecraft, GSE and facilities to build visualizations of Orion pre-launch and postlanding processing at KSC. Visualizations were a powerful tool for communicating planned operations within the KSC community (i.e., Ground Systems design team), and externally to the Orion Project, Lockheed Martin spacecraft designers and other Constellation Program stakeholders during the SRR to PDR timeframe. Other operations planning

  18. Input-Output Modeling and Control of the Departure Process of Congested Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujet, Nicolas; Delcaire, Bertrand; Feron, Eric

    2003-01-01

    A simple queueing model of busy airport departure operations is proposed. This model is calibrated and validated using available runway configuration and traffic data. The model is then used to evaluate preliminary control schemes aimed at alleviating departure traffic congestion on the airport surface. The potential impact of these control strategies on direct operating costs, environmental costs and overall delay is quantified and discussed.

  19. Concept of Operations for a Prospective "Proving Ground" in the Lunar Vicinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Hill, James J.; Goodliff, Kandyce

    2016-01-01

    NASA is studying conceptual architectures for a "Proving Ground" near the Moon or in high lunar orbit to conduct human space exploration missions that bridge the gap between today's operations with the International Space Station (ISS) and future human exploration of Mars beginning in the 2030s. This paper describes the framework of a concept of operations ("Conops") for candidate activities in the Proving Ground. The Conops discusses broad goals that the Proving Ground might address, such as participation from commercial entities, support for human landings on the Moon, use of mature technologies, and growth of capability through a steady cadence of increasingly ambitious piloted missions. Additional Proving Ground objectives are outlined in a companion paper. Key elements in the Conops include the Orion spacecraft (with mission kits for docking and other specialized operations) and the Space Launch System (SLS) heavy-lift rocket. Potential additions include a new space suit, commercial launch vehicles and logistics carriers, Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) stages to move elements between different orbits and eventually take them on excursions to deep space, a core module with multiple docking ports, a habitation block, and robotic and piloted lunar landers. The landers might include reusable ascent modules which could remain docked to in-space elements between lunar sorties. A module providing advanced regenerative life support functions could launch to the ISS, and later move to the Proving Ground. The architecture will include infrastructure for launch preparation, communication, mission control, and range safety. The Conops describes notional missions chosen to guide the design of the architecture and its elements. One such mission might be the delivery of a approximately 10-t Transit Habitat element, comanifested with Orion on a Block 1B SLS launcher, to the Proving Ground. In another mission, the architecture might participate in direct human exploration of

  20. Review of Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Tools for Verifying Command and Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Michael L.; Bonanne, Kevin H.; Favretto, Jeffrey A.; Jackson, Maddalena M.; Jones, Stephanie L.; Mackey, Ryan M.; Sarrel, Marc A.; Simpson, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Standing Review Board (SRB) requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conduct an independent review of the plan developed by Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) for identifying models and emulators to create a tool(s) to verify their command and control software. The NESC was requested to identify any issues or weaknesses in the GSDO plan. This document contains the outcome of the NESC review.

  1. Alabama Ground Operations during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Blakeslee, Richard; Koshak, William; Bain, Lamont; Rogers, Ryan; Kozlowski, Danielle; Sherrer, Adam; Saari, Matt; Bigelbach, Brandon; Scott, Mariana; Schultz, Elise; Schultz, Chris; Gatlin, Patrick; Wingo, Matt; Phillips, Dustin; Phillips, Chris; Peterson, Harold; Bailey, Jeff; Frederickson, Terryn; Hall, John; Bart, Nicole; Becker, Melissa; Pinkney, Kurtis; Rowe, Scott; Starzec, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign investigates the impact of deep, midlatitude convective clouds, including their dynamical, physical and lighting processes, on upper tropospheric composition and chemistry. DC3 science operations took place from 14 May to 30 June 2012. The DC3 field campaign utilized instrumented aircraft and ground ]based observations. The NCAR Gulfstream ]V (GV) observed a variety of gas ]phase species, radiation and cloud particle characteristics in the high ]altitude outflow of storms while the NASA DC ]8 characterized the convective inflow. Groundbased radar networks were used to document the kinematic and microphysical characteristics of storms. In order to study the impact of lightning on convective outflow composition, VHF ]based lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) provided detailed three ]dimensional measurements of flashes. Mobile soundings were utilized to characterize the meteorological environment of the convection. Radar, sounding and lightning observations were also used in real ]time to provide forecasting and mission guidance to the aircraft operations. Combined aircraft and ground ]based observations were conducted at three locations, 1) northeastern Colorado, 2) Oklahoma/Texas and 3) northern Alabama, to study different modes of deep convection in a variety of meteorological and chemical environments. The objective of this paper is to summarize the Alabama ground operations and provide a preliminary assessment of the ground ]based observations collected over northern Alabama during DC3. The multi ] Doppler, dual ]polarization radar network consisted of the UAHuntsville Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR), the UAHuntsville Mobile Alabama X ]band (MAX) radar and the Hytop (KHTX) Weather Surveillance Radar 88 Doppler (WSR ]88D). Lightning frequency and structure were observed in near real ]time by the NASA MSFC Northern Alabama LMA (NALMA). Pre ]storm and inflow proximity

  2. Positioning System Accuracy Assessment for the Runway Incursion Prevention System Flight Test at the Dallas/Ft. Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA/Langley Research Center collaborated with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to test a Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) at the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The RIPS combines airborne and ground sensor data with various cockpit displays to improve pilots' awareness of traffic conditions on the airport surface. The systems tested at DFW involved surface radar and data systems that gather and send surface traffic information to a research aircraft outfitted with the RIPS software, cockpit displays, and data link transceivers. The data sent to the airborne systems contained identification and GPS location of traffic. This information was compared with the own-ship location from airborne GPS receivers to generate incursion alerts. A total of 93 test tracks were flown while operating RIPS. This report compares the accuracy of the airborne GPS systems that gave the own-ship position of the research aircraft for the 93 test tracks.

  3. Application of networked unattended ground sensors in urban combat and stability operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarretta, Albert A.; Yerace, Gary A.

    2005-05-01

    Increasingly, the U.S. is being drawn into non-traditional military operations in complex terrain, including villages and cities occupied by a combination of non-combatants and hostile forces. This trend will continue, as the world's urban population continues its significant growth. Of all the missions faced by U.S. military forces, combat and peacekeeping operations in urban terrain present the greatest challenges. In response, commanders will need to employ network-/execution-centric combined arms forces and Joint capabilities at the lowest tactical echelons and with minimal staffs. To do so, commanders will need information, especially from networked unattended ground sensors (UGS), to rapidly and effectively plan and rehearse urban operations, synchronize ground and air forces, command and control mixed assets, coordinate effects (from weapons and actions), and determine logistics support. Today, urban terrain operations" tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) are transforming from painstaking ground assaults with large numbers of forces and excessively destructive remote strikes, to more efficient Joint operations which identify, isolate, and assault nodes with precision weapons and smaller forces. Successful employment of such TTPs will support future command and control (C2) concepts; reduce force requirements, civilian casualties and collateral damage; and shorten mission times. These TTPs, future C2 concepts, and the complex urban environment will drive the networked UGS requirements for future operations. This paper will first address these emerging TTPs, future C2 concepts, and the complex urban environment; and identify associated networked UGS challenges. Next, the paper will discuss the recent uses of networked UGS in experiments and demonstrations. Finally, the paper will discuss the innovative employment of networked UGS in these experiments and demonstrations by Warfighters (e.g., for developing situational understanding, mission planning

  4. The systems approach to airport security: The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration)/BWI (Baltimore-Washington International) Airport demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, D.L.; Olascoaga, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in designing, installing and evaluating security systems for various applications during the past 15 years. A systems approach to security that evolved from this experience was applied to aviation security for the Federal Aviation Administration. A general systems study of aviation security in the United States was concluded in 1987. One result of the study was a recommendation that an enhanced security system concept designed to meet specified objectives be demonstrated at an operational airport. Baltimore-Washington International Airport was selected as the site for the demonstration project which began in 1988 and will be completed in 1992. This article introduced the systems approach to airport security and discussed its application at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. Examples of design features that could be included in an enhanced security concept also were presented, including details of the proposed Ramps Area Intrusion Detection System (RAIDS).

  5. The Next Generation of Ground Operations Command and Control; Scripting in C Sharp and Visual Basic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, George; Pedoto, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of scripting languages in Ground Operations Command and Control. It describes the use of scripting languages in a historical context, the advantages and disadvantages of scripts. It describes the Enhanced and Redesigned Scripting (ERS) language, that was designed to combine the features of a scripting language and the graphical and IDE richness of a programming language with the utility of scripting languages. ERS uses the Microsoft Visual Studio programming environment and offers custom controls that enable an ERS developer to extend the Visual Basic and C sharp language interface with the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) telemetry and command system.

  6. Insights into the Thwaites Glacier grounding zone from Operation IceBridge aerogravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinto, K. J.; Bell, R. E.; Cochran, J. R.; Elieff, S.; Frearson, N.

    2010-12-01

    Operation IceBridge acquired 1500 km of geophysical data, at 10 km spacing, in front of the Thwaites Glacier grounding line during the 2009 season. The gravity anomalies recorded by the survey have been used to model the bathymetry of the sea floor in front of the glacier, an area inaccessible to previous surveys. The resulting map reveals previously unseen detail of the Thwaites grounding zone, as well as the spatial extent of features that were formerly only known as points affecting the ice surface. The modeled bathymetry in front of Thwaites Glacier is marked by an undulating ridge running sub-parallel to the grounding line, 40 km seaward. The highest peak on the ridge is in contact with the overlying ice shelf, hindering its flow. Ridge elevation decreases to the west, with a maximum ridge depth of 850 m and an average relief of 350 m. This is comparable in scale to the recently identified ridge crossing the channel of nearby Pine Island Glacier (Jenkins et al., 2010). The present-day grounding line of Thwaites appears to be marked by a more subdued ridge, in which we have identified a 20 km wide hollow, to a water depth of 1200 m. Our model shows that this hollow corresponds to a landward bight in the grounding line, in the region through which the fast ice flow of Thwaites Glacier is focused. This correlation was not visible on previous, coarser scale maps of the grounding line, and shows a clear relationship between the bathymetry and ice flow. Gravity inversions have been constrained by nearby marine surveys, satellite images of the ice rise at the peak of the ridge and radar and laser data from the IceBridge survey to constrain ice thickness. The absolute values of predicted bathymetry are dependent on the density of the rocks in the subsurface, for example the presence or absence of volcanic material or loose sediments. Some models of the geology of the survey area are also proposed. Uncertainty of underlying geology may account for ~100 m errors in the

  7. Development and verification of ground-based tele-robotics operations concept for Dextre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Sarmad

    2013-05-01

    The Special Purpose Dextreous Manipulator (Dextre) is the latest addition to the on-orbit segment of the Mobile Servicing System (MSS); Canada's contribution to the International Space Station (ISS). Launched in March 2008, the advanced two-armed robot is designed to perform various ISS maintenance tasks on robotically compatible elements and on-orbit replaceable units using a wide variety of tools and interfaces. The addition of Dextre has increased the capabilities of the MSS, and has introduced significant complexity to ISS robotics operations. While the initial operations concept for Dextre was based on human-in-the-loop control by the on-orbit astronauts, the complexities of robotic maintenance and the associated costs of training and maintaining the operator skills required for Dextre operations demanded a reexamination of the old concepts. A new approach to ISS robotic maintenance was developed in order to utilize the capabilities of Dextre safely and efficiently, while at the same time reducing the costs of on-orbit operations. This paper will describe the development, validation, and on-orbit demonstration of the operations concept for ground-based tele-robotics control of Dextre. It will describe the evolution of the new concepts from the experience gained from the development and implementation of the ground control capability for the Space Station Remote Manipulator System; Canadarm 2. It will discuss the various technical challenges faced during the development effort, such as requirements for high positioning accuracy, force/moment sensing and accommodation, failure tolerance, complex tool operations, and the novel operational tools and techniques developed to overcome them. The paper will also describe the work performed to validate the new concepts on orbit and will discuss the results and lessons learned from the on-orbit checkout and commissioning of Dextre using the newly developed tele-robotics techniques and capabilities.

  8. Improved low visibility forecasts at Amsterdam Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijngaard, J.; Vogelezang, D.; Maat, N.; van Bruggen, H.

    2009-09-01

    Accurate, reliable and unambiguous information concerning the actual and expected (low) visibility conditions at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol is very important for the available operational flow capacity. Therefore visibility forecast errors can have a negative impact on safety and operational expenses. KNMI has performed an update of the visibility forecast system in close collaboration with the main users of the forecasts (Air Traffic Control, the airport authorities and KLM airlines). This automatic forecasting system consists of a Numerical Weather Prediction Model (Hirlam) with a statistical post processing module on top of it. Output of both components is supplied to a human forecaster who issues a special probabilistic forecast bulletin. This bulletin is tailored to the specific requirements of the airport community. The improvements made to the forecast system are twofold: 1) In addition to the Meteorological Optical Range (MOR) values, RVR (Runway Visual Range) is forecasted. Since RVR depends on both MOR and the local Background Luminance, a (deterministic) statistical forecast for the latter has been developed. 2) Another improvement was achieved by calculating joint probabilities for specific combinations of visibility and cloud base height for thresholds which have direct impact on the flow capacity at the airport. The development of this new visibility forecast will be presented briefly. Also a few verification results will be shown to demonstrate the improvements made. Finally, the importance of explaining the user the use of the forecast information, in relation to their decision making process, will be discussed. For that reason, a simple guideline model to make a cost-optimal choice will be introduced.

  9. Concept of Operations for a Prospective "Proving Ground" in the Lunar Vicinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Hill, James J.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is studying a "Proving Ground" near the Moon to conduct human space exploration missions in preparation for future flights to Mars. This paper describes a concept of operations ("conops") for activities in the Proving Ground, focusing on the construction and use of a mobile Cislunar Transit Habitat capable of months-long excursions within and beyond the Earth-Moon system. Key elements in the conops include the Orion spacecraft (with mission kits for docking and other specialized operations) and the Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket. Potential additions include commercial launch vehicles and logistics carriers, solar electric propulsion stages to move elements between different orbits and eventually take them on excursions to deep space, a node module with multiple docking ports, habitation and life support blocks, and international robotic and piloted lunar landers. The landers might include reusable ascent modules which could remain docked to in-space elements between lunar sorties. The architecture will include infrastructure for launch preparation, communication, mission control, and range safety. The conops describes "case studies" of notional missions chosen to guide the design of the architecture and its elements. One such mission is the delivery of a 10-ton pressurized element, co-manifested with an Orion on a Block 1B Space Launch System rocket, to the Proving Ground. With a large solar electric propulsion stage, the architecture could enable a year-long mission to land humans on a near-Earth asteroid. In the last case, after returning to near-lunar space, two of the asteroid explorers could join two crewmembers freshly arrived from Earth for a Moon landing, helping to safely quantify the risk of landing deconditioned crews on Mars. The conops also discusses aborts and contingency operations. Early return to Earth may be difficult, especially during later Proving Ground missions. While adding risk, limited-abort conditions provide needed practice

  10. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  11. FIELD EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING AT CDG AIRPORTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.

    2009-12-01

    Richard Ramaroson1,4, Klaus Schaefer2, Stefan Emeis2, Carsten Jahn2, Gregor Schürmann2, Maria Hoffmann2, Mikhael Zatevakhin3, Alexandre Ignatyev3. 1ONERA, Châtillon, France; 4SEAS, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA; 2FZK, Garmisch, Germany; (3)FSUE SPbAEP, St Petersburg, Russia. 2-month field campaigns have been organized at CDG airports in autumn 2004 and summer 2005. Air quality and ground air traffic emissions have been monitored continuously at terminals and taxi-runways, along with meteorological parameters onboard trucks and with a SODAR. This paper analyses the commercial engine emissions characteristics at airports and their effects on gas pollutants and airborne particles coupled to meteorology. LES model results for PM dispersion coupled to microphysics in the PBL are compared to measurements. Winds and temperature at the surface and their vertical profiles have been stored with turbulence. SODAR observations show the time-development of the mixing layer depth and turbulent mixing in summer up to 800m. Active low level jets and their regional extent have been observed and analyzed. PM number and mass size distribution, morphology and chemical contents are investigated. Formation of new ultra fine volatile (UFV) particles in the ambient plume downstream of running engines is observed. Soot particles are mostly observed at significant level at high power thrusts at take-off (TO) and on touch-down whereas at lower thrusts at taxi and aprons ultra the UFV PM emissions become higher. Ambient airborne PM1/2.5 is closely correlated to air traffic volume and shows a maximum beside runways. PM number distribution at airports is composed mainly by volatile UF PM abundant at apron. Ambient PM mass in autumn is higher than in summer. The expected differences between TO and taxi emissions are confirmed for NO, NO2, speciated VOC and CO. NO/NO2 emissions are larger at runways due to higher power. Reactive VOC and CO are more produced at low powers during idling at

  12. Auctioning Airport Slots?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruyer, Nicolas; Lenoir, Nathalie

    2003-01-01

    The current allocation of slots on congested European airports constitutes an obstacle to the effective liberalisation of air transportation undertaken in Europe. With a view to favouring effluent slot utilisation and competition, as is the goal of the Euopean commission, we propose to use a market mechanism, based on temporary" utilisation licences. In order to allocate those licences, we propose and describe an iterated combinatorial auction mechanism where a percentage of licences would be reallocated each season. A secondary market would also be set up in order to reallocate slots during a season. Since a combinatorial auction involve a complex optimisation procedure, we describe how it can be made to work in the case of auctions.

  13. A major cogeneration system goes in at JFK International Airport. Low-visibility privatization in a high-impact environment

    SciTech Connect

    Leibler, J.; Luxton, R.; Ostberg, P.

    1998-04-01

    This article describes the first major privatization effort to be completed at John F. Kennedy International Airport. The airport owner and operator, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, decided to seek private sector involvement in a capital-intensive project to expand and upgrade the airport`s heating and air conditioning facilities and construct a new cogeneration plant. Kennedy International Airport Cogeneration (KIAC) Partners, a partnership between Gas Energy Incorporated of New York and Community Energy Alternatives of New Jersey, was selected to develop an energy center to supply electricity and hot and chilled water to meet the airport`s growing energy demand. Construction of a 110 MW cogeneration plant, 7,000 tons of chilled water equipment, and 30,000 feet of hot water delivery piping started immediately. JFK Airport`s critical international position called for this substantial project to be developed almost invisibly; no interruption in heating and air conditioning service and no interference in the airport`s active operations could be tolerated. Commercial operation was achieved in February 1995.

  14. The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS), Higher Volume Operations (HVO) Off-Nominal Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxley, B.; Williams, D.; Consiglio, M.; Conway, S.; Adams, C.; Abbott, T.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to conduct concurrent, multiple aircraft operations in poor weather, at virtually any airport, offers an important opportunity for a significant increase in the rate of flight operations, a major improvement in passenger convenience, and the potential to foster growth of charter operations at small airports. The Small Aircraft Transportation System, (SATS) Higher Volume Operations (HVO) concept is designed to increase traffic flow at any of the 3400 nonradar, non-towered airports in the United States where operations are currently restricted to one-in/one-out procedural separation during Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The concept's key feature is pilots maintain their own separation from other aircraft using procedures, aircraft flight data sent via air-to-air datalink, cockpit displays, and on-board software. This is done within the Self-Controlled Area (SCA), an area of flight operations established during poor visibility or low ceilings around an airport without Air Traffic Control (ATC) services. The research described in this paper expands the HVO concept to include most off-nominal situations that could be expected to occur in a future SATS environment. The situations were categorized into routine off-nominal operations, procedural deviations, equipment malfunctions, and aircraft emergencies. The combination of normal and off-nominal HVO procedures provides evidence for an operational concept that is safe, requires little ground infrastructure, and enables concurrent flight operations in poor weather.

  15. SiC-foamed mirror for telescope operating in space or on ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citterio, Oberto; Parodi, Giancarlo

    1997-03-01

    By combining the excellent intrinsic thermo-mechanical properties of the SiC (silicon carbide) with a structural design based on a sandwich structure composed of two SiC face sheets CVD (chemical vapor deposition) deposited on a foam core of the same material, it is possible to manufacture very light and stiff primary mirrors for telescopes to be operated in space or on ground. The paper presents an analysis of the mechanical properties of this structure, it proposes a preliminary design of a segmented mirror and support pattern for space or for on ground telescopes, and it points out the important saving in weight which is possible with respect to other approaches used to manufacture lightweight mirrors.

  16. Spatially-varying surface roughness and ground-level air quality in an operational dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M J; Brade, T K; MacKenzie, A R; Whyatt, J D; Carruthers, D J; Stocker, J; Cai, X; Hewitt, C N

    2014-02-01

    Urban form controls the overall aerodynamic roughness of a city, and hence plays a significant role in how air flow interacts with the urban landscape. This paper reports improved model performance resulting from the introduction of variable surface roughness in the operational air-quality model ADMS-Urban (v3.1). We then assess to what extent pollutant concentrations can be reduced solely through local reductions in roughness. The model results suggest that reducing surface roughness in a city centre can increase ground-level pollutant concentrations, both locally in the area of reduced roughness and downwind of that area. The unexpected simulation of increased ground-level pollutant concentrations implies that this type of modelling should be used with caution for urban planning and design studies looking at ventilation of pollution. We expect the results from this study to be relevant for all atmospheric dispersion models with urban-surface parameterisations based on roughness. PMID:24212233

  17. Potential low frequency ground vibration (<6.3 Hz) impacts from underground LRT operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S.

    2003-10-01

    Vibration sensitive research activities at the laboratories of the University of Washington (UW) Physics and Astronomy Building (PAB) were a critical issue for the design of the Sound Transit Link Light Rail LRT system in Seattle, Washington. A study was conducted to measure and predict low frequency ground vibration generated by the LRT operations. The University's concern was an on-going research experiment in gravity, which had sensitivity to vibration below 6.3 Hz. The experiment was located on an independent concrete slab in an area cut-out from the building foundation with no connection to the building structure. Another concern was the planned future construction of a Life Sciences Center with vibration sensitive test equipment. This paper presents the results of a study to estimate the ground displacement at these buildings using empirical measured data of a similar deep tunnel transit system and finite difference modelling analysis.

  18. Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.; Hall, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To help increase the capacity and efficiency of the nation s airports, a secure wideband wireless communications system is proposed for use on the airport surface. This paper provides an overview of the research and development process for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). AeroMACS is based on a specific commercial profile of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.16 standard known as Wireless Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access or WiMAX (WiMax Forum). The paper includes background on the need for global interoperability in air/ground data communications, describes potential AeroMACS applications, addresses allocated frequency spectrum constraints, summarizes the international standardization process, and provides findings and recommendations from the world s first AeroMACS prototype implemented in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

  19. Comparison of On-Orbit and Ground Based Hollow Cathode Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor); Carpenter, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed by the Rocketdyne division of Boeing to control charging of the International Space Station (ISS). Each PCU contains a Hollow Cathode Assembly (HCA), which emits the charge control electrons. The HCAs were designed and fabricated at NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC). GRC's HCA development program included manufacture of engineering, qualification, and flight model HCAs as well as wear tests and qualification tests. GRC is currently tracking the on-orbit data for the flight HCAs. This data will be discussed with comparison to operating parameters verified by ground based HCA tests. The flight HCAs continue to operate flawlessly. The first unit has accumulated more than 3650 hours of on-orbit operation and the second unit has accumulated over 5550 hours.

  20. A Near-Term Concept for Trajectory Based Operations with Air/Ground Data Link Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNally, David; Mueller, Eric; Thipphavong, David; Paielli, Russell; Cheng, Jinn-Hwei; Lee, Chuhan; Sahlman, Scott; Walton, Joe

    2010-01-01

    An operating concept and required system components for trajectory-based operations with air/ground data link for today's en route and transition airspace is proposed. Controllers are fully responsible for separation as they are today, and no new aircraft equipage is required. Trajectory automation computes integrated solutions to problems like metering, weather avoidance, traffic conflicts and the desire to find and fly more time/fuel efficient flight trajectories. A common ground-based system supports all levels of aircraft equipage and performance including those equipped and not equipped for data link. User interface functions for the radar controller's display make trajectory-based clearance advisories easy to visualize, modify if necessary, and implement. Laboratory simulations (without human operators) were conducted to test integrated operation of selected system components with uncertainty modeling. Results are based on 102 hours of Fort Worth Center traffic recordings involving over 37,000 individual flights. The presence of uncertainty had a marginal effect (5%) on minimum-delay conflict resolution performance, and windfavorable routes had no effect on detection and resolution metrics. Flight plan amendments and clearances were substantially reduced compared to today s operations. Top-of-descent prediction errors are the largest cause of failure indicating that better descent predictions are needed to reliably achieve fuel-efficient descent profiles in medium to heavy traffic. Improved conflict detections for climbing flights could enable substantially more continuous climbs to cruise altitude. Unlike today s Conflict Alert, tactical automation must alert when an altitude amendment is entered, but before the aircraft starts the maneuver. In every other failure case tactical automation prevented losses of separation. A real-time prototype trajectory trajectory-automation system is running now and could be made ready for operational testing at an en route

  1. Airport Simulations Using Distributed Computational Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDermott, William J.; Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Tran, Peter; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Virtual National Airspace Simulation (VNAS) will improve the safety of Air Transportation. In 2001, using simulation and information management software running over a distributed network of super-computers, researchers at NASA Ames, Glenn, and Langley Research Centers developed a working prototype of a virtual airspace. This VNAS prototype modeled daily operations of the Atlanta airport by integrating measured operational data and simulation data on up to 2,000 flights a day. The concepts and architecture developed by NASA for this prototype are integral to the National Airspace Simulation to support the development of strategies improving aviation safety, identifying precursors to component failure.

  2. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel, Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, arc also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/Integral Luchthaven Competitive Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.

  3. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel. Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, are also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/integraal Luchthaven Competitie Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.

  4. Nowcasting system MeteoExpert at Irkutsk airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazlova, Tatiana; Bocharnikov, Nikolai; Solonin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Airport operations are significantly impacted by low visibility concerned with fog. Generation of accurate and timely nowcast products is a basis of early warning automated system providing information about significant weather conditions for decision-makers. Nowcasting system MeteoExpert has been developed that provides aviation forecasters with 0-6 hour nowcasts of the weather conditions including fog and low visibility. The system has been put into operation at the airport Irkutsk since August 2014. Aim is to increase an accuracy of fog forecasts, contributing to the airport safety, efficiency and capacity improvement. Designed for operational use numerical model of atmospheric boundary layer runs with a 10-minute update cycle. An important component of the system is the use of AWOS at the airdrome and three additional automatic weather stations at fogging sites in the vicinity of the airdrome. Nowcasts are visualized on a screen of forecaster's workstation and dedicated website. Nowcasts have been verified against actual observations.

  5. Infrared augmentation system for collision avoidance on airport surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Elizabeth A.

    1998-07-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration is examining a variety of technologies for augmenting surface radar detection at airports. This paper describes the testing of infrared cameras and operational concepts to improve detection and tracking of targets on airport surfaces. Three different cameras were tested during summer and winter months and during inclement weather. Two operational concepts were tested at Dulles International Airport. A prototype image processing system is described that extracts target coordinates from camera video output and passes them to an AMASS simulator for fusion with radar and other target tracking data. All three cameras evaluated were able to detect and recognize a variety of targets on a runway surface including humans, vehicles, and small and large airplanes. The range to detection and recognition varies with each camera's instantaneous FOV, thermal sensitivity, atmospheric conditions and operating conditions. Each camera was found to meet specific FAA requirements in unique ways.

  6. SINCGARS (Single-Channel Ground/Airborne Radio System) operator performance decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Richard L.; Buckalew, Louis W.

    1988-11-01

    The Single-Channel Ground/Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS) is scheduled to replace the Army's VRC-12 and PRC-77 radios. However, SINCGARS is more complex to operate and requires more training. This study examined the decay of operational skills and knowledge in two groups of recently trained operators who went without exposure to SINCGARS for several weeks. Performance levels were measured with the SINCGARS Learning-Retention Test (SLRT), a simulated hands-on performance test emphasizing skills and operational knowledge retention. The results provided tentative indications that operators may lose about 10 percent of their prior performance levels within the first few weeks. This figure is expected to vary considerably, depending on the type of soldier, the length of the nonexposure period, and other conditions. It was also found that performance level was correlated with soldiers' Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) General Technical (GT) scores. Correlations between GT and SLRT scores obtained at two different times were .43 and .50, respectively. However, no relation was observed between performance decay and GT. Further evaluation of operator performance decay needs to be done to determine the effect of longer periods of nonexposure (e.g., 60 and 90 days).

  7. Comparison of On-orbit and Ground Based Hollow Cathode Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael (Technical Monitor); Carpenter, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The Plasma Contactor Units (PCUs) were developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Boeing for charge control on board the International Space Station (ISS). Since the first ignition of a PCU on 10/16/2000 over 3,900 hours of operation have been demonstrated on a single unit. In order to guarantee that the PCUs hollow cathode assemblies (HCAs), which emit the electrons used for charge control, would satisfy the life requirement of 18,000 hours, a ground based hollow cathode life test program was initiated at GRC. The life test program aimed at 27,000 hours of operation on a single unit to demonstrate the industry standard 1.5 times operational life requirement. As of this printing, over 18,000 hours of operation have been accumulated on a single hollow cathode. By comparing the data received from the on-orbit HCAs to the data obtained for the life test cathodes, a comparison may be drawn to determine if the on-orbit HCAs are operating normally, with a final goal of predicting lifetime. Based on the data taken thus far, it can be concluded that the on-orbit HCAs are operating within their design specifications.

  8. Ground and Range Operations for a Heavy-Lift Vehicle: Preliminary Thoughts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabelo, Luis; Zhu, Yanshen; Compton, Jeppie; Bardina, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the ground and range operations for a Shuttle derived Heavy-Lift Vehicle being launched from the Kennedy Space Center on the Eastern range. Comparisons will be made between the Shuttle and a heavy lift configuration (SLS-ETF MPCV April 2011) by contrasting their subsystems. The analysis will also describe a simulation configuration with the potential to be utilized for heavy lift vehicle processing/range simulation modeling and the development of decision-making systems utilized by the range. In addition, a simple simulation model is used to provide the required critical thinking foundations for this preliminary analysis.

  9. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 3: Program cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Cost data for the tug DDT&E and operations phases are presented. Option 6 is the recommended option selected from seven options considered and was used as the basis for ground processing estimates. Option 6 provides for processing the tug in a factory clean environment in the low bay area of VAB with subsequent cleaning to visibly clean. The basis and results of the trade study to select Option 6 processing plan is included. Cost estimating methodology, a work breakdown structure, and a dictionary of WBS definitions is also provided.

  10. Ground noise measurements during static and flyby operations of the Cessna 02-T turbine powered airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Henderson, H. R.; Lawton, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    The field noise measurements on the Cessna 02-T turbine powered propeller aircraft are presented. The objective of the study was to obtain the basic noise characteristics of the aircraft during static ground runs and flyover tests, to identify the sources of the noise, and to correlate the noises with the aircraft operating conditions. The results are presented in the form of a overall noise levels, radiation patterns, and frequency spectra. The noise characteristics of the turbine powered aircraft are compared with those of the reciprocating engine powered aircraft.

  11. Clutter modeling of the Denver Airport and surrounding areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrah, Steven D.; Delmore, Victor E.; Onstott, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    To accurately simulate and evaluate an airborne Doppler radar as a wind shear detection and avoidance sensor, the ground clutter surrounding a typical airport must be quantified. To do this, an imaging airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was employed to investigate and map the normalized radar cross sections (NRCS) of the ground terrain surrounding the Denver Stapleton Airport during November of 1988. Images of the Stapleton ground clutter scene were obtained at a variety of aspect and elevation angles (extending to near-grazing) at both HH and VV polarizations. Presented here, in viewgraph form with commentary, are the method of data collection, the specific observations obtained of the Denver area, a summary of the quantitative analysis performed on the SAR images to date, and the statistical modeling of several of the more interesting stationary targets in the SAR database. Additionally, the accompanying moving target database, containing NRCS and velocity information, is described.

  12. Airport Noise Tech Challenge Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, operating under NASA Aeronautics Mission Directorate#s Fundamental Aero Program, has been organized around the Technical Challenges that have historically precluded commercial supersonic flight. One of these Challenges is making aircraft that are capable of such high aerodynamic performance quiet enough around airports that they will not be objectionable. It is recognized that a successful civilian supersonic aircraft will be a system where many new technologies will come together, and for this to happen not only will new low noise propulsion concepts be required, but new engineering tools that predict the noise of the aircraft as these technologies are combined and compromised with the rest of the aircraft design. These are the two main objectives of the Airport Noise Tech Challenge. " ! As a Project in the Fundamental Aero Program, we work at a relatively low level of technology readiness. However, we have high level milestones which force us to integrate our efforts to impact systems-level activities. To keep the low-level work tied to delivering engineering tools and low-noise concepts, we have structured our milestones around development of the concepts and organized our activities around developing and applying our engineering tools to these concepts. The final deliverables in these milestones are noise prediction modules validated against the best embodiment of each concept. These will then be used in cross-disciplinary exercises to demonstrate the viability of aircraft designs to meet all the Technical Challenges. Some of the concepts being developed are shown: Fan Flow Diverters, Multi-jet Shielding, High-Aspect Ratio Embedded Nozzles, Plasma Actuated Instability Manipulation, Highly Variable Cycle Mixer- Ejectors, and Inverted Velocity Profiles. These concepts are being developed for reduced jet noise along with the design tools which describe how they perform when used in various aircraft configurations. Several key upcoming

  13. 76 FR 77383 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...This action modifies the Palm Beach International Airport, FL, Class C airspace area by raising the floor of Class C airspace over Palm Beach County Park Airport. The FAA is taking this action to enhance safety and increase the efficiency of air traffic operations in the Palm Beach, FL, terminal...

  14. 14 CFR 135.395 - Large nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.395 Large nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Alternate airports. No person may select an airport as...

  15. 14 CFR 135.395 - Large nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.395 Large nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Alternate airports. No person may select an airport as...

  16. 14 CFR 135.395 - Large nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.395 Large nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Alternate airports. No person may select an airport as...

  17. 14 CFR 121.203 - Nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Destination airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airport. (a) No person operating a nontransport category airplane may take off that airplane at a weight that— (1) Allowing for anticipated consumption of fuel and oil, is greater than the weight that would... destination airport; and (2) Is greater than the weight allowable if the landing is to be made on the...

  18. 14 CFR 135.395 - Large nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Alternate airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Large nontransport category airplanes... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Airplane Performance Operating Limitations § 135.395 Large nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Alternate airports. No person may select an airport as...

  19. 76 FR 15028 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Interim Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property (75 FR 54946..., Safety Management System for Certificated Airports (75 FR 62008, October 7, 2010). However, the...

  20. A cyclic ground test of an ion auxiliary propulsion system: Description and operational considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Jerri S.; Kramer, Edward H.

    1988-01-01

    The Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) experiment is designed for launch on an Air Force Space Test Program satellite (NASA-TM-78859; AIAA Paper No. 78-647). The primary objective of the experiment is to flight qualify the 8 cm mercury ion thruster system for stationkeeping applications. Secondary objectives are measuring the interactions between operating ion thruster systems and host spacecraft, and confirming the design performance of the thruster systems. Two complete 8 cm mercury ion thruster subsystems will be flown. One of these will be operated for 2557 on and off cycles and 7057 hours at full thrust. Tests are currently under way in support of the IAPS flight experiment. In this test an IAPS thruster is being operated through a series of startup/run/shut-down cycles which simulate thruster operation during the planned flight experiment. A test facility description and operational considerations of this testing using an engineering model 8 cm thruster (S/N 905) is the subject of this paper. Final results will be published at a later date when the ground test has been concluded.

  1. A Method of Separation Assurance for Instrument Flight Procedures at Non-Radar Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Sheila R.; Consiglio, Maria

    2002-01-01

    A method to provide automated air traffic separation assurance services during approach to or departure from a non-radar, non-towered airport environment is described. The method is constrained by provision of these services without radical changes or ambitious investments in current ground-based technologies. The proposed procedures are designed to grant access to a large number of airfields that currently have no or very limited access under Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), thus increasing mobility with minimal infrastructure investment. This paper primarily addresses a low-cost option for airport and instrument approach infrastructure, but is designed to be an architecture from which a more efficient, albeit more complex, system may be developed. A functional description of the capabilities in the current NAS infrastructure is provided. Automated terminal operations and procedures are introduced. Rules of engagement and the operations are defined. Results of preliminary simulation testing are presented. Finally, application of the method to more terminal-like operations, and major research areas, including necessary piloted studies, are discussed.

  2. The Challenges of New Observing/Operating Modes at Ground Based Optical Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veillet, C.

    2012-09-01

    Over the past years, many ground-based optical observatories have moved away from the traditional “observing visitor mode” where the astronomer comes to the telescopes to carry the observations for which a given number of nights have been allocated. Remote observing, queued observations, service observing, remote or automated operations, these new observational modes are mainly implemented to minimize the operating costs, increase the efficiency of the observations, or better serve the users, leading ultimately to better data and hopefully better science. We will review these modes and the challenges of their implementation for the facilities as well as the users, stressing the need for the required appropriate software tools to keep the users satisfied while optimizing the use of the telescopes and their instrumentation.

  3. Cooperation of German Airports in Europe: Comparison of Different Types by Means of an Interdependence-Profile-Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meincke, Peter A.

    2003-01-01

    The limited growth possibilities in the home markets - not the least of which, based on capacity and expansion problems - force the large airport operators to enter into, via partnerships, cooperations and alliances. The German airports already cooperate among one another in different forms. The purpose of the paper is to examine the structures and possibilities of cooperation among airports in Europe (e.g. Airport Systems, Airport Networks). The experience of German airports with different cooperations and alliances will be also considered. Finally the forms of cooperations among airports are analysed by means of interdependence-profile-models with different features (mutual dependence, coordination volume, complexity, cooperation profit, value, degree of formalization and temporal frame), in order to find out how high the cooperative attachment of cooperation is to be evaluated.

  4. Operational Processing of Ground Validation Data for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulie, Mark S.; Robinson, Mike; Marks, David A.; Ferrier, Brad S.; Rosenfeld, Danny; Wolff, David B.

    1999-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was successfully launched in November 1997. A primary goal of TRMM is to sample tropical rainfall using the first active spaceborne precipitation radar. To validate TRMM satellite observations, a comprehensive Ground Validation (GV) Program has been implemented for this mission. A key component of GV is the analysis and quality control of meteorological ground-based radar data from four primary sites: Melbourne, FL; Houston, TX; Darwin, Australia; and Kwajalein Atoll, RMI. As part of the TRMM GV effort, the Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, has been tasked with developing and implementing an operational system to quality control (QC), archive, and provide data for subsequent rainfall product generation from the four primary GV sites. This paper provides an overview of the JCET operational environment. A description of the QC algorithm and performance, in addition to the data flow procedure between JCET and the TRNM science and Data Information System (TSDIS), are presented. The impact of quality-controlled data on higher level rainfall and reflectivity products will also be addressed, Finally, a brief description of JCET's expanded role into producing reference rainfall products will be discussed.

  5. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  6. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  7. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  8. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  9. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  10. 1-G Human Factors for Optimal Processing and Operability of Ground Systems up to CxP GOP PDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Henderson, Gena; Miller, Darcy; Prevost, Gary; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2010-01-01

    During the mid stages of design development, up to Constellation Program (CxP) Preliminary Design Review (PDR), the requirements for leveraging I-G human factors for optimizing ground processing of Flight Hardware were mature for levels - 2, 3, 4, and 5. This paper gives an overview of the accomplishments achieved during that time. The main focus of this paper will be on the CxP Ground Operations Project human factors engineering analysis process using a Human Factors Engineering Analysis Tool (HFEAT) for developing the level- 5 requirements effecting the design development of the subsystems for Ground Support System (GSS), and Ground Support Equipment (GSE).

  11. SWIFT BAT Loop Heat Pipe Thermal System Characteristics and Ground/Flight Operation Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    The SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Detector Array has a total power dissipation of 208 W. To meet the stringent temperature gradient and thermal stability requirements in the normal operational mode, and heater power budget in both the normal operational and safehold modes, the Detector Array is thermally well coupled to eight constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) embedded in the Detector Array Plate (DAP), and two loop heat pipes (LHPs) transport heat fiom the CCHPs to a radiator. The CCHPs have ammonia as the working fluid and the LHPs have propylene as the working fluid. Precision heater controllers, which have adjustable set points in flight, are used to control the LHP compensation chamber and Detector Array XA1 ASIC temperatures. The radiator has the AZ-Tek AZW-LA-II low-alpha white paint as the thermal coating and is located on the anti-sun side of the spacecraft. This paper presents the characteristics, ground operation and flight operation procedures of the LHP thermal system.

  12. Coordinated ground system for joint science operations for the ExoMars2016 TGO mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, Vladimir; Heather, David; Frew, David; Eismont, Natan; Manaud, Nicolas; Ledkov, Anton; Nazirov, Ravil; Metcalfe, Leo; Cardesin, Alejandro; Konoplev, Veniamin; Korotkov, Fedor; Batanov, Oleg; Brumfitt, Jon; Alvarez, Rub; Martin, Patrick; Melnik, Anton; Tretiakov, Alexey; Villacorta, Antonio

    International collaboration is increasingly important for space science missions, often requiring joint operations activity. Such an approach is extremely important for studies of planets and other bodies of the Solar system that usually require high budget for their realization. In addition, as the development of international payloads for such missions is a well-established practice, the establishment of common ground systems for joint science operations is an important feature. Benefits of such an approach are evident: • More science return • Reduced the cost • More redundancy • Technology exchange But on the other hand, common systems for joint operations pose some specific difficulties, such as: • Different review procedures in the developing organisations • Incompatible documentation structures (“document tree”) • A risk of producing a “multiheaded dragon” (inefficient/duplicated task distributions) • Different base technologies • Language problems This article describes approaches for resolving these problems on the basis of the coordinated system for joint science operations for the ExoMars2016 mission, which is at the design stage now. The architecture of the system, the scenario of distributed but joint data management, as well as some methodological and technological aspects, will be discussed

  13. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2009-01-01

    An initial Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the initial concept for an aircraft-based method of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) in the TMA focusing on conflict detection algorithms and alerting display concepts. This paper gives an overview of the CD&R concept, simulation study, and test results.

  14. A simulator study for the development and evaluation of operating procedures on a supersonic cruise research transport to minimize airport-community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Smith, P. M.; Deal, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    Piloted-simulator studies were conducted to determine takeoff and landing operating procedures for a supersonic cruise research transport concept that result in predicted noise levels which meet current Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification standards. With the use of standard FAA noise certification test procedures, the subject simulated aircraft did not meet the FAA traded-noise-level standards during takeoff and landing. However, with the use of advanced procedures, this aircraft meets the traded-noise-level standards for flight crews with average skills. The advanced takeoff procedures developed involved violating some of the current Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR), but it was not necessary to violate any FAR noise-test conditions during landing approach. Noise contours were also determined for some of the simulated takeoffs and landings in order to indicate the noise-reduction advantages of using operational procedures other than standard.

  15. Temperature and energy deficit in the ground during operation and recovery phases of closed-loop ground source heat pump system: Effect of the groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erol, Selcuk; Francois, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The advection/dispersion mechanism of the groundwater flow in the ground has a significant effect on a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) to enhance its thermal performance. However, the amount of energy extracted from the ground never disappears and only shifts with the magnitude of the effective thermal velocity in the infinite domain. In this work, we focus on the temperature and the energy balance of the ground in an advection/dispersion dominated heat transfer system during the operation period of a BHE and the subsequent recovery phase when the system is idle. The problem is treated with single BHE and multi-BHEs systems, for different representative geology and different groundwater flow velocity. In order to assess the thermal energy deficit due to heat extraction from the ground, we used the finite line source analytical model, developed recently (Erol et al., 2015) that provides the temperature distributions around the boreholes for discontinuous heat extraction. The model is developed based on the Green's function, which is the solution of heat conduction/advection/dispersion equation in porous media, for discontinuous heat extraction by analytically convoluting rectangular function or pulses in time domain. The results demonstrate the significant positive impact of the groundwater flow for the recovery in terms of temperature deficit at the location of the borehole. However, the total thermal energy deficit is not affected by the groundwater movement. The energy balance of the ground is the same no matter the prevailing heat transfer system, which can be only conduction or advection/dispersion. In addition, the energy balance of the ground is not based on either the duration of the production period operation or of the recovery phase, but depends on the total amount of heat that is extracted and on the bulk volumetric heat capacity of the ground.

  16. A Human-in-the Loop Evaluation of a Coordinated Arrival Departure Scheduling Operations for Managing Departure Delays at LaGuardia Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul U.; Smith, Nancy M.; Bienert, Nancy; Brasil, Connie; Buckley, Nathan; Chevalley, Eric; Homola, Jeffrey; Omar, Faisal; Parke, Bonny; Yoo, Hyo-Sang

    2016-01-01

    LaGuardia (LGA) departure delay was identified by the stakeholders and subject matter experts as a significant bottleneck in the New York metropolitan area. Departure delay at LGA is primarily due to dependency between LGA's arrival and departure runways: LGA departures cannot begin takeoff until arrivals have cleared the runway intersection. If one-in one-out operations are not maintained and a significant arrival-to-departure imbalance occurs, the departure backup can persist through the rest of the day. At NASA Ames Research Center, a solution called "Departure-sensitive Arrival Spacing" (DSAS) was developed to maximize the departure throughput without creating significant delays in the arrival traffic. The concept leverages a Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (TSS) operations that create and manage the arrival schedule to the runway threshold and added an interface enhancement to the traffic manager's timeline to provide the ability to manually adjust inter-arrival spacing to build precise gaps for multiple departures between arrivals. A more complete solution would include a TSS algorithm enhancement that could automatically build these multi-departure gaps. With this set of capabilities, inter-arrival spacing could be controlled for optimal departure throughput. The concept was prototyped in a human-in-the- loop (HITL) simulation environment so that operational requirements such as coordination procedures, timing and magnitude of TSS schedule adjustments, and display features for Tower, TRACON and Traffic Management Unit could be determined. A HITL simulation was conducted in August 2014 to evaluate the concept in terms of feasibility, controller workload impact, and potential benefits. Three conditions were tested, namely a Baseline condition without scheduling, TSS condition that schedules the arrivals to the runway threshold, and TSS+DSAS condition that adjusts the arrival schedule to maximize the departure throughput. The results showed that during high

  17. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development, Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward; Isaacs, James; Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen. Steve

    2010-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." The proposed future C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface communication system, referred to as the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS), is anticipated to increase overall air-to-ground data communications systems capacity by using a new spectrum (i.e., not very high frequency (VHF)). Although some critical services could be supported, AeroMACS will also target noncritical services, such as weather advisory and aeronautical information services as part of an airborne System Wide Information Management (SWIM) program. AeroMACS is to be designed and implemented in a manner that will not disrupt other services operating in the C-band. This report defines the AeroMACS concepts of use, high-level system requirements, and architecture; the performance of supporting system analyses; the development of AeroMACS test and demonstration plans; and the establishment of an operational AeroMACS capability in support of C-band aeronautical data communications standards to be advanced in both international (International Civil Aviation Organization, ICAO) and national (RTCA) forums. This includes the development of system parameter profile recommendations for AeroMACS based on existing Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE) 802.16e- 2009 standards

  18. Mission Operations Centers (MOCs): Integrating key spacecraft ground data system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harbaugh, Randy; Szakal, Donna

    1994-01-01

    In an environment characterized by decreasing budgets, limited system development time, and user needs for increased capabilities, the Mission Operations Division (MOD) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center initiated a new, cost-effective concept in developing its spacecraft ground data systems: the Mission Operations Center (MOC). In the MOC approach, key components are integrated into a comprehensive and cohesive spacecraft planning, monitoring, command, and control system with a single, state-of-the-art graphical user interface. The MOD is currently implementing MOC's, which feature a common, reusable, and extendable system architecture, to support the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), and Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) missions. As a result of the MOC approach, mission operations are integrated, and users can, with a single system, perform real-time health and safety monitoring, real-time command and control, real-time attitude processing, real-time and predictive graphical spacecraft monitoring, trend analysis, mission planning and scheduling, command generation and management, network scheduling, guide star selection, and (using an expert system) spacecraft monitoring and fault isolation. The MOD is also implementing its test and training simulators under the new MOC management structure. This paper describes the MOC concept, the management approaches used in developing MOC systems, the technologies employed and the development process improvement initiatives applied in implementing MOC systems, and the expected benefits to both the user and the mission project in using the MOC approach.

  19. Telescience and microgravity. Impact on future facilities, ground segments and operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, R.

    Scientific activities related to experimentation in long duration microgravity missions can only be accomplished by the implementation of the Telescience Concept. Telescience is in fact the logical answer to the need of an intelligent interactive conduct of experiments, to the lack (or very little availability) of crew time on board of the Segments of the Columbus project and to the PIs demand for decentralized operations. Telescience could also be seen as the preparative phase for the ultimate, future exploitation of Microgravity by means of Expert Systems that will utilize AI and Robotics for routine operations (Data Factories, Space Productions and Commercial Enterprises). The implications of Telescience on future Space Activities is reviewed with reference to the Principal Investigator Activities, Crew Members Roles and Facilities. The possibilities offered by newly designed Facilities to be operated in Telescience are pointed out with reference to the scientific objectives that would not be achieved otherwise. Diagnostic facilities (mainly non invasive) that provide digital measurements to be inputted (in real time) into numerical codes for computation of field parameters are being considered. Ground Segment Structure, User Support Centers Organization and Test Bedding activities will be discussed as essential factors of the Telescience Scenario of the Multiuser, permanent platform Facilities for the Microgravity disciplines (Material, Fluid, Life and Engineering Science).

  20. 77 FR 4394 - Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL AGENCY... provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties 12.4 acres at the Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL from the conditions, release certain properties from all terms, conditions, reservations...

  1. Denver airport pumping systems achieve optimal [Delta] T's

    SciTech Connect

    Mannion, G.F.; Krist, G.D. )

    1994-07-01

    This article describes how the pumping and generating systems at the new Denver Airport operate efficiently with the user loops in the buildings producing design temperature rise at all load levels. Fifteen miles east of Denver's Stapleton International Airport lies the newly completed Denver International Airport (DIA)--the world's largest and most high-tech airport. Besides being one of the largest construction projects in the works, it has many of the latest technical innovations available. Of particular interest to the HVAC industry is the design of the heating and cooling water systems. These systems provide environmental cooling and heating water to the three concourses, the airport office building, and the main terminal. The mechanical engineers for the project were all from the Denver area. The central plant design was the work of Behrent Engineering Co.; the three concourses were designed by Swanson-Rink Associates; and the main terminal and administrative office building were designed by Abeyta Engineering Consultants. The overall system concept was developed during the initial design phase by engineers from these firms, members of the DIA staff, and application engineers from several manufacturers.

  2. 14 CFR 91.171 - VOR equipment check for IFR operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... more than 20 nautical miles from the VOR ground facility and maneuver the aircraft directly over the... sign the aircraft log or other record. In addition, if a test signal radiated by a repair station, as...) Use, at the airport of intended departure, an FAA-operated or approved test signal or a test...

  3. 14 CFR 91.171 - VOR equipment check for IFR operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... more than 20 nautical miles from the VOR ground facility and maneuver the aircraft directly over the... sign the aircraft log or other record. In addition, if a test signal radiated by a repair station, as...) Use, at the airport of intended departure, an FAA-operated or approved test signal or a test...

  4. 14 CFR 91.171 - VOR equipment check for IFR operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... more than 20 nautical miles from the VOR ground facility and maneuver the aircraft directly over the... sign the aircraft log or other record. In addition, if a test signal radiated by a repair station, as...) Use, at the airport of intended departure, an FAA-operated or approved test signal or a test...

  5. 14 CFR 91.171 - VOR equipment check for IFR operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... more than 20 nautical miles from the VOR ground facility and maneuver the aircraft directly over the... sign the aircraft log or other record. In addition, if a test signal radiated by a repair station, as...) Use, at the airport of intended departure, an FAA-operated or approved test signal or a test...

  6. FootFall: A Ground Based Operations Toolset Enabling Walking for the ATHLETE Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SunSpiral, Vytas; Chavez-Clemente, Daniel; Broxton, Michael; Keely, Leslie; Mihelich, Patrick; Mittman, David; Collins, Curtis

    2008-01-01

    The ATHLETE (All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer) vehicle consists of six identical, six degree of freedom limbs. FootFall is a ground tool for ATHLETE intended to provide an operator with integrated situational awareness, terrain reconstruction, stability and safety analysis, motion planning, and decision support capabilities to enable the efficient generation of flight software command sequences for walking. FootFall has been under development at NASA Ames for the last year, and having accomplished the initial integration, it is being used to generate command sequences for single footfalls. In this paper, the architecture of FootFall in its current state will be presented, results from the recent Human Robotic Systems Project?s Integrated Field Test (Moses Lake, Washington, June, 2008) will be discussed, and future plans for extending the capabilities of FootFall to enable ATHLETE to walk across a boulder field in real time will be described.

  7. The Nature of Procedural Interrupts in Ground Operations in Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Cheryl M.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This study proposes a methodology for characterizing the causal context and consequences of procedural interrupts in ground operations tasks. Behavioral science researchers observed 26 tasks at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. From these tasks, 81 procedural interrupts were identified and coded for the following information: source of the interrupt, circumstances surrounding the interrupt, and consequences of the interrupt. We found that more interrupts were equipment or personnel-related than procedure-related. More interrupts were due to unavailable resources or resources being incorrect than resources being inaccessible, and most interrupts resulted in some action being taken. Variation in duration of procedural interrupts across causal categories was also examined. The characterization process helps to identify those interrupts that are disruptive, those that cannot be avoided, and those that may have been prevented through better planning or scheduling of resources. Implications for the use of the methodology and suggestions for further research are discussed.

  8. Thermo-physical performance prediction of the KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit for liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, J. H.; Notardonato, W. U.; Karng, S. W.; Oh, I.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) researchers have been working on enhanced and modernized cryogenic liquid propellant handling techniques to reduce life cycle costs of propellant management system for the unique KSC application. The KSC Ground Operation Demonstration Unit (GODU) for liquid hydrogen (LH2) plans to demonstrate integrated refrigeration, zero-loss flexible term storage of LH2, and densified hydrogen handling techniques. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has partnered with the KSC researchers to develop thermal performance prediction model of the GODU for LH2. The model includes integrated refrigeration cooling performance, thermal losses in the tank and distribution lines, transient system characteristics during chilling and loading, and long term steady-state propellant storage. This paper will discuss recent experimental data of the GODU for LH2 system and modeling results.

  9. Operation of an array of field-change detectors to provide ground truth for FORTE data

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, R.S.; Eack, K.B.; Eberle, M.H.; Shao, X.M.; Smith, D.A.; Wiens, K.C.

    1999-06-01

    The authors have deployed an array of fast electric-field-change sensors around the state of New Mexico to help identify the lightning processes responsible for the VHF RF signals detected by the FORTE satellite`s wide-band transient radio emission receivers. The array provides them with locations and electric-field waveforms for events within New Mexico and into surrounding states, and operates continuously. They are particularly interested in events for which there are coincident FORTE observations. For these events, they can correct both the array and FORTE waveforms for time of flight, and can plot the two waveforms on a common time axis. Most of the coincident events are from cloud-go-ground discharges, but the most powerful are from a little-studied class of events variously called narrow bipolar events and compact intra-cloud discharges. They have therefore focused their attention on these events whether or not FORTE was in position to observe them.

  10. Evolution of Chinese airport network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Cao, Xian-Bin; Du, Wen-Bo; Cai, Kai-Quan

    2010-09-01

    With the rapid development of the economy and the accelerated globalization process, the aviation industry plays a more and more critical role in today’s world, in both developed and developing countries. As the infrastructure of aviation industry, the airport network is one of the most important indicators of economic growth. In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the Chinese airport network (CAN) via complex network theory. It is found that although the topology of CAN has remained steady during the past few years, there are many dynamic switchings inside the network, which have changed the relative importance of airports and airlines. Moreover, we investigate the evolution of traffic flow (passengers and cargoes) on CAN. It is found that the traffic continues to grow in an exponential form and has evident seasonal fluctuations. We also found that cargo traffic and passenger traffic are positively related but the correlations are quite different for different kinds of cities.

  11. Tephra fallout hazards at Quito International Airport (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volentik, Alain C. M.; Houghton, Bruce F.

    2015-06-01

    Tephra fallout is the most widespread hazard posed by explosive volcanic eruptions. The 2010 explosive eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland significantly exposed the vulnerability of aviation operations to volcanic ash. The presence of fine ash in the atmosphere forced authorities to close most of European airspace for almost a week. A worldwide study of airport operations disrupted by volcanic eruptions (Guffanti et al., Nat Hazards 51:287-302, 2009) showed significant past exposure to tephra fall of the old international airport (OUIO) in Quito, Ecuador. A new international airport, Mariscal Sucre International Airport (UIO), located 15 km due east to OUIO, started operations on February 20, 2013. Given its location close to the old airport, UIO is also at risk for tephra fallout in the future. We identified five volcanoes capable of producing tephra hazard at UIO. Three (Guagua Pichincha, Reventador, and Tungurahua) are currently active and have recently disrupted aviation operations in Ecuador. The other two (Cotopaxi and Pululagua) are not currently active, but any future eruption from these two volcanoes would probably be explosive, hence capable of producing tephra hazard to UIO. As eruption parameters and wind profiles cannot be forecast in advance, we used a probabilistic approach to quantify the probability of tephra accumulation exceeding 1 mm and 1 cm (regarded as non-conservative and conservative bounds for airport disruption) following an explosive eruption from each volcano. Each eruptive parameter was randomly sampled within a predefined distribution, and wind profiles are randomly sampled within a 5-year dataset. The probability of tephra accumulation reaching 1 mm and 1 cm at UIO is 14.3-19.9 and 2.5-5.8 %, respectively, for Cotopaxi; 17.5-19.9 and 7-7.7 %, respectively, for Guagua Pichincha; and 44.3-44.8 and 18.8-24.9 %, respectively, for Pululagua. According to our results, Reventador and Tungurahua are not likely to yield tephra

  12. AN OPTIMAL MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT MODEL FOR AIRPORT CONCRETE PAVEMENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Taizo; Fujimori, Yuji; Kaito, Kiyoyuki; Obama, Kengo; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi

    In this paper, an optimal management model is formulated for the performance-based rehabilitation/maintenance contract for airport concrete pavement, whereby two types of life cycle cost risks, i.e., ground consolidation risk and concrete depreciation risk, are explicitly considered. The non-homogenous Markov chain model is formulated to represent the deterioration processes of concrete pavement which are conditional upon the ground consolidation processes. The optimal non-homogenous Markov decision model with multiple types of risk is presented to design the optimal rehabilitation/maintenance plans. And the methodology to revise the optimal rehabilitation/maintenance plans based upon the monitoring data by the Bayesian up-to-dating rules. The validity of the methodology presented in this paper is examined based upon the case studies carried out for the H airport.

  13. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... aircraft removal responsibilities or capabilities. (d) The plan required by this section must provide for...; (2) The removal of disabled aircraft; (3) Emergency alarm or notification systems; and (4... Operating Certificate must hold a full-scale airport emergency plan exercise at least once every...

  14. 75 FR 39090 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... procedures to be used in applications for exemption under the Airport Privatization Pilot Program (62 FR... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... application for participation in the airport privatization pilot program received under 49 U.S.C....

  15. 75 FR 58020 - Notice of Submission Deadline for Schedule Information for O'Hare International Airport, John F...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ...\\ Operating Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport. 73 FR 3,510 (Jan. 18, 2008). 74 FR 51650 (Oct. 7, 2009). Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport. 73 FR 29,550 (May 21, 2008). 74 FR 51648 (Oct. 7, 2009). The FAA is primarily concerned about planned passenger and...

  16. 75 FR 20672 - Notice of Submission Deadline for Schedule Information for O'Hare International Airport, John F...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, 73 FR 3,510 (Jan. 18, 2008); 73 FR 8,737 (Feb. 14, 2008); 74 FR 51,650 (Oct. 7, 2009), (amendments to order). Order Limiting Scheduled Operations at Newark Liberty International Airport, 73 FR 29,550 (May 21, 2008); 74 FR 51,648 (Oct. 7,...

  17. Airport electric vehicle powered by fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontela, Pablo; Soria, Antonio; Mielgo, Javier; Sierra, José Francisco; de Blas, Juan; Gauchia, Lucia; Martínez, Juan M.

    Nowadays, new technologies and breakthroughs in the field of energy efficiency, alternative fuels and added-value electronics are leading to bigger, more sustainable and green thinking applications. Within the Automotive Industry, there is a clear declaration of commitment with the environment and natural resources. The presence of passenger vehicles of hybrid architecture, public transport powered by cleaner fuels, non-aggressive utility vehicles and an encouraging social awareness, are bringing to light a new scenario where conventional and advanced solutions will be in force. This paper presents the evolution of an airport cargo vehicle from battery-based propulsion to a hybrid power unit based on fuel cell, cutting edge batteries and hydrogen as a fuel. Some years back, IBERIA (Major Airline operating in Spain) decided to initiate the replacement of its diesel fleet for battery ones, aiming at a reduction in terms of contamination and noise in the surrounding environment. Unfortunately, due to extreme operating conditions in airports (ambient temperature, intensive use, dirtiness, …), batteries suffered a very severe degradation, which took its toll in terms of autonomy. This reduction in terms of autonomy together with the long battery recharge time made the intensive use of this fleet impractical in everyday demanding conditions.

  18. Ground-source heat pump design and operation -- Experience within an Asian country

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, W.S.

    1998-10-01

    Pacific Rim nations have become dominant as a major market for entrepreneurial persons of industrial countries. During the 1980s and today, a majority of goods and services exported to Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and China are from other Asian countries and the European Union (EU). The author believes advanced US technology and service to be beneficial to both the US and PRC. In the fall of 1987, a 130-ton geothermal heat pump (GHP) system and energy management control (EMC) system were successfully designed, exported, commissioned, and operated for a commercial office building in Shanghai, China. A key factor was the author`s construction management personnel, People`s Republic of China (PRC) engineering professionals, PRC management, and PRC labor personnel. The ground-source heat pump (GSHP) system operated according to specifications during heating and cooling cycle testing within the building. It is understood that the GHP system has had minimum maintenance problems, continues to perform as designed, and provides energy and environmental benefits.

  19. SpaceOps 1992: Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Ground Data Systems for Space Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Second International Symposium featured 135 oral presentations in these 12 categories: Future Missions and Operations; System-Level Architectures; Mission-Specific Systems; Mission and Science Planning and Sequencing; Mission Control; Operations Automation and Emerging Technologies; Data Acquisition; Navigation; Operations Support Services; Engineering Data Analysis of Space Vehicle and Ground Systems; Telemetry Processing, Mission Data Management, and Data Archiving; and Operations Management. Topics focused on improvements in the productivity, effectiveness, efficiency, and quality of mission operations, ground systems, and data acquisition. Also emphasized were accomplishments in management of human factors; use of information systems to improve data retrieval, reporting, and archiving; design and implementation of logistics support for mission operations; and the use of telescience and teleoperations.

  20. Precise Ortho Imagery as the Source for Authoritative Airport Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, H.; Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    As the aviation industry moves from paper maps and charts to the digital cockpit and electronic flight bag, producers of these products need current and accurate data to ensure flight safety. FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) require certified suppliers to follow a defined protocol to produce authoritative map data for the aerodrome. Typical airport maps have been produced to meet 5 m accuracy requirements. The new digital aviation world is moving to 1 m accuracy maps to provide better situational awareness on the aerodrome. The commercial availability of 0.5 m satellite imagery combined with accurate ground control is enabling the production of avionics certified .85 m orthophotos of airports around the globe. CompassData maintains an archive of over 400+ airports as source data to support producers of 1 m certified Aerodrome Mapping Database (AMDB) critical to flight safety and automated situational awareness. CompassData is a DO200A certified supplier of authoritative orthoimagery and attendees will learn how to utilize current airport imagery to build digital aviation mapping products.

  1. Monte Carlo Analysis of Airport Throughput and Traffic Delays Using Self Separation Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Sturdy, James L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of three simulation studies of throughput and delay times of arrival and departure operations performed at non-towered, non-radar airports using self-separation procedures. The studies were conducted as part of the validation process of the Small Aircraft Transportation Systems Higher Volume Operations (SATS HVO) concept and include an analysis of the predicted airport capacity using with different traffic conditions and system constraints under increasing levels of demand. Results show that SATS HVO procedures can dramatically increase capacity at non-towered, non-radar airports and that the concept offers the potential for increasing capacity of the overall air transportation system.

  2. A revolutionary and operational tethered aerostat system illustrating new LTA technology. [for ground-air-ground communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menke, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    An operational tethered aerostat system, which demonstrates utility of LTA systems, is described. It was made possible by development of a reliable tethered aerostat that is used to support broadcast equipment at an altitude of 10,000 feet. Two elements of the TCOM system, the aerostat and mooring station, are particularly relevant to the LTA Workshop. They demonstrate the feasibility of using LTA vehicles in real, operational, all-weather applications and, in addition, illustrate an advance in the overall technology base of LTA. The aerostat and the mooring station, including their technical design features and demonstrated performance characteristics, are described.

  3. Effect of Surface Traffic Count on Taxi Time at Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, Matthew Stephen; Gupta, Gautam

    2008-01-01

    As the amount of air traffic increases over the years, most airports simply do not have the means of expanding to handle the intensified traffic on the surface that will ensue. Precise surveillance equipment and automation concepts, as well as advanced surface traffic algorithms are being developed to improve airport efficiency. These surface algorithms require inputs unique to each airport to ensure maximum efficiency, and minimal taxi delay. This study analyzes surface traffic at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) to determine the effect of the number of aircraft on the surface and the amount of stop and go situations they experience to the amount of additional taxi time encountered. If the surface capacity of an airport is known, minimal delay can be accomplished by limiting the number of taxiing aircraft to that capacity. This concept is related to highways, where traffic flow drastically decreases as more cars occupy the road. An attempt to minimize this effect on highways is seen with the use of metering lights at freeway on-ramps. Since the surface traffic at airports is highly regulated, and aircraft are less mobile on the ground, limiting the surface count to a certain number can greatly reduce the amount of additional taxi time encountered, as well as reduce hazardous emissions. This study will also find the regions of an airport that encounter the most additional taxi time when the number of aircraft in that area is increased. This could help surface traffic algorithms avoid congesting that area, or re-route aircraft to different runways when that area reaches its capacity. The relationship between the amount of stop and go situations an aircraft encounters and their effect on the taxi time of that aircraft will also be investigated. This will help to determine the effect of holding an aircraft on the taxiway as opposed to re-routing it. The lesser of the two should be used when developing surface traffic algorithms to further minimize the

  4. FBO and Airport Internships for University Aviation Students: Benefits for Students, Universities, and the Aviation Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiesse, James L.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes five types of internships for aviation education: job shadowing, departmental rotation, single department based, academic, and specific task. Gives examples in two settings: airports and fixed-base operators. (SK)

  5. Impact of air traffic emissions on airport air quality. Multi-scale modeling, test bed and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.; Vuillot, F.; Durand, Y.; Courbet, B.; Janin, F.; Copalle, A.; Guin, C.; Paux, E.; Vannier, F.; Talbaut, M.; Weill, M.

    2004-12-01

    Air traffic emissions are playing a significant role in airport air quality. Engine emissions contribute to the ozone and PM formation. There is an emergence of a need to develop advanced numerical tools and airport emission databases for air pollution studies. Field monitoring at airports necessary to support model assessment is still limited in time and space. The French ONERA AIRPUR project has focused on three objectives: emission inventories; dispersion models; field measurements. Results are presented and discussed in this paper. The ground spatial distribution of LTO emissions using realistic aircraft trajectories, aircraft-engine classification by ICAO, fuel flow methodology and diurnal variations of fleet number, is presented and discussed. Exhaust species time evolution is simulated using a chemical-dispersion model. Results show high emissions of NOx during LTO, and a maximum of CO and Hydrocarbons during taxi. Depending on seasons, the NOx lifetime is varying differently; lower concentration is calculated far away from LTO emissions. Longer-lived pollutants such as ozone are formed downstream and require the use of advanced dispersion models. For this reason, two interactive models coupling the micro and the regional scales are developed and used in this work. A 3D CFD model (CEDRE) simulates the flow characteristics around buildings and the dispersion of emissions. CEDRE boundary conditions are provided by the 3D nested dispersion model MEDIUM/MM5, which includes a surface boundary layer chemistry and calculates the concentration of pollutants from the local to the airport vicinities. The CFD results show a tracer accumulation calculated downstream beside terminals, consistent with observations at some mega-airports. Sensibility studies are conducted to highlight the impact of emissions on ozone formation with MEDIUM. Results show that longer-lived species are produced downstream, their concentration depending on NOx, aromatics and VOC released by

  6. Ground Operations of the ISS GNC Babb-Mueller Atmospheric Density Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogan, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The ISS GNC system was updated recently with a new software release that provides onboard state determination capability. Prior to this release, only the Russian segment maintained and propagated the onboard state, which was periodically updated through Russian ground tracking. The new software gives the US segment the capability for maintaining the onboard state, and includes new GPS and state vector propagation capabilities. Part of this software package is an atmospheric density model based on the Babb-Mueller algorithm. Babb-Mueller efficiently mimics a full analytical density model, such as the Jacchia model. While lacchia is very robust and is used in the Mission Control Center, it is too computationally intensive for use onboard. Thus, Babb-Mueller was chosen as an alternative. The onboard model depends on a set of calibration coefficients that produce a curve fit to the lacchia model. The ISS GNC system only maintains one set of coefficients onboard, so a new set must be uplinked by controllers when the atmospheric conditions change. The onboard density model provides a real-time density value, which is used to calculate the drag experienced by the ISS. This drag value is then incorporated into the onboard propagation of the state vector. The propagation of the state vector, and therefore operation of the BabbMueller algorithm, will be most critical when GPS updates and secondary state vector sources fail. When GPS is active, the onboard state vector will be updated every ten seconds, so the propagation error is irrelevant. When GPS is inactive, the state vector must be updated at least every 24 hours, based on current protocol. Therefore, the Babb-Mueller coefficients must be accurate enough to fulfill the state vector accuracy requirements for at least one day. A ground operations concept was needed in order to manage both the on board Babb-Mueller density model and the onboard state quality. The Babb-Mueller coefficients can be determined operationally

  7. Final Report for The Creation of a Physics-based Ground-effect Model, Phase 2 - Inclusion of the Effects of Wind, Stratification, and Shear into the New Ground Effect Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarpkaya, Turgut

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of the separation of the leading and following aircrafts is desirable to enhance the airport capacity provided that there is a physics-based operational model applicable to all regions of the flight domain (out of ground effect, OGE; near ground effect, NGE; and in ground effect, IGE) and that the quality of the quantitative input from the measurements of the prevailing atmospheric conditions and the quality of the total airport operations regarding the safety and the sound interpretation of the prevailing conditions match the quality of the analysis and numerical simulations. In the absence of an analytical solution, the physics of the flow is best expressed by a mathematical model based on numerical simulations, field and laboratory experiments, and heuristic reasoning. This report deals with the creation of a sound physics-based real-time IGE model of the aircraft wake vortices subjected to crosswind, stratification and shear.

  8. Developing a Logistics Data Process for Support Equipment for NASA Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, Suman

    2010-01-01

    the design of the equipment can make such operational effort unnecessary. Finally, this paper addresses processes of tying resources to a timeline of tasks performed in ground operations: this enables various overarching analyses, e.g., a summarization of all resources used for a given piece of equipment. Quality Control of data will also be discussed: importing and exporting data from product teams, including spreadsheets-todatabase or data exchange between databases.

  9. Wireless Channel Characterization in the Airport Surface Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, Joshua T.

    2004-01-01

    Given the anticipated increase in air traffic in the coming years, modernization of the National Airspace System (NAS) is a necessity. Part of this modernization effort will include updating current communication, navigation, and surveillance (CNS) systems to deal with the increased traffic as well as developing advanced CNS technologies for the systems. An example of such technology is the integrated CNS (ICNS) network being developed by the Advanced CNS Architecture and Systems Technology (ACAST) group for use in the airport surface environment. The ICNS network would be used to convey voice/data between users in a secure and reliable manner. The current surface system only supports voice and does so through an obsolete physical infrastructure. The old system is vulnerable to outages and costly to maintain. The proposed ICNS network will include a wireless radio link. To ensure optimal performance, a thorough and accurate characterization of the channel across which the link would operate is necessary. The channel is the path the signal takes from the transmitter to the receiver and is prone to various forms of interference. Channel characterization involves a combination of analysis, simulation, and measurement. My work this summer was divided into four tasks. The first task required compiling and reviewing reference material that dealt with the characterization and modeling of aeronautical channels. The second task involved developing a systematic approach that could be used to group airports into classes, e.g. small airfields, medium airports, large open airports, large cluttered airports, etc. The third task consisted of implementing computer simulations of existing channel models. The fourth task entailed measuring possible interference sources in the airport surface environment via a spectrum analyzer.

  10. 19 CFR 122.153 - Limitations on airport of entry or departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Airport. Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Chicago... International Airport. Houston, Texas George Bush Intercontinental Airport. Jamaica, New York John F....

  11. 19 CFR 122.153 - Limitations on airport of entry or departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Airport. Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Chicago... International Airport. Houston, Texas George Bush Intercontinental Airport. Jamaica, New York John F....

  12. Measurements of aircraft emissions indices at airports passive remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Klaus; Jahn, Carsten; Sturm, Peter J.; Lechner, Bernhard; Bacher, Michael

    2003-04-01

    The emission indices of aircraft engine exhausts to calculate precisely the emissions inventories of airports are not available up to now from measurements taken under operating conditions. To determine these data no installations nearby or behind the aircraft are possible at airports. That's why measurements by FTIR emission spectrometry were performed by the IMK-IFU with a spectrometer installed in a van and with total measurement time at one thrust level of about 1 minute to determine CO, NO and CO2. The FTIR instrument telescope was aligned to the engine nozzle exit of standing aircraft. A DOAS and a FTIR spectrometer with globar were used for simultaneous open-path measurements of NO, NO2, CO, CO2 and speciated hydrocarbons behind the aircraft by the TUG-VKMB. Measurement results at the airports Frankfurt/Main, London-Heathrow and Vienna are presented. The methods are evaluated by comparing CO emission indices from passive measurements with open-path data. The measured emission indices of CO show slightly higher values than the International Civil Aviation Organisation data sheets but less values for NOx emissions. A fruitful co-operation with the airlines AUA, BA and DLH as well as the airport authorities in Vienna and London-Heathrow supported this work which is financed from EC.

  13. Airport Surface Delays and Causes: A Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, David K.; Goldberg, Jay; Tang, Tammy

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes FAA Program Analysis and Operations Research Service (ASD-400)/Lockheed Martin activities and findings related to airport surface delays and causes, in support of NASA Langley Research Center's Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program. The activities described in this report were initiated in June 1995. A preliminary report was published on September 30, 1995. The final report incorporates data collection forms filled out by traffic managers, other FAA staff, and an airline for the New York City area, some updates, data previously requested from various sources to support this analysis, and further quantification and documentation than in the preliminary report. This final report is based on data available as of April 12, 1996. This report incorporates data obtained from review and analysis of data bases and literature, discussions/interviews with engineers, air-traffic staff, other FAA technical personnel, and airline staff, site visits, and a survey on surface delays and causes. It includes analysis of delay statistics; preliminary findings and conclusions on surface movement, surface delay sources and causes, runway occupancy time (ROT), and airport characteristics impacting surface operations and delays; and site-specific data on the New York City area airports, which are the focus airports for this report.

  14. Air Traffic Control Response to Delays: A System Study of Newark International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Antony D.; Clarke, John-Paul

    2002-01-01

    Airport delays are a significant problem in the United States air transportation system. Between 1999 and 2000 the number of flights delayed increased by 20 percent despite only a 0.4% increase in total operations. Newark International Airport (EWR), one of New York City's primary airports, is one of the airports in the United States most impacted by delays. Newark had the highest percentage of operations delayed in 1999, and was second only to LaGuardia Airport in 2000. Nearly 85% of delays at Newark are caused by adverse weather impacting an airport that may be characterized as having limited capacity and a very full schedule. Although Newark is heavily impacted by weather, delays have not increased significantly since 1998. This indicates that the airlines, air traffic control (ATC), and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey have successfully adapted. On June 29, 2000, a research team from MIT visited Newark airport to assess the effectiveness of any adaptations made, and to collect data on airline and ATC departure operations, and of the national and local weather affecting the airport. Airline and ATC personnel were also interviewed. Results of this study indicate that airspace capacity limitations downstream of the airport are a primary flow constraint at the airport, and that these constraints are the source of most surface delays. A number of tactical ATC responses to delays were examined, including the application of restrictions, re-routing with the help of the National Playbook, and the use of decision-aiding tools such as the Dynamic Spacing Program (DSP) and the Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS). Improved interfacility communications and further utilization of runway 11-29 were identified as other tactical responses to delays, whilst the formation of the Air Traffic Control System Command Center and the New York Airspace redesign were identified as thekey strategic ATC responses to delays. Particularly the New York airspace redesign has

  15. An integrated transportation and operations comparison of space and ground based OTV's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. E.; Rehder, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparison of space vs. ground basing of orbital transfer vehicles (OTV). The comparison was done assuming an 11-year mission model beginning in 1995 and averaging over 100 MT of payloads per year to GEO. When analyzed from a total transportation standpoint, the launch system employed had the greatest impact on the basing mode comparison. A launch fleet consisting of both a basic STS and a Shuttle derivative cargo vehicle provided the least cost. Only a small advantage (3%) was found in flight performance for the space based (SB) OTV once it incorporated the necessary provisions for space debris protection and on-orbit maintenance. Propellant storage and transfer losses associated with the SB OTV amounted to 12% of the actual flight propellant requirement. Turnaround of the SB OTV required a crew of 3 and 40% duty cycle. The life cycle cost comparison including all involved space elements indicated less than a 10% difference between basing modes. The SB OTV however is judged to provide more flexibility in launch manifesting, simplified recovery operations and greater potential for improvement.

  16. An integrated transportation and operations comparison of space and ground based OTV's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. E.; Rehder, J. J.

    1981-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparison of space vs. ground basing of orbital transfer vehicles (OTV). The comparison was done assuming an 11-year mission model beginning in 1995 and averaging over 100 MT of payloads per year to GEO. When analyzed from a total transportation standpoint, the launch system employed had the greatest impact on the basing mode comparison. A launch fleet consisting of both a basic STS and a Shuttle derivative cargo vehicle provided the least cost. Only a small advantage (3%) was found in flight performance for the space based (SB) OTV once it incorporated the necessary provisions for space debris protection and on-orbit maintenance. Propellant storage and transfer losses associated with the SB OTV amounted to 12% of the actual flight propellant requirement. Turnaround of the SB OTV required a crew of 3 and 40% duty cycle. The life cycle cost comparison including all involved space elements indicated less than a 10% difference between basing modes. The SB OTV however is judged to provide more flexibility in launch manifesting, simplified recovery operations and greater potential for improvement.

  17. Runway Incursion Prevention System: Demonstration and Testing at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Quach, Cuong C.; Young, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was tested at the Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The system integrated airborne and ground components to provide both pilots and controllers with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warning of runway incursions in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted using NASA s Boeing 757 research aircraft and a test van equipped to emulate an incurring aircraft. The system was also demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, DFW flight test activities, and quantitative and qualitative results of the testing.

  18. An Initial Study of Airport Arrival Heinz Capacity Benefits Due to Improved Scheduling Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry; Erzberger, Heinz

    2005-01-01

    The long-term growth rate in air-traffic demand leads to future air-traffic densities that are unmanageable by today's air-traffic control system. I n order to accommodate such growth, new technology and operational methods will be needed in the next generation air-traffic control system. One proposal for such a system is the Automated Airspace Concept (AAC). One of the precepts of AAC is to direct aircraft using trajectories that are sent via an air-ground data link. This greatly improves the accuracy in directing aircraft to specific waypoints at specific times. Studies of the Center-TRACON Automation System (CTAS) have shown that increased scheduling accuracy enables increased arrival capacity at CTAS equipped airports.

  19. Advisory circular. Building for storage and maintenance of airport snow removal and ice control equipment: A guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-03-01

    Standards are suggested for an airport maintenance, storage, and snow removal equipment building that can protect the airport's investment in snow and ice control equipment, as well as in stored ice conrol materials, as well as support safe all-weather aircraft operations. It is advantageous to size the building to include storage for field lighting and other airport maintenance equipment, friction measuring equipment, rubber removal devices, and inspection or bird partol vehicles. Such buildings require site specific design, should be planned by an architectural and engineering firm familiar and airport needs and construction constraints.

  20. A new approach of drawing airport noise contours on computer based on Surfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bang-jun; Guo, Chun-yan; Di, Guo-qing

    2004-01-01

    Noise contours are used to describe the extent of airport noise pollution and to plan land use around airports. The L(WECPN) (weighted equivalent continuous perceive noise level) recommended by ICAO(International Civil Aviation Organization) is adopted as airport noise rating parameter in this paper. With the help of various mathematical models in the software Surfer, noise contours can be drawn automatically by the completed program in Visual C++ Code. Corrections for thrust, velocity, atmospheric temperature, humidity and lateral ground attenuation are also considered in the new method, which can improve the efficiency of drawing contours. An example of its use for drawing noise contours of an airport in Zhejiang Province of China is proposed and the predictions and the measurements show agreements well. PMID:15495959

  1. Enhanced Airport Capacity Through Safe, Dynamic Reductions in Aircraft Separation: NASA's Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, Cornelius J.; Rutishauser, David K.

    2001-01-01

    An aspect of airport terminal operations that holds potential for efficiency improvements is the separation criteria applied to aircraft for wake vortex avoidance. These criteria evolved to represent safe spacing under weather conditions conducive to the longest wake hazards, and are consequently overly conservative during a significant portion of operations. Under many ambient conditions, such as moderate crosswinds or turbulence, wake hazard durations are substantially reduced. To realize this reduction NASA has developed a proof-of-concept Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). Successfully operated in a real-time field demonstration during July 2000 at the Dallas Ft. Worth International Airport, AVOSS is a novel integration of weather sensors, wake sensors, and analytical wake prediction algorithms. Gains in airport throughput using AVOSS spacing as compared to the current criteria averaged 6%, with peak values approaching the theoretical maximum of 16%. The average throughput gain translates to 15-40% reductions in delay when applied to realistic capacity ratios at major airports.

  2. Taxi Time Prediction at Charlotte Airport Using Fast-Time Simulation and Machine Learning Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hanbong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate taxi time prediction is required for enabling efficient runway scheduling that can increase runway throughput and reduce taxi times and fuel consumptions on the airport surface. Currently NASA and American Airlines are jointly developing a decision-support tool called Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) that assists airport ramp controllers to make gate pushback decisions and improve the overall efficiency of airport surface traffic. In this presentation, we propose to use Linear Optimized Sequencing (LINOS), a discrete-event fast-time simulation tool, to predict taxi times and provide the estimates to the runway scheduler in real-time airport operations. To assess its prediction accuracy, we also introduce a data-driven analytical method using machine learning techniques. These two taxi time prediction methods are evaluated with actual taxi time data obtained from the SARDA human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulation for Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) using various performance measurement metrics. Based on the taxi time prediction results, we also discuss how the prediction accuracy can be affected by the operational complexity at this airport and how we can improve the fast time simulation model before implementing it with an airport scheduling algorithm in a real-time environment.

  3. The Santa Maria Ground Station Technical Parameters with Trainee Operation for CubeSat Tracking - Capacity Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manica, Thales Ramos; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Moro, Pietro Fernando; Cupertino Durao, Otavio S.; Farias, Tiago Travi; Mozzaquatro Wendt, João Francisco

    This paper aims to describe the technical parameters of the NANOSATC-BR1's Ground Station (GS) installed at the Southern Regional Space Research Center - CRS/INPE-MCTI, Santa Maria, RS, Southern of Brazil, (29.4245ºS, 53.4303ºW) which is being operated by two UFSM' trainee students financed by the Brazilian Space Agency (AEB), from the INPE-UFSM NANOSATC-BR CubeSat Development Capacity Building Program (CBP). The NANOSATC-BR - CubeSats development Project, consists of two CubeSats, NANOSATC-BR 1 (1U) & 2 (2U) and is expected to operate in orbit for at least 12 months each. The NANOSATC-BR 1 & 2 - CubeSats spaces stations communication subsystems will make the radio down and up data links with the NANOSATC-BR Ground Stations Network. The Ground Station is compatible with on board NANOSAC-BR 1 & 2 systems and also with the GENSO (Global Educational Network for Satellite Operations). It was projected to track LEO (Low Earth Orbit) nanosatellites operating in the IARU (International Amateur Radio Union) VHF and UHF bandwidths and also at S-band frequency. The Program with its NANOSATC-BR Brazilian Ground Stations Network are presented and it has support from The Brazilian Space Agency (AEB).

  4. 1-G Human Factors for Optimal Processing and Operability of Ground Systems Up to CxP GOP PDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Henderson, Gena; Miller, Darcy; Prevost, Gary; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development and use of a process and tool for developing these requirements and improve the design for ground operations. A Human Factors Engineering Analysis (HFEA) Tool was developed to create a dedicated subset of requirements from the FAA requirements for each subsystem. As an example the use of the human interface with an actuator motor is considered.

  5. 14 CFR 152.109 - Project eligibility: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport planning. 152....109 Project eligibility: Airport planning. (a) Airport master planning. A proposed project for airport master planning is not approved unless— (1) The location of the existing or proposed airport is...

  6. Teaching at Logan International Airport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    Although Terminal C at Logan airport does not look like a classroom, for about fifty minutes on this author's way back from Boston it was for him. Like many public spaces, Logan now has a very robust Wi-Fi wireless network and this enabled him to take advantage of a departure delay to "teach" his class. In 1970 when the author started teaching,…

  7. 77 FR 21146 - Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue: Petition of the Clark County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ...On April 14, 2011, the FAA issued a Notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 21,420, April 15, 2011) seeking comment on a petition submitted by Clark County Department of Aviation (CCDOA), owner and operator of Las Vegas McCarran International Airport (Airport). The petition requested a determination by the Federal Aviation Administration (``FAA'') that its proposed air service incentives program......

  8. 77 FR 58608 - Notice of Submission Deadline for Schedule Information for O'Hare International Airport, San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Limitations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, 73 FR 3510 (Jan. 18, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18620 (Apr. 4, 2011); Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport, 73 FR 29550 (May 21, 2008) as amended 76 FR 18618 (Apr. 4, 2011). The FAA is primarily concerned about planned passenger...

  9. Airport noise complaint patterns and interviews of frequent complainers at two major air carrier airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaggers, Nicholas; Eiff, Gary

    2005-09-01

    The complex and highly sensitive topic of aircraft noise and population annoyance continues to be a major inhibitor to airport development plans. The projected growth of air travel necessitates expanded capacity at many existing airports and the development and construction of new airports in order to accommodate burgeoning traveler needs. Concerns by citizens near major airports about their economic, health, and social welfare continue to generate community and individual declarations of annoyance and concern which threaten timely solutions to airport expansion plans. A deeper understanding of the nature of these concerns is important to more effectively cope with airport expansion concerns among adjacent communities and surrounding neighbors. This study analyzed existing noise complaints registered at Denver International Airport (DEN) and Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL) in an attempt to gain greater understanding of noise complaint drivers and public annoyance. Interviews of frequent complainers were utilized in order to gain richer data concerning individual annoyance issues.

  10. 78 FR 22024 - Request To Release Airport Property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL), Oakley, Kansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ...), Oakley, Kansas, under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47107(h)(2). DATES: Comments must be received on or... 2.5 acres of airport property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL) under the provisions of 49...

  11. 76 FR 31823 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport, Dallas, TX AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... revising the list of user fee airports to reflect the recent user fee airport designation for Dallas Love... of user fee status for Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport. This document updates the list of...

  12. Further studies of methods for reducing community noise around airports. [aircraft noise - aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. H.; Barry, D. J.; Kline, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified method of analysis was used in which all flights at a 'simulated' airport were assumed to operate from one runway in a single direction. For this simulated airport, contours of noise exposure forecast were obtained and evaluated. A flight schedule of the simulated airport which is representative of the 23 major U. S. airports was used. The effect of banning night-time operations by four-engine, narrow-body aircraft in combination with other noise reduction options was studied. The reductions in noise which would occur of two- and three-engine, narrow-body aircraft equipped with a refanned engine was examined. A detailed comparison of the effects of engine cutback on takeoff versus the effects of retrofitting quiet nacelles for narrow-body aircraft was also examined. A method of presenting the effects of various noise reduction options was treated.

  13. Miscellaneous information regarding operation and inventory of 618-11 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    This report is a compilation of inventories and radiation surveys taken for the 618-11 Burial Ground at Hanford. This report deals with waste management activities at the facility during the early to mid-1960s.

  14. Airport electrotechnology resource guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Geba, V.; Nesbit, M.

    1998-06-01

    Electrotechnologies offer utilities a cutting edge marketing tool to work with airport customers to increase passenger comfort, and achieve environmental and economic goals. At the same time, utility objectives such as customer retention, and revenue and sales goals can be enhanced. This guide provides electric utility marketing staff with the necessary information to market electrotechnologies in airport applications. The airport industry is profiled and an overview of airport building, infrastructure technologies and electric vehicles is provided. In addition, the guide offers market strategies for customer targeting, market research, market plan development and development of trade ally partnerships.

  15. 76 FR 54287 - Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ..., and the FAA Airports District Office, 5950 Hazeltine National Drive, Suite 400, Orlando, FL 32822... Manager, Orlando Airports District Office, 5950 Hazeltine National Drive, Suite 400, Orlando, FL 32822-5024. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rebecca R. Henry, Program Manager, Orlando Airports...

  16. Ranging airport pseudolite for local area augmentation using the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartone, Chris Gregory

    The Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) is being developed to support precision approach and landing operations in and about the local area surrounding an airport. The LAAS Program is currently under development by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) with Minimum Aviation System Performance Standards for the LAAS being developed by RTCA, Incorporated. The LAAS uses differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and includes one or more airport pseudolites (APL) to increase the availability for certain installations. This dissertation addresses the addition of a differentially corrected, ranging APL into a LAAS. Prior to this work, no ranging APL has been integrated into a prototype LAAS and demonstrated in a real-time flight environment showing that an increase in LAAS availability is feasible. The APL requirements resulted in a prototype APL transmitting and receiving subsystem with a coarse-acquisition (C/A) code format that could be operated at any frequency within the L1± 10.0 MHz band. To investigate the major APL error the developmental approach was performed in two phases. Phase I implemented an APL operating at a center frequency off-L1 and concentrated on multipath limiting. The Phase II on-L1 APL architecture implemented a unique pulsing, automatic gain control (AGC) and GPS Blanker technique in the common reception path to maximize APL signal tracking and minimize electromagnetic interference to DGPS. To minimize ground multipath for the APL geometry, which is more severe than for GPS, a multipath limiting antenna (MLA) was designed, fabricated, and tested within a 4-month period. The implementation of this MLA concept was a first for APL applications and also contributed to the successful multipath limiting of ground multipath at the DGPS LAAS Ground Station. This effort successfully demonstrated that ground multipath can be limited (with low variance and no long-term bias) for the APL geometry and that suitable precision approach performance

  17. 61 FR 25729 - Security Measures; Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-05-22

    ... Security Measures; Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece Summary The Secretary of Transportation has now determined that Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece, maintains and carries out... that Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece, did not maintain and carry out...

  18. 14 CFR 121.203 - Nontransport category airplanes: Landing limitations: Destination airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airport. (a) No person operating a nontransport category airplane may take off that airplane at a weight... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nontransport category airplanes: Landing...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS...

  19. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Ludowise

    2006-12-12

    This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project.

  20. An approach to ground based space surveillance of geostationary on-orbit servicing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Robert (Lauchie); Ellery, Alex

    2015-07-01

    On Orbit Servicing (OOS) is a class of dual-use robotic space missions that could potentially extend the life of orbiting satellites by fuel replenishment, repair, inspection, orbital maintenance or satellite repurposing, and possibly reduce the rate of space debris generation. OOS performed in geostationary orbit poses a unique challenge for the optical space surveillance community. Both satellites would be performing proximity operations in tight formation flight with separations less than 500 m making atmospheric seeing (turbulence) a challenge to resolving a geostationary satellite pair when viewed from the ground. The two objects would appear merged in an image as the resolving power of the telescope and detector, coupled with atmospheric seeing, limits the ability to resolve the two objects. This poses an issue for obtaining orbital data for conjunction flight safety or, in matters pertaining to space security, inferring the intent and trajectory of an unexpected object perched very close to one's satellite asset on orbit. In order to overcome this problem speckle interferometry using a cross spectrum approach is examined as a means to optically resolve the client and servicer's relative positions to enable a means to perform relative orbit determination of the two spacecraft. This paper explores cases where client and servicing satellites are in unforced relative motion flight and examines the observability of the objects. Tools are described that exploit cross-spectrum speckle interferometry to (1) determine the presence of a secondary in the vicinity of the client satellite and (2) estimate the servicing satellite's motion relative to the client. Experimental observations performed with the Mont Mégantic 1.6 m telescope on co-located geostationary satellites (acting as OOS proxy objects) are described. Apparent angular separations between Anik G1 and Anik F1R from 5 to 1 arcsec were observed as the two satellites appeared to graze one another. Data