Science.gov

Sample records for airport movement area

  1. Enhancing pilot situational awareness of the airport surface movement area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. R.; Young, S. D.

    1994-01-01

    Two studies are being conducted to address airport surface movement area safety and capacity issues by providing enhanced situational awareness information to pilots. One study focuses on obtaining pilot opinion of the Runway Status Light System (RSLS). This system has been designed to reduce the likelihood of runway incursions by informing pilots when a runway is occupied. The second study is a flight demonstration of an rate integrated system consisting of an electronic moving map in the cockpit and display of the aircraft identification to the controller. Taxi route and hold warning information will be sent to the aircraft data link for display on the electronic moving map. This paper describes the plans for the two studies.

  2. Airport Surface Movement Technologies: Atlanta Demonstrations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted in August 1997 at the Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) International Airport as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. This research was aimed at investigating technology to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft movements on the surface during the operational phases of roll-out, turnoff, and taxi in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. The system tested at ATL was composed of airborne and ground-based components that were integrated to provide both the flight crew and controllers with supplemental information to enable safe, expedient surface operations. Experimental displays were installed on a Boeing 757-200 research aircraft in both headup and head-down formats. On the ground, an integrated system maintained surveillance of the airport surface and a controller interface provided routing and control instructions. While at ATL, the research aircraft performed a series of flight and taxi operations to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. The concept was demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the LVLASO system and ATL test activities.

  3. 14 CFR 121.445 - Pilot in command airport qualification: Special areas and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot in command airport qualification: Special areas and airports. 121.445 Section 121.445 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Qualifications § 121.445 Pilot in command airport qualification: Special areas and airports. (a)...

  4. 14 CFR 121.445 - Pilot in command airport qualification: Special areas and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pilot in command airport qualification: Special areas and airports. 121.445 Section 121.445 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Qualifications § 121.445 Pilot in command airport qualification: Special areas and airports. (a)...

  5. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Movement Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Atlanta Hartsfield International Airport in Atlanta, GA. The test aircraft was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. Qualitative and quantitative results are discussed.

  6. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery of Airports and Surrounding Areas: Denver Stapleton International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.

    1990-01-01

    This is the third in a series of three reports which address the statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data were collected at the Denver Stapleton Airport using a set of parameters which closely match those which are anticipated to be utilized by an aircraft on approach to an airport. These data and the results of the clutter study are described. Scenes of 13 x 10 km were imaged at 9.38 GHz and HH-, VV-, and HV-polarizations, and contain airport grounds and facilities (up to 14 percent), cultural areas (more than 50 percent), and rural areas (up to 6 percent). Incidence angles range from 40 to 84 deg. At the largest depression angles the distributed targets, such as forest, fields, water, and residential, rarely had mean scattering coefficients greater than -10 dB. From 30 to 80 percent of an image had scattering coefficients less than -20 dB. About 1 to 10 percent of the scattering coefficients exceeded 0 dB, and from 0 to 1 percent above 10 dB. In examining the average backscatter coefficients at large angles, the clutter types cluster according to the following groups: (1) terminals (-3 dB), (2) city and industrial (-7 dB), (3) warehouse (-10 dB), (4) urban and residential (-14 dB), and (5) grass (-24 dB).

  7. Synthetic aperture radar imagery of airports and surrounding areas: Philadelphia Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.

    1990-01-01

    The statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area is addressed. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data were collected at the Philadelphia Airport. These data and the results of the clutter study are described. This 13 km x 10 km scene was imaged at 9.38 GHz and HH-polarization and contained airport grounds and facilities (6 percent), industrial (14 percent), residential (14 percent), fields (10 percent), forest (8 percent), and water (33 percent). Incidence angles ranged from 40 to 84 deg. Even at the smallest incidence angles, the distributed targets such as forest, fields, water, and residential rarely had mean scattering coefficients greater than -10 dB. Eighty-seven percent of the image had scattering coefficients less than -17.5 dB. About 1 percent of the scattering coefficients exceeded 0 dB, with about 0.1 percent above 10 dB. Sources which produced the largest cross sections were largely confined to the airport grounds and areas highly industrialized. The largest cross sections were produced by observing broadside large buildings surrounded by smooth surfaces.

  8. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of land uses in airport..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND ACCESS RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.11 Identification of land uses in airport noise study area. For...

  9. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 113 - Airport Customs Security Area Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Airport Customs Security Area Bond A Appendix A to... OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Pt. 113, App. A Appendix A to Part 113—Airport Customs Security Area Bond Airport Customs Security Area Bond (name of principal) of and (name of surety) of are held...

  10. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... noise study area. 161.11 Section 161.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND ACCESS RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.11 Identification of land uses in airport noise study area. For...

  11. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... noise study area. 161.11 Section 161.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND ACCESS RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.11 Identification of land uses in airport noise study area. For...

  12. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... noise study area. 161.11 Section 161.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND ACCESS RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.11 Identification of land uses in airport noise study area. For...

  13. Airport Choice in Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area: An Application of the Conditional Logit Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Marcelo Baena; Muller, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Using the conditional LOGIT model, this paper addresses the airport choice in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area. In this region, Guarulhos International Airport (GRU) and Congonhas Airport (CGH) compete for passengers flying to several domestic destinations. The airport choice is believed to be a result of the tradeoff passengers perform considering airport access characteristics, airline level of service characteristics and passenger experience with the analyzed airports. It was found that access time to the airports better explain the airport choice than access distance, whereas direct flight frequencies gives better explanation to the airport choice than the indirect (connections and stops) and total (direct plus indirect) flight frequencies. Out of 15 tested variables, passenger experience with the analyzed airports was the variable that best explained the airport choice in the region. Model specifications considering 1, 2 or 3 variables were tested. The model specification most adjusted to the observed data considered access time, direct flight frequencies in the travel period (morning or afternoon peak) and passenger experience with the analyzed airports. The influence of these variables was therefore analyzed across market segments according to departure airport and flight duration criteria. The choice of GRU (located neighboring Sao Paulo city) is not well explained by the rationality of access time economy and the increase of the supply of direct flight frequencies, while the choice of CGH (located inside Sao Paulo city) is. Access time was found to be more important to passengers flying shorter distances while direct flight frequencies in the travel period were more significant to those flying longer distances. Keywords: Airport choice, Multiple airport region, Conditional LOGIT model, Access time, Flight frequencies, Passenger experience with the analyzed airports, Transportation planning

  14. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Identification of land uses in airport noise study area. 161.11 Section 161.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.11 Identification of land uses in airport noise study area. For...

  15. Wireless Channel Characterization in the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Airport Surface Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David W.

    2007-01-01

    In this project final report, entitled "Wireless Channel Characterization in the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Airport Surface Areas," we provide a detailed description and model representation for the wireless channel in the airport surface environment in this band. In this executive summary, we review report contents, describe the achieved objectives and major findings, and highlight significant conclusions and recommendations.

  16. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 113 - Airport Customs Security Area Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Airport Customs Security Area Bond A Appendix A to Part 113 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Pt. 113, App. A Appendix A to Part 113—Airport Customs Security...

  17. Environmental Assessment for Terminal Area Improvements, Charleston International Airport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-17

    Hazardous Wildlife Attractants on or Near Airports . 5. Should unanticipated discovery of archaeological materials occurs during construction or...III-15 3.6 3.7 3.8 Historic, Archaeological ...Fish, Wildlife, and Plants ........................................................................................ N-8 4.9 Historical, Archaeological

  18. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability on or Near the Airport Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David F.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. In this report, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS). CAAT research is conducted jointly under NASA's Airspace Systems Program, Airportal Project and the Aviation Safety Program, Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Project.

  19. Assessing coastal flood risk and sea level rise impacts at New York City area airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, K. A.; Kimball, N.; Osler, M.; Eberbach, S.

    2014-12-01

    Flood risk and sea level rise impacts were assessed for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) at four airports in the New York City area. These airports included John F. Kennedy International, LaGuardia, Newark International, and Teterboro Airports. Quantifying both present day and future flood risk due to climate change and developing flood mitigation alternatives is crucial for the continued operation of these airports. During Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 all four airports were forced to shut down, in part due to coastal flooding. Future climate change and sea level rise effects may result in more frequent shutdowns and disruptions in travel to and from these busy airports. The study examined the effects of the 1%-annual-chance coastal flooding event for present day existing conditions and six different sea level rise scenarios at each airport. Storm surge model outputs from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provided the present day storm surge conditions. 50th and 90thpercentile sea level rise projections from the New York Panel on Climate Change (NPCC) 2013 report were incorporated into storm surge results using linear superposition methods. These projections were evaluated for future years 2025, 2035, and 2055. In addition to the linear superposition approach for storm surge at airports where waves are a potential hazard, one dimensional wave modeling was performed to get the total water level results. Flood hazard and flood depth maps were created based on these results. In addition to assessing overall flooding at each airport, major at-risk infrastructure critical to the continued operation of the airport was identified and a detailed flood vulnerability assessment was performed. This assessment quantified flood impacts in terms of potential critical infrastructure inundation and developed mitigation alternatives to adapt to coastal flooding and future sea level changes. Results from this project are advancing the PANYNJ

  20. 75 FR 19422 - Notice of Closure of Airport Mesa/Carizzo Creek Shooting Area in Eastern San Diego County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Closure of Airport Mesa/Carizzo Creek Shooting Area in Eastern San... as the Airport Mesa/Carrizo Creek shooting area located in eastern San Diego County, California. The closure order prohibits recreational shooting and target practice. The use of firearms will continue to...

  1. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area....

  2. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area....

  3. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area....

  4. The effect of airplane noise on the inhabitants of areas near Okecie Airport in Warsaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koszarny, Z.; Maziarka, S.; Szata, W.

    1981-01-01

    The state of health and noise annoyance among persons living in areas near Okecie airport exposed to various intensities of noise was evaluated. Very high annoyance effects of airplane noise of intensities over 100 dB (A) were established. A connection between the airplane noise and certain ailments complained about by the inhabitants was demonstrated.

  5. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems. 1544.231 Section 1544.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  6. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems. 1544.231 Section 1544.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  7. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems. 1544.231 Section 1544.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  8. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems. 1544.231 Section 1544.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  9. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems. 1544.231 Section 1544.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  10. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flushing Bay near La Guardia... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. (a... side of the extended center line of Runway No. 13-31 at La Guardia Airport. (b) The regulations....

  11. Terminal Area Productivity Airport Wind Analysis and Chicago O'Hare Model Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemm, Robert; Shapiro, Gerald

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes two results from a continuing effort to provide accurate cost-benefit analyses of the NASA Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program technologies. Previous tasks have developed airport capacity and delay models and completed preliminary cost benefit estimates for TAP technologies at 10 U.S. airports. This task covers two improvements to the capacity and delay models. The first improvement is the completion of a detailed model set for the Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airport. Previous analyses used a more general model to estimate the benefits for ORD. This paper contains a description of the model details with results corresponding to current conditions. The second improvement is the development of specific wind speed and direction criteria for use in the delay models to predict when the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) will allow use of reduced landing separations. This paper includes a description of the criteria and an estimate of AVOSS utility for 10 airports based on analysis of 35 years of weather data.

  12. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability On or Near the Airport Surface, Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. The term ATMA was created to reflect the fact that the CD&R concept area of operation is focused near the airport within the terminal maneuvering area. In the following, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS).

  13. 77 FR 68813 - Notice of Closure of Airport Mesa/Carizzo Creek Shooting Area in Eastern San Diego County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Closure of Airport Mesa/Carizzo Creek Shooting Area in Eastern San.../Carrizo Creek shooting area located in eastern San Diego County, California. The closure order prohibits recreational shooting and target practice. The use of firearms will continue to be allowed for...

  14. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND...

  15. Ranging airport pseudolite for local area augmentation using the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartone, Chris Gregory

    The Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) is being developed to support precision approach and landing operations in and about the local area surrounding an airport. The LAAS Program is currently under development by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) with Minimum Aviation System Performance Standards for the LAAS being developed by RTCA, Incorporated. The LAAS uses differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and includes one or more airport pseudolites (APL) to increase the availability for certain installations. This dissertation addresses the addition of a differentially corrected, ranging APL into a LAAS. Prior to this work, no ranging APL has been integrated into a prototype LAAS and demonstrated in a real-time flight environment showing that an increase in LAAS availability is feasible. The APL requirements resulted in a prototype APL transmitting and receiving subsystem with a coarse-acquisition (C/A) code format that could be operated at any frequency within the L1± 10.0 MHz band. To investigate the major APL error the developmental approach was performed in two phases. Phase I implemented an APL operating at a center frequency off-L1 and concentrated on multipath limiting. The Phase II on-L1 APL architecture implemented a unique pulsing, automatic gain control (AGC) and GPS Blanker technique in the common reception path to maximize APL signal tracking and minimize electromagnetic interference to DGPS. To minimize ground multipath for the APL geometry, which is more severe than for GPS, a multipath limiting antenna (MLA) was designed, fabricated, and tested within a 4-month period. The implementation of this MLA concept was a first for APL applications and also contributed to the successful multipath limiting of ground multipath at the DGPS LAAS Ground Station. This effort successfully demonstrated that ground multipath can be limited (with low variance and no long-term bias) for the APL geometry and that suitable precision approach performance

  16. Assessing the Impacts of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on Particulate Matter and Ozone in Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Alper; Odman, M. Talat; Russell, Armistead G.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine, through modeling, the impact of aircraft emissions on regional air quality, especially in regard to fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) as well as ozone and other pollutants. For this, we focused on Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport which is the busiest airport in the world based on passenger traffic (AIC, 2003). Hartsfield-Jackson serves the metropolitan Atlanta area where air quality does not meet national standards. Emissions from mobile and industrial sources (including several large electric power generating utilities) are the major contributors to the area's air pollution. In this study, we assessed the impact of Hartsfield-Jackson Airport on air quality around Atlanta, Georgia, and compared it to the impacts of other emission sources in the area. The assessment was built upon other, related air quality studies involving both field and modeling components. To achieve the objectives, first a detailed inventory was developed for aircraft and other emissions at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Then, air quality simulations were performed to relate these emissions to regional air quality around Atlanta. The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) was used as the modeling platform. The period of August 11-20 2000 was selected as the episode to be modeled in this study. Prior modeling of this episode during the Fall Line Air Quality Study (FAQS) and availability of additional PM(2.5) measurements for evaluation played a major role in this selection. Meteorological data for this episode as well as emission data for sources other than aircrafts were already available from FAQS.

  17. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  18. 76 FR 27743 - Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Assessment for a Proposed Airport Traffic Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... visibility and improve safety of airport movement areas, have the capability to meet existing and future...-day public comment period at the following libraries: Champaign Public Library, 200 W Green...

  19. Parieto-premotor areas mediate directional interference during bimanual movements.

    PubMed

    Wenderoth, Nicole; Debaere, Filiep; Sunaert, Stefan; van Hecke, Paul; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2004-10-01

    In bimanual movements, interference emerges when limbs are moved simultaneously along incompatible directions. The neural substrate and mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare brain activation during directional incompatible versus compatible bimanual movements. Our main results were that directional interference emerges primarily within superior parietal, intraparietal and dorsal premotor areas of the right hemisphere. The same areas were also activated when the unimanual subtasks were executed in isolation. In light of previous findings in monkeys and humans, we conclude that directional interference activates a parieto-premotor circuit that is involved in the control of goal-directed movements under somatosensory guidance. Moreover, our data suggest that the parietal cortex might represent an important locus for integrating spatial aspects of the limbs' movements into a common action. It is hypothesized to be the candidate structure from where interference arises when directionally incompatible movements are performed. We discuss the possibility that interference emerges when computational resources in these parietal areas are insufficient to code two incompatible movement directions independently from each other.

  20. Total and size-resolved particle number and black carbon concentrations in urban areas near Schiphol airport (the Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuken, M. P.; Moerman, M.; Zandveld, P.; Henzing, J. S.; Hoek, G.

    2015-03-01

    The presence of black carbon, and size-resolved and total particle number concentrations (PNC) were investigated in the vicinity of Schiphol airport in the Netherlands, the fourth busiest airport in Europe. Continuous measurements were conducted between March and May 2014 at Adamse Bos, located 7 km from Schiphol, and in 2012 at Cabauw, a regional background site 40 km south of Schiphol. No significantly elevated black carbon levels were found near Schiphol. However, PNC increased during periods in which the wind direction was from Schiphol: at Cabauw by 20% and at Adamse Bos by a factor of three, from 14,100 (other wind directions) to 42,000 # cm-3 between 06.00 and 23.00. The size distribution of Schiphol-related PNC was dominated by ultrafine particles, ranging from 10 to 20 nm. Four relevant particle number (PN) emission sources at Schiphol were identified as being responsible for the elevated PNC levels at Adamse Bos: take-off and climb-out on the Kaagbaan and Aalsmeerbaan runways, planes waiting at the gates, and landing on the Buitenveldertbaan runway. PN emissions from road traffic at and near the airport were less important than air traffic. The exposure to Schiphol-related PNC in urban areas northeast of Schiphol in Amsterdam and Amstelveen was estimated for 2012 using a Gaussian Plume model. The results showed that a considerable number of the 555,000 addresses in the modelling domain were exposed to elevated PNC. For example: 45,000 addresses suffered long-term exposure to an additional annual background PNC of 5-10,000 # cm-3 originating from Schiphol and 60,000 addresses suffered short-term exposure (14% of the time) of additional 10-15,000 # cm-3 originating from Schiphol. Further research on emission sources and the dispersion of PN is recommended and may support future studies on eventual health effects.

  1. Synthetic aperture radar imagery of airports and surrounding areas: Study of clutter at grazing angles and their polarimetric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.; Clinthorne, James T.

    1991-01-01

    The statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area is addressed. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic aperture radar data were collected at the Denver Stapleton Airport. Mountain terrain data were examined to determine if they may potentially contribute to range ambiguity problems and degrade microburst detection. Results suggest that mountain clutter may not present a special problem source. The examination of clutter at small grazing angles was continued by examining data collected at especially low altitudes. Cultural objects such as buildings produce strong sources of backscatter at angles of about 85 deg, with responses of 30 dB to 60 dB above the background. Otherwise there are a few sources which produce significant scatter. The polarization properties of hydrospheres and clutter were examined with the intent of determining the optimum polarization. This polarization was determined to be dependent upon the ratio of VV and HH polarizations of both rain and ground clutter.

  2. Progress on the Development of Future Airport Surface Wireless Communications Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Budinger, James M.; Brooks, David E.; Franklin, Morgan; DeHart, Steve; Dimond, Robert P.; Borden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Continuing advances in airport surface management and improvements in airport surface safety are required to enable future growth in air traffic throughout the airspace, as airport arrival and departure delays create a major system bottleneck. These airport management and safety advances will be built upon improved communications, navigation, surveillance, and weather sensing, creating an information environment supporting system automation. The efficient movement of the digital data generated from these systems requires an underlying communications network infrastructure to connect data sources with the intended users with the required quality of service. Current airport surface communications consists primarily of buried copper or fiber cable. Safety related communications with mobile airport surface assets occurs over 25 kHz VHF voice and data channels. The available VHF spectrum, already congested in many areas, will be insufficient to support future data traffic requirements. Therefore, a broadband wireless airport surface communications network is considered a requirement for the future airport component of the air transportation system. Progress has been made on defining the technology and frequency spectrum for the airport surface wireless communications network. The development of a test and demonstration facility and the definition of required testing and standards development are now underway. This paper will review the progress and planned future work.

  3. Concentration of 1,4-Dioxane in Wells Sampled During 2002-2009 in the Vicinity of the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund Site, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillman, Fred D

    2010-01-01

    Extensive groundwater contamination resulting from industrial activities led to the listing of the Tucson International Airport Area as a Superfund Site in 1983. Early investigations revealed elevated levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including the chlorinated solvents trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) in wells in the area. Several responsible parties were identified and cleanup activities were begun in the late 1980s using technology designed for removal of VOCs. In 2002, the compound 1,4-dioxane was discovered in wells in the Tucson Airport Remediation Project (TARP) area. Since then, 1,4-dioxane has been detected throughout the TARP area, in some cases exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) drinking water advisory level of 3 ?g/L.

  4. Integrated Airport Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczo, S.

    1998-01-01

    The current air traffic environment in airport terminal areas experiences substantial delays when weather conditions deteriorate to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Research activity at NASA has culminated in the development, flight test and demonstration of a prototype Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) system. A NASA led industry team and the FAA developed the system which integrated airport surface surveillance systems, aeronautical data links, DGPS navigation, automation systems, and controller and flight deck displays. The LVLASO system was demonstrated at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport using a Boeing 757-200 aircraft during August, 1997. This report documents the contractors role in this testing particularly in the area of data link and DGPS navigation.

  5. A Terminal Area Analysis of Continuous Ascent Departure Fuel Use at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Keenan; Robinson, John E., III

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft departing from the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) encounter vertical restrictions that prevent continuous ascent operations. The result of these restrictions are temporary level-offs at 10,000 feet. A combination of flow direction, specific Area Navigation (RNAV) route geometry, and arrival streams have been found to be the biggest factors in the duration and frequency of a temporary level-offs. In total, 20% of DFW departures are affected by these level-offs, which have an average duration of just over 100 seconds. The use of continuous descent approaches at DFW are shown to lessen the impact arrivals have on the departures and allow more continuous ascents. The fuel used in a continuous ascent and an ascent with a temporary level-off have been calculated using a fuel burn rate model created from a combination of actual aircraft track data, aircraft manufacturer flight operations manuals, and Eurocontrol's Base of Aircraft Data (BADA) simulation tool. This model represents the average aggregate burn rates for the current fleet mix at DFW. Continuous ascents would save approximately seven gallons of fuel out of 450 gallons used to climb to a cruise altitude of 31,000ft per departure.

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Tucson International Airport Area, Operable Unit 3 (AFP 44), Tucson, AZ, September 28, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-05-01

    Air Force Plant 44 (AFP 44) is located within the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund Site, Tucson, Arizona, and is identified as such on the National Priorities List. The Air Force has decided that excavation and offsite disposal in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Class I landfill with solidification/stabilization (S/S) is the preferred remedy for excavated metals-contaminated materials under CERCLA for these three specific sites and sources.

  7. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Tobiason

    2001-07-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the remediation activities performed and the results of verification sampling conducted at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box. The CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1) and consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 22-03-01- Sewage Lagoon (CAU 230); and 22-99-01- Strainer Box (CAU 320). Included with CAS 22-99-01 is a buried Imhoff tank and a sludge bed. These CAUs will be collectively referred to in this plan as the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. Site characterization activities were done during September 1999. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) indicated that only the sludge bed (CAS 22-99-01) contained constituents of concern (COC) above action levels and required remediation (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 2000a).

  8. Flight demonstration of integrated airport surface automation concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1995-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted to address airport surface movement area capacity issues by providing pilots with enhanced situational awareness information. The demonstration showed an integration of several technologies to government and industry representatives. These technologies consisted of an electronic moving map display in the cockpit, a Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) receiver, a high speed VHF data link, an ASDE-3 radar, and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS). Aircraft identification was presented to an air traffic controller on AMASS. The onboard electronic map included the display of taxi routes, hold instructions, and clearances, which were sent to the aircraft via data link by the controller. The map also displayed the positions of other traffic and warning information, which were sent to the aircraft automatically from the ASDE-3/AMASS system. This paper describes the flight demonstration in detail, along with preliminary results.

  9. Noise zoning around airports in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, F. W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The situation in the Netherlands with respect to noise abatement is dominated by a steadily increasing activity both at the political and the administrative level. A new law with respect to the designation of noise zones around existing and future airports and military airfields was enacted on 1 October 1978. A comprehensive new noise nuisance act was signed by the Queen on 16 February 1979. Both laws were accepted by Parliament unanimously. This article describes the new regulations with respect to noise zoning around airports. To maintain the habitability of the environment around airports, a demarcation will be made between the interest of the people living there and those of aviation. A noise zone will be designated outside which the noise load from aircraft movements may not exceed a fixed maximum. Within this area, where a noise load above the fixed maximum is allowed, planning and building design measures will have to be taken. Although the exclusion of new housing within the noise zone is an essential element, the area will be used for other purposes by exchanging previously intended developments with those from areas outside the zone. The Minister in charge of physical planning will issue directives concerning the contents of local development plans and will indicate how such plans, once amended, should be put into effect. Termination of the use or habitation of existing buildings is possible as well as soundproofing of buildings. The costs of measures taken to prevent undesirable new developments and measures taken to improve the existing state of affairs are borne by the central government. But a charge has to be paid by the users of the airports to defray the costs.

  10. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Technologies for Increased Capacity and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.; Wills, Robert W.; Smith, Kathryn A.; Shipman, Floyd S.; Bryant, Wayne H.; Eckhardt, Dave E., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted to address airport surface movement area capacity and safety issues by providing pilots with enhanced situational awareness information. The demonstration presented an integration of several technologies to government and industry representatives. These technologies consisted of an electronic moving map display in the cockpit, a Differential Global Positioning system (DGPS) receiver, a high speed very high frequency (VHF) data link, an Airport Surface Detection Equipment (ASDE-3) radar, and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS). Aircraft identification was presented to an air traffic controller on an AMASS display. The onboard electronic map included the display of taxi routes, hold instructions, and clearances, which were sent to the aircraft via data link by the controller. The map also displayed the positions of other traffic and warning information, which were sent to the aircraft automatically from the ASDE-3/AMASS system. This paper describes the flight demonstration in detail, along with test results.

  11. Airport Surface Delays and Causes: A Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, David K.; Goldberg, Jay; Tang, Tammy

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes FAA Program Analysis and Operations Research Service (ASD-400)/Lockheed Martin activities and findings related to airport surface delays and causes, in support of NASA Langley Research Center's Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program. The activities described in this report were initiated in June 1995. A preliminary report was published on September 30, 1995. The final report incorporates data collection forms filled out by traffic managers, other FAA staff, and an airline for the New York City area, some updates, data previously requested from various sources to support this analysis, and further quantification and documentation than in the preliminary report. This final report is based on data available as of April 12, 1996. This report incorporates data obtained from review and analysis of data bases and literature, discussions/interviews with engineers, air-traffic staff, other FAA technical personnel, and airline staff, site visits, and a survey on surface delays and causes. It includes analysis of delay statistics; preliminary findings and conclusions on surface movement, surface delay sources and causes, runway occupancy time (ROT), and airport characteristics impacting surface operations and delays; and site-specific data on the New York City area airports, which are the focus airports for this report.

  12. Measuring ground movement in geothermal areas of Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, B. E.

    1974-01-01

    Significant ground movement may accompany the extraction of large quantities of fluids from the subsurface. In Imperial Valley, California, one of the potential hazards of geothermal development is the threat of both subsidence and horizontal movement of the land surface. Regional and local survey nets are being monitored to detect and measure possible ground movement caused by future geothermal developments. Precise measurement of surface and subsurface changes will be required to differentiate man-induced changes from natural processes in this tectonically active region.

  13. 7 CFR 301.75-7 - Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-7 Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a quarantined area. (a) Regulated fruit produced in a quarantined area or moved into a...

  14. 7 CFR 301.75-7 - Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-7 Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a quarantined area. (a) Regulated fruit produced in a quarantined area or moved into a...

  15. 7 CFR 301.75-7 - Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-7 Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a quarantined area. (a) Regulated fruit produced in a quarantined area or moved into a...

  16. 7 CFR 301.75-7 - Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-7 Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a quarantined area. (a) Regulated fruit produced in a quarantined area or moved into a...

  17. 7 CFR 301.75-7 - Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-7 Interstate movement of regulated fruit from a quarantined area. (a) Regulated fruit produced in a quarantined area or moved into a...

  18. 9 CFR 72.6 - Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from... ANIMAL PRODUCTS BOVINE BABESIOSIS § 72.6 Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks. Cattle in quarantined areas where tick eradication is not being conducted 3 may be...

  19. 9 CFR 72.6 - Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.6 Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks. Cattle in quarantined areas where tick eradication is not being conducted...

  20. 9 CFR 72.6 - Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.6 Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks. Cattle in quarantined areas where tick eradication is not being conducted...

  1. 9 CFR 72.6 - Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.6 Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks. Cattle in quarantined areas where tick eradication is not being conducted...

  2. 9 CFR 72.6 - Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of cattle from... ANIMAL PRODUCTS TEXAS (SPLENETIC) FEVER IN CATTLE § 72.6 Interstate movement of cattle from quarantined areas not eradicating ticks. Cattle in quarantined areas where tick eradication is not being conducted...

  3. Supersonics--Airport Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2007-01-01

    At this, the first year-end meeting of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, an overview of the Airport Noise discipline of the Supersonics Project leads the presentation of technical plans and achievements in this area of the Project. The overview starts by defining the Technical Challenges targeted by Airport Noise efforts, and the Approaches planned to meet these challenges. These are fleshed out in Elements, namely Prediction, Diagnostics, and Engineering, and broken down into Tasks. The Tasks level is where individual researchers' work is defined and from whence the technical presentations to follow this presentation come. This overview also presents the Milestones accomplished to date and to be completed in the next year. Finally, the NASA Research Announcement cooperative agreement activities are covered and tied to the Tasks and Milestones.

  4. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  5. Airport technology international 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiorcopulo, George

    The present survey of developments in airport technologies and their management discusses airport extensions and upgradings, airport developments in China, polluter penalization, airport effects on environments, European ground-handling methods, ATC in Europe, EC duty-free sales at airports, and the privatization of airport security. Also discussed are airport advertising, new alternatives in air-cargo handling, ATC training, taxi-guidance systems, and the reduction of fuel consumption and emissions on the ground. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  6. FAA Airport Design Competition for Universities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Raise awareness of the importance of airports to the National Airspace System infrastructure. Increase the involvement of the academic community in addressing airport operations and infrastructure issues and needs. Engage U.S. students in the conceptualization of applications, systems and equipment capable of addressing related challenges in a robust, reliable and comprehensive manner. Encourage U.S. undergraduate and graduate students to contribute innovative ideas and solutions to airport and runway safety issues. Provide the framework and incentives for quality educational experiences for university students. d Develop an awareness of and an interest in airports as a vital and interesting area for engineering and technology careers.

  7. Flight Testing of an Airport Surface Guidance, Navigation, and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 (B-757) research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport (ATL) in Atlanta, GA. The B-757 was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range (RVR) of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. The integrated ground and airborne components resulted in a system that has the potential to significantly improve the safety and efficiency of airport surface movements particularly as weather conditions deteriorate. Several advanced technologies were employed to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate flight simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. Results show that while the maturity of some of the technologies does not permit immediate implementation, the operational concept is valid and the performance is more than adequate in many areas.

  8. Airport-related air pollution and noise.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beverly S; Bronzaft, Arline L; Heikkinen, Maire; Goodman, Jerome; Nádas, Arthur

    2008-02-01

    To provide quantitative evidence of the impact on people of a neighboring metropolitan airport, La Guardia Airport (LGA) in New York City, (1) airborne particulate matter (PM) was measured to determine whether concentration differences could be detected between homes that are upwind and downwind of the airport; (2) 24-hr noise measurements were made in 12 homes near the airport; and (3) the impact of noise was assessed by a Community Wellness and Health Promotion Survey. Particulate matter concentrations were higher during active airport operating hours than during nonoperating hours, and the percent increase varied inversely with distance from the airport. Hourly differences between paired upwind and downwind sites were not remarkable. Residents living near the airport were exposed to noise levels as much as four times greater than those experienced by residents in a quiet, comparison home. Impulse noise events were detected from both aircraft and vehicular traffic. More than 55% of the people living within the flight path were bothered by aircraft noise, and 63% by highway noise; these were significantly higher percentages than for residents in the nonflight area. The change in PM concentrations with distance during operating compared with nonoperating hours; traffic-related impulse noise events; and the elevated annoyance with highway noise, as well as aircraft noise among residents in the flight path area, show airport-related motor vehicle traffic to be a major contributor to the negative impact of airports on people in the surrounding communities.

  9. Bird Activity Analysis Using Avian Radar Information in Naval Air Station airport, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Herricks, E.

    2010-12-01

    The number of bird strikes on aircraft has increased sharply over recent years and airport bird hazard management has gained increasing attention in wildlife management and control. Evaluation of bird activity near airport is very critical to analyze the hazard of bird strikes. Traditional methods for bird activity analysis using visual counting provide a direct approach to bird hazard assessment. However this approach is limited to daylight and good visual conditions. Radar has been proven to be a useful and effective tool for bird detection and movement analysis. Radar eliminates observation bias and supports consistent data collection for bird activity analysis and hazard management. In this study bird activity data from the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island was collected by Accipiter Avian Radar System. Radar data was pre-processed by filtering out non-bird noises, including traffic vehicle, aircraft, insects, wind, rainfall, ocean waves and so on. Filtered data is then statistically analyzed using MATLAB programs. The results indicated bird movement dynamics in target areas near the airport, which includes (1) the daily activity varied at dawn and dusk; (2) bird activity varied by target area due to the habitat difference; and (3) both temporal and spatial movement patterns varied by bird species. This bird activity analysis supports bird hazard evaluation and related analysis and modeling to provide very useful information in airport bird hazard management planning.

  10. Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Lynda S.

    This document summarizes 20 articles and books which stress the importance of movement in the overall development of the human species. Each summary ranges in length from 100 to 200 words and often includes direct quotations. A wide range of movement activities suitable for people of all ages (from infants to adults) are discussed. Many summaries…

  11. An Analysis of Federal Airport and Air Carrier Employee Access Control, Screening. and Training Regulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    traveling public, air carriers, and persons employed by or conducting business at public airports. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Airport Security , Federal...26 4. Sterile Area 28 5. Exclusive Area 28 E. SECURITY ALERT LEVELS 29 F. AIRPORT SECURITY TOOLS 30 1. Electronic Detection System 31 a... Security Coordinator ASP Airport Security Program BIS Biometrie Identification System CCTV Closed Circuit Television CJIS Criminal Justice Information

  12. Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) New R&D Simulator for Airport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorighi, Nancy S.

    1997-01-01

    A new simulator, the Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) is under construction at the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Jointly funded by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NASA, the SDTF will be a testbed for airport surface automation technologies of the future. The SDTF will be operational in the third quarter of 1998. The SDTF will combine a virtual tower with simulated ground operations to allow evaluation of new technologies for safety, effectiveness, reliability, and cost benefit. The full-scale level V tower will provide a seamless 360 degree high resolution out-the-window view, and a full complement of ATC (air traffic control) controller positions. The imaging system will be generated by two fully-configured Silicon Graphics Onyx Infinite Reality computers, and will support surface movement of up to 200 aircraft and ground vehicles. The controller positions, displays and consoles can be completely reconfigured to match the unique layout of any individual airport tower. Dedicated areas will accommodate pseudo-airport ramp controllers, pseudo-airport operators, and pseudo-pilots. Up to 33 total personnel positions will be able to participate in simultaneous operational scenarios. A realistic voice communication infrastructure will emulate the intercom and telephone communications of a real airport tower. Multi-channel audio and video recording and a sophisticated data acquisition system will support a wide variety of research and development areas, such as evaluation of automation tools for surface operations, human factors studies, integration of terminal area and airport technologies, and studies of potential airport physical and procedural modifications.

  13. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  14. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  15. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  16. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known...) The hatching eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of...

  17. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N.; Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  18. Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on movement: movable art, relocating families, human rights, and trains and cars. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books, additional resources and activities (PEN)

  19. 7 CFR 301.75-6 - Interstate movement of regulated nursery stock from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-6 Interstate movement of regulated nursery... from a quarantined area into any area of the United States except commercial citrus-producing areas if... paragraph (b). Cuttings may not be obtained from properties where citrus canker is present. (4) All...

  20. 7 CFR 301.75-6 - Interstate movement of regulated nursery stock from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-6 Interstate movement of regulated nursery... from a quarantined area into any area of the United States except commercial citrus-producing areas if... paragraph (b). Cuttings may not be obtained from properties where citrus canker is present. (4) All...

  1. Sustainable stormwater management at Fornebu--from an airport to an industrial and residential area of the city of Oslo, Norway.

    PubMed

    Astebøl, Svein Ole; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Simonsen, Oyvind

    2004-12-01

    The Oslo Airport at Fornebu was closed in 1998 after 60 years of operation. An area of 3.1 km(2) was made available for one of Norway's biggest property development projects. Plans include 6000 residences and 20,000 workplaces. Fornebu is situated on a peninsula in the Oslo Fjord just outside the city of Oslo and is regarded as a very attractive area for both urbanisation and recreation. The residential area located centrally at Fornebu surrounds a centrally located park area. In the planning process, there was an expressed interest in using water as a life-giving element within the vegetation structure of the park. In Norway, stormwater in urban areas has traditionally been collected and transported in pipe systems to adjacent watercourses. However, there is an increasing interest in alternative "green" solutions for the management of stormwater. The paper presents a concept for sustainable stormwater management at Fornebu. A main objective is to improve the recreational and ecological value of stormwater while achieving a cost-effective solution. This objective is reached by replacing conventional urban drainage pipes with swales, filter strips, wetlands and ponds as collection, storage and treatment systems designed for natural processes. The paper thereby addresses integrated systems for stormwater management by approaching nature's way and sustainable development principles.

  2. 76 FR 28888 - Revocation of Class E Airspace; Gruver Cluck Ranch Airport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revocation of Class E Airspace; Gruver Cluck Ranch Airport... removes Class E airspace at Gruver, Cluck Ranch Airport, TX. The airport has been abandoned, thereby eliminating the need for controlled airspace in the Gruver, Cluck Ranch Airport, TX, area. The FAA is...

  3. Movements of juvenile Gyrfalcons from western and interior Alaska following departure from their natal areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntyre, C.L.; Douglas, D.C.; Adams, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    Juvenile raptors often travel thousands of kilometers from the time they leave their natal areas to the time they enter a breeding population. Documenting movements and identifying areas used by raptors before they enter a breeding population is important for understanding the factors that influence their survival. In North America, juvenile Gyrfalcons (Falco rusticolus) are routinely observed outside the species' breeding range during the nonbreeding season, but the natal origins of these birds are rarely known. We used satellite telemetry to track the movements of juvenile Gyrfalcons during their first months of independence. We instrumented nestlings with lightweight satellite transmitters within 10 d of estimated fledging dates on the Seward Peninsula in western Alaska and in Denali National Park (Denali) in interior Alaska. Gyrfalcons spent an average of 41.4 ?? 6.1 d (range = 30-50 d) in their natal areas after fledging. The mean departure date from natal areas was 27 August ?? 6.4 d. We tracked 15 individuals for an average of 70.5 ?? 28.1 d post-departure; Gyrfalcons moved from 105 to 4299 km during this period and tended to move greater distances earlier in the tracking period than later in the tracking period. Gyrfalcons did not establish temporary winter ranges within the tracking period. We identified several movement patterns among Gyrfalcons, including unidirectional long-distance movements, multidirectional long-and shortdistance movements, and shorter movements within a local region. Gyrfalcons from the Seward Peninsula remained in western Alaska or flew to eastern Russia with no movements into interior Alaska. In contrast, Gyrfalcons from Denali remained in interior Alaska, flew to northern and western Alaska, or flew to northern Alberta. Gyrfalcons from both study areas tended to move to coastal, riparian, and wetland areas during autumn and early winter. Because juvenile Gyrfalcons dispersed over a large geographic area and across three

  4. Productivity Analysis of Public and Private Airports: A Causal Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasigh, Bijan; Gorjidooz, Javad

    2007-01-01

    Around the world, airports are being viewed as enterprises, rather than public services, which are expected to be managed efficiently and provide passengers with courteous customer services. Governments are, increasingly, turning to the private sectors for their efficiency in managing the operation, financing, and development, as well as providing security for airports. Operational and financial performance evaluation has become increasingly important to airport operators due to recent trends in airport privatization. Assessing performance allows the airport operators to plan for human resources and capital investment as efficiently as possible. Productivity measurements may be used as comparisons and guidelines in strategic planning, in the internal analysis of operational efficiency and effectiveness, and in assessing the competitive position of an airport in transportation industry. The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate the operational and financial efficiencies of 22 major airports in the United States and Europe. These airports are divided into three groups based on private ownership (7 British Airport Authority airports), public ownership (8 major United States airports), and a mix of private and public ownership (7 major European Union airports. The detail ownership structures of these airports are presented in Appendix A. Total factor productivity (TFP) model was utilized to measure airport performance in terms of financial and operational efficiencies and to develop a benchmarking tool to identify the areas of strength and weakness. A regression model was then employed to measure the relationship between TFP and ownership structure. Finally a Granger causality test was performed to determine whether ownership structure is a Granger cause of TFP. The results of the analysis presented in this paper demonstrate that there is not a significant relationship between airport TFP and ownership structure. Airport productivity and efficiency is

  5. Lip movement tracking based on the changes of surface area of ellipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talha, Kamil S.; Wan, Khairunizam; Chittawad, Viratt; Za'ba, S. K.; Ayob, M. Nasir

    2015-05-01

    Lip reading is a technique used by a hard hearing person to communicate in their conversation. Sometime the word they understand is not the same as what the other speaker talk. Computer-based lip reading system may help to track those words based on the movement of the lips. When speak, lip make a unique movement that may differ between several words. For the computer to recognize the spoken word, preliminary studies need to be done in order to extract features from the movements of the lip. A surface area of the lip is proposed as the feature of the lip movement. The horizontal and vertical distances of the lip are extracted to determine the surface area. In the experiments, several spoken words at the hospital have been chosen. The experimental results show that the ellipse feature could be employed to train the computer understands the spoken word from the human.

  6. Ordinary and Extraordinary Movement Behaviour of Small Resident Fish within a Mediterranean Marine Protected Area

    PubMed Central

    Aspillaga, Eneko; Bartumeus, Frederic; Linares, Cristina; Starr, Richard M.; López-Sanz, Àngel; Díaz, David; Zabala, Mikel; Hereu, Bernat

    2016-01-01

    It is important to account for the movement behaviour of fishes when designing effective marine protected areas (MPAs). Fish movements occur across different spatial and temporal scales and understanding the variety of movements is essential to make correct management decisions. This study describes in detail the movement patterns of an economically and commercially important species, Diplodus sargus, within a well-enforced Mediterranean MPA. We monitored horizontal and vertical movements of 41 adult individuals using passive acoustic telemetry for up to one year. We applied novel analysis and visualization techniques to get a comprehensive view of a wide range of movements. D. sargus individuals were highly territorial, moving within small home ranges (< 1 km2), inside which they displayed repetitive diel activity patterns. Extraordinary movements beyond the ordinary home range were observed under two specific conditions. First, during stormy events D. sargus presented a sheltering behaviour, moving to more protected places to avoid the disturbance. Second, during the spawning season they made excursions to deep areas (> 50 m), where they aggregated to spawn. This study advances our understanding about the functioning of an established MPA and provides important insights into the biology and management of a small sedentary species, suggesting the relevance of rare but important fish behaviours. PMID:27437692

  7. Male Texas Horned Lizards increase daily movements and area covered in spring: A mate searching strategy?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stark, Richard C.; Fox, S. F.; David, M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Texas Horned Lizards, Phrynosoma cornutum, were tracked using fluorescent powder to determine exact daily movements. Daily linear movements and daily space use were compared between adult males and females. Lizards that traveled the greatest linear distances also covered the largest areas. In Oklahoma, adults emerge from hibernation in late April and early May and mate soon afterward. Males traveled significantly greater distances (and covered significantly larger areas in a day) than females in May but not after May. We propose that males move more and cover more area than females early in the mating season to intercept receptive females. Copyright 2005 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  8. YANGTZE project: Investigation of mass movements in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area (P. R. China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, Dominik; Rohn, Joachim; Wiedenmann, Johannes; Rudolph, René; Otte, Karel; Ernstberger, Stefanie; Eckstein, Susan; Dumperth, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Within the German YANGTZE Project, mass movement hazard is investigated for the Xiangxi Catchment which is part of the Three Gorges Reservoir (P. R. China). The objective of our sub-project is to investigate the impact of the Three Gorges Reservoir on slope stability and (re-)activation of mass movements. Within this paper first results of investigations on mass movements in the Xiangxi Catchment that were started in summer 2008 are presented. They show a significant correlation between mass movement distribution and activity on the one hand and lithology and altitude on the other hand. In Xiangxi Catchment, correlation between geology and occurrence of mass movements can be studied ideally as most of the geological formations outcropping in the reservoir area can be found there. Furthermore, the mouth of Xiangxi River is quite close to the Three Gorges Dam so that the impact of the impoundment is distinctive in the Xiangxi Catchment. In 2008 and 2009, about 70 km² were mapped geotechnically. The mapping was done for (a) the backwater area of Xiangxi River influenced by the impoundment of the Three Gorges Reservoir (from Yangtze River to Gaoyang Town), (b) Quyuan Valley as a sub-catchment of Xiangxi Catchment, and (c) along the main roads from Gaoyang Town towards Gufu City and towards Shennongjia Nature Reserve. The investigated area comprises marine and continental sedimentary layers from Cambrian to Jurassic Period. The lithology of these layers is dominated by carbonates (limestone, dolostone and marlstone) on the one hand and clastic sediments (shale, mudstone, siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate) on the other hand. A total of 180 mass movements was found and mapped. Mainly rotational or combined rotational-translational landslides, but also some rockslides and rockfalls were found. As expected, a strong correlation between lithology on the one side and occurrence and activity of mass movements on the other side could be found. In the study area, Jurassic

  9. 9 CFR 82.7 - Interstate movement of manure and litter from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... litter from a quarantined area. 82.7 Section 82.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... Interstate movement of manure and litter from a quarantined area. (a) Manure generated by and litter used by... if: (1) The manure and litter is accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (2)...

  10. African Buffalo Movement and Zoonotic Disease Risk across Transfrontier Conservation Areas, Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Caron, Alexandre; Cornelis, Daniel; Foggin, Chris; Hofmeyr, Markus; de Garine-Wichatitsky, Michel

    2016-02-01

    We report on the long-distance movements of subadult female buffalo within a Transfrontier Conservation Area in Africa. Our observations confirm that bovine tuberculosis and other diseases can spread between buffalo populations across national parks, community land, and countries, thus posing a risk to animal and human health in surrounding wildlife areas.

  11. Sentence processing selectivity in Broca’s area: evident for structure but not syntactic movement

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Diogo; Sprouse, Jon; Hickok, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The role of Broca’s area in sentence processing is hotly debated. Prominent hypotheses include that Broca’s area supports sentence comprehension via syntax-specific processes (“syntactic movement” in particular), hierarchical structure building or working memory. In the present fMRI study we adopt a within subject, across task approach using targeted sentence-level contrasts and non-sentential comparison tasks to address these hypotheses regarding the role of Broca’s area in sentence processing. For clarity, we have presented findings as three experiments: (i) Experiment 1 examines selectivity for a particular type of sentence construction, namely those containing syntactic movement. Standard syntactic movement distance effects in Broca’s area were replicated but no difference was found between movement and non-movement sentences in Broca’s area at the group level or consistently in individual subjects. (ii) Experiment 2 examines selectivity for sentences versus non-sentences, to assess claims regarding the role of Broca’s area in hierarchical structure building. Group and individual results differ, but both identify subregions of Broca’s area that are selective for sentence structure. (iii) Experiment 3 assesses whether activations in Broca’s area are selective for sentences when contrasted with simple subvocal articulation. Group results suggest shared resources for sentence processing and articulation in Broca’s area, but individual subject analyses contradict this finding. We conclude that Broca’s area is not selectively involved in processing syntactic movement, but that subregions are selectively responsive to sentence structure. Our findings also reinforce Fedorenko & Kanwishser’s call for the use of more individual subject analyses in functional imaging studies of sentence processing in Broca’s area, as group findings can obscure selective response patterns. PMID:27135039

  12. Results of the Analyses for 1,4-Dioxane of Groundwater Samples Collected in the Tucson Airport Remediation Project Area, South-Central Arizona, 2006-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillman, Fred D

    2009-01-01

    Extensive groundwater contamination resulting from industrial activities led to the listing of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) as a Superfund Site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1983. Early investigations revealed elevated levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including the chlorinated solvents trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene, in wells in the area. Several responsible parties were identified, and cleanup activities were initiated in the late 1980s using technology designed for removal of VOCs. In 2002, the compound 1,4-dioxane was discovered in wells in the TIAA area. Since then, 1,4-dioxane has been detected throughout the TIAA area at levels exceeding the USEPA Drinking Water Health Advisory value of 3 micrograms per liter (ug/L; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2006). Chemical properties of 1,4-dioxane make it relatively unaffected by the treatment technologies employed in the TIAA area. In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Arizona Water Science Center, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment, began an investigation into the extent of groundwater contamination by 1,4-dioxane in the area. Five rounds of groundwater sampling in the TIAA area have been completed by the USGS since that time, yielding a total of 210 samples. Results from these analyses indicate less than reportable concentrations of 1,4-dioxane in 30 percent of the samples, with 46 percent of the samples having concentrations at or above the USEPA Drinking Water Health Advisory level.

  13. Area- and band-specific representations of hand movements by local field potentials in caudal cingulate motor area and supplementary motor area of monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Osamu; Nakayama, Yoshihisa; Hoshi, Eiji

    2016-03-01

    The caudal cingulate motor area (CMAc) and the supplementary motor area (SMA) play important roles in movement execution. The present study examined the neural mechanisms underlying these roles by investigating local field potentials (LFPs) from these areas while monkeys pressed buttons with either their left or right hand. During hand movement, power increases in the high-gamma (80-120 Hz) and theta (3-8 Hz) bands and a power decrease in the beta (12-30 Hz) band were observed in both the CMAc and SMA. High-gamma and beta activity in the SMA predominantly represented contralateral hand movements, whereas activity in the CMAc preferentially represented movement of either hand. Theta activity in both brain regions most frequently reflected movement of either hand, but a contralateral hand bias was more evident in the SMA than in the CMAc. An analysis of the relationships of the laterality representations between the high-gamma and theta bands at each recording site revealed that, irrespective of the hand preference for the theta band, the high-gamma band in the SMA preferentially represented contralateral hand movement, whereas the high-gamma band in the CMAc represented movement of either hand. These findings suggest that the input-output relationships for ipsilateral and contralateral hand movements in the CMAc and SMA differ in terms of their functionality. The CMAc may transform the input signals representing general aspects of movement into commands to perform movements with either hand, whereas the SMA may transform the input signals into commands to perform movement with the contralateral hand.

  14. Hemispheric asymmetry in supplementary motor area connectivity during unilateral finger movements.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Baxter P; Carew, John D; Meyerand, M Elizabeth

    2004-06-01

    Studies of unilateral finger movement in right-handed subjects have shown asymmetrical patterns of activation in primary motor cortex. Some studies have measured a similar asymmetry in the supplementary motor area (SMA), but others have not. To shed more light on the symmetry of function in the SMA, we used path analysis of functional MRI data to investigate effective connectivity during a unilateral finger movement task. We observed a slight asymmetry in task activation: left SMA was equally active during movement of either hand, while right SMA was more active for left-hand movement, suggesting a dominant role of left SMA. In addition, we tested for a corresponding asymmetry in the influence of SMA on sensorimotor cortex (SMC) using a path model based on the well-established principle that SMA is involved in motor control and SMC in execution. We observed that the influence of left SMA on left SMC increased during right-hand movement, and the influence of left SMA on right SMC increased during left-hand movement. However, there was no significant hand-dependent change in the influences of the right SMA. This asymmetry in connectivity implies that left SMA does play a dominant role in unilateral movements of either hand in right handers. The experiment also provides a basis for further studies of motor system connectivity in healthy or patient populations.

  15. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2010-01-01

    A Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pilot reaction to conflict events in the TMA near the airport, different alert timings for various scenarios, alerting display concepts, and directive alerting concepts. This paper gives an overview of the conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) concept, simulation study, and test results

  16. Decoding individuated finger movements using volume-constrained neuronal ensembles in the M1 hand area.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Soumyadipta; Tenore, Francesco; Aggarwal, Vikram; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Schieber, Marc H; Thakor, Nitish V

    2008-02-01

    Individuated finger and wrist movements can be decoded using random subpopulations of neurons that are widely distributed in the primary motor (M1) hand area. This work investigates 1) whether it is possible to decode dexterous finger movements using spatially-constrained volumes of neurons as typically recorded from a microelectrode array; and 2) whether decoding accuracy differs due to the configuration or location of the array within the M1 hand area. Single-unit activities were sequentially recorded from task-related neurons in two rhesus monkeys as they performed individuated movements of the fingers and the wrist. Simultaneous neuronal ensembles were simulated by constraining these activities to the recording field dimensions of conventional microelectrode array architectures. Artificial neural network (ANN) based filters were able to decode individuated finger movements with greater than 90% accuracy for the majority of movement types, using as few as 20 neurons from these ensemble activities. Furthermore, for the large majority of cases there were no significant differences (p < 0.01) in decoding accuracy as a function of the location of the recording volume. The results suggest that a brain-machine interface (BMI) for dexterous control of individuated fingers and the wrist can be implemented using microelectrode arrays placed broadly in the M1 hand area.

  17. Effect of forest harvesting on microclimate and sediment movement in a periglacial area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaizumi, F.; Ryoko, N.; Ueno, K.; Kurobe, K.

    2013-12-01

    Activities of periglacial processes are controlled by the hillslope microclimate (i.e., air and ground temperatures, ground water content) that is highly affected by land cover conditions. Thus, forest harvesting in periglacial areas possibly affects activities of sediment movement (i.e., soil creep, dry ravel) by changing the microclimate of hillslopes. Knowledge on the effect of forest harvesting on sediment movement are needed to protect aquatic ecosystems as well as to develop better mitigation measures for preventing sediment disasters. In this study, we investigated seasonal changes in the sediment movement in arterial forests located in a periglacial area of southern Japanese Alps. In the southern Japanese Alps, rainfall is abundant in summer and autumn, and air temperature frequently rise above and fall below 0 degree in winter. We also observed difference in the microclimate as well as sediment movement between harvested and non-harvested artificial forests. Our monitoring by interval cameras and sediment traps detected sediment movements in all seasons. Rainfall-induced sediment movements were identified both in summer and winter, while periglacial processes (i.e., frost heave) was limited in winter. Forest harvesting changed both temperature and water condition of hillslopes; diurnal fluctuation of the ground surface temperature in the harvested area (about 15 degree) were much larger than that in the non-harvested area (about 3 degree). In the period without rainfall, water content ratio of soil in the harvested area was lower than that in the non-harvested area. Difference in the freezing and thawing frequency between the harvested and the non-harvested area was also observed by interval cameras. In the period without snow cover, diurnal frost heave was observed almost everyday in the harvested area. In contrast, diurnal frost heave in the non-harvested was observed only several times in one winter. Consequently, forest harvesting changes both

  18. Secondary Work Force Movement into Energy Industry Employment in Areas Affected by "Boom Town" Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurado, Eugene A.

    A labor market study of implications of rapid energy development in the West examined the dimensions of work force movement from secondary occupations to primary energy occupations in areas affected by "boom town" growth. (Secondary occupations were defined as those in all industries not categorized as primary energy industries.) Focus…

  19. 7 CFR 301.75-6 - Interstate movement of regulated nursery stock from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-6 Interstate movement of regulated nursery... United States except commercial citrus-producing areas if all of the following conditions are met: (1... obtained from properties where citrus canker is present. (4) All citrus plants at the nursery premises...

  20. 7 CFR 301.75-6 - Interstate movement of regulated nursery stock from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-6 Interstate movement of regulated nursery... United States except commercial citrus-producing areas if all of the following conditions are met: (1... obtained from properties where citrus canker is present. (4) All citrus plants at the nursery premises...

  1. 7 CFR 301.75-6 - Interstate movement of regulated nursery stock from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-6 Interstate movement of regulated nursery... United States except commercial citrus-producing areas if all of the following conditions are met: (1... obtained from properties where citrus canker is present. (4) All citrus plants at the nursery premises...

  2. 9 CFR 82.9 - Interstate movement of hatching eggs from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interstate movement of hatching eggs... hatching eggs from a quarantined area. Hatching eggs from birds or poultry not known to be infected with or... eggs are accompanied by a permit obtained in accordance with § 82.11; (b) Copies of the...

  3. Thermal area effectiveness for future aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happ, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    Problem areas in airport planning, design, and operations identified by a decision matrix developed to display various airport functions interfaced with facilities and an extensive literature survey were investigated. Areas considered include: site selection and growth potential; emissions and noise control/containment for airports; financial and legal aspects of airport planning, contruction, and operation; intra-airport transportation and other passenger flow facilitators; simulation and modeling for airports; guidelines for airport multimodal access planning. Results are summarized and a bibliography is included.

  4. Calculation of odour emissions from aircraft engines at Copenhagen Airport.

    PubMed

    Winther, Morten; Kousgaard, Uffe; Oxbøl, Arne

    2006-07-31

    In a new approach the odour emissions from aircraft engines at Copenhagen Airport are calculated using actual fuel flow and emission measurements (one main engine and one APU: Auxiliary Power Unit), odour panel results, engine specific data and aircraft operational data for seven busy days. The calculation principle assumes a linear relation between odour and HC emissions. Using a digitalisation of the aircraft movements in the airport area, the results are depicted on grid maps, clearly reflecting aircraft operational statistics as single flights or total activity during a whole day. The results clearly reflect the short-term temporal fluctuations of the emissions of odour (and exhaust gases). Aircraft operating at low engine thrust (taxiing, queuing and landing) have a total odour emission share of almost 98%, whereas the shares for the take off/climb out phases (2%) and APU usage (0.5%) are only marginal. In most hours of the day, the largest odour emissions occur, when the total amount of fuel burned during idle is high. However, significantly higher HC emissions for one specific engine cause considerable amounts of odour emissions during limited time periods. The experimentally derived odour emission factor of 57 OU/mg HC is within the range of 23 and 110 OU/mg HC used in other airport odour studies. The distribution of odour emission results between aircraft operational phases also correspond very well with the results for these other studies. The present study uses measurement data for a representative engine. However, the uncertainties become large when the experimental data is used to estimate the odour emissions for all aircraft engines. More experimental data is needed to increase inventory accuracy, and in terms of completeness it is recommended to make odour emission estimates also for engine start and the fuelling of aircraft at Copenhagen Airport in the future.

  5. Volcanic hazards to airports

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  6. On tooth movements and associated tissue alterations related to edentulous areas and bone defects.

    PubMed

    Stokland, Birgitta Lindskog

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to study orthodontic tooth movement in relation to edentulous areas and infrabony pockets as well as the physiological movement of teeth facing an edentulous area. A dog model was used in Studies I and II. Teeth were orthodontically moved into and out from inflamed, infrabony periodontal pockets (Study I) and into areas of reduced bone height (Study II). Clinical, radiographic and histometric analyses were made with respect to changes in tooth-supporting tissues. Study III involved clinical, radiographic and 3D model assessments of changes in periodontal conditions and alveolar ridge dimensions in adult patients subjected to tooth movement into areas with reduced ridge dimensions. In Study IV, panoramic radiographs of 292 subjects, taken at an interval of 12 years, were analyzed with regard to changes in the elongation of unopposed molars and tipping of molars facing a mesial edentulous space. In the animal study orthodontic bodily movement of teeth with inflamed, infrabony pockets caused an enhanced rate of progression of the periodontal lesion (Study 1), particularly when the tooth movement was directed towards the infrabony defect. Teeth with healthy periodontium that were orthodontically moved into areas of markedly reduced bone height maintained their periodontal tissue support (Study II). Corresponding orthodontic tooth movement in humans (Study III) resulted in minor dimensional alterations of the periodontal tissues and an increased bucco-lingual width of the alveolar ridge in the area into which the tooth had been moved, whereas a decreased width of the newly established edentulous area was noted. All teeth that were moved showed lateral root resorption at the level of the bone crest on the pressure side, but signs of repair were noticed 1-year post-treatment. In the 12-year radiographic study (Study IV) unopposed molars showed a significant increase in elongation over the 12 years of follow-up. The degree of elongation increased

  7. Two Types of Receptive Field Dynamics in Area V4 at the Time of Eye Movements?

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Till S.; Zirnsak, Marc; Marquis, Michael; Hamker, Fred H.; Moore, Tirin

    2017-01-01

    How we perceive the world as stable despite the frequent disruptions of the retinal image caused by eye movements is one of the fundamental questions in sensory neuroscience. Seemingly convergent evidence points towards a mechanism which dynamically updates representations of visual space in anticipation of a movement (Wurtz, 2008). In particular, receptive fields (RFs) of neurons, predominantly within oculomotor and attention related brain structures (Duhamel et al., 1992; Walker et al., 1995; Umeno and Goldberg, 1997), are thought to “remap” to their future, post-movement location prior to an impending eye movement. New studies (Neupane et al., 2016a,b) report observations on RF dynamics at the time of eye movements of neurons in area V4. These dynamics are interpreted as being largely dominated by a remapping of RFs. Critically, these observations appear at odds with a previous study reporting a different type of RF dynamics within the same brain structure (Tolias et al., 2001), consisting of a shrinkage and shift of RFs towards the movement target. Importantly, RFs have been measured with different techniques in those studies. Here, we measured V4 RFs comparable to Neupane et al. (2016a,b) and observe a shrinkage and shift of RFs towards the movement target when analyzing the immediate stimulus response (Zirnsak et al., 2014). When analyzing the late stimulus response (Neupane et al., 2016a,b), we observe RF shifts resembling remapping. We discuss possible causes for these shifts and point out important issues which future studies on RF dynamics need to address. PMID:28377700

  8. Movement patterns and study area boundaries: Influences on survival estimation in capture-mark-recapture studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horton, G.E.; Letcher, B.H.

    2008-01-01

    The inability to account for the availability of individuals in the study area during capture-mark-recapture (CMR) studies and the resultant confounding of parameter estimates can make correct interpretation of CMR model parameter estimates difficult. Although important advances based on the Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) model have resulted in estimators of true survival that work by unconfounding either death or recapture probability from availability for capture in the study area, these methods rely on the researcher's ability to select a method that is correctly matched to emigration patterns in the population. If incorrect assumptions regarding site fidelity (non-movement) are made, it may be difficult or impossible as well as costly to change the study design once the incorrect assumption is discovered. Subtleties in characteristics of movement (e.g. life history-dependent emigration, nomads vs territory holders) can lead to mixtures in the probability of being available for capture among members of the same population. The result of these mixtures may be only a partial unconfounding of emigration from other CMR model parameters. Biologically-based differences in individual movement can combine with constraints on study design to further complicate the problem. Because of the intricacies of movement and its interaction with other parameters in CMR models, quantification of and solutions to these problems are needed. Based on our work with stream-dwelling populations of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, we used a simulation approach to evaluate existing CMR models under various mixtures of movement probabilities. The Barker joint data model provided unbiased estimates of true survival under all conditions tested. The CJS and robust design models provided similarly unbiased estimates of true survival but only when emigration information could be incorporated directly into individual encounter histories. For the robust design model, Markovian emigration (future

  9. A Comparison of Independent Event-Related Desynchronization Responses in Motor-Related Brain Areas to Movement Execution, Movement Imagery, and Movement Observation

    PubMed Central

    Duann, Jeng-Ren; Chiou, Jin-Chern

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) event-related desynchronization (ERD) induced by movement imagery or by observing biological movements performed by someone else has recently been used extensively for brain-computer interface-based applications, such as applications used in stroke rehabilitation training and motor skill learning. However, the ERD responses induced by the movement imagery and observation might not be as reliable as the ERD responses induced by movement execution. Given that studies on the reliability of the EEG ERD responses induced by these activities are still lacking, here we conducted an EEG experiment with movement imagery, movement observation, and movement execution, performed multiple times each in a pseudorandomized order in the same experimental runs. Then, independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to the EEG data to find the common motor-related EEG source activity shared by the three motor tasks. Finally, conditional EEG ERD responses associated with the three movement conditions were computed and compared. Among the three motor conditions, the EEG ERD responses induced by motor execution revealed the alpha power suppression with highest strengths and longest durations. The ERD responses of the movement imagery and movement observation only partially resembled the ERD pattern of the movement execution condition, with slightly better detectability for the ERD responses associated with the movement imagery and faster ERD responses for movement observation. This may indicate different levels of involvement in the same motor-related brain circuits during different movement conditions. In addition, because the resulting conditional EEG ERD responses from the ICA preprocessing came with minimal contamination from the non-related and/or artifactual noisy components, this result can play a role of the reference for devising a brain-computer interface using the EEG ERD features of movement imagery or observation. PMID:27636359

  10. Annoyance from light aircraft investigation carried out around four airports near Paris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An opinion survey was carried out on residents living near four airports in the Paris, France area. An evaluation of their responses concerning noise pollution and possible expansion of airport activity is presented.

  11. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure. This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  12. Urban dogs in rural areas: Human-mediated movement defines dog populations in southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Villatoro, Federico J; Sepúlveda, Maximiliano A; Stowhas, Paulina; Silva-Rodríguez, Eduardo A

    2016-12-01

    Management strategies for dog populations and their diseases include reproductive control, euthanasia and vaccination, among others. However, the effectiveness of these strategies can be severely affected by human-mediated dog movement. If immigration is important, then the location of origin of dogs imported by humans will be fundamental to define the spatial scales over which population management and research should apply. In this context, the main objective of our study was to determine the spatial extent of dog demographic processes in rural areas and the proportion of dogs that could be labeled as immigrants at multiple spatial scales. To address our objective we conducted surveys in households located in a rural landscape in southern Chile. Interviews allowed us to obtain information on the demographic characteristics of dogs in these rural settings, human influence on dog mortality and births, the localities of origin of dogs living in rural areas, and the spatial extent of human-mediated dog movement. We found that most rural dogs (64.1%) were either urban dogs that had been brought to rural areas (40.0%), or adopted dogs that had been previously abandoned in rural roads (24.1%). Some dogs were brought from areas located as far as ∼700km away from the study area. Human-mediated movement of dogs, especially from urban areas, seems to play a fundamental role in the population dynamics of dogs in rural areas. Consequently, local scale efforts to manage dog populations or their diseases are unlikely to succeed if implemented in isolation, simply because dogs can be brought from surrounding urban areas or even distant locations. We suggest that efforts to manage or study dog populations and related diseases should be implemented using a multi-scale approach.

  13. 9 CFR 82.8 - Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area. 82.8 Section 82.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... Disease (END) § 82.8 Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area....

  14. 9 CFR 82.8 - Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area. 82.8 Section 82.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... Disease (END) § 82.8 Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area....

  15. 9 CFR 82.8 - Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area. 82.8 Section 82.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... Disease (END) § 82.8 Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area....

  16. 9 CFR 82.8 - Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area. 82.8 Section 82.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... Disease (END) § 82.8 Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area....

  17. 9 CFR 82.8 - Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area. 82.8 Section 82.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND... Interstate movement of eggs, other than hatching eggs, from a quarantined area. (a) Eggs, other than...

  18. Terminal area air traffic control simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    To study the impact of advanced aeronautical technologies on operations to and from terminal airports, a computer model of air traffic movements was developed. The advantages of fast-time simulation are discussed, and the arrival scheduling and flight simulation are described. A New York area study, user's guide, and programmer's guide are included.

  19. Roadless wilderness area determines forest elephant movements in the Congo Basin.

    PubMed

    Blake, Stephen; Deem, Sharon L; Strindberg, Samantha; Maisels, Fiona; Momont, Ludovic; Isia, Inogwabini-Bila; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Karesh, William B; Kock, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    A dramatic expansion of road building is underway in the Congo Basin fuelled by private enterprise, international aid, and government aspirations. Among the great wilderness areas on earth, the Congo Basin is outstanding for its high biodiversity, particularly mobile megafauna including forest elephants (Loxodonta africana cyclotis). The abundance of many mammal species in the Basin increases with distance from roads due to hunting pressure, but the impacts of road proliferation on the movements of individuals are unknown. We investigated the ranging behaviour of forest elephants in relation to roads and roadless wilderness by fitting GPS telemetry collars onto a sample of 28 forest elephants living in six priority conservation areas. We show that the size of roadless wilderness is a strong determinant of home range size in this species. Though our study sites included the largest wilderness areas in central African forests, none of 4 home range metrics we calculated, including core area, tended toward an asymptote with increasing wilderness size, suggesting that uninhibited ranging in forest elephants no longer exists. Furthermore we show that roads outside protected areas which are not protected from hunting are a formidable barrier to movement while roads inside protected areas are not. Only 1 elephant from our sample crossed an unprotected road. During crossings her mean speed increased 14-fold compared to normal movements. Forest elephants are increasingly confined and constrained by roads across the Congo Basin which is reducing effective habitat availability and isolating populations, significantly threatening long term conservation efforts. If the current road development trajectory continues, forest wildernesses and the forest elephants they contain will collapse.

  20. Roadless Wilderness Area Determines Forest Elephant Movements in the Congo Basin

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Stephen; Deem, Sharon L.; Strindberg, Samantha; Maisels, Fiona; Momont, Ludovic; Isia, Inogwabini-Bila; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Karesh, William B.; Kock, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    A dramatic expansion of road building is underway in the Congo Basin fuelled by private enterprise, international aid, and government aspirations. Among the great wilderness areas on earth, the Congo Basin is outstanding for its high biodiversity, particularly mobile megafauna including forest elephants (Loxodonta africana cyclotis). The abundance of many mammal species in the Basin increases with distance from roads due to hunting pressure, but the impacts of road proliferation on the movements of individuals are unknown. We investigated the ranging behaviour of forest elephants in relation to roads and roadless wilderness by fitting GPS telemetry collars onto a sample of 28 forest elephants living in six priority conservation areas. We show that the size of roadless wilderness is a strong determinant of home range size in this species. Though our study sites included the largest wilderness areas in central African forests, none of 4 home range metrics we calculated, including core area, tended toward an asymptote with increasing wilderness size, suggesting that uninhibited ranging in forest elephants no longer exists. Furthermore we show that roads outside protected areas which are not protected from hunting are a formidable barrier to movement while roads inside protected areas are not. Only 1 elephant from our sample crossed an unprotected road. During crossings her mean speed increased 14-fold compared to normal movements. Forest elephants are increasingly confined and constrained by roads across the Congo Basin which is reducing effective habitat availability and isolating populations, significantly threatening long term conservation efforts. If the current road development trajectory continues, forest wildernesses and the forest elephants they contain will collapse. PMID:18958284

  1. Estrogen modulates neuronal movements within the developing preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, John Gabriel; Wolfe, Cory A.; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2008-01-01

    The preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus (POA/AH) is characterized by sexually dimorphic features in a number of vertebrates and is a key region of the forebrain for regulating physiological responses and sexual behaviors. Using live-cell, fluorescent video microscopy with organotypic brain slices the current study examined sex differences in the movement characteristics of neurons expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) driven by the Thy-1 promoter. Cells in slices from embryonic day 14 (E14), but not E13 mice displayed significant sex differences in their basal neuronal movement characteristics. Exposure to 10nM estradiol-17β (E2), but not 100nM dihydrotestosterone, significantly altered cell movement characteristics within minutes of exposure in a location specific manner. E2 treatment decreased the rate of motion of cells located in the dorsal POA/AH, but increased the frequency of movement in cells located more ventrally. These effects were consistent across age and sex. To further determine whether early developing sex differences in the POA/AH depend upon gonadal steroids, we examined cell positions in mice with a disruption of the steroidogenic factor-1 gene in which gonads do not form. An early born cohort of cells was labeled with the mitotic indicator bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) on E11. More cells were found in the POA/AH of females than males on the day of birth (P0) regardless of gonadal status. These results support the hypothesis that estrogen partially contributes to brain sexual dimorphism through its influence on cell movements during development. Estrogen's influence may be superimposed upon a pre-existing genetic bias. PMID:17767488

  2. Late cenozoic vertical movements of non-volcanic islands in the Banda Arc area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smet, M. E. M.; Fortuin, A. R.; Tjokrosapoetro, S.; Van Hinte, J. E.

    During onshore campaigns of the Snellius-II Expedition late Cenozoic sections were recorded and systematically sampled on the non-volcanic outer Banda Arc Islands of Timor, Buton, Buru, Seram and Kai. Microfaunal studies provided age and palaeobathymetric data to construct geohistory diagrams. Geohistory analysis of field and laboratory data allows to calculate rates of vertical movements of the island basements. The vertical movements were intermittent and differed widely from place to place in the arc; short periods of uplift alternated with longer periods of tectonic rest or subsidence and lateral variations in timing and magnitude seem to be more the rule than the exception. Movements affected larger segments of the arc at about the same time, especially since the late Pliocene, when widespread vertical movements started, which led to the present configuration of the arc. Rates of uplift or subsidence differed within each segment. On an intermediate scale, deformation has the character of tilting or doming of whole islands or parts of islands. On a local scale, various types of deformation occur. Calculated duration of uplift pulses is in the order of a million years where less than 50 cm·ka -1 of vertical movements are involved. Sections, however, with a high time stratigraphic resolutions show pulses of uplift with a duration of only some hundreds of thousands of years and rates of more than 500 cm·ka -1. The duration of such pulses therefore is comparable to that of eustatic third order sea level changes. But because their amplitude is an order of magnitude larger, this implies that in tectonically active areas eustatic signals, preserved in the sedimentary record, will be overprinted by tectonics, i.e. will be difficult to disentangle from the tectonic signal.

  3. Architectonic mapping of somatosensory areas involved in skilled forelimb movements and tool use.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrei; Nascimento-Silva, Márcio L; Keher, Natalia B; Bittencourt-Navarrete, Ruben Ernesto; Gattass, Ricardo; Franca, João G

    2016-05-01

    Cebus monkeys stand out from other New World monkeys by their ability to perform fine hand movements, and by their spontaneous use of tools in the wild. Those behaviors rely on the integration of somatosensory information, which occurs in different areas of the parietal cortex. Although a few studies have examined and parceled the somatosensory areas of the cebus monkey, mainly using electrophysiological criteria, very little is known about its anatomical organization. In this study we used SMI-32 immunohistochemistry, myelin, and Nissl stains to characterize the architecture of the parietal cortical areas of cebus monkeys. Seven cortical areas were identified between the precentral gyrus and the anterior bank of the intraparietal sulcus. Except for areas 3a and 3b, distinction between different somatosensory areas was more evident in myelin-stained sections and SMI-32 immunohistochemistry than in Nissl stain, especially for area 2 and subdivisions of area 5. Our results show that cebus monkeys have a relatively complex somatosensory cortex, similar to that of macaques and humans. This suggests that, during primate evolution, the emergence of new somatosensory areas underpinned complex manual behaviors in most Old World simians and in the New World cebus monkey. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1399-1423, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Art at the Airport: An Exploration of New Art Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Many airports have transformed empty waiting spaces into mini malls, children's play areas, and displays of beautiful art, making a long wait a bit more pleasant. For the modern airport, showcasing art has become an important component, with perks including a built-in global audience, as well as the vast spaces of modern architecture. For the art…

  5. Movements, Home Range and Site Fidelity of Snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) within a Temperate Marine Protected Area

    PubMed Central

    Harasti, David; Lee, Kate A.; Gallen, Christopher; Hughes, Julian M.; Stewart, John

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the movement dynamics of marine fish provides valuable information that can assist with species management, particularly regarding protection within marine protected areas (MPAs). We performed an acoustic tagging study implemented within the Port Stephens-Great Lakes Marine Park on the mid-north coast of New South Wales, Australia, to assess the movement patterns, home range and diel activity of snapper (Chrysophrys auratus; Sparidae); a species of significant recreational and commercial fishing importance in Australia. The study focused on C. auratus movements around Cabbage Tree Island, which is predominantly a no-take sanctuary zone (no fishing), with an array of acoustic stations deployed around the island and adjacent reefs and islands. Thirty C. auratus were tagged with internal acoustic tags in November 2010 with their movements recorded until September 2014. Both adult and juvenile C. auratus were observed to display strong site fidelity to Cabbage Tree Island with a mean 12-month residency index of 0.83 (range = 0 low to 1 high). Only three fish were detected on acoustic receivers away from Cabbage Tree Island, with one fish moving a considerable distance of ~ 290 kms over a short time frame (46 days). The longest period of residency recorded at the island was for three fish occurring regularly at the site for a period of 1249 days. Chrysophrys auratus displayed strong diurnal behaviour and detection frequency was significantly higher during the day than at night; however, there was no significant difference in detection frequency between different hours. This study demonstrates that even small-scale protected areas can benefit C. auratus during multiple life-history stages as it maintains a small home range and displays strong site fidelity over a period of 3 years. PMID:26544185

  6. 14 CFR 137.43 - Operations in controlled airspace designated for an airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... designated for an airport. 137.43 Section 137.43 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... airspace designated for an airport. (a) Except for flights to and from a dispensing area, no person may... an airport unless authorization for that operation has been obtained from the ATC facility...

  7. 14 CFR 121.443 - Pilot in command qualification: Route and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airports. 121.443 Section 121.443 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Pilot in command qualification: Route and airports. (a) Each certificate holder shall provide a system... to each airport and terminal area into which that person is to operate, and ensures that that...

  8. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Anchorage, Alaska, Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each person operating an aircraft to or from Lake Campbell or Sixmile Lake Airport shall conform to the...

  9. 14 CFR 121.443 - Pilot in command qualification: Route and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airports. 121.443 Section 121.443 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Pilot in command qualification: Route and airports. (a) Each certificate holder shall provide a system... to each airport and terminal area into which that person is to operate, and ensures that that...

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320. Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Appenzeller, Janet

    2000-04-20

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-04-20

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

  12. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Tobiason

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during September 1999, Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method and a backhoe. Soil samples were collected from the sludge bed, sewage lagoons, strainer box, and Imhoff tank areas. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Soil sample results indicated that the only constituent of concern (COC) detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs) was total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel-range organics. This COC was detected in three samples from the sludge bed at concentrations up to 580 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). Excavation of the area during characterization uncovered asphalt debris, four safety poles, and strands of barbed wire. The TPH-impacted soil and debris will be removed and disposed in the NTS Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill.

  13. Small ICBM area narrowing report. Volume 1. Hard mobile launcher in random movement basing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify those areas that could potentially support deployment of the Small Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) utilizing basing modes presently considered viable: the Hard Mobile Launcher in Random Movement, the Hard Mobile Launcher at Minuteman Facilities, and the Hard Silo in Patterned Array. Specifically, this report describes the process and the rationale supporting the application of Exclusionary and Evaluative Criteria and lists those locations that were eliminated through the application of these criteria. The remaining locations will be the subject of further investigations.

  14. Airport databases for 3D synthetic-vision flight-guidance displays: database design, quality assessment, and data generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Axel; Raabe, Helmut; Schiefele, Jens; Doerr, Kai Uwe

    1999-07-01

    In future aircraft cockpit designs SVS (Synthetic Vision System) databases will be used to display 3D physical and virtual information to pilots. In contrast to pure warning systems (TAWS, MSAW, EGPWS) SVS serve to enhance pilot spatial awareness by 3-dimensional perspective views of the objects in the environment. Therefore all kind of aeronautical relevant data has to be integrated into the SVS-database: Navigation- data, terrain-data, obstacles and airport-Data. For the integration of all these data the concept of a GIS (Geographical Information System) based HQDB (High-Quality- Database) has been created at the TUD (Technical University Darmstadt). To enable database certification, quality- assessment procedures according to ICAO Annex 4, 11, 14 and 15 and RTCA DO-200A/EUROCAE ED76 were established in the concept. They can be differentiated in object-related quality- assessment-methods following the keywords accuracy, resolution, timeliness, traceability, assurance-level, completeness, format and GIS-related quality assessment methods with the keywords system-tolerances, logical consistence and visual quality assessment. An airport database is integrated in the concept as part of the High-Quality- Database. The contents of the HQDB are chosen so that they support both Flight-Guidance-SVS and other aeronautical applications like SMGCS (Surface Movement and Guidance Systems) and flight simulation as well. Most airport data are not available. Even though data for runways, threshold, taxilines and parking positions were to be generated by the end of 1997 (ICAO Annex 11 and 15) only a few countries fulfilled these requirements. For that reason methods of creating and certifying airport data have to be found. Remote sensing and digital photogrammetry serve as means to acquire large amounts of airport objects with high spatial resolution and accuracy in much shorter time than with classical surveying methods. Remotely sensed images can be acquired from satellite

  15. [Study of 6 cases of malaria acquired near Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle in 1994. Necessary prevention measures in airports].

    PubMed

    Giacomini, T; Mouchet, J; Mathieu, P; Petithory, J C

    1995-02-01

    During the very hot 1994 summer, six new cases of airport malaria have been observed in and around Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle airport. Four patients were regular or occasional airport employees. The two other cases were inhabitants of a city at 7 km. Entomological investigations suggest that cars of airport employees served to disseminate anophelines outside the airport areas. The six cases were very severe. One patient died. Apparently, W.H.O. recommendations on aircraft disinsecting procedures have not been fully followed. There is obviously a threat for areas near the airports.

  16. ICAO's anti-SARS airport activities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Silvio; Curdt-Christiansen, Claus M

    2003-11-01

    To prevent SARS from spreading through air travel and in order to rebuild the confidence of the traveling public in the safety of air travel, ICAO has set up an "Anti-SARS Airport Evaluation Project." The first phase of this project was to develop a set of protective measures for international airports in affected areas to adopt and implement and then to send out, on the request of Contracting States, a team of inspectors to evaluate and assess airports and issue a "statement of evaluation" that the airport inspected complies with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. In cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO), the first part of phase 1 was completed in early June this year, and the second part of phase 1 followed soon after. By mid-July, five international airports in Southeast Asia had been inspected and found to be in full compliance with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. The success of this ICAO project is believed to have contributed significantly to the recovery of international air travel and related industries now taking place. Phase 2 of the project is now being developed. It is aimed at preventing a resurgence of SARS, but it also contains elements to make the methodology developed applicable to future outbreaks of any other communicable disease in which the mode of transmission could involve aviation and/or the need to prevent the spread of the disease by air travel.

  17. Migration patterns, use of stopover areas, and austral summer movements of Swainson's hawks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocher, Michael N.; Fuller, Mark R.; Schueck, Linda S.; Bond, Laura; Bechard, Marc J.; Woodbridge, Brian; Holroyd, Geoff L.; Martell, Mark S.; Banasch, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    from 1995 to 1998, we tracked movements of adult Swainson's Hawks (Buteo swainsoni), using satellite telemetry to characterize migration, important stopover areas, and movements in the austral summer. we tagged 46 hawks from July to September on their nesting grounds in seven U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. Swainson's Hawks followed three basic routes south on a broad front, converged along the east coast of cen-tral Mexico, and followed a concentrated corridor to a communal area in central Argentina for the austral summer. North of 20° N, southward and northward tracks differed little for individuals from east of the continental divide but differed greatly (up to 1700 km) for individuals from west of the continental divide. Hawks left the breeding grounds mid-August to mid-October; departure dates did not differ by location, year, or sex. Southbound migra-tion lasted 42 to 98 days, northbound migration 51 to 82 days. Southbound, 36% of the Swainson's Hawks departed the nesting grounds nearly 3 weeks earlier than the other radio-marked hawks and made stopovers 9.0–26.0 days long in seven separate areas, mainly in the southern great Plains, southern Arizona and New Mexico, and north-central Mexico. The birds stayed in their nonbreeding range for 76 to 128 days. All used a core area in central Ar-gentina within 23% of the 738 800-km2 austral summer range, where they frequently moved long distances (up to 1600 km). Conservation of Swainson's Hawks must be an international effort that considers habitats used during nesting and non-nesting seasons, including migration stopovers.

  18. Migration patterns, use of stopover areas, and austral summer movements of swainson's hawks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kochert, M.N.; Fuller, M.R.; Schueck, L.S.; Bond, L.; Bechard, M.J.; Woodbridge, B.; Holroyd, G.L.; Martell, M.S.; Banasch, U.

    2011-01-01

    From 1995 to 1998, we tracked movements of adult Swainson's Hawks (Buteo swainsoni), using satellite telemetry to characterize migration, important stopover areas, and movements in the austral summer. We tagged 46 hawks from July to September on their nesting grounds in seven U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. Swainson's Hawks followed three basic routes south on a broad front, converged along the east coast of central Mexico, and followed a concentrated corridor to a communal area in central Argentina for the austral summer. North of 20?? N, southward and northward tracks differed little for individuals from east of the continental divide but differed greatly (up to 1700 km) for individuals from west of the continental divide. Hawks left the breeding grounds mid-August to mid-October; departure dates did not differ by location, year, or sex. Southbound migration lasted 42 to 98 days, northbound migration 51 to 82 days. Southbound, 36% of the Swainson's Hawks departed the nesting grounds nearly 3 weeks earlier than the other radio-marked hawks and made stopovers 9.0-26.0 days long in seven separate areas, mainly in the southern Great Plains, southern Arizona and New Mexico, and northcentral Mexico. The birds stayed in their nonbreeding range for 76 to 128 days. All used a core area in central Argentina within 23% of the 738 800-km2 austral summer range, where they frequently moved long distances (up to 1600 km). Conservation of Swainson's Hawks must be an international effort that considers habitats used during nesting and non-nesting seasons, including migration stopovers. Copyright ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  19. MIGRATION PATTERNS, USE OF STOPOVER AREAS, AND AUSTRAL SUMMER MOVEMENTS OF SWAINSON'S HAWKS.

    PubMed

    Kochert, Michael N; Fuller, Mark R; Schueck, Linda S; Bond, Laura; Bechard, Marc J; Woodbridge, Brian; Holroyd, Geoff; Martell, Mark; Banasch, Ursula

    From 1995-1998, we tracked movements of adult Swainson's Hawks (Buteo swainsoni) using satellite telemetry to characterize migration, important stopover areas, and austral summer movements. We tagged 46 hawks from July - September on their nesting grounds in seven U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. Swainson's Hawks basically followed three routes south on a broad front, converged along the east coast of central Mexico, and followed a concentrated corridor to a communal austral summer area in central Argentina. North of 20° N, southward and northward tracks differed little for individuals from east of the Continental Divide but differed greatly (up to 1700 km) for individuals from west of the Continental Divide. Hawks left the breeding grounds mid-August to mid-October; departure dates did not differ by location, year, or sex. South migration lasted 42 to 98 days, and north migration took 51 to 82 days. On south migration, 36% of the Swainson's Hawks departed the nesting grounds nearly 3 weeks earlier than the other radio marked hawks and made stopovers 9.0 - 26.0 days long in seven separate areas, mainly in the southern Great Plains, southern Arizona and New Mexico, and north-central Mexico. The austral period lasted 76 to 128 days. All Swainson's Hawks used a core area in central Argentina within 23% of the 738800 km(2) austral summer range where they frequently moved long distances (up to 1600 km). Conservation of Swainson's Hawks must be an international effort that considers habitats used during nesting and non-nesting seasons including migration stopovers.

  20. MIGRATION PATTERNS, USE OF STOPOVER AREAS, AND AUSTRAL SUMMER MOVEMENTS OF SWAINSON’S HAWKS

    PubMed Central

    Kochert, Michael N.; Fuller, Mark R.; Schueck, Linda S.; Bond, Laura; Bechard, Marc J.; Woodbridge, Brian; Holroyd, Geoff; Martell, Mark; Banasch, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    From 1995–1998, we tracked movements of adult Swainson’s Hawks (Buteo swainsoni) using satellite telemetry to characterize migration, important stopover areas, and austral summer movements. We tagged 46 hawks from July - September on their nesting grounds in seven U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. Swainson’s Hawks basically followed three routes south on a broad front, converged along the east coast of central Mexico, and followed a concentrated corridor to a communal austral summer area in central Argentina. North of 20° N, southward and northward tracks differed little for individuals from east of the Continental Divide but differed greatly (up to 1700 km) for individuals from west of the Continental Divide. Hawks left the breeding grounds mid-August to mid-October; departure dates did not differ by location, year, or sex. South migration lasted 42 to 98 days, and north migration took 51 to 82 days. On south migration, 36% of the Swainson’s Hawks departed the nesting grounds nearly 3 weeks earlier than the other radio marked hawks and made stopovers 9.0 – 26.0 days long in seven separate areas, mainly in the southern Great Plains, southern Arizona and New Mexico, and north-central Mexico. The austral period lasted 76 to 128 days. All Swainson’s Hawks used a core area in central Argentina within 23% of the 738800 km2 austral summer range where they frequently moved long distances (up to 1600 km). Conservation of Swainson’s Hawks must be an international effort that considers habitats used during nesting and non-nesting seasons including migration stopovers. PMID:26380528

  1. Movement patterns of the parrotfish Sparisoma cretense in a Mediterranean marine protected area.

    PubMed

    La Mesa, Gabriele; Consalvo, Ivan; Annunziatellis, Aldo; Canese, Simonepietro

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the movements of exploited fish has become a major concern for several management and conservation initiatives, such as the implementation of well designed marine protected areas. Movements of an important recreational target species from the Mediterranean Sea, the parrotfish Sparisoma cretense, were determined in a marine protected area using passive acoustic telemetry, to evaluate site fidelity and homing, quantify home range and identify temporal patterns. Six adult parrotfish (20.8-29.8 cm total length) were caught along the north-eastern coast of Lampedusa (Italy) and surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters. Three fish were caught and released at the same site within the integral (i.e. "no entry-no take") reserve, whereas the others were caught outside the reserve boundary and released at the mid reserve 0.5 km apart. Two of the three fish that were released away from the capture site demonstrated homing abilities. Four fish showed a strong site fidelity, whereas the others moved frequently in and out of the monitoring area. Home range sizes estimated over the period of monitoring (up to 207 days) varied from 70,387 to 256,398 m(2), with core areas of 16,688 to 84,946 m(2). Home range size did not differ significantly between day and night. Home ranges of all fish extended beyond the reserve boundaries, showing example of potential spillover into take zones. Temporal activity patterns of fish were diurnal with a dominant diel rhythm, likely due to a resting behaviour at night. Though not specifically designed to protect exploited fish, the marine reserve of Lampedusa seems adequate for the conservation and management of S. cretense.

  2. Predicting ground-water movement in large mine spoil areas in the Appalachian Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wunsch, D.R.; Dinger, J.S.; Graham, C.D.R.

    1999-01-01

    Spoil created by surface mining can accumulate large quantities of ground-water, which can create geotechnical or regulatory problems, as well as flood active mine pits. A current study at a large (4.1 km2), thick, (up to 90 m) spoil body in eastern Kentucky reveals important factors that control the storage and movement of water. Ground-water recharge occurs along the periphery of the spoil body where surface-water drainage is blocked, as well as from infiltration along the spoil-bedrock contact, recharge from adjacent bedrock, and to a minor extent, through macropores at the spoil's surface. Based on an average saturated thickness of 6.4 m for all spoil wells, and assuming an estimated porosity of 20%, approximately 5.2 x 106 m3 of water is stored within the existing 4.1 km2 of reclaimed spoil. A conceptual model of ground-water flow, based on data from monitoring wells, dye-tracing data, discharge from springs and ponds, hydraulic gradients, chemical data, field reconnaissance, and aerial photographs indicate that three distinct but interconnected saturated zones have been established: one in the spoil's interior, and others in the valley fills that surround the main spoil body at lower elevations. Ground-water movement is sluggish in the spoil's interior, but moves quickly through the valley fills. The conceptual model shows that a prediction of ground-water occurrence, movement, and quality can be made for active or abandoned spoil areas if all or some of the following data are available: structural contour of the base of the lowest coal seam being mined, pre-mining topography, documentation of mining methods employed throughout the mine, overburden characteristics, and aerial photographs of mine progression.Spoil created by surface mining can accumulate large quantities of ground-water, which can create geotechnical or regulatory problems, as well as flood active mine pits. A current study at a large (4.1 km2), thick, (up to 90 m) spoil body in eastern

  3. Minimum area requirements for an at-risk butterfly based on movement and demography.

    PubMed

    Brown, Leone M; Crone, Elizabeth E

    2016-02-01

    Determining the minimum area required to sustain populations has a long history in theoretical and conservation biology. Correlative approaches are often used to estimate minimum area requirements (MARs) based on relationships between area and the population size required for persistence or between species' traits and distribution patterns across landscapes. Mechanistic approaches to estimating MAR facilitate prediction across space and time but are few. We used a mechanistic MAR model to determine the critical minimum patch size (CMP) for the Baltimore checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas phaeton), a locally abundant species in decline along its southern range, and sister to several federally listed species. Our CMP is based on principles of diffusion, where individuals in smaller patches encounter edges and leave with higher probability than those in larger patches, potentially before reproducing. We estimated a CMP for the Baltimore checkerspot of 0.7-1.5 ha, in accordance with trait-based MAR estimates. The diffusion rate on which we based this CMP was broadly similar when estimated at the landscape scale (comparing flight path vs. capture-mark-recapture data), and the estimated population growth rate was consistent with observed site trends. Our mechanistic approach to estimating MAR is appropriate for species whose movement follows a correlated random walk and may be useful where landscape-scale distributions are difficult to assess, but demographic and movement data are obtainable from a single site or the literature. Just as simple estimates of lambda are often used to assess population viability, the principles of diffusion and CMP could provide a starting place for estimating MAR for conservation.

  4. Molecular Mapping of Movement-Associated Areas in the Avian Brain: A Motor Theory for Vocal Learning Origin

    PubMed Central

    Feenders, Gesa; Liedvogel, Miriam; Rivas, Miriam; Zapka, Manuela; Horita, Haruhito; Hara, Erina; Wada, Kazuhiro; Mouritsen, Henrik; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2008-01-01

    Vocal learning is a critical behavioral substrate for spoken human language. It is a rare trait found in three distantly related groups of birds-songbirds, hummingbirds, and parrots. These avian groups have remarkably similar systems of cerebral vocal nuclei for the control of learned vocalizations that are not found in their more closely related vocal non-learning relatives. These findings led to the hypothesis that brain pathways for vocal learning in different groups evolved independently from a common ancestor but under pre-existing constraints. Here, we suggest one constraint, a pre-existing system for movement control. Using behavioral molecular mapping, we discovered that in songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds, all cerebral vocal learning nuclei are adjacent to discrete brain areas active during limb and body movements. Similar to the relationships between vocal nuclei activation and singing, activation in the adjacent areas correlated with the amount of movement performed and was independent of auditory and visual input. These same movement-associated brain areas were also present in female songbirds that do not learn vocalizations and have atrophied cerebral vocal nuclei, and in ring doves that are vocal non-learners and do not have cerebral vocal nuclei. A compilation of previous neural tracing experiments in songbirds suggests that the movement-associated areas are connected in a network that is in parallel with the adjacent vocal learning system. This study is the first global mapping that we are aware for movement-associated areas of the avian cerebrum and it indicates that brain systems that control vocal learning in distantly related birds are directly adjacent to brain systems involved in movement control. Based upon these findings, we propose a motor theory for the origin of vocal learning, this being that the brain areas specialized for vocal learning in vocal learners evolved as a specialization of a pre-existing motor pathway that controls

  5. Molecular mapping of movement-associated areas in the avian brain: a motor theory for vocal learning origin.

    PubMed

    Feenders, Gesa; Liedvogel, Miriam; Rivas, Miriam; Zapka, Manuela; Horita, Haruhito; Hara, Erina; Wada, Kazuhiro; Mouritsen, Henrik; Jarvis, Erich D

    2008-03-12

    Vocal learning is a critical behavioral substrate for spoken human language. It is a rare trait found in three distantly related groups of birds-songbirds, hummingbirds, and parrots. These avian groups have remarkably similar systems of cerebral vocal nuclei for the control of learned vocalizations that are not found in their more closely related vocal non-learning relatives. These findings led to the hypothesis that brain pathways for vocal learning in different groups evolved independently from a common ancestor but under pre-existing constraints. Here, we suggest one constraint, a pre-existing system for movement control. Using behavioral molecular mapping, we discovered that in songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds, all cerebral vocal learning nuclei are adjacent to discrete brain areas active during limb and body movements. Similar to the relationships between vocal nuclei activation and singing, activation in the adjacent areas correlated with the amount of movement performed and was independent of auditory and visual input. These same movement-associated brain areas were also present in female songbirds that do not learn vocalizations and have atrophied cerebral vocal nuclei, and in ring doves that are vocal non-learners and do not have cerebral vocal nuclei. A compilation of previous neural tracing experiments in songbirds suggests that the movement-associated areas are connected in a network that is in parallel with the adjacent vocal learning system. This study is the first global mapping that we are aware for movement-associated areas of the avian cerebrum and it indicates that brain systems that control vocal learning in distantly related birds are directly adjacent to brain systems involved in movement control. Based upon these findings, we propose a motor theory for the origin of vocal learning, this being that the brain areas specialized for vocal learning in vocal learners evolved as a specialization of a pre-existing motor pathway that controls

  6. 77 FR 23598 - Technical Amendment to Cuba Airport List: Addition of Recently Approved Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport Southwest Florida.../Fort Worth International Airport. Fort Lauderdale, Florida Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood...

  7. Residency times and patterns of movement of postbreeding dunlin on a subarctic staging area in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warnock, Nils; Handel, Colleen M.; Gill, Robert E.; McCaffery, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how individuals use key resources is critical for effective conservation of a population. The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska is the most important postbreeding staging area for shorebirds in the subarctic North Pacific, yet little is known about movements of shorebirds there during the postbreeding period. To address this information gap, we studied residency times and patterns of movement of 17 adult and 17 juvenile radio-marked Dunlin (Calidris alpina) on the YKD between early August and early October 2005. Throughout this postbreeding period, during which Dunlin were molting, most birds were relocated within a 130 km radius of their capture site on the YKD, but three birds were relocated more than 600 km to the south at estuaries along the Alaska Peninsula. On average, juvenile Dunlin were relocated farther away from the banding site (median relocation distance = 36.3 km) than adult Dunlin (median relocation distance = 8.8 km). Post-capture, minimum lengths of stay by Dunlin on the YKD were not significantly different between juveniles (median = 19 days) and adults (median = 23 days), with some birds staging for more than 50 days. Body mass at time of capture was the best single variable explaining length of stay on the YKD, with average length of stay decreasing by 2.5 days per additional gram of body mass at time of capture. Conservation efforts for postbreeding shorebirds should consider patterns of resource use that may differ not only by age cohort but also by individual condition.

  8. Planning for New Primary Airports in the United States: A Survey of Metropolitan Planning Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NewMyer, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Airport congestion at primary airports in major metropolitan areas was analyzed in a report prepared by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in 1990. Taking the top twenty-three most congested airports from this study, a questionnaire was prepared and sent to the metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) for twenty of the twenty-three metropolitan areas represented in the TRB study, The questionnaire focused on the role of the MPOs in planning for new primary airports in the United States, including questions about the status of the most recent MPO airport system plan, whether or not the latest plan recommends a new primary airport, and whether or not any other entities in the MPO areas are recommending new primary airports. The results indicated that 44.4 percent of the eighteen respondent MPOs have airport system plans that are five years old or older. Also, only two of the respondent MPOs have recommended a new primary airport in their latest regional airport system plan and only one of these two is a common recommendation in the Federal Aviation Administration's National Plan of Integrated Airport System.

  9. Planning for New Primary Airports in the United States: A Survey of Metropolitan Planning Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NewMeyer, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Airport congestion at primary airports in major metropolitan areas was analyzed in a report prepared by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in 1990. Taking the top twenty-three most congested airports from this study, a questionnaire was prepared and sent to the metropolitan planning organizations (MPOS) for twenty of the twenty-three metropolitan areas represented in the TRB study. The questionnaire focused on the role of the MPOs in planning for new primary airports in the United States, including questions about the status of the most recent MPO airport system plan, whether or not the latest plan recommends a new primary airport, and whether or not any other entities in the MPO areas are recommending new primary airports. The results indicated that 44.4 percent of the eighteen respondent MPOs have airport system plans that are five years old or older. Also, only two of the respondent MPOs have recommended a new primary airport in their latest regional airport system plan and only one of these two is a common recommendation in the Federal Aviation Administration's National Plan of Integrated Airport System.

  10. Insights from the supplementary motor area syndrome in balancing movement initiation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Potgieser, A. R. E.; de Jong, B. M.; Wagemakers, M.; Hoving, E. W.; Groen, R. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The supplementary motor area (SMA) syndrome is a characteristic neurosurgical syndrome that can occur after unilateral resection of the SMA. Clinical symptoms may vary from none to a global akinesia, predominantly on the contralateral side, with preserved muscle strength and mutism. A remarkable feature is that these symptoms completely resolve within weeks to months, leaving only a disturbance in alternating bimanual movements. In this review we give an overview of the old and new insights from the SMA syndrome and extrapolate these findings to seemingly unrelated diseases and symptoms such as Parkinson’s disease (PD) and tics. Furthermore, we integrate findings from lesion, stimulation and functional imaging studies to provide insight in the motor function of the SMA. PMID:25506324

  11. NDVI from Landsat 8 Vegetation Indices to Study Movement Dynamics of Capra Ibex in Mountain Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirotti, F.; Parraga, M. A.; Stuaro, E.; Dubbini, M.; Masiero, A.; Ramanzin, M.

    2014-09-01

    In this study we analyse the correlation between the spatial positions of Capra ibex (mountain goat) on an hourly basis and the information obtained from vegetation indices extracted from Landsat 8 datasets. Eight individuals were tagged with a collar with a GNSS receiver and their position was recorded every hour since the beginning of 2013 till 2014 (still ongoing); a total of 16 Landsat 8 cloud-free datasets overlapped that area during that time period. All images were brought to a reference radiometric level and NDVI was calculated. To assess behaviour of animal movement, NDVI values were extracted at each position (i.e. every hour). A daily "area of influence" was calculated by spatially creating a convex hull perimeter around the 24 points relative to each day, and then applying a 120 m buffer (figure 4). In each buffer a set of 24 points was randomly chosen and NDVI values again extracted. Statistical analysis and significance testing supported the hypothesis of the pseudo-random NDVI values to be have, in average, lower values than the real NDVI values, with a p value of 0.129 for not paired t test and p value of < 0.001 for pairwise t test. This is still a first study which will go more in depth in near future by testing models to see if the animal movements in different periods of the year follow in some way the phenological stage of vegetation. Different aspects have to be accounted for, such as the behaviour of animals when not feeding (e.g. resting) and the statistical significance of daily distributions, which might be improved by analysing broader gaps of time.

  12. 7 CFR 301.75-8 - Interstate movement of regulated seed from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-8 Interstate movement of regulated seed from... interstate movement, no plants or plant parts infected with or exposed to citrus canker were found in...

  13. 7 CFR 301.75-8 - Interstate movement of regulated seed from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-8 Interstate movement of regulated seed from... interstate movement, no plants or plant parts infected with or exposed to citrus canker were found in...

  14. 7 CFR 301.75-8 - Interstate movement of regulated seed from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-8 Interstate movement of regulated seed from... interstate movement, no plants or plant parts infected with or exposed to citrus canker were found in...

  15. 7 CFR 301.75-8 - Interstate movement of regulated seed from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-8 Interstate movement of regulated seed from... interstate movement, no plants or plant parts infected with or exposed to citrus canker were found in...

  16. 7 CFR 301.75-8 - Interstate movement of regulated seed from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-8 Interstate movement of regulated seed from... interstate movement, no plants or plant parts infected with or exposed to citrus canker were found in...

  17. Low back load in airport baggage handlers.

    PubMed

    Koblauch, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    Low back pain (LBP) constitutes a major economic problem in many countries. The causes of LBP are still largely unknown and several risk factors have been suggested including heavy lifting, which causes high compression forces of the tissues in the low back. Micro-fractures in the endplates of the vertebrae caused by compression forces have been suggested as a source of unspecific pain. Although airport baggage handlers exhibit a high prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints the amount of biomechanical research within this and similar areas is limited. The aims of this thesis were to perform a general description of the lumbar loading in baggage handlers (Paper I), to develop a generically useful tool to examine specific lumbar compression in a valid manner (Paper II & III), and to investigate the spinal loading in common work tasks for baggage handlers. (Paper III). We recorded electromyography during baggage handling in the baggage hall, by a conveyor, and inside the aircraft baggage compartment. Electromyography was analyzed using amplitude probability distribution functions (APDF) on both tasks and full day recordings and root mean square (RMS) values on tasks. Furthermore, we estimated L4/L5 compression and moment along with shoulder flexor moment with a Watbak model based on more specific subtasks. In addition, we built an inverse dynamics-based musculoskeletal computer model using the AnyBody Modeling System (AMS). Motion capture recorded the movements in 3D during a stooped and a kneeling lifting task simulating airport baggage handler work. Marker trajectories were used to drive the model. The AMS-models computed estimated compression forces, shear forces and the moments around the L4/L5 joint. The compression forces were used for comparison with the vertebral compression tolerances reported in the literature. The RMS muscle activity was high in all tasks. The average peak RMS muscle activity was up to 120% EMGmax in the erector spinae during the baggage

  18. Airport Land Banking.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    the Secretary of Transportation to conduct a study with respect to the feasibility, practicability, and cost of land bank planning and development...1977. Airport land banking was studied and analyzed from several different perspectives, including legal, economic, and financial, and the results of this study are reported in this document. (Author)

  19. Data on noise environments at different times of day around airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Sources of information about noise environments at different times of the day at civilian and military airports are identified. Information about movements of scheduled flights are available in machine readable form from the Official Airline Guide. Information about permanent noise monitoring sites is readily obtained from individual airports. Limited data on the timing of flights are available at centralized locations for military airports. An examination of scheduled flights at commercial airports leads to the conclusion that differences between daytime and nighttime noise levels (measured in Equivalent Continuous Noise Level, LEQ) vary from 7 to 15 decibels. Data from 128 permanent noise monitoring sites at 11 airports are also examined. Differences between daytime and nighttime noise levels at these 128 noise monitoring sites vary from 3 to 17 decibels (LEQ). Preliminary analyses suggest that accurate estimates of time-of-day weights could not be obtained from conventional social surveys at existing airports.

  20. 9 CFR 82.5 - Interstate movement of live birds and live poultry from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... live poultry from a quarantined area. 82.5 Section 82.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.5 Interstate movement of live birds and live poultry from a quarantined area. (a) Pet...

  1. 9 CFR 82.6 - Interstate movement of dead birds and dead poultry from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... dead poultry from a quarantined area. 82.6 Section 82.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.6 Interstate movement of dead birds and dead poultry from a quarantined area. (a) Except...

  2. 9 CFR 82.5 - Interstate movement of live birds and live poultry from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... live poultry from a quarantined area. 82.5 Section 82.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS NEWCASTLE DISEASE AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Newcastle Disease § 82.5 Interstate movement of live birds and live poultry from a quarantined area. (a) Pet birds. An individual may move...

  3. 9 CFR 82.6 - Interstate movement of dead birds and dead poultry from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dead poultry from a quarantined area. 82.6 Section 82.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS NEWCASTLE DISEASE AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Newcastle Disease § 82.6 Interstate movement of dead birds and dead poultry from a quarantined area. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b)...

  4. 9 CFR 82.6 - Interstate movement of dead birds and dead poultry from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... dead poultry from a quarantined area. 82.6 Section 82.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.6 Interstate movement of dead birds and dead poultry from a quarantined area. (a) Except...

  5. 9 CFR 82.5 - Interstate movement of live birds and live poultry from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... live poultry from a quarantined area. 82.5 Section 82.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE (END) AND CHLAMYDI-OSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.5 Interstate movement of live birds and live poultry from a quarantined area. (a) Pet...

  6. 9 CFR 82.6 - Interstate movement of dead birds and dead poultry from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... dead poultry from a quarantined area. 82.6 Section 82.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE (END) AND CHLAMYDI-OSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.6 Interstate movement of dead birds and dead poultry from a quarantined area. (a) Except...

  7. 9 CFR 82.5 - Interstate movement of live birds and live poultry from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... live poultry from a quarantined area. 82.5 Section 82.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DIS- EASE (END) AND CHLAMYDIOSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.5 Interstate movement of live birds and live poultry from a quarantined area. (a) Pet...

  8. 9 CFR 82.5 - Interstate movement of live birds and live poultry from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... live poultry from a quarantined area. 82.5 Section 82.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE (END) AND CHLAMYDI-OSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.5 Interstate movement of live birds and live poultry from a quarantined area. (a) Pet...

  9. 9 CFR 82.6 - Interstate movement of dead birds and dead poultry from a quarantined area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... dead poultry from a quarantined area. 82.6 Section 82.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS EXOTIC NEWCASTLE DISEASE (END) AND CHLAMYDI-OSIS Exotic Newcastle Disease (END) § 82.6 Interstate movement of dead birds and dead poultry from a quarantined area. (a) Except...

  10. 7 CFR 301.51-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... regulated articles from quarantined areas. 301.51-4 Section 301.51-4 Agriculture Regulations of the... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Asian Longhorned Beetle § 301.51-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas. (a) Any regulated article may be moved interstate...

  11. Study Results on Knowledge Requirements for Entry-Level Airport Operations and Management Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilty, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper identifies important topical knowledge areas required of individuals employed in airport operations and management positions. A total of 116 airport managers and airfield operations personnel responded to a survey that sought to identify the importance of various subject matter for entry level airport operations personnel. The results from this study add to the body of research on aviation management curriculum development and can be used to better develop university curriculum and supplemental training focused on airport management and operations. Recommendations are made for specialized airport courses within aviation management programs. Further, this study identifies for job seekers or individuals employed in entry level positions those knowledge requirements deemed important by airport managers and operations personnel at different sized airports.

  12. Shallow Groundwater Movement in the Skagit River Delta Area, Skagit County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savoca, Mark E.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Fasser, Elisabeth T.

    2009-01-01

    Shallow groundwater movement in an area between the lower Skagit River and Puget Sound was characterized by the U.S. Geological Survey to assist Skagit County and the Washington State Department of Ecology with the identification of areas where water withdrawals from existing and new wells could adversely affect streamflow in the Skagit River. The shallow groundwater system consists of alluvial, lahar runout, and recessional outwash deposits composed of sand, gravel, and cobbles, with minor lenses of silt and clay. Upland areas are underlain by glacial till and outwash deposits that show evidence of terrestrial and shallow marine depositional environments. Bedrock exposures are limited to a few upland outcrops in the southwestern part of the study area, and consist of metamorphic, sedimentary, and igneous rocks. Water levels were measured in 47 wells on a quarterly basis (August 2007, November 2007, February 2008, and May 2008). Measurements from 34 wells completed in the shallow groundwater system were used to construct groundwater-level and flow-direction maps and perform a linear-regression analysis to estimate the overall, time averaged shallow groundwater-flow direction and gradient. Groundwater flow in the shallow groundwater system generally moves in a southwestward direction away from the Skagit River and toward the Swinomish Channel and Skagit Bay. Local groundwater flow towards the river was inferred during February 2008 in areas west and southwest of Mount Vernon. Water-level altitudes varied seasonally, however, and generally ranged from less than 3 feet (August 2007) in the west to about 15 feet (May 2008) in the east. The time-averaged, shallow groundwater-flow direction derived from regression analysis, 8.5 deg south of west, was similar to flow directions depicted on the quarterly water-level maps. Seasonal changes in groundwater levels in most wells in the Skagit River Delta follow a typical pattern for shallow wells in western Washington. Water

  13. 14 CFR 221.52 - Airport to airport application, accessorial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport to airport application, accessorial... Charges § 221.52 Airport to airport application, accessorial services. Tariffs shall specify whether or not the fares therein include services in addition to airport-to-airport transportation....

  14. 14 CFR 221.52 - Airport to airport application, accessorial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport to airport application, accessorial... Charges § 221.52 Airport to airport application, accessorial services. Tariffs shall specify whether or not the fares therein include services in addition to airport-to-airport transportation....

  15. Coarse-to-fine wavelet-based airport detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Wang, Shuigen; Pang, Zhaofeng; Zhao, Baojun

    2015-10-01

    Airport detection on optical remote sensing images has attracted great interest in the applications of military optics scout and traffic control. However, most of the popular techniques for airport detection from optical remote sensing images have three weaknesses: 1) Due to the characteristics of optical images, the detection results are often affected by imaging conditions, like weather situation and imaging distortion; and 2) optical images contain comprehensive information of targets, so that it is difficult for extracting robust features (e.g., intensity and textural information) to represent airport area; 3) the high resolution results in large data volume, which makes real-time processing limited. Most of the previous works mainly focus on solving one of those problems, and thus, the previous methods cannot achieve the balance of performance and complexity. In this paper, we propose a novel coarse-to-fine airport detection framework to solve aforementioned three issues using wavelet coefficients. The framework includes two stages: 1) an efficient wavelet-based feature extraction is adopted for multi-scale textural feature representation, and support vector machine(SVM) is exploited for classifying and coarsely deciding airport candidate region; and then 2) refined line segment detection is used to obtain runway and landing field of airport. Finally, airport recognition is achieved by applying the fine runway positioning to the candidate regions. Experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms the existing algorithms in terms of detection accuracy and processing efficiency.

  16. Movement of moisture in the unsaturated zone in a loess-mantled area, southwestern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prill, Robert C.

    1977-01-01

    A study of moisture movement associated with ponding near Garden City, Kansas, indicates that loess-manted areas have excellent potential for artificial recharge by water spreading. Infiltration stabilized at rates ranging from 0.7 to 2.2 feet (0.2 to 0.7 meter) per day reflecting changes in hydraulic conductivity of soil horizons. Results of the study indicate that the underlying loess has the capacity to temporarily store about 1 cubic foot (0.03 cubic meter) of water for each 6 cubic feet (0.17 cubic meter) of material. Owing to relatively high hydraulic conductivities of the loess and alluvium, however, moisture continues to move through the unsaturated zone. After application of 21 feet (6 meters) of water, mounding at the water table had a maximum thickness of 2 feet (0.6 meter) at the edge of the pond. Although the boundary of mounding spread rapidly, the applied water moved slowly by lateral displacement. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. 75 FR 39090 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Gwinnett County Airport Briscoe Field (LZU), Lawrenceville, Georgia. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has completed its review of the Gwinnett County Airport Briscoe Field (LZU)...

  18. 78 FR 7476 - Airport Improvement Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Improvement Program AGENCY: Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration. ACTION: Invitation to comment on draft FAA Order 5100-38, Airport Improvement...-38D, Airport Improvement Program Handbook. When finalized, this Order will replace Order...

  19. Simulation of groundwater flow and saltwater movement in the Onslow County area, North Carolina: predevelopment-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fine, Jason M.; Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2014-01-01

    Onslow County, North Carolina, is located within the designated Central Coastal Plain Capacity Use Area (CCPCUA). The CCPCUA was designated by law as a result of groundwater level declines of as much as 200 feet during the past four decades within aquifers in rocks of Cretaceous age in the central Coastal Plain of North Carolina and a depletion of water in storage from increased groundwater withdrawals in the area. The declines and depletion of water in storage within the Cretaceous aquifers increase the potential for saltwater migration—both lateral encroachment and upward leakage of brackish water. Within the CCPCUA, a reduction in groundwater withdrawals over a period of 16 years from 2003 to 2018 is mandated. Under the CCPCUA rules, withdrawals in excess of 100,000 gallons per day from any of the Cretaceous aquifer well systems are subject to water-use reductions of as much as 75 percent. To assess the effects of the CCPCUA rules and to assist with groundwater-management decisions, a numerical model was developed to simulate the groundwater flow and chloride concentrations in the surficial Castle Hayne, Beaufort, Peedee, and Black Creek aquifers in the Onslow County area. The model was used to (1) simulate groundwater flow from 1900 to 2010; (2) assess chloride movement throughout the aquifer system; and (3) create hypothetical scenarios of future groundwater development. After calibration of a groundwater flow model and conversion to a variable-density model, five scenarios were created to simulate future groundwater conditions in the Onslow County area: (1) full implementation of the CCPCUA rules with three phases of withdrawal reductions simulated through 2028; (2) implementation of only phase 1 withdrawal reductions of the CCPCUA rules and simulated through 2028; (3) implementation of only phases 1 and 2 withdrawal reductions of the CCPCUA rules and simulated through 2028; (4) full implementation of the CCPCUA rules with the addition of withdrawals from

  20. Intelligent building system for airport

    SciTech Connect

    Ancevic, M.

    1997-11-01

    The Munich airport uses a state-of-the-art intelligent building management system to control systems such as HVAC, runway lights, baggage handling, etc. Planning the new Munich II international airport provided a unique opportunity to use the latest state-of-the-art technical systems, while integrating their control through a single intelligent building management system. Opened in 1992, the airport is Germany`s second-largest airport after Frankfurt. The airport is staffed by 16,000 employees and can handle 17 million passengers a year. The sprawling site encompasses more than 120 buildings. The airport`s distributed control system is specifically designed to optimize the complex`s unique range of functions, while providing a high degree of comfort, convenience and safety for airport visitors. With the capacity to control 200,000 points, this system controls more than 112,000 points and integrates 13 major subsystems from nine different vendors. It provides convenient, accessible control of everything including the complex`s power plant, HVAC Control, the terminal`s people-moving functions, interior lighting controls, runway lights, baggage forwarding systems, elevators, and boarding bridges. The airport was named 1993 intelligent building of the year by the Intelligent Buildings Institute Foundation. Its building management system is a striking example of the degree to which a building complex`s functions can be integrated for greater operational control and efficiency.

  1. Integration of seawater and grey water reuse to maximize alternative water resource for coastal areas: the case of the Hong Kong International Airport.

    PubMed

    Leung, R W K; Li, D C H; Yu, W K; Chui, H K; Lee, T O; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Chen, G H

    2012-01-01

    Development, population growth and climate change have pressurized water stress in the world. Being an urbanized coastal city, Hong Kong has adopted a dual water supply system since the 1950s for seawater toilet flushing for 80% of its 7 million inhabitants. Despite its success in saving 750,000 m(3)/day of freshwater, the saline sewage (consisting of about 20-30% of seawater) appears to have sacrificed the urban water cycle in terms of wastewater reuse and recycling. Can seawater toilet flushing be applied without affecting the urban water cycle with respect to sustainable water resource management? To address this issue, we examined the entire urban water cycle and developed an innovative water resource management system by integrating freshwater, seawater and reclaimed grey water into a sustainable, low-freshwater demand, low-energy consumption, and low-cost triple water supply (TWS) system. The applicability of this novel system has been demonstrated at the Hong Kong International Airport which reduced 52% of its freshwater demand.

  2. An Interaction-Network Instrument to Assess Pupil-Interaction and Movement in Open-Area Learning Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Peter

    The study was conducted to gain an understanding of pupil-interaction and pupil-movement in an open-area learning environment. The only measures that were available were not sufficiently suitable and it was necessary to construct a new instrument to gain a valid measure of pupil behavior in a classroom setting. As a result, the Interaction-Network…

  3. 7 CFR 301.74-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Plum Pox § 301.74-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated... Departmental permit and found by the Administrator to be adequate to prevent the spread of plum pox; and (4... plum pox while in the quarantined area; (2) The regulated article's point of origin is indicated on...

  4. 7 CFR 301.74-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Plum Pox § 301.74-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated... Departmental permit and found by the Administrator to be adequate to prevent the spread of plum pox; and (4... plum pox while in the quarantined area; (2) The regulated article's point of origin is indicated on...

  5. 7 CFR 301.74-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Plum Pox § 301.74-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated... Departmental permit and found by the Administrator to be adequate to prevent the spread of plum pox; and (4... plum pox while in the quarantined area; (2) The regulated article's point of origin is indicated on...

  6. 7 CFR 301.74-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Plum Pox § 301.74-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated... Departmental permit and found by the Administrator to be adequate to prevent the spread of plum pox; and (4... plum pox while in the quarantined area; (2) The regulated article's point of origin is indicated on...

  7. 7 CFR 301.74-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Plum Pox § 301.74-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated... Departmental permit and found by the Administrator to be adequate to prevent the spread of plum pox; and (4... plum pox while in the quarantined area; (2) The regulated article's point of origin is indicated on...

  8. Spatial patterns and movements of red king and Tanner crabs: Implications for the design of marine protected areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taggart, S.J.; Mondragon, Jennifer; Andrews, A.G.; Nielsen, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    Most examples of positive population responses to marine protected areas (MPAs) have been documented for tropical reef species with very small home ranges; the utility of MPAs for commercially harvested temperate species that have large movement patterns remains poorly tested. We measured the distribution and abundance of red king Paralithodes camtschaticus and Tanner Chionoecetes bairdi crabs inside and outside of MPAs in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska, USA. By tagging a sub-sample of crabs with sonic tags, we estimated the movement of adult crabs from one of the MPAs (Muir Inlet) into the central portion of Glacier Bay where fishing still occurs. Tanner crabs and red king crabs moved similar average distances per day, although Tanner crabs had a higher transfer out of the Muir Inlet MPA into the central bay. Tanner crab movements were characterized by large variation among individual crabs, both in distance and direction traveled, while red king crabs migrated seasonally between 2 specific areas. Although Tanner crabs exhibited relatively large movements, distribution and abundance data suggest that they may be restricted at large spatial scales by habitat barriers. MPAs that are effective at protecting king and especially Tanner crab brood stock from fishing mortality will likely need to be larger than is typical of MPAs worldwide. However, by incorporating information on the seasonal movements of red king crabs and the location of habitat barriers for Tanner crabs, MPAs could likely be designed that would effectively protect adults from fishing mortality. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  9. The homosexual rights movement in the United States: a traditionally overlooked area of American history.

    PubMed

    Licata, S J

    In this short account, the homosexual rights movement in the United States, traditionally overlooked by historians, is presented as a minority movement. References are made to the European origins and the early efforts in America. The author sees eight stages in the growth of the movement. In Stage 1, from 1908 through 1945, there were sporadic individual attempts to defend the rights of homosexual men and women. In the years immediately following World War II, Stage 2 witnessed the dawning of a minority consciousness among gay people living in the cities. Stage 3, from 1950 to 1952, represented a search for identity. During the years 1952-1953, Stage 4, righteous indignation flared up within the movement. In Stage 5, from 1953 to 1960, the movement emphasized information and educational approaches. The decade of the sixties, Stage 6, brought civil-rights activism to the homophile movement. In Stage 7, beginning in 1969, gay liberation emerged. Finally, in Stage 8 (1973-1979), the movement and the government responded to each other through institutional channels. The 1970s ended with two major confrontations, giving the decade of 1969 to 1979 a unity and sense of accomplishment.

  10. 7 CFR 301.81-4 - Interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Imported Fire Ant Quarantine and Regulations § 301.81-4 Interstate movement of regulated articles from... inaccessible to the imported fire ant, or in locations that have been treated in accordance with part 305...

  11. 7 CFR 301.81-4 - Interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Imported Fire Ant Quarantine and Regulations § 301.81-4 Interstate movement of regulated articles from... inaccessible to the imported fire ant, or in locations that have been treated in accordance with part 305...

  12. 7 CFR 301.81-4 - Interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Imported Fire Ant Quarantine and Regulations § 301.81-4 Interstate movement of regulated articles from... inaccessible to the imported fire ant, or in locations that have been treated in accordance with part 305...

  13. 7 CFR 301.81-4 - Interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Imported Fire Ant Quarantine and Regulations § 301.81-4 Interstate movement of regulated articles from... inaccessible to the imported fire ant, or in locations that have been treated in accordance with part 305...

  14. 7 CFR 301.81-4 - Interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Imported Fire Ant Quarantine and Regulations § 301.81-4 Interstate movement of regulated articles from... inaccessible to the imported fire ant, or in locations that have been treated in accordance with the...

  15. Reorganization and enhanced functional connectivity of motor areas in repetitive ankle movements after training in locomotor attention.

    PubMed

    Sacco, Katiuscia; Katiuscia, Sacco; Cauda, Franco; Franco, Cauda; D'Agata, Federico; Federico, D'Agata; Mate, Davide; Davide, Mate; Duca, Sergio; Sergio, Duca; Geminiani, Giuliano; Giuliano, Geminiani

    2009-11-10

    We examined the functional changes in the activity of the cerebral areas involved in motor tasks, prior to and following a 1-week period of locomotor attention training consisting of physical and mental practice, in normal subjects. In a previous study, we examined the effect of the same kind of training on motor circuits using an fMRI paradigm of motor imagery. In this work, we investigated whether the expanded activations found in the previous study were present also using an overt foot motor task consisting of ankle dorsiflexion; a control task requiring hand movements was also administered. In this article, we also discuss the changes in functional connectivity between the pretraining and posttraining conditions during foot movements. The foot task showed a posttraining reorganization of the sensorimotor areas, which is in line with earlier studies on lower limb motor learning, while the control hand movement task only produced a modification in the left premotor cortex. These results confirm the effect of training on functional reorganization and underline its task specificity. After training, we also observed enhanced connectivity in the sensorimotor areas, suggesting that functional connectivity of the sensorimotor network can be modulated by focusing attention on the movements involved in ambulation.

  16. 75 FR 70081 - Notice of Release From Federal Grant Assurance Obligations for Tucson International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... building code because the parking area will be too small. The Tucson Airport Authority has agreed to sell... used for parking by the neighboring commercial property owner. The property line was not correctly stacked causing the parking area to encroach into airport property. If the commercial property...

  17. An fMRI study dissociating distance measures computed by Broca's area in movement processing: clause boundary vs. identity.

    PubMed

    Santi, Andrea; Friederici, Angela D; Makuuchi, Michiru; Grodzinsky, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral studies of sentence comprehension suggest that processing long-distance dependencies is subject to interference effects when Noun Phrases (NP) similar to the dependency head intervene in the dependency. Neuroimaging studies converge in localizing such effects to Broca's area, showing that activity in Broca's area increases with the number of NP interveners crossed by a moved NP of the same type. To test if NP interference effects are modulated by adding an intervening clause boundary, which should by hypothesis increase the number of successive-cyclic movements, we conducted an fMRI study contrasting NP interveners with clausal (CP) interveners. Our design thus had two components: (I) the number of NP interveners crossed by movement was parametrically modulated; (II) CP-intervention was contrasted with NP-intervention. The number of NP interveners parametrically modulated a cluster straddling left BA44/45 of Broca's area, replicating earlier studies. Adding an intervening clause boundary did not significantly modulate the size of the NP interference effect in Broca's area. Yet, such an interaction effect was observed in the Superior Frontal Gyrus (SFG). Therefore, the involvement of Broca's area in processing syntactic movement is best captured by memory mechanisms affected by a grammatically instantiated type-identity (i.e., NP) intervention.

  18. Representation of continuous hand and arm movements in macaque areas M1, F5, and AIP: a comparative decoding study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menz, Veera Katharina; Schaffelhofer, Stefan; Scherberger, Hansjörg

    2015-10-01

    Objective. In the last decade, multiple brain areas have been investigated with respect to their decoding capability of continuous arm or hand movements. So far, these studies have mainly focused on motor or premotor areas like M1 and F5. However, there is accumulating evidence that anterior intraparietal area (AIP) in the parietal cortex also contains information about continuous movement. Approach. In this study, we decoded 27 degrees of freedom representing complete hand and arm kinematics during a delayed grasping task from simultaneously recorded activity in areas M1, F5, and AIP of two macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Main results. We found that all three areas provided decoding performances that lay significantly above chance. In particular, M1 yielded highest decoding accuracy followed by F5 and AIP. Furthermore, we provide support for the notion that AIP does not only code categorical visual features of objects to be grasped, but also contains a substantial amount of temporal kinematic information. Significance. This fact could be utilized in future developments of neural interfaces restoring hand and arm movements.

  19. An fMRI study dissociating distance measures computed by Broca's area in movement processing: clause boundary vs. identity

    PubMed Central

    Santi, Andrea; Friederici, Angela D.; Makuuchi, Michiru; Grodzinsky, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral studies of sentence comprehension suggest that processing long-distance dependencies is subject to interference effects when Noun Phrases (NP) similar to the dependency head intervene in the dependency. Neuroimaging studies converge in localizing such effects to Broca's area, showing that activity in Broca's area increases with the number of NP interveners crossed by a moved NP of the same type. To test if NP interference effects are modulated by adding an intervening clause boundary, which should by hypothesis increase the number of successive-cyclic movements, we conducted an fMRI study contrasting NP interveners with clausal (CP) interveners. Our design thus had two components: (I) the number of NP interveners crossed by movement was parametrically modulated; (II) CP-intervention was contrasted with NP-intervention. The number of NP interveners parametrically modulated a cluster straddling left BA44/45 of Broca's area, replicating earlier studies. Adding an intervening clause boundary did not significantly modulate the size of the NP interference effect in Broca's area. Yet, such an interaction effect was observed in the Superior Frontal Gyrus (SFG). Therefore, the involvement of Broca's area in processing syntactic movement is best captured by memory mechanisms affected by a grammatically instantiated type-identity (i.e., NP) intervention. PMID:26042078

  20. The systems approach to airport security: The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration)/BWI (Baltimore-Washington International) Airport demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, D.L.; Olascoaga, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in designing, installing and evaluating security systems for various applications during the past 15 years. A systems approach to security that evolved from this experience was applied to aviation security for the Federal Aviation Administration. A general systems study of aviation security in the United States was concluded in 1987. One result of the study was a recommendation that an enhanced security system concept designed to meet specified objectives be demonstrated at an operational airport. Baltimore-Washington International Airport was selected as the site for the demonstration project which began in 1988 and will be completed in 1992. This article introduced the systems approach to airport security and discussed its application at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. Examples of design features that could be included in an enhanced security concept also were presented, including details of the proposed Ramps Area Intrusion Detection System (RAIDS).

  1. Maternal dexamethasone exposure inhibits the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal movement in the preoptic area of rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wei Ling; Soga, Tomoko; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2014-01-01

    Migration and final positioning of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the preoptic area (POA) is critical for reproduction. It is known that maternal dexamethasone (DEX) exposure impairs reproductive function and behaviour in the offspring. However, it is still not known whether maternal DEX exposure affects the postnatal GnRH neurons in the offspring. This study determined the neuronal movement of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged GnRH neurons in slice culture of postnatal day 0 (P0), P5 and P50-60 transgenic male rats. Effect of maternal DEX treatment on EGFP-GnRH neuronal movement and F-actin distribution on GnRH neurons at P0 stage were studied. Time-lapse analysis of P0 and P5 EGFP-GnRH neurons displayed active cellular movement within the POA compared to young adult P50-60 stages, suggesting possible fine-tuning movement for positioning of early postnatal GnRH neurons. The DEX-treated EGFP-GnRH neurons demonstrated decreased motility in the POA and reduced F-actin distribution in the GnRH neurons at 60 h culture compared to the vehicle-treated. These results suggest that the P0 GnRH neuronal movement in the POA is altered by maternal DEX exposure, which possibly disrupts the fine-tuning process for positioning and development of early postnatal GnRH neurons in the brain, potentially linked to reproductive dysfunction in adulthood.

  2. Cortical area inducing chewing-like rhythmical jaw movements and its connections with thalamic nuclei in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Fumihiko; Kato, Takafumi; Fujimoto, Masaichiro; Toi, Shoko; Oka, Ayaka; Adachi, Tadafumi; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Morimoto, Toshifumi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Masuda, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    Repetitive electrical stimulation to the cortical masticatory areas (CMA) evokes rhythmical jaw movements (RJM), whose patterns vary depending on the stimulation site, in various species. In guinea pigs, although alternating bilateral jaw movements are usually seen during natural chewing, it is still unclear which cortical areas are responsible for chewing-like RJM. To address this issue, we first defined the cortical areas inducing chewing-like RJM by intracortical microstimulation. Stimulation of the most lateral area of the CMA, the granular cortex, induced chewing-like RJM, but from the region medial to this area, simple vertical RJM were induced. Subsequently, to reveal the properties of these two areas in the CMA, the connections between the CMA and the dorsal thalamus were examined by neuronal tract-tracing techniques. The area inducing chewing-like RJM possessed strong reciprocal connections, mainly with the medial part of the ventral posteromedial nucleus, which is the sensory-relay thalamus. On the other hand, the simple vertical RJM-inducing area had reciprocal connections with the motor thalamus. The present study suggests that the CMA inducing chewing-like RJM is different from the CMA inducing simple vertical RJM, and plays a role in cortically induced chewing-like RJM under the influence of the sensory thalamus in guinea pigs.

  3. 14 CFR 139.339 - Airport condition reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., safety areas, or loading ramps and parking areas. (3) Snow, ice, slush, or water on the movement area or loading ramps and parking areas. (4) Snow piled or drifted on or near movement areas contrary to §...

  4. 14 CFR 139.339 - Airport condition reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., safety areas, or loading ramps and parking areas. (3) Snow, ice, slush, or water on the movement area or loading ramps and parking areas. (4) Snow piled or drifted on or near movement areas contrary to §...

  5. 14 CFR 139.339 - Airport condition reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., safety areas, or loading ramps and parking areas. (3) Snow, ice, slush, or water on the movement area or loading ramps and parking areas. (4) Snow piled or drifted on or near movement areas contrary to §...

  6. Mass movements of lowland areas in long range TLS and ALS monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyszkowski, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The development of geodynamic processes in lowland areas remains an interesting issue for geomorphology and geology as well as civil engineering. Landslides, slumps, slope washes, rills and gully erosion are considered both geomorphological processes and natural hazards. In order to know precisely their origin and development, it is crucial to determine the rate and direction of their change. Previously such studies used geodesy and photogrammetry but the recent progress in the LiDAR technology allows collecting the data in a wider range and comparable or higher precision than most of geodetic methods. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is also a good tool, but high costs and low frequency of the surveys make it difficult to trace the dynamics of the studied phenomena and processes. Nevertheless, this method enables gathering information from large areas, which is useful for the preliminary identification of the research issues and nomination of the areas for subsequent case studies. It is, however, more common to use Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) for the detailed studies of morphology and its change. This method provides mobility and high accuracy, and enables frequent measurements. The problem in the analysis of many geoprocesses lies in the limited range of this method. This study concerns the Lower Vistula Valley located in northern Poland. It presents the results of measurements of landslides located in the escarpment zone of a big river valley. The object of the studies is mass movements developing within the quaternary deposits on the valley slopes. These processes were monitored in previous years with the traditional survey methods, mainly based on the geodesy field observations (benchmark) as well as the analyses of historical maps and archives. The ALS method used during the study enabled gathering the data on the valley with the density of 8 points per sq m, which provided the background for the consecutive monitoring study. In the surveys a terrestrial

  7. Four-dimensional modeling of recent vertical movements in the area of the southern California uplift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vanicek, Petr; Elliot, Michael R.; Castle, Robert O.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical technique that utilizes scattered geodetic relevelings and tide-gauge records to portray Recent vertical crustal movements that may have been characterized by spasmodic changes in velocity. The technique is based on the fitting of a time-varying algebraic surface of prescribed degree to the geodetic data treated as tilt elements and to tide-gauge readings treated as point movements. Desired variations in time can be selected as any combination of powers of vertical movement velocity and episodic events. The state of the modeled vertical displacement can be shown for any number of dates for visual display. Statistical confidence limits of the modeled displacements, derived from the density of measurements in both space and time, line length, and accuracy of input data, are also provided. The capabilities of the technique are demonstrated on selected data from the region of the southern California uplift. 

  8. A Cross-Sectional Study of Tobacco Advertising, Promotion, and Sponsorship in Airports across Europe and the United States.

    PubMed

    Soong, Andrea; Navas-Acien, Ana; Pang, Yuanjie; Lopez, Maria Jose; Garcia-Esquinas, Esther; Stillman, Frances A

    2016-09-28

    Tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship (TAPS) bans are effective and are increasingly being implemented in a number of venues and countries, yet the state of TAPS in airports and their effect on airport smoking behavior is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of TAPS in airports across Europe and the US, and to begin to examine the relationship between TAPS and smoking behaviors in airports. We used a cross-sectional study design to observe 21 airports in Europe (11) and the US (10). Data collectors observed points of sale for tobacco products, types of products sold, advertisements and promotions, and branding or logos that appeared in the airport. Tobacco products were sold in 95% of all airports, with significantly more sales in Europe than the US. Advertisements appeared mostly in post-security areas; however, airports with advertisements in pre-security areas had significantly more smokers observed outdoors than airports without advertisements in pre-security areas. Tobacco branding appeared in designated smoking rooms as well as on non-tobacco products in duty free shops. TAPS are widespread in airports in Europe and the US and might be associated with outdoor smoking, though further research is needed to better understand any relationship between the two. This study adds to a growing body of research on tobacco control in air transit and related issues. As smoke-free policies advance, they should include comprehensive TAPS bans that extend to airport facilities.

  9. A Cross-Sectional Study of Tobacco Advertising, Promotion, and Sponsorship in Airports across Europe and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Andrea; Navas-Acien, Ana; Pang, Yuanjie; Lopez, Maria Jose; Garcia-Esquinas, Esther; Stillman, Frances A.

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship (TAPS) bans are effective and are increasingly being implemented in a number of venues and countries, yet the state of TAPS in airports and their effect on airport smoking behavior is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of TAPS in airports across Europe and the US, and to begin to examine the relationship between TAPS and smoking behaviors in airports. We used a cross-sectional study design to observe 21 airports in Europe (11) and the US (10). Data collectors observed points of sale for tobacco products, types of products sold, advertisements and promotions, and branding or logos that appeared in the airport. Tobacco products were sold in 95% of all airports, with significantly more sales in Europe than the US. Advertisements appeared mostly in post-security areas; however, airports with advertisements in pre-security areas had significantly more smokers observed outdoors than airports without advertisements in pre-security areas. Tobacco branding appeared in designated smoking rooms as well as on non-tobacco products in duty free shops. TAPS are widespread in airports in Europe and the US and might be associated with outdoor smoking, though further research is needed to better understand any relationship between the two. This study adds to a growing body of research on tobacco control in air transit and related issues. As smoke-free policies advance, they should include comprehensive TAPS bans that extend to airport facilities. PMID:27690072

  10. The Airport Gate Assignment Problem: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleb, Mageed A.; Salem, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    The airport gate assignment problem (AGAP) is one of the most important problems operations managers face daily. Many researches have been done to solve this problem and tackle its complexity. The objective of the task is assigning each flight (aircraft) to an available gate while maximizing both conveniences to passengers and the operational efficiency of airport. This objective requires a solution that provides the ability to change and update the gate assignment data on a real time basis. In this paper, we survey the state of the art of these problems and the various methods to obtain the solution. Our survey covers both theoretical and real AGAP with the description of mathematical formulations and resolution methods such as exact algorithms, heuristic algorithms, and metaheuristic algorithms. We also provide a research trend that can inspire researchers about new problems in this area. PMID:25506074

  11. Building Airport Surface HITL Simulation Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinn, Fay Cherie

    2016-01-01

    FutureFlight Central is a high fidelity, real-time simulator designed to study surface operations and automation. As an air traffic control tower simulator, FFC allows stakeholders such as the FAA, controllers, pilots, airports, and airlines to develop and test advanced surface and terminal area concepts and automation including NextGen and beyond automation concepts and tools. These technologies will improve the safety, capacity and environmental issues facing the National Airspace system. FFC also has extensive video streaming capabilities, which combined with the 3-D database capability makes the facility ideal for any research needing an immersive virtual and or video environment. FutureFlight Central allows human in the loop testing which accommodates human interactions and errors giving a more complete picture than fast time simulations. This presentation describes FFCs capabilities and the components necessary to build an airport surface human in the loop simulation capability.

  12. Airport Pricing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pels, Eric; Verhoef, Erik T.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional economic wisdom suggests that congestion pricing would be an appropriate response to cope with the growing congestion levels currently experienced at many airports. Several characteristics of aviation markets, however, may make naive congestion prices equal to the value of marginal travel delays a non-optimal response. This paper has developed a model of airport pricing that captures a number of these features. The model in particular reflects that airlines typically have market power and are engaged in oligopolistic competition at different sub-markets; that part of external travel delays that aircraft impose are internal to an operator and hence should not be accounted for in congestion tolls. We presented an analytical treatment for a simple bi-nodal symmetric network, which through the use of 'hyper-networks' would be readily applicable to dynamic problems (in discrete time) such as peak - off-peak differences, and some numerical exercises for the same symmetric network, which was only designed to illustrate the possible comparative static impacts of tolling, in addition to marginal equilibrium conditions as could be derived for the general model specification. Some main conclusions are that second-best optimal tolls are typically lower than what would be suggested by congestion costs alone and may even be negative, and that the toll as derived by Brueckner (2002) may not lead to an increase in total welfare. While Brueckner (2002) has made clear that congestion tolls on airports may be smaller than expected when congestion costs among aircraft are internal for a firm, our analysis adds to this that a further downward adjustment may be in order due to market power. The presence of market power (which causes prices to exceed marginal costs) may cause the pure congestion toll to be suboptimal, because the resulting decrease in demand is too high (the pure congestion tall does not take into account the decrease in consumer surplus). The various

  13. 77 FR 4394 - Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL AGENCY... provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties 12.4 acres at the Orlando Executive Airport... restrictions of a Quitclaim Deed agreement, dated August 9, 1961, between the subject airport and the...

  14. 19 CFR 122.84 - Intermediate airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intermediate airport. 122.84 Section 122.84... Intermediate airport. (a) Application. The provisions of this section apply at any U.S. airport to which an... aircraft arrives at the next airport, the aircraft commander or agent shall make entry by filing the:...

  15. 14 CFR 125.49 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport requirements. 125.49 Section 125.49... Requirements § 125.49 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder may use any airport unless it is adequate...) No pilot of an airplane carrying passengers at night may take off from, or land on, an airport...

  16. 49 CFR 27.71 - Airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport facilities. 27.71 Section 27.71... Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.71 Airport facilities. (a) This section applies... financial assistance at a commercial service airport, including parking and ground transportation...

  17. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airports. 141.38 Section 141.38 Aeronautics... CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Personnel, Aircraft, and Facilities Requirements § 141.38 Airports. (a) An... has continuous use of each airport at which training flights originate. (b) Each airport used...

  18. 49 CFR 27.71 - Airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport facilities. 27.71 Section 27.71... Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.71 Airport facilities. (a) This section applies... financial assistance at a commercial service airport, including parking and ground transportation...

  19. 19 CFR 122.84 - Intermediate airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermediate airport. 122.84 Section 122.84... Intermediate airport. (a) Application. The provisions of this section apply at any U.S. airport to which an... aircraft arrives at the next airport, the aircraft commander or agent shall make entry by filing the:...

  20. 14 CFR 125.49 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport requirements. 125.49 Section 125.49... Requirements § 125.49 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder may use any airport unless it is adequate...) No pilot of an airplane carrying passengers at night may take off from, or land on, an airport...

  1. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airports. 141.38 Section 141.38 Aeronautics... CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Personnel, Aircraft, and Facilities Requirements § 141.38 Airports. (a) An... has continuous use of each airport at which training flights originate. (b) Each airport used...

  2. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  3. 75 FR 39091 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Mu oz Mar n International Airport (SJU), San Juan, Puerto Rico. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has completed its review of the Luis Mu oz Mar n International Airport International Airport... submitted a preliminary application to the Airport Privatization Pilot Program for Luis Mu oz Mar...

  4. Urban landscape features influencing rodent control and animal movement in two urban areas of California

    EPA Science Inventory

    “Pest” control of both native (e.g., gophers) and exotic (e.g., black rats, house mice) species may impact populations of non-target species inadvertently. We evaluated relationships among animal movement, rodent control, and landscape features in two urban locations in Californ...

  5. Landscape features influencing residential rodent control and animal movement in two urban areas of California

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residential “pest” control of both native (e.g., gophers, rabbits) and exotic (e.g., black and Norway rats, house mice) species may impact populations of non-target species inadvertently. We evaluated relationships among animal movement, rodent control, and landscape features in...

  6. Role of primate basal ganglia and frontal cortex in the internal generation of movements. III. Neuronal activity in the supplementary motor area.

    PubMed

    Romo, R; Schultz, W

    1992-01-01

    This study is a part of a project investigating neuronal activity in the basal ganglia and frontal cortex and describes externally and internally induced preparatory activity in the supplementary motor area (SMA), which forms a closed neuronal loop with the striatum. Monkeys made self-initiated arm reaching movements toward a constant target in the absence of phasic external stimuli. In separate blocks of trials, animals performed in a delayed go no-go task in which an instruction cue prepared for subsequent movement or no-movement to a trigger stimulus. A total of 328 neurons were tested in the delay task. Of these, 91 responded transiently to the instruction light with a median latency of 262 ms. Three quarters of these responses were restricted to the instruction preparing for arm movement, as opposed to withholding it, and thus may be involved in movement preparation processes. Sustained activation during the instruction-trigger interval was found for 67 neurons and occurred nearly exclusively in movement trials. Activation usually increased gradually after the cue and ended abruptly upon movement onset and thus could be related to the setting and maintenance of processes underlying the preparation of movement. Time-locked responses to the trigger stimulus were found in 38 neurons and were usually restricted to movement trials (median latency 80 ms). Activity time-locked to movement execution occurred in 67 neurons, beginning up to 252 ms before movement onset. A total of 266 neurons were tested with self-initiated arm movements. Of these, 43 showed premovement activity beginning 610-3030 ms before movement onset (median 1430 ms). The activity increased slowly and reached its peak at 370 ms before movement onset. It ended before movement onset or continued until the arm began to move or reached the target. This activity appears to reflect neuronal processes related to the internal generation of movements. Two thirds of activations preceding self

  7. Collection of Calibration and Validation Data for an Airport Landside Dynamic Simulation Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    34 The Trans- portation Systems Center has developed a computer model which simulates the movements of passengers in an airport terminal and vehicles on...conditions to efforts leading to the development of detailed mathematical models simulating the entire landside passenger and vehicular system...Denver-Stapleton International Airport, during the period December 12-15, 1975. -1- cut! AWAG9CLAI XII SAGWA CLIR REGIONALL ICKETING ENTANC SEURT CTAS OR

  8. The control of complex finger movements by directional information flow between mesial frontocentral areas and the primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Boenstrup, M; Feldheim, J; Heise, K; Gerloff, C; Hummel, F C

    2014-09-01

    Complex movements require the interplay of local activation and interareal communication of sensorimotor brain regions. This is reflected in a decrease of task-related spectral power over the sensorimotor cortices and an increase in functional connectivity predominantly in the upper alpha band in the electroencephalogram (EEG). In the present study, directionality of information flow was investigated using EEG recordings to gain better understanding about the network architecture underlying the performance of complex sequential finger movements. This was assessed by means of Granger causality-derived directed transfer function (DTF). As DTF measures the influence one signal exerts on another based on a time lag between them, it allows implications to be drawn on causal relationships. To reveal causal connections between brain regions that are specifically modulated by task complexity, we contrasted the performance of right-handed sequential finger movements of different complexities (simple, scale, complex) that were either pre-learned (memorized) or novel instructed. A complexity-dependent increase in information flow from mesial frontocentral to the left motor cortex and, less pronounced, also to the right motor cortex specifically in the upper alpha range was found. Effective coupling during sequences of high complexity was larger for memorized sequences compared with novel sequences (P = 0.0037). These findings further support the role of mesial frontocentral areas in directing the primary motor cortex in the process of orchestrating complex movements and in particular learned sequences.

  9. 78 FR 63562 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property at Charleston International Airport, Charleston...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Request To Release Airport Property at Charleston International Airport, Charleston, South Carolina AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... sale of three parcels totaling 266.954-acres of airport property located at the...

  10. 77 FR 51948 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Chapter 1 Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property; Correction AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... paragraph in the Proposed Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property that was...

  11. Auctioning Airport Slots?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruyer, Nicolas; Lenoir, Nathalie

    2003-01-01

    The current allocation of slots on congested European airports constitutes an obstacle to the effective liberalisation of air transportation undertaken in Europe. With a view to favouring effluent slot utilisation and competition, as is the goal of the Euopean commission, we propose to use a market mechanism, based on temporary" utilisation licences. In order to allocate those licences, we propose and describe an iterated combinatorial auction mechanism where a percentage of licences would be reallocated each season. A secondary market would also be set up in order to reallocate slots during a season. Since a combinatorial auction involve a complex optimisation procedure, we describe how it can be made to work in the case of auctions.

  12. Hydrogeology and water quality in the Snake River alluvial aquifer at Jackson Hole Airport, Jackson, Wyoming, September 2008-June 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogeology and water quality of the Snake River alluvial aquifer, at the Jackson Hole Airport in northwest Wyoming, was studied by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Jackson Hole Airport Board and the Teton Conservation District during September 2008-June 2009. Hydrogeologic conditions were characterized using data collected from 14 Jackson Hole Airport wells. Groundwater levels are summarized in this report and the direction of groundwater flow, hydraulic gradients, and estimated groundwater velocity rates in the Snake River alluvial aquifer underlying the study area are presented. Analytical results of chemical, dissolved gas, and stable isotopes are presented and summarized. Seasonally, the water table at Jackson Hole Airport was lowest in early spring and reached its peak in July, with an increase of 12 to 14 feet between April and July 2009. Groundwater flow was predominantly horizontal but had the hydraulic potential for downward flow. The direction of groundwater flow was from the northeast to the west-southwest. Horizontal groundwater velocities within the Snake River alluvial aquifer at the airport were estimated to be about 26 to 66 feet per day. This indicates that the traveltime from the farthest upgradient well to the farthest downgradient well was approximately 53 to 138 days. This estimate only describes the movement of groundwater because some solutes may move at a rate much slower than groundwater flow through the aquifer. The quality of the water in the alluvial aquifer generally was considered good. The alluvial aquifer was a fresh, hard to very hard, calcium carbonate type water. No constituents were detected at concentrations exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Levels, and no anthropogenic compounds were detected at concentrations greater than laboratory reporting levels. The quality of groundwater in the alluvial aquifer generally was suitable for domestic and other uses; however, dissolved

  13. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel. Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, are also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/integraal Luchthaven Competitie Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.

  14. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel, Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, arc also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/Integral Luchthaven Competitive Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.

  15. Airport expansion requires major wetlands mitigation project

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the steps taken to mitigate the impact to existing wetlands by creating new wetlands in an airport expansion project. The project addressed maintaining suitable amounts of wetlands to accommodate peak waterfowl populations, moving of high voltage power transmission towers, and maintaining agricultural and hunting interests. This project involved recreating of open water areas, marsh habitat, mud flat habitat, saline meadow habitat, maintaining two existing wetlands in the area of the new wetlands without disturbing them, and improving upland habitat surrounding the new wetlands.

  16. 76 FR 36014 - Proposed Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... floor of Class C airspace to 1,600 feet MSL within an area overlying, and to the south of, the Palm... Airport and US 1, on the south by a 10-mile radius of the Palm Beach International Airport, and on the... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 RIN 2120-AA66 Proposed Amendment of Class C Airspace;...

  17. 75 FR 69905 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Brunswick Malcolm-McKinnon Airport, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Brunswick, GA, as the McKinnon NDB Non-Directional Beacon (NDB) has been decommissioned and new Standard... Class E airspace designated as surface areas. * * * * * ASO GA E2 Brunswick Malcolm-McKinnon Airport, GA... Airspace; Brunswick Malcolm- McKinnon Airport, GA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  18. 76 FR 22011 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carizzo Springs, Glass Ranch Airport, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carizzo Springs, Glass Ranch... amends Class E airspace for the Carizzo Springs, Glass Ranch Airport, TX, airspace area, to accommodate... rulemaking to amend Class E airspace for the Carizzo Springs, Glass Ranch Airport, TX, airspace...

  19. 78 FR 3964 - Request for Public Comment, Raleigh County Memorial Airport, Beckley, WV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... Creek Gorge'' to a depth in excess of 600ft below the airport elevation and has no aeronautical benefit... development opportunities exist for the airport. Once released, the land will be sold and placed in a Conservation Easement, with restriction of no future development. Proposed buyer would be placing the area...

  20. Airport surface operations requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, John L.; Vonbokern, Greg J.; Wray, Rick L.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Airport Surface Operations Requirements Analysis (ASORA) study. This study was conducted in response to task 24 of NASA Contract NAS1-18027. This study is part of NASA LaRC's Low Visibility Surface Operations program, which is designed to eliminate the constraints on all-weather arrival/departure operations due to the airport/aircraft ground system. The goal of this program is to provide the capability for safe and efficient aircraft operations on the airport surface during low visibility conditions down to zero. The ASORA study objectives were to (1) develop requirements for operation on the airport surface in visibilities down to zero; (2) survey and evaluate likely technologies; (3) develop candidate concepts to meet the requirements; and (4) select the most suitable concept based on cost/benefit factors.

  1. Fish with Chips: Tracking Reef Fish Movements to Evaluate Size and Connectivity of Caribbean Marine Protected Areas

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Simon J.; Monaco, Mark E.; Friedlander, Alan M.; Legare, Bryan; Nemeth, Richard S.; Kendall, Matthew S.; Poti, Matthew; Clark, Randall D.; Wedding, Lisa M.; Caldow, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs and associated fish populations have experienced rapid decline in the Caribbean region and marine protected areas (MPAs) have been widely implemented to address this decline. The performance of no-take MPAs (i.e., marine reserves) for protecting and rebuilding fish populations is influenced by the movement of animals within and across their boundaries. Very little is known about Caribbean reef fish movements creating a critical knowledge gap that can impede effective MPA design, performance and evaluation. Using miniature implanted acoustic transmitters and a fixed acoustic receiver array, we address three key questions: How far can reef fish move? Does connectivity exist between adjacent MPAs? Does existing MPA size match the spatial scale of reef fish movements? We show that many reef fishes are capable of traveling far greater distances and in shorter duration than was previously known. Across the Puerto Rican Shelf, more than half of our 163 tagged fish (18 species of 10 families) moved distances greater than 1 km with three fish moving more than 10 km in a single day and a quarter spending time outside of MPAs. We provide direct evidence of ecological connectivity across a network of MPAs, including estimated movements of more than 40 km connecting a nearshore MPA with a shelf-edge spawning aggregation. Most tagged fish showed high fidelity to MPAs, but also spent time outside MPAs, potentially contributing to spillover. Three-quarters of our fish were capable of traveling distances that would take them beyond the protection offered by at least 40–64% of the existing eastern Caribbean MPAs. We recommend that key species movement patterns be used to inform and evaluate MPA functionality and design, particularly size and shape. A re-scaling of our perception of Caribbean reef fish mobility and habitat use is imperative, with important implications for ecology and management effectiveness. PMID:24797815

  2. Fish with chips: tracking reef fish movements to evaluate size and connectivity of Caribbean marine protected areas.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Simon J; Monaco, Mark E; Friedlander, Alan M; Legare, Bryan; Nemeth, Richard S; Kendall, Matthew S; Poti, Matthew; Clark, Randall D; Wedding, Lisa M; Caldow, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Coral reefs and associated fish populations have experienced rapid decline in the Caribbean region and marine protected areas (MPAs) have been widely implemented to address this decline. The performance of no-take MPAs (i.e., marine reserves) for protecting and rebuilding fish populations is influenced by the movement of animals within and across their boundaries. Very little is known about Caribbean reef fish movements creating a critical knowledge gap that can impede effective MPA design, performance and evaluation. Using miniature implanted acoustic transmitters and a fixed acoustic receiver array, we address three key questions: How far can reef fish move? Does connectivity exist between adjacent MPAs? Does existing MPA size match the spatial scale of reef fish movements? We show that many reef fishes are capable of traveling far greater distances and in shorter duration than was previously known. Across the Puerto Rican Shelf, more than half of our 163 tagged fish (18 species of 10 families) moved distances greater than 1 km with three fish moving more than 10 km in a single day and a quarter spending time outside of MPAs. We provide direct evidence of ecological connectivity across a network of MPAs, including estimated movements of more than 40 km connecting a nearshore MPA with a shelf-edge spawning aggregation. Most tagged fish showed high fidelity to MPAs, but also spent time outside MPAs, potentially contributing to spillover. Three-quarters of our fish were capable of traveling distances that would take them beyond the protection offered by at least 40-64% of the existing eastern Caribbean MPAs. We recommend that key species movement patterns be used to inform and evaluate MPA functionality and design, particularly size and shape. A re-scaling of our perception of Caribbean reef fish mobility and habitat use is imperative, with important implications for ecology and management effectiveness.

  3. Airport Surface Network Architecture Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thanh C.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Bretmersky, Steven C.; Lawas-Grodek, Fran; Ellis, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, airport surface communications are fragmented across multiple types of systems. These communication systems for airport operations at most airports today are based dedicated and separate architectures that cannot support system-wide interoperability and information sharing. The requirements placed upon the Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) systems in airports are rapidly growing and integration is urgently needed if the future vision of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) 2025 concept are to be realized. To address this and other problems such as airport surface congestion, the Space Based Technologies Project s Surface ICNS Network Architecture team at NASA Glenn Research Center has assessed airport surface communications requirements, analyzed existing and future surface applications, and defined a set of architecture functions that will help design a scalable, reliable and flexible surface network architecture to meet the current and future needs of airport operations. This paper describes the systems approach or methodology to networking that was employed to assess airport surface communications requirements, analyze applications, and to define the surface network architecture functions as the building blocks or components of the network. The systems approach used for defining these functions is relatively new to networking. It is viewing the surface network, along with its environment (everything that the surface network interacts with or impacts), as a system. Associated with this system are sets of services that are offered by the network to the rest of the system. Therefore, the surface network is considered as part of the larger system (such as the NAS), with interactions and dependencies between the surface network and its users, applications, and devices. The surface network architecture includes components such as addressing/routing, network management, network

  4. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Leidichj, Christopher; Papasin, Richard; Tran, Peter B.; Bass, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Networks of video cameras, meteorological sensors, and ancillary electronic equipment are under development in collaboration among NASA Ames Research Center, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These networks are to be established at and near airports to provide real-time information on local weather conditions that affect aircraft approaches and landings. The prototype network is an airport-approach-zone camera system (AAZCS), which has been deployed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and San Carlos Airport (SQL). The AAZCS includes remotely controlled color video cameras located on top of SFO and SQL air-traffic control towers. The cameras are controlled by the NOAA Center Weather Service Unit located at the Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center and are accessible via a secure Web site. The AAZCS cameras can be zoomed and can be panned and tilted to cover a field of view 220 wide. The NOAA observer can see the sky condition as it is changing, thereby making possible a real-time evaluation of the conditions along the approach zones of SFO and SQL. The next-generation network, denoted a remote tower sensor system (RTSS), will soon be deployed at the Half Moon Bay Airport and a version of it will eventually be deployed at Los Angeles International Airport. In addition to remote control of video cameras via secure Web links, the RTSS offers realtime weather observations, remote sensing, portability, and a capability for deployment at remote and uninhabited sites. The RTSS can be used at airports that lack control towers, as well as at major airport hubs, to provide synthetic augmentation of vision for both local and remote operations under what would otherwise be conditions of low or even zero visibility.

  5. 78 FR 27029 - Modification of Class C Airspace; Nashville International Airport; TN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... surface area that was put in place to accommodate operations at an airport that is now permanently closed... the Class C surface area. The cutout was put in place to exclude the airspace within a 1.5 NM...

  6. 76 FR 18618 - Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport AGENCY... amends the Order Limiting Operations at Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) that published on May... Management Rule for LaGuardia Airport, John F. Kennedy International Airport, and Newark...

  7. Particle number concentrations near the Rome-Ciampino city airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafoggia, M.; Cattani, G.; Forastiere, F.; Di Menno di Bucchianico, A.; Gaeta, A.; Ancona, C.

    2016-12-01

    Human exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) has been postulated to be associated with adverse health effects, and there is interest regarding possible measures to reduce primary emissions. One important source of UFP are airport activities, with aircraft take-offs being the most relevant one. We implemented two measurement campaigns of total particle number concentrations (PNC), a proxy for UFP, near a medium-size airport in central Italy. One-minute PNC averages were collected on June 2011 and January 2012 concurrently with 30-min average meteorological data on temperature and wind speed/direction. Data on minute-specific take-offs and landings were obtained by the airport authorities. We applied statistical regression models to relate PNC data to the presence of aircraft activities while adjusting for time trends and meteorology, and estimated the increases in PNC ±15 min before and after take-offs and landings. We repeated the analyses considering prevalent wind direction and by size of the aircraft. We estimated PNC increases of 5400 particles/cm3/minute during the 15 min before and after take-offs, with a peak of 19,000 particles/cm3/minute within 5 min after take-offs. Corresponding figures for landings were 1300 and 1000 particles, respectively. The highest PNC estimates were obtained when the prevailing wind came from the runway direction, and led to estimated PNC increases of 60,000 particles/cm3/minute within 5 min after take-offs. No main differences were noted from the exhaust of different types of aircrafts. The area surrounding Ciampino airport is densely inhabited, raising concerns about the potential adverse effects of long-term and short-term exposure to airport-borne UFP. A close monitoring of airport activities and emissions is mandatory to reduce the public health impact of the airport on the nearby population.

  8. Difference in Activity in the Supplementary Motor Area Depending on Limb Combination of Hand-Foot Coordinated Movements.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kento; Kawashima, Saeko; Mizuguchi, Nobuaki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Periodic interlimb coordination shows lower performance when the ipsilateral hand and foot (e.g., right hand and right foot) are simultaneously moved than when the contralateral hand and foot (e.g., right hand and left foot) are simultaneously moved. The present study aimed to investigate how brain activity that is related to the dependence of hand-foot coordination on limb combination, using functional magnetic imaging. Twenty-one right-handed subjects performed periodic coordinated movements of the ipsilateral or contralateral hand and foot in the same or opposite direction in the sagittal plane. Kinematic data showed that performance was lower for the ipsilateral hand-foot coordination than for the contralateral one. A comparison of brain activity between the same and opposite directions showed that there was a greater activation of supplementary motor area for ipsilateral hand-foot coordination as compared to that seen during contralateral hand-foot coordination. We speculate that this might reflect a difference in the degree of inhibition of the neural circuit that disrupts opposite directional movements between ipsilateral and contralateral hand-foot coordinated movements.

  9. Decoding the timing and target locations of saccadic eye movements from neuronal activity in macaque oculomotor areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmae, Shogo; Takahashi, Toshimitsu; Lu, Xiaofeng; Nishimori, Yasunori; Kodaka, Yasushi; Takashima, Ichiro; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2015-06-01

    Objective. The control of movement timing has been a significant challenge for brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). As a first step toward developing a timing-based BMI, we aimed to decode movement timing and target locations in a visually guided saccadic eye movement task using the activity of neurons in the primate frontal eye field (FEF) and supplementary eye field (SEF). Approach. For this purpose, we developed a template-matching method that could recruit a variety of neurons in these areas. Main results. As a result, we were able to achieve a favorable estimation of saccade onset: for example, data from 20 randomly sampled FEF neurons or 40 SEF neurons achieved a median estimation error of ˜10 ms with an interquartile range less than 50 ms (± ˜25 ms). In the best case, seven simultaneously recorded SEF neurons using a multi-electrode array achieved a comparable accuracy (10 ± 30 ms). The method was significantly better than a heuristic method that used only a group of movement cells with sharp discharges at the onset of saccades. The estimation of target location was less accurate but still favorable, especially when we estimated target location at a timing of 200 ms after the onset of saccade: the method was able to discriminate 16 targets with an accuracy of 90%, which differed not only in their directions (eight directions) but also in amplitude (10/20°) when we used data from 61 randomly sampled FEF neurons. Significance. The results show that the timing, amplitude and direction of saccades can be decoded from neuronal activity in the FEF and SEF and further suggest that timing-based BMIs can be developed by decoding timing information using the template-matching method.

  10. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2009-01-01

    An initial Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the initial concept for an aircraft-based method of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) in the TMA focusing on conflict detection algorithms and alerting display concepts. This paper gives an overview of the CD&R concept, simulation study, and test results.

  11. 14 CFR 139.205 - Amendment of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amendment of Airport Certification Manual... CERTIFICATION OF AIRPORTS Airport Certification Manual § 139.205 Amendment of Airport Certification Manual. (a) Under § 139.3, the Regional Airports Division Manager may amend any Airport Certification...

  12. 14 CFR 139.205 - Amendment of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Amendment of Airport Certification Manual... CERTIFICATION OF AIRPORTS Airport Certification Manual § 139.205 Amendment of Airport Certification Manual. (a) Under § 139.3, the Regional Airports Division Manager may amend any Airport Certification...

  13. 14 CFR 156.4 - Airport and project eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... participating State shall administer the airport development and airport planning projects for airports within... grant agreement for integrated airport system planning, projects related to any primary airport, or any... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport and project eligibility....

  14. 14 CFR 156.4 - Airport and project eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... participating State shall administer the airport development and airport planning projects for airports within... grant agreement for integrated airport system planning, projects related to any primary airport, or any... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport and project eligibility....

  15. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Massachusetts L.G. Hanscom Field. Broomfield, Colorado Jefferson County Airport. Carlsbad, California McClellan... International Airport. Englewood, Colorado Centennial Airport. Fort Worth, Texas Fort Worth Alliance Airport... Airport. Mascoutah, Illinois MidAmerica St. Louis Airport. McKinney, Texas Collin County Regional...

  16. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Colorado Jefferson County Airport. Carlsbad, California McClellan-Palomar Airport. Dallas, Texas Dallas..., Colorado Centennial Airport. Fort Worth, Texas Fort Worth Alliance Airport. Fresno, California Fresno... MidAmerica St. Louis Airport. McKinney, Texas Collin County Regional Airport. Melbourne,...

  17. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Colorado Jefferson County Airport. Carlsbad, California McClellan-Palomar Airport. Dallas, Texas Dallas..., Colorado Centennial Airport. Fort Worth, Texas Fort Worth Alliance Airport. Fresno, California Fresno... MidAmerica St. Louis Airport. McKinney, Texas Collin County Regional Airport. Melbourne,...

  18. Examining Passenger Flow Choke Points at Airports Using Discrete Event Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jeremy R.; Madhavan, Poomima

    2011-01-01

    The movement of passengers through an airport quickly, safely, and efficiently is the main function of the various checkpoints (check-in, security. etc) found in airports. Human error combined with other breakdowns in the complex system of the airport can disrupt passenger flow through the airport leading to lengthy waiting times, missing luggage and missed flights. In this paper we present a model of passenger flow through an airport using discrete event simulation that will provide a closer look into the possible reasons for breakdowns and their implications for passenger flow. The simulation is based on data collected at Norfolk International Airport (ORF). The primary goal of this simulation is to present ways to optimize the work force to keep passenger flow smooth even during peak travel times and for emergency preparedness at ORF in case of adverse events. In this simulation we ran three different scenarios: real world, increased check-in stations, and multiple waiting lines. Increased check-in stations increased waiting time and instantaneous utilization. while the multiple waiting lines decreased both the waiting time and instantaneous utilization. This simulation was able to show how different changes affected the passenger flow through the airport.

  19. A Concept and Implementation of Optimized Operations of Airport Surface Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoon C.; Hoang, Ty; Montoya, Justin; Gupta, Gautam; Malik, Waqar; Tobias, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept of optimized surface operations at busy airports to improve the efficiency of taxi operations, as well as reduce environmental impacts. The suggested system architecture consists of the integration of two decoupled optimization algorithms. The Spot Release Planner provides sequence and timing advisories to tower controllers for releasing departure aircraft into the movement area to reduce taxi delay while achieving maximum throughput. The Runway Scheduler provides take-off sequence and arrival runway crossing sequence to the controllers to maximize the runway usage. The description of a prototype implementation of this integrated decision support tool for the airport control tower controllers is also provided. The prototype decision support tool was evaluated through a human-in-the-loop experiment, where both the Spot Release Planner and Runway Scheduler provided advisories to the Ground and Local Controllers. Initial results indicate the average number of stops made by each departure aircraft in the departure runway queue was reduced by more than half when the controllers were using the advisories, which resulted in reduced taxi times in the departure queue.

  20. 78 FR 22024 - Request To Release Airport Property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL), Oakley, Kansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Request To Release Airport Property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL... proposes to rule and invites public comment on the release of land at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL... following address: Lynn D. Martin, Airports Compliance Specialist, Federal Aviation Administration,...

  1. 75 FR 57829 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports... Proposed Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property that was published in the Federal... and clarify FAA policy concerning through-the-fence access to a Federally obligated airport from...

  2. 77 FR 3031 - Release of Airport Property: Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property: Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL AGENCY... FAA hereby provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties, approximately 3.407 acres, at the Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL from the conditions, reservations, and restrictions...

  3. Modulatory effects of movement sequence preparation and covert spatial attention on early somatosensory input to non-primary motor areas.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matt J N; Staines, W Richard

    2015-02-01

    Early frontal somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) (i.e., N30) are known to be modulated by movement. Furthermore, individuals with prefrontal lesions have enhanced early frontal SEPs. However, it is currently unclear through what mechanism the prefrontal cortex may modulate early frontal SEPs. The current study investigated whether prefrontal modulatory effects on frontal SEPs may depend on the relevancy of somatosensory input for movement (i.e., interaction with motor areas). Two experiments were conducted to determine whether selective spatial attention alone (Experiment 1-Attend and Mentally Count) or when using attended somatosensory input in the preparation of finger sequences with the limb contralateral to somatosensory stimulation (Experiment 2-Attend for Movement Preparation) could modulate SEPs. In Experiment 1, SEPs elicited by median nerve (MN) stimulation at both wrists were measured in trials when individuals attended and mentally counted vibrotactile (VibT) input at either index finger. In Experiment 2, SEPs elicited by MN stimulation at the left wrist were measured in trials when individuals used attended VibT input at the left index finger to prepare finger sequences that were contralateral to MN stimulation. In both experiments, control conditions were performed where participants received passive VibT and MN stimulation. Results from Experiment 1 confirmed that selective spatial attention alone does not modulate frontal N30 peak amplitudes. However, Experiment 2 revealed that frontal N30 peak amplitudes were decreased (i.e., gated) when individuals used attended VibT input at the left index finger to prepare contralateral finger sequences. These results support a role of sensory gating of early frontal SEPs during finger sequence preparation of the limb contralateral to MN stimulation that may result from increased activity in prefrontal, motor preparatory areas, and basal ganglia.

  4. 19 CFR 122.85 - Final airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Final airport. 122.85 Section 122.85 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Procedures for Residue Cargo and Stopover Passengers § 122.85 Final airport. When an aircraft enters at the last domestic airport of discharge, the traveling general...

  5. 19 CFR 122.85 - Final airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final airport. 122.85 Section 122.85 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Procedures for Residue Cargo and Stopover Passengers § 122.85 Final airport. When an aircraft enters at the last domestic airport of discharge, the traveling general...

  6. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder may use any airport unless it is adequate for the proposed operation, considering such items as...

  7. 32 CFR 644.423 - Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Airport development. 644.423 Section 644.423... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.423 Airport... carrying out a project for airport development under this subchapter, or for the operation of any...

  8. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder may use any airport unless it is adequate for the proposed operation, considering such items as...

  9. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of new... used by turbojet or piston-type aircraft must notify the affected airport and the Federal...

  10. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of new... used by turbojet or piston-type aircraft must notify the affected airport and the Federal...

  11. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of new... used by turbojet or piston-type aircraft must notify the affected airport and the Federal...

  12. Implementation of noise budgets for civil airports

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    An increasing number of airports are faced with the need for establishing a lid on the noise from aircraft operations and for developing programs for reducing airport noise on a year-to-year basis. As an example, the California Airport Noise Standard acts to impose such programs on a number of airports in California. Any airport faced with the need to establish a quantitative reduction of noise obviously wants to achieve this reduction with the least impact on numbers of operations and reduction in air transportation services to the community. A reduction in noise and an increase in operations usually can be achieved only by encouraging use of the quietest aircraft available and, further adding incentives for operating procedures that minimize noise. One approach in administering airport noise reduction is to adopt an airport noise budget. As used in this paper, the noise budget concept implies that quantitative limits on the noise environment and on the noise contributions by major airport users will be established. Having methods for enforcing compliance with the airport budget for those airport users that exceed their budget will be established. Thus, the noise budget provides airport management, and major airport users, with quantitative measures for defining noise goals, and actual progress in achieving such goals.

  13. Planning, Management, and Economics of Airport Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, J.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the role of the airport in the transportation complex and in the community is presented. The establishment of the airport including its requirements in regional planning and the operation of the airport as a social and economic force are discussed.

  14. Teaching Ideas Notebook: Student Airport Tours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Outlines, as recommended by the Aviation Distributors and Manufacturers Association, a cooperative program between schools and local airports. The Student Airport Tours Program for class and career study groups includes a field trip to an airport, free rides, and follow-up activities. (CS)

  15. Implementing Solar Technologies at Airports

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-07-01

    Federal agencies, such as the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security, as well as numerous private entities are actively pursuing the installation of solar technologies to help reduce fossil fuel energy use and associated emissions, meet sustainability goals, and create more robust or reliable operations. One potential approach identified for siting solar technologies is the installation of solar energy technologies at airports and airfields, which present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to large amounts of open land. This report focuses largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) policies toward siting solar technologies at airports.

  16. Integrating small mammal community variables into aircraft-wildlife collision management plans at Namibian airports.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Morgan L; Avenant, Nico L

    2015-11-01

    Understanding ecosystems within and around airports can help to determine the causes and possible mitigation measures for collisions between aircraft and wildlife. Small mammal communities are an important component of the semi-arid savanna ecosystems of Namibia, its productivity and its ecosystem integrity. They are also a major direct attractant for raptors at airports. The present study compared the abundance and diversity of small mammals between Namibia's 2 main airport properties (Hosea Kutako International Airport and Eros Airport), and among areas of land used for various purposes surrounding the airports. A total of 2150 small mammals (3 orders, 11 species) were captured over 4 trapping seasons. Small mammal abundance was significantly higher at the end of the growing season than during the non-growing season. The grass mowing regimen in current management plans at the airports resulted in a significant reduction of small mammal abundance at Hosea Kutako during the non-growing season only, thus indicating that annual mowing is effective but insufficient to reduce the overall abundance of mammal prey species for raptors. Small mammal numbers were significantly higher at Hosea Kutako Airport compared to the cattle and game farming land surrounding the airport, while no differences in small mammal densities or diversity were found for areas with different land uses at and surrounding Eros. The study suggests that the fence around Hosea Kutako provides a refuge for small mammals, resulting in higher densities. It also indicates that different surrounding land use practices result in altered ecosystem function and productivity, an important consideration when identifying wildlife attractants at airports.

  17. Supersonics Project - Airport Noise Tech Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2010-01-01

    The Airport Noise Tech Challenge research effort under the Supersonics Project is reviewed. While the goal of "Improved supersonic jet noise models validated on innovative nozzle concepts" remains the same, the success of the research effort has caused the thrust of the research to be modified going forward in time. The main activities from FY06-10 focused on development and validation of jet noise prediction codes. This required innovative diagnostic techniques to be developed and deployed, extensive jet noise and flow databases to be created, and computational tools to be developed and validated. Furthermore, in FY09-10 systems studies commissioned by the Supersonics Project showed that viable supersonic aircraft were within reach using variable cycle engine architectures if exhaust nozzle technology could provide 3-5dB of suppression. The Project then began to focus on integrating the technologies being developed in its Tech Challenge areas to bring about successful system designs. Consequently, the Airport Noise Tech Challenge area has shifted efforts from developing jet noise prediction codes to using them to develop low-noise nozzle concepts for integration into supersonic aircraft. The new plan of research is briefly presented by technology and timelines.

  18. Upstream movement of residual hatchery steelhead into areas containing bull trout and cutthroat trout.

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, Geoffrey A. ); Pearsons, Todd N.

    2000-11-01

    Hatchery-reared steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss that do not emigrate as smolts shortly after release may negatively impact wild fish communities through ecological interactions. We used systematic, stratified snorkeling surveys to document the relative abundance of wild rainbow trout O. mykiss, bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi as well as the upstream limit of residual hatchery steelhead (hatchery-reared steelhead that had failed to emigrate before June 1). Our objective was to determine whether residual hatchery steelhead had migrated upstream from their release point into an area containing a threatened population of bull trout and cutthroat trout. Hatchery steelhead made up a larger portion of the salmonid community in the sites near their release location (mean= 52.5%, range= 29-79%), and constituted a lower proportion (mean= 4.8%, range= 0-14%) of the salmonid community as distance upstream of the release location increased. However, residual hatchery steelhead had migrated over 12 km upstream into an area containing a threatened stock of bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi.

  19. Movement of Saltwater in the "2,000-Foot" Sand of the Baton Rouge Area, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewski, D. J.

    2005-05-01

    Ground-water withdrawals in southeastern Louisiana have caused saltwater to encroach into some freshwater aquifers. The most heavily pumped area, East Baton Rouge Parish, includes the city of Baton Rouge and surrounding areas. The Baton Rouge aquifer system includes 10 extensive aquifers that were pumped about 150 Mgal/d (million gallons per day) in 2003. Ground-water investigations in the 1960's delineated a freshwater-saltwater interface located at the Baton Rouge fault. Test drilling and water well data collected near the fault indicate that the fault is associated with major discontinuities in water levels and water quality. Generally, aquifers south of the fault contain saltwater and aquifers north of the fault contain freshwater with chloride concentrations less than 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter). Saltwater encroachment into freshwater areas north of the fault has been monitored and delineated with well networks in several aquifers. Saltwater was initially detected as early as the 1960's; by the 1990's saltwater had been detected in six of the aquifers north of the fault, including the "2,000-ft" sand. Northward encroachment of saltwater across the fault in the "2,000-ft" sand in East Baton Rouge Parish is in response to large water withdrawals from the aquifer totaling about 22.7 Mgal/d in the Parish in 2002. Encroachment of saltwater has been monitored by a system of wells. The approximate location of the freshwater-saltwater interface north of the fault was delineated for the years 1966, 1977, and 1992. At present, wells in the "2,000-ft" sand at two public-supply well fields located north of the fault are producing water with chloride concentrations approaching 200 mg/L. Wells at these fields may help protect the aquifer from northward advancement of saltwater by intercepting and discharging saltwater. In 2002, about 0.8 Mgal/d from the aquifer was withdrawn by the impacted wells. If withdrawals from the impacted wells were discontinued, saltwater could

  20. English for Airport Ground Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  1. Teaching at Logan International Airport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    Although Terminal C at Logan airport does not look like a classroom, for about fifty minutes on this author's way back from Boston it was for him. Like many public spaces, Logan now has a very robust Wi-Fi wireless network and this enabled him to take advantage of a departure delay to "teach" his class. In 1970 when the author started…

  2. Numerical simulation of groundwater movement and managed aquifer recharge from Sand Hollow Reservoir, Hurricane Bench area, Washington County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marston, Thomas M.; Heilweil, Victor M.

    2012-01-01

    The Hurricane Bench area of Washington County, Utah, is a 70 square-mile area extending south from the Virgin River and encompassing Sand Hollow basin. Sand Hollow Reservoir, located on Hurricane Bench, was completed in March 2002 and is operated primarily as a managed aquifer recharge project by the Washington County Water Conservancy District. The reservoir is situated on a thick sequence of the Navajo Sandstone and Kayenta Formation. Total recharge to the underlying Navajo aquifer from the reservoir was about 86,000 acre-feet from 2002 to 2009. Natural recharge as infiltration of precipitation was approximately 2,100 acre-feet per year for the same period. Discharge occurs as seepage to the Virgin River, municipal and irrigation well withdrawals, and seepage to drains at the base of reservoir dams. Within the Hurricane Bench area, unconfined groundwater-flow conditions generally exist throughout the Navajo Sandstone. Navajo Sandstone hydraulic-conductivity values from regional aquifer testing range from 0.8 to 32 feet per day. The large variability in hydraulic conductivity is attributed to bedrock fractures that trend north-northeast across the study area.A numerical groundwater-flow model was developed to simulate groundwater movement in the Hurricane Bench area and to simulate the movement of managed aquifer recharge from Sand Hollow Reservoir through the groundwater system. The model was calibrated to combined steady- and transient-state conditions. The steady-state portion of the simulation was developed and calibrated by using hydrologic data that represented average conditions for 1975. The transient-state portion of the simulation was developed and calibrated by using hydrologic data collected from 1976 to 2009. Areally, the model grid was 98 rows by 76 columns with a variable cell size ranging from about 1.5 to 25 acres. Smaller cells were used to represent the reservoir to accurately simulate the reservoir bathymetry and nearby monitoring wells; larger

  3. Ground-water movement and nitrate in ground water, East Erda area, Tooele County, Utah, 1997-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Susong, D.D.

    2005-01-01

    Nitrate was discovered in ground water in the east Erda area of Tooele County, Utah, in 1994. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Tooele County, investigated the ground-water flow system and water quality in the eastern part of Tooele Valley to determine (1) the vertical and horizontal distribution of nitrate, (2) the direction of movement of the nitrate contamination, and (3) the source of the nitrate. The potentiometric surface of the upper part of the basin-fill aquifer indicates that the general direction of ground-water flow is to the northwest, the flow system is complex, and there is a ground-water mound probably associated with springs. The spatial distribution of nitrate reflects the flow system with the nitrate contamination split into a north and south part by the ground-water mound. The distribution of dissolved solids and sulfate in ground water varies spatially. Vertical profiles of nitrate in water from selected wells indicate that nitrate contamination generally is in the upper part of the saturated zone and in some wells has moved downward. Septic systems, mining and smelting, agriculture, and natural sources were considered to be possible sources of nitrate contamination in the east Erda area. Septic systems are not the source of nitrate because water from wells drilled upgradient of all septic systems in the area had elevated nitrate concentrations. Mining and smelting activity are a possible source of nitrate contamination but few data are available to link nitrate contamination with mining sites. Natural and agricultural sources of nitrate are present east of the Erda area but few data are available about these sources. The source(s) of nitrate in the east Erda area could not be clearly delineated in spite of considerable effort and expenditure of resources.

  4. Nitrogen dioxide concentrations in neighborhoods adjacent to a commercial airport: a land use regression modeling study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is growing concern in communities surrounding airports regarding the contribution of various emission sources (such as aircraft and ground support equipment) to nearby ambient concentrations. We used extensive monitoring of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in neighborhoods surrounding T.F. Green Airport in Warwick, RI, and land-use regression (LUR) modeling techniques to determine the impact of proximity to the airport and local traffic on these concentrations. Methods Palmes diffusion tube samplers were deployed along the airport's fence line and within surrounding neighborhoods for one to two weeks. In total, 644 measurements were collected over three sampling campaigns (October 2007, March 2008 and June 2008) and each sampling location was geocoded. GIS-based variables were created as proxies for local traffic and airport activity. A forward stepwise regression methodology was employed to create general linear models (GLMs) of NO2 variability near the airport. The effect of local meteorology on associations with GIS-based variables was also explored. Results Higher concentrations of NO2 were seen near the airport terminal, entrance roads to the terminal, and near major roads, with qualitatively consistent spatial patterns between seasons. In our final multivariate model (R2 = 0.32), the local influences of highways and arterial/collector roads were statistically significant, as were local traffic density and distance to the airport terminal (all p < 0.001). Local meteorology did not significantly affect associations with principal GIS variables, and the regression model structure was robust to various model-building approaches. Conclusion Our study has shown that there are clear local variations in NO2 in the neighborhoods that surround an urban airport, which are spatially consistent across seasons. LUR modeling demonstrated a strong influence of local traffic, except the smallest roads that predominate in residential areas, as well as proximity to the

  5. Air quality and public health impacts of UK airports. Part II: Impacts and policy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Steve H. L.; Stettler, Marc E. J.; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2013-03-01

    Thames Estuary airport combined with emissions mitigation measures would reduce UK-wide aviation-attributable early deaths by 56% in 2030 while increasing aircraft movements, which would represent aviation causing about the same level of adverse health impacts as today in absolute terms. We note that because aviation emissions are included in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme, all options are CO2-neutral in terms of direct emissions (but not climate-neutral).

  6. 30 CFR 75.1003-2 - Requirements for movement of off-track mining equipment in areas of active workings where...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... equipment in areas of active workings where energized trolley wires or trolley feeder wires are present; pre... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1003-2 Requirements for movement of off-track mining equipment in areas of active workings where energized trolley wires or...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1003-2 - Requirements for movement of off-track mining equipment in areas of active workings where...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... equipment in areas of active workings where energized trolley wires or trolley feeder wires are present; pre... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1003-2 Requirements for movement of off-track mining equipment in areas of active workings where energized trolley wires or...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1003-2 - Requirements for movement of off-track mining equipment in areas of active workings where...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... equipment in areas of active workings where energized trolley wires or trolley feeder wires are present; pre... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1003-2 Requirements for movement of off-track mining equipment in areas of active workings where energized trolley wires or...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1003-2 - Requirements for movement of off-track mining equipment in areas of active workings where...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... equipment in areas of active workings where energized trolley wires or trolley feeder wires are present; pre... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1003-2 Requirements for movement of off-track mining equipment in areas of active workings where energized trolley wires or...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1003-2 - Requirements for movement of off-track mining equipment in areas of active workings where...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... equipment in areas of active workings where energized trolley wires or trolley feeder wires are present; pre... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trolley Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1003-2 Requirements for movement of off-track mining equipment in areas of active workings where energized trolley wires or...

  11. Tephra fallout hazards at Quito International Airport (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volentik, Alain C. M.; Houghton, Bruce F.

    2015-06-01

    accumulations of 1 cm or greater, and the probability of tephra accumulation reaching 1 mm at UIO is 3.8-8.2 and 0.2 %, respectively. Our results show that the probabilities of tephra accumulation are mostly reduced at the new airport site with respect to OUIO (except for Reventador). The use of our probabilistic approach is not restricted to UIO, but it can certainly be applied to quantify tephra fall hazards at other airports worldwide, especially those identified as being potentially affected by future volcanic eruptions (e.g., Catania, Italy; Anchorage, USA; Kokopo, Papua New Guinea). Finally, the probabilistic method presented here can also be applied to other critical facilities (e.g., nuclear power plants) or to urban areas.

  12. Noise-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Residences Near Two Civil Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fidell, Sanford; Howe, Richard R.; Tabachnick, Barbara G.; Pearsons, Karl S.; Sneddon, Matthew D.

    1995-01-01

    A large-scale field study of noise-induced sleep disturbance was conducted in the vicinities of Stapleton International Airport (DEN) and Denver International Airport (DIA) in anticipation of the closure of the former and opening of the latter. Both indoor and outdoor measurements of aircraft and other nighttime noises were made during four time periods. Measurements were made in 57 homes located as close as feasible to the runway ends of the two airports. Sleep disturbance was measured by several indices of behaviorally confirmed awakening (button pushes upon awakening) and body movement (as measured with wrist-worn actimeters). A total of 2717 subject-nights of observations were made over the course of the study. Although average noise event levels measured outdoors decreased markedly at DEN after closure of the airport and increased slightly at DIA after its opening, indoor noise event levels varied much less in homes near both airports. No large differences were observed in noise-induced sleep disturbance at either airport. Indoor sound exposure levels of noise events were, however, closely related to and good predictors of actimetrically defined motility and arousal.

  13. A Study of Airports - Design, Art and Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    area. Large sweeps of blue,parking lots, and other facilities. yellow, and red wildflowers de- Airtrans is a completely auto- signed by artist Chapman...airport, there are large masses of vegetation, strong earth forms, and broad areas of grass and wildflowers . Because of high speed traffic and the large... California 93727 duce confusion to the traveler Two of the exterior walls dis- monitored and have not caused Tower Chief by establishing strict controls

  14. Observations regarding the movement of barchan sand dunes in the Nazca to Tanaca area of southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker Gay, S.

    1999-03-01

    Significant studies of sand dunes and sand movement made in coastal southern Peru in 1959-1961 [Gay, S.P., 1962. Origen, distribución y movimiento de las arenas eólicas en el área de Yauca a Palpa. Boletin de la Sociedad Geologica del Perú 37, 37-58] have never been published in the English language and consequently have never been referred to in the standard literature. These studies contain valuable information, not developed by later workers in this field, that may be of broad general interest. For example, using airphotos of barchan dunes and plotting the rates of movement vs. dune widths, the author quantified the deduction of Bagnold [Bagnold, R.A., 1941. The Physics of Blown Sand and Desert Dunes. Methuen, London.] that the speed of barchan movement is inversely proportional to barchan size (as characterized by height or width). This led to the conclusion that all barchans in a given dune field, regardless of size, sweep out approximately equal areas in equal times. Another conclusion was that collisions between smaller, overtaking dunes and larger dunes in front of them do not result in destruction or absorption of the smaller dunes if the collision is a `sideswipe'. The dunes simply merge into a compound dune for a time, and the smaller dune then moves on intact, i.e., passes, the larger dune, whilst retaining its approximate original size and shape. Another result of the 1959-1961 studies was a map that documents the Pacific coast beaches as the source of the sand ( Fig. 1), which is then blown inland through extensive dune fields of barchans and other dune forms in great clockwise-sweeping paths, to its final resting place in huge sand masses, sometimes called `sand seas' [Lancaster, N., 1995. Geomorphology of Desert Dunes. Routledge, London], at higher elevations 20 to 60 km from the coast. A minor, but nevertheless interesting, discovery was a small heavy mineral dune located directly in the lee of a large barchan, evidently formed by the winnowing

  15. 14 CFR 152.109 - Project eligibility: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport planning. 152....109 Project eligibility: Airport planning. (a) Airport master planning. A proposed project for airport master planning is not approved unless— (1) The location of the existing or proposed airport is...

  16. 14 CFR 152.325 - Financial status report: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Financial status report: Airport planning... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.325 Financial status report: Airport planning. Each sponsor of a project for airport master planning and each...

  17. 14 CFR 152.103 - Sponsors: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sponsors: Airport development. 152.103... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Application Procedures § 152.103 Sponsors: Airport development. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for airport development...

  18. 14 CFR 152.103 - Sponsors: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sponsors: Airport development. 152.103... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Application Procedures § 152.103 Sponsors: Airport development. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for airport development...

  19. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Massachusetts L.G. Hanscom Field. Broomfield, Colorado Jefferson County Airport. Carlsbad, California McClellan... Centennial Airport. Fort Worth, Texas Fort Worth Alliance Airport. Fresno, California Fresno Yosemite... St. Louis Airport. McKinney, Texas Collin County Regional Airport. Melbourne, Florida...

  20. Palmdale International Airport, Palmdale, California. Airport Development Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    Valley as a whole, to almost 17 persons per acre for all of Los Angeles County. If the airport is not built, the North County region will continue to...four- and six-lane freeway runs from the northeastern corner of the San Fernando Valley , past Palmdale and Lancaster, to just beyond Rosamond where...fanning centered in Lancaster <i<*l consists largely of t.rkey growers. The construction industry is also prominent in the Valley , adding

  1. Preliminary Study of Ground Movement in Prone Landslide Area by Means of MAI InSAR A Case Study: Ciloto, West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayati, Noorlaila; Riedel, Björn; Niemeier, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Ciloto is one of the most prone landslide hazard areas in Indonesia. Several landslides in 2012 and 2013 had been recorded in Ciloto and damaged infrastructure around the area. Investigating the history of ground movement along slope area before the landslide happened could support the hazard mitigation in the future. Considering to an efficient surveying method, space-borne SAR processing is the one appropriate way to monitor the phenomenon in past years. The purpose of this study is detecting ground movement using multi-temporal synthetic aperture radar images. We use 13 ALOS PALSAR images from 2007 to 2009 with combination Fine Beam Single (FBS) and Fine Beam Double (FBD) polarization to investigate the slow movement on slope topography. MAI (Multiple Aperture Interferometry) InSAR method is used to analyze the ground movement from both line-of-sight and along-track direction. We split the synthetic aperture into two-looking aperture so that along-track displacement could be created by the difference of forward-backward looking interferograms. With integration of both methods, we could more precisely detect the movement in prone landslide area and achieve two measurements produced by the same interferogram. However, InSAR requires smaller baseline and good temporal baseline between master and slave images to avoid decorellation. There are only several pairs that meet the condition of proper length and temporal baseline indeed the location is also on the agriculture area where is mostly covered by vegetation. The result for two years observation shows that there is insignificant slow movement along slope surface in Ciloto with -2 - -7 cm in range looks or line of sight and 9-40 cm in along track direction. Based on geometry SAR , the most visible detecting of displacement is on the north-west area due to utilization of ascending SAR images.

  2. 76 FR 31823 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport, Dallas, TX AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... revising the list of user fee airports to reflect the recent user fee airport designation for Dallas Love... of user fee status for Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport. This document updates the list of...

  3. Airport noise complaint patterns and interviews of frequent complainers at two major air carrier airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaggers, Nicholas; Eiff, Gary

    2005-09-01

    The complex and highly sensitive topic of aircraft noise and population annoyance continues to be a major inhibitor to airport development plans. The projected growth of air travel necessitates expanded capacity at many existing airports and the development and construction of new airports in order to accommodate burgeoning traveler needs. Concerns by citizens near major airports about their economic, health, and social welfare continue to generate community and individual declarations of annoyance and concern which threaten timely solutions to airport expansion plans. A deeper understanding of the nature of these concerns is important to more effectively cope with airport expansion concerns among adjacent communities and surrounding neighbors. This study analyzed existing noise complaints registered at Denver International Airport (DEN) and Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL) in an attempt to gain greater understanding of noise complaint drivers and public annoyance. Interviews of frequent complainers were utilized in order to gain richer data concerning individual annoyance issues.

  4. 76 FR 15028 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Interim Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Interim Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). ACTION: Interim policy; amendment to sponsor grant assurance 5. SUMMARY: This action adopts an interim policy amending...

  5. LH2 airport requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the facilities and equipment which will be required at a representative airport is provided so liquid hydrogen LH2 can be used as fuel in long range transport aircraft in 1995-2000. A complete facility was conceptually designed, sized to meet the projected air traffic requirement. The facility includes the liquefaction plant, LH2, storage capability, and LH2 fuel handling system. The requirements for ground support and maintenance for the LH2 fueled aircraft were analyzed. An estimate was made of capital and operating costs which might be expected for the facility. Recommendations were made for design modifications to the reference aircraft, reflecting results of the analysis of airport fuel handling requirements, and for a program of additional technology development for air terminal related items.

  6. Economic Aspects of Airport Security Measures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    Airport security measures use very expensive equipment, and may keep passengers in line for several minutes. The time passengers spend in those lines...can add up, and must be understood as time opportunity cost. In the 1970s, several airport security measures were adopted to help stop aircraft...associated with airport security measures. He concluded that the costs of the adopted measures were very high. While Landes concentrated on the

  7. Analysis of Vertiport Studies Funded by the Airport Improvement Program (AIP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    Systems Plan Caribbean Hotel Association Caribbean Tourism Statistical Report 1986, 1987 CASP (California Aviation System Plan) 1988 (3) Center for...and tourism , particularly through the hub at San Juan’s airport (SJU), is clearly increasing. By 1991, more than 90 twin-plant industries had also been...In areas with poor infrastructure, the CTR could also transfer people directly from hub airports to hotels and resorts to avoid ground transportation

  8. [Diagnostic and prognostic importance of laboratory tests in malaria in airports. Study of six recent cases].

    PubMed

    Poupin, F; Baledent, F; Le Bras, J; Adam, M N; Caillet, R; Abecassis, L; Giacomini, T

    1996-04-01

    During the summer 1994, six cases of airport malaria occurred in France, near the Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle airport. Due to Plasmodium falciparum, all cases underwent rapid and severe deterioration, and in one case, the patient died. The role of laboratory tests is essential to establish the diagnosis of persons who have never resided in the endemic malaria areas and follow up with the patients already under treatment to detect possible complications.

  9. 76 FR 54287 - Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Request for public comment. SUMMARY: The FAA hereby provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties,...

  10. 77 FR 44515 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Chapter I Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... policy, based on Federal law, concerning through-the-fence access to a federally obligated airport...

  11. 76 FR 74843 - Release of Airport Property, Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property, Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL AGENCY... properties, namely approximately 200 acres at the Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL, from the conditions, reservations, and restrictions as contained in a Surplus Property Agreement between the FAA and the...

  12. 76 FR 19517 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and Newark Liberty International Airport; High Density Rule at Reagan National.... FAA Analysis Under the FAA's High Density Rule and Orders limiting scheduled operations at LGA,...

  13. Meteorological and air pollution modeling for an urban airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, P. R.; Lee, I. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of numerical experiments modeling meteorology, multiple pollutant sources, and nonlinear photochemical reactions for the case of an airport in a large urban area with complex terrain. A planetary boundary-layer model which predicts the mixing depth and generates wind, moisture, and temperature fields was used; it utilizes only surface and synoptic boundary conditions as input data. A version of the Hecht-Seinfeld-Dodge chemical kinetics model is integrated with a new, rapid numerical technique; both the San Francisco Bay Area Air Quality Management District source inventory and the San Jose Airport aircraft inventory are utilized. The air quality model results are presented in contour plots; the combined results illustrate that the highly nonlinear interactions which are present require that the chemistry and meteorology be considered simultaneously to make a valid assessment of the effects of individual sources on regional air quality.

  14. A guideline for integrating dynamic areas of interests in existing set-up for capturing eye movement: Looking at moving aircraft.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Maik; Rußwinkel, Nele; Möhlenbrink, Christoph

    2016-06-10

    Today, capturing the behavior of a human eye is considered a standard method for measuring the information-gathering process and thereby gaining insights into cognitive processes. Due to the dynamic character of most task environments there is still a lack of a structured and automated approach for analyzing eye movement in combination with moving objects. In this article, we present a guideline for advanced gaze analysis, called IGDAI (Integration Guideline for Dynamic Areas of Interest). The application of IGDAI allows gathering dynamic areas of interest and simplifies its combination with eye movement. The first step of IGDAI defines the basic requirements for the experimental setup including the embedding of an eye tracker. The second step covers the issue of storing the information of task environments for the dynamic AOI analysis. Implementation examples in XML are presented fulfilling the requirements for most dynamic task environments. The last step includes algorithms to combine the captured eye movement and the dynamic areas of interest. A verification study was conducted, presenting an air traffic controller environment to participants. The participants had to distinguish between different types of dynamic objects. The results show that in comparison to static areas of interest, IGDAI allows a faster and more detailed view on the distribution of eye movement.

  15. Preliminary Results Of Hydrodynamic Responses To Ship Movements And Weather Conditions Along The Coastal Walls Of Shallow Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Alpar, Bedri; Cagatay, Namık; Ozeren, Sinan; Sarı, Erol; Eris, Kadir; Vardar, Denizhan; Arslan, Tugce; Basegmez, Koray

    2016-04-01

    Water-level variations in coastal areas and shallow channels take place under the influence of more complex factors, compared to those in deeper areas. Atmospheric pressure, wind, and wave interactions with bottom morphological characteristics are some important natural features while human-induced factors are usually maritime traffic and manoeuvres the ships. While weather conditions cause long-term changes in water level, water level interactions in near shore areas, can occur very quickly depending on the ship manoeuvres and squat characteristics, and these rapid changes can lead to unpredictable water level lowering. Such rapid changes may cause various dangerous incidents and ship accidents, particularly in areas where rapid water oscillations occur. Improper calculations of propulsion power or orientation of the ship body, especially in the areas where geological and morphological characteristics permit fast water movements, are the most important additional causes of accidents due to sudden water level decreases. For an example, even though a 200-m-long vessel can complete its 35° rotation in a circular area with radius of 250 m, if it is calm and sufficiently deep, this diameter increases 5 times at the shallow waters also depending on the hydrodynamic flow conditions. In 2005, "Gerardus Mercator" has bumped into the inside bottom wall of the channel with a low speed (4 knots) turn of when she had just made a 200° turn. Seven years later the cruise ship "Costa Concordia" struck a rock, before she drifted and grounded, in the calm seas of the coast of Isola del Giglio in Italy, due to a combined effects of waves generated by side waves of ship manoeuvres, atmospheric pressure and squat specifications as well. The waves reflected from the seawalls complicate the navigation problems which should be examined in detail. Thus, three prototype models with various angular seawall features were prepared, simple in shape with perpendicular and sloped seawalls with

  16. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    US DOE /Nevada Operations Office

    1999-06-10

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  17. Report of Accomplishments under the Airport Improvement Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    funds) is for use within the States and Insular Areas. The 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico qualify for 99 percent of the 12% annual...MULTI-YEAR PROJECT. TOTAL FEDERAL COMMITMENTS 504,000) PUERTO RICO ........................ ==== ARECIBO 02 $688,297 INSTALL RUNWAY LIGHTING AND...NAME OF AIRPORT NUMBER FUNDS DESCRIPTION OF WORK PUERTO RICO (CONTINUED) - SAN JUAN 05 $193,000 OVERLAY APRON; INSTALL BEACON; PUERTO RICO INTERNATIONAL

  18. Accomplishments under the Airport Improvement Program: Fiscal Year 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Airport Program. Of the remaining discretionary funds, 75 percent is to be used for preserving and enhancing capacity, safety, and security and carrying...EQUIPMENT ACQUIRE LAND FOR APPROACHES FOREST CITY 02 S531.450 REHABILITATE AND OVERLAY RUNWAY FOREST CITY MUNICIPAL (GENERAL AVIATION) FORT DODGE 08...IMPROVE RUNWAY SAFETY GENERAL AVIATION) AREA; RECONSTRUICT. EXTEND AMD LIGHT TAXIWAYS W YOM I NOa AFTON 06 S210.000 OVERLAY RUNWlAY. IMPROVE RUNWAY

  19. Insects, vegetation, and the control of laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) at Kennedy International Airport, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckley, P.A.; McCarthy, M.

    1994-01-01

    1. In response to a purported 'bird-strike problem' at J.F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, we examined short (5 cm) and long (45 cm) grass heights as gull deterrents, in a randomized-block experiment. 2. Vegetative cover, numbers of adult insects and of larval beetles (suspected on-airport food of the gulls) were sampled in the six-block, 36-plot study area, as well as gut contents of adult and downy young gulls in the immediately adjacent colony in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge. 3. We found that (i) Oriental beetle larvae were the most numerous and concentrated in one experimental block; (ii) beetle larvae numbers were uncorrelated with grass height; (iii) adult beetles were also uncorrelated with grass height; (iv) laughing gulls were distributed across blocks irrespective of percentage cover; (v) within blocks, laughing gulls were selecting short grass and avoiding long grass plots; (vi) laughing gull numbers were positively associated with numbers of Oriental beetle larvae; (vii) adult laughing gulls on the airport were eating lower-nutrition food of terrestrial origin (74-83% adult beetles, mostly Oriental plus green June and ground beetles); (viii) on the other hand, gull chicks in the adjacent breeding colony were being fed more easily digested, higher-protein food of marine origin (86-88% fishes, crustacea and molluscs); (ix) laughing gulls on the airport were taking their adult beetles only in short-grass plots, ignoring large numbers in adjacent long grass; (x) during the summer, on-airport gulls shifted from performing largely maintenance activities on pavement to feeding actively for beetles on newly mown short grass, the change coinciding with adult beetle emergence; (xi) standing water on the airport attracted significantly more gulls than dry areas all summer long. 4. We recommend a series of ecologically compatible, but aggressive habitat management actions for controlling laughing gulls on Kennedy Airport by rendering the airport

  20. Ambient air particulates and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) concentrations: dry deposition study over a Traffic, Airport, Park (T.A.P.) areas during years of 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Lin, Yen-Heng; Zheng, Yu-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    The main purpose of this study was to monitor ambient air particles and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) in total suspended particulate (TSP) concentrations and dry deposition at the Hung Kuang (Traffic), Taichung airport and Westing Park sampling sites during the daytime and nighttime, from 2011 to 2012. In addition, the calculated/measured dry deposition flux ratios of ambient air particles and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) were also studied with Baklanov & Sorensen and the Williams models. For a particle size of 10 μm, the Baklanov & Sorensen model yielded better predictions of dry deposition of ambient air particulates and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) at the Hung Kuang (Traffic), Taichung airport and Westing Park sampling site during the daytime and nighttime sampling periods. However, for particulates with sizes 20-23 μm, the results obtained in the study reveal that the Williams model provided better prediction results for ambient air particulates and particulate-bound mercury Hg(p) at all sampling sites in this study.

  1. Initial Investigation of Operational Concept Elements for NASA's NextGen-Airportal Project Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary; Lee, Jonathan; Poage, James L.; Tobias, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    The NextGen-Airportal Project is organized into three research focus areas: Safe and Efficient Surface Operations, Coordinated Arrival/Departure Operations Management, and Airportal Transition and Integration Management. The content in this document was derived from an examination of constraints and problems at airports for accommodating future increases in air traffic, and from an examination of capabilities envisioned for NextGen. The concepts are organized around categories of constraints and problems and therefore do not precisely match, but generally reflect, the research focus areas. The concepts provide a framework for defining and coordinating research activities that are, and will be, conducted by the NextGen-Airportal Project. The concepts will help the research activities function as an integrated set focused on future needs for airport operations and will aid aligning the research activities with NextGen key capabilities. The concepts are presented as concept elements with more detailed sub-elements under each concept element. For each concept element, the following topics are discussed: constraints and problems being addressed, benefit descriptions, required technology and infrastructure, and an initial list of potential research topics. Concept content will be updated and more detail added as the research progresses. The concepts are focused on enhancing airportal capacity and efficiency in a timeframe 20 to 25 years in the future, which is similar to NextGen's timeframe.

  2. The monocular visual imaging technology model applied in the airport surface surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhe; Wang, Jian; Huang, Chao

    2013-08-01

    At present, the civil aviation airports use the surface surveillance radar monitoring and positioning systems to monitor the aircrafts, vehicles and the other moving objects. Surface surveillance radars can cover most of the airport scenes, but because of the terminals, covered bridges and other buildings geometry, surface surveillance radar systems inevitably have some small segment blind spots. This paper presents a monocular vision imaging technology model for airport surface surveillance, achieving the perception of scenes of moving objects such as aircrafts, vehicles and personnel location. This new model provides an important complement for airport surface surveillance, which is different from the traditional surface surveillance radar techniques. Such technique not only provides clear objects activities screen for the ATC, but also provides image recognition and positioning of moving targets in this area. Thereby it can improve the work efficiency of the airport operations and avoid the conflict between the aircrafts and vehicles. This paper first introduces the monocular visual imaging technology model applied in the airport surface surveillance and then the monocular vision measurement accuracy analysis of the model. The monocular visual imaging technology model is simple, low cost, and highly efficient. It is an advanced monitoring technique which can make up blind spot area of the surface surveillance radar monitoring and positioning systems.

  3. Career Unit. Careers at an Airport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, Billie

    This career exploration instructional unit on airport careers is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). This unit is designed to help students become aware of the different types of jobs connected with running an airport (e.g., ticket agent, pilot, skycap, traffic…

  4. 14 CFR 398.3 - Specific airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specific airports. 398.3 Section 398.3... STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.3 Specific airports. (a) At an eligible place, essential air service may be specified as service to a particular...

  5. 14 CFR 398.3 - Specific airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Specific airports. 398.3 Section 398.3... STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.3 Specific airports. (a) At an eligible place, essential air service may be specified as service to a particular...

  6. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  7. Airport Economics: Management Control Financial Reporting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchbinder, A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of management control financial reporting systems for airport operation is discussed. The operation of the system to provide the reports required for determining the specific revenue producing facilities of airports is described. The organization of the cost reporting centers to show the types of information provided by the system is analyzed.

  8. 7 CFR 301.53-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Emerald Ash Borer § 301.53-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of... infestation by emerald ash borer; and (iv) The article has not been combined or commingled with other...

  9. 7 CFR 301.53-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Emerald Ash Borer § 301.53-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of... infestation by emerald ash borer; and (iv) The article has not been combined or commingled with other...

  10. 7 CFR 301.53-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Emerald Ash Borer § 301.53-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of... infestation by emerald ash borer; and (iv) The article has not been combined or commingled with other...

  11. 7 CFR 301.53-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Emerald Ash Borer § 301.53-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of... infestation by emerald ash borer; and (iv) The article has not been combined or commingled with other...

  12. 7 CFR 301.53-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Emerald Ash Borer § 301.53-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of... infestation by emerald ash borer; and (iv) The article has not been combined or commingled with other...

  13. Siting Solar Photovoltaics at Airports: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-06-01

    Airports present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to their open land; based on a 2010 Federal Aviation Administration study, the US Department of Agriculture, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service, there's potential for 116,704 MW of solar photovoltaics (PV) on idle lands at US airports. PV has a low profile and likely low to no impact on flight operations. This paper outlines guidance for implementing solar technologies at airports and airfields, focusing largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's policies. The paper also details best practices for siting solar at airports, provides information on the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool, and highlights a case study example where solar has been installed at an airport.

  14. Giving radioiodine? Think about airport security alarms.

    PubMed

    Kaniuka-Jakubowska, S; Lewczuk, A; Mizan-Gross, K; Obołończyk, L; Lass, P; Sworczak, K

    2012-01-01

    An increased sensitivity of airport detectors, a growing number of isotopic tests, and globalization of the society have raised a number of false positive radioactive alarms at airports and public places. This paper presents two new cases of patients who triggered airport security alarms after receiving 740MBq of (131)I for non-toxic goitre and attempts to compare surprisingly limited literature concerning this problem. A 57-year-old man triggered a security alarm at three different airports on the 17th, 28th, and 31st day after radioiodine exposure. Interestingly enough, in the meantime, on the 18th and 22nd day, no radiation was detected in him at the airport where he was twice detained as a source of radiation later on. The second case presents a 45-year-old woman who activated security alarm detectors while crossing a border on her coach trip 28 days after radioiodine administration.

  15. Airport noise impact reduction through operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1981-01-01

    The airport-noise levels and annoyance model (ALAMO) developed at NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of a system of computer programs which is capable of quantifying airport community noise impact in terms of noise level, population distribution, and human subjective response to noise. The ALAMO can be used to compare the noise impact of an airport's current operating scenario with the noise impact which would result from some proposed change in airport operations. The relative effectiveness of number of noise-impact reduction alternatives is assessed for a major midwest airport. Significant reductions in noise impact are predicted for certain noise abatement strategies while others are shown to result in relatively little noise relief.

  16. Measuring the levels of noise at the İstanbul Atatürk Airport and comparisons with model simulations.

    PubMed

    Sari, Deniz; Ozkurt, Nesimi; Akdag, Ali; Kutukoglu, Murat; Gurarslan, Aliye

    2014-06-01

    Airport noise and its impact on the surrounding areas are major issues in the aviation industry. The İstanbul Atatürk Airport is a major global airport with passenger numbers increasing rapidly per annum. The noise levels for day, evening and night times were modeled around the İstanbul Atatürk Airport according to the European Noise Directive using the actual data records for the year 2011. The "ECAC Doc. 29-Interim" method was used for the computation of the aircraft traffic noise. In the setting the noise model for the local airport topography was taken into consideration together with the noise source data, the airport loadings, features of aircraft and actual air traffic data. Model results were compared with long-term noise measurement values for calibration. According to calibration results, classifications of the aircraft type and flight tracks were revised. For noise model validation, the daily noise measurements at four additional locations were used during the verification period. The input data was re-edited only for these periods and the model was validated. A successful model performance was obtained in several zones around the airport. The validated noise model of the İstanbul Atatürk Airport can be now utilized both for determining the noise levels in the future and for producing new strategies which are about the land use planning, operational considerations for the air traffic management and the noise abatement procedures.

  17. Effect of Traffic Position Accuracy for Conducting Safe Airport Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Barnes, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept proposes many revolutionary operational concepts and technologies, such as display of traffic information and movements, airport moving maps (AMM), and proactive alerts of runway incursions and surface traffic conflicts, to deliver an overall increase in system capacity and safety. A piloted simulation study was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center to evaluate the ability to conduct safe and efficient airport surface operations while utilizing an AMM displaying traffic of various position accuracies as well as the effect of traffic position accuracy on airport conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capability. Nominal scenarios and off-nominal conflict scenarios were conducted using 12 airline crews operating in a simulated Memphis International Airport terminal environment. The data suggest that all traffic should be shown on the airport moving map, whether qualified or unqualified, and conflict detection and resolution technologies provide significant safety benefits. Despite the presence of traffic information on the map, collisions or near collisions still occurred; when indications or alerts were generated in these same scenarios, the incidences were averted.

  18. Metabarcoding avian diets at airports: implications for birdstrike hazard management planning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wildlife collisions with aircraft cost the airline industry billions of dollars per annum and represent a public safety risk. Clearly, adapting aerodrome habitats to become less attractive to hazardous wildlife will reduce the incidence of collisions. Formulating effective habitat management strategies relies on accurate species identification of high-risk species. This can be successfully achieved for all strikes either through morphology and/or DNA-based identifications. Beyond species identification, dietary analysis of birdstrike gut contents can provide valuable intelligence for airport hazard management practices in regards to what food is attracting which species to aerodromes. Here, we present birdstrike identification and dietary data from Perth Airport, Western Australia, an aerodrome that saw approximately 140,000 aircraft movements in 2012. Next-generation high throughput DNA sequencing was employed to investigate 77 carcasses from 16 bird species collected over a 12-month period. Five DNA markers, which broadly characterize vertebrates, invertebrates and plants, were used to target three animal mitochondrial genes (12S rRNA, 16S rRNA, and COI) and a plastid gene (trnL) from DNA extracted from birdstrike carcass gastrointestinal tracts. Results Over 151,000 DNA sequences were generated, filtered and analyzed by a fusion-tag amplicon sequencing approach. Across the 77 carcasses, the most commonly identified vertebrate was Mus musculus (house mouse). Acrididae (grasshoppers) was the most common invertebrate family identified, and Poaceae (grasses) the most commonly identified plant family. The DNA-based dietary data has the potential to provide some key insights into feeding ecologies within and around the aerodrome. Conclusions The data generated here, together with the methodological approach, will greatly assist in the development of hazard management plans and, in combination with existing observational studies, provide an improved way to

  19. Airport Delay and Improvement Study, John F. Kennedy International Airport and LaGuardia Airport.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    LaGuardia Airport fb Current System Operation Aircraft delat has been ar integral part of the operationr or out presen s %tem of major huh airpnort,. Ru ri...iuardia %%henl Kcnnecd% is usingt thre Ruiiwa% 131 11 S. I it, pioposal riral. with the departure delav increasing h,, 3.5 minutes. Oserall. a delat ...genieral iatrioii actIisits. adds 5.7󈧥 additiontal I%TF;RIM AK k ORTErX %S rFEM mntes o t delat , at a Co st of S95.5-8 annual[%. Because of he os

  20. The community response to aircraft noise around six Spanish airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A.; Faus, L. J.; Garcia, A. M.

    1993-06-01

    The community response to aircraft noise has been studied through a social survey. A total of 1800 persons living in the vicinity of six major Spanish airports have been interviewed at their homes concerning the environmental quality of the area, dissatisfaction with road traffic noise and aircraft noise, activities interfered with by noise, most disturbing aircraft types, and subjective evaluation of airport impact. All the responses obtained in this survey have been compared with aircraft noise levels corresponding to the residence locations of the people interviewed (values of NEF levels were calculated with the INM model). The results obtained in this work allow one to evaluate the impact of aircraft noise under a wide range of different situations.

  1. Distribution of Blood Pressure Data from People Living Near AN Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GOTO, K.; KANEKO, T.

    2002-02-01

    We observed blood pressure in general health examination data around a city airport and compared the data with those from a calm suburban area of the city. Information was also collected on the short-term history of medication and lifestyle including smoking, drinking and eating salty foods. This cross-sectional study on 469 women showed that systolic and diastolic blood pressure was not associated with aircraft noise levels in the area, even after controlling for variables regarding anti-hypertension treatment and lifestyle factors. A comparative study on 469 women from an area around an airport and 1177 women from a suburban control area showed no significant differences between blood pressure and other medical tests controlling for the variables of medication and lifestyle. Changes in blood pressure after 8 years were observed in 183 women around the airport. No significant differences among three zones with different levels of aircraft noise were found.

  2. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.15 User fee airports. (a) Permission to land. The procedures for obtaining permission to land at a user fee airport are the same procedures as those set forth... is subject to change without notice. Information concerning service at any user fee airport can...

  3. 14 CFR 139.203 - Contents of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Contents of Airport Certification Manual... CERTIFICATION OF AIRPORTS Airport Certification Manual § 139.203 Contents of Airport Certification Manual. (a... serving facilities or NAVAIDS that support air carrier operations X X X 8. A description of the system...

  4. 14 CFR 139.203 - Contents of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of Airport Certification Manual... CERTIFICATION OF AIRPORTS Airport Certification Manual § 139.203 Contents of Airport Certification Manual. (a) Except as otherwise authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must include in the...

  5. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false List of international airports. 122.13 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.13 List of international airports. The following is a list of international airports of entry designated by the Secretary of the Treasury....

  6. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false List of international airports. 122.13 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.13 List of international airports. The following is a list of international airports of entry designated by the Secretary of the Treasury....

  7. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  8. 14 CFR 121.617 - Alternate airport for departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate airport for departure. 121.617... Alternate airport for departure. (a) If the weather conditions at the airport of takeoff are below the landing minimums in the certificate holder's operations specifications for that airport, no person...

  9. 14 CFR 135.223 - IFR: Alternate airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport requirements. 135... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.223 IFR: Alternate airport requirements...) to— (1) Complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing; (2) Fly from that airport...

  10. 14 CFR 151.3 - National Airport Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National Airport Plan. 151.3 Section 151.3 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS General Requirements § 151.3 National Airport Plan. (a) Under the Federal...

  11. 14 CFR 121.617 - Alternate airport for departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate airport for departure. 121.617... Alternate airport for departure. (a) If the weather conditions at the airport of takeoff are below the landing minimums in the certificate holder's operations specifications for that airport, no person...

  12. 14 CFR 135.223 - IFR: Alternate airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport requirements. 135... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.223 IFR: Alternate airport requirements...) to— (1) Complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing; (2) Fly from that airport...

  13. 14 CFR 152.107 - Project eligibility: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport development... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Application Procedures § 152.107 Project eligibility: Airport development. (a) Except in the case of approved stage...

  14. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  15. 14 CFR 152.323 - Budget revision: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Budget revision: Airport development. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.323 Budget revision: Airport development. (a) If any performance review conducted by the sponsor discloses a need...

  16. 19 CFR 122.14 - Landing rights airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Landing rights airport. 122.14 Section 122.14... TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.14 Landing rights airport. (a) Permission to land. Permission to land at a landing rights airport may be given as follows: (1) Scheduled flight....

  17. 14 CFR 152.107 - Project eligibility: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport development... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Application Procedures § 152.107 Project eligibility: Airport development. (a) Except in the case of approved stage...

  18. 14 CFR 139.203 - Contents of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contents of Airport Certification Manual... CERTIFICATION OF AIRPORTS Airport Certification Manual § 139.203 Contents of Airport Certification Manual. (a) Except as otherwise authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must include in the...

  19. 14 CFR 152.111 - Application requirements: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application requirements: Airport... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Application Procedures § 152.111 Application requirements: Airport development. (a) An eligible sponsor that desires to...

  20. 14 CFR 152.323 - Budget revision: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget revision: Airport development. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.323 Budget revision: Airport development. (a) If any performance review conducted by the sponsor discloses a need...

  1. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  2. 14 CFR 151.3 - National Airport Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false National Airport Plan. 151.3 Section 151.3 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS General Requirements § 151.3 National Airport Plan. (a) Under the Federal...

  3. 14 CFR 152.111 - Application requirements: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Application requirements: Airport... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Application Procedures § 152.111 Application requirements: Airport development. (a) An eligible sponsor that desires to...

  4. 14 CFR 152.109 - Project eligibility: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport planning. 152....109 Project eligibility: Airport planning. (a) Airport master planning. A proposed project for airport... master planning as defined in § 152.3; (4) If the project has been determined to have...

  5. 14 CFR 152.325 - Financial status report: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... status report: Airport planning. Each sponsor of a project for airport master planning and each planning agency conducting a project for airport system planning shall submit a financial status report on a form... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial status report: Airport...

  6. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  7. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  8. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  9. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  10. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  11. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  12. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  13. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  14. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  15. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  16. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  17. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  18. 78 FR 65417 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Regional Airport (EAR), Kearney, Nebraska. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invites public comment on... request to release approximately 67.72 acres of airport property at the Kearney Regional Airport (EAR... property at the Kearney Regional Airport (EAR) submitted by the Sponsor meets the procedural...

  19. 77 FR 73310 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Bozeman Yellowstone International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Airports: Addition of Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, Belgrade, MT AGENCY: U.S. Customs and... user fee airports to reflect the recent user fee airport designation for Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport in Belgrade, Montana. User fee airports are those airports which, while not qualifying...

  20. 76 FR 21420 - Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue; Policy Regarding Airport Rates and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue; Policy Regarding Airport Rates and Charges: Petition of the Clark County Department of Aviation To Use a Weight... consistent with Federal law and policies on the use of airport revenue and on airport rates and charges....

  1. 76 FR 30422 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Helena Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... on Request To Release Airport Property at the Helena Regional Airport, Helena, Montana AGENCY... Release Airport Property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invite public comment on the release of land at Helena Regional Airport (HLN) under the provisions of Section 125 of the Wendell H....

  2. Surface Operations Systems Improve Airport Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Ames Research Center, Mosaic ATM of Leesburg, Virginia created software to analyze surface operations at airports. Surface surveillance systems, which report locations every second for thousands of air and ground vehicles, generate massive amounts of data, making gathering and analyzing this information difficult. Mosaic?s Surface Operations Data Analysis and Adaptation (SODAA) tool is an off-line support tool that can analyze how well the airport surface operation is working and can help redesign procedures to improve operations. SODAA helps researchers pinpoint trends and correlations in vast amounts of recorded airport operations data.

  3. 7 CFR 301.32-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruit Flies § 301.32-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of... enclosed vehicle or is completely enclosed by a covering adequate to prevent access by fruit flies (such as... prevent the spread of fruit flies; and (4) With a tag or label bearing the number of the permit issued...

  4. 7 CFR 301.32-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruit Flies § 301.32-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of... enclosed vehicle or is completely enclosed by a covering adequate to prevent access by fruit flies (such as... prevent the spread of fruit flies; and (4) With a tag or label bearing the number of the permit issued...

  5. 7 CFR 301.32-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruit Flies § 301.32-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of... enclosed vehicle or is completely enclosed by a covering adequate to prevent access by fruit flies (such as... prevent the spread of fruit flies; and (4) With a tag or label bearing the number of the permit issued...

  6. 7 CFR 301.32-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruit Flies § 301.32-4 Conditions governing the interstate movement of... enclosed vehicle or is completely enclosed by a covering adequate to prevent access by fruit flies (such as... prevent the spread of fruit flies; and (4) With a tag or label bearing the number of the permit issued...

  7. 9 CFR 73.7 - Movement from quarantined to free area and shipment therefrom; restrictions under which permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.7 Movement from quarantined to free... any State, Territory, or the District of Columbia any cattle which have been moved from the..., however, That such cattle may be delivered for transportation, transported, driven on foot, or...

  8. 9 CFR 73.7 - Movement from quarantined to free area and shipment therefrom; restrictions under which permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.7 Movement from quarantined to free... any State, Territory, or the District of Columbia any cattle which have been moved from the..., however, That such cattle may be delivered for transportation, transported, driven on foot, or...

  9. 9 CFR 73.7 - Movement from quarantined to free area and shipment therefrom; restrictions under which permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.7 Movement from quarantined to free... any State, Territory, or the District of Columbia any cattle which have been moved from the..., however, That such cattle may be delivered for transportation, transported, driven on foot, or...

  10. 9 CFR 73.7 - Movement from quarantined to free area and shipment therefrom; restrictions under which permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.7 Movement from quarantined to free... any State, Territory, or the District of Columbia any cattle which have been moved from the..., however, That such cattle may be delivered for transportation, transported, driven on foot, or...

  11. 9 CFR 73.7 - Movement from quarantined to free area and shipment therefrom; restrictions under which permitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCABIES IN CATTLE § 73.7 Movement from quarantined to free... any State, Territory, or the District of Columbia any cattle which have been moved from the..., however, That such cattle may be delivered for transportation, transported, driven on foot, or...

  12. Mathematics Education in Brazilian Rural Areas: An Analysis of the "Escola Ativa" Public Policy and the Landless Movement Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knijnik, Gelsa; Wanderer, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses mathematics education within two educational projects addressed to rural multigrade schools in Brazil: Active School Program (in Portuguese, Programa Escola Ativa--PEA) and the Landless Movement (Movimento Sem Terra--MST) Pedagogy. It is based on an ethnomathematics perspective drawn from Wittgenstein's later work and Michel…

  13. 76 FR 43804 - Movement of Hass Avocados From Areas Where Mediterranean Fruit Fly or South American Fruit Fly Exist

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Parts 301 and 319 RIN 0579-AD34 Movement of Hass... Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are amending the regulations to... making them consistent with each other and relieving restrictions for Mexican and Peruvian Hass...

  14. Reduction of Weather-Related Terminal Area Delays in the Free-Flight Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sally C.; Chin, David K.; Rovinsky, Robert B.; Kostiuk, Peter F.; Lee, David A.; Hemm, Robert V.; Wingrove, Earl R., III

    1996-01-01

    While much of the emphasis of the free-flight movement has been concentrated on reducing en-route delays, airport capacity is a major bottleneck in the current airspace system, particularly during bad weather. According to the Air Transport Association (ATA) Air Carrier Delay Reports, ground delays (gate-hold, taxi-in, and taxi-out) comprise 75 percent of total delays. It is likely that the projected steady growth in traffic will only exacerbate these losses. Preliminary analyses show that implementation of the terminal area technologies and procedures under development in NASA s Terminal Area Productivity program can potentially save the airlines at least $350M annually in weather-related delays by the year 2005 at Boston Logan and Detroit airports alone. This paper briefly describes the Terminal Area Productivity program, outlines the costhenefit analyses that are being conducted in support of the program, and presents some preliminary analysis results.

  15. Effects of sympathetic stimulation on the rhythmical jaw movements produced by electrical stimulation of the cortical masticatory areas of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Roatta, S; Windhorst, U; Djupsjöbacka, M; Lytvynenko, S; Passatore, M

    2005-03-01

    The somatomotor and sympathetic nervous systems are intimately linked. One example is the influence of peripheral sympathetic fibers on the discharge characteristics of muscle spindles. Since muscle spindles play important roles in various motor behaviors, including rhythmic movements, the working hypothesis of this research was that changes in sympathetic outflow to muscle spindles can change rhythmic movement patterns. We tested this hypothesis in the masticatory system of rabbits. Rhythmic jaw movements and EMG activity induced by long-lasting electrical cortical stimulation were powerfully modulated by electrical stimulation of the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN). This modulation manifested itself as a consistent and marked reduction in the excursion of the mandibular movements (often preceded by a transient modest enhancement), which could be attributed mainly to corresponding changes in masseter muscle activity. These changes outlasted the duration of CSN stimulation. In some of the cortically evoked rhythmic jaw movements (CRJMs) changes in masticatory frequency were also observed. When the jaw-closing muscles were subjected to repetitive ramp-and-hold force pulses, the CRMJs changed characteristics. Masseter EMG activity was strongly enhanced and digastric EMG slightly decreased. This change was considerably depressed during CSN stimulation. These effects of CSN stimulation are similar in sign and time course to the depression exerted by sympathetic activity on the jaw-closing muscle spindle discharge. It is suggested that the change in proprioceptive information induced by an increase in sympathetic outflow (a) has important implications even under normal conditions for the control of motor function in states of high sympathetic activity, and (b) is one of the mechanisms responsible for motor impairment under certain pathological conditions such as chronic musculoskeletal head-neck disorders, associated with stress conditions.

  16. Movement Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... t want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia ... movement and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. Nerve diseases ...

  17. Geophysical characterization of permafrost terrain at Iqaluit International Airport, Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenborger, Greg A.; LeBlanc, Anne-Marie

    2015-12-01

    Iqaluit International Airport presently suffers from instabilities and subsidence along its runway, taxiways and apron. In particular, asphalt surfaces are significantly impacted by settlement and cracking. These instabilities may be related to permafrost, permafrost degradation and associated drainage conditions. Low induction number electromagnetic measurements along with galvanic and capacitive electrical resistivity surveys were performed over selected areas within the airport boundary and in the near vicinity to assist with permafrost characterization and to investigate active permafrost processes. Electrical resistivity images suggest distinct electrical signatures for different terrain units and sediment types, and for ice-rich material including ice wedges. Anomalous regions are identified that are coincident with localized settlement problems. Repeated resistivity maps reveal seasonal changes indicative of high unfrozen water content and freeze/thaw of groundwater beneath airport infrastructure in distinct regions related to surficial geology. Even with continuous permafrost and cold permafrost temperatures, the resistivity models reveal anomalously conductive material at depth that is not obviously correlated to mapped surficial sediments and that may represent thaw susceptible sediments or significant unfrozen water content.

  18. Impact of aircraft plume dynamics on airport local air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Steven R. H.; Britter, Rex E.; Waitz, Ian A.

    2013-08-01

    Air quality degradation in the locality of airports poses a public health hazard. The ability to quantitatively predict the air quality impacts of airport operations is of importance for assessing the air quality and public health impacts of airports today, of future developments, and for evaluating approaches for mitigating these impacts. However, studies such as the Project for the Sustainable Development of Heathrow have highlighted shortcomings in understanding of aircraft plume dispersion. Further, if national or international aviation environmental policies are to be assessed, a computationally efficient method of modeling aircraft plume dispersion is needed. To address these needs, we describe the formulation and validation of a three-dimensional integral plume model appropriate for modeling aircraft exhaust plumes at airports. We also develop a simplified concentration correction factor approach to efficiently account for dispersion processes particular to aircraft plumes. The model is used to explain monitoring station results in the London Heathrow area showing that pollutant concentrations are approximately constant over wind speeds of 3-12 m s-1, and is applied to reproduce empirically derived relationships between engine types and peak NOx concentrations at Heathrow. We calculated that not accounting for aircraft plume dynamics would result in a factor of 1.36-2.3 over-prediction of the mean NOx concentration (depending on location), consistent with empirical evidence of a factor of 1.7 over-prediction. Concentration correction factors are also calculated for aircraft takeoff, landing and taxi emissions, providing an efficient way to account for aircraft plume effects in atmospheric dispersion models.

  19. Public health impact of large airports.

    PubMed

    Passchier, W; Knottnerus, A; Albering, H; Walda, I

    2000-01-01

    Large airports with the related infrastructure, businesses and industrial activities affect the health of the population living, travelling and working in the surroundings of or at the airport. The employment and contributions to economy from the airport and related operations are expected to have a beneficial effect, which, however, is difficult to quantify. More pertinent data are available on the, largely negative, health effects of environmental factors, such as air and soil pollution, noise, accident risk, and landscape changes. Information on the concurrent and cumulative impact of these factors is lacking, but is of primary relevance for public health policy. A committee of the Health Council of The Netherlands recently reviewed the data on the health impact of large airports. It was concluded that, generally, integrated health assessments are not available. Such assessments, as part of sustainable mobility policy, should accompany the further development of the global aviation system.

  20. Aircraft and airport noise control prospective outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, N.

    1982-01-01

    In a perspective look at aircraft and airport noise control over the past ten years or more - or more is added here because the Federal Aviation Regulation Part 36 of 1969 is a more significant milestone for the air transportation system than is the Noise Control Act of 1972 - we see an appreciable reduction in the noise emitted by newly designed and newly produced airplanes, particularly those powered by the new high bypass engines, but only, at best, a moderate alleviation of airport noise. The change in airport noise exposure was the consequence of the introduction of some new, quieter airplanes into the airlines fleets and some operational modifications or restrictions at the airports.

  1. Innovative School Facility Partnerships: Downtown, Airport, and Retail Space. Policy Study No. 276.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Matthew D.; Snell, Lisa

    This document examines three locations that schools have utilized in partnership with private enterprises to help ease school overcrowding: downtown areas, airports, and malls. The downtown model serves students whose parents work in a downtown area. The mall model targets high school students who want an alternative education with job training.…

  2. Behavioral Indicators of Drug Couriers in Airports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-30

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/5508--15-9595 Behavioral Indicators of Drug Couriers in Airports April 30, 2015 Approved...identify behaviors typical of drug couriers. Based on this training and the roundtable, AMX researchers cataloged 69 distinct behaviors in 7...in the case of the illegal narcotics trade, where drug couriers use airports to transport drugs and money throughout the United States. While

  3. The Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J.; Wilson, J.; Fujita, T. T.

    1983-01-01

    A block diagram of the joint airport weather studies program is presented. Background leading to the development of the program is reviewed. Basic studies, aircraft performance, and detection and warning techniques used to develop fine scale structure of thunderstorm dynamics and kinematics in the vicinity of a major airport; effect of thunderstorm low level wind shear on aircraft performance; and development of real time testing of flow level wind shear detection and warning techniques and displays are described.

  4. Movement and effects of spilled oil over the outer continental shelf; inadequacy of existent data for the Baltimore Canyon Trough area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, Harley J.

    1974-01-01

    A deductive approach to the problem of determining the movement and effects of spilled oil over the Outer Continental Shelf requires that the potential paths of oil be determined first, in order that critical subareas may be defined for later studies. The paths of spilled oil, in turn, depend primarily on the temporal and spatial variability of four factors: the thermohaline structure of the waters, the circulation of the water, the winds, and the distribution of suspended matter. A review of the existent data concerning these factors for the Baltimore Canyon Trough area (a relatively well studied segment of the Continental Shelf) reveals that the movement and dispersal of potential oil spills cannot be reliably predicted. Variations in the thermohaline structure of waters and in the distribution of suspended matter are adequately known; the uncertainty is due to insufficient wind and storm statistics and to the lack of quantitative understanding of the relationship between the nontidal drift and its basic driving mechanisms. Similar inadequacies should be anticipated for other potentially leasable areas of the shelf because an understanding of the movement of spilled oil has not been the underlying aim of most previous studies.

  5. Prediction of Weather Impacted Airport Capacity using Ensemble Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2011-01-01

    Ensemble learning with the Bagging Decision Tree (BDT) model was used to assess the impact of weather on airport capacities at selected high-demand airports in the United States. The ensemble bagging decision tree models were developed and validated using the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation System Performance Metrics (ASPM) data and weather forecast at these airports. The study examines the performance of BDT, along with traditional single Support Vector Machines (SVM), for airport runway configuration selection and airport arrival rates (AAR) prediction during weather impacts. Testing of these models was accomplished using observed weather, weather forecast, and airport operation information at the chosen airports. The experimental results show that ensemble methods are more accurate than a single SVM classifier. The airport capacity ensemble method presented here can be used as a decision support model that supports air traffic flow management to meet the weather impacted airport capacity in order to reduce costs and increase safety.

  6. Chloroplast movement.

    PubMed

    Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    Chloroplast movement is important for plant survival under high light and for efficient photosynthesis under low light. This review introduces recent knowledge on chloroplast movement and shows how to analyze the responses and the moving mechanisms, potentially inspiring research in this field. Avoidance from the strong light is mediated by blue light receptor phototropin 2 (phot2) plausibly localized on the chloroplast envelop and accumulation at the week light-irradiated area is mediated by phot1 and phot2 localized on the plasma membrane. Chloroplasts move by chloroplast actin (cp-actin) filaments that must be polymerized by Chloroplast Unusual Positioning1 (CHUP1) at the front side of moving chloroplast. To understand the signal transduction pathways and the mechanism of chloroplast movement, that is, from light capture to motive force-generating mechanism, various methods should be employed based on the various aspects. Observation of chloroplast distribution pattern under different light condition by fixed cell sectioning is somewhat an old-fashioned technique but the most basic and important way. However, most importantly, precise chloroplast behavior during and just after the induction of chloroplast movement by partial cell irradiation using an irradiator with either low light or strong light microbeam should be recorded by time lapse photographs under infrared light and analyzed. Recently various factors involved in chloroplast movement, such as cp-actin filaments and CHUP1, could be traced in Arabidopsis transgenic lines with fluorescent protein tags under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and/or a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM). These methods are listed and their advantages and disadvantages are evaluated.

  7. Dangerous Fog Analyses and Forecast in the Maceio Airport, Brasil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, N.; Silva, A.; Levit, V.; Santos, E.

    2010-07-01

    A small airplane fatal accident has occurred near Maceio Airport, on the coastal region on 26 July 2007. Low visibility in the intensive fog has provoked this accident. Weather forecast analysis, published in the local and central Brazilian newspapers during 2007, showed fog forecast absence during whole year. A study of the fog formation causes was elaborated using the high and low resolution satellite data, radar data, different products of NCEP reanalysis data and high resolution regional MM5 model simulation. The trade winds with a weak cyclonic curvature at the low levels have generated the humidity convergence at the superficial layers up to 850hPa on the coastal region. An anticyclonic circulation existence at the middle and higher levels and weak ascendant motion (by NCEP data) have support a weak convection development. The low levels clouds development on the continental region and convection development over ocean were confirmed by the radar and satellite data. A thermal inversion near surface level (up to 150m) and descendent movement at the middle and high levels were identified by MM5 model. Fog formation was simulated by PAFOG model. The conventional airport observations have shown the minimal visibility of 200m between 4 and 7a.m. Moreover visibility less than 1000m between 1 and 8a.m. with the minimal visibility of 213m was simulated by PAFOG model.

  8. Decentralized aircraft landing scheduling at single runway non-controlled airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yuanyuan

    The existing air transportation system is approaching a bottleneck because its dominant hub-and-spoke model results in a concentration of a large percentage of the air traffic at a few hub airports. Advanced technologies are greatly needed to enhance the transportation capabilities of the small airports in the U.S.A., and distribute the high volume of air traffic at the hub airports to those small airports, which are mostly non-controlled airports. Currently, two major focus areas of research are being pursued to achieve this objective. One focus concentrates on the development of tools to improve operations in the current Air Traffic Management system. A more long-term research effort focuses on the development of decentralized Air Traffic Management techniques. This dissertation takes the latter approach and seeks to analyze the degree of decentralization for scheduling aircraft landings in the dynamic operational environment at single runway non-controlled airports. Moreover, it explores the feasibility and capability of scheduling aircraft landings within uninterrupted free-flight environment in which there is no existence of Air Traffic Control (ATC). First, it addresses the approach of developing static optimization algorithms for scheduling aircraft landings and, thus, analyzes the capability of automated aircraft landing scheduling at single runway non-controlled airports. Then, it provides detailed description of the implementation of a distributed Air Traffic Management (ATM) system that achieves decentralized aircraft landing scheduling with acceptable performance whereas a solution to the distributed coordination issues is presented. Finally real-time Monte Carlo flight simulations of multi-aircraft landing scenarios are conducted to evaluate the static and dynamic performance of the aircraft landing scheduling algorithms and operation concepts introduced. Results presented in the dissertation demonstrate that decentralized aircraft landing scheduling

  9. Wildlife Strike Risk Assessment in Several Italian Airports: Lessons from BRI and a New Methodology Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Soldatini, Cecilia; Albores-Barajas, Yuri Vladimir; Lovato, Tomas; Andreon, Adriano; Torricelli, Patrizia; Montemaggiori, Alessandro; Corsa, Cosimo; Georgalas, Vyron

    2011-01-01

    The presence of wildlife in airport areas poses substantial hazards to aviation. Wildlife aircraft collisions (hereafter wildlife strikes) cause losses in terms of human lives and direct monetary losses for the aviation industry. In recent years, wildlife strikes have increased in parallel with air traffic increase and species habituation to anthropic areas. In this paper, we used an ecological approach to wildlife strike risk assessment to eight Italian international airports. The main achievement is a site-specific analysis that avoids flattening wildlife strike events on a large scale while maintaining comparable airport risk assessments. This second version of the Birdstrike Risk Index (BRI2) is a sensitive tool that provides different time scale results allowing appropriate management planning. The methodology applied has been developed in accordance with the Italian Civil Aviation Authority, which recognizes it as a national standard implemented in the advisory circular ENAC APT-01B. PMID:22194950

  10. 7 CFR 301.86-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... experimental or scientific purposes; or (ii) The regulated article originates outside the quarantined area and... regulated articles from quarantined areas. 301.86-4 Section 301.86-4 Agriculture Regulations of the... regulated articles from quarantined areas. (a) Any regulated article may be moved interstate from...

  11. 7 CFR 301.51-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... experimental or scientific purposes; or (ii) The regulated article originates outside the quarantined area and... regulated articles from quarantined areas. 301.51-4 Section 301.51-4 Agriculture Regulations of the... of regulated articles from quarantined areas. (a) Any regulated article may be moved interstate...

  12. 75 FR 54946 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ..., such as the proximity of children and pets, to normal airport operations. In addition, not all..., and resistance to the sponsor's accommodation of those changes. At airports where the nearby residents... accommodation of new aircraft types. While the FAA supports these mitigation measures where available,...

  13. 77 FR 3324 - Release of Airport Property: Fort Myers International Airport, Fort Myers, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 14 (Monday, January 23, 2012)] [Notices] [Page 3324] [FR Doc No: 2012-1064] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport... Airports District Office Southern Region. R [FR Doc. 2012-1064 Filed 1-20-12; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE...

  14. Airport Noise Tech Challenge Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, operating under NASA Aeronautics Mission Directorate#s Fundamental Aero Program, has been organized around the Technical Challenges that have historically precluded commercial supersonic flight. One of these Challenges is making aircraft that are capable of such high aerodynamic performance quiet enough around airports that they will not be objectionable. It is recognized that a successful civilian supersonic aircraft will be a system where many new technologies will come together, and for this to happen not only will new low noise propulsion concepts be required, but new engineering tools that predict the noise of the aircraft as these technologies are combined and compromised with the rest of the aircraft design. These are the two main objectives of the Airport Noise Tech Challenge. " ! As a Project in the Fundamental Aero Program, we work at a relatively low level of technology readiness. However, we have high level milestones which force us to integrate our efforts to impact systems-level activities. To keep the low-level work tied to delivering engineering tools and low-noise concepts, we have structured our milestones around development of the concepts and organized our activities around developing and applying our engineering tools to these concepts. The final deliverables in these milestones are noise prediction modules validated against the best embodiment of each concept. These will then be used in cross-disciplinary exercises to demonstrate the viability of aircraft designs to meet all the Technical Challenges. Some of the concepts being developed are shown: Fan Flow Diverters, Multi-jet Shielding, High-Aspect Ratio Embedded Nozzles, Plasma Actuated Instability Manipulation, Highly Variable Cycle Mixer- Ejectors, and Inverted Velocity Profiles. These concepts are being developed for reduced jet noise along with the design tools which describe how they perform when used in various aircraft configurations. Several key upcoming

  15. Relationship between the perifornical hypothalamic area and oral pontine reticular nucleus in the rat. Possible implication of the hypocretinergic projection in the control of rapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, A; Moreno-Balandrán, M E; Rodrigo-Angulo, M L; Garzón, M; De Andrés, I

    2006-11-01

    The perifornical (PeF) area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus has been implicated in several physiological functions including the regulation of sleep-wakefulness. Some PeF neurons, which contain hypocretin, have been suggested to play an important role in sleep-wake regulation. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the PeF area and hypocretin on the electrophysiological activity of neurons of the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO), which is an important structure in the generation and maintenance of rapid eye movement sleep. PnO neurons were recorded in urethane-anesthetized rats. Extracellular recordings were performed by means of tungsten microelectrodes or barrel micropipettes. Electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral PeF area elicited orthodromic responses in both type I (49%) and type II (58%) electrophysiologically characterized PnO neurons, with a mean latency of 13.0 +/- 2 and 8.3 +/- 5 ms, respectively. In six cases, antidromic spikes were evoked in type I PnO neurons with a mean latency of 3.2 +/- 0.4 ms, indicating the existence of PnO neurons that projected to the PeF area. Anatomical studies showed retrogradely labeled neurons in the PeF area from the PnO. Some of these neurons projecting to the PnO contained hypocretin (17.8%). Iontophoretic application of hypocretin-1 through a barrel micropipette in the PnO induced an inhibition, which was blocked by a previous iontophoretic application of bicuculline, indicating that the inhibitory action of hypocretin-1 may be due to activation of GABA(A) receptors. These data suggest that the PeF area may control the generation of rapid eye movement sleep through a hypocretinergic projection by inhibiting the activity of PnO neurons.

  16. Negligible risk associated with the movement of processed rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), from an infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) endemic area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaPatra, S.E.; Batts, W.N.; Overturf, K.; Jones, G.N.; Shewmaker, W.D.; Winton, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    To assess the risk of transmission of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) associated with the movement of processed rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, from an area where the virus is endemic, 240 freshly eviscerated fish (225-500 g) exhibiting spinal curvature or spinal compression types of deformities were tested for IHNV by virus isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Commercially produced rainbow trout, approximately 1-year-old, that exhibited spinal deformities were considered to have had a high likelihood of having survived an outbreak of IHN. Serological analysis of fish exhibiting spinal curvature or spinal compression types of deformities for anti-IHNV antibodies resulted, in 71 and 50% of the serum samples, respectively, with detectable neutralization activity suggesting previous infection with IHNV. A portion of the skin and muscle in the area of the deformity was collected, as well as brain tissue from each commercially processed fish. Tissue homogenates were tested for IHNV using the epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cell line pretreated with polyethylene glycol and the chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line using standard methods. Nested, reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR for the detection of IHNV used the central 1231 bp portion of the glycoprotein (G) challenge studies and is suggested as a mechanism responsible for virus clearance. These results provide scientific information that can be used to assess the risk associated with the movement of processed rainbow trout from an IHNV endemic area.

  17. Chloride profile technique to estimate water movement through unsatured zone in a cropped area in subhumid climate (Po Valley—NW Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Russo, Stefano; Zavattaro, Laura; Acutis, Marco; Zuppi, Gian Maria

    2003-01-01

    Two methods based on a chloride concentration profile were applied to evaluate the annual groundwater recharge in a subhumid area cropped with maize where chloride anthropogenic inputs were greater than the natural ones. The site is located in the alluvial Po plain (NW Italy). The two methods were a steady-state model and an approximate diffusive movement equation. They were applied to the Cl - content of retention water extracted from porous cups on 24 sampling dates through one year. The sampling depth ranged from 0.2 to 2.6 m, and the concentration was steady in time below 1.6 m. Considering all the approximations introduced (homogeneous and non-dispersive medium, constant diffusion coefficient with depth, all the liquid phase in movement, no macroporosity, steady state conditions), the results were consistent with those obtained with a long-term mass-balance method. The mean annual recharge assessed using the steady-state chloride profile method was 205 mm yr -1, using the approximate diffusive movement equation it was 216 mm yr -1, while using the mass-balance method the calculated mean recharge was 174 mm yr -1. The estimate showed a moderate dependence with the sampling date. Chloride inputs were wet and dry atmospheric deposition, irrigation water and fertilizers. The incorporation of chloride fertilizers to the soil is one of the more unusual aspects of the chloride approach in this study.

  18. Passive Wake Acoustics Measurements at Denver International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Frank Y.; Wassaf, Hadi; Dougherty, Robert P.; Clark, Kevin; Gulsrud, Andrew; Fenichel, Neil; Bryant, Wayne H.

    2004-01-01

    From August to September 2003, NASA conducted an extensive measurement campaign to characterize the acoustic signal of wake vortices. A large, both spatially as well as in number of elements, phased microphone array was deployed at Denver International Airport for this effort. This paper will briefly describe the program background, the microphone array, as well as the supporting ground-truth and meteorological sensor suite. Sample results to date are then presented and discussed. It is seen that, in the frequency range processed so far, wake noise is generated predominantly from a very confined area around the cores.

  19. NASA Research on an Integrated Concept for Airport Surface Operations Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Surface operations at airports in the US are based on tactical operations, where departure aircraft primarily queue up and wait at the departure runways. There have been attempts to address the resulting inefficiencies with both strategic and tactical tools for metering departure aircraft. This presentation gives an overview of Spot And Runway Departure Advisor with Collaborative Decision Making (SARDA-CDM): an integrated strategic and tactical system for improving surface operations by metering departure aircraft. SARDA-CDM is the augmentation of ground and local controller advisories through sharing of flight movement and related operations information between airport operators, flight operators and air traffic control at the airport. The goal is to enhance the efficiency of airport surface operations by exchanging information between air traffic control and airline operators, while minimizing adverse effects on stakeholders and passengers. The presentation motivates the need for departure metering, and provides a brief background on the previous work on SARDA. Then, the concept of operations for SARDA-CDM is described. Then the preliminary results from testing the concept in a real-time automated simulation environment are described. Results indicate benefits such as reduction in taxiing delay and fuel consumption. Further, the preliminary implementation of SARDA-CDM seems robust for two minutes delay in gate push-back times.

  20. 76 FR 26654 - Movement of Hass Avocados From Areas Where Mediterranean Fruit Fly or South American Fruit Fly Exist

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... Avocados From Areas Where Mediterranean Fruit Fly or South American Fruit Fly Exist AGENCY: Animal and... from Mediterranean fruit fly quarantined areas in the United States with a certificate if the fruit is... quarantine regulations to remove trapping requirements for Mediterranean fruit fly for Hass avocados...

  1. 9 CFR 83.3 - Interstate movement of live VHS-regulated fish species from VHS-regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-regulated fish species from VHS-regulated areas. 83.3 Section 83.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND...-regulated fish species from VHS-regulated areas. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, live VHS-regulated fish, including fish moved to live fish markets, may only be...

  2. 9 CFR 83.3 - Interstate movement of live VHS-regulated fish species from VHS-regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-regulated fish species from VHS-regulated areas. 83.3 Section 83.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND...-regulated fish species from VHS-regulated areas. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, live VHS-regulated fish, including fish moved to live fish markets, may only be...

  3. 7 CFR 301.32-4 - Conditions governing the interstate movement of regulated articles from quarantined areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... domestic plant quarantines and regulations must also be met. (a) With a certificate or limited permit... area quarantined for Mexican or sapote fruit fly and that are moving interstate from such an area...

  4. Overview of environmental and hydrogeologic conditions at the Merle K. "Mudhole" Smith Airport near Cordova, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorava, J.M.; Sokup, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Air service to Cordova, Alaska and the surrounding region is provided by the Merle K. "Mudhole" Smith Airport, 21 kilometers east of the townsite. The Federal Aviation Administration owns or operates support facilities at the airport and wishes to consider the environmental setting and hydro- geologic conditions when evaluating options for remediation of potential contamination at these facilities. The airport is within the Copper River Delta wetlands area and the Chugach National Forest. Silts, sands, and gravels of fluvial origin underlie the airport. Potential flooding may be caused by outbursts of glacier-dammed lakes, glacier icemelt, snowmelt runoff, or precipitation. Surface spills and disposal of hazardous materials in conjunction with precipitation or flooding may adversely affect the quality of ground water. Drinking water at the airport is currently supplied by wells. Alternative drinking-water sources include local rivers and streams, transporting city water from Cordova, or undiscovered aquifers. Each alternative source, however, would likely cost significantly more to develop than using the existing shallow aquifer supply.

  5. An assessment of local risk. [to area associated with commercial operations of aircraft with graphite fiber composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pocinki, L. S.

    1979-01-01

    A status report is presented on the assessment of the risk at Washington National Airport and the surrounding Washington, D.C. area associated with commercial operations of aircraft with graphite fiber composite in their structures. The presentation is outlined as follows: (1) overall strategy; (2) need for individual airport results; (3) airport-metro area model - submodels, method, assumptions and data; and (4) preliminary results for National Airport - D.C. area.

  6. Yeager Airport Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Williams

    2015-10-01

    The scope of this project was changed during the course of the project. Phase I of the project was designed to have the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC), together with its partners, manage the Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project at the Yeager Airport in conjunction with the Central West Virginia Regional Airport Authority (CWVRAA) in coordination with the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE NETL). This program would allow testing and evaluation of the use of hydrogen vehicles in the state of West Virginia utilizing the hydrogen fueling station at Yeager Airport. The NAFTC and CWVRAA to raise awareness and foster a greater understanding of hydrogen fuel and hydrogen-powered vehicles through a targeted utilization and outreach and education effort. After initial implementation of the project, the project added, determine the source(s) of supply for hydrogen powered vehicles that could be used for the testing. After completion of this, testing was begun at Yeager Airport. During the course of the project, the station at Yeager Airport was closed and moved to Morgantown and the West Virginia University Research Corporation. The vehicles were then moved to Morgantown and a vehicle owned by the CWVRAA was purchased to complete the project at the new location. Because of a number of issues detailed in the report for DE-FE0002994 and in this report, this project did not get to evaluate the effectiveness of the vehicles as planned.

  7. Northern New Mexico regional airport market feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1998-06-01

    This report is about the market for airline travel in northern New Mexico. Interest in developing a northern New Mexico regional airport has periodically surfaced for a number of years. The New Mexico State Legislature passed a memorial during the 1998 Second Session calling for the conduct of a study to determine the feasibility of building a new regional airport in NNM. This report is a study of the passenger market feasibility of such an airport. In addition to commercial passenger market feasibility, there are other feasibility issues dealing with siting, environmental impact, noise, economic impact, intermodal transportation integration, region-wide transportation services, airport engineering requirements, and others. These other feasibility issues are not analyzed in any depth in this report although none were discovered to be show-stoppers as a by-product of the authors doing research on the passenger market itself. Preceding the need for a detailed study of these other issues is the determination of the basic market need for an airport with regular commercial airline service in the first place. This report is restricted to an in-depth look at the market for commercial passenger air service in NNM. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Airport Capacity and Delay Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, David A.; Nelson, Caroline; Shapiro, Gerald

    1998-01-01

    The ASAC Airport Capacity Model and the ASAC Airport Delay Model support analyses of technologies addressing airport capacity. NASA's Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Airport Capacity Model estimates the capacity of an airport as a function of weather, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) procedures, traffic characteristics, and the level of technology available. Airport capacity is presented as a Pareto frontier of arrivals per hour versus departures per hour. The ASAC Airport Delay Model allows the user to estimate the minutes of arrival delay for an airport, given its (weather dependent) capacity. Historical weather observations and demand patterns are provided by ASAC as inputs to the delay model. The ASAC economic models can translate a reduction in delay minutes into benefit dollars.

  9. 77 FR 28667 - Land Release for Plattsburgh International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Plattsburgh International Airport AGENCY: Federal... Secretary may waive a Sponsor's Federal obligation to use certain airport land for aeronautical use....

  10. Flow-Meter and Passive Diffusion Bag Tests and Potential Influences on the Vertical Distribution of Contaminants in Wells at Galena Airport, Galena, Alaska, August to October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peterson, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Past activities at Galena Airport, a U.S. Air Force Base in Galena, Alaska, have resulted in ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds. The primary contaminants are petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. The U.S. Geological Survey and Earth Tech, in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, conducted investigations at Galena Airport from August to October 2002 using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers and borehole flow-meter testing to examine the vertical distribution of ground-water contamination in selected wells. This investigation was limited to the vicinity of building 1845 and to the area between building 1845 and the Yukon River. In addition, the U.S. Geological Survey was asked to determine whether additional wells are needed to more clearly define the nature and extent of the ground-water contamination at the Air Force Base. Little or no vertical water movement occurred under ambient conditions in the wells tested at Galena Airport, Alaska, in August 2002. All of the ambient vertical flows detected in wells were at rates less than the quantitative limit of the borehole flow meter (0.03 gallons per minute). In wells 06-MW-07 and 10-MW-01, no vertical flow was detected. In wells where ambient flow was detected, the direction of flow was downward. In general, concentrations of volatile organic compounds detected in the low-flow samples from wells at Galena Airport were approximately the same concentrations detected in the closest polyethylene diffusion bag sample for a wide variety of volatile organic compounds. The data indicate that the polyethylene diffusion bag sample results are consistent with the low-flow sample results. Vertical profiling of selected wells using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers at Galena Airport showed that from September 30 to October 1, 2002, little vertical change occurred in volatile organic compound concentrations along the screen length despite the fact that

  11. A Global Airport-Based Risk Model for the Spread of Dengue Infection via the Air Transport Network

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Lauren; Sarkar, Sahotra

    2013-01-01

    The number of travel-acquired dengue infections has seen a consistent global rise over the past decade. An increased volume of international passenger air traffic originating from regions with endemic dengue has contributed to a rise in the number of dengue cases in both areas of endemicity and elsewhere. This paper reports results from a network-based risk assessment model which uses international passenger travel volumes, travel routes, travel distances, regional populations, and predictive species distribution models (for the two vector species, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus) to quantify the relative risk posed by each airport in importing passengers with travel-acquired dengue infections. Two risk attributes are evaluated: (i) the risk posed by through traffic at each stopover airport and (ii) the risk posed by incoming travelers to each destination airport. The model results prioritize optimal locations (i.e., airports) for targeted dengue surveillance. The model is easily extendible to other vector-borne diseases. PMID:24009672

  12. Wireless Channel Characterization: Modeling the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Future Airport Surface Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, D. W.; Apaza, Rafael; Foore, Lawrence R.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a recently completed wideband wireless channel characterization project for the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System (MLS) extension band, for airport surface areas. This work included mobile measurements at large and small airports, and fixed point-to-point measurements. Mobile measurements were made via transmission from the air traffic control tower (ATCT), or from an airport field site (AFS), to a receiving ground vehicle on the airport surface. The point-to-point measurements were between ATCT and AFSs. Detailed statistical channel models were developed from all these measurements. Measured quantities include propagation path loss and power delay profiles, from which we obtain delay spreads, frequency domain correlation (coherence bandwidths), fading amplitude statistics, and channel parameter correlations. In this paper we review the project motivation, measurement coordination, and illustrate measurement results. Example channel modeling results for several propagation conditions are also provided, highlighting new findings.

  13. The noise impact of proposed runway alternatives at Craig Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1982-01-01

    Four proposed runway expansion alternatives at Craig Airport in Jacksonville, Florida have been assessed with respect to their forecasted noise impact in the year 2005. The assessment accounts for population distributions around the airport and human subjective response to noise, as well as the distribution of noise levels in the surrounding community (footprints). The impact analysis was performed using the Airport-noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO), an airport community response model recently developd at Langley Research Center.

  14. Environmental Impacts of Airport Operations: Maintenance, and Expansion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-05

    goals. Projects funded under this category address the environmental impacts of airports, primarily to abate airport noise (e.g., soundproofing homes...of airports, primarily aircraft noise. Among other uses, those funds may be spent on projects to abate airport noise impacts (e.g., soundproofing ... soundproofing ) do not address issues associated with outdoor noise. Further, the use of limited funds for short-tem benefits detracts from investments

  15. TRIZ Tool for Optimization of Airport Runway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Venkata; Selladurai, V.; Saravanan, R.

    TRIZ tool is used for conceptual design and layout of the novel ascending and descending runway model for the effective utilization of short length airports. Handling bigger aircrafts at smaller airports become the necessity for economic consideration and for the benefit of vast airliners and the aspiring air travelers of the region. The authors’ proposal of ascending and descending runway would enable the operational need of wide body aircrafts such as Boeing 747 and Airbus A380-800. Negotiating take-off and landing of bigger aircrafts at less than 10000 feet runway is an optimization solution. This conceptual model and the theoretical design with its layout is dealt in this paper as Part - I. The computer-aided design and analysis using MATLAB with Simulink tool box to confirm the adequacy of the runway length for the bigger aircrafts at smaller airports is however dealt in subsequent papers.

  16. 76 FR 73505 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Danville Airport, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Class E airspace at Danville, PA, to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System... reference in 14 CFR 71.1. The Class E airspace designations listed in this document will be published... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Danville Airport,...

  17. Study of quiet turbofan STOL aircraft for short-haul transportation. Volume 3: Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The airport siting, design, cost, operation, and implementation aspects of a short takeoff aircraft transportation system are analyzed. Problem areas are identified and alternative solutions or actions required to achieve system implementation by the early 1980's are recommended. Factors associated with the ultimate community acceptance of the STOL program, such as noise, emissions, and congestion, are given special emphasis.

  18. Fine-scale movements of rural free-ranging dogs in conservation areas in the temperate rainforest of the coastal range of southern Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepulveda, Maximiliano; Pelican, Katherine; Cross, Paul C.; Eguren, Antonieta; Singer, Randall S.

    2015-01-01

    Domestic dogs can play a variety of important roles for farmers. However, when in proximity to conservation areas, the presence of rural free-ranging dogs can be problematic due to the potential for predation of, competition with, or transmission of infectious disease to local threatened fauna. We used a frequent location radio tracking technology to study rural free-ranging dog movements and habitat use into sensitive conservation habitats. To achieve a better understanding of foray behaviors in dogs we monitored dogs (n = 14) in rural households located in an isolated area between the Valdivian Coastal Reserve and the Alerce Costero National Park in southern Chile. Dogs were mostly located near households (<200 m) but exhibited a diurnal pattern of directed excursions (forays) away from their home locations. Dogs spent, on average, 5.3% of their time in forays with average per dog foray distances from the house ranging 0.5–1.9 km (maximum distance detected 4.3 km). Foraying behavior was positively associated with pasture habitat compared to forest habitat including protected lands. Foraying dogs rarely used forest habitat and, when entered, trails and/or roads were selected for movement. Our study provides important information about how dogs interact in a fine-scale with wildlife habitat, and, in particular, protected lands, providing insight into how dog behavior might drive wildlife interactions, and, in turn, how an understanding of dog behavior can be used to manage these interactions.

  19. Episodic Late Holocene dune movements on the sand-sheet area, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, San Luis Valley, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, S. L.; Spaeth, M.; Marín, L.; Pierson, J.; Gómez, J.; Bunch, F.; Valdez, A.

    2006-07-01

    The Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (GSDNPP) in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, contains a variety of eolian landforms that reflect Holocene drought variability. The most spectacular is a dune mass banked against the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, which is fronted by an extensive sand sheet with stabilized parabolic dunes. Stratigraphic exposures of parabolic dunes and associated luminescence dating of quartz grains by single-aliquot regeneration (SAR) protocols indicate eolian deposition of unknown magnitude occurred ca. 1290-940, 715 ± 80, 320 ± 30, and 200-120 yr ago and in the 20th century. There are 11 drought intervals inferred from the tree-ring record in the past 1300 yr at GSDNPP potentially associated with dune movement, though only five eolian depositional events are currently recognized in the stratigraphic record. There is evidence for eolian transport associated with dune movement in the 13th century, which may coincide with the "Great Drought", a 26-yr-long dry interval identified in the tree ring record, and associated with migration of Anasazi people from the Four Corners areas to wetter areas in southern New Mexico. This nascent chronology indicates that the transport of eolian sand across San Luis Valley was episodic in the late Holocene with appreciable dune migration in the 8th, 10-13th, and 19th centuries, which ultimately nourished the dune mass against the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

  20. 77 FR 68196 - Orders Limiting Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-15

    ...Guardia Airport, and Newark Liberty International Airport; High Density Rule at Reagan Washington National... operations took several days after the storm. FAA Analysis Under the FAA's High Density Rule at DCA...

  1. 75 FR 23841 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Reading Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... to Berks County Industrial Development Authority. The property was transferred to the City of Reading... needed for airport development as shown on the Airport Layout Plan. Any proceeds from the sale...

  2. 14 CFR 125.365 - Alternate airport for departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules... person may release an airplane from that airport unless the flight release specifies an alternate airport... person lists each required alternate airport in the flight release....

  3. 14 CFR 125.365 - Alternate airport for departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules... person may release an airplane from that airport unless the flight release specifies an alternate airport... person lists each required alternate airport in the flight release....

  4. 14 CFR 125.365 - Alternate airport for departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules... person may release an airplane from that airport unless the flight release specifies an alternate airport... person lists each required alternate airport in the flight release....

  5. 14 CFR 125.365 - Alternate airport for departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules... person may release an airplane from that airport unless the flight release specifies an alternate airport... person lists each required alternate airport in the flight release....

  6. 14 CFR 125.365 - Alternate airport for departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Release Rules... person may release an airplane from that airport unless the flight release specifies an alternate airport... person lists each required alternate airport in the flight release....

  7. Un Viaje al Aeropuerto (A Trip to the Airport).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This illustrated, bilingual Spanish-English intermediate reader describes a class trip to an airport, in which the class tours the airport, and learns about airport activities, the parts of an airplane, and other related topics. Each page of the text is illustrated with a drawing. The narrative is followed by a list of 24 suggested learning…

  8. 14 CFR 135.223 - IFR: Alternate airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) to— (1) Complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing; (2) Fly from that airport to the alternate airport; and (3) Fly after that for 45 minutes at normal cruising speed or, for helicopters, fly after that for 30 minutes at normal cruising speed. (b) Paragraph (a)(2) of this section...

  9. 14 CFR 152.323 - Budget revision: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Budget revision: Airport development. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.323 Budget... change in the budget estimates, the sponsor shall submit a request for budget revision on a...

  10. 14 CFR 152.323 - Budget revision: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Budget revision: Airport development. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.323 Budget... change in the budget estimates, the sponsor shall submit a request for budget revision on a...

  11. 14 CFR 152.323 - Budget revision: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Budget revision: Airport development. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.323 Budget... change in the budget estimates, the sponsor shall submit a request for budget revision on a...

  12. 14 CFR 139.203 - Contents of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Contents of Airport Certification Manual. 139.203 Section 139.203 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... succession of airport operational responsibility X X X X 2. Each current exemption issued to the airport...

  13. 14 CFR 139.203 - Contents of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Contents of Airport Certification Manual. 139.203 Section 139.203 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... succession of airport operational responsibility X X X X 2. Each current exemption issued to the airport...

  14. 14 CFR 121.117 - Airports: Required data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airports: Required data. 121.117 Section... Operations § 121.117 Airports: Required data. (a) No certificate holder conducting supplemental operations may use any airport unless it is properly equipped and adequate for the proposed...

  15. 14 CFR 121.97 - Airports: Required data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airports: Required data. 121.97 Section 121... § 121.97 Airports: Required data. (a) Each certificate holder conducting domestic or flag operations must show that each route it submits for approval has enough airports that are properly equipped...

  16. 14 CFR 121.97 - Airports: Required data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airports: Required data. 121.97 Section 121... § 121.97 Airports: Required data. (a) Each certificate holder conducting domestic or flag operations must show that each route it submits for approval has enough airports that are properly equipped...

  17. 14 CFR 121.624 - ETOPS Alternate Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false ETOPS Alternate Airports. 121.624 Section... Alternate Airports. (a) No person may dispatch or release an airplane for an ETOPS flight unless enough ETOPS Alternate Airports are listed in the dispatch or flight release such that the airplane...

  18. 14 CFR 121.624 - ETOPS Alternate Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false ETOPS Alternate Airports. 121.624 Section... Alternate Airports. (a) No person may dispatch or release an airplane for an ETOPS flight unless enough ETOPS Alternate Airports are listed in the dispatch or flight release such that the airplane...

  19. 14 CFR 121.117 - Airports: Required data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airports: Required data. 121.117 Section... Operations § 121.117 Airports: Required data. (a) No certificate holder conducting supplemental operations may use any airport unless it is properly equipped and adequate for the proposed...

  20. 14 CFR 139.339 - Airport condition reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport condition reporting. 139.339... OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.339 Airport condition reporting. In a manner authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must— (a) Provide for the collection and dissemination of...

  1. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport...

  2. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  3. 46 CFR 72.05-30 - Windows and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Windows and airports. 72.05-30 Section 72.05-30 Shipping... Structural Fire Protection § 72.05-30 Windows and airports. (a) For the purpose of this subpart, all glass in windows or airports shall be at least 1/4 inch thick. However, greater thickness may be required...

  4. 14 CFR 139.339 - Airport condition reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport condition reporting. 139.339... OF AIRPORTS Operations § 139.339 Airport condition reporting. In a manner authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must— (a) Provide for the collection and dissemination of...

  5. 49 CFR 1560.111 - Covered airport operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Covered airport operators. 1560.111 Section 1560... Transmission of Secure Flight Passenger Data for Watch List Matching § 1560.111 Covered airport operators. (a) Applicability. This section applies to a covered airport operator that has a program approved by TSA...

  6. 78 FR 3311 - Safety Enhancements, Certification of Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 139 RIN 2120-AJ70 Safety Enhancements, Certification of Airports AGENCY: Federal... pertaining to certification of airports to clarify that the applicability of these regulations is based only... intentionally false statements concerning an airport operating certificate. Finally, this final rule...

  7. 49 CFR 1560.111 - Covered airport operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Covered airport operators. 1560.111 Section 1560... Transmission of Secure Flight Passenger Data for Watch List Matching § 1560.111 Covered airport operators. (a) Applicability. This section applies to a covered airport operator that has a program approved by TSA...

  8. 46 CFR 72.05-30 - Windows and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Windows and airports. 72.05-30 Section 72.05-30 Shipping... Structural Fire Protection § 72.05-30 Windows and airports. (a) For the purpose of this subpart, all glass in windows or airports shall be at least 1/4 inch thick. However, greater thickness may be required...

  9. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  10. 77 FR 17492 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports AGENCY: U.S.... This document announces the expansion of the program to include four additional airports. DATES: Global... site, http://www.globalentry.gov . Expansion of Global Entry Program to Additional Airports CBP...

  11. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  12. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  13. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  14. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  15. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  16. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  17. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  18. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  19. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  20. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  1. 78 FR 48217 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... To Release Airport Property AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of intent to rule on request to release airport property at the Ottumwa Regional Airport (OTM), Ottumwa....martin@faa.gov . The request to release property may be reviewed, by appointment, in person at this...

  2. Airports, Hotel, and Ground Transportation Information | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Airports in and near Washington, DC Reagan National (DCA)  Approximate 30 minute drive from Rockville* Has its own Metro stop on the blue and yellow lines in Virginia NOTE: This airport may be the closest and easiest option if not renting a car or do not want to pay for an airport cab/shuttle.   Dulles International (IAD) |

  3. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  4. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  5. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  6. Airport Characterization for the Adaptation of Surface Congestion Management Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    1 of 2 Airport Characterization for the Adaptation of Surface Congestion Management Approaches Melanie Sandberg, Tom Reynolds...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Airport Characterization for the Adaptation of Surface Congestion Management...1 Airport Characterization for the Adaptation of Surface Congestion Management Approaches* Melanie

  7. 46 CFR 72.05-30 - Windows and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Windows and airports. 72.05-30 Section 72.05-30 Shipping... Structural Fire Protection § 72.05-30 Windows and airports. (a) For the purpose of this subpart, all glass in windows or airports shall be at least 1/4 inch thick. However, greater thickness may be required...

  8. 46 CFR 72.05-30 - Windows and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Windows and airports. 72.05-30 Section 72.05-30 Shipping... Structural Fire Protection § 72.05-30 Windows and airports. (a) For the purpose of this subpart, all glass in windows or airports shall be at least 1/4 inch thick. However, greater thickness may be required...

  9. 46 CFR 72.05-30 - Windows and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Windows and airports. 72.05-30 Section 72.05-30 Shipping... Structural Fire Protection § 72.05-30 Windows and airports. (a) For the purpose of this subpart, all glass in windows or airports shall be at least 1/4 inch thick. However, greater thickness may be required...

  10. Potential hazards from floodflows and debris movement in the Furnace Creek area, Death Valley National Monument, California-Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crippen, John R.

    1979-01-01

    Death Valley is known as the driest and hottest region in the United States. Despite the aridity of the valley itself, however , very heavy rainfall sometimes occurs in the nearby mountains. Such violent rainstorms are likely to be of relatively short duration and to occur over rather small areas; nevertheless, they sometimes produce large floodflows that in turn cause severe erosion and flows of debris. The debris-laden flows may be hazardous to life and property. Given sufficient knowledge of the hydrologic and hydraulic environment, the degree of hazard can be estimated. Potential hazards are defined for areas in the vicinity of the Furnace Creek fan and the Park Service residential area. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. 76 FR 18419 - Movement of Hass Avocados From Areas Where Mediterranean Fruit Fly or South American Fruit Fly Exist

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... from the State of Michoacan, Mexico, requirements for treatment or origin from an area free of Mediterranean fruit fly for Hass avocados imported from Peru, and requirements for trapping or origin from an..., Mexico, the treatment requirements and origin restrictions for Mediterranean fruit fly for imported...

  12. 75 FR 41922 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Fort Smith Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Smith Regional Airport, Fort Smith, AR AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... comment on the release of land at Fort Smith Regional Airport under the provisions of Title 49, U.S.C... comments submitted to the FM must be mailed or delivered to Mr. John Parker, Airport Director, Fort...

  13. 76 FR 23854 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dubois Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dubois Regional Airport, Reynoldsville, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invite...

  14. 78 FR 20168 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Boulder Municipal Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Boulder Municipal Airport, Boulder, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invite public...

  15. 76 FR 69321 - Intent To Rule On Request To Release Airport Property at the Malden Regional Airport and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Intent To Rule On Request To Release Airport Property at the Malden Regional Airport and Industrial Park (MAW), Malden, MO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... the Malden Regional Airport & Industrial Park (MAW), Malden, Missouri, under the provisions of 49...

  16. 77 FR 12906 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dubois Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dubois Regional Airport, Reynoldsville, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invite...

  17. Detection of emission indices of aircraft exhaust compounds by open-path optical methods at airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürmann, Gregor; Schäfer, Klaus; Jahn, Carsten; Hoffmann, Herbert; Utzig, Selina

    2005-10-01

    Air pollutant emission rates of aircrafts are determined with test bed measurements. Regulations exist for CO2, NO, NO2, CO concentrations, the content of total unburned hydrocarbons and the smoke number, a measure of soot. These emission indices are listed for each engine in a data base of the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) for four different Air pollutant emission rates of aircrafts are determined with test bed measurements. Regulations exist for CO2, NO, NO2, CO concentrations, the content of total unburned hydrocarbons and the smoke number, a measure of soot. These emission indices are listed for each engine in a data base of the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) for four different thrust levels (Idle, approach, cruise and take-off). It is a common procedure to use this data base as a starting point to estimate aircraft emissions at airports and further on to calculate the contribution of airports on local air quality. The comparison of these indices to real in use measurements therefore is a vital task to test the quality of air quality models at airports. Here a method to determine emission indices is used, where concentration measurements of CO2 together with other pollutants in the aircraft plume are needed. During intensive measurement campaigns at Zurich (ZRH) and Paris Charles De Gaulle (CDG) airports, concentrations of CO2, NO, NO2 and CO were measured. The measurement techniques were Fourier-Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectrometry and Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). The big advantage of these methods is that no operations on the airport are influenced during measurement times. Together with detailed observations of taxiway movements, a comparison of emission indices with real in use emissions is possible.

  18. Avanex Unique Endophyte Technology: Reduced Insect Food Source at Airports.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Christopher G L; Popay, Alison J; Rolston, M Philip; Townsend, Richard J; Lloyd-West, Catherine M; Card, Stuart D

    2016-02-01

    Birds and other forms of wildlife are a major issue for airport authorities worldwide, as they can create hazards to operating aircraft. Wildlife "strikes," the majority caused by birds, can cause damage to operating aircraft and in severe cases lead to a loss of human life. Many airfields contain large areas of ground cover herbage alongside their runways that consist of mixtures of grasses, legumes, and weeds that can harbor many invertebrates. Many airfields use insecticides to control insect populations; however, mounting pressure from regional councils and water boards aim to reduce this practice due to ground water runoff and contamination concerns. Avanex Unique Endophyte Technology, a product specifically developed to reduce the attractiveness of airports and surrounding areas to birds, is based on a novel association between a selected strain of Epichloë endophyte and a turf-type tall fescue cultivar. This grass-endophyte association acts through a direct mechanism whereby a negative response in birds is created through taste aversion and postingestion feedback as well as an indirect mechanism by deterring many invertebrates, a food source of many bird species.

  19. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker; Alkjær, Tine; Koblauch, Henrik; Simonsen, Erik Bruun; Helweg-Larsen, Karin; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain, and previous results may be sensitive to reporting and selection bias. We examined the relation between meniscal lesions and cumulative exposure to heavy lifting in a prospective register-based study with complete follow-up and independent information on exposure and outcome. We established a cohort of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time hospital diagnosis or surgery of a meniscal lesion. Baggage handlers had a higher incidence of meniscal lesions than the referents. Within baggage handlers spline regression showed that the incidence rate ratio was 1.91 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–2.84) after five years as a baggage handler and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only involves lifting in standing positions. The results support that long-term heavy lifting in a kneeling or squatting position is a risk factor for the development of symptomatic

  20. Research Of Airborne Precision Spacing to Improve Airport Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Baxley, Brian T.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In September 2004, the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL) and the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation to mutually develop, modify, test, and evaluate systems, procedures, facilities, and devices to meet the need for safe and efficient air navigation and air traffic control in the future. In the United States and Europe, these efforts are defined within the architectures of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Program and Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) Program respectively. Both programs have identified Airborne Spacing as a critical component, with Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) as a key enabler. Increased interest in reducing airport community noise and the escalating cost of aviation fuel has led to the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures to reduce noise, emissions, and fuel usage compared to current procedures. To provide these operational enhancements, arrival flight paths into terminal areas are planned around continuous vertical descents that are closer to an optimum trajectory than those in use today. The profiles are designed to be near-idle descents from cruise altitude to the Final Approach Fix (FAF) and are typically without any level segments. By staying higher and faster than conventional arrivals, CDAs also save flight time for the aircraft operator. The drawback is that the variation of optimized trajectories for different types and weights of aircraft requires the Air Traffic Controller to provide more airspace around an aircraft on a CDA than on a conventional arrival procedure. This additional space decreases the throughput rate of the destination airport. Airborne self-spacing concepts have been developed to increase the throughput at high-demand airports by managing the inter-arrival spacing to be more precise and consistent using on-board guidance. It has been proposed that the