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Sample records for airport pavement test

  1. Use of Ground Penetrating Radar at the FAA's National Airport Pavement Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Injun, Song

    2015-04-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the United States has used a ground-coupled Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) at the National Airport Pavement Test Facility (NAPTF) since 2005. One of the primary objectives of the testing at the facility is to provide full-scale pavement response and failure information for use in airplane landing gear design and configuration studies. During the traffic testing at the facility, a GSSI GPR system was used to develop new procedures for monitoring Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) pavement density changes that is directly related to pavement failure. After reviewing current setups for data acquisition software and procedures for identifying different pavement layers, dielectric constant and pavement thickness were selected as dominant parameters controlling HMA properties provided by GPR. A new methodology showing HMA density changes in terms of dielectric constant variations, called dielectric sweep test, was developed and applied in full-scale pavement test. The dielectric constant changes were successfully monitored with increasing airplane traffic numbers. The changes were compared to pavement performance data (permanent deformation). The measured dielectric constants based on the known HMA thicknesses were also compared with computed dielectric constants using an equation from ASTM D4748-98 Standard Test Method for Determining the Thickness of Bound Pavement Layers Using Short-Pulse Radar. Six inches diameter cylindrical cores were taken after construction and traffic testing for the HMA layer bulk specific gravity. The measured bulk specific gravity was also compared to monitor HMA density changes caused by aircraft traffic conditions. Additionally this presentation will review the applications of the FAA's ground-coupled GPR on embedded rebar identification in concrete pavement, sewer pipes in soil, and gage identifications in 3D plots.

  2. Design of airport pavements for expansive soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeen, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    Expansive soil subgrades exhibit volume changes with variation in moisture condition. These changes result in differential movement of airport pavements resting on these soils. Special design procedures must be used to account for the expansive soil activity during equilibration. In addition, special precautions are required to protect the subgrade from moisture variation with climate. Measurement of soil suction is a key step in quantifying moisture-induced soil behavior. Procedures are outlined for suction characterization of the soil and for estimating the in situ differential movement likely to occur under the pavement. Once the wavelength and amplitude characteristics of the differential movement are obtained, design calculations to select the thickness and materials for the pavement may proceed.

  3. Friction evaluation of concrete paver blocks for airport pavement applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    The development and use of concrete paver blocks is reviewed and some general specifications for application of this type of pavement surface at airport facilities are given. Two different shapes of interlocking concrete paver blocks installed in the track surface at NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) are described. Preliminary cornering performance results from testing of 40 x 14 radial-belted and bias-ply aircraft tires are reviewed. These tire tests are part of a larger, ongoing joint NASA/FAA/Industry Surface Traction and Radial Tire (START) Program involving several different tire sizes. Both dry and wet surface conditions were evaluated on the two concrete paver block test surfaces and a conventional, nongrooved Portland cement concrete surface. Future test plans involving evaluation of other concrete paver block designs at the ALDF are indicated.

  4. AN OPTIMAL MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT MODEL FOR AIRPORT CONCRETE PAVEMENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Taizo; Fujimori, Yuji; Kaito, Kiyoyuki; Obama, Kengo; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi

    In this paper, an optimal management model is formulated for the performance-based rehabilitation/maintenance contract for airport concrete pavement, whereby two types of life cycle cost risks, i.e., ground consolidation risk and concrete depreciation risk, are explicitly considered. The non-homogenous Markov chain model is formulated to represent the deterioration processes of concrete pavement which are conditional upon the ground consolidation processes. The optimal non-homogenous Markov decision model with multiple types of risk is presented to design the optimal rehabilitation/maintenance plans. And the methodology to revise the optimal rehabilitation/maintenance plans based upon the monitoring data by the Bayesian up-to-dating rules. The validity of the methodology presented in this paper is examined based upon the case studies carried out for the H airport.

  5. 76 FR 67018 - Notice to Manufacturers of Airport In-Pavement Stationary Runway Weather Information Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice to Manufacturers of Airport In-Pavement Stationary Runway Weather... of In-Pavement Stationary Runway Weather Information Systems. SUMMARY: Projects funded under the... Active or Passive In- Pavement Stationary Runway Weather Information Systems that meet the...

  6. Response of pavement to freeze-thaw cycles: Lebanon, New Hampshire, regional airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Wendy L.; Quinn, William F.; Keller, Donald; Eaton, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    In 1978 reconstruction was begun on the runway of the Lebanon Regional Airport, Lebanon, New Hampshire. The runway had experienced severe differential frost heaving and cracking during the previous three winters, which had resulted in closure of the facility during periods of extreme roughness. Temperature sensors were placed within the newly constructed pavement sections, and during the winters of 1979, 1980, and 1982 temperature data were recorded, and level surveys and repeated plate bearing tests were performed in order to provide data for the investigation. The three pavement sections were constructed to investigate the effect of section thickness on the level of frost protection provided. The sections consisted of 4 in. of asphalt concrete, 6 in. of crushed gravel and 22,30 dn 38 in. of well-graded sand subbase material. The 48-in section provided the highest level of frost protection to the subgrade. However, all three pavement sections maintained resilient stiffness values during the spring thaw period on the order of two to three times that of the pavement before reconstruction. Also, frost heave in all sections was reduced to levels that would not cause difficulty for aircraft using the facility.

  7. Resilient modulus of freeze-thaw affected granular soils for pavement design and evaluation. Part 4: Field validation tests at Albany County Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Crowe, A.; Erickson, M.; Cole, D. M.

    1986-10-01

    Stress-deformation data for unbound base, subbase, and silty sand subgrade soils in two airfield pavements were obtained from in situ tests and laboratory tests. Surface deflections were measured in the in situ tests, with a falling-weight deflectometer, when the soils were frozen, thawed, and at various stages of recovery from thaw weakening. The measured deflections were used to judge the validity of procedures developed for laboratory triaxial tests to determine nonlinear resilient moduli of specimens in the frozen, thawed and recovering states. The validity of the nonlinear resilient moduli, expressed as functions of externally applied stress and moisture tension, was confirmed by using the expressions to calculate surface deflections that were found to compare well with deflections measured in the in situ tests. The tests on specimens at various stages of recovery are especially significant because they show a strong dependence of the resilient modulus on moisture tension, leading to the conclusion that predictions or in situ measurements of moisture tension can be used to evaluate expected seasonal variation in the resilient modulus of granular soils.

  8. Aquatic toxicity of airfield-pavement deicer materials and implications for airport runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, S.R.; Geis, S.W.; Bowman, G.; Failey, G.G.; Rutter, T.D.

    2009-01-01

    Concentrations of airfield-pavement deicer materials (PDM) in a study of airport runoff often exceeded levels of concern regarding aquatic toxicity. Toxicity tests on Vibrio fischeri, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (commonly known as Selenastrum capricornutum) were performed with potassium acetate (K-Ac) PDM, sodium formate (Na-For) PDM, and with freezing- point depressants (K-Ac and Na-For). Results indicate that toxicity in PDM is driven by the freezing-point depressants in all tests except the Vibrio fisheri test for Na-For PDM which is influenced by an additive. Acute toxicity end points for different organisms ranged from 298 to 6560 mg/L (as acetate) for K-Ac PDM and from 1780 to 4130 mg/L (as formate) for Na- For PDM. Chronic toxicity end points ranged from 19.9 to 336 mg/L (as acetate) for K-Ac PDM and from 584 to 1670 mg/L (as formate) for Na-For PDM. Sample results from outfalls at General Mitchell International Airport in Milwaukee, Wl (GMIA) indicated that 40% of samples had concentrations greater than the aquatic-life benchmark for K-Ac PDM. K-Ac has replaced urea during the 1990s as the most widely used PDM at GMIA and in the United States. Results of ammonia samples from airport outfalls during periods when urea-based PDM was used at GMIA indicated that41% of samples had concentrations exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) 1 -h water-quality criterion. The USEPA 1-h water-quality criterion for chloride was exceeded in 68% of samples collected in the receiving stream, a result of road-salt runoff from urban influence near the airport. Results demonstrate that PDM must be considered to comprehensively evaluate the impact of chemical deicers on aquatic toxicity in water containing airport runoff. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  9. Aquatic toxicity of airfield-pavement deicer materials and implications for airport runoff.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Steven R; Geis, Steven W; Bowman, George; Failey, Greg G; Rutter, Troy D

    2009-01-01

    Concentrations of airfield-pavement deicer materials (PDM) in a study of airport runoff often exceeded levels of concern regarding aquatic toxicity. Toxicity tests on Vibrio fischeri, Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (commonly known as Selenastrum capricornutum) were performed with potassium acetate (K-Ac) PDM, sodium formate (Na-For) PDM, and with freezing-point depressants (K-Ac and Na-For). Results indicate that toxicity in PDM is driven by the freezing-point depressants in all tests except the Vibrio fisheri test for Na-For PDM which is influenced by an additive. Acute toxicity end points for different organisms ranged from 298 to 6560 mg/L (as acetate) for K-Ac PDM and from 1780 to 4130 mg/L (as formate) for Na-For PDM. Chronic toxicity end points ranged from 19.9 to 336 mg/L (as acetate) for K-Ac PDM and from 584 to 1670 mg/L (as formate) for Na-For PDM. Sample results from outfalls at General Mitchell International Airport in Milwaukee, WI (GMIA) indicated that 40% of samples had concentrations greater thanthe aquatic-life benchmarkfor K-Ac PDM. K-Ac has replaced urea during the 1990s as the most widely used PDM at GMIA and in the United States. Results of ammonia samples from airport outfalls during periods when urea-based PDM was used at GMIA indicated that 41% of samples had concentrations exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) 1-h water-quality criterion. The USEPA 1-h water-quality criterion for chloride was exceeded in 68% of samples collected in the receiving stream, a result of road-salt runoff from urban influence near the airport. Results demonstrate that PDM must be considered to comprehensively evaluate the impact of chemical deicers on aquatic toxicity in water containing airport runoff.

  10. Small-scale accelerated pavement testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Hugo, F.; Roesset, J.M.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a study conducted to explore the use of small-scale models of accelerated pavement testing (APT) devices to evaluate the performance of pavements in conjunction with full-scale tests. The motivation for the study was the availability of a model mobile load simulator (MMLS), which had been built originally to illustrate the operation of the full-scale mobile load simulator (MLS) under design at the time. The scaling requirements will be different depending on whether dynamic (inertia), viscous, or gravity effects are important. One must thus decide which one of these effects controls the behavior to try to reproduce it exactly. In the preliminary tests conducted with the MMLS, emphasis had been placed in reproducing accurately the viscoelastic behavior of the asphalt layer. The possibility of obtaining valid results, even if similitude is not maintained in relation to inertia forces, is explored in this paper. The effects of load frequency or velocity and the effects of layer thicknesses are studied. The total thickness of the model pavement, which must be finite, and its effects on displacements and strains are also considered. It is concluded that even when full similitude is not satisfied it is possible to obtain valid results that can be extrapolated to predict prototype performance if one were interested primarily in the behavior of the asphalt layer. Preliminary analyses should be conducted, however, to guide on the selection of the model dimensions.

  11. Multimodal approach to seismic pavement testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryden, N.; Park, C.B.; Ulriksen, P.; Miller, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    A multimodal approach to nondestructive seismic pavement testing is described. The presented approach is based on multichannel analysis of all types of seismic waves propagating along the surface of the pavement. The multichannel data acquisition method is replaced by multichannel simulation with one receiver. This method uses only one accelerometer-receiver and a light hammer-source, to generate a synthetic receiver array. This data acquisition technique is made possible through careful triggering of the source and results in such simplification of the technique that it is made generally available. Multiple dispersion curves are automatically and objectively extracted using the multichannel analysis of surface waves processing scheme, which is described. Resulting dispersion curves in the high frequency range match with theoretical Lamb waves in a free plate. At lower frequencies there are several branches of dispersion curves corresponding to the lower layers of different stiffness in the pavement system. The observed behavior of multimodal dispersion curves is in agreement with theory, which has been validated through both numerical modeling and the transfer matrix method, by solving for complex wave numbers. ?? ASCE / JUNE 2004.

  12. Yeager Airport Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Williams

    2015-10-01

    The scope of this project was changed during the course of the project. Phase I of the project was designed to have the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC), together with its partners, manage the Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project at the Yeager Airport in conjunction with the Central West Virginia Regional Airport Authority (CWVRAA) in coordination with the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE NETL). This program would allow testing and evaluation of the use of hydrogen vehicles in the state of West Virginia utilizing the hydrogen fueling station at Yeager Airport. The NAFTC and CWVRAA to raise awareness and foster a greater understanding of hydrogen fuel and hydrogen-powered vehicles through a targeted utilization and outreach and education effort. After initial implementation of the project, the project added, determine the source(s) of supply for hydrogen powered vehicles that could be used for the testing. After completion of this, testing was begun at Yeager Airport. During the course of the project, the station at Yeager Airport was closed and moved to Morgantown and the West Virginia University Research Corporation. The vehicles were then moved to Morgantown and a vehicle owned by the CWVRAA was purchased to complete the project at the new location. Because of a number of issues detailed in the report for DE-FE0002994 and in this report, this project did not get to evaluate the effectiveness of the vehicles as planned.

  13. Predicting in-service fatigue life of flexible pavements based on accelerated pavement testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Runhua

    Pavement performance prediction in terms of fatigue cracking and surface rutting are essential for any mechanistically-based pavement design method. Traditionally, the estimation of the expected fatigue field performance has been based on the laboratory bending beam test. Full-scale Accelerated Pavement Testing (APT) is an alternative to laboratory testing leading to advances in practice and economic savings for the evaluation of new pavement configurations, stress level related factors, new materials and design improvements. This type of testing closely simulates field conditions; however, it does not capture actual performance because of the limited ability to address long-term phenomena. The same pavement structure may exhibit different response and performance under APT than when in-service. Actual field performance is better captured by experiments such as Federal Highway Administration's Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) studies. Therefore, to fully utilize the benefits of APT, there is a need for a methodology to predict the long-term performance of in-service pavement structures from the results of APT tests that will account for such differences. Three models are generally suggested to account for the difference: shift factors, statistical and mechanistic approaches. A reliability based methodology for fatigue cracking prediction is proposed in this research, through which the three models suggested previously are combined into one general approach that builds on their individual strengths to overcome some of the shortcomings when the models are applied individually. The Bias Correction Factor (BCF) should account for all quantifiable differences between the fatigue life of the pavement site under APT and in-service conditions. In addition to the Bias Correction Factor, a marginal shifty factor, M, should be included to account for the unquantifiable differences when predicting the in-service pavement fatigue life from APT. The Bias Correction Factor

  14. Airport testing an explosives detection portal

    SciTech Connect

    Rhykerd, C.; Linker, K.; Hannum, D.; Bouchier, F.; Parmeter, J.

    1998-08-01

    At the direction of the US Congress, following the Pan Am 103 and TWA 800 crashes, the Federal Aviation Administration funded development of non-invasive techniques to screen airline passengers for explosives. Such an explosives detection portal, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, was field tested at the Albuquerque International airport in September 1997. During the 2-week field trial, 2,400 passengers were screened and 500 surveyed. Throughput, reliability, maintenance and sensitivity were studied. Follow-up testing at Sandia and at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was conducted. A passenger stands in the portal for five seconds while overhead fans blow air over his body. Any explosive vapors or dislodged particles are collected in vents at the feet. Explosives are removed from the air in a preconcentrator and subsequently directed into an ion mobility spectrometer for detection. Throughput measured 300 passengers per hour. The non-invasive portal can detect subfingerprint levels of explosives residue on clothing. A survey of 500 passengers showed a 97% approval rating, with 99% stating that such portals, if effective, should be installed in airports to improve security. Results of the airport test, as well as operational issues, are discussed.

  15. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of conditioned foamed asphalt mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of Indirect Tensile Strength (ITS) Test for samples prepared with reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). Samples were conditioned in water at 25°C for 24 hours prior to testing. Results show that recycled aggregate from reclaimed asphalt pavement performs as well as virgin aggregate.

  16. Performance Prediction of the NCAT Test Track Pavements Using Mechanistic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaCroix, Andrew Thomas

    In the pavement industry in the United States of America, there is an increasing desire to improve the pavement construction quality and life for new and rehabilitated pavements. In order to improve the quality of the pavements, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has pursued a performance-related specification (PRS) for over 20 years. The goal of PRS is to provide material and construction (M/C) properties that correlate well with pavement performance. In order to improve upon the PRS projects developed in WesTrack (NCHRP 9-20) and the MEPDG-based PRS (NCHRP 9-22), a set of PRS tests and models are proposed to provide a critical link between pavement performance and M/C properties. The PRS testing is done using the asphalt mixture performance tester (AMPT). The proposed PRS focuses on rutting and fatigue cracking of asphalt mixtures. The mixtures are characterized for their stiffness, fatigue behavior, and rutting resistance using a dynamic modulus (|E*|) test, a fatigue test, and a triaxial stress sweep (TSS) test, respectively. Information from the fatigue test characterizes the simplified viscoelastic continuum damage (S-VECD) model. Once the stiffness is reduced to a certain level, the material develops macro-cracks and fails. The TSS test is used to characterize a viscoplastic (VP) model. The VP model allows the prediction of the rut depth beneath the center of the wheel. The VECD and VP models are used within a layered viscoelastic (LVE) pavement model to predict fatigue and rutting performance of pavements. The PRS is evaluated by comparing the predictions to the field performance at the NCAT pavement test track in Opelika, Alabama. The test track sections evaluated are part of the 2009 test cycle group experiment, which focused on WMA, high RAP (50%), and a combination of both. The fatigue evaluation shows that all sections would last at least 18 years at the same traffic rate. The sections do not show any cracking, suggesting the sections are well

  17. Relating tensile, bending, and shear test data of asphalt binders to pavement performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.S.; Tsai, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    Eight different asphalt binders representing a wide range of applications for pavement construction were tested in uniaxial tension, bending, and shear stresses. Theoretical analyses were performed in this study to covert the data from the three engineering tests to stiffness moduli for predicting pavement performance. At low temperatures, high asphalt stiffness may induce pavement thermal cracking; thus, the allowable maximum stiffness was set at 1,000 MPa. At high temperatures, low asphalt stiffness may lead to pavement rutting (ruts in the road); master curves were constructed to rank the potential for rutting in the asphalts. All three viscoelastic functions were shown to be interchangeable within the linear viscoelastic region. When subjected to large deformation in the direct tension test, asphalt binders behaved nonlinear viscoelastic in which the data under bending, shear and tension modes were not comparable. The asphalts were, however, found toe exhibit linear viscoelasticity up to the failure point in the steady-state strain region.

  18. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of foamed asphalt mix tested in dry condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    Indirect tensile strength (ITS) test was conducted to analyse strength of the foamed asphalt mixes incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement. Samples were tested for ITS after cured in the oven at 40°C for 72 hours. This testing condition known as dry condition or unconditioned. Laboratory results show that reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) contents insignificantly affect the ITS results. ITS results significantly affected by foamed bitumen contents.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of LTPP continuously reinforced concrete (CRC) pavement test sections. Final report, February 1995--October 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Tayabji, S.D.; Selezneva, O.; Jiang, Y.J.

    1999-07-01

    As part of the study reported here, analysis of data from the LTPP GPS-5 test sections was conducted to identify factors that influence long-term crack spacing in continuously reinforced concrete (CRC) pavements and to determine that effect of crack spacing on pavement performance. Data from the 85 test sections from the GPS-5 experiment were analyzed.

  20. Methods to Use Surface Infiltration Tests in Permeable Pavement Systems to Determine Maintenance Frequency

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, there is limited guidance on selecting test sites to measure surface infiltration rates in permeable pavement systems to determine maintenance frequency. The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete suggest to either (1) p...

  1. New MagViz Airport Liquid Analysis System Undergoes Testing

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-18

    LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, December 16, 2008—An innovative application of a technology first used for medical imaging may enhance airport security if Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are successful. Los Alamos technologists have adapted Magnetic Res

  2. Full-scale accelerated pavement testing of Texas Mobile Load Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.H.; Hugo, F.

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents the test results from full-scale accelerated pavement testing with the Texas Mobile Load Simulator. Data from in-situ instrumentation and nondestructive testing were collected and analyzed at different loading stages to assess material property changes under accelerated loading. Forensic studies were made to study material characteristics in the longitudinal and transverse directions. It was found that at the early stage of trafficking the test pad responded to falling weight deflectometer (FWD) load linearly, not only over the whole pavement system but also within individual layers. Before mobile load simulator testing, FWD data indicated the weakest area exists at the left wheel path (LWP) of 7.5-m line (7.5L). Later, this weak area was confirmed to have the highest rutting and the most intensive cracking. The dynamic cone penetration results showed that the base at this location was at its weakest. Also, at 7.5L the dry density was lowest, {approximately}7% lower with a moisture content {approximately}8% higher than the adjacent area. The LWP had higher FWD deflections than the right wheel path (RWP), and consequently the LWP manifested more rutting. This proved to be primarily due to differences in moisture content. This was probably because more water infiltrated in the area during rain due to manifestation of more extensive cracking during early phases of trafficking. The maximum surface deflection values increased as trafficking increased in the left and right wheel paths due to pavement deterioration, while deflection for the center remained constant because of the lack of traffic loading. The LWP had more rutting than the RWP and this correlated with the measured FWL deflections prior to trafficking. The WI values increased as trafficking increased for the LWP and RWP due to pavement deterioration. The majority (>60%) of rutting was from the 300-mm uncrushed river gravel base.

  3. New MagViz Airport Liquid Analysis System Undergoes Testing

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, December 16, 2008—An innovative application of a technology first used for medical imaging may enhance airport security if Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are successful. Los Alamos technologists have adapted Magnetic Res

  4. Evaluation of a highway pavement using non destructive tests: Falling Weight Deflectometer and Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marecos, Vania; Fontul, Simona; de Lurdes Antunes, Maria

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the results of the application of Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to assess the bearing capacity of a rehabilitated flexible highway pavement that began to show the occurrence of cracks in the surface layer, about one year after the improvement works. A visual inspection of the surface of the pavement was performed to identify and characterize the cracks. Several core drills were done to analyse the cracks propagation in depth, these cores were also used for GPR data calibration. From the visual inspection it was concluded that the development of the cracks were top-down and that the cracks were located predominantly in the wheel paths. To determine the thickness of the bituminous and granular layers GPR tests were carried out using two horn antennas of 1,0 GHz and 1,8 GHz and a radar control unit SIR-20, both from GSSI. FWD load tests were performed on the wheel paths and structural models were established, based on the deflections measured, through back calculation. The deformation modulus of the layers was calculated and the bearing capacity of the pavement was determined. Summing up, within this study the GPR was used to continuously detect the layer thickness and the GPR survey data was calibrated with core drills. The results showed variations in the bituminous layer thickness in comparison to project data. From the load tests it was concluded that the deformation modulus of the bituminous layers were also vary variable. Limitations on the pavement bearing capacity were detected in the areas with the lower deformation modulus. This abstract is of interest for COST Action TU1208 Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar.

  5. Pavement evaluation and rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, N.A.; Khosla, N.P.; Johnson, E.G.; Hicks, R.G.; Uzan, J.

    1987-01-01

    The 20 papers in this report deal with the following areas: determination of layer moduli using a falling weight deflectometer; evaluation of effect of uncrushed base layers on pavement performance; the effect of contact area shape and pressure distribution on multilayer systems response; sensitivity analysis of selected backcalculation procedures; performance of a full-scale pavement design experiment in Jamaica; subsealing and load-transfer restoration; development of a demonstration prototype expert system for concrete pavement evaluation; numerical assessment of pavement test sections; development of a distress index and rehabilitation criteria for continuously reinforced concrete pavements using discriminant analysis; a mechanistic model for thermally induced reflection cracking of portland cement concrete pavement with reinforced asphalt concrete overlay; New Mexico study of interlayers used in reflective crack control; status of the South Dakota profilometer; incorporating the effects of tread pattern in a dynamic tire excitation mechanism; external methods for evaluating shock absorbers for road-roughness measurements; factor analysis of pavement distresses for surface condition predictions; development of a utility evaluation for nondestructive-testing equipment used on asphalt-concrete pavements; estimating the life of asphalt overlays using long-term pavement performance data; present serviceability-roughness correlations using rating panel data; video image distress analysis technique for Idaho transportation department pavement-management system; acceptability of shock absorbers for road roughness-measuring trailers.

  6. Pavement condition data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zaniewski, J.P.; Hudson, S.W.; Hudson, W.R.

    1987-07-01

    This paper describes a computer methodology for analyzing pavement condition data to define inputs for pavement management systems. This system of programs was developed during a Federal Highway Administration research project. In the project, eight state highway departments were studied to determine the types of pavement condition data collected, procedures used for collecting data, the inputs to the states' pavement management systems, and computer programs used by the states to analyze raw pavement condition data. Several of the programs were assembled into the Method for Analyzing Pavement Condition, MAPCON, during a project performed at Pennsylvania State University. These and other existing or new programs (a total of 18) were identified, tested, modified, and incorporated onto a MS/DOS microcomputer system. MAPCON guides the user through selection of analysis method, raw data entry, and data analysis.

  7. Evaluation of Surface Infiltration Testing Procedures in Permeable Pavement Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete provides limited guidance on how to select testing locations, so research is needed to evaluate how testing sites should be selected and how results should be interpreted to assess surface ...

  8. Pavement management

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, F.R.; Connor, B.; Lytton, R.L.; Darter, M.I.; Shahin, M.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The 11 papers in this report deal with the following areas: effect of pavement roughness on vehicle fuel consumption; rational seasonal load restrictions and overload permits; state-level pavement monitoring program; data requirements for long-term monitoring of pavements as a basis for development of multiple regression relations; simplified pavement management at the network level; combined priority programming of maintenance and rehabilitation for pavement networks; Arizona pavement management system: Phase 2-verification of performance prediction models and development of data base; overview of paver pavement management system; economic analysis of field implementation of paver pavement management system; development of a statewide pavement maintenance management system; and, prediction of pavement maintenance expenditure by using a statistical cost function.

  9. Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) New R&D Simulator for Airport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorighi, Nancy S.

    1997-01-01

    A new simulator, the Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) is under construction at the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Jointly funded by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NASA, the SDTF will be a testbed for airport surface automation technologies of the future. The SDTF will be operational in the third quarter of 1998. The SDTF will combine a virtual tower with simulated ground operations to allow evaluation of new technologies for safety, effectiveness, reliability, and cost benefit. The full-scale level V tower will provide a seamless 360 degree high resolution out-the-window view, and a full complement of ATC (air traffic control) controller positions. The imaging system will be generated by two fully-configured Silicon Graphics Onyx Infinite Reality computers, and will support surface movement of up to 200 aircraft and ground vehicles. The controller positions, displays and consoles can be completely reconfigured to match the unique layout of any individual airport tower. Dedicated areas will accommodate pseudo-airport ramp controllers, pseudo-airport operators, and pseudo-pilots. Up to 33 total personnel positions will be able to participate in simultaneous operational scenarios. A realistic voice communication infrastructure will emulate the intercom and telephone communications of a real airport tower. Multi-channel audio and video recording and a sophisticated data acquisition system will support a wide variety of research and development areas, such as evaluation of automation tools for surface operations, human factors studies, integration of terminal area and airport technologies, and studies of potential airport physical and procedural modifications.

  10. Layered pavement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numerous aspects of the mechanical and structural response of layered pavement systems are discussed. Subgrade moduli for soil that exhibits nonlinear behavior are predicted. The use of a pressure meter test to predict modulus is discussed. Load equivalency factors of triaxial loading for flexible pavements is discussed, as well as a constitutive equation for the permanent strain of sand subjected to cyclic loading.

  11. Use of leaching tests to quantify trace element release from waste to energy bottom ash amended pavements.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Justin G; Townsend, Timothy G; Ferraro, Christopher C

    2015-12-30

    A series of roadway tests strips were paved on-site at a landfill in Florida, U.S. Waste to energy (WTE) bottom ash was used as a partial course aggregate replacement in a hot mix asphalt (HMA) and a Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement, along with control HMA and PCC sections. This allowed for a comparison of the relative degree of leaching between both materials (HMA and PCC) as well as between the ash-amended and control pavements. Batch and monolithic tank leaching tests were conducted on the pavements. Testing of the PCC samples demonstrated that Mo and Al were elevated above regulatory thresholds for both the control and ash amended samples. Further leach testing demonstrated that the release of Mo was likely from the PCC and not a result of the inclusion of the BA into pavement. Batch leach testing of ash-amended HMA samples revealed Sb as a constituent of potential concern. The results of the monolith leaching test displayed leaching of Sb within the same order of magnitude as the regulatory threshold. Calculation of the leachability index (LI) for Sb found that it would have limited mobility when incorporated in the HMA matrix. PMID:26340550

  12. Use of leaching tests to quantify trace element release from waste to energy bottom ash amended pavements.

    PubMed

    Roessler, Justin G; Townsend, Timothy G; Ferraro, Christopher C

    2015-12-30

    A series of roadway tests strips were paved on-site at a landfill in Florida, U.S. Waste to energy (WTE) bottom ash was used as a partial course aggregate replacement in a hot mix asphalt (HMA) and a Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement, along with control HMA and PCC sections. This allowed for a comparison of the relative degree of leaching between both materials (HMA and PCC) as well as between the ash-amended and control pavements. Batch and monolithic tank leaching tests were conducted on the pavements. Testing of the PCC samples demonstrated that Mo and Al were elevated above regulatory thresholds for both the control and ash amended samples. Further leach testing demonstrated that the release of Mo was likely from the PCC and not a result of the inclusion of the BA into pavement. Batch leach testing of ash-amended HMA samples revealed Sb as a constituent of potential concern. The results of the monolith leaching test displayed leaching of Sb within the same order of magnitude as the regulatory threshold. Calculation of the leachability index (LI) for Sb found that it would have limited mobility when incorporated in the HMA matrix.

  13. A road pavement full-scale test track containing stabilized bottom ashes.

    PubMed

    Toraldo, E; Saponaro, S

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a road pavement full-scale test track built by using stabilized bottom ash (SBA) from an Italian municipal solid waste incinerator as the aggregate in granular foundation, cement-bound mixes and asphalt concretes. The investigation focused on both the performance and the environmental compatibility of such mixes, especially with regard to the effects of mixing, laying and compaction. From the road construction point of view, the performance related to the effects of mixing, laying and compaction on constructability was assessed, as well as the volumetric and the mechanical properties. Environmental aspects were investigated by leaching tests. The results suggested that SBA meets the environmental Italian law for the reuse of non-hazardous waste and could be used as road material with the procedures, plants and equipment currently used for road construction. PMID:25354811

  14. A road pavement full-scale test track containing stabilized bottom ashes.

    PubMed

    Toraldo, E; Saponaro, S

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a road pavement full-scale test track built by using stabilized bottom ash (SBA) from an Italian municipal solid waste incinerator as the aggregate in granular foundation, cement-bound mixes and asphalt concretes. The investigation focused on both the performance and the environmental compatibility of such mixes, especially with regard to the effects of mixing, laying and compaction. From the road construction point of view, the performance related to the effects of mixing, laying and compaction on constructability was assessed, as well as the volumetric and the mechanical properties. Environmental aspects were investigated by leaching tests. The results suggested that SBA meets the environmental Italian law for the reuse of non-hazardous waste and could be used as road material with the procedures, plants and equipment currently used for road construction.

  15. Construction and testing of crumb rubber modified hot mix asphalt pavement. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Albritton, G.E.; Gatlin, G.R.

    1996-08-01

    This study was structured towards addressing that portion of ISTEA which directs the individual states to conduct studies on the recyclability of crumb rubber modified hot mix asphalt (CRMHMA), and the technical performance of CRMHMA pavement by monitoring the construction and evaluating the performance of highway test sections in which CRMHA is removed by cold milling and recycled into new HMA through a hot mix asphalt plant. This project is to be constructed in two phases, the CRMHMA will be built in the first phase and approximately one year later it will be recycled. This report deals with the first phase in which the objective was to further document the construction, engineering characteristics, and performace of CRMHMA.

  16. A test of porous pavement effectiveness on clay soils during natural storm events.

    PubMed

    Dreelin, Erin A; Fowler, Laurie; Ronald Carroll, C

    2006-02-01

    Porous pavements allow precipitation to infiltrate through the pavement to the soil, reducing the volume of stormwater runoff produced at a site. However, porous pavements are not widely used on fine-grained soils due to concerns about their performance. Our objective was to investigate the efficacy of porous pavements in controlling stormwater runoff on clay soils. We compared the performance of an asphalt parking lot and a porous pavement parking lot of grass pavers in Athens, Georgia, USA, over relatively small and low-intensity rain events. The porous lot produced 93% less runoff than the asphalt lot. The total volume of runoff at the porous lot was significantly less than the asphalt lot (t = 2.96, p = 0.009). Turbidity was significantly greater at the asphalt lot (t = 6.18, p < 0.001) whereas conductivity was significantly higher at the porous lot (t = 2.31, p = 0.03). Metal and nutrient concentrations were below detection limits at both lots during seven of nine small storm events. During events in which we could detect pollutants, calcium, zinc, silica, and total phosphorus concentrations were higher at the asphalt lot whereas total nitrogen concentrations were greater at the porous lot. Our results suggest porous pavements are a viable option for reducing stormwater runoff and some pollutants from small storms or the first flush from large storms on clay soils.

  17. Runway Incursion Prevention System: Demonstration and Testing at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Quach, Cuong C.; Young, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was tested at the Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The system integrated airborne and ground components to provide both pilots and controllers with enhanced situational awareness, supplemental guidance cues, a real-time display of traffic information, and warning of runway incursions in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted using NASA s Boeing 757 research aircraft and a test van equipped to emulate an incurring aircraft. The system was also demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, DFW flight test activities, and quantitative and qualitative results of the testing.

  18. Flight Test Comparison of Synthetic Vision Display Concepts at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Trey; Parrish, Russell V.; Barry, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Limited visibility is the single most critical factor affecting the safety and capacity of worldwide aviation operations. Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) technology can solve this visibility problem with a visibility solution. These displays employ computer-generated terrain imagery to present 3D, perspective out-the-window scenes with sufficient information and realism to enable operations equivalent to those of a bright, clear day, regardless of weather conditions. To introduce SVS display technology into as many existing aircraft as possible, a retrofit approach was defined that employs existing HDD display capabilities for glass cockpits and HUD capabilities for the other aircraft. This retrofit approach was evaluated for typical nighttime airline operations at a major international airport. Overall, 6 evaluation pilots performed 75 research approaches, accumulating 18 hours flight time evaluating SVS display concepts that used the NASA LaRC's Boeing B-757-200 aircraft at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Results from this flight test establish the SVS retrofit concept, regardless of display size, as viable for tested conditions. Future assessments need to extend evaluation of the approach to operations in an appropriate, terrain-challenged environment with daytime test conditions.

  19. Flight Test Evaluation of Synthetic Vision Concepts at a Terrain Challenged Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Prince, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randell E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Parrish, Russell V.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) Project is striving to eliminate poor visibility as a causal factor in aircraft accidents as well as enhance operational capabilities of all aircraft through the display of computer generated imagery derived from an onboard database of terrain, obstacle, and airport information. To achieve these objectives, NASA 757 flight test research was conducted at the Eagle-Vail, Colorado airport to evaluate three SVS display types (Head-up Display, Head-Down Size A, Head-Down Size X) and two terrain texture methods (photo-realistic, generic) in comparison to the simulated Baseline Boeing-757 Electronic Attitude Direction Indicator and Navigation/Terrain Awareness and Warning System displays. The results of the experiment showed significantly improved situation awareness, performance, and workload for SVS concepts compared to the Baseline displays and confirmed the retrofit capability of the Head-Up Display and Size A SVS concepts. The research also demonstrated that the tunnel guidance display concept used within the SVS concepts achieved required navigation performance (RNP) criteria.

  20. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  1. Potential applicability of stress wave velocity method on pavement base materials as a non-destructive testing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahedi, Masrur

    Aggregates derived from natural sources have been used traditionally as the pavement base materials. But in recent times, the extraction of these natural aggregates has become more labor intensive and costly due to resource depletion and environmental concerns. Thus, the uses of recycled aggregates as the supplementary of natural aggregates are increasing considerably in pavement construction. Use of recycled aggregates such as recycled crushed concrete (RCA) and recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) reduces the rate of natural resource depletion, construction debris and cost. Although recycled aggregates could be used as a viable alternative of conventional base materials, strength characteristics and product variability limit their utility to a great extent. Hence, their applicability is needed to be evaluated extensively based on strength, stiffness and cost factors. But for extensive evaluation, traditionally practiced test methods are proven to be unreasonable in terms of time, cost, reliability and applicability. On the other hand, rapid non-destructive methods have the potential to be less time consuming and inexpensive along with the low variability of test results; therefore improving the reliability of estimated performance of the pavement. In this research work, the experimental program was designed to assess the potential application of stress wave velocity method as a non-destructive test in evaluating recycled base materials. Different combinations of cement treated recycled concrete aggregate (RAP) and recycled crushed concrete (RCA) were used to evaluate the applicability of stress wave velocity method. It was found that, stress wave velocity method is excellent in characterizing the strength and stiffness properties of cement treated base materials. Statistical models, based on P-wave velocity were derived for predicting the modulus of elasticity and compressive strength of different combinations of cement treated RAP, Grade-1 and Grade-2 materials. Two

  2. Automated pilot advisory system test and evaluation at Manassas Municipal Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, J. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    In cooperation with the Federal Aviation Administration, NASA developed an experimental automated pilot advisory system (APAS) to provide airport and air traffic advisories at high density uncontrolled airports. The APAS concept is to utilize low cost automated systems to provide the necessary information for pilots to more safely plan and execute approach and landing at uncontrolled high density airports. The system is designed to be a natural extension of the procedural visual flight rules system used at uncontrolled airports and, as an advisory system, will enhance the "see-and-be-seen" rule and an evaluation of the APAS concept was obtained from pilots who used the system at the Manassas, Virginia airport. These evaluations and the system performance are presented.

  3. Airport Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan Paluska/Flickr Denver Airport Security Screening Introduction With air travel regaining popularity and increased secu- rity measures, airport security screening has become an area of interest for ...

  4. Positioning System Accuracy Assessment for the Runway Incursion Prevention System Flight Test at the Dallas/Ft. Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA/Langley Research Center collaborated with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to test a Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) at the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The RIPS combines airborne and ground sensor data with various cockpit displays to improve pilots' awareness of traffic conditions on the airport surface. The systems tested at DFW involved surface radar and data systems that gather and send surface traffic information to a research aircraft outfitted with the RIPS software, cockpit displays, and data link transceivers. The data sent to the airborne systems contained identification and GPS location of traffic. This information was compared with the own-ship location from airborne GPS receivers to generate incursion alerts. A total of 93 test tracks were flown while operating RIPS. This report compares the accuracy of the airborne GPS systems that gave the own-ship position of the research aircraft for the 93 test tracks.

  5. Permanent deformation of flexible pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. F.; Broderick, B. V.; Pappin, J. W.

    1980-06-01

    Seven pairs of pavements with granular bases were tested under controlled conditions. One pavement in each pair contained fabric inclusions. An improved testing facility was developed, including: (1) servo-hydraulic system for the loading carriage; (2) amplification and read-out system for pressure cells; (3) linearizing unit for strain coils; (4) transducers for measuring vertical and resilient deflection; (5) techniques for measuring in situ strain on fabric inclusions; (6) extensive use of nuclear density meter to monitor pavement and foundation materials. The following conclusions are drawn: (1) No improvement in performance resulted from fabric inclusions. (2) No consistent reduction in in-situ stresses, resilient strains, or permanent strains was observed as a result of fabric inclusion. (3) No consistent improvement in densities resulted from fabric inclusions. (4) Some slip apparently occurred between fabric and soil on those pavements which involved large deformations. The slip occurred between fabric and crushed limestone base rather than between fabric and silty-clay subgrade.

  6. Flight Testing of an Airport Surface Guidance, Navigation, and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 (B-757) research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport (ATL) in Atlanta, GA. The B-757 was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range (RVR) of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. The integrated ground and airborne components resulted in a system that has the potential to significantly improve the safety and efficiency of airport surface movements particularly as weather conditions deteriorate. Several advanced technologies were employed to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate flight simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. Results show that while the maturity of some of the technologies does not permit immediate implementation, the operational concept is valid and the performance is more than adequate in many areas.

  7. Impact of air traffic emissions on airport air quality. Multi-scale modeling, test bed and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.; Vuillot, F.; Durand, Y.; Courbet, B.; Janin, F.; Copalle, A.; Guin, C.; Paux, E.; Vannier, F.; Talbaut, M.; Weill, M.

    2004-12-01

    engines. Evidence of NOx regime is simulated for the ozone formation at and surrounding airports. At the boarding area, during aircraft parking, APU are generally operated for supplementary electrical power supply for cabin cooling or heating. APU emission indices of NOx, CO, HC and PM equipping civil aircraft are still badly known as they are not certified. Emission indices of soot, NOx, CO, CO2, have been measured on test bed for a specific APU consuming kerosene. Results show that APU emissions are comparable to aero-engine indices for gas, but are far more important for soot. Consequently it is expected that APU emissions are potentially important at airports. Finally, real-time continuous measurements of airborne PM, size distribution and number concentration, have been performed at Nice airport-France, along taxiways for 3 days, in summer 2003 using a 13-stage ELPI. Results show that, when road traffic emissions are not transported into the airport, the observed PM concentration does not exceed the French national threshold for PM mass in summer 2003.

  8. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papasin, Richard; Gawdiak, Yuri; Maluf, David A.; Leidich, Christopher; Tran, Peter B.

    2001-01-01

    Remote Tower Sensor Systems (RTSS) are proof-of-concept prototypes being developed by NASA/Ames Research Center (NASA/ARC) with collaboration with the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NOAA (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration). RTSS began with the deployment of an Airport Approach Zone Camera System that includes real-time weather observations at San Francisco International Airport. The goal of this research is to develop, deploy, and demonstrate remotely operated cameras and sensors at several major airport hubs and un-towered airports. RTSS can provide real-time weather observations of airport approach zone. RTSS will integrate and test airport sensor packages that will allow remote access to realtime airport conditions and aircraft status.

  9. Non-invasive diagnostic methods for investigating the quality of Žilina airport's runway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slabej, Martin; Grinč, Michal; Kováč, Matúš; Decký, Martin; Šedivý, Štefan

    2015-09-01

    The Žilina airport was after almost 50 years of use measured by non-invasive methods including GPR and Profilograph GE in order to investigate the quality of the runway pavement at the chosen spots. Since it was just a pilot action, a sample of survey was carried out. The testing spots were placed where the geologic drill core J02 have been drilled out. The measurements performed by Profilograph GE were used to verify the quality of the pavement surface in term longitudinal unevenness by means of index IRI and C. The GPR survey was performed in 3D geometry, hence in the x- and y-direction. A horn type antenna with central frequency of 2 GHz was used on the test field in order to verify the thicknesses of pavement construction layers. Here, the result of a 3D survey is presented. The investigation confirms two sub-horizontal construction layers of the runway pavement. In some areas the GPR interpretation was not possible due to the signal attenuation. This significant signal attenuation is found mainly in the areas where the linear cracks are situated.

  10. Performance of continuously reinforced concrete pavements: Volume 6 -- CRC pavement design, construction, and performance. Final report, August 1990--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Zollinger, D.G.; Buch, N.; Xin, D.; Soares, J.

    1999-02-01

    This report is one of a series of reports prepared as part of a recent study sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) aimed at updating the state-of-the-art of the design, construction, maintenance, and rehabilitation of continuous reinforced concrete (CRC) pavements. The scope of work of the FHWA study included the following: (1) Conduct of a literature review and preparation of an annotated bibliography on CRC pavements and CRC overlays. (2) Conduct of a field investigation and laboratory testing related to 23 existing in-service pavement sections. This was done to evaluate the effect of various design features on CRC pavement performance, to identify any design or construction related problems, and to recommend procedures to improve CRC pavement technology. (3) Evaluation of the effectiveness of various maintenance and rehabilitation strategies for CRC pavements. (4) Preparation of a Summary Report on the current state of the practice for CRC pavements. Each of the above four items is addressed in a separate report. The following reports have been prepared under this study: Performance of CRC Pavements. Volume 1: Summary of Practice and Annotated Bibliography. Volume 2: Field Investigation of CRC Pavements. Volume 3: Analysis and Evaluation of Field Test Data. Volume 4: Resurfacing for CRC Pavements. Volume 5: Maintenance and Repair of CRC Pavements. Volume 6: CRC Pavement Design, Construction, and Performance. Volume 7: Summary. This report is Volume 6 in the series.

  11. Field evaluation of in-situ test technology for Q(C)/Q(A) during construction of pavement layers and embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazzal, Munir Darwish

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation documents the results of an extensive research study that was conducted to characterize the behavior of geogrid reinforced base course materials. The research was conducted through an experimental testing and numerical modeling programs. The experimental testing program included performing different laboratory tests to evaluate the effect of various factors on the performance geogrid reinforced base course materials. Finite element models were also developed to investigate the benefits of placing geogrids within the base course layer in a flexible pavement structure. The results of the experimental testing demonstrated that the inclusion of the geogrid reinforcement layer(s) improved the compressive strength and stiffness of base course materials under static loading. This improvement was more pronounced at higher strain levels. Furthermore, the results showed that the geogrid significantly reduced the base course material permanent deformation under cyclic loading, but it did not show appreciable effect on their resilient deformation. The results also showed that for stress levels less than the plastic shakedown stress limit, the geogrid had a minimum contribution to the permanent deformation resistance during primary post-compaction stage; however, it significantly increased this resistance during the secondary stage. The results also showed that the change in the moisture content of the base material altered its state of stress; this significantly affected the geogrid improvement. The finite modeling program showed that the geogrid reinforcement reduced the lateral, vertical, and shear strains within the base course and subgrade layers. Furthermore, the geogrid had appreciable reduction in permanent deformation for pavement sections built on top of weak subgrade soils with medium to thin base layer thickness; with the thin base layer thickness showing greater values of improvement. However, negligible to modest reinforcement effect on permanent

  12. Construction of an experimental sulfur-extended-asphalt pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, K. S.

    1982-07-01

    The design, placement and collection of initial data from a sulfur extended asphalt (SEA) pavement and a conventional pavement used as a control is documented. The SEA pavement used 30 percent sulfur by total weight of the binder. Mix temperatures, hot bin gradations, and toxic emissions were monitored at the plant and the site throughout placement. Aggregates were collected from the hot bin during production of the control and SEA mixes for use in a Marshall mix design. Cores were extracted from both SEA and control pavements 1 month after placement for laboratory testing. Pavement surface properties were also examined after 1 month of service.

  13. Multilevel modelling of aircraft noise on performance tests in schools around Heathrow Airport London

    PubMed Central

    Haines, M; Stansfeld, S; Head, J; Job, R

    2002-01-01

    Design: This is a cross sectional study using the National Standardised Scores (SATs) in mathematics, science, and English (11 000 scores from children aged 11 years). The analyses used multilevel modelling to determine the effects of chronic aircraft noise exposure on childrens' school performance adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic and school factors in 123 primary schools around Heathrow Airport. Schools were assigned aircraft noise exposure level from the 1994 Civil Aviation Authority aircraft noise contour maps. Setting: Primary schools. Participants: The sample were approximately 11 000 children in year 6 (approximately 11 years old) from 123 schools in the three boroughs surrounding Heathrow Airport. Main results: Chronic exposure to aircraft noise was significantly related to poorer reading and mathematics performance. After adjustment for the average socioeconomic status of the school intake (measured by percentage of pupils eligible for free school meals) these associations were no longer statistically significant. Conclusions: Chronic exposure to aircraft noise is associated with school performance in reading and mathematics in a dose-response function but this association is confounded by socioeconomic factors. PMID:11812814

  14. Integrated Airport Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczo, S.

    1998-01-01

    The current air traffic environment in airport terminal areas experiences substantial delays when weather conditions deteriorate to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Research activity at NASA has culminated in the development, flight test and demonstration of a prototype Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) system. A NASA led industry team and the FAA developed the system which integrated airport surface surveillance systems, aeronautical data links, DGPS navigation, automation systems, and controller and flight deck displays. The LVLASO system was demonstrated at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport using a Boeing 757-200 aircraft during August, 1997. This report documents the contractors role in this testing particularly in the area of data link and DGPS navigation.

  15. Mechanistic design concepts for conventional flexible pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, R. P.; Thompson, M. R.

    1985-02-01

    Mechanical design concepts for convetional flexible pavement (asphalt concrete (AC) surface plus granular base/subbase) for highways are proposed and validated. The procedure is based on ILLI-PAVE, a stress dependent finite element computer program, coupled with appropriate transfer functions. Two design criteria are considered: AC flexural fatigue cracking and subgrade rutting. Algorithms were developed relating pavement response parameters (stresses, strains, deflections) to AC thickness, AC moduli, granular layer thickness, and subgrade moduli. Extensive analyses of the AASHO Road Test flexible pavement data are presented supporting the validity of the proposed concepts.

  16. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 2: Test Bed Performance Evaluation and Final AeroMACS Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward; Magner, James

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II (this document) describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  17. Radiation Detection Field Test at the Federal Express (FedEx) Air Cargo Facility at Denver International Airport (DIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Weirup, D; Waters, A; Hall, H; Dougan, A; Trombino, D; Mattesich, G; Hull, E; Bahowick, S; Loshak, A; Gruidl, J

    2004-02-11

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks. Comprehensive background measurements were performed and were analyzed, and a trial strategy for detection and identification of parcels displaying radioactivity was implemented to aid in future development of a comprehensive protection plan. The purpose of this project was threefold: {sm_bullet} Quantify background radiation environments at an air cargo facility. {sm_bullet} Quantify and identify ''nuisance'' alarms. {sm_bullet} Evaluate the performance of various isotope identifiers deployed in an operational environment (in this case, the operational environment included the biggest blizzard in over 90 years!).

  18. Recycled materials in asphalt pavements. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt pavement materials, and the use of other recycled materials to manufacture asphalt pavement. Articles discuss methods used for recycling bituminous pavement including hot-mix and cold-mix. Materials used to improve recycled pavement, and recycled materials used in asphalt pavement include latexes, rubber scrap such as tires, glass shards, concretes, dusts, waste oils, roofing wastes, sulfur, and metal refining sludges. Testing and evaluation of recycled pavements both in laboratories and in test cases are considered. (Contains a minimum of 160 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Pavement base drain evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, G. L.

    1981-06-01

    Portions of a highway drainage system design was revised. Essentially, the longitudinal drainage trench was moved closer to the pavement/shoulder joint, and the fine concrete sand layer was eliminated as a trench backfill material. The specified backfill material is a coarser crushed aggregate (pea gravel). An evaluation of the effects of these changes on pavement performance is given and the new pavement base drain system is compared to the older pipe foundation underdrain system at the same site.

  20. Pavement management and weigh-in-motion. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Cation, K.A.; Shahin, M.Y.; Scullion, T.; Lytton, R.L.; Butt, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The 15 papers in the report deal with the following areas: development of a preventive maintenance algorithm for use in pavement-management systems; pavement-performance prediction model using the Markov Process; roadway modeling and data conversion for a transportation-facilities information system; development of a methodology to estimate pavement maintenance and repair costs for different ranges of pavement-condition index; new techniques for modeling pavement deterioration; pavement management at the local government level; a comprehensive ranking system for local-agency pavement management; expert system as a part of pavement management; MAPCON: a pavement-evaluation data-analysis computer system; a microcomputer procedure to analyze axle load limits and pavement damage responsibility; selected results from the first three years of the Oregon automatic monitoring demonstration project; automated acquisition of truck-tire pressure data; calibration and accuracy testing of weigh-in-motion systems; accuracy and tolerances of weigh-in-motion systems; on-site calibration of weigh-in-motion systems.

  1. Reducing traffic noise with quieter pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavan, Paul

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, interest has increased in the use of pavement type to reduce traffic noise. This has been driven by public concern over noise from freeways and state transportation agencies' interest in using pavement instead of sound walls to mitigate traffic noise. Beginnings of the recent interest go back to 1998 with the formation of the Institute for Safe, Quiet & Durable Highways at Purdue University and the initiation long-term research by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) on the effectiveness of quieter pavements. In 2002, the State of Arizona announced plans to overlay 115 miles of concrete freeway in the greater Phoenix area with a quieter asphalt rubber surface. This turned into the first Quiet Pavement Pilot Program in partnership between Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Arizona Department of Transportation. Since that time, the FHWA in cooperation with the American Association of State Highway Transportation Agencies conducted a fact finding ``Scan'' tour in Europe to evaluate their quiet pavement technology and policy. This was followed by the first comparative tire/pavement noise testing in the US and Europe using the same procedures and test tires. The results, issues, and future directions surrounding these activities will be discussed.

  2. Asphalt in Pavement Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asphalt Inst., College Park, MD.

    Maintenance methods that can be used equally well in all regions of the country have been developed for the use of asphalt in pavement maintenance. Specific information covering methods, equipment and terminology that applies to the use of asphalt in the maintenance of all types of pavement structures, including shoulders, is provided. In many…

  3. Precast concrete pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollings, R. S.; Chou, Y. T.

    1981-11-01

    This report reviewed published literature on precast concrete pavements and found that precast concrete pavements have had some limited application in airfields, roads, and storage areas. This review of past experience and an analytical study of precast slabs concluded that existing design and construction techniques can be adapted for use with precast concrete pavements, but more work is needed to develop effective and easily constructed load transfer designs for slab joints. Precast concrete does not offer any advantage for conventional pavements due to its high cost and surface roughness, but it may find applications for special problems such as construction in adverse weather, subgrade settlement, temporary pavements that need to be relocated, and military operations.

  4. Do sediment type and test durations affect results of laboratory-based, accelerated testing studies of permeable pavement clogging?

    PubMed

    Nichols, Peter W B; White, Richard; Lucke, Terry

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have attempted to quantify the clogging processes of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers (PICPs) using accelerated testing methods. However, the results have been variable. This study investigated the effects that three different sediment types (natural and silica), and different simulated rainfall intensities, and testing durations had on the observed clogging processes (and measured surface infiltration rates) of laboratory-based, accelerated PICP testing studies. Results showed that accelerated simulated laboratory testing results are highly dependent on the type, and size of sediment used in the experiments. For example, when using real stormwater sediment up to 1.18 mm in size, the results showed that neither testing duration, nor stormwater application rate had any significant effect on PICP clogging. However, the study clearly showed that shorter testing durations generally increased clogging and reduced the surface infiltration rates of the models when artificial silica sediment was used. Longer testing durations also generally increased clogging of the models when using fine sediment (<300 μm). Results from this study will help researchers and designers better anticipate when and why PICPs are susceptible to clogging, reduce maintenance and extend the useful life of these increasingly common stormwater best management practices.

  5. Study on Flexible Pavement Failures in Soft Soil Tropical Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, M.; Chee Soon, Lee

    2015-04-01

    Road network system experienced rapid upgrowth since ages ago and it started developing in Malaysia during the colonization of British due to its significant impacts in transportation field. Flexible pavement, the major road network in Malaysia, has been deteriorating by various types of distresses which cause descending serviceability of the pavement structure. This paper discusses the pavement condition assessment carried out in Sarawak and Sabah, Malaysia to have design solutions for flexible pavement failures. Field tests were conducted to examine the subgrade strength of existing roads in Sarawak at various failure locations, to assess the impact of subgrade strength on pavement failures. Research outcomes from field condition assessment and subgrade testing showed that the critical causes of pavement failures are inadequate design and maintenance of drainage system and shoulder cross fall, along with inadequate pavement thickness provided by may be assuming the conservative value of soil strength at optimum moisture content, whereas the exiting and expected subgrade strengths at equilibrium moisture content are far below. Our further research shows that stabilized existing recycled asphalt and base materials to use as a sub-base along with bitumen stabilized open graded base in the pavement composition may be a viable solution for pavement failures.

  6. Pavement management practices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    This synthesis will be of interest to pavement designers, maintenance engineers, and others responsible for the management of highway pavements. Information is presented on pavement management systems - the established, documented procedures used to treat all activities involved in providing and sustaining pavements in an acceptable condition. As highway agencies focus more attention on maintenance and rehabilitation of highway networks, the use of some form of a pavement management system becomes increasingly important. This report of the Transportation Research Board describes the features, applicability, and used of a pavement management system and recommends five general steps for implementing a new pavement management system or improving an existing system.

  7. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  8. Airport technology international 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiorcopulo, George

    The present survey of developments in airport technologies and their management discusses airport extensions and upgradings, airport developments in China, polluter penalization, airport effects on environments, European ground-handling methods, ATC in Europe, EC duty-free sales at airports, and the privatization of airport security. Also discussed are airport advertising, new alternatives in air-cargo handling, ATC training, taxi-guidance systems, and the reduction of fuel consumption and emissions on the ground. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  9. Prediction of Weather Impacted Airport Capacity using Ensemble Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2011-01-01

    Ensemble learning with the Bagging Decision Tree (BDT) model was used to assess the impact of weather on airport capacities at selected high-demand airports in the United States. The ensemble bagging decision tree models were developed and validated using the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation System Performance Metrics (ASPM) data and weather forecast at these airports. The study examines the performance of BDT, along with traditional single Support Vector Machines (SVM), for airport runway configuration selection and airport arrival rates (AAR) prediction during weather impacts. Testing of these models was accomplished using observed weather, weather forecast, and airport operation information at the chosen airports. The experimental results show that ensemble methods are more accurate than a single SVM classifier. The airport capacity ensemble method presented here can be used as a decision support model that supports air traffic flow management to meet the weather impacted airport capacity in order to reduce costs and increase safety.

  10. Airport cleanup rises above problems

    SciTech Connect

    Pressly, N.; Lucas, B.; Frumer, B.; Roth, R.

    1996-07-01

    Engineers used a treatment combination to improve the in-situ bioremediation system`s efficiency in removing underground fuel leaks at JFK Airport. John F. Kennedy International Airport, in New York City, on Jamaica Bay, has an above-ground storage capacity of about 32 million gallons of jet fuel, which flow through about 50 miles of high-pressure underground pipe to the central terminal area. EAch terminal`s fuel hydrant system was the major source os subsurface contamination at the site. The site is covered by 1 to 1.5 feet of reinforced concrete pavement. Liquid phase jet fuel (free product) was measured on the water table with true thickness ranging from less than 1 inch to 1 foot. After analysis of core samples, contamination was found adsorbed to the soil with maximum levels at the water table. This article describes the clean up, covering the following topics: microbial conditions during system operation; above-ground treatment challenges: free product emulsification, presence of biomass; evaluation of enhancements: dissolved air floatation, coagulation and flocculation, retention time adjustments; conclusions.

  11. Recycled materials in asphalt pavements, January 1980-June 1991 (citations from the NTIS database). Rept. for Jan 80-Jun 91

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt pavement materials, and the use of other recycled materials to manufacture asphalt pavement. Articles discuss methods used for recycling bituminous pavement including hot-mix and cold-mix. Materials used to improve recycled pavement, and recycled materials used in asphalt pavement include latexes, rubber scrap such as tires, glass shards, concretes, dusts, waste oils, roofing wastes, sulfur, and metal refining sludges. Testing and evaluation of recycled pavements both in laboratories and in test cases are considered. (The bibliography contains 75 citations.) (Also includes title list and subject index.)

  12. Pervious Pavement System Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Porous pavement is a low impact development stormwater control. The Urban Watershed Management Branch is evaluating interlocking concrete pavers as a popular implementation. The pavers themselves are impermeable, but the spaces between the pavers are backfilled with washed, grade...

  13. Dynamic pavement deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, D. W.; Jacobs, K. M.

    1981-06-01

    Dynamic pavement deflection measurements for bituminous concrete pavements of two and three-quarter, five and seven-eights, and seven and one-half inches in thickness under moving axle loads of 15,000, 18,000, and 22,000 pounds were obtained at speeds of 10, 25 and 45 miles per hour. The results were analyzed and compared to Benkelman beam measurements. The data indicate that slow moving loads have greater adverse effect (larger deflections) on the pavement than the high speed loads. The results also show that the bituminous pavement undergoes numerous vertical fluctuations and bending as the front and rear axles approached the point of measurement. The magnitude of the vertical displacement was measured via the means of an accelerometer and double integrator. When values of the dynamic deflections were in the magnitude of 0.07 through 0.10 inches, there was evidence of pavement failure. When the deflection values were above 0.10 inches pavement failures were distinct.

  14. Effects of aircraft noise on the equilibrium of airport residents: Testing and utilization of a new methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francois, J.

    1981-01-01

    The focus of the investigation is centered around two main themes: an analysis of the effects of aircraft noise on the psychological and physiological equilibrium of airport residents; and an analysis of the sources of variability of sensitivity to noise. The methodology used is presented. Nine statistical tables are included, along with a set of conclusions.

  15. Overview of the Arizona Quiet Pavement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavan, Paul; Scofield, Larry

    2005-09-01

    The Arizona Quiet Pavement Pilot Program (QP3) was initially implemented to reduce highway related traffic noise by overlaying most of the Phoenix metropolitan area Portland cement concrete pavement with a one inch thick asphalt rubber friction coarse. With FHWA support, this program represents the first time that pavement surface type has been allowed as a noise mitigation strategy on federally funded projects. As a condition of using pavement type as a noise mitigation strategy, ADOT developed a ten-year, $3.8 million research program to evaluate the noise reduction performance over time. Historically, pavement surface type was not considered a permanent solution. As a result, the research program was designed to specifically address this issue. Noise performance is being evaluated through three means: (1) conventional roadside testing within the roadway corridor (e.g., far field measurements within the right-of-way) (2) the use of near field measurements, both close proximity (CPX) and sound intensity (SI); and (3) far field measurements obtained beyond the noise barriers within the surrounding neighborhoods. This paper provides an overview of the program development, presents the research conducted to support the decision to overlay the urban freeway, and the status of current research.

  16. NASA New Virtual Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Virtual Airport Tower is located at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The Virtual Airport Tower's two-story structure is a full-scale, highly sophisticated simulation facility that will emulate Level 5 air traffic control towers and the busiest airports. It provides the platform to conduct in-depth human factors studies with quantifiable results using actual air traffic controllers, airline dispatchers and airport managers.

  17. Flow-Meter and Passive Diffusion Bag Tests and Potential Influences on the Vertical Distribution of Contaminants in Wells at Galena Airport, Galena, Alaska, August to October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peterson, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Past activities at Galena Airport, a U.S. Air Force Base in Galena, Alaska, have resulted in ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds. The primary contaminants are petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. The U.S. Geological Survey and Earth Tech, in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, conducted investigations at Galena Airport from August to October 2002 using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers and borehole flow-meter testing to examine the vertical distribution of ground-water contamination in selected wells. This investigation was limited to the vicinity of building 1845 and to the area between building 1845 and the Yukon River. In addition, the U.S. Geological Survey was asked to determine whether additional wells are needed to more clearly define the nature and extent of the ground-water contamination at the Air Force Base. Little or no vertical water movement occurred under ambient conditions in the wells tested at Galena Airport, Alaska, in August 2002. All of the ambient vertical flows detected in wells were at rates less than the quantitative limit of the borehole flow meter (0.03 gallons per minute). In wells 06-MW-07 and 10-MW-01, no vertical flow was detected. In wells where ambient flow was detected, the direction of flow was downward. In general, concentrations of volatile organic compounds detected in the low-flow samples from wells at Galena Airport were approximately the same concentrations detected in the closest polyethylene diffusion bag sample for a wide variety of volatile organic compounds. The data indicate that the polyethylene diffusion bag sample results are consistent with the low-flow sample results. Vertical profiling of selected wells using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers at Galena Airport showed that from September 30 to October 1, 2002, little vertical change occurred in volatile organic compound concentrations along the screen length despite the fact that

  18. Experimental pavement using household waste slag

    SciTech Connect

    Kouda, Masahiro

    1996-12-31

    Municipal wastes used to be simply landfilled, but because of increasing difficulty in finding disposal sites, it became common practice to incinerate wastes and landfill the ash. In view of rapidly dwindling landfill sites, the author thought that the landfill site problem might be solved by finding a way to utilize slag made from incinerator ash. In this paper, a method for utilizing water-granulated slag as an asphalt pavement material is discussed. On the basis of laboratory test results, trial paving using base course materials consisting of crushed stone and 25 or 50% slag was carried out, paying attention primarily to bearing capacity. Marshall tests and fatigue resistance tests were conducted to determine the optimum content of water-granulated slag, and it was concluded that quality comparable to that of conventional asphalt concrete was attained at the slag content of 25% or less and that no problem would arise if the slag content was kept at 60% or less of the fine aggregate content. The mix proportions thus determined were also tested through experimental paving. A follow-up study to evaluate the durability of the experimental pavements confirmed that the experimental pavements were comparable in performance with conventional asphalt concrete pavements. This paper also reports on some problems encountered that need to be solved before utilizing water-granulated slag.

  19. Pavement cracking measurements using 3D laser-scan images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, W.; Xu, B.

    2013-10-01

    Pavement condition surveying is vital for pavement maintenance programs that ensure ride quality and traffic safety. This paper first introduces an automated pavement inspection system which uses a three-dimensional (3D) camera and a structured laser light to acquire dense transverse profiles of a pavement lane surface when it carries a moving vehicle. After the calibration, the 3D system can yield a depth resolution of 0.5 mm and a transverse resolution of 1.56 mm pixel-1 at 1.4 m camera height from the ground. The scanning rate of the camera can be set to its maximum at 5000 lines s-1, allowing the density of scanned profiles to vary with the vehicle's speed. The paper then illustrates the algorithms that utilize 3D information to detect pavement distress, such as transverse, longitudinal and alligator cracking, and presents the field tests on the system's repeatability when scanning a sample pavement in multiple runs at the same vehicle speed, at different vehicle speeds and under different weather conditions. The results show that this dedicated 3D system can capture accurate pavement images that detail surface distress, and obtain consistent crack measurements in repeated tests and under different driving and lighting conditions.

  20. Productivity Analysis of Public and Private Airports: A Causal Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasigh, Bijan; Gorjidooz, Javad

    2007-01-01

    Around the world, airports are being viewed as enterprises, rather than public services, which are expected to be managed efficiently and provide passengers with courteous customer services. Governments are, increasingly, turning to the private sectors for their efficiency in managing the operation, financing, and development, as well as providing security for airports. Operational and financial performance evaluation has become increasingly important to airport operators due to recent trends in airport privatization. Assessing performance allows the airport operators to plan for human resources and capital investment as efficiently as possible. Productivity measurements may be used as comparisons and guidelines in strategic planning, in the internal analysis of operational efficiency and effectiveness, and in assessing the competitive position of an airport in transportation industry. The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate the operational and financial efficiencies of 22 major airports in the United States and Europe. These airports are divided into three groups based on private ownership (7 British Airport Authority airports), public ownership (8 major United States airports), and a mix of private and public ownership (7 major European Union airports. The detail ownership structures of these airports are presented in Appendix A. Total factor productivity (TFP) model was utilized to measure airport performance in terms of financial and operational efficiencies and to develop a benchmarking tool to identify the areas of strength and weakness. A regression model was then employed to measure the relationship between TFP and ownership structure. Finally a Granger causality test was performed to determine whether ownership structure is a Granger cause of TFP. The results of the analysis presented in this paper demonstrate that there is not a significant relationship between airport TFP and ownership structure. Airport productivity and efficiency is

  1. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Tracked Vehicle Movement across Desert Pavement

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Mark J; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Hargrove, William Walter

    2008-01-01

    A multiple stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60-A1 tanks. This paper describes the ecological risk assessment for the tracked vehicle movement component of the testing program. The principal stressor associated with tracked vehicle movement was soil disturbance, and a resulting, secondary stressor was hydrological change. Water loss to washes and wash vegetation was expected to result from increased infiltration and/or evaporation associated with disturbances to desert pavement. The simulated exposure of wash vegetation to water loss was quantified using estimates of exposed land area from a digital ortho quarter quad aerial photo and field observations, a 30 30 m digital elevation model, the flow accumulation feature of ESRI ArcInfo, and a two-step process in which runoff was estimated from direct precipitation to a land area and from water that flowed from upgradient to a land area. In all simulated scenarios, absolute water loss decreased with distance from the disturbance, downgradient in the washes; however, percentage water loss was greatest in land areas immediately downgradient of a disturbance. Potential effects on growth and survival of wash trees were quantified by using an empirical relationship derived from a local unpublished study of water infiltration rates. The risk characterization concluded that neither risk to wash vegetation growth or survival nor risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction was expected. The risk characterization was negative for both the incremental risk of the test program and the combination of the test and pretest disturbances.

  2. Pervious Pavement System Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervious pavement is a low impact development stormwater control. The Urban Watershed Management Branch of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Edison, NJ, is evaluating concrete pavers as a popular implementation. The pollutant removal of a bench-scale permeable interlo...

  3. Recycled materials in asphalt pavements. October 1973-November 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for October 1973-November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt-pavement materials, and the use of other recycled materials to manufacture asphalt pavement. Articles discuss methods used for recycling bituminous pavement including hot-mix and cold-mix. Materials used to improve recycled pavement, and recycled materials used in asphalt pavement include latexes, rubber scrap such as tires, glass shards, concretes, dusts, waste oils, roofing wastes, sulfur, and metal refining sludges. Testing and evaluation of recycled pavements both in laboratories and in test cases are considered. (Contains 110 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  4. Structural response of LVR flexible pavements at Mn/ROAD project

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, N.; Thompson, M.R.

    1999-05-01

    Pavement surface deflection basins provide valuable information for the structural evaluation of flexible pavements. Surface deflection measurements are rapid, inexpensive, and nondestructive and are used frequently as an indicator of pavement structural capability and performance potential. In this study, falling weight deflectometer testing results on the conventional flexible pavements (asphalt concrete surface, granular base/subbase) and aggregate-surface/surface-treated test sections in the low-volume road loop at the Minnesota Road Research Project (Mn/ROAD) were analyzed to evaluate the effect of granular material quality on the pavement structural response. Asphalt concrete (AC) modulus and subgrade ``break-point`` modulus were back-calculated using algorithms previously developed at the University of Illinois. The surface deflections were normalized to the same AC modulus and subgrade modulus. The analyses show a limited effect of granular material quality on the pavement deflection response in the case of conventional flexible pavements. Because of higher granular layer stresses, the granular material quality effects on the pavement surface deflection response of surface-treated/aggregate-surface pavements are significant. Increased AC thickness reduces the effect of granular base quality on the pavement deflection response.

  5. NASA diagonal-braked test vehicle evaluation of traction characteristics of grooved and ungrooved runway surfaces at Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida, 8-9 May 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Two runways were evaluated under artificially wetted conditions with the NASA diagonal-braked vehicle (DBV). Results of the evaluation which included a pavement drainage analysis, a pavement skid resistance analysis, and a DBV wet/dry stopping distance ratio analysis indicated that the ungrooved runway surfaces had poor water drainage characteristics and poor skid resistance under wet conditions at high speeds especially in rubbercoated areas of the runways. Grooving runways to a transverse 1-1/4 x 1/4 x 1/4 inch pattern greatly improved both the water drainage and pavement skid resistance capability of these asphaltic concrete surfaces.

  6. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2010-01-01

    A Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pilot reaction to conflict events in the TMA near the airport, different alert timings for various scenarios, alerting display concepts, and directive alerting concepts. This paper gives an overview of the conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) concept, simulation study, and test results

  7. Pavement performance equations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, J.P.; Kay, R.K.; Jackson, N.C.

    1988-03-01

    The WSDOT PMS data base was used to develop regression equations for three pavement surface types: bituminous surface treatments, asphalt concrete, and portland-cement concrete. The primary regression equations developed were to predict Pavement Condition Rating (PCR) which is a measure of the pavement surface distress (ranges from 100 (no distress) to below 0 (extensive distress)). Overall, the equations fit the data rather well given the expected variation of pavement performance information. The relative effects of age (time since construction or reconstruction) were illustrated for the three surface types.

  8. Volcanic hazards to airports

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  9. General outlook of pavement and vehicle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mamlouk, M.S.

    1997-11-01

    The interaction between vehicle and pavement is complex since pavement roughness excites the dynamic forces generated by vehicles, while these dynamic forces simultaneously increase the pavement roughness. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the results of recent research related to pavement and vehicle dynamics and their interaction and to evaluate their potential use in the design and management of pavements. Pavement dynamic models are capable of determining stresses, strains, and deflections in various directions when harmonic, pulse, or transient loads are applied. Vehicle dynamic models simulate the effect of pavement roughness on the inertia of various vehicle components. These models can predict the dynamic forces produced by different axles and wheels of traveling vehicles at different locations along the pavement. Pavement response computed using dynamic models matches field measurements closer than those computed using static models. The concept of vehicle-pavement interaction can be applied to weigh-in-motion, pavement design and performance, and vehicle regulations.

  10. Asphalt pavement surfaces and asphalt mixtures. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The papers in this volume, which deal with asphalt pavement surfaces and asphalt mixtures, should be of interest to state and local construction, design, materials, and research engineers as well as contractors and material producers. The papers in Part 1 include discussions of pavement smoothness specifications and skidding characteristics. The first four papers in Part 2 were submitted in response to a call for papers for a session at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board on low-temperature properties of hot-mix asphalt. The next eight are on the influence of volumetric and strength properties on the performance of hot-mix asphalt. In the following three papers, the topics covered are the complex modulus of asphalt concrete, cold in-place asphalt recycling, and polymer modification of asphalt pavements in Ontario. The last two papers were presented in a session on relationship of materials characterization to accelerated pavement performance testing.

  11. Performance of pervious pavement parking bays storing rainwater in the north of Spain.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ullate, E; Bayon, J R; Coupe, S; Castro-Fresno, D

    2010-01-01

    Pervious pavements are drainage techniques that improve urban water management in a sustainable manner. An experimental pervious pavement parking area has been constructed in the north of Spain (Santander), with the aim of harvesting good quality rainwater. Forty-five pervious pavement structures have been designed and constructed to measure stored water quantity and quality simultaneously. Ten of these structures are specifically constructed with different geotextile layers for improving water storage within the pavements. Following the confirmation in previous laboratory experiments that the geotextile influenced on water storage, two different geosynthetics (Inbitex and a One Way evaporation control membrane) and control pervious pavements with no geotextile layers were tested in the field. Weather conditions were monitored in order to find correlations with the water storage within the pervious pavement models tested. During one year of monitoring the three different pervious pavement types tested remained at their maximum storage capacity. The heavy rain events which occurred during the experimental period caused evaporation rates within the pervious pavements to be not significant, but allowed the researchers to observe certain trends in the water storage. Temperature was the most closely correlated weather factor with the level of the water stored within the pervious pavements tested.

  12. The Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J.; Wilson, J.; Fujita, T. T.

    1983-01-01

    A block diagram of the joint airport weather studies program is presented. Background leading to the development of the program is reviewed. Basic studies, aircraft performance, and detection and warning techniques used to develop fine scale structure of thunderstorm dynamics and kinematics in the vicinity of a major airport; effect of thunderstorm low level wind shear on aircraft performance; and development of real time testing of flow level wind shear detection and warning techniques and displays are described.

  13. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure. This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  14. Pavement roughness and skid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Road roughness and roadway safety as it relates to both surface and air transportation are discussed. The role of road roughness in vehicle ride, the measurement of roughness, the evaluation of riding confort, and the effect of grooving pavements are discussed. The effects of differential pavement friction on the response of cars in skidding maneuvers is discussed.

  15. Geotextiles in Flexible Pavement Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alungbe, Gabriel D.

    2004-01-01

    People everywhere in the developed world regularly drive on paved roads. Learning about the construction techniques and materials used in paving benefits technology and construction students. This article discusses the use of geosynthetic textiles in pavement construction. It presents background on pavements and describes geotextiles and drainage…

  16. Plastic (wire-combed) grooving of a slip-formed concrete runway overlay at Patrick Henry Airport: An initial evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlin, E. C.; Horne, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    A wire-comb technique is described for transversely grooving the surface of a freshly laid (plastic state) slip-formed concrete overlay installed at Patrick Henry Airport. This method of surface texturing yields better water drainage and pavement skid resistance than that obtained with an older conventional burlap drag concrete surface treatment installed on an adjacent portion of the runway.

  17. Factors influencing PM 10 emissions from road pavement wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Gudmundsson, Anders; Dahl, Andreas; Jonsson, Per; Swietlicki, Erik

    Accelerated pavement wear is one of the major environmental disadvantages of studded tyres in northern regions and results in increased levels of PM 10. Measurements of PM 10 in a road simulator hall have been used to study the influence of pavement properties, tyre type and vehicle speed on pavement wear. The test set-up included three different pavements (one granite and two quartzite with different aggregate sizes), three different tyre types (studded, non-studded, and summer tyres) and different speeds (30-70 km h -1). The results show that the granite pavement was more prone to PM 10 production compared to the quartzite pavements. Studded winter tyres yield tens of times higher PM 10 concentrations compared to non-studded winter tyres. Wear from summer tyres was negligible in comparison. It was also shown that wear is strongly dependent on speed; every 10 km h -1 increase yielded an increase of the PM 10 concentration of 680 μg m -3 in one of the simulator experiments.

  18. Pavement recycling. Executive summary and report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) initiated Demonstration Project 39 (DP 39) Recycling Asphalt Pavements in June 1976. The project showed that asphalt pavement recycling was a technically viable rehabitation technique, and it was estimated that the use of reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) would amount to approximately 15 percent of the total hot-mix asphalt (HMA) production by the mid-1980s. It was expected that most of the asphalt pavement removed would be reused in new pavement construction or overlays.

  19. Recycled materials in asphalt pavements. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt pavement materials for road construction. Citations discuss asphalt concrete mixtures and recycling, recycled materials testing and evaluation, and pavement bases. Engineering and environmental aspects of recycled materials are examined. (Contains a minimum of 78 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Evaluation of low temperature cracking in asphalt pavement mixes. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ksaibati, K.; Erickson, R.

    1998-10-01

    This report examines the feasibility of using the thermal stress restrained specimen test to evaluate low temperature cracking in asphalt pavement mixes. Data were collected from laboratory and field evaluations. Various mixing, aging, and compaction methods were used to prepare test samples with materials obtained from two WYDOT highway projects. Field data were obtained from two recently built test sections to compare with laboratory test results. Pavement condition surveys quantified low temperature cracking of both test sections after one winter. Temperature data for these projects sites were also collected. Pavement condition and temperature data were compared to results from the thermal stress restrained specimen test.

  1. Integrated wave propagation devices for quality control or diagnostics of pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarian, Soheil; Yuan, Deren; Baker, Mark R.; Crain, Kevin

    1996-11-01

    Seismic Pavement Analyzer and a portable version of it have been extensively used for quality control and monitoring the structural condition of pavements. With them, a pavement can be tested at closely spaced points and at a fraction of the cost and time of coring. The main tests used are the impact echo for determining the thickness of the slab, ultrasonic body wave and ultrasonic surface wave for determining the moduli of top layer, impulse response for determining the condition of subgrade, and SASW method for determining the modulus profile of pavement. Based on extensive field testing on numerous types of base and subgrade,the techniques in general, and the two devices in particular are quite suitable for many quality and pavement evaluation projects.

  2. Fatigue properties of rubber modified pavements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Raad, L.; Saboundjian, S.; Yuan, X.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents results of a study to determine the fatigue behavior of rubber modified pavements in Alaska in comparison with conventional asphalt concrete pavements. Laboratory studies were conducted on field specimens using the flexural fatigue test in the controlled-displacement mode. Tests were performed at 72 deg F and 40 deg F. Tested materials include (1) conventional HMA with AC 2.5 and AC 5; (2) PlusRide RUMAC with AC 5; (3) asphalt-rubber concrete with AC 2.5 (wet Process); and (4) rubberized asphalt-rubber concrete with AC 2.5 (wet/dry process).

  3. Early-life study of the FA409 full-depth asphalt-concrete pavement sections

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) is currently implementing a mechanistic thickness-design procedure for full-depth asphalt-concrete pavements. This thesis is an early design-life investigation of full-depth asphalt-concrete pavements, constructed on FA409 near Carlyle, Illinois in 1986. Included in the study are: sampling and testing of paving and subgrade materials; extensive non-destructive testing (NDT) using the Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD); development of techniques for interpreting NDT data; determination of as-built structural characteristics of the various pavement sections; evaluation of subsurface drainage and lime-treated soil behavior; and examination of the validity of the ILLI-PAVE computer model. The simplicity of a full-depth asphalt-concrete pavement allows useful information regarding pavement structure to be determined from FWD surface-deflection data. The ILLI-PAVE model was used in conjunction with statistical methods to quantify, in the form of regression equations or algorithms, the relationship between pavement structure (Tac, Eac, and Eri) and pavement response to FWD loading. Testing of pavement and subgrade material samples as used to validate these algorithms.

  4. Pervious Pavement System Evaluation- Abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Porous pavement is a low impact development stormwater control. The Urban Watershed Management Branch is evaluating interlocking concrete pavers as a popular implementation. The pavers themselves are impermeable, but the spaces between the pavers are backfilled with washed, gra...

  5. Evaluation of multilayered pavement structures from measurements of surface waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryden, N.; Lowe, M.J.S.; Cawley, P.; Park, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    A method is presented for evaluating the thickness and stiffness of multilayered pavement structures from guided waves measured at the surface. Data is collected with a light hammer as the source and an accelerometer as receiver, generating a synthetic receiver array. The top layer properties are evaluated with a Lamb wave analysis. Multiple layers are evaluated by matching a theoretical phase velocity spectrum to the measured spectrum. So far the method has been applied to the testing of pavements, but it may also be applicable in other fields such as ultrasonic testing of coated materials. ?? 2006 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Tobiason

    2001-07-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the remediation activities performed and the results of verification sampling conducted at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box. The CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1) and consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 22-03-01- Sewage Lagoon (CAU 230); and 22-99-01- Strainer Box (CAU 320). Included with CAS 22-99-01 is a buried Imhoff tank and a sludge bed. These CAUs will be collectively referred to in this plan as the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. Site characterization activities were done during September 1999. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) indicated that only the sludge bed (CAS 22-99-01) contained constituents of concern (COC) above action levels and required remediation (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 2000a).

  7. GPR used in combination with other NDT methods for assessing pavements in PPP projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizos, Andreas; Plati, Christina

    2014-05-01

    In the recent decades, Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) has been adopted for highway infrastructure procurement in many countries. PPP projects typically take the form of a section of highway and connecting roadways which are to be construction and managed for a given concession period. Over the course of the highway concession period, the private agency takes over the pavement maintenance and rehabilitation duties. On this purpose, it is critical to find the most cost effective way to maintain the infrastructure in compliance with the agreed upon performance measures and a Pavement Management Systems (PMS) is critical to the success of this process. For the prosperous operation of a PMS it is necessary to have appropriate procedures for pavement monitoring and evaluation, which is important in many areas of pavement engineering. Non Destructive Testing (NDT) has played a major role in pavement condition monitoring, assessments and evaluation accomplishing continuous and quick collection of pavement data. The analysis of this data can lead to indicators related to trigger values (criteria) that define the pavement condition based on which the pavement "health" is perceived helping decide whether there is the need or not to intervene in the pavement. The accomplished perception appoints required management activities for preserving pavements in favor not only of the involved highway/road agencies but also of users' service. Amongst NDT methods Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) seems to be a very powerful toll, as it provides a range of condition and construction pavement information. It can support effectively the implementation of PMS activities in the framework of pavement monitoring and evaluation. Given that, the present work aims to the development and adaptation of a protocol for the use of GPR in combination with other NDT methods, such as Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD), for assessing pavements in PPP projects. It is based on the experience of Laboratory of

  8. Stormwater quality of spring-summer-fall effluent from three partial-infiltration permeable pavement systems and conventional asphalt pavement.

    PubMed

    Drake, Jennifer; Bradford, Andrea; Van Seters, Tim

    2014-06-15

    This study examined the spring, summer and fall water quality performance of three partial-infiltration permeable pavement (PP) systems and a conventional asphalt pavement in Ontario. The study, conducted between 2010 and 2012, compared the water quality of effluent from two Interlocking Permeable Concrete Pavements (AquaPave(®) and Eco-Optiloc(®)) and a Hydromedia(®) Pervious Concrete pavement with runoff from an Asphalt control pavement. The usage of permeable pavements can mitigate the impact of urbanization on receiving surface water systems through quantity control and stormwater treatment. The PP systems provided excellent stormwater treatment for petroleum hydrocarbons, total suspended solids, metals (copper, iron, manganese and zinc) and nutrients (total-nitrogen and total-phosphorus) by reducing event mean concentrations (EMC) as well as total pollutant loadings. The PPs significantly reduced the concentration and loading of ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3), nitrite (NO2(-)) and organic-nitrogen (Org-N) but increased the concentration and loading of nitrate (NO3(-)). The PP systems had mixed performances for the treatment of phosphate (PO4(3-)). The PP systems increased the concentration of sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) but EMCs remained well below recommended levels for drinking water quality. Relative to the observed runoff, winter road salt was released more slowly from the PP systems resulting in elevated spring and early-summer Cl and Na concentrations in effluent. PP materials were found to introduce dissolved solids into the infiltrating stormwater. The release of these pollutants was verified by additional laboratory scale testing of the individual pavement and aggregate materials at the University of Guelph. Pollutant concentrations were greatest during the first few months after construction and declined rapidly over the course of the study.

  9. Tire Footprint Affects Hydroplaning On Wet Pavement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent investigations of tire hydroplaning at highway speeds reveal, in addition to inflation pressure, tire-footprint aspect ratio (FAR), defined as width divided by length of tire surface in contact with pavement, significantly influences speed at which dynamic hydroplaning begins. Tire speeds and forces developed during tests of up to 65 mi/h (105 km/h) were monitored on flooded test surface to identify development of hydroplaning. Study focused on automotive tires because FAR's of automotive tires vary more than those of aircraft tires.

  10. 14 CFR 135.299 - Pilot in command: Line checks: Routes and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airports. 135.299 Section 135.299 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Crewmember Testing Requirements § 135.299 Pilot in command: Line checks: Routes and airports. (a) No...; and (3) Include takeoffs and landings at one or more representative airports. In addition to...

  11. Ground Deformation Analysis of Blast-Induced Liquefaction at a Simulated Airport Infrastructure Using High Resolution 3D Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasian, D.; Kayen, R.; Ashford, S.; Kawamata, Y.; Sugano, T.

    2008-12-01

    In October 2007, the Port and Airport Research Institute (PARI) of the Japan Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation conducted a large-scale blast-induced liquefaction experiment in Ishikari, Hokkaido, Japan. Approximately 24,000 m2 of ground was liquefied using controlled blasting techniques to investigate the performance of airport infrastructure. The USGS and Oregon State University participated in the study and measured topographic changes in ground level using 3D laser scanning techniques (terrestrial lidar), as well as changes in shear wave velocity of the between the pre- and post-liquefied soil. This poster focuses on the lidar results. The overall objective of the PARI experiment is to assess the performance of airport infrastructure subjected to liquefaction. Specifically, the performance of pipelines and large concrete utility raceways located beneath runway pavements is of interest, as well as the performance of pavements and embankments with and without soil improvement techniques. At the site, 5-7 m of loose silty sand was placed as hydraulic fill on natural alluvial sand as an expansion of the Ishikari port facility. On a portion of the liquefied site, three 20 m by 50 m test sections were constructed to investigate the performance of improved ground beneath asphalt runways, concrete runway aprons, and open areas. Pipelines and concrete utility conduits were also buried in each section. The three ground improvement techniques investigated were sand-cement mixing, vertical drains, and colloidal silica injection. The PARI experiment provided an excellent opportunity to conduct terrestrial lidar measurements - a revolutionary tool for accurate characterization of fine-scale changes of topography and identification of subtle deformations. Lidar was used for characterizing post-blast deformations both immediately after the charges were used, and subsequently over time at intervals of 2 days, 4 days, and 5 months after blasting. Settlement

  12. Pervious Pavement System Evaluation-Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervious pavement is a low impact development stormwater control. The Environmental Protection Agency's Urban Watershed Management Branch is evaluating interlocking concrete pavingstone pervious pavement systems. The pavingstones themselves are impermeable, but the spaces between...

  13. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  14. Research of infrared laser based pavement imaging and crack detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hanyu; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Xiuhua; Jing, Genqiang

    2013-08-01

    Road crack detection is seriously affected by many factors in actual applications, such as some shadows, road signs, oil stains, high frequency noise and so on. Due to these factors, the current crack detection methods can not distinguish the cracks in complex scenes. In order to solve this problem, a novel method based on infrared laser pavement imaging is proposed. Firstly, single sensor laser pavement imaging system is adopted to obtain pavement images, high power laser line projector is well used to resist various shadows. Secondly, the crack extraction algorithm which has merged multiple features intelligently is proposed to extract crack information. In this step, the non-negative feature and contrast feature are used to extract the basic crack information, and circular projection based on linearity feature is applied to enhance the crack area and eliminate noise. A series of experiments have been performed to test the proposed method, which shows that the proposed automatic extraction method is effective and advanced.

  15. Impact of pavement conditions on crash severity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingfeng; Liu, Chunxiao; Ding, Liang

    2013-10-01

    Pavement condition has been known as a key factor related to ride quality, but it is less clear how exactly pavement conditions are related to traffic crashes. The researchers used Geographic Information System (GIS) to link Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Crash Record Information System (CRIS) data and Pavement Management Information System (PMIS) data, which provided an opportunity to examine the impact of pavement conditions on traffic crashes in depth. The study analyzed the correlation between several key pavement condition ratings or scores and crash severity based on a large number of crashes in Texas between 2008 and 2009. The results in general suggested that poor pavement condition scores and ratings were associated with proportionally more severe crashes, but very poor pavement conditions were actually associated with less severe crashes. Very good pavement conditions might induce speeding behaviors and therefore could have caused more severe crashes, especially on non-freeway arterials and during favorable driving conditions. In addition, the results showed that the effects of pavement conditions on crash severity were more evident for passenger vehicles than for commercial vehicles. These results provide insights on how pavement conditions may have contributed to crashes, which may be valuable for safety improvement during pavement design and maintenance. Readers should notice that, although the study found statistically significant effects of pavement variables on crash severity, the effects were rather minor in reality as suggested by frequency analyses.

  16. Airport Choice in Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area: An Application of the Conditional Logit Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Marcelo Baena; Muller, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Using the conditional LOGIT model, this paper addresses the airport choice in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area. In this region, Guarulhos International Airport (GRU) and Congonhas Airport (CGH) compete for passengers flying to several domestic destinations. The airport choice is believed to be a result of the tradeoff passengers perform considering airport access characteristics, airline level of service characteristics and passenger experience with the analyzed airports. It was found that access time to the airports better explain the airport choice than access distance, whereas direct flight frequencies gives better explanation to the airport choice than the indirect (connections and stops) and total (direct plus indirect) flight frequencies. Out of 15 tested variables, passenger experience with the analyzed airports was the variable that best explained the airport choice in the region. Model specifications considering 1, 2 or 3 variables were tested. The model specification most adjusted to the observed data considered access time, direct flight frequencies in the travel period (morning or afternoon peak) and passenger experience with the analyzed airports. The influence of these variables was therefore analyzed across market segments according to departure airport and flight duration criteria. The choice of GRU (located neighboring Sao Paulo city) is not well explained by the rationality of access time economy and the increase of the supply of direct flight frequencies, while the choice of CGH (located inside Sao Paulo city) is. Access time was found to be more important to passengers flying shorter distances while direct flight frequencies in the travel period were more significant to those flying longer distances. Keywords: Airport choice, Multiple airport region, Conditional LOGIT model, Access time, Flight frequencies, Passenger experience with the analyzed airports, Transportation planning

  17. Evaluation of ASTM test method D 4867, effect of moisture on asphalt concrete paving mixtures. Final report, May 1995--May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, K.D.

    1998-09-01

    The moisture sensitivities of 21 dense-graded asphalt pavements were predicted in 1987 using American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Test Method D 4867, Effect of Moisture on Asphalt Concrete Paving Mixtures. Tests were performed on cores taken from the pavements. The air-void levels of the cores varied from pavement to pavement. In 1995 and 1996, cores were again taken from the pavements to ascertain whether the test method correctly predicted performance. Pavement distress surveys were also performed.

  18. Solar-reflective coating as a cooling overlay for asphalt pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Xu, Geng; Feng, Decheng; Zhong, Jing; Xie, Ning

    2011-11-01

    Rutting is one of the most serious problems on asphalt pavements. Decrease the surface temperature of the asphalt pavement is an effective method to solve the rutting problem on asphalt pavements. In this study, nano sized particles filled polymer composite was developed as an overlay to reflect the solar energy and decrease the surface temperature of asphalt pavements. The overlay was composed of acrylic or epoxy resin filled with nano TiO2 or nano TiNO2. The solar reflection of the nano particle filled polymers was tested and the results showed that solar reflection effectiveness of the epoxy/TiO2 composite reached the highest value. The results of outdoor temperature test indicate that the solar-reflective overlay could decrease the surface temperature of asphalt pavements about 10 °C when the pavement temperature is about 60 °C. Pavement skid resistance was also tested, which expressed by micro/macrotexture depth and the results of which showed that both matrix was qualified after coated with aggregates on the surface.

  19. Solar-reflective coating as a cooling overlay for asphalt pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He; Xu, Geng; Feng, Decheng; Zhong, Jing; Xie, Ning

    2012-04-01

    Rutting is one of the most serious problems on asphalt pavements. Decrease the surface temperature of the asphalt pavement is an effective method to solve the rutting problem on asphalt pavements. In this study, nano sized particles filled polymer composite was developed as an overlay to reflect the solar energy and decrease the surface temperature of asphalt pavements. The overlay was composed of acrylic or epoxy resin filled with nano TiO2 or nano TiNO2. The solar reflection of the nano particle filled polymers was tested and the results showed that solar reflection effectiveness of the epoxy/TiO2 composite reached the highest value. The results of outdoor temperature test indicate that the solar-reflective overlay could decrease the surface temperature of asphalt pavements about 10 °C when the pavement temperature is about 60 °C. Pavement skid resistance was also tested, which expressed by micro/macrotexture depth and the results of which showed that both matrix was qualified after coated with aggregates on the surface.

  20. Contributions of performance-graded asphalt to low temperature cracking resistance of pavements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Loh, S.W.; Olek, J.

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to study and evaluate the role that asphalt cracking. As part of the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP) new specifications for asphalt binders were developed that are based on the performance of the material. The asphalt binder graded and specified according to these new performance-based specifications is called PG binder. These new specifications are commonly referred to as Superpave (Superior Performing Asphalt Pavement) binder specifications. A section of Interstate 64 in southern Indiana was experiencing severe low temperature cracking before it was reconstructed over the summers of 1995 and 1996. The binder used in the new pavement mixes was PG material. Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) tests, Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) tests, and viscosity tests were performed on this binder. Comparisons were made between test results obtained from the binders in the old pavement and the new pavement. All tests and comparisons were based on the Superpave binder specifications.

  1. Teaching Methodology of Flexible Pavement Materials and Pavement Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Yusuf; Najafi, Fazil

    2004-01-01

    Flexible pavement materials exhibit complex mechanical behavior, in the sense, that they not only show stress and temperature dependency but also are sensitive to moisture conditions. This complex behavior presents a great challenge to the faculty in bringing across the level of complexity and providing the concepts needed to understand them. The…

  2. Monitoring pavement response and performance using in-situ instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.H.; Bilyeu, J.; Hugo, F.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the effectiveness of in-situ instrumentation on diagnosing the pavement layer conditions under full-scale accelerated traffic loading. The test section is an in-service pavement (US281) in Jacksboro, Texas. Multi-Depth Deflectometers (MDDs) are used to measure both permanent deformations and transient deflections, caused by accelerated traffic loading and Falling Weight Deflectometers (MDDs) are used to measure both permanent deformations and transient deflections, caused by accelerated traffic loading and Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) tests. Four different FWD loads of 25, 40, 52, and 67 kN were applied in close proximity to the MDDs at various traffic loading intervals to determine pavement conditions. It was found that the majority of rutting occurred in the newly recycled asphalt mix. The aged ({gt}40 years) underlying base and subgrade layers contributed less than 30% to overall rutting. Only the top recycled Asphalt layer underwent notable deterioration due to traffic loading. Up to 1.5 million axle repetitions, the test pad responded to FWD load almost linearly, not only over the whole pavement system but also within individual layers. However, under higher FWD loads, the percentage of total deflection contributed by the subgrade increased.

  3. The Concrete and Pavement Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world is characterized by the extensive use of concrete and asphalt pavement. Periodically, these materials are replaced and the old materials disposed of. In this challenge, students will be asked to develop ways to reuse the old materials. It is important for students to understand how concrete and asphalt are made and applied, as…

  4. Recycling of portland cement concrete pavement, Johnson County. Final report, 1986-1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wojakowski, J.B.; Fager, G.A.; Catron, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in recycling construction materials. Surface courses of bituminous pavements are currently being actively recycled all over Kansas. The recycling of portland cement concrete pavements (PCCP) can help alleviate any material disposal problems during construction, especially in urban areas and reduce the consumption or importation of virgin aggregate into aggregate poor areas. Two test sections using the coarser fraction from the original crushed portland cement concrete pavement were placed on K-7 in 1985. One section incorporated a recycled base and standard PCCP construction, another section was designed as a recycled base and recycled PCCP. Two other sections were control sections constructed with regular aggregate.

  5. Airport Surface Movement Technologies: Atlanta Demonstrations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted in August 1997 at the Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) International Airport as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. This research was aimed at investigating technology to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft movements on the surface during the operational phases of roll-out, turnoff, and taxi in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. The system tested at ATL was composed of airborne and ground-based components that were integrated to provide both the flight crew and controllers with supplemental information to enable safe, expedient surface operations. Experimental displays were installed on a Boeing 757-200 research aircraft in both headup and head-down formats. On the ground, an integrated system maintained surveillance of the airport surface and a controller interface provided routing and control instructions. While at ATL, the research aircraft performed a series of flight and taxi operations to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. The concept was demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the LVLASO system and ATL test activities.

  6. Assessing the potential for restoration of surface permeability for permeable pavements through maintenance.

    PubMed

    Drake, Jennifer; Bradford, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Permeable pavements (PPs) have been in use as stormwater management systems in Canada and the United States for over 20 years. After years of exposure to sediment and debris build-up, surface clogging reduces the infiltration of stormwater and inhibits the hydraulic and environmental functions of the pavement. Removal of surface material has been shown to restore infiltration but the majority of studies have been limited to small-scale testing. This paper presents the results of small- and full-sized equipment testing aimed at restoring surface permeability, including the first testing of regenerative-air and vacuum-sweeping streetsweepers in Ontario. Maintenance achieved partial restoration of PP surface permeability. Post-treatment surface infiltration rates displayed large spatial variability, highlighting that localized conditions throughout the pavement have a confounding influence on the overall effectiveness of maintenance. The impact of maintenance may be improved by establishing regular cleaning intervals and developing instructional guidelines for pavement owners and equipment operators.

  7. Evaluation and verification of two systems for mechanistic structural design of asphalt concrete pavements in Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneddon, R. V.

    1982-07-01

    The VESY-3-A mechanistic design system for asphalt pavements was field verified for three pavement sections at two test sites in Nebraska. PSI predictions from VESYS were in good agreement with field measurements for a 20 year old 3 layer pavement located near Elmwood, Nebraska. Field measured PSI values for an 8 in. full depth pavement also agreed with VESYS predictions for the study period. Rut depth estimates from the model were small and were in general agreement with field measurements. Cracking estimates were poor and tended to underestimate the time required to develop observable fatigue cracking in the field. Asphalt, base course and subgrade materials were tested in a 4.0 in. diameter modified triaxial cell. Test procedures used dynamic conditioning and rest periods to simulate service conditions.

  8. Performance of concrete pavements containing recycled concrete aggregate. Interim report, October 1993-October 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.J.; Cuttell, G.D.; Vandenbossche, J.M.; Yu, H.T.; Smith, K.D.

    1997-03-01

    This interim report documents the field performance of nine concrete pavement projects that incorporate recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) in the construction of the pavement. Multiple sections were evaluated on many of the nine projects, due to perceived differences in performance levels or variations in pavement design (such as the use of virgin aggregate or the inclusion of dowel bars). All told, a total of 17 sections (of which 12 contain RCA) were subjected to an extensive field testing program, consisting of pavement condition surveys, drainage surveys, falling weight deflectometer (FWD) testing, coring, and serviceability assessments. A minimum of eight cores were retrieved from each section for laboratory evaluation of compressive strength, split tensile strength, dynamic elastic modulus, static elastic modulus, and thermal coefficient of expansion, as well as for volumetric surface testing and petrographic analyses.

  9. Supersonics--Airport Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2007-01-01

    At this, the first year-end meeting of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, an overview of the Airport Noise discipline of the Supersonics Project leads the presentation of technical plans and achievements in this area of the Project. The overview starts by defining the Technical Challenges targeted by Airport Noise efforts, and the Approaches planned to meet these challenges. These are fleshed out in Elements, namely Prediction, Diagnostics, and Engineering, and broken down into Tasks. The Tasks level is where individual researchers' work is defined and from whence the technical presentations to follow this presentation come. This overview also presents the Milestones accomplished to date and to be completed in the next year. Finally, the NASA Research Announcement cooperative agreement activities are covered and tied to the Tasks and Milestones.

  10. 14 CFR 221.52 - Airport to airport application, accessorial services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport to airport application, accessorial... Charges § 221.52 Airport to airport application, accessorial services. Tariffs shall specify whether or not the fares therein include services in addition to airport-to-airport transportation....

  11. 75 FR 39090 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... procedures to be used in applications for exemption under the Airport Privatization Pilot Program (62 FR... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Gwinnett County Airport Briscoe Field (LZU), Lawrenceville, Georgia. SUMMARY: The Federal...

  12. 75 FR 68018 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... procedures to be used in applications for exemption under Airport Privatization Pilot Program (62 FR 48693... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Airglades Airport (2IS), Clewiston, Florida. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)...

  13. Flexible pavement performance evaluation using deflection criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedner, R. J.

    1980-04-01

    Flexible pavement projects in Nebraska were monitored for dynamic deflections, roughness, and distress for six consecutive years. Present surface conditions were characterized and data for evaluating rehabilitation needs, including amount of overlay, were provided. Data were evaluated and factors were isolated for determining the structural adequacy of flexible pavements, evaluating existing pavement strength and soil subgrade conditions, and determining overlay thickness requirements. Terms for evaluating structural condition for pavement sufficiently ratings were developed and existing soil support value and subgrade strength province maps were evaluated.

  14. Influence of mixture composition on the noise and frictional characteristics of flexible pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Karol J.

    Both traffic noise and wet pavement-tire friction are mainly affected by the tire/pavement interaction. Existing laboratory test methods allow for evaluation of polishing resistance of the aggregates only. Currently, there is no generally accepted standardized laboratory test method to address noise related issues and the overall frictional properties of pavements (including macrotexture). In this research, which included both laboratory and field components, friction and noise properties of the flexible (asphalt) pavements were investigated. As a part of this study, a laboratory device to polish asphalt specimens was developed and the procedure to evaluate mixture frictional properties was proposed. Following this procedure, forty-six different Superpave mixtures (each utilizing a different aggregate blends), one stone matrix asphalt (SMA) mixture and one porous friction course (PFC) mixture were tested. Six of the above mixes (four Superpave mixtures, SMA mixture and PFC mixture) were selected for laboratory noise testing. This testing was performed using a one-of-a-kind tester called the Tire/Pavement Test Apparatus (TPTA). In addition, the field sections constructed using Superpave, SMA and PFC mixtures were also periodically tested for friction and noise. Field measurements included testing of total of 23 different asphalt and two concrete pavements. The field friction testing was performed using both portable CTM and DFT devices and the (ASTM E 274) locked wheel friction trailer. The laboratory friction testing was performed using CTM and DFT devices only. The results of both field and laboratory friction measurements were used to develop an International Friction Index (IFI)-based frictional requirement for laboratory friction measurements. The results collected in the course of the study indicate that the IFI-based flag values could be successfully used in place of SN-based flag values to characterize frictional characteristics of pavements.

  15. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability.

  16. Predicting physical clogging of porous and permeable pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, C. F.; McCarthy, D. T.; Deletic, A.

    2013-02-01

    SummaryPorous pavements are easily retrofitted, and effective in improving water quality and hydrology, but prone to clogging. Despite being a major determinant in the lifespan of porous pavements, there is limited information on the physical clogging processes through these systems. The aim of this study was to understand the main physical processes that govern physical clogging and develop a simple black-box model that predicts physical clogging. The key variables that were hypothesised to influence clogging were pavement design and climate characteristics. Two compressed time scale laboratory experiments were conducted over 3 years on three common porous pavement types; monolithic porous asphalt, modular Hydrapave and monolithic Permapave. Pavement design was found to be an important role in clogging. Permapave did not clog even after 26 years of operation in simulated sub-tropical Brisbane (Australia) climate while porous asphalt and Hydrapave clogged after just 12 years, from surface clogging and geotextile clogging, respectively. Each system was tested using two different dosing patterns: (1) continual wetting with no dry periods and (2) variable inflow rates with drying periods (i.e. representing more natural conditions). The latter dosing method approximately doubled the lifespan of all systems suggesting the influence of climate conditions on clogging. Clogging was found to be highly correlated with cumulative volume and flow rate. A simple black-box regression model that predicts physical clogging was developed as a function of cumulative volume and Brisbane climatic conditions. However it is very likely that the shape of this regression is general, and that it could be calibrated for different climates in the future.

  17. PHYSIOLOGICAL INFORMATION FOR PAVEMENT HEALTH MONITORING BASED ON SURFACE RIDE QUALITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyama, Kazuya; Kawamura, Akira; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Ishida, Tateki

    Pavement ride quality testing has traditionally been based on subjective questionnaire ratings. The questionnaire survey has ability to directly measure the sense of road users' ride quality. However, it is difficult to quantify the evaluation results based on the questionnaire due to its lack of objectivity. This study examines pavement health monitoring method using physiological information such as heart rate variability (HRV) for detecting mental stress of road users toward pavement ride quality. First, a results of a driving simulator experiment shows that potential mental stress caused by road roughness can be observed in high-frequency oscillations in 0.15-0.4Hz of HRV processed by continuous wavelet transform. Then, the high-frequency oscillations of HRV is summarized as an index related to the mental stress that makes objective ride quality evaluation possible. Finally, this study indicates that the index contributes to improve the accuracy of pavement health monitoring based on surface ride quality.

  18. Insects, vegetation, and the control of laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) at Kennedy International Airport, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckley, P.A.; McCarthy, M.

    1994-01-01

    1. In response to a purported 'bird-strike problem' at J.F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City, we examined short (5 cm) and long (45 cm) grass heights as gull deterrents, in a randomized-block experiment. 2. Vegetative cover, numbers of adult insects and of larval beetles (suspected on-airport food of the gulls) were sampled in the six-block, 36-plot study area, as well as gut contents of adult and downy young gulls in the immediately adjacent colony in the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge. 3. We found that (i) Oriental beetle larvae were the most numerous and concentrated in one experimental block; (ii) beetle larvae numbers were uncorrelated with grass height; (iii) adult beetles were also uncorrelated with grass height; (iv) laughing gulls were distributed across blocks irrespective of percentage cover; (v) within blocks, laughing gulls were selecting short grass and avoiding long grass plots; (vi) laughing gull numbers were positively associated with numbers of Oriental beetle larvae; (vii) adult laughing gulls on the airport were eating lower-nutrition food of terrestrial origin (74-83% adult beetles, mostly Oriental plus green June and ground beetles); (viii) on the other hand, gull chicks in the adjacent breeding colony were being fed more easily digested, higher-protein food of marine origin (86-88% fishes, crustacea and molluscs); (ix) laughing gulls on the airport were taking their adult beetles only in short-grass plots, ignoring large numbers in adjacent long grass; (x) during the summer, on-airport gulls shifted from performing largely maintenance activities on pavement to feeding actively for beetles on newly mown short grass, the change coinciding with adult beetle emergence; (xi) standing water on the airport attracted significantly more gulls than dry areas all summer long. 4. We recommend a series of ecologically compatible, but aggressive habitat management actions for controlling laughing gulls on Kennedy Airport by rendering the airport

  19. Field validation of road roughness evaluation using in-pavement strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Deng, F.; Huang, Y.; Bridgelall, R.

    2016-04-01

    Most transportation agencies now collect pavement roughness data using the inertial profilers, which requires instrumented vehicles and technicians with specialized training to interpret the results. The extensive labor requirements of the profiling activities limit data collection for portions of the national highway system to at most once per year, resulting in outdated roughness data for decision making of maintenance needs. In this paper, a real-time roughness evaluation method was developed by linking the output of durable in-pavement strain sensors to road roughness level. The durable in-pavement sensors will continuously provide information of road roughness in real time after they are installed and calibrated during the road construction until the service life of the associated pavement. Field tests validated the developed strain method by comparison with standard inertial profiling method and the connected-vehicle method. The comparison of the results from the field tests approves the effectiveness of the developed road roughness evaluation method using in-pavement strain sensors, which can be further applied practically for needed concrete pavements.

  20. Airport Pricing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pels, Eric; Verhoef, Erik T.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional economic wisdom suggests that congestion pricing would be an appropriate response to cope with the growing congestion levels currently experienced at many airports. Several characteristics of aviation markets, however, may make naive congestion prices equal to the value of marginal travel delays a non-optimal response. This paper has developed a model of airport pricing that captures a number of these features. The model in particular reflects that airlines typically have market power and are engaged in oligopolistic competition at different sub-markets; that part of external travel delays that aircraft impose are internal to an operator and hence should not be accounted for in congestion tolls. We presented an analytical treatment for a simple bi-nodal symmetric network, which through the use of 'hyper-networks' would be readily applicable to dynamic problems (in discrete time) such as peak - off-peak differences, and some numerical exercises for the same symmetric network, which was only designed to illustrate the possible comparative static impacts of tolling, in addition to marginal equilibrium conditions as could be derived for the general model specification. Some main conclusions are that second-best optimal tolls are typically lower than what would be suggested by congestion costs alone and may even be negative, and that the toll as derived by Brueckner (2002) may not lead to an increase in total welfare. While Brueckner (2002) has made clear that congestion tolls on airports may be smaller than expected when congestion costs among aircraft are internal for a firm, our analysis adds to this that a further downward adjustment may be in order due to market power. The presence of market power (which causes prices to exceed marginal costs) may cause the pure congestion toll to be suboptimal, because the resulting decrease in demand is too high (the pure congestion tall does not take into account the decrease in consumer surplus). The various

  1. Pervious Pavement System Evaluation-Paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of a pervious pavement can be effective as a low impact development stormwater control. The Urban Watershed Management Branch is evaluating interlocking concrete paver systems as a type of porous pavement. Although the pavers are impermeable, the spaces between the pave...

  2. Analysis and design optimization of flexible pavement

    SciTech Connect

    Mamlouk, M.S.; Zaniewski, J.P.; He, W.

    2000-04-01

    A project-level optimization approach was developed to minimize total pavement cost within an analysis period. Using this approach, the designer is able to select the optimum initial pavement thickness, overlay thickness, and overlay timing. The model in this approach is capable of predicting both pavement performance and condition in terms of roughness, fatigue cracking, and rutting. The developed model combines the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) design procedure and the mechanistic multilayer elastic solution. The Optimization for Pavement Analysis (OPA) computer program was developed using the prescribed approach. The OPA program incorporates the AASHTO equations, the multilayer elastic system ELSYM5 model, and the nonlinear dynamic programming optimization technique. The program is PC-based and can run in either a Windows 3.1 or a Windows 95 environment. Using the OPA program, a typical pavement section was analyzed under different traffic volumes and material properties. The optimum design strategy that produces the minimum total pavement cost in each case was determined. The initial construction cost, overlay cost, highway user cost, and total pavement cost were also calculated. The methodology developed during this research should lead to more cost-effective pavements for agencies adopting the recommended analysis methods.

  3. 75 FR 54946 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... assurances if the airport sponsor meets certain standards for control of airport operations and development; self- sustaining and nondiscriminatory airport rates; and compatible land use. At present, there are 75... and powers necessary to control and operate the airport; to maintain the airport in a safe...

  4. 77 FR 4394 - Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL AGENCY... provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties 12.4 acres at the Orlando Executive Airport... restrictions of a Quitclaim Deed agreement, dated August 9, 1961, between the subject airport and the...

  5. 19 CFR 122.84 - Intermediate airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermediate airport. 122.84 Section 122.84... Intermediate airport. (a) Application. The provisions of this section apply at any U.S. airport to which an... aircraft arrives at the next airport, the aircraft commander or agent shall make entry by filing the:...

  6. 49 CFR 27.71 - Airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Access Act rules (49 CFR part 382) for carriers. (g) If an airport operator who receives Federal... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport facilities. 27.71 Section 27.71... Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.71 Airport facilities. (a) This section...

  7. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  8. Predicting pavement distress in oil field areas

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Scullion, T.; Stampley, B.E.

    1984-05-01

    A study on oil field traffic characteristics was performed and a procedure was developed for assessing current and future effects of oil field truck traffic on surface-treated (stage construction type) pavements. A computer program calculates several types of pavement distress and serviceability parameters to evaluate pavement performance under various axle load repetitions. Stepwise regression analysis of 132 surface-treated pavement sections led to the development of individual distress equations for rutting, raveling, flushing, alligator cracking, patching, longitudinal and transverse cracking, and failures (potholes). The versatility of the program provides a means of anticipating early pavement failures due to increased axle load repetitions. The program also provides the basic framework for computing the effects of other ''special-use'' truck traffic demands.

  9. Predicting pavement distress in oil field areas

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Scullion, T.; Stampley, B.E.

    1983-05-01

    A study on oil field traffic characteristics was performed and a procedure was developed for assessing current and future effects of oil field truck traffic on surface-treated (stage construction type) pavements. A computer program calculates several types of pavement distress and serviceability parameters to evaluate pavement performance under various axle load repetitions. Stepwise regression analysis of 132 surface-treated pavement sections led to the development of individual distress equations for rutting, raveling, flushing, alligator cracking, patching, longitudinal and transverse cracking, and failures (potholes). The versatility of the program provides a means of anticipating early pavement failures due to increased axle load repetitions. The program also provides the basic framework for computing the effects of other ''special-use'' truck traffic demands.

  10. Improving rutting resistance of pavement structures using geosynthetics: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mirzapour Mounes, Sina; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Khodaii, Ali; Almasi, Mohammad Hadi

    2014-01-01

    A pavement structure consists of several layers for the primary purpose of transmitting and distributing traffic loads to the subgrade. Rutting is one form of pavement distresses that may influence the performance of road pavements. Geosynthetics is one type of synthetic materials utilized for improving the performance of pavements against rutting. Various studies have been conducted on using different geosynthetic materials in pavement structures by different researchers. One of the practices is a reinforcing material in asphalt pavements. This paper intends to present and discuss the discoveries from some of the studies on utilizing geosynthetics in flexible pavements as reinforcement against permanent deformation (rutting). PMID:24526919

  11. Improving rutting resistance of pavement structures using geosynthetics: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mirzapour Mounes, Sina; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Khodaii, Ali; Almasi, Mohammad Hadi

    2014-01-01

    A pavement structure consists of several layers for the primary purpose of transmitting and distributing traffic loads to the subgrade. Rutting is one form of pavement distresses that may influence the performance of road pavements. Geosynthetics is one type of synthetic materials utilized for improving the performance of pavements against rutting. Various studies have been conducted on using different geosynthetic materials in pavement structures by different researchers. One of the practices is a reinforcing material in asphalt pavements. This paper intends to present and discuss the discoveries from some of the studies on utilizing geosynthetics in flexible pavements as reinforcement against permanent deformation (rutting).

  12. Improving Rutting Resistance of Pavement Structures Using Geosynthetics: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Khodaii, Ali; Almasi, Mohammad Hadi

    2014-01-01

    A pavement structure consists of several layers for the primary purpose of transmitting and distributing traffic loads to the subgrade. Rutting is one form of pavement distresses that may influence the performance of road pavements. Geosynthetics is one type of synthetic materials utilized for improving the performance of pavements against rutting. Various studies have been conducted on using different geosynthetic materials in pavement structures by different researchers. One of the practices is a reinforcing material in asphalt pavements. This paper intends to present and discuss the discoveries from some of the studies on utilizing geosynthetics in flexible pavements as reinforcement against permanent deformation (rutting). PMID:24526919

  13. Statistical classification of road pavements using near field vehicle rolling noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joel Preto; Coelho, J L Bento; Figueiredo, Mário A T

    2010-10-01

    Low noise surfaces have been increasingly considered as a viable and cost-effective alternative to acoustical barriers. However, road planners and administrators frequently lack information on the correlation between the type of road surface and the resulting noise emission profile. To address this problem, a method to identify and classify different types of road pavements was developed, whereby near field road noise is analyzed using statistical learning methods. The vehicle rolling sound signal near the tires and close to the road surface was acquired by two microphones in a special arrangement which implements the Close-Proximity method. A set of features, characterizing the properties of the road pavement, was extracted from the corresponding sound profiles. A feature selection method was used to automatically select those that are most relevant in predicting the type of pavement, while reducing the computational cost. A set of different types of road pavement segments were tested and the performance of the classifier was evaluated. Results of pavement classification performed during a road journey are presented on a map, together with geographical data. This procedure leads to a considerable improvement in the quality of road pavement noise data, thereby increasing the accuracy of road traffic noise prediction models.

  14. Monitoring Wake Vortices for More Efficient Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Wake vortices are generated by all aircraft during flight. The larger the aircraft, the stronger the wake, so the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) separates aircraft to ensure wake turbulence has no effect on approaching aircraft. Currently, though, the time between planes is often larger than it needs to be for the wake to dissipate. This unnecessary gap translates into arrival and departure delays, but since the wakes are invisible, the delays are nearly inevitable. If, however, the separation between aircraft can be reduced safely, then airport capacity can be increased without the high cost of additional runways. Scientists are currently studying these patterns to identify and introduce new procedures and technologies that safely increase airport capacity. NASA, always on the cutting edge of aerospace research, has been contributing knowledge and testing to these endeavors.

  15. Effects of temperature and water on pavement performance

    SciTech Connect

    Badu-Tweneboah, K.; Tia, M.; Ruth, B.E.; Richardson, J.M.; Armaghani, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The 12 papers in the report deal with the following areas: procedures for estimation of asphalt-concrete pavement moduli at in-situ temperatures; stress caused by temperature gradient in portland-cement concrete pavements; characterizing temperature effects for pavement analysis and design; temperature response of concrete pavements; an examination of environmental versus load effects on pavements; moisture in portland-cement concrete; effect of rainfall on the performance of continuously reinforced concrete pavements in Texas; effect of moisture on the structural performance of a crushed-limestone road base; water-induced distress in flexible pavement in a wet tropical climate; an evaluation of design high-water clearances for pavements; economic impact of pavement subsurface drainage; use of open-graded, free-draining layers in pavement systems; a national synthesis report.

  16. Auctioning Airport Slots?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruyer, Nicolas; Lenoir, Nathalie

    2003-01-01

    The current allocation of slots on congested European airports constitutes an obstacle to the effective liberalisation of air transportation undertaken in Europe. With a view to favouring effluent slot utilisation and competition, as is the goal of the Euopean commission, we propose to use a market mechanism, based on temporary" utilisation licences. In order to allocate those licences, we propose and describe an iterated combinatorial auction mechanism where a percentage of licences would be reallocated each season. A secondary market would also be set up in order to reallocate slots during a season. Since a combinatorial auction involve a complex optimisation procedure, we describe how it can be made to work in the case of auctions.

  17. 76 FR 30822 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Naples Municipal Airport, Naples, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... Airports: Addition of Naples Municipal Airport, Naples, FL AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... user fee airports to reflect the recent user fee airport designation for Naples Municipal Airport, in Naples, Florida. User fee airports are those airports which, while not qualifying for designation...

  18. 75 FR 57106 - Public Notice for Sale of Airport Property at Houlton International Airport, Houlton, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Public Notice for Sale of Airport Property at Houlton International Airport, Houlton, ME AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Request for public... (.73 acres) of Airport property. The property was acquired from the United States Government...

  19. Effects of impervious pavements on reducing runoff in an arid urban catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epshtein, O.; Turnbull, L.; Earl, S.

    2011-12-01

    The progressive urbanization of US arid and semi-arid southwestern territories has transformed undeveloped aridlands into dynamic, radially expanding metropolitan centers. As these mature, infill development further reduces undeveloped area, inversely coupling surface imperviousness to infiltration rates, with a subsequent increase in runoff generation. Intensified runoff carries undesirable environmental consequences, magnifying urban flooding events and concentrations, transport, and propagation of contaminants. Pervious pavements offer one potential solution for decreased urban infiltration. At present, the application potential of pervious pavements as an effective urban infiltration management tool exceeds its exploitation. While entirely eliminating urban Total Impervious Area is not a feasible solution, pervious pavements significantly reduce Effective Impervious Area at costs competitive with traditional Best Management Practices. Previous research into pervious pavements has largely consisted of laboratory prototypes or small-scale field experiments, with a heavy bias towards parking lots. In this study we explore the effectiveness of pervious pavements in increasing infiltration, thus decreasing runoff volume during summer monsoonal and winter convective rainfall events in an 8 ha residential catchment in Scottsdale, Arizona. Analysis focuses on the interaction dynamics between surface area of pervious pavement application and its net effect on runoff response at the catchment level. Hydrological response was modeled using MAHLERAN (Model for Assessing Hillslope-Landscape Erosion, Runoff and Nutrients), a spatially explicit, event-based model, parameterized at a spatial resolution of 0.25 sq m. Data for model parameterization was obtained from analysis of aerial imagery and field-based monitoring of surface properties. The model was tested against measurements of flow at the catchment outlet for multiple rainfall events with total event rainfall ranging

  20. Airport surface operations requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, John L.; Vonbokern, Greg J.; Wray, Rick L.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Airport Surface Operations Requirements Analysis (ASORA) study. This study was conducted in response to task 24 of NASA Contract NAS1-18027. This study is part of NASA LaRC's Low Visibility Surface Operations program, which is designed to eliminate the constraints on all-weather arrival/departure operations due to the airport/aircraft ground system. The goal of this program is to provide the capability for safe and efficient aircraft operations on the airport surface during low visibility conditions down to zero. The ASORA study objectives were to (1) develop requirements for operation on the airport surface in visibilities down to zero; (2) survey and evaluate likely technologies; (3) develop candidate concepts to meet the requirements; and (4) select the most suitable concept based on cost/benefit factors.

  1. An application of smart dust for pavement condition monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferzli, Nadim A.; Ivey, Richard A.; King, Timothy; Sandburg, Colby J.; Pei, Jin-Song; Zaman, Musharraf M.; Refai, Hazem H.; Lin, Hung, Jr.; Landrum, Aaron; Victor, Rory

    2006-03-01

    Pavement maintenance is vital for travel safety; detecting road weather conditions using a wireless sensing network poses many challenges due to the harsh environment. This paper presents some preliminary results of an ongoing effort of applying "Smart Dust" sensor network for monitoring pavement temperature and moisture condition to detect icy road condition. Careful considerations yield effective solutions to various hardware and software development issues including the selection of sensors and antenna, design of casing, interfacing motes with alien sensors and programming of motes. A series of experiments is carried out to study traffic interference to packet delivery performance of a small-scale sensor network in a pseudo-field environment. In addition, several overnight tests are conducted to study the performance of motes operated under a power efficient condition. The results are analyzed and challenges are identified in this smart sensing application. The aforementioned research activities would benefit robust real-world implementations of off-the-shelf sensor network products.

  2. Oxygen demand of aircraft and airfield pavement deicers and alternative freezing point depressants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, Steven R.; Mericas, Dean; Bowman, George

    2012-01-01

    Aircraft and pavement deicing formulations and other potential freezing point depressants were tested for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Propylene glycol-based aircraft deicers exhibited greater BOD5 than ethylene glycol-based aircraft deicers, and ethylene glycol-based products had lower degradation rates than propylene glycol-based products. Sodium formate pavement deicers had lower COD than acetate-based pavement deicers. The BOD and COD results for acetate-based pavement deicers (PDMs) were consistently lower than those for aircraft deicers, but degradation rates were greater in the acetate-based PDM than in aircraft deicers. In a 40-day testing of aircraft and pavement deicers, BOD results at 20°C (standard) were consistently greater than the results from 5°C (low) tests. The degree of difference between standard and low temperature BOD results varied among tested products. Freshwater BOD test results were not substantially different from marine water tests at 20°C, but glycols degraded slower in marine water than in fresh water for low temperature tests. Acetate-based products had greater percentage degradation than glycols at both temperatures. An additive component of the sodium formate pavement deicer exhibited toxicity to the microorganisms, so BOD testing did not work properly for this formulation. BOD testing of alternative freezing point depressants worked well for some, there was little response for some, and for others there was a lag in response while microorganisms acclimated to the freezing point depressant as a food source. Where the traditional BOD5 test performed adequately, values ranged from 251 to 1,580 g/kg. Where the modified test performed adequately, values of BOD28 ranged from 242 to 1,540 g/kg.

  3. GPR in Nondestructive Quality Assurance of New Asphalt Pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poikajärvi, J.; Peisa, K.; Narbro, A.

    2012-04-01

    Mara Nord is an international cooperation project financed by Interreg IVA Nord funding program with partners from Finland, Sweden and Norway. One of the objectives in Mara Nord project has been to research the quality assurance of new asphalt pavement. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey is used as an alternative method for coring in quality assurance. There exist numerous advantages for the use of GPR. For example, the fluent measuring arrangements without closing the traffic on the road and the extensive continuous profile that can be constructed from the measuring data. Within the framework of Mara Nord Project field tests were organized in Seinäjoki region in Finland on August 2011. The tests were done by four consulting companies from Finland and Rovaniemi University of Applied Sciences. The aim of these tests was to compare the measured dielectric value profiles and the calculated void content profiles of the equipment. The tested equipment was GSSI manufactured SIR-20 and 1 GHz horn antennas. Void content values were calculated using the model presented by Mr. Roimela (1997). All core samples were taken from the right wheel path. The same reference core samples were used when analyzing the data of each GPR equipment. Some samples were taken right after the pavement work was completed with the rest three weeks after during the test measurements. The tests indicated that GPRs have very good repeatability in measuring dielectric changes on top surface layers of asphalt pavements. Furthermore, different GPRs locate the same detectable longitudinal dielectric changes with high accuracy. Some differences were found in the dielectric value levels, yet reproducibility of the calculated void content values was quite good. The test data was also used to evaluate the reliability of the regression model between the dielectric values measured through GPR and the void content of the pavement determined from reference cores. Test data indicated that accurate regression

  4. Airport Surface Network Architecture Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thanh C.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Bretmersky, Steven C.; Lawas-Grodek, Fran; Ellis, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, airport surface communications are fragmented across multiple types of systems. These communication systems for airport operations at most airports today are based dedicated and separate architectures that cannot support system-wide interoperability and information sharing. The requirements placed upon the Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) systems in airports are rapidly growing and integration is urgently needed if the future vision of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) 2025 concept are to be realized. To address this and other problems such as airport surface congestion, the Space Based Technologies Project s Surface ICNS Network Architecture team at NASA Glenn Research Center has assessed airport surface communications requirements, analyzed existing and future surface applications, and defined a set of architecture functions that will help design a scalable, reliable and flexible surface network architecture to meet the current and future needs of airport operations. This paper describes the systems approach or methodology to networking that was employed to assess airport surface communications requirements, analyze applications, and to define the surface network architecture functions as the building blocks or components of the network. The systems approach used for defining these functions is relatively new to networking. It is viewing the surface network, along with its environment (everything that the surface network interacts with or impacts), as a system. Associated with this system are sets of services that are offered by the network to the rest of the system. Therefore, the surface network is considered as part of the larger system (such as the NAS), with interactions and dependencies between the surface network and its users, applications, and devices. The surface network architecture includes components such as addressing/routing, network management, network

  5. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Leidichj, Christopher; Papasin, Richard; Tran, Peter B.; Bass, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Networks of video cameras, meteorological sensors, and ancillary electronic equipment are under development in collaboration among NASA Ames Research Center, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These networks are to be established at and near airports to provide real-time information on local weather conditions that affect aircraft approaches and landings. The prototype network is an airport-approach-zone camera system (AAZCS), which has been deployed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and San Carlos Airport (SQL). The AAZCS includes remotely controlled color video cameras located on top of SFO and SQL air-traffic control towers. The cameras are controlled by the NOAA Center Weather Service Unit located at the Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center and are accessible via a secure Web site. The AAZCS cameras can be zoomed and can be panned and tilted to cover a field of view 220 wide. The NOAA observer can see the sky condition as it is changing, thereby making possible a real-time evaluation of the conditions along the approach zones of SFO and SQL. The next-generation network, denoted a remote tower sensor system (RTSS), will soon be deployed at the Half Moon Bay Airport and a version of it will eventually be deployed at Los Angeles International Airport. In addition to remote control of video cameras via secure Web links, the RTSS offers realtime weather observations, remote sensing, portability, and a capability for deployment at remote and uninhabited sites. The RTSS can be used at airports that lack control towers, as well as at major airport hubs, to provide synthetic augmentation of vision for both local and remote operations under what would otherwise be conditions of low or even zero visibility.

  6. Progress on the Development of Future Airport Surface Wireless Communications Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Budinger, James M.; Brooks, David E.; Franklin, Morgan; DeHart, Steve; Dimond, Robert P.; Borden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Continuing advances in airport surface management and improvements in airport surface safety are required to enable future growth in air traffic throughout the airspace, as airport arrival and departure delays create a major system bottleneck. These airport management and safety advances will be built upon improved communications, navigation, surveillance, and weather sensing, creating an information environment supporting system automation. The efficient movement of the digital data generated from these systems requires an underlying communications network infrastructure to connect data sources with the intended users with the required quality of service. Current airport surface communications consists primarily of buried copper or fiber cable. Safety related communications with mobile airport surface assets occurs over 25 kHz VHF voice and data channels. The available VHF spectrum, already congested in many areas, will be insufficient to support future data traffic requirements. Therefore, a broadband wireless airport surface communications network is considered a requirement for the future airport component of the air transportation system. Progress has been made on defining the technology and frequency spectrum for the airport surface wireless communications network. The development of a test and demonstration facility and the definition of required testing and standards development are now underway. This paper will review the progress and planned future work.

  7. Pavement friction measurements on nontangent sections of roadways, vol. 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, R. A.; Tonda, R. D.

    1983-10-01

    A practical measurement technique for measuring wet-pavement friction for road sections other than the straight, level portions currently measured was developed. Measurements on nontangent sections can be conducted with an ASTM E-274 skid trailer when it accurately measures both the dynamic longitudinal and vertical forces on the test wheel during locked-wheel tests. The limit of performance of an E-274 system is approximately + or - 0.35 g lateral acceleration in the horizontal plane of the test trailer. Nontangent tests should not be attempted unless dynamic vertical forces are determined either by a load cell or translated from accelerations acting on the trailer.

  8. Assessment of highway pavements using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, Christina; Loizos, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Highway infrastructure is a prerequisite for a functioning economy and social life. Highways, often prone to congestion and disruption, are one of the aspects of a modern transport network that require maximum efficiency if an integrated transport network, and sustainable mobility, is to be achieved. Assessing the condition of highway structures, to plan subsequent maintenance, is essential to allow the long-term functioning of a road network. Optimizing the methods used for such assessment will lead to better information being obtained about the road and underlying ground conditions. The condition of highway structures will be affected by a number of factors, including the properties of the highway pavement, the supporting sub-base and the subgrade (natural ground), and the ability to obtain good information about the entire road structure, from pavement to subgrade, allows appropriate maintenance programs to be planned. The maintenance of highway pavements causes considerable cost and in many cases obstruction to traffic flow. In this situation, methods that provide information on the present condition of pavement structure non-destructively and economically are of great interest. It has been shown that Ground-Penetrating-Radar (GPR), which is a Non Destructive Technique (NDT), can deliver information that is useful for the planning of pavement maintenance activities. More specifically GPR is used by pavement engineers in order to determine physical properties and characteristics of the pavement structure, information that is valuable for the assessment of pavement condition. This work gives an overview on the practical application of GPR using examples from highway asphalt pavements monitoring. The presented individual applications of GPR pavement diagnostics concern structure homogeneity, thickness of pavement layers, dielectric properties of asphalt materials etc. It is worthwhile mentioning that a number of applications are standard procedures, either

  9. Recycling asphalt pavements. January 1975-January 1990 (a Bibliography from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for January 1975-January 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt-containing pavement materials. Articles include examples of recycling asphalt pavements; performance testing of recycled paving; methods including cold in-place, cold off-site, and hot-mix recycling; additives in recycled pavement for better performance; use of scrap roofing asphalt in conjunction with recycled paving; economics of recycling; process design; and process variables. Recycling of other materials is considered in related bibliographies. (Contains 130 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  10. Airport Noise Tech Challenge Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, operating under NASA Aeronautics Mission Directorate#s Fundamental Aero Program, has been organized around the Technical Challenges that have historically precluded commercial supersonic flight. One of these Challenges is making aircraft that are capable of such high aerodynamic performance quiet enough around airports that they will not be objectionable. It is recognized that a successful civilian supersonic aircraft will be a system where many new technologies will come together, and for this to happen not only will new low noise propulsion concepts be required, but new engineering tools that predict the noise of the aircraft as these technologies are combined and compromised with the rest of the aircraft design. These are the two main objectives of the Airport Noise Tech Challenge. " ! As a Project in the Fundamental Aero Program, we work at a relatively low level of technology readiness. However, we have high level milestones which force us to integrate our efforts to impact systems-level activities. To keep the low-level work tied to delivering engineering tools and low-noise concepts, we have structured our milestones around development of the concepts and organized our activities around developing and applying our engineering tools to these concepts. The final deliverables in these milestones are noise prediction modules validated against the best embodiment of each concept. These will then be used in cross-disciplinary exercises to demonstrate the viability of aircraft designs to meet all the Technical Challenges. Some of the concepts being developed are shown: Fan Flow Diverters, Multi-jet Shielding, High-Aspect Ratio Embedded Nozzles, Plasma Actuated Instability Manipulation, Highly Variable Cycle Mixer- Ejectors, and Inverted Velocity Profiles. These concepts are being developed for reduced jet noise along with the design tools which describe how they perform when used in various aircraft configurations. Several key upcoming

  11. Surface runoff from full-scale coal combustion product pavements during accelerated loading

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.M.; Taerakul, P.; Tu, W.; Zand, B.; Butalia, T.; Wolfe, W.; Walker, H.

    2008-08-15

    In this study, the release of metals and metalloids from full-scale portland cement concrete pavements containing coal combustion products (CCPs) was evaluated by laboratory leaching tests and accelerated loading of full-scale pavement sections under well-controlled conditions. An equivalent of 20 years of highway traffic loading was simulated at the OSU/OU Accelerated Pavement Load Facility (APLF). Three types of portland cement concrete driving surface layers were tested, including a control section (i.e., ordinary portland cement (PC) concrete) containing no fly ash and two sections in which fly ash was substituted for a fraction of the cement; i.e., 30% fly ash (FA30) and 50% fly ash (FA50). In general, the concentrations of minor and trace elements were higher in the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachates than in the leachates obtained from synthetic precipitation leaching procedure and ASTM leaching procedures. Importantly, none of the leachate concentrations exceeded the TCLP limits or primary drinking water standards. Surface runoff monitoring results showed the highest release rates of inorganic elements from the FA50 concrete pavement, whereas there were little differences in release rates between PC and FA30 concretes. The release of elements generally decreased with increasing pavement loading. Except for Cr, elements were released as particulates (>0.45 {mu} m) rather than dissolved constituents. The incorporation of fly ash in the PC cement concrete pavements examined in this study resulted in little or no deleterious environmental impact from the leaching of inorganic elements over the lifetime of the pavement system.

  12. Cosmogenic {sup 3}He surface-exposure dating of stone pavements. Implications for landscape evolution in deserts

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.; McFadden, L.D.; Poths, J.; Olinger, C.T.

    1995-07-01

    The formation of stone pavements, a ubiquitous gravel armor mantling landforms in arid regions of the world, has been previously attributed to erosion by wind and water or alternating shrinking and swelling of soil horizons, implying that gravel is concentrated at the land surface in a time-transgressive manner. A newly proposed model for pavement evolution differs from these models in that pavement clasts are continuously maintained at the land surface in response to deposition and pedogenic modification of windblown dust. In-situ cosmogenic {sup 3}He surface-exposure ages on volcanic and alluvial landforms in the Mojave Desert of California are used to understand pavement evolution over geologic time scales and to test this new model. These exposure ages are stratigraphically consistent, show internal consistency at each site, and, for stone pavements adjacent to pristine, continuously exposed volcanic bedrock, are indistinguishable at the 1{sigma} level. We conclude that stone pavements are born at the surface and that pavements may provide one of the longest-term records of geologic, hydrologic, and climatic processes operating on desert surfaces. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Guidelines and specifications for the use of reclaimed aggregates in pavement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chini, S.A.; Kuo, S.S.; Duxbury, J.P.; Monteiro, F.M.B.R.; Mbwambo, W.J.

    1998-08-01

    The project focused on evaluating the performance of recycled concrete for use as a base material under hot mix asphalt pavements and as an aggregate in Portland cement concrete pavements. In order to meet this objective, several goals were established. First, published literature on RCA was reviewed and a survey of State Highway Agencies (SHA) was performed to determine the extent of use of RCA in highway projects. Second, the RCA was tested at the FDOT Material Lab in Gainesville, Florida, to determine the material properties. Third, by using the output from the falling weight deflectometer test along with the KENSLABS and KENLAYER computer programs (Huang, 1993), a theoretical analysis was performed to predict the number of repetitions before the pavements failed in both the fatigue and permanent deformation criteria. Lastly, nine design sections involving HMA and PCC pavements were constructed at the University of Central Florida`s Circular Accelerated Test Track (UCF-CATT) to evaluate the response of the pavement sections made with RCA under actual dual-wheel loading.

  14. Implementation and Validation of the Viscoelastic Continuum Damage Theory for Asphalt Mixture and Pavement Analysis in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Luis Alberto Herrmann do

    This dissertation presents the implementation and validation of the viscoelastic continuum damage (VECD) model for asphalt mixture and pavement analysis in Brazil. It proposes a simulated damage-to-fatigue cracked area transfer function for the layered viscoelastic continuum damage (LVECD) program framework and defines the model framework's fatigue cracking prediction error for asphalt pavement reliability-based design solutions in Brazil. The research is divided into three main steps: (i) implementation of the simplified viscoelastic continuum damage (S-VECD) model in Brazil (Petrobras) for asphalt mixture characterization, (ii) validation of the LVECD model approach for pavement analysis based on field performance observations, and defining a local simulated damage-to-cracked area transfer function for the Fundao Project's pavement test sections in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, and (iii) validation of the Fundao project local transfer function to be used throughout Brazil for asphalt pavement fatigue cracking predictions, based on field performance observations of the National MEPDG Project's pavement test sections, thereby validating the proposed framework's prediction capability. For the first step, the S-VECD test protocol, which uses controlled-on-specimen strain mode-of-loading, was successfully implemented at the Petrobras and used to characterize Brazilian asphalt mixtures that are composed of a wide range of asphalt binders. This research verified that the S-VECD model coupled with the GR failure criterion is accurate for fatigue life predictions of Brazilian asphalt mixtures, even when very different asphalt binders are used. Also, the applicability of the load amplitude sweep (LAS) test for the fatigue characterization of the asphalt binders was checked, and the effects of different asphalt binders on the fatigue damage properties of the asphalt mixtures was investigated. The LAS test results, modeled according to VECD theory, presented a strong correlation with

  15. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Vt.—Burlington International Airport Calexico, Calif.—Calexico International Airport Caribou, Maine—Caribou Municipal Airport Chicago, Ill.—Midway Airport Cleveland, Ohio—Cleveland Hopkins...

  16. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Vt.—Burlington International Airport Calexico, Calif.—Calexico International Airport Caribou, Maine—Caribou Municipal Airport Chicago, Ill.—Midway Airport Cleveland, Ohio—Cleveland Hopkins...

  17. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Vt.—Burlington International Airport Calexico, Calif.—Calexico International Airport Caribou, Maine—Caribou Municipal Airport Chicago, Ill.—Midway Airport Cleveland, Ohio—Cleveland Hopkins...

  18. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Vt.—Burlington International Airport Calexico, Calif.—Calexico International Airport Caribou, Maine—Caribou Municipal Airport Chicago, Ill.—Midway Airport Cleveland, Ohio—Cleveland Hopkins...

  19. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....—Detroit City Airport Detroit, Mich.—Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport Douglas, Ariz.—Bisbee-Douglas International Airport Duluth, Minn.—Duluth International Airport Duluth, Minn.—Sky Harbor...

  20. Effect of aircraft noise on the equilibrium of airport residents: Longitudinal study around Roissy, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francois, J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of airplane noise on the mental equilibrium of residents living near airports are discussed, and based on population sample surveys involving health questionnaires and self-administered personality tests. Progressive changes were observed on the part of residents living near a large airport.

  1. The Edison Environmental Center Permeable Pavement Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    This a presentation for a Community Outreach Event called "Chemistry Works and Celebration of International Year of Chemistry." It will review the permeable pavement research project at the Edison Environmental center.

  2. Pervious Pavement System Evaluation- Abstract 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Porous pavement is a low impact development stormwater control. The Urban Watershed Management Branch is evaluating interlocking concrete pavers as a popular implementation. The pavers themselves are impermeable, but the spaces between the pavers are backfilled with washed, gra...

  3. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  4. 77 FR 16891 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Tulsa International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... International Airport, Tulsa, OK AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Request... Agnew, Manager, Federal Aviation Administration, Southwest Region, Airports Division, AR/OK Airports..., Project Manager, Federal Aviation Administration, Southwest Region, Airports Division, AR/OK...

  5. Environmental interactions of Sulphlex pavement.

    PubMed

    Ferenbaugh, R W; Gladney, E S; Soholt, L F; Lyall, K A; Kimber Wallwork-Barber, M; Herman, L E

    1992-01-01

    Sulphlex, a mixture of elemental sulfur and plasticizers, has been considered for use as an asphalt substitute in road construction. Because this material contains substantial quantities of elemental sulfur, it is a potential substrate for growth of sulfur-oxidising bacteria. Experiments, performed to determine the susceptibility of Sulphlex in Sulphlex-containing media to degradation by Thiobacillus thiooxidans, resulted in breakdown of the Sulphlex material and concomitant production of acid. In concurrent studies, plants were grown in Sulphlex-amended soils. These plants exhibited higher sulfur content and reduced productivity as compared with plants grown in unamended soils, indicating that Sulphlex was being broken down in the soil and that the breakdown products were apparently having a detrimental effect on plant productivity. These experiments indicate that naturally occurring sulfur-oxidising bacteria have the potential to break down Sulphlex paving material, resulting in adverse effects on both the structural integrity of the pavement and the local environment. PMID:15091995

  6. 14 CFR 139.205 - Amendment of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amendment of Airport Certification Manual... CERTIFICATION OF AIRPORTS Airport Certification Manual § 139.205 Amendment of Airport Certification Manual. (a) Under § 139.3, the Regional Airports Division Manager may amend any Airport Certification...

  7. Investigation of mechanical properties of pavement through electromagnetic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, Andrea; Tosti, Fabio; D'Amico, Fabrizio

    2014-05-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is considered as one of the most flexible geophysical tools that can be effectively and efficiently used in many different applications. In the field of pavement engineering, GPR can cover a wide range of uses, spanning from physical to geometrical inspections of pavements. Traditionally, such inferred information are integrated with mechanical measurements from other traditional (e.g. plate bearing test) or non-destructive (e.g. falling weight deflectometer) techniques, thereby resulting, respectively, in time-consuming and low-significant measurements, or in a high use of technological resources. In this regard, the new challenge of retrieving mechanical properties of road pavements and materials from electromagnetic measurements could represent a further step towards a greater saving of economic resources. As far as concerns unpaved and bound layers it is well-known that strength and deformation properties are mostly affected, respectively, by inter-particle friction and cohesion of soil particles and aggregates, and by bitumen adhesion, whose variability is expressed by the Young modulus of elasticity. In that respect, by assuming a relationship between electromagnetic response (e.g. signal amplitudes) and bulk density of materials, a reasonable correlation between mechanical and electric properties of substructure is therefore expected. In such framework, a pulse GPR system with ground-coupled antennae, 600 MHz and 1600 MHz centre frequencies was used over a 4-m×30-m test site composed by a flexible pavement structure. The horizontal sampling resolution amounted to 2.4×10-2 m. A square regular grid mesh of 836 nodes with a 0.40-m spacing between the GPR acquisition tracks was surveyed. Accordingly, a light falling weight deflectometer (LFWD) was used for measuring the elastic modulus of pavement at each node. The setup of such instrument consisted of a 10-kg falling mass and a 100-mm loading plate so that the influence domain

  8. 78 FR 22024 - Request To Release Airport Property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL), Oakley, Kansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Request To Release Airport Property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL... proposes to rule and invites public comment on the release of land at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL... following address: Lynn D. Martin, Airports Compliance Specialist, Federal Aviation Administration,...

  9. 14 CFR 121.445 - Pilot in command airport qualification: Special areas and airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pilot in command airport qualification: Special areas and airports. 121.445 Section 121.445 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Qualifications § 121.445 Pilot in command airport qualification: Special areas and airports. (a)...

  10. 76 FR 74843 - Release of Airport Property, Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... advised that its release request is designed to clarify the airport property and to correct ambiguities in... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property, Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL AGENCY... properties, namely approximately 200 acres at the Martin County Airport, Stuart, FL, from the...

  11. 49 CFR 27.71 - Airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Access Act rules (49 CFR part 382) for carriers. (g) If an airport operator who receives Federal...). (c) The airport shall ensure that there is an accessible path between the gate and the area...

  12. Thermal stability analysis under embankment with asphalt pavement and cement pavement in permafrost regions.

    PubMed

    Junwei, Zhang; Jinping, Li; Xiaojuan, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The permafrost degradation is the fundamental cause generating embankment diseases and pavement diseases in permafrost region while the permafrost degradation is related with temperature. Based on the field monitoring results of ground temperature along G214 Highway in high temperature permafrost regions, both the ground temperatures in superficial layer and the annual average temperatures under the embankment were discussed, respectively, for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements. The maximum depth of temperature field under the embankment for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements was also studied by using the finite element method. The results of numerical analysis indicate that there were remarkable seasonal differences of the ground temperatures in superficial layer between asphalt pavement and concrete pavement. The maximum influencing depth of temperature field under the permafrost embankment for every pavement was under the depth of 8 m. The thawed cores under both embankments have close relation with the maximum thawed depth, the embankment height, and the service time. The effective measurements will be proposed to keep the thermal stabilities of highway embankment by the results. PMID:24027444

  13. Thermal stability analysis under embankment with asphalt pavement and cement pavement in permafrost regions.

    PubMed

    Junwei, Zhang; Jinping, Li; Xiaojuan, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The permafrost degradation is the fundamental cause generating embankment diseases and pavement diseases in permafrost region while the permafrost degradation is related with temperature. Based on the field monitoring results of ground temperature along G214 Highway in high temperature permafrost regions, both the ground temperatures in superficial layer and the annual average temperatures under the embankment were discussed, respectively, for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements. The maximum depth of temperature field under the embankment for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements was also studied by using the finite element method. The results of numerical analysis indicate that there were remarkable seasonal differences of the ground temperatures in superficial layer between asphalt pavement and concrete pavement. The maximum influencing depth of temperature field under the permafrost embankment for every pavement was under the depth of 8 m. The thawed cores under both embankments have close relation with the maximum thawed depth, the embankment height, and the service time. The effective measurements will be proposed to keep the thermal stabilities of highway embankment by the results.

  14. Thermal Stability Analysis under Embankment with Asphalt Pavement and Cement Pavement in Permafrost Regions

    PubMed Central

    Jinping, Li; Xiaojuan, Quan

    2013-01-01

    The permafrost degradation is the fundamental cause generating embankment diseases and pavement diseases in permafrost region while the permafrost degradation is related with temperature. Based on the field monitoring results of ground temperature along G214 Highway in high temperature permafrost regions, both the ground temperatures in superficial layer and the annual average temperatures under the embankment were discussed, respectively, for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements. The maximum depth of temperature field under the embankment for concrete pavements and asphalt pavements was also studied by using the finite element method. The results of numerical analysis indicate that there were remarkable seasonal differences of the ground temperatures in superficial layer between asphalt pavement and concrete pavement. The maximum influencing depth of temperature field under the permafrost embankment for every pavement was under the depth of 8 m. The thawed cores under both embankments have close relation with the maximum thawed depth, the embankment height, and the service time. The effective measurements will be proposed to keep the thermal stabilities of highway embankment by the results. PMID:24027444

  15. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2009-01-01

    An initial Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the initial concept for an aircraft-based method of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) in the TMA focusing on conflict detection algorithms and alerting display concepts. This paper gives an overview of the CD&R concept, simulation study, and test results.

  16. Planning, Management, and Economics of Airport Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, J.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the role of the airport in the transportation complex and in the community is presented. The establishment of the airport including its requirements in regional planning and the operation of the airport as a social and economic force are discussed.

  17. Teaching Ideas Notebook: Student Airport Tours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Outlines, as recommended by the Aviation Distributors and Manufacturers Association, a cooperative program between schools and local airports. The Student Airport Tours Program for class and career study groups includes a field trip to an airport, free rides, and follow-up activities. (CS)

  18. 19 CFR 122.85 - Final airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final airport. 122.85 Section 122.85 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Procedures for Residue Cargo and Stopover Passengers § 122.85 Final airport. When an aircraft enters at the last domestic airport of discharge, the traveling general...

  19. Implementing Solar Technologies at Airports

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-07-01

    Federal agencies, such as the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security, as well as numerous private entities are actively pursuing the installation of solar technologies to help reduce fossil fuel energy use and associated emissions, meet sustainability goals, and create more robust or reliable operations. One potential approach identified for siting solar technologies is the installation of solar energy technologies at airports and airfields, which present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to large amounts of open land. This report focuses largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) policies toward siting solar technologies at airports.

  20. Road Asphalt Pavements Analyzed by Airborne Thermal Remote Sensing: Preliminary Results of the Venice Highway

    PubMed Central

    Pascucci, Simone; Bassani, Cristiana; Palombo, Angelo; Poscolieri, Maurizio; Cavalli, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a fast procedure for evaluating asphalt pavement surface defects using airborne emissivity data. To develop this procedure, we used airborne multispectral emissivity data covering an urban test area close to Venice (Italy).For this study, we first identify and select the roads' asphalt pavements on Multispectral Infrared Visible Imaging Spectrometer (MIVIS) imagery using a segmentation procedure. Next, since in asphalt pavements the surface defects are strictly related to the decrease of oily components that cause an increase of the abundance of surfacing limestone, the diagnostic absorption emissivity peak at 11.2μm of the limestone was used for retrieving from MIVIS emissivity data the areas exhibiting defects on asphalt pavements surface.The results showed that MIVIS emissivity allows establishing a threshold that points out those asphalt road sites on which a check for a maintenance intervention is required. Therefore, this technique can supply local government authorities an efficient, rapid and repeatable road mapping procedure providing the location of the asphalt pavements to be checked.

  1. Research on tensile strength characteristics of bridge deck pavement bonding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaopeng; Han, Jun

    2009-12-01

    As the development of the traffic in the world, the bridge deck pavement is playing a more and more important role in the whole traffic system. Big span bridge has become more and more especially cement concrete bridge, therefore the bridge deck pavement bonding layers are emphasized as an important part of bridge traffic system, which can mitigate travel impact to bridge and magnify stationary or traffic amenity. The quality and durability of deck pavement bonding layer has directly effect on traffic safety, comfort, durability and investment of bridge. It represents the first line of defence against the ingress of water, road de-icing salts and aggressive chemicals. In real project, many early age damage of bridge deck pavement has become serious disease that affecting the function of bridge. During the construction of the bridge deck, many types of asphalt binders were used, such as styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified asphalt, styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt, neoprene latex asphalt, etc. In this paper UTM-25 was used to test the tensile strength of different bridge deck pavement bonding layers with the different treatment methods to inter-surface.

  2. Research on tensile strength characteristics of bridge deck pavement bonding layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaopeng; Han, Jun

    2010-03-01

    As the development of the traffic in the world, the bridge deck pavement is playing a more and more important role in the whole traffic system. Big span bridge has become more and more especially cement concrete bridge, therefore the bridge deck pavement bonding layers are emphasized as an important part of bridge traffic system, which can mitigate travel impact to bridge and magnify stationary or traffic amenity. The quality and durability of deck pavement bonding layer has directly effect on traffic safety, comfort, durability and investment of bridge. It represents the first line of defence against the ingress of water, road de-icing salts and aggressive chemicals. In real project, many early age damage of bridge deck pavement has become serious disease that affecting the function of bridge. During the construction of the bridge deck, many types of asphalt binders were used, such as styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified asphalt, styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) modified asphalt, neoprene latex asphalt, etc. In this paper UTM-25 was used to test the tensile strength of different bridge deck pavement bonding layers with the different treatment methods to inter-surface.

  3. Electrical resistance tomography for imaging the spatial distribution of moisture in pavement sections

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, M.; Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.

    1995-11-08

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) was used to image spatial moisture distribution and movement in pavement sections during an infiltration test. ERT is a technique for determining the electrical resistivity distribution within a volume from measurement of injected currents and the resulting electrical potential distribution on the surface. The transfer resistance (ratio of potential to injected current) data are inverted using an algorithm based on a finite element forward solution which is iteratively adjusted in a least squares sense until the measured and calculated transfer resistances agree to within some predetermined value. Four arrays of ERT electrodes were installed in vertical drill holes 1.22 m (4 ft) placed at the comers of a square 61 cm (2 ft) on a side into a pavement section which is used for a truck scale ramp on U.S. Highway 99 just north of Sacramento, CA. Water was introduced slowly into the pavement through a shallow hole in the center of this pattern and ERT data were collected in various planes as the water infiltrated into the pavement and subgrade materials over a period of several hours. The ERT data were inverted, and the resulting images show (1) the basic structure of the pavement section and (2) the movement of water through the image planes as a function of time during infiltration. An interesting result is that the water does not appear to drain from the section toward the shoulder as had been expected based on the design.

  4. Thermal imaging as a lie detection tool at airports.

    PubMed

    Warmelink, Lara; Vrij, Aldert; Mann, Samantha; Leal, Sharon; Forrester, Dave; Fisher, Ronald P

    2011-02-01

    We tested the accuracy of thermal imaging as a lie detection tool in airport screening. Fifty-one passengers in an international airport departure hall told the truth or lied about their forthcoming trip in an interview. Their skin temperature was recorded via a thermal imaging camera. Liars' skin temperature rose significantly during the interview, whereas truth tellers' skin temperature remained constant. On the basis of these different patterns, 64% of truth tellers and 69% of liars were classified correctly. The interviewers made veracity judgements independently from the thermal recordings. The interviewers outperformed the thermal recordings and classified 72% of truth tellers and 77% of liars correctly. Accuracy rates based on the combination of thermal imaging scores and interviewers' judgements were the same as accuracy rates based on interviewers' judgements alone. Implications of the findings for the suitability of thermal imaging as a lie detection tool in airports are discussed.

  5. Layer by layer evaluation of a PCC pavement as it was constructed: Comparison of backcalculated values to lab material values. Research investigation (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Netemeyer, R.; Munsell, S.

    1999-02-01

    This study was conducted to observe the background layer strengths of a pavement structure as each layer was constructed and compare these layer strengths to laboratory tested sample strengths. The objective was carried out by gathering Falling Weight Deflectometer deflection data on each sequential layer. The laboratory samples included bulk samples of the base, shelby tube samples of the subgrade, and concrete core samples from the pavement`s structure. Laboratory tests were performed on these extracted samples to estimate the resilient modulus testing on the base samples was not performed because the backcalculated base results were inconclusive and no comparison could be made.

  6. Operational Characteristics Identification and Simulation Model Verification for Incheon International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, Yeonju; Jeon, Daekeun; Lee, Hanbong; Zhu, Zhifan; Jung, Yoon C.; Jeong, Myeongsook; Kim, Hyounkyong; Oh, Eunmi; Hong, Sungkwon; Lee, Junwon

    2016-01-01

    Incheon International Airport (ICN) is one of the hub airports in East Asia. Airport operations at ICN have been growing more than 5 percent per year in the past five years. According to the current airport expansion plan, a new passenger terminal will be added and the current cargo ramp will be expanded in 2018. This expansion project will bring 77 new stands without adding a new runway to the airport. Due to such continuous growth in airport operations and future expansion of the ramps, it will be highly likely that airport surface traffic will experience more congestion, and therefore, suffer from efficiency degradation. There is a growing awareness in aviation research community of need for strategic and tactical surface scheduling capabilities for efficient airport surface operations. Specific to ICN airport operations, a need for A-CDM (Airport - Collaborative Decision Making) or S-CDM (Surface - Collaborative Decision Making), and controller decision support tools for efficient air traffic management has arisen since several years ago. In the United States, there has been independent research efforts made by academia, industry, and government research organizations to enhance efficiency and predictability of surface operations at busy airports. Among these research activities, the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) developed and tested by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a decision support tool to provide tactical advisories to the controllers for efficient surface operations. The effectiveness of SARDA concept, was successfully verified through the human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations for both spot release and runway operations advisories for ATC Tower controllers of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in 2010 and 2012, and gate pushback advisories for the ramp controller of Charlotte-Douglas International Airport (CLT) in 2014. The SARDA concept for tactical surface scheduling is further enhanced and is being

  7. Operational Characteristics Identification and Simulation Model Verification for Incheon International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, Yeonju; Jeon, Daekeun; Lee, Hanbong; Zhu, Zhifan; Jung, Yoon C.; Jeong, Myeongsook; Kim, Hyounkyong; Oh, Eunmi; Hong, Sungkwon; Lee, Junwon

    2016-01-01

    Incheon International Airport (ICN) is one of the hub airports in East Asia. Airport operations at ICN have been growing more than 5% per year in the past five years. According to the current airport expansion plan, a new passenger terminal will be added and the current cargo ramp will be expanded in 2018. This expansion project will bring 77 new stands without adding a new runway to the airport. Due to such continuous growth in airport operations and future expansion of the ramps, it will be highly likely that airport surface traffic will experience more congestion, and therefore, suffer from efficiency degradation. There is a growing awareness in aviation research community of need for strategic and tactical surface scheduling capabilities for efficient airport surface operations. Specific to ICN airport operations, a need for A-CDM (Airport - Collaborative Decision Making) or S-CDM(Surface - Collaborative Decision Making), and controller decision support tools for efficient air traffic management has arisen since several years ago. In the United States, there has been independent research efforts made by academia, industry, and government research organizations to enhance efficiency and predictability of surface operations at busy airports. Among these research activities, the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) developed and tested by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a decision support tool to provide tactical advisories to the controllers for efficient surface operations. The effectiveness of SARDA concept, was successfully verified through the human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations for both spot release and runway operations advisories for ATC Tower controllers of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in 2010 and 2012, and gate pushback advisories for the ramp controller of Charlotte/Douglas International Airport (CLT) in 2014. The SARDA concept for tactical surface scheduling is further enhanced and is being integrated into

  8. Monitoring the performance of geosynthetic materials within pavement systems using MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attoh-Okine, Nii O.; Ayenu-Prah, Albert Y.; Mensah, Stephen A.

    2005-05-01

    Geosynthetic materials have found useful applications when unbound aggregates have been placed on cohesive soil with very weak subgrade. They have also been successfully used in retarding reflective cracking in both flexible and composite pavements. There are many applications of geosynthetics in pavement engineering yet there is considerable lack of understanding in the behavior of the material. Geosynthetic materials exhibit very peculiar properties in the area of tensile strength and reinforcement. MEMS are miniature sensing or actuating devices that can interact with other environments (provided no adverse reaction occurs) to either obtain information or alter it. With remote query capability, it appears such devices can be embedded in pavement systems as testing and monitoring tools. The aim of this paper is to propose both field and laboratory methods for monitoring geotextile performance using MEMS.

  9. Road pavement condition mapping and assessment using remote sensing data based on MESMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Zhang, X.; Jin, X.; Yu, H.; Rao, J.; Tian, S.; Luo, L.; Li, C.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing can be used to monitor changes of asphalt pavement condition because of the spectral change of aged asphalt material. However, owing to coarse spatial resolution of images and the limited width of roads ambient land cover types (e.g. vegetation, buildings, and soil) affect the spectral signal and add significant variability and uncertainty to analysis of road conditions. To overcome this problem, Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) was tested to map asphalt pavement condition using WorldView-2 satellite imagery with eight bands spanning from visible to near infrared. Results indicated that MESMA run in a three-endmember model models mixed-pavement pixels well with a low average RMSE (0.01).

  10. Evaluation of non-metallic fiber reinforced concrete in new full depth pcc pavements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, V.; Tolmare, N.S.

    1998-12-30

    This final report presents the construction and performance evaluation of a new full depth pavement, constructed with a new type non-metallic fiber reinforced concrete (NMFRC). The mixture proportions used, the quality control tests conducted for the evaluation of the fresh and hardened concrete properties, the procedure used for mixing, transporting, placing, consolidating, finishing, and curing of the concrete are described. Periodic inspection of the full depth pavement was done and this report includes the results of these inspections. The feasibility of using this NMFRC in the construction of highway structures has been discussed. The new NMFRC with enhanced fatigue, impact resistance, modulus of rupture, ductility and toughness properties is suitable for the construction of full depth pavements. However, a life-cycle cost analysis shows that NMFRC is not a favorable choice, because of it`s high initial cost.

  11. Performance of pavements designed with low-cost materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grau, R. W.; Yrjanson, W. A.; Packard, R. G.; Barksdale, R. D.; Potts, C. F.; Ruth, B. E.; Smith, L. L.; Huddleston, I. J.; Vinson, T. S.; Hicks, R. G.

    1980-04-01

    The following areas are discussed. Utilization of marginal aggregate materials for secondary road surface layers; econocrete pavements; current practices; construction and performance of sand-asphalt bases and performance of sand-asphalt and limerock pavements in Florida. Cement stabilization of degrading aggregates use of crushed stone screenings in highway construction (abridgement); and sulfur-asphalt pavement technology are also reviewed.

  12. English for Airport Ground Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  13. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (Miami International Airport) Minneapolis, MN (Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport) Newark, NJ... International Airport) Minneapolis, MN (Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport) Newark, NJ...

  14. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (Miami International Airport) Minneapolis, MN (Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport) Newark, NJ... International Airport) Minneapolis, MN (Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport) Newark, NJ...

  15. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (Miami International Airport) Minneapolis, MN (Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport) Newark, NJ... International Airport) Minneapolis, MN (Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport) Newark, NJ...

  16. Optical fiber based sensing system design for the health monitoring of multi-layered pavement structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wanqiu; Wang, Huaping; Zhou, Zhi; Li, Shiyu; Ni, Yuanbao; Wang, Geng

    2011-11-01

    This paper introduces an optical fiber based sensing system design for multi-layered pavement structural health monitoring. The co-line and integration design of FBG (Fiber Bragg Gating) sensors and BOTDR (Brillouin Optical Time Domain Reflectometry) sensors will ensure the large scale damage monitoring and local high accurate strain measurement. The function of pavement structure multi-scale shape measurement will provide real time subgrade settlement and rutting information. The sensor packaging methodology and strain transfer problem of the system will also be discussed in this paper. Primary lab tests prove the potential and feasibility of the practical application of the sensing system.

  17. Hot bituminous pavement recycling US-56, Edwards and Pawnee counties, Kansas. Final report 1989-1993

    SciTech Connect

    Fager, G.A.; Maag, R.G.

    1993-10-01

    A study was undertaken between 1978 and 1993 to construct and monitor a hot recycle section. One hot recycle test section and one control section were completed in 1978 and monitored for cracking for approximately 12 years. This project was the first hot recycle project constructed in Kansas and one of the first in the United States. Using the experimental cost data and only cracking to determine pavement life, this hot recycle project was not economically feasible. Wheelpath rutting was not a problem throughout the life of both pavements. Opacity and particulate requirements were never met on this first hot recycle project. Due to the many unknowns, the project was considered a success.

  18. Pavement Sealcoat, PAHs, and the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Metre, P. C.; Mahler, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    Recent research by the USGS has identified coal-tar-based pavement sealants as a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the environment. Coal-tar-based sealcoat is commonly used to coat parking lots and driveways and is typically is 20-35 percent coal tar pitch, a known human carcinogen. Several PAHs are suspected mutagens, carcinogens, and (or) teratogens. In the central and eastern U.S. where the coal-tar-based sealants dominate use, sum-PAH concentration in dust particles from sealcoated pavement is about 1,000 times higher than in the western U.S. where the asphalt-based formulation is prevalent. Source apportionment modeling indicates that particles from sealcoated pavement are contributing the majority of the PAHs to recent lake sediment in 35 U.S. urban lakes and are the primary cause of upward trends in PAHs in many of these lakes. Mobile particles from parking lots with coal-tar-based sealcoat are tracked indoors, resulting in elevated PAH concentrations in house dust. In a recently completed study, volatilization fluxes of PAHs from sealcoated pavement were estimated to be about 60 times fluxes from unsealed pavement. Using a wide variety of methods, the author and colleagues have shown that coal-tar-based sealcoat is a major source of PAHs to the urban environment and might pose risks to aquatic life and human health.

  19. Liquid-explosives scanners stand trial in airports

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Jermey N. A.

    2010-07-15

    Air passengers may once more be allowed to pack beverages, lotions, and hair spray in their carry-on luggage, if imaging technologies to detect liquid explosives can prove their worth. Several competing systems, including multi-energy x-ray systems and a low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, are undergoing field tests at some airports worldwide.

  20. Solving Optimization Problems with Dynamic Geometry Software: The Airport Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras, José

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes how the author's students (in-service and pre-service secondary mathematics teachers) enrolled in college geometry courses use the Geometers' Sketchpad (GSP) to gain insight to formulate, confirm, test, and refine conjectures to solve the classical airport problem for triangles. The students are then provided with strategic…

  1. ACAA pavement manual. Recommended practice: Coal fly ash in pozzolanic stabilized mixtures for flexible pavement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to guide pavement design engineers, materials engineers, and construction managers in the design and construction of flexible pavement systems in which low- to high-strength Pozzolanic Stabilized Mixtures' ( PSMs') serve as base layers. A PSM incorporates coal fly ash in combination with activators, aggregates and water. Each of three design methods is useful for determining the thickness of a PSM base layer for a flexible pavement system: Method A - American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) flexible pavement design procedures, using structural layer coefficients; Method B - Mechanistic pavement design procedures, using resilient modulus values for the pavement layers; and Method C - A combination of Method A and Method B, using mechanistic design concepts for determining pavement layer coefficients. PSMs offer several advantages: PSMs are strong, durable mixtures using locally available materials; PSMs are economically competitive with properly engineered full-depth asphalt or crushed stone base courses; PSMs are suited to stabilizing recycled base mixtures; and PSMs are placed and compacted with conventional construction equipment. To provide the needed guidance for capturing the long-term service and cost-saving features of a PSM design, this manual details the following: a procedure for proportioning PSMs; thickness design procedures which include base layer and asphalt wearing course; and proven techniques for PSM mixing and base layer construction.

  2. [Airport related air pollution and health effects].

    PubMed

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Ancona, Carla; Forastiere, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Airport is an extremely complex emission source of airborne pollutants that can have a significant impact on the environment. Indeed, several airborne chemicals emitted during airport activities may significantly get worse air quality and increase exposure level of both airport workers and general population living nearby the airports. In recent years airport traffic has increased and consequently several studies investigated the association between airport-related air pollution and occurrence of adverse health effects, particularly on respiratory system, in exposed workers and general population resident nearby. In this context, we carried out a critical evaluation of the studies that investigated this correlation in order to obtain a deeper knowledge of this issue and to identify the future research needs. Results show that the evidence of association between airport-related air pollution and health effects on workers and residents is still limited. PMID:25115476

  3. [Airport related air pollution and health effects].

    PubMed

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Ancona, Carla; Forastiere, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Airport is an extremely complex emission source of airborne pollutants that can have a significant impact on the environment. Indeed, several airborne chemicals emitted during airport activities may significantly get worse air quality and increase exposure level of both airport workers and general population living nearby the airports. In recent years airport traffic has increased and consequently several studies investigated the association between airport-related air pollution and occurrence of adverse health effects, particularly on respiratory system, in exposed workers and general population resident nearby. In this context, we carried out a critical evaluation of the studies that investigated this correlation in order to obtain a deeper knowledge of this issue and to identify the future research needs. Results show that the evidence of association between airport-related air pollution and health effects on workers and residents is still limited.

  4. Spills on Flat Inclined Pavements

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Carver S.; Keller, Jason M.; Hylden, Jeff L.

    2004-03-01

    This report describes the general spill phenomenology for liquid spills occurring on relatively impermeable surfaces such as concrete or asphalt pavement and the development and application of a model to describe the time evolution of such spills. The discussion assumes evaporation and degradation are negligible and a homogeneous surface. In such an instance, the inherent interfacial properties determine the spatial extent of liquid spreading with the initial flow being controlled by the release rate of the spill and by the liquids resistance to flow as characterized by its viscosity. A variety of spill scenarios were simulated and successful implementation of the model was achieved. A linear relationship between spill area and spill volume was confirmed. The simulations showed spill rate had little effect on the final spill area. Slope had an insignificant effect on the final spill area, but did modify spill shape considerably. However, a fluid sink on the edge of the simulation domain, representing a storm drain, resulted in a substantial decrease in spill area. A bona fide effort to determine the accuracy of the model and its calculations remain, but comparison against observations from a simple experiment showed the model to correctly determine the spill area and general shape under the conditions considered. Further model verification in the form of comparison against small scale spill experiments are needed to confirm the models validity.

  5. Assessment of porous asphalt pavement performance: hydraulics and water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, J. F.; Ballestero, T. P.; Roseen, R. M.; Houle, J. J.

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study is to focus on the water quality treatment and hydraulic performance of a porous asphalt pavement parking lot in Durham, New Hampshire. The site was constructed in October 2004 to assess the suitability of porous asphalt pavement for stormwater management in cold climates. The facility consists of a 4-inch asphalt open-graded friction course layer overlying a high porosity sand and gravel base. This base serves as a storage reservoir in-between storms that can slowly infiltrate groundwater. Details on the design, construction, and cost of the facility will be presented. The porous asphalt pavements is qualitatively monitored for signs of distress, especially those due to cold climate stresses like plowing, sanding, salting, and freeze-thaw cycles. Life cycle predictions are discussed. Surface infiltration rates are measured with a constant head device built specifically to test high infiltration capacity pavements. The test measures infiltration rates in a single 4-inch diameter column temporarily sealed to the pavement at its base. A surface inundation test, as described by Bean, is also conducted as a basis for comparison of results (Bean, 2004). These tests assess infiltration rates soon after installation, throughout the winter, during snowmelt, after a winter of salting, sanding, and plowing, and after vacuuming in the spring. Frost penetration into the subsurface reservoir is monitored with a frost gauge. Hydrologic effects of the system are evaluated. Water levels are monitored in the facility and in surrounding wells with continuously logging pressure transducers. The 6-inch underdrain pipe that conveys excess water in the subsurface reservoir to a riprap pad is also continuously monitored for flow. Since porous asphalt pavement systems infiltrate surface water into the subsurface, it is important to assess whether water quality treatment performance in the subsurface reservoir is adequate. The assumed influent water quality is

  6. Breaking/cracking and seating concrete pavements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.R.

    1989-03-01

    This synthesis will be of interest to pavement designers, maintenance engineers, and others interested in reducing reflection cracking of asphalt overlays on portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement. Information is presented on the technique of breaking or cracking of the concrete pavement into small segments before overlaying with asphalt concrete. Asphalt concrete overlays on existing PCC pavements are subject to reflection cracking induced by thermal movements of PCC pavement. The report of the Transportation Research Board discusses the technique of breaking/cracking and seating of the existing PCC before an overlay as a means to reduce or eliminate reflection cracking.

  7. Micro-thermal stress analysis of cement based pavement composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Zhao, Y.; Pang, S.S.; Huang, W.

    1998-12-31

    A four-layer sphere model for microscopic thermal analysis was proposed based upon the structural form of cement based pavement composites. Using temperature induced stresses of pavement structure as the external field, the micro-thermal stresses of two types of cement based pavement composite were calculated. The results showed that, by introducing the low stiffness rubberized asphalt in the interphase of coarse aggregate phase and cement mortar phase of Portland cement concrete, the interfacial thermal stresses could be reduced significantly, thus improving crack resistance of the pavement material under low temperature environment. Factors affecting micro-thermal stress of cement based pavement composite were discussed.

  8. Full-scale testing and early production results from horizontal air sparging and soil vapor extraction wells remediating jet fuel in soil and groundwater at JFK International Airport, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, R.J.; Bianco, P.; Kirshner, M.; Pressly, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Jet fuel contaminated soil and groundwater contaminated at the International Arrivals Building (IAB) of the JFK International Airport in Jamaica, New York, are being remediated using soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). The areal extent of the contaminated soil is estimated to be 70 acres and the volume of contaminated groundwater is estimated to be 2.3 million gallons. The remediation uses approximately 13,000 feet of horizontal SVE (HSVE) wells and 7,000 feet of horizontal AS (HAS) wells. The design of the HSVE and HAS wells was based on a pilot study followed by a full-scale test. In addition to the horizontal wells, 28 vertical AS wells and 15 vertical SVE wells are used. Three areas are being remediated, thus, three separate treatment systems have been installed. The SVE and AS wells are operated continuously while groundwater will be intermittently extracted at each HAS well, treated by liquid phase activated carbon and discharged into stormwater collection sewerage. Vapors extracted by the SVE wells are treated by vapor phase activated carbon and discharged into ambient air. The duration of the remediation is anticipated to be between two and three years before soil and groundwater are remediated to New York State cleanup criteria for the site. Based on the monitoring data for the first two months of operation, approximately 14,600 lbs. of vapor phase VOCs have been extracted. Analyses show that the majority of the VOCs are branched alkanes, branched alkenes, cyclohexane and methylated cyclohexanes.

  9. Quantitative analysis of microtubule orientation in interdigitated leaf pavement cells.

    PubMed

    Akita, Kae; Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Leaf pavement cells are shaped like a jigsaw puzzle in most dicotyledon species. Molecular genetic studies have identified several genes required for pavement cells morphogenesis and proposed that microtubules play crucial roles in the interdigitation of pavement cells. In this study, we performed quantitative analysis of cortical microtubule orientation in leaf pavement cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. We captured confocal images of cortical microtubules in cotyledon leaf epidermis expressing GFP-tubulinβ and quantitatively evaluated the microtubule orientations relative to the pavement cell growth axis using original image processing techniques. Our results showed that microtubules kept parallel orientations to the growth axis during pavement cell growth. In addition, we showed that immersion treatment of seed cotyledons in solutions containing tubulin polymerization and depolymerization inhibitors decreased pavement cell complexity. Treatment with oryzalin and colchicine inhibited the symmetric division of guard mother cells. PMID:26039484

  10. Quantitative analysis of microtubule orientation in interdigitated leaf pavement cells.

    PubMed

    Akita, Kae; Higaki, Takumi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Leaf pavement cells are shaped like a jigsaw puzzle in most dicotyledon species. Molecular genetic studies have identified several genes required for pavement cells morphogenesis and proposed that microtubules play crucial roles in the interdigitation of pavement cells. In this study, we performed quantitative analysis of cortical microtubule orientation in leaf pavement cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. We captured confocal images of cortical microtubules in cotyledon leaf epidermis expressing GFP-tubulinβ and quantitatively evaluated the microtubule orientations relative to the pavement cell growth axis using original image processing techniques. Our results showed that microtubules kept parallel orientations to the growth axis during pavement cell growth. In addition, we showed that immersion treatment of seed cotyledons in solutions containing tubulin polymerization and depolymerization inhibitors decreased pavement cell complexity. Treatment with oryzalin and colchicine inhibited the symmetric division of guard mother cells.

  11. Prosthetic metal implants and airport metal detectors

    PubMed Central

    Dancey, A; Titley, OG

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Metal detectors have been present in airports and points of departure for some time. With the introduction of heightened security measures in response to fears of an increased threat of terrorism, they may become more prevalent in other public locations. The aim of this study was to ascertain which prosthetic devices activated metal detector devices used for security purposes. Methods A range of prosthetic devices used commonly in orthopaedic and plastic surgery procedures were passed through an arch metal detector at Birmingham Airport in the UK. Additionally, each item was passed under a wand detector. Items tested included expandable breast prostheses, plates used in wrist and hand surgery, screws, K-wires, Autosuture™ ligation clips and staples. Results No prostheses were detected by the arch detector. The expandable implants and wrist plates were the only devices detected by passing the wand directly over them. No device was detected by the wand when it was under cover of the axillary soft tissue. Screws, K-wires, Autosuture™ clips and staples were not detected under any of the study conditions. Conclusions Although unlikely to trigger a detector, it is possible that an expandable breast prosthesis or larger plate may do so. It is therefore best to warn patients of this so they can anticipate detection and further examination. PMID:23827294

  12. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O'Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  13. 49 CFR 1542.113 - Airport tenant security programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY Airport Security Program § 1542.113 Airport tenant security programs. (a) TSA may approve an airport tenant... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airport tenant security programs. 1542.113...

  14. 49 CFR 1542.113 - Airport tenant security programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY Airport Security Program § 1542.113 Airport tenant security programs. (a) TSA may approve an airport tenant... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airport tenant security programs. 1542.113...

  15. 14 CFR 152.103 - Sponsors: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sponsors: Airport development. 152.103... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Application Procedures § 152.103 Sponsors: Airport development. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for airport development...

  16. 49 CFR 1542.113 - Airport tenant security programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport tenant security programs. 1542.113 Section... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY Airport Security Program § 1542.113 Airport tenant security programs. (a) TSA may approve an airport...

  17. 14 CFR 152.109 - Project eligibility: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport planning. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Application Procedures § 152.109 Project eligibility: Airport planning. (a) Airport master planning. A proposed project for...

  18. 49 CFR 1542.3 - Airport security coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport security coordinator. 1542.3 Section 1542... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY General § 1542.3 Airport security coordinator. (a) Each airport operator must designate one or more Airport Security...

  19. 14 CFR 152.325 - Financial status report: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial status report: Airport planning... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.325 Financial status report: Airport planning. Each sponsor of a project for airport master planning and each...

  20. LH2 airport requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the facilities and equipment which will be required at a representative airport is provided so liquid hydrogen LH2 can be used as fuel in long range transport aircraft in 1995-2000. A complete facility was conceptually designed, sized to meet the projected air traffic requirement. The facility includes the liquefaction plant, LH2, storage capability, and LH2 fuel handling system. The requirements for ground support and maintenance for the LH2 fueled aircraft were analyzed. An estimate was made of capital and operating costs which might be expected for the facility. Recommendations were made for design modifications to the reference aircraft, reflecting results of the analysis of airport fuel handling requirements, and for a program of additional technology development for air terminal related items.

  1. Teaching at Logan International Airport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    Although Terminal C at Logan airport does not look like a classroom, for about fifty minutes on this author's way back from Boston it was for him. Like many public spaces, Logan now has a very robust Wi-Fi wireless network and this enabled him to take advantage of a departure delay to "teach" his class. In 1970 when the author started teaching,…

  2. 77 FR 35104 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property at Merrill Field Airport, Anchorage, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... purchased for inclusion into MRI utilizing FAA Airport Improvement (AIP) Funds. Said lands, described as a... impacts to the airport by allowing the disposal of the property. A categorical exclusion for this...

  3. Framework for determining airport daily departure and arrival delay thresholds: statistical modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Wesonga, Ronald; Nabugoomu, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The study derives a framework for assessing airport efficiency through evaluating optimal arrival and departure delay thresholds. Assumptions of airport efficiency measurements, though based upon minimum numeric values such as 15 min of turnaround time, cannot be extrapolated to determine proportions of delay-days of an airport. This study explored the concept of delay threshold to determine the proportion of delay-days as an expansion of the theory of delay and our previous work. Data-driven approach using statistical modelling was employed to a limited set of determinants of daily delay at an airport. For the purpose of testing the efficacy of the threshold levels, operational data for Entebbe International Airport were used as a case study. Findings show differences in the proportions of delay at departure (μ = 0.499; 95 % CI = 0.023) and arrival (μ = 0.363; 95 % CI = 0.022). Multivariate logistic model confirmed an optimal daily departure and arrival delay threshold of 60 % for the airport given the four probable thresholds {50, 60, 70, 80}. The decision for the threshold value was based on the number of significant determinants, the goodness of fit statistics based on the Wald test and the area under the receiver operating curves. These findings propose a modelling framework to generate relevant information for the Air Traffic Management relevant in planning and measurement of airport operational efficiency. PMID:27441145

  4. Study of the durability of demolition aggregates on pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachir, Melbouci; Fazia, Boudjemia

    2009-06-01

    This work is an experimental contribution to the study of durability of various materials coming from the demolition of buildings for their use in the flexible infrastructures of pavements. However, these pavements undergo traffic loading which causes, in the long time permanent deformations and settlements thus generating significant degradations of materials. Various recent works aim at characterizing these materials. This work falls under this scope and gives an approach of the mechanical behavior and the response of these last to repetitive loadings. After identification of materials and the determination of the characteristics of hardness and durability, we studied their mechanical behavior with cyclic shearing on these three materials (aggregates of concrete, brick and concrete block). These tests enabled us to analyze the mechanisms which occur through the various parameters related to loading (the amplitude and the repetition of loading, the parameters related to materials (the water content, the density and the grain size distribution). The study of the durability of these materials consists on quantifying the degradation rate of the grains after the various tests and the grain size distribution which governs the amplitude of crushing.

  5. Desert pavement study at Amboy, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S.; Greeley, R.

    1984-01-01

    Desert pavement is a general term describing a surface that typically consists of a thin layer of cm-sized rock fragments set on top of a layer of finer material in which no fragments are found. An understanding of desert pavement is important to planetary geology because they may play a major role in the formation and visibility of various aeolian features such as wind streaks, which are important on Mars and may be important on Venus. A field study was conducted in Amboy, California to determine the formation mechanism of desert pavements. The probable sequence of events for the formation and evolution of a typical desert pavement surface, based on this experiment and the work of others, is as follows. Starting with a layer of surface material consisting of both fine particles and rock fragments, aeolian deflation will rapidly erode the surface until an armored lag is developed, after which aeolian processes become less important. The concentration of fragments then slowly increases as new fragments are brought to the surface from the subsurface and as fragments move downslope by sheet wash. Sheet wash would be responsible for removing very fine particles from the surface and for moving the fragments relative to one another, forming interlocks.

  6. Permeable pavement research – Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    These are the slides for the New York City Concrete Promotional Council Pervious Concrete Seminar presentation. The basis for the project, the monitoring design and some preliminary monitoring data from the permeable pavement parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center are pre...

  7. Reconstruction of a pavement geothermal deicing system

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1999-03-01

    In 1948, US 97 in Klamath Falls, Oregon was routed over Esplanade Street to Main Street and through the downtown area. In order to widen the bridge across the US Bureau of Reclamation A Canal and to have the road cross under the Southern Pacific Railroad main north-south line, a new bridge and roadway were constructed at the beginning of this urban route. Because the approach and stop where this roadway intersected Alameda Ave (now Hwy 50 -- Eastside Bypass) caused problems with traffic getting traction in the winter on an adverse 8% grade, a geothermal experiment in pavement de-icing was incorporated into the project. A grid system within the pavement was connected to a nearby geothermal well using a downhole heat exchanger (DHE). The 419-foot well provided heat to a 50-50 ethylene glycol-water solution that ran through the grid system at about 50 gpm. This energy could provide a relatively snow free pavement at an outside temperature of {minus}10 F and snowfall up to 3 inches per hour, at a heat requirement of 41 Btu/hr/ft{sup 2}. Over time, the well temperature dropped from 143 to 98 F at the surface. The bridge and surface pavement, geothermal well, and associated equipment were modified. This paper describes the modifications.

  8. Evaluation of high pressure water blast with rotating spray bar for removing paint and rubber deposits from airport runways, and review of runway slipperiness problems created by rubber contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Griswold, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    A high pressure water blast with rotating spray bar treatment for removing paint and rubber deposits from airport runways is studied. The results of the evaluation suggest that the treatment is very effective in removing above surface paint and rubber deposits to the point that pavement skid resistance is restored to trafficked but uncontaminated runway surface skid resistance levels. Aircraft operating problems created by runway slipperiness are reviewed along with an assessment of the contributions that pavement surface treatments, surface weathering, traffic polishing, and rubber deposits make in creating or alleviating runway slipperiness. The results suggest that conventional surface treatments for both portland cement and asphaltic concrete runways are extremely vulnerable to rubber deposit accretions which can produce runway slipperiness conditions for aircraft operations as or more slippery than many snow and ice-covered runway conditions. Pavement grooving surface treatments are shown to be the least vulnerable to rubber deposits accretion and traffic polishing of the surface treatments examined.

  9. 78 FR 63562 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property at Charleston International Airport, Charleston...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... of Airport Revenue, published in the Federal Register on February 16, 1999 (64 FR 7696). The Aviation... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Request To Release Airport Property at Charleston International Airport, Charleston, South Carolina AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION:...

  10. 76 FR 54287 - Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Request for public comment. SUMMARY: The FAA hereby provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties,...

  11. Evaluation of bridge decks and pavements at highway speed using ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maser, Kenneth R.

    1995-05-01

    Ground penetrating radar has been developed as an economical alternative for evaluating pavement layer properties and estimating quantities of deterioration in bridge decks. These highway applications are based on the use of vehicle-mounted radar systems traveling at normal driving speed. Surveys are conducted without lane closures, and extensive coverage can be obtained in a short survey period. Customized software has been specifically developed to handle and interpret the large quantities of data collected by this system. Two integrated software systems have been developed and extensively tested for pavement layer thickness and bridge deck condition evaluation. PAVLAYER, for pavements, has demonstrated an accuracy of +/- 7% for asphalt layer thickness evaluation based on tests on 150 pavement sections and correlation with over 700 cores. DECAR, for evaluating quantities of deteriorated concrete in bridge decks, has demonstrated an accuracy of +/- 4.4% of the total deck area based on ground truth evaluation of 64 bridge decks. The paper describes the details of the hardware and software components and the analytic methods used in these two systems. Also presented are descriptions of three field evaluation programs, in which the PAVLAYER and DECAR results are correlated with ground truth. Typical output and ground truth correlations are presented.

  12. Airport-related air pollution and noise.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beverly S; Bronzaft, Arline L; Heikkinen, Maire; Goodman, Jerome; Nádas, Arthur

    2008-02-01

    To provide quantitative evidence of the impact on people of a neighboring metropolitan airport, La Guardia Airport (LGA) in New York City, (1) airborne particulate matter (PM) was measured to determine whether concentration differences could be detected between homes that are upwind and downwind of the airport; (2) 24-hr noise measurements were made in 12 homes near the airport; and (3) the impact of noise was assessed by a Community Wellness and Health Promotion Survey. Particulate matter concentrations were higher during active airport operating hours than during nonoperating hours, and the percent increase varied inversely with distance from the airport. Hourly differences between paired upwind and downwind sites were not remarkable. Residents living near the airport were exposed to noise levels as much as four times greater than those experienced by residents in a quiet, comparison home. Impulse noise events were detected from both aircraft and vehicular traffic. More than 55% of the people living within the flight path were bothered by aircraft noise, and 63% by highway noise; these were significantly higher percentages than for residents in the nonflight area. The change in PM concentrations with distance during operating compared with nonoperating hours; traffic-related impulse noise events; and the elevated annoyance with highway noise, as well as aircraft noise among residents in the flight path area, show airport-related motor vehicle traffic to be a major contributor to the negative impact of airports on people in the surrounding communities.

  13. Components of the airport access system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The organizations and agencies which make up or influence the airport access system are examined. These include the airport, the airline industry, the public and private transit agencies which provide ground access to the airport, and the regulatory agencies which affect all of these organizations and their actions. Each component, with the exception of the regulatory agencies is described in terms of its legal status, its sources of funds, and the nature of its relationship with the other components. Conclusions regarding the system components' effects on airport access and recommendations for changes which appear practical are presented.

  14. FAA Airport Design Competition for Universities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Raise awareness of the importance of airports to the National Airspace System infrastructure. Increase the involvement of the academic community in addressing airport operations and infrastructure issues and needs. Engage U.S. students in the conceptualization of applications, systems and equipment capable of addressing related challenges in a robust, reliable and comprehensive manner. Encourage U.S. undergraduate and graduate students to contribute innovative ideas and solutions to airport and runway safety issues. Provide the framework and incentives for quality educational experiences for university students. d Develop an awareness of and an interest in airports as a vital and interesting area for engineering and technology careers.

  15. 61 FR 25729 - Security Measures; Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-05-22

    ... Security Measures; Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece Summary The Secretary of Transportation has now determined that Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece, maintains and carries out... that Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece, did not maintain and carry out...

  16. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... Airport. Mesa, Arizona Williams Gateway Airport. Midland, Texas Midland International Airport....

  17. Learning from history: The Glasgow Airport terrorist attack.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Gillies

    Glasgow Airport was the target of a terrorist attack on 30th June, 2007. Many people within Scotland had come to believe that Scotland was immune from terrorism. This perception was in large part informed by Scotland's experience during the protracted Troubles in Northern Ireland, during which the Provisional Irish Republican Army's mainland bombing campaign focused on targets in England, sparing both Scotland and Wales. While Glasgow Airport did not expect such an attack to take place, meticulous planning, organising and testing of plans had taken place to mitigate the unlikely event of such an attack. The attack stands up as a shining example of robust business continuity management, where the airport reopened for business as usual in less than 24 hours from the time of the attack. Little is known about how the airport handled the situation in conjunction with other responding agencies as people tend to want to focus on high-profile disasters only. Yet countless such incidents are happening worldwide on a daily basis, in which there are excellent learning opportunities, and, taken in the spirit of converting hindsight into foresight, the likelihood of similar incidents could potentially be reduced in the future.

  18. Learning from history: The Glasgow Airport terrorist attack.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Gillies

    Glasgow Airport was the target of a terrorist attack on 30th June, 2007. Many people within Scotland had come to believe that Scotland was immune from terrorism. This perception was in large part informed by Scotland's experience during the protracted Troubles in Northern Ireland, during which the Provisional Irish Republican Army's mainland bombing campaign focused on targets in England, sparing both Scotland and Wales. While Glasgow Airport did not expect such an attack to take place, meticulous planning, organising and testing of plans had taken place to mitigate the unlikely event of such an attack. The attack stands up as a shining example of robust business continuity management, where the airport reopened for business as usual in less than 24 hours from the time of the attack. Little is known about how the airport handled the situation in conjunction with other responding agencies as people tend to want to focus on high-profile disasters only. Yet countless such incidents are happening worldwide on a daily basis, in which there are excellent learning opportunities, and, taken in the spirit of converting hindsight into foresight, the likelihood of similar incidents could potentially be reduced in the future. PMID:25416378

  19. A comprehensive approach for the assessment of in-situ pavement density using GPR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, Christina; Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Proper construction of the asphalt pavement is a prerequisite to developing a long lasting roadway that does not require extensive future maintenance. This goal is achieved by verifying that design specifications are met through the use of quality assurance (QA) practices. The in-situ density is regarded as one of the most important controls used to ensure that a pavement being placed is of high quality because it is a good indicator of future performance. In-situ density is frequently assessed utilizing one or more of the following three methods: cores, nuclear density gauge measurements or non-nuclear density gauge measurements. Each of the above mentioned methods, however, have their distinct disadvantages. Cores, for example, are generally considered to be the most accurate means of measuring in-situ density, however, they are a time consuming and destructive test that introduces a defect into asphalt pavements. Because of the destructive nature associated with coring, contractors and agencies have alternatively used non-destructive nuclear and non-nuclear density gauges for quality control purposes. These instruments allow for a more rapid assessment of the in-situ density, allowing measurements to be taken even during the pavement's construction. The disadvantage of these gauges are that they provide density readings only at discrete locations of the asphalt pavement mat, while no consensus exists among pavement researchers on the proper correlation between the gauges and core density. In recent years, numerous alternative methods have been introduced for the assessment of in-situ density, both during asphalt pavement construction and afterwards. These methods include, amongst others, intelligent compaction, thermal imaging and ground penetrating radar (GPR). Among these methods, GPR has been defined as both a technically feasible and promising method for the nondestructive, rapid, and continuous evaluation of in-situ asphalt pavement density based on

  20. 19 CFR 122.153 - Limitations on airport of entry or departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... International Airport. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Pittsburgh International Airport. San Juan, Puerto Rico San Juan Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport. Tampa, Florida Tampa International Airport. West Palm Beach, Florida Palm Beach International Airport....

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-04-20

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320. Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Appenzeller, Janet

    2000-04-20

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

  3. The making of the modern airport executive: Causal connections among key attributes in career development, compromise, and satisfaction in airport management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, David Alan

    The purpose of this study was to identify specific career development attributes of contemporary senior-level airport executives and to evaluate the relationship of these attributes to the level of satisfaction airport executives have in their career choice. Attribute sets that were examined included early aviation interests, health factors, psychological factors, demographic factors, formal education, and other aviation-related experiences. A hypothesized causal model that expressed direct and indirect effects among these attributes relative to airport executives' career satisfaction was tested using sample data collected from 708 airport executives from general aviation and commercial service airport throughout the United States. Applying a multiple regression analysis strategy to the model, the overall results revealed that 16% of the variability in airport executives' career satisfaction scores was due to the collective influence of the six research attribute sets, this was significant. The results of the path analysis also indicated that four attribute sets (early aviation interests, health factors, formal education, and other aviation-related experiences) had respective direct significant effects on participants' career satisfaction. Early aviation interests, health factors, and demographic factors had additional indirect effects on career satisfaction; all were mediated by formal education attitude. These results were inconsistent with the hypothesized path model and a revised model was developed to reflect the sample data. The findings suggest that airport executives, as a group, are satisfied with their career choice. Early aviation interests appear to play an important role for influencing the career field selection phase of career development. The study also suggests health factors, formal education, and other aviation-related experiences such as flight training or military experience influence the compromise phase of career development. Each of these

  4. Re-evaluation of the AASHTO-flexible pavement design equation with neural network modeling.

    PubMed

    Tiğdemir, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    Here we establish that equivalent single-axle loads values can be estimated using artificial neural networks without the complex design equality of American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). More importantly, we find that the neural network model gives the coefficients to be able to obtain the actual load values using the AASHTO design values. Thus, those design traffic values that might result in deterioration can be better calculated using the neural networks model than with the AASHTO design equation. The artificial neural network method is used for this purpose. The existing AASHTO flexible pavement design equation does not currently predict the pavement performance of the strategic highway research program (Long Term Pavement Performance studies) test sections very accurately, and typically over-estimates the number of equivalent single axle loads needed to cause a measured loss of the present serviceability index. Here we aimed to demonstrate that the proposed neural network model can more accurately represent the loads values data, compared against the performance of the AASHTO formula. It is concluded that the neural network may be an appropriate tool for the development of databased-nonparametric models of pavement performance. PMID:25397962

  5. Re-Evaluation of the AASHTO-Flexible Pavement Design Equation with Neural Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Tiğdemir, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    Here we establish that equivalent single-axle loads values can be estimated using artificial neural networks without the complex design equality of American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). More importantly, we find that the neural network model gives the coefficients to be able to obtain the actual load values using the AASHTO design values. Thus, those design traffic values that might result in deterioration can be better calculated using the neural networks model than with the AASHTO design equation. The artificial neural network method is used for this purpose. The existing AASHTO flexible pavement design equation does not currently predict the pavement performance of the strategic highway research program (Long Term Pavement Performance studies) test sections very accurately, and typically over-estimates the number of equivalent single axle loads needed to cause a measured loss of the present serviceability index. Here we aimed to demonstrate that the proposed neural network model can more accurately represent the loads values data, compared against the performance of the AASHTO formula. It is concluded that the neural network may be an appropriate tool for the development of databased-nonparametric models of pavement performance. PMID:25397962

  6. Analysis of durability of advanced cementitious materials for rigid pavement construction in California

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtis, K.E.; Monteiro, P.

    1999-04-01

    Caltrans specifications for the construction of rigid pavements require rapid setting, high early strength, superior workability concrete with a desired 30+ year service life. These strict specifications provide the motivations for the investigation of advanced cementitious materials for pavement construction. The cementitious materials under consideration by Caltrans may be classified into four categories: Portland cements and blends, calcium aluminate cements and blends, calcium sulfoaluminate cements, and fly ash-based cements. To achieve the desired 30+ year design life, it is essential to select materials that are expected to exhibit long-term durability. Because most of the cementitious materials under consideration have not been extensively used for pavement construction in the United States, it is essential to characterize the long-term durability of each material. This report provides general information concerning the deleterious reactions that may damage concrete pavements in California. The reactions addressed in this report are sulfate attack, aggregate reactions, corrosion of reinforcing steel, and freeze-thaw action. Specifically, the expected performance of Portland cements and blends, calcium aluminate cements and blends, calcium sulfoaluminate cements, and fly ash-based cements are examined with regard to each of the deleterious reactions listed. Additional consideration is given to any deterioration mechanism that is particular to any of these cement types. Finally, the recommended test program for assessing potential long-term durability with respect to sulfate attack is described.

  7. Re-evaluation of the AASHTO-flexible pavement design equation with neural network modeling.

    PubMed

    Tiğdemir, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    Here we establish that equivalent single-axle loads values can be estimated using artificial neural networks without the complex design equality of American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). More importantly, we find that the neural network model gives the coefficients to be able to obtain the actual load values using the AASHTO design values. Thus, those design traffic values that might result in deterioration can be better calculated using the neural networks model than with the AASHTO design equation. The artificial neural network method is used for this purpose. The existing AASHTO flexible pavement design equation does not currently predict the pavement performance of the strategic highway research program (Long Term Pavement Performance studies) test sections very accurately, and typically over-estimates the number of equivalent single axle loads needed to cause a measured loss of the present serviceability index. Here we aimed to demonstrate that the proposed neural network model can more accurately represent the loads values data, compared against the performance of the AASHTO formula. It is concluded that the neural network may be an appropriate tool for the development of databased-nonparametric models of pavement performance.

  8. MODELING PAVEMENT DETERIORATION PROCESSES BY POISSON HIDDEN MARKOV MODELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Le Thanh; Kaito, Kiyoyuki; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Okizuka, Ryosuke

    In pavement management, it is important to estimate lifecycle cost, which is composed of the expenses for repairing local damages, including potholes, and repairing and rehabilitating the surface and base layers of pavements, including overlays. In this study, a model is produced under the assumption that the deterioration process of pavement is a complex one that includes local damages, which occur frequently, and the deterioration of the surface and base layers of pavement, which progresses slowly. The variation in pavement soundness is expressed by the Markov deterioration model and the Poisson hidden Markov deterioration model, in which the frequency of local damage depends on the distribution of pavement soundness, is formulated. In addition, the authors suggest a model estimation method using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, and attempt to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed Poisson hidden Markov deterioration model by studying concrete application cases.

  9. Digital image processing as a tool for pavement distress evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgopoulos, A.; Loizos, A.; Flouda, A.

    The information obtained through accurate condition assessment of pavement surface distress data is needed as an essential input to any decision making process concerning pavement management policy. At the same time technological advances in automated inspection systems provide the opportunity to automate the collection and evaluation of the pavement surface condition. In this paper a method developed jointly by the Laboratories of Highway Engineering and Photogrammetry of the National Technical University of Athens is described and proposed. The method involves digital image processing techniques to provide suitable digital imagery as input to specialised software developed especially for this project. This software determines objectively and fully automatically the type, the extent and the severity of surface crackings for flexible road pavements. The proposed method presenten substantial agreement, when compared with systematic visual ratings of existing pavement crackings carried out according to the internationally accepted requirements for airfield and road pavement of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  10. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  11. Airport Economics: Management Control Financial Reporting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchbinder, A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of management control financial reporting systems for airport operation is discussed. The operation of the system to provide the reports required for determining the specific revenue producing facilities of airports is described. The organization of the cost reporting centers to show the types of information provided by the system is analyzed.

  12. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... has continuous use of each airport at which training flights originate. (b) Each airport used for airplanes and gliders must have at least one runway or takeoff area that allows training aircraft to make a... the powerplant operation, and landing gear and flap operation recommended by the manufacturer; and...

  13. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... has continuous use of each airport at which training flights originate. (b) Each airport used for airplanes and gliders must have at least one runway or takeoff area that allows training aircraft to make a... the powerplant operation, and landing gear and flap operation recommended by the manufacturer; and...

  14. 75 FR 39091 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Program (62 FR 48693). A request for participation in the Pilot Program must be initiated by the filing of... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Mu oz Mar n International Airport (SJU), San Juan, Puerto Rico. SUMMARY: The Federal...

  15. 14 CFR 398.3 - Specific airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Specific airports. 398.3 Section 398.3... STATEMENTS GUIDELINES FOR INDIVIDUAL DETERMINATIONS OF BASIC ESSENTIAL AIR SERVICE § 398.3 Specific airports. (a) At an eligible place, essential air service may be specified as service to a particular...

  16. 77 FR 58208 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... will also participate. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at: Verdanza Hotel, 8020 Tartak Street, Isla... for sending your comments electronically. Docket Number: FAA 2009-1144. Mail: Docket Management... Compliance Specialist, Airport Compliance Division, ACO-100, Office of Airport Compliance and...

  17. 78 FR 7476 - Airport Improvement Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Program Handbook. SUMMARY: This notice announces the request for comments on the draft of FAA Order 5100-38D, Airport Improvement Program Handbook. When finalized, this Order will replace Order 5100-38C, Airport Improvement Program Handbook, issued on June 28, 2005. This update clarifies...

  18. Siting Solar Photovoltaics at Airports: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-06-01

    Airports present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to their open land; based on a 2010 Federal Aviation Administration study, the US Department of Agriculture, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service, there's potential for 116,704 MW of solar photovoltaics (PV) on idle lands at US airports. PV has a low profile and likely low to no impact on flight operations. This paper outlines guidance for implementing solar technologies at airports and airfields, focusing largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's policies. The paper also details best practices for siting solar at airports, provides information on the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool, and highlights a case study example where solar has been installed at an airport.

  19. Airport noise impact reduction through operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1981-01-01

    The airport-noise levels and annoyance model (ALAMO) developed at NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of a system of computer programs which is capable of quantifying airport community noise impact in terms of noise level, population distribution, and human subjective response to noise. The ALAMO can be used to compare the noise impact of an airport's current operating scenario with the noise impact which would result from some proposed change in airport operations. The relative effectiveness of number of noise-impact reduction alternatives is assessed for a major midwest airport. Significant reductions in noise impact are predicted for certain noise abatement strategies while others are shown to result in relatively little noise relief.

  20. A study of bituminous pavements to determine a correlation between pavement structure designs and tripping of asphalt cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, B. R.

    1984-03-01

    After detecting a few cases of stripping of asphalt cement from the aggregate in bituminous pavement, there was concern that stripping might be a widespread problem in the state. It is agreed that water is the cause of stripping, and it was the opinion of some that pavements on granular bases would be less likely to strip because of supposedly better drainage characteristics. Differently designed pavement structures in all areas of the state were investigated to determine if there is a correlation between base and pavement design and stripping. Stripping was not as widespread as had been feared and there was less stripping in fulldepth bituminous base and pavement constructed over a lime-treated subgrade than in pavements constructed oer granular bases. This was contrary to what some had theorized.

  1. Hybrid green permeable pave with hexagonal modular pavement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, M. A.; Abustan, I.; Hamzah, M. O.

    2013-06-01

    Modular permeable pavements are alternatives to the traditional impervious asphalt and concrete pavements. Pervious pore spaces in the surface allow for water to infiltrate into the pavement during rainfall events. As of their ability to allow water to quickly infiltrate through the surface, modular permeable pavements allow for reductions in runoff quantity and peak runoff rates. Even in areas where the underlying soil is not ideal for modular permeable pavements, the installation of under drains has still been shown to reflect these reductions. Modular permeable pavements have been regarded as an effective tool in helping with stormwater control. It also affects the water quality of stormwater runoff. Places using modular permeable pavement has been shown to cause a significant decrease in several heavy metal concentrations as well as suspended solids. Removal rates are dependent upon the material used for the pavers and sub-base material, as well as the surface void space. Most heavy metals are captured in the top layers of the void space fill media. Permeable pavements are now considered an effective BMP for reducing stormwater runoff volume and peak flow. This study examines the extent to which such combined pavement systems are capable of handling load from the vehicles. Experimental investigation were undertaken to quantify the compressive characteristics of the modular. Results shows impressive results of achieving high safety factor for daily life vehicles.

  2. Investigation of Primary Causes of Load-Related Cracking in Asphalt Concrete Pavement in North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hong Joon

    This dissertation presents causes of cracking in asphalt concrete pavement in North Carolina through field investigation and laboratory experiments with field extracted material. North Carolina is experiencing higher than anticipated rates of fatigue cracking compared to other state. These higher than expected rates could be reflective of the national trends in mix design practice or could be caused by structural pavement failures. The problems associated with premature cracking in North Carolina pavements point to the need to evaluate the North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT) mixes, processes, and measures to ensure that these factors properly balance the goals of preventing cracking and minimizing permanent deformation. Without solid data from in-service pavements, any conclusions regarding the causes of these failures might be pure conjecture. Accordingly, this research examines material properties through laboratory experiments using field-extracted materials and investigates in situ pavements and pavement structure. In order to assess condition of existing pavement, alligator cracking index (ACI) was developed. The asphalt content in the top layer that exhibits top-down cracking or bottom-up cracking has a proportional relationship to ACI values. The air void content in a bottom layer that exhibits top-down cracking or bottom-up cracking shows an inverse proportional relationship to ACI values. These observations reflect reasonable results. A comparison between ACI and asphalt film thickness values does not produce noteworthy findings, but somewhat reasonable results are evident once the range of comparison is narrowed down. Thicker film thicknesses show higher ACI values. From field core visual observations, road widening is identified as a major cause of longitudinal cracking. Regions with observed layer interface separation tend to have low ACI values. Through tensile strain simulation based on actual field conditions, it is observed that

  3. Example of using small falling weight deflectomer (FWD) for Earth structures and low cost road pavement in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yasutomo; Ono, Isamu; Okano, Tsuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The FWD (Falling Weight Deflectometer) is an instrument which makes the weight fall freely on its loading plate to apply impact load and measures the displacement caused by the fall at the center of impact load and also at the points in radial direction from the center of impact load. A kind of instrument which is mounted on or drawn by a vehicle used for construction of concrete pavement or asphalt pavement of a runway is usually called FWD. The impact load of FWD is 49KN to 196kN and it can obtain the modulus of elasticity of each pavement layer by back analysis based on the theory of multi-layer elasticity using 6 to 8 of extemal displacement sensors. On the other hand, the small FWD is an FWD which is constructed small and easy and is applicable for hand carry. It makes the weight fall freely on the loading plate to apply impact load and measures the load and displacement caused by the fall. It was developed for mainly assessing the rigidity and bearing capacity of the subgrade easily and promptly. It can measure many points in short term and obtain coefficient of subgrade reaction and modulus of subgrade elasticity without using reaction facilities like as plate bearing test or CBR test. It has also been tried to apply the small FWD to low cost asphalt road pavement (later called as low cost road pavement). Application examples of small FWD test for earth structure and low cost load pavement in Japan are shown and the methods and test results are stated in this report.

  4. Orientation patterns of stone pavements as a result of modern geomorphologic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Michael; Kleber, Arno

    2010-05-01

    Stone pavements are typical surface features of climate-sensitive, arid environments. They form a tightly interlocking mosaic of clasts, covering virtually stone-free aeolian material. However, this mosaic does not generally exhibit random orientation of its constituents. Rather, there are systematic unimodal to bimodal distributions of stone length axes present. These orientation patterns may be the result of active geomorphologic processes, implying the unstable and fragile nature of this landform as well as a dominant lateral geomorphologic component, not considered in existing models of stone pavement formation. Responsible processes should be controlled by relief properties and may thus be described by topographic attributes. From three study areas (Laguna Salada, Mexico, eastern Mojave Desert and southern Sevier Basin, USA) we present measurements of pavement stone orientations and their relationship to landscape parameters. From 1 by 1 m sized plots azimuthal digital images were taken, corrected, georeferenced and length as well as orientation angle of the a- and b-axes of at least 100 stones were digitised. Subsequently, statistical parameters of circular data were calculated. From a digital elevation model relief attributes were derived to test their influence on pavement patterns. Three general types of orientation patterns were identified from all study areas: unimodal, bimodal and unoriented. These types are clustered together and may change within small lateral distance. The type of pattern is not influenced by stone dimensions or the formation character of the site (i.e. basalt flow vs. alluvial fan). Relief properties (e.g. slope length, specific catchment, inclination), controlling lateral geomorphologic processes appear to play a major role in generating orientation patterns in stone pavement surfaces. Hence, from pattern analysis the dynamic nature of these features can be drawn.

  5. Implications of Use of Coal-Tar-Based Pavement Sealcoat on Urban Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Metre, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coal-tar-based (CT) sealcoat is used to protect and improve the appearance of asphalt pavement of driveways and parking lots primarily in the central and eastern U.S. and in Canada. CT sealcoat typically is 20 to 35% crude coal tar or coal-tar pitch and contains from 50,000 to 100,000 mg/kg polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), about 1,000 times more than asphalt-based (AS) sealcoat or asphalt itself. Tires and snowplows abrade the friable sealcoat surface into fine particles—median total PAH concentrations in dust from CT-sealcoated pavement are 2,200 mg/kg compared to a median concentration of 11 mg/kg for dust from unsealed pavement. Use of CT sealcoat has several implications for urban streams and lakes. Source apportionment modeling has indicated that, in regions where CT sealcoat is prevalent, particles from sealcoated pavement are contributing the majority of the PAHs to recently deposited lake sediment, often resulting in sediment concentrations above toxicity thresholds based on effects-based sediment quality guidelines. Acute 2-day laboratory toxicity testing of simulated runoff from CT-sealcoated pavement to a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) demonstrated that toxicity continues for samples collected for weeks or months following sealcoat application and that toxicity is enhanced by exposure to UV light. Using the fish-liver cell line RTL-W1, runoff collected as much as 36 days following CT-sealcoat application has been demonstrated to cause DNA damage and impair DNA repair capacity. These results demonstrate that CT runoff is a potential hazard to aquatic ecosystems and that exposure to sunlight can enhance toxicity and genetic damage. Recent research has provided direct evidence that restricting use of CT sealcoat in a watershed can lead to a substantial reduction in PAH concentrations in receiving water bodies.

  6. Hydraulic and treatment performance of pervious pavements under variable drying and wetting regimes.

    PubMed

    Yong, C F; Deletic, A; Fletcher, T D; Grace, M R

    2011-01-01

    Pervious pavements are an effective stormwater treatment technology. However, their performance under variable drying and wetting conditions have yet to be tested, particularly under a continuous time scale. This paper reports on the clogging behaviour and pollutant removal efficiency of three pervious pavement types over 26 accelerated years. These pavements were monolithic porous asphalt (PA), Permapave (PP) and modular Hydrapave (HP). Over a cycle of 13 days, the period of which was equivalent to the average annual Brisbane, Australia rainfall (1,200 mm), the pavements were randomly dosed with four different flows. Drying events of 3 h duration were simulated during each flow. Inflow and outflow samples were collected and analysed for Total Suspended Solids (TSS), Total Phosphorus (TP) and Total Nitrogen (TN). To evaluate the rate of clogging, a 1 in 5 year Brisbane storm event was simulated in the 6th, 8th, 12th, 16th, 20th and 24th week. Under normal dosing conditions, none of the pavements showed signs of clogging even after 15 years. However, under storm conditions, both PA and HP started to clog after 12 years, while PP showed no signs of clogging after 26 years. The drying and various flow events showed no effects in TSS removal, with all systems achieving a removal of approximately 100%. The average TP removal was 20% for all flows except for low flow, which had a significant amount of leaching over time. Leaching from TN was also observed during all flows except high flow. The TSS, TP and TN results observed during storm events were similar to that of high flow.

  7. Effects of Using Silica Fume and Polycarboxylate-Type Superplasticizer on Physical Properties of Cementitious Grout Mixtures for Semiflexible Pavement Surfacing

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Mahmud, Hilmi; Mashaan, Nuha S.; Katman, Herdayati; Husain, Nadiah Md

    2014-01-01

    Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout. PMID:24526911

  8. Effects of using silica fume and polycarboxylate-type superplasticizer on physical properties of cementitious grout mixtures for semiflexible pavement surfacing.

    PubMed

    Koting, Suhana; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Mahmud, Hilmi; Mashaan, Nuha S; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herdayati; Husain, Nadiah Md

    2014-01-01

    Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout.

  9. Effects of using silica fume and polycarboxylate-type superplasticizer on physical properties of cementitious grout mixtures for semiflexible pavement surfacing.

    PubMed

    Koting, Suhana; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Mahmud, Hilmi; Mashaan, Nuha S; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herdayati; Husain, Nadiah Md

    2014-01-01

    Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout. PMID:24526911

  10. Field Performance of Asphalt Pavements with New Technologies in Northern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faeth, Benjamin Michael

    The Regional Transportation Commission (RTC) of the Washoe Valley Area has been tasked to determine if three advanced asphalt pavement technologies and one modified aggregate gradation are suitable for implementation within Reno, Stead, and Sparks Nevada. This was accomplished through research and test roads and Intersections to determine if Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP), Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), Polymer-Modified Asphalt Binder, and the Type 2-R aggregate gradation were succeeding in their design plans. Over the course of several years the streets being used by RTC to test the technologies are succeeding within their design lifespans, and the Intersections being used to test the Type 2-R aggregate gradation are showing significant resistance to rutting. Due to the roads and Intersections not being more than 10 years old, these conclusions are subject to change over time.

  11. New structural systems for zero-maintenance pavements. Volume 2: Analysis of anchored pavements using ANSYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, S. K.; Militsopoulos, S. G.

    1980-08-01

    A set of procedures to evaluate the response of an anchored pavement subjected to vehicle static loads, moisture variation in the subgrade, and/or temperature variation through the surface of the pavement is presented. These procedures include two computer programs known as FEMESH and ANSYS. The FEMESH program generates rectangular meshes in either a two or three dimensional coordinate system for any prespecified number and spacing of nodes. The ANSYS program evaluates the stresses, strains, and the deflections at all elements in each material included in the analytical model.

  12. 14 CFR 152.325 - Financial status report: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Financial status report: Airport planning... agency conducting a project for airport system planning shall submit a financial status report on a form... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.325...

  13. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  14. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  15. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  16. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  17. 78 FR 65417 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Regional Airport (EAR), Kearney, Nebraska. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invites public comment on... request to release approximately 67.72 acres of airport property at the Kearney Regional Airport (EAR... property at the Kearney Regional Airport (EAR) submitted by the Sponsor meets the procedural...

  18. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  19. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  20. 14 CFR 135.223 - IFR: Alternate airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport requirements. 135... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.223 IFR: Alternate airport requirements...) to— (1) Complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing; (2) Fly from that airport...

  1. 14 CFR 152.107 - Project eligibility: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport development... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Application Procedures § 152.107 Project eligibility: Airport development. (a) Except in the case of approved stage...

  2. 14 CFR 151.3 - National Airport Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National Airport Plan. 151.3 Section 151.3 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS FEDERAL AID TO AIRPORTS General Requirements § 151.3 National Airport Plan. (a) Under the Federal...

  3. 14 CFR 121.617 - Alternate airport for departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate airport for departure. 121.617... Alternate airport for departure. (a) If the weather conditions at the airport of takeoff are below the landing minimums in the certificate holder's operations specifications for that airport, no person...

  4. 14 CFR 125.365 - Alternate airport for departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate airport for departure. 125.365... § 125.365 Alternate airport for departure. (a) If the weather conditions at the airport of takeoff are below the landing minimums in the certificate holder's operations specifications for that airport,...

  5. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  6. 14 CFR 152.323 - Budget revision: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget revision: Airport development. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.323 Budget revision: Airport development. (a) If any performance review conducted by the sponsor discloses a need...

  7. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  8. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  9. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  10. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  11. 14 CFR 139.205 - Amendment of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS...) Under § 139.3, the Regional Airports Division Manager may amend any Airport Certification Manual... Airports Division Manager's own initiative, if the Regional Airports Division Manager determines...

  12. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  13. 14 CFR 125.369 - Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate airport weather minimums. 125.369... § 125.369 Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in the flight release unless the appropriate weather reports or forecasts, or any combination...

  14. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  15. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  16. 14 CFR 125.369 - Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate airport weather minimums. 125.369... § 125.369 Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in the flight release unless the appropriate weather reports or forecasts, or any combination...

  17. 14 CFR 125.369 - Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate airport weather minimums. 125.369... § 125.369 Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in the flight release unless the appropriate weather reports or forecasts, or any combination...

  18. 14 CFR 125.369 - Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate airport weather minimums. 125.369... § 125.369 Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in the flight release unless the appropriate weather reports or forecasts, or any combination...

  19. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  20. 14 CFR 125.369 - Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate airport weather minimums. 125.369... § 125.369 Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in the flight release unless the appropriate weather reports or forecasts, or any combination...

  1. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  2. 14 CFR 156.4 - Airport and project eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS STATE BLOCK GRANT PILOT PROGRAM § 156.4 Airport and project eligibility. (a) A participating State shall use monies distributed pursuant to a State block grant agreement for airport... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport and project eligibility....

  3. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  4. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  5. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  6. Pavement thickness and stabilised foundation layer assessment using ground-coupled GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinhui; Vennapusa, Pavana K. R.; White, David J.; Beresnev, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Experimental results from field and laboratory investigations using a ground-coupled ground penetrating radar (GPR), dielectric measurement, magnetic imaging tomography (MIT) and dynamic cone penetrometer (DCP) tests are presented. Dielectric properties of asphalt pavement and stabilised and unstabilised pavement foundation materials were evaluated in the laboratory in frozen and unfrozen conditions. Laboratory test results showed that dielectric properties of materials back-calculated from GPR in comparison to dielectric gauge measurements are strongly correlated and repeatable. For chemically stabilised materials, curing time affected the dielectric properties of the materials. Field tests were conducted on asphalt pavement test sections with different foundation materials (stabilised and unstabilised layers), drainage conditions and layer thicknesses. GPR and MIT results were used to determine asphalt layer thicknesses and were compared with measured core thicknesses, while GPR and DCP were used to assess foundation layer profiles. Asphalt thicknesses estimated from GPR showed an average error of about 11% using the dielectric gauge values as input. The average error reduced to about 4% when calibrated with cores thicknesses. MIT results showed thicknesses that are about 9% higher than estimated using GPR. Foundation layer thicknesses could not be measured using GPR due to variations in moisture conditions between the test sections, which is partly attributed to variations in gradation and drainage characteristics of the subbase layer.

  7. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Movement Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Atlanta Hartsfield International Airport in Atlanta, GA. The test aircraft was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. Qualitative and quantitative results are discussed.

  8. State-of-the art guideline manual for design, quality control and construction of Sulfur-Extended-Asphalt (SEA) pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Izatt, J. O.

    1980-08-01

    Sulfur-Extended-Asphalt (SEA) binders save asphalt, a potential energy source, by replacing some asphalt in conventional flexible pavement mixes with sulfur. These new binders appear to possess properties comparable to asphalt. The guideline manual discussed provides the highway community in both public and private organizations with the most definitive state-of-the-art guidelines extant for using these binders. Information on design, construction, quality control, equipment, mixing plants, specifications, and safety is included. Administrators and professionals in pavement construction, design, maintenance, and materials testing will be the personnel who are most interested in the manual.

  9. Concentration of Airline Operations at Individual Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelerman, W.; Deneufville, R.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that it is a natural property of air transportation networks for competitive airlines to concentrate their operations at individual airports serving a given market. This implies that a strategy of developing satellite airports is doomed to failure unless the competitives behavior of the airlines is restricted. The results are demonstrated by tracing out the implications of observed patterns of traveller behavior as regards choice of carrier on the optimal game strategy for any particular airline. Analytic results for a two airline, two airport situation are extrapolated to the more general case, and specific supportive evidence from current operations are cited.

  10. Surface Operations Systems Improve Airport Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Ames Research Center, Mosaic ATM of Leesburg, Virginia created software to analyze surface operations at airports. Surface surveillance systems, which report locations every second for thousands of air and ground vehicles, generate massive amounts of data, making gathering and analyzing this information difficult. Mosaic?s Surface Operations Data Analysis and Adaptation (SODAA) tool is an off-line support tool that can analyze how well the airport surface operation is working and can help redesign procedures to improve operations. SODAA helps researchers pinpoint trends and correlations in vast amounts of recorded airport operations data.

  11. 77 FR 59035 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the St. George Airport, St...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the St. George Airport, St. George, UT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... Administration, Northwest Mountain Region, Airports Division, Denver Airports District Office, 26805 E....

  12. Superplasticized concretes for rehabilitation of bridge decks and highway pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, V.; Coyle, W. V.

    1981-01-01

    Two mixes, one with medium workability and high cement content suitable for bridge deck replacement and another with high workability suitable for structural and pavement concrete were selected for intensive study. For these mixes, properties of the fresh concrete (slump, vebe time, flow table spread, air content, initial and final setting times) are reported. The effects of retempering are described. The influence of three types of cements on the properties of plastic and hardened concrete is explained. Complete results of the following tests are presented: compressive strength, tensile strength, flexural strength, static modulus of elasticity, dynamic modulus of elasticity, pulse velocity and dry unit weight at 1, 3, 28 and 90 days curing. The selected concretes had high durability and satisfactory resistance against deicer scaling.

  13. Article title misstates the role of pavement sealers.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Kirk

    2014-08-01

    The claim made in the title of Witter et al. (2014) "Coal-tar-based sealcoated pavement: A major PAH source to urban stream sediments" is not supported by the data presented. The author's use of Pearson correlation coefficients is insufficient to indicate causation. The application of spatial analysis and principle component analysis did not include sealer specific inputs, so provides no basis for the claim. To test the hypothesis that sealers are a source of PAHs in the stream studied, EPA's Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) source evaluation model was applied to Witter's sediment data. CMB found an excellent fit (R(2) > 0.999) between measured and modeled PAH concentrations when sealers were not included as a potential source. This finding does not support Witter et al. (2014) claim that sealers are a major source of PAHs.

  14. Assessment of asphalt mixtures characteristics through GPR testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Jorge; Fernandes, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    Road pavements are composed by granular and asphalt layers, placed over the pavement subgrade, which are designed to resist to traffic and climatic effects. Pavement distresses include permanent deformation mainly due to the contribution of the subgrade and fatigue cracking in the asphalt layers. Fatigue cracking is the main pavement distress and is responsible for the main rehabilitations carried out in road pavements which leads, in most cases, to the pavement reconstruction due to the severity of the cracking observed in many roads. For a given aggregate gradation, the fatigue cracking resistance is related to the proportions of the components in the asphalt mixtures, namely the void content and the binder content. Also the presence of water, or moisture, has an important influence in the fatigue resistance, and its effect is characterized by a reduction in the fatigue cracking resistance. The characteristics of the asphalt mixtures applied in road pavements can be assessed in laboratory through the testing of cores extracted from the pavement. These cores are extracted some representative section of the pavement, usually equally spaced in the road. Due to the construction process, the representative sections of the pavement don't allow to identify the quality of the whole pavement. Thus, the use of continuous measurement is essential to ensure the perfect assessment of the pavement quality and the use of the GPR assumes a paramount importance. Thus, this communication presents several GPR tests carried out on pavement slabs produced in laboratory with different void content, binder content and moisture content in order to establish different classifiers that will allow the identification of this condition during regular inspections. Furthermore, tests carried on specimens before and after fatigue tests will allow to calculate similar parameters to estimate the state of conservation of pavements in terms of stiffness and the presence of cracks. This work is a

  15. Permeable pavement demonstration site at Edison Environmental Center (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are few studies of full-scale, outdoor, replicated, working pervious pavement systems. More studies of pervious pavement operating in its intended use (parking lot, roadway, etc.) during a range of climatic events, daily usage conditions, and maintenance regimes are necessa...

  16. Research on pavement crack recognition methods based on image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yingchun; Zhang, Yamin

    2011-06-01

    In order to overview and analysis briefly pavement crack recognition methods , then find the current existing problems in pavement crack image processing, the popular methods of crack image processing such as neural network method, morphology method, fuzzy logic method and traditional image processing .etc. are discussed, and some effective solutions to those problems are presented.

  17. Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison Environmental Center

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are few detailed studies of full-scale, replicated, actively-used permeable pavement systems. Practitioners need additional studies of permeable pavement systems in its intended application (parking lot, roadway, etc.) across a range of climatic events, daily usage conditio...

  18. Permeable pavement monitoring at the Edison Environmental Center demonstration site

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are few detailed studies of full-scale, replicated, actively-used pervious pavement systems. Practitioners need additional studies of pervious pavement systems in its intended application (parking lot, roadway, etc.) during a range of climatic events, daily usage conditions...

  19. Permeable Pavement Demonstration at the Edison Environmental Center (Hartford)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In general, there is a lack of full-scale, outdoor, real-world porous pavement studies with system replicates. More studies of porous pavement operating in its intended use (parking lot, roadway, etc.) with climatic events, regular use, and maintenance effects, are necessary. The...

  20. Permeable pavement demonstration at the Edison Environmental Center

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are few studies of full-scale, outdoor, replicated, functioning pervious pavement systems. More studies of pervious pavement operating in its intended use (parking lot, roadway, etc.) during a range of climatic events, daily usage conditions, and maintenance regimes are nec...

  1. Permeable pavement demonstration at the Edison Environmental Center (Hartford, CT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In general, there is a lack of full-scale, outdoor, real-world porous pavement studies with system replicates. More studies of porous pavement operating in its intended use (parking lot, roadway, etc.) with climatic events, regular use, and maintenance effects, are necessary. The...

  2. Permeable Pavement Monitoring at the Edison Environmental Center Demonstration Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are few detailed studies of full-scale, replicated, actively-used pervious pavement systems. Practitioners need additional studies of pervious pavement systems in its intended application (parking lot, roadway, etc.) during a range of climatic events, daily usage conditions...

  3. Full-Depth Asphalt Pavements for Parking Lots and Driveways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asphalt Inst., College Park, MD.

    The latest information for designing full-depth asphalt pavements for parking lots and driveways is covered in relationship to the continued increase in vehicle registration. It is based on The Asphalt Institute's Thickness Design Manual, Series No. 1 (MS-1), Seventh Edition, which covers all aspects of asphalt pavement thickness design in detail,…

  4. Nutrient Infiltrate Concentrations from Three Permeable Pavement Types

    EPA Science Inventory

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha...

  5. 211. EQUIPMENT LAYING FIRST LANE OF CONCRETE PAVEMENT NEAR THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    211. EQUIPMENT LAYING FIRST LANE OF CONCRETE PAVEMENT NEAR THE CAPITAL OVERLOOK, 1931. NOTE THE BEGINNING OF BITUMINOUS TYPE OF TEMPORARY PAVEMENT TO ALLOW FOR SETTLEMENT IN HYDRAULIC FILL AREAS. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  6. Modeling the Hydrologic Processes of a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A permeable pavement system can capture stormwater to reduce runoff volume and flow rate, improve onsite groundwater recharge, and enhance pollutant controls within the site. A new unit process model for evaluating the hydrologic performance of a permeable pavement system has be...

  7. Integrating repositories with fuel cycles: The airport authority model

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.

    2012-07-01

    The organization of the fuel cycle is a legacy of World War II and the cold war. Fuel cycle facilities were developed and deployed without consideration of the waste management implications. This led to the fuel cycle model of a geological repository site with a single owner, a single function (disposal), and no other facilities on site. Recent studies indicate large economic, safety, repository performance, nonproliferation, and institutional incentives to collocate and integrate all back-end facilities. Site functions could include geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) with the option for future retrievability, disposal of other wastes, reprocessing with fuel fabrication, radioisotope production, other facilities that generate significant radioactive wastes, SNF inspection (navy and commercial), and related services such as SNF safeguards equipment testing and training. This implies a site with multiple facilities with different owners sharing some facilities and using common facilities - the repository and SNF receiving. This requires a different repository site institutional structure. We propose development of repository site authorities modeled after airport authorities. Airport authorities manage airports with government-owned runways, collocated or shared public and private airline terminals, commercial and federal military facilities, aircraft maintenance bases, and related operations - all enabled and benefiting the high-value runway asset and access to it via taxi ways. With a repository site authority the high value asset is the repository. The SNF and HLW receiving and storage facilities (equivalent to the airport terminal) serve the repository, any future reprocessing plants, and others with needs for access to SNF and other wastes. Non-public special-built roadways and on-site rail lines (equivalent to taxi ways) connect facilities. Airport authorities are typically chartered by state governments and managed by commissions with members

  8. Monitoring asphalt pavement damages using remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettas, Christodoulos; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Neocleous, Kyriacos; Christofe, Andreas; Pilakoutas, Kypros; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos

    2015-06-01

    One of the main issues in the maintenance plans of road agencies or governmental organizations is the early detection of damaged asphalt pavements. The development of a smart and non-destructive systematic technique for monitoring damaged asphalt pavements is considered a main priority to fill this gap. During the 1970's, remote sensing was used to map road surface distress, while during the last decade, remote sensing became more advanced, thereby assisting in the evolution of the identification and mapping of roads. Various techniques were used in order to explore condition, age, weaknesses and imperfections of asphalted pavements. These methods were fairly successful in the classification of asphalted surfaces and in the detection of some of their characteristics. This paper explores the state of the art of using remote sensing techniques for monitoring damaged pavements and some typical spectral profiles of various asphalt pavements in Cyprus area acquired using the SVC1024 field spectroradiometer.

  9. 19 CFR 122.153 - Limitations on airport of entry or departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., the Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida; the John F. Kennedy International Airport, Jamaica... York John F. Kennedy International Airport Los Angeles, California Los Angeles International...

  10. 19 CFR 122.153 - Limitations on airport of entry or departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., the Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida; the John F. Kennedy International Airport, Jamaica... York John F. Kennedy International Airport Los Angeles, California Los Angeles International...

  11. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... use any airport unless it is adequate for the proposed operation, considering such items as size... to be used for takeoff or landing is marked by flare pots or lanterns, their use must be approved...

  12. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... use any airport unless it is adequate for the proposed operation, considering such items as size... to be used for takeoff or landing is marked by flare pots or lanterns, their use must be approved...

  13. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... use any airport unless it is adequate for the proposed operation, considering such items as size... to be used for takeoff or landing is marked by flare pots or lanterns, their use must be approved...

  14. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... use any airport unless it is adequate for the proposed operation, considering such items as size... to be used for takeoff or landing is marked by flare pots or lanterns, their use must be approved...

  15. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... use any airport unless it is adequate for the proposed operation, considering such items as size... to be used for takeoff or landing is marked by flare pots or lanterns, their use must be approved...

  16. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the end of each runway at ground level; (d) Each airport must have a traffic direction indicator when... seaplanes is permitted to use adequate nonpermanent lighting or shoreline lighting, if approved by...

  17. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the end of each runway at ground level; (d) Each airport must have a traffic direction indicator when... seaplanes is permitted to use adequate nonpermanent lighting or shoreline lighting, if approved by...

  18. Pilot preference and procedures at uncontrolled airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. C.

    1975-01-01

    The report presents the results of a pilot questionnaire utilized at the 1974 Reading, Pennsylvania Air Show to obtain data on pilot procedures and preference in the terminal airspace of uncontrolled airports.

  19. Public health impact of large airports.

    PubMed

    Passchier, W; Knottnerus, A; Albering, H; Walda, I

    2000-01-01

    Large airports with the related infrastructure, businesses and industrial activities affect the health of the population living, travelling and working in the surroundings of or at the airport. The employment and contributions to economy from the airport and related operations are expected to have a beneficial effect, which, however, is difficult to quantify. More pertinent data are available on the, largely negative, health effects of environmental factors, such as air and soil pollution, noise, accident risk, and landscape changes. Information on the concurrent and cumulative impact of these factors is lacking, but is of primary relevance for public health policy. A committee of the Health Council of The Netherlands recently reviewed the data on the health impact of large airports. It was concluded that, generally, integrated health assessments are not available. Such assessments, as part of sustainable mobility policy, should accompany the further development of the global aviation system.

  20. Aircraft and airport noise control prospective outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, N.

    1982-01-01

    In a perspective look at aircraft and airport noise control over the past ten years or more - or more is added here because the Federal Aviation Regulation Part 36 of 1969 is a more significant milestone for the air transportation system than is the Noise Control Act of 1972 - we see an appreciable reduction in the noise emitted by newly designed and newly produced airplanes, particularly those powered by the new high bypass engines, but only, at best, a moderate alleviation of airport noise. The change in airport noise exposure was the consequence of the introduction of some new, quieter airplanes into the airlines fleets and some operational modifications or restrictions at the airports.

  1. Evaluation of flexible pavement performance life in Florida. Final research report, October 1993--June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Ping, W.V.; He, Y.

    1998-06-01

    The pavement performance life provides information on how long a particular pavement type will typically last before it needs rehabilitation. This study presents the research effort to estimate the average flexible pavement performance life in Florida. Two data files of Pavement Condition Survey (PCS) and Work Program Administration (WPA) were used for this study. SAS programs were applied to analyze and manipulate these two data files. The pavement performance condition curves were developed for a large sample size of pavement sections based on the polynomial model. The average pavement performance lives were evaluated for each pavement group based on the performance curves. The results of the evaluation showed that the primary system had longer average performance life than the interstate system. Generally, the polynomial model performed well in fitting the data. The pavement performance curve indicates that if M and R are performed while the pavement is still in the `slow rate of deterioration` phase, life cycle cost may be reduced.

  2. Assessment of in-situ compaction degree of HMA pavement surface layers using GPR and novel dielectric properties-based algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Fokion

    2015-04-01

    Field compaction of asphalt pavements is ultimately conducted to achieve layer(s) with suitable mechanical stability. However, the achieved degree of compaction has a significant influence on the performance of asphalt pavements. Providing all desirable mixture design characteristics without adequate compaction could lead to premature permanent deformation, excessive aging, and moisture damage; these distresses reduce the useful life of asphalt pavements. Hence, proper construction of an asphalt pavement is necessary to develop a long lasting roadway that will help minimize future maintenance. This goal is achieved by verifying and confirming that design specifications, in this case density specifications are met through the use of Quality Assurance (QA) practices. With respect to in-situ compaction degree of hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavement surface layers, nearly all agencies specify either cored samples or nuclear/ non nuclear density gauges to provide density measurement of the constructed pavement. Typically, a small number of spot tests (with either cores or nuclear gauges) are run and a judgment about the density level of the entire roadway is made based on the results of this spot testing. Unfortunately, density measurement from a small number of spots may not be representative of the density of the pavement mat. Hence, full coverage evaluation of compaction quality of the pavement mat is needed. The Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), as a Non Destructive Testing (NDT) technique, is an example of a non-intrusive technique that favors over the methods mentioned above for assessing compaction quality of asphalt pavements, since it allows measurement of all mat areas. Further, research studies in recent years have shown promising results with respect to its capability, coupled with the use of novel algorithms based on the dielectric properties of HMA, to predict the in-situ field density. In view of the above, field experimental surveys were conducted to assess the

  3. Predicting the behavior of asphalt concrete pavements in seasonal frost areas using nondestructive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoo, Vincent C.; Berg, Richard L.

    1990-11-01

    Four different pavement test sections were subjected to freeze-thaw cycling in the Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF). The test sections, each 610 cm in length, consisted of 15.2 cm of asphalt concrete pavement over a clay subgrade; 15.2 cm of asphalt concrete over 10.2 cm of crushed gravel over a clay subgrade; 5.1 cm of asphalt over 17.8 cm of crushed gravel over 20.3 cm of clean sand over a clay subgrade; and 5.1 cm of asphalt concrete over 25.4 cm of crushed gravel over 12.7 cm of clean sand over clay subgrade. Thermocouples were imbedded throughout the pavement structure and subgrade. During the thawing periods, deflection measurements were made at four locations in each test section using a Dynatest Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD). The results of the deflection measurement are presented here. An analysis was done to qualify the subgrade strength based solely on FDW measurements. It was also shown that a relationship existed between thaw depth and FWD measurement in the subgrade.

  4. Properties and toxicological effects of particles from the interaction between tyres, road pavement and winter traction material.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Gudmundsson, Anders; Dahl, Andreas; Swietlicki, Erik; Bohgard, Mats; Lindbom, John; Ljungman, Anders

    2008-04-15

    In regions where studded tyres and traction material are used during winter, e.g. the Nordic countries, northern part of USA, Canada, and Japan, mechanically generated particles from traffic are the main reason for high particle mass concentrations in busy street and road environments. In many Nordic municipalities the European environmental quality standard for inhalable particles (PM(10)) is exceeded due to these particles. In this study, particles from the wear of studded and studless friction tyres on two pavements and traction sanding were generated using a road simulator. The particles were characterized using particle sizers, Particle Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis and electron microscopy. Cell studies were conducted on particles sampled from the tests with studded tyres and compared with street environment, diesel exhaust and subway PM(10), respectively. The results show that in the road simulator, where resuspension is minimized, studded tyres produce tens of times more particles than friction tyres. Chemical analysis of the sampled particles shows that the generated wear particles consist almost entirely of minerals from the pavement stone material, but also that Sulfur is enriched for the submicron particles and that Zink is enriched for friction tyres for all particles sizes. The chemical data can be used for source identification and apportionment in urban aerosol studies. A mode of ultra-fine particles was also present and is hypothesised to originate in the tyres. Further, traction material properties affect PM(10) emission. The inflammatory potential of the particles from wear of pavements seems to depend on type of pavement and can be at least as potent as diesel exhaust particles. The results imply that there is a need and a good potential to reduce particle emission from pavement wear and winter time road and street operation by adjusting both studded tyre use as well as pavement and traction material properties. PMID:18258284

  5. Runoff and infiltration characteristics of pavement structures--review of an extensive monitoring program.

    PubMed

    Illgen, M; Harting, K; Schmitt, T G; Welker, A

    2007-01-01

    The stormwater runoff and infiltration performance of permeable pavements has been systematically evaluated within an intensive monitoring program. The primary objective of the investigation was to generate a broad database, which enables the development of an advanced simulation module for urban drainage modelling. Over 160 field and lab scale experiments have been completed and analyzed for surface runoff and infiltration characteristics. The test series include several pavement types under various boundary conditions such as diverse precipitation impacts, varying surface slope and layer construction as well as different stages of surface clogging and several base and subgrade layer characteristics. The results represent a reliable and comprehensive database that allows profound conclusions and substantial recommendations. PMID:18048986

  6. A numerical model for flexible pavements rut depth evolution with time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allou, Fatima; Chazallon, Cyrille; Hornych, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    A simplified method has been developed for the finite elements modelling of flexible pavements rut depth evolution with time. This method is based on the shakedown theory established by Zarka for metallic structures. The yield surface of Drucker-Prager and the plastic potential of Von Mises have been used. The simplified method determines straightforwardly the purely elastic state or the elastic shakedown state or the plastic shakedown state. The calibration of the simplified method with two unbound granular materials for roads under repeated loads triaxial tests, is explained. Then, a finite elements modelling of a flexible pavement has been carried out. Calculations of 2D and 3D have been performed and rut depth evolutions with time are shown, which underline the capabilities of the model to take into account the accumulation of plastic strains along the loading cycles. Copyright

  7. Characterizing a porous road pavement using surface impedance measurement: a guided numerical inversion procedure.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Gaëlle; Heinkélé, Christophe; Gourdon, Emmanuel

    2013-12-01

    This paper deals with a numerical procedure to identify the acoustical parameters of road pavement from surface impedance measurements. This procedure comprises three steps. First, a suitable equivalent fluid model for the acoustical properties porous media is chosen, the variation ranges for the model parameters are set, and a sensitivity analysis for this model is performed. Second, this model is used in the parameter inversion process, which is performed with simulated annealing in a selected frequency range. Third, the sensitivity analysis and inversion process are repeated to estimate each parameter in turn. This approach is tested on data obtained for porous bituminous concrete and using the Zwikker and Kosten equivalent fluid model. This work provides a good foundation for the development of non-destructive in situ methods for the acoustical characterization of road pavements.

  8. 77 FR 3031 - Release of Airport Property: Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ...The FAA hereby provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties, approximately 3.407 acres, at the Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL from the conditions, reservations, and restrictions as contained in federal grant assurances. The release of property will allow the Hillsborough County Aviation Authority to dispose of the property for other than aeronautical purposes. The......

  9. 76 FR 15028 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Interim Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... standards for control of airport operations and development and for self-sustaining and nondiscriminatory... include responsibilities to retain the rights and powers necessary to control and operate the airport; to... as self-sustaining as possible. A complete list of the current grant assurances can be viewed...

  10. 77 FR 23598 - Technical Amendment to Cuba Airport List: Addition of Recently Approved Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... FR 5058) that amended the CBP regulations to establish such procedures and airport eligibility... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR Part 122 Technical Amendment to Cuba Airport List... from Cuba. DATES: Effective: April 20, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Arthur A.E. Pitts, Sr.,...

  11. Evaluation of base widening methods on flexible pavements in Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offei, Edward

    The surface transportation system forms the biggest infrastructure investment in the United States of which the roadway pavement is an integral part. Maintaining the roadways can involve rehabilitation in the form of widening, which requires a longitudinal joint between the existing and new pavement sections to accommodate wider travel lanes, additional travel lanes or modification to shoulder widths. Several methods are utilized for the joint construction between the existing and new pavement sections including vertical, tapered and stepped joints. The objective of this research is to develop a formal recommendation for the preferred joint construction method that provides the best base layer support for the state of Wyoming. Field collection of Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP) data, Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) data, base samples for gradation and moisture content were conducted on 28 existing and 4 newly constructed pavement widening projects. A survey of constructability issues on widening projects as experienced by WYDOT engineers was undertaken. Costs of each joint type were compared as well. Results of the analyses indicate that the tapered joint type showed relatively better pavement strength compared to the vertical joint type and could be the preferred joint construction method. The tapered joint type also showed significant base material savings than the vertical joint type. The vertical joint has an 18% increase in cost compared to the tapered joint. This research is intended to provide information and/or recommendation to state policy makers as to which of the base widening joint techniques (vertical, tapered, stepped) for flexible pavement provides better pavement performance.

  12. The airnoise boundary concept for airport noise management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Philip J.

    Attention is given to the draft New Zealand Standard on Airport Noise, which tells airport users exactly how much noise exposure they may make over any residential area; only in a fixed airport control zone, enclosed by the 'airnoise boundary', may they make more noise than this amount. The airnoise boundary concept for airport noise management is argued to be feasible and applicable to any airport irrespective of size. Use of the concept may greatly ease the related health problems around many busy airports, and still allow for necessary growth.

  13. Automated management for pavement inspection system (AMPIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Hung Chi; Girardello, Roberto; Soeller, Tony; Shinozuka, Masanobu

    2003-08-01

    An automated in-situ road surface distress surveying and management system, AMPIS, has been developed on the basis of video images within the framework of GIS software. Video image processing techniques are introduced to acquire, process and analyze the road surface images obtained from a moving vehicle. ArcGIS platform is used to integrate the routines of image processing and spatial analysis in handling the full-scale metropolitan highway surface distress detection and data fusion/management. This makes it possible to present user-friendly interfaces in GIS and to provide efficient visualizations of surveyed results not only for the use of transportation engineers to manage road surveying documentations, data acquisition, analysis and management, but also for financial officials to plan maintenance and repair programs and further evaluate the socio-economic impacts of highway degradation and deterioration. A review performed in this study on fundamental principle of Pavement Management System (PMS) and its implementation indicates that the proposed approach of using GIS concept and its tools for PMS application will reshape PMS into a new information technology-based system providing a convenient and efficient pavement inspection and management.

  14. 33 CFR 165.1192 - Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport, San Francisco Bay... Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport, San Francisco Bay, California. (a) Locations. The following areas are security zones: (1)...

  15. 33 CFR 165.1192 - Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport, San Francisco Bay... Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport, San Francisco Bay, California. (a) Locations. The following areas are security zones: (1)...

  16. Research on pavement roughness based on the laser triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenxue; Ni, Zhibin; Hu, Xinhan; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    Pavement roughness is one of the most important factors for appraising highway construction. In this paper, we choose the laser triangulation to measure pavement roughness. The principle and configuration of laser triangulation are introduced. Based on this technology, the pavement roughness of a road surface is measured. The measurement results are given in this paper. The measurement range of this system is 50 μm. The measurement error of this technology is analyzed. This technology has an important significance to appraise the quality of highway after completion of the workload.

  17. ICAO's anti-SARS airport activities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Silvio; Curdt-Christiansen, Claus M

    2003-11-01

    To prevent SARS from spreading through air travel and in order to rebuild the confidence of the traveling public in the safety of air travel, ICAO has set up an "Anti-SARS Airport Evaluation Project." The first phase of this project was to develop a set of protective measures for international airports in affected areas to adopt and implement and then to send out, on the request of Contracting States, a team of inspectors to evaluate and assess airports and issue a "statement of evaluation" that the airport inspected complies with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. In cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO), the first part of phase 1 was completed in early June this year, and the second part of phase 1 followed soon after. By mid-July, five international airports in Southeast Asia had been inspected and found to be in full compliance with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. The success of this ICAO project is believed to have contributed significantly to the recovery of international air travel and related industries now taking place. Phase 2 of the project is now being developed. It is aimed at preventing a resurgence of SARS, but it also contains elements to make the methodology developed applicable to future outbreaks of any other communicable disease in which the mode of transmission could involve aviation and/or the need to prevent the spread of the disease by air travel.

  18. Northern New Mexico regional airport market feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1998-06-01

    This report is about the market for airline travel in northern New Mexico. Interest in developing a northern New Mexico regional airport has periodically surfaced for a number of years. The New Mexico State Legislature passed a memorial during the 1998 Second Session calling for the conduct of a study to determine the feasibility of building a new regional airport in NNM. This report is a study of the passenger market feasibility of such an airport. In addition to commercial passenger market feasibility, there are other feasibility issues dealing with siting, environmental impact, noise, economic impact, intermodal transportation integration, region-wide transportation services, airport engineering requirements, and others. These other feasibility issues are not analyzed in any depth in this report although none were discovered to be show-stoppers as a by-product of the authors doing research on the passenger market itself. Preceding the need for a detailed study of these other issues is the determination of the basic market need for an airport with regular commercial airline service in the first place. This report is restricted to an in-depth look at the market for commercial passenger air service in NNM. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. New structural systems for zero-maintenance pavements. Volume 3: Anchored pavement system designed for Edens Expressway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, S. K.; Militsopoulos, S. G.

    1980-08-01

    The response of the Edens Expressway subjected to mechanical and environmental loads using the anchored pavement concept is discussed. The mechanical and thermal properties of materials that could be encountered in future reconstruction of Edens Expressway are presented in a consistent form for computer programming. These properties are viewed as typical design values during investigation of pavement response. The behavior of the anchored pavement under induced temperature loads and weakening of subgrade (by thawing action) is clearly demonstrated. The example problem provides the input parameters of materials and loads for the analysis, the generation of finite element mesh, and the results of the analysis.

  20. Fore and aft elastic response characteristics of 34 x 9.9, type 7, 14 ply-rating aircraft tires of bias-ply, bias-belted, and radial-belted design. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ., May 1973; [static and rolling tests on dry concrete pavements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the fore-and-aft elastic response characteristics of 34 x 9.9, type VII, 14 ply-rating aircraft tires of bias-ply, bias-belted, and radial-belted design. The investigation consisted of static and rolling tests on dry concrete pavements at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility; statistical techniques which related the measured tire elastic characteristics to variations in the vertical load, inflation pressure, braking force and/or tire vertical deflection; and a semiempirical analysis which related the tire elastic behavior to measured wheel slippage during steady-state braking. The bias-belted tire developed the largest spring constant value for most loading conditions; the radial-belted tire, the smallest. The elastic response of the tire free periphery to static braking included both tread stretch and carcass torsional wind-up about the axle for the bias-ply and bias-belted tires and carcass wind-up alone for the radial-belted tire.

  1. Wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory reactions in mouse macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2007-06-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. These health risks are of increasing concern in society, and to protect public health, a clarification of the toxic properties of particles from different sources is of importance. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized as a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries where studded tires are used. The aim of this study was to further investigate and compare the ability to induce inflammatory mediators of different traffic-related wear particles collected from an urban street, a subway station, and studded tire-pavement wear. Inflammatory effects were measured as induction of nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, TNF-alpha, arachidonic acid (AA), and lipid peroxidation after exposure of the murine macrophage like cell line RAW 264.7. In addition, the redox potential of the particles was measured in a cell-free system. The results show that all particles tested induce IL-6, TNF-alpha, and NO, and those from the urban street were the most potent ones. In contrast, particles collected from a subway station were most potent to induce lipid peroxidation, AA release, and formation of ROS. Particles from studded tire-pavement wear, generated using a road simulator, were able to induce inflammatory cytokines, NO, lipid peroxidation, and ROS formation. Interestingly, particles generated from pavement containing granite as the main stone material were more potent than those generated from pavement containing quartzite as the main stone material.

  2. The Efficiency Analysis of Low Impact Development Applied in Taiwan: A Case Study of Porous Pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. H.; Liu, H. J.; Hsu, N. S.; Chang, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    Low Impact Development (LID) has been developed since the end of 1990s. Lots of successful experience based on this new technology have been made. Taiwan Executive Yuan is conducting a six-year (2014~2019) program "Integrated River Basin Management Plan" applying LID to build sponge cities. Construction and Planning Agency, Ministry of the Interior is editing the manual of LID technology for Taiwan. However, since the hydrological environments, physiographic conditions, climates, the strength and frequency of disasters in Taiwan are different from that in America, this study takes the first laboratory experiment and model simulation to evaluate the efficiency of application of LID in Taiwan.LID Facilities includes porous pavement, rain garden, green roof, tree box filter facilities and so on, and in this study, porous pavement is taken as an example for discussion. In the part of laboratory experiments, the sand box experiments is designed to operate with the specified rainfall return period calculated by Horton formula and rainfall characteristics of Taipei. Then the outflow hydrograph in each designed rainfall of specified return period can be evaluated. As for model simulation, this study constructs LID simulation elements by SWMM model and tests the suitability for simulation of the outflow hydrograph obtained from experiments, and definitely quantifies the efficiency of water retention and flood reduction of porous pavement. The results fits well with the experimental observation data with less than 10% error of pick flow. It suggests that, with LID simulation elements constructed in this study, the efficiency of LID in actual on-site application can be evaluated.The results shows that porous pavement is able to delay arrival time of pick about 5% ~10% and reduce the pick flow about 5%~20%, and hold the ability of near 3~5% water retention. It proves that application of LID can retain water and reduce flood in Taiwan.

  3. Wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory reactions in mouse macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2007-06-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. These health risks are of increasing concern in society, and to protect public health, a clarification of the toxic properties of particles from different sources is of importance. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized as a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries where studded tires are used. The aim of this study was to further investigate and compare the ability to induce inflammatory mediators of different traffic-related wear particles collected from an urban street, a subway station, and studded tire-pavement wear. Inflammatory effects were measured as induction of nitric oxide (NO), IL-6, TNF-alpha, arachidonic acid (AA), and lipid peroxidation after exposure of the murine macrophage like cell line RAW 264.7. In addition, the redox potential of the particles was measured in a cell-free system. The results show that all particles tested induce IL-6, TNF-alpha, and NO, and those from the urban street were the most potent ones. In contrast, particles collected from a subway station were most potent to induce lipid peroxidation, AA release, and formation of ROS. Particles from studded tire-pavement wear, generated using a road simulator, were able to induce inflammatory cytokines, NO, lipid peroxidation, and ROS formation. Interestingly, particles generated from pavement containing granite as the main stone material were more potent than those generated from pavement containing quartzite as the main stone material. PMID:17516662

  4. Laser Scanning on Road Pavements: A New Approach for Characterizing Surface Texture

    PubMed Central

    Bitelli, Gabriele; Simone, Andrea; Girardi, Fabrizio; Lantieri, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    The surface layer of road pavement has a particular importance in relation to the satisfaction of the primary demands of locomotion, such as security and eco-compatibility. Among those pavement surface characteristics, the “texture” appears to be one of the most interesting with regard to the attainment of skid resistance. Specifications and regulations, providing a wide range of functional indicators, act as guidelines to satisfy the performance requirements. This paper describes an experiment on the use of laser scanner techniques on various types of asphalt for texture characterization. The use of high precision laser scanners, such as the triangulation types, is proposed to expand the analysis of road pavement from the commonly and currently used two-dimensional method to a three-dimensional one, with the aim of extending the range of the most important parameters for these kinds of applications. Laser scanners can be used in an innovative way to obtain information on areal surface layer through a single measurement, with data homogeneity and representativeness. The described experience highlights how the laser scanner is used for both laboratory experiments and tests in situ, with a particular attention paid to factors that could potentially affect the survey. PMID:23012535

  5. Temporal evolution modeling of hydraulic and water quality performance of permeable pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian; He, Jianxun; Valeo, Caterina; Chu, Angus

    2016-02-01

    A mathematical model for predicting hydraulic and water quality performance in both the short- and long-term is proposed based on field measurements for three types of permeable pavements: porous asphalt (PA), porous concrete (PC), and permeable inter-locking concrete pavers (PICP). The model was applied to three field-scale test sites in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The model performance was assessed in terms of hydraulic parameters including time to peak, peak flow and water balance and a water quality variable (the removal rate of total suspended solids). A total of 20 simulated storm events were used for model calibration and verification processes. The proposed model can simulate the outflow hydrographs with a coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.762 to 0.907, and normalized root-mean-square deviation (NRMSD) ranging from 13.78% to 17.83%. Comparison of the time to peak flow, peak flow, runoff volume and TSS removal rates between the measured and modeled values in model verification phase had a maximum difference of 11%. The results demonstrate that the proposed model is capable of capturing the temporal dynamics of the pavement performance. Therefore, the model has great potential as a practical modeling tool for permeable pavement design and performance assessment.

  6. Laser scanning on road pavements: a new approach for characterizing surface texture.

    PubMed

    Bitelli, Gabriele; Simone, Andrea; Girardi, Fabrizio; Lantieri, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    The surface layer of road pavement has a particular importance in relation to the satisfaction of the primary demands of locomotion, such as security and eco-compatibility. Among those pavement surface characteristics, the "texture" appears to be one of the most interesting with regard to the attainment of skid resistance. Specifications and regulations, providing a wide range of functional indicators, act as guidelines to satisfy the performance requirements. This paper describes an experiment on the use of laser scanner techniques on various types of asphalt for texture characterization. The use of high precision laser scanners, such as the triangulation types, is proposed to expand the analysis of road pavement from the commonly and currently used two-dimensional method to a three-dimensional one, with the aim of extending the range of the most important parameters for these kinds of applications. Laser scanners can be used in an innovative way to obtain information on areal surface layer through a single measurement, with data homogeneity and representativeness. The described experience highlights how the laser scanner is used for both laboratory experiments and tests in situ, with a particular attention paid to factors that could potentially affect the survey. PMID:23012535

  7. Evaluation of a new construction pavement section using the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Justin

    The AASHTO Mechanistic-Empirical Design Guide (MEPDG) is one of several "next generation" pavement design approaches intended to address limitations of older empirical methods. This research investigated the capabilities and performance of the MEPDG through analyses of an empirically-designed section of NH Route 16, which the New Hampshire Department of Transportation (NHDOT) indicated may be under-designed. MEPDG distress predictions indicate that the pavement section should achieve a service life of at least 10 years. This was supported by the fatigue analysis of the base course, which also indicated that the pavement may have been damaged by traffic loads prior to the completion of the surface course. During this research, a number of limitations and model behaviors of the MEPDG were observed, some with significant importance to this analysis and to future projects within New Hampshire. Because implementation and full realization of the MEPDG requires significant investment, the results of this research should be considered before undertaking steps towards adoption of the software.

  8. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume... Centennial Airport. Fort Worth, Texas Fort Worth Alliance Airport. Fresno, California Fresno...

  9. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Federal Register citations affecting § 122.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the...-Palomar Airport. Dallas, Texas Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport Daytona Beach, Florida Daytona...

  10. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 122.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... Love Field Municipal Airport Daytona Beach, Florida Daytona Beach International Airport....

  11. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 122.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... Love Field Municipal Airport Daytona Beach, Florida Daytona Beach International Airport....

  12. Aerial overview of the Denver International Airport site, looking southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial overview of the Denver International Airport site, looking southwest - Denver International Airport Site, Between Fifty-sixth & 128th Avenues, Buckley Road & Box Elder Creek, Denver, Denver County, CO

  13. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Airport Capacity and Delay Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, David A.; Nelson, Caroline; Shapiro, Gerald

    1998-01-01

    The ASAC Airport Capacity Model and the ASAC Airport Delay Model support analyses of technologies addressing airport capacity. NASA's Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Airport Capacity Model estimates the capacity of an airport as a function of weather, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) procedures, traffic characteristics, and the level of technology available. Airport capacity is presented as a Pareto frontier of arrivals per hour versus departures per hour. The ASAC Airport Delay Model allows the user to estimate the minutes of arrival delay for an airport, given its (weather dependent) capacity. Historical weather observations and demand patterns are provided by ASAC as inputs to the delay model. The ASAC economic models can translate a reduction in delay minutes into benefit dollars.

  14. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... certificate holder must develop and maintain an airport emergency plan designed to minimize the possibility...) Coordination of airport and control tower functions relating to emergency actions, as appropriate. (e) The...

  15. Photocopy of aerial photograph taken in 1959, showing Newark Airport. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of aerial photograph taken in 1959, showing Newark Airport. Photographer unknown. Original photograph property of Continental Airlines, Houston, Texas - Newark International Airport, Between New Jersey Turnpike, U.S. Routes 1 & 9, & Interstate 78, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  16. 14 CFR 152.107 - Project eligibility: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airport that is safe, useful, and usable; or, (2) An additional facility that increases the safety... incorporated into this part by § 152.11; and (3) Be described in an approved airport layout plan. (d)...

  17. Recycled asphalt pavement as a base and sub-base material

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, M.H.; Gucunski, N.; Papp, W.J. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Laboratory and field investigations were conducted to evaluate the use of recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in roadway base and sub-base applications. The laboratory resilient modulus test results showed RAP has comparable strength with dense graded aggregate base and sub-base material used in the state of New Jersey. Using the spectral-analysis-of-the-surface-waves method (SASW), the field testing program evaluated the elastic modulus of the RAP base in the field and verified the laboratory results. The field test results showed higher modulus and stiffness for RAP than the dense graded aggregate base normally used in state of New Jersey.

  18. STUDY ON PROPERTIES OF SKID RESISTANCE ON FREEZING PAVEMENTS AND QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION METHOD OF ANTIFREEZING EFFECTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shunsuke; Takeichi, Kiyoshi; Masuyama, Yukiei; Takahashi, Naoto

    Snow and ice control in winter roads trends to be controlled by the skid friction coefficients in North America and North European countries at present, but the measurements are not necessarily easy. We studied on a simplified measurement method based on the relationship between skid friction coefficients and the bare pavement ratio (BPR) in the laboratory tests and field tests. The factors of BPR, surface textures and antifreezing materials which affect the skid friction coefficient are reviewed by a multiple linear regression analysis and a spectrum analysis, considering different freezing surfaces. These studies indicate that conclusions induced by laboratory tests could be applied to roads in service.

  19. ANALYSIS OF GROUP MAINTENANCE STRATEGY -ROAD PAVEMENT AND SEWERAGE PIPES-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Keishi; Sugimoto, Yasuaki; Miyamoto, Shinya; Nada, Hideki; Hosoi, Yoshihiko

    Recently, it is critical to manage deteriorating sewerage and road facilities efficiently and strategically. Since the sewerage pipes are mostly installed under road pavement, the works for the replacement of the sewerage pipes are partially common to the works for the road. This means that the replacement cost can be saved by coordinating the timing of the replacements by sewerage pipe and road pavement. The purpose of the study is to develop the model based on Markov decision process to derive the optimal group maintenance policy so as to minimize lifecycle cost. Then the model is applied to case study area and demonstrated to estimate the lifecycle cost using statistical data such as pipe replacement cost, road pavement rehabilitation cost, and state of deterioration of pipes and road pavement.

  20. Permeable Pavement Demonstration at the Edison Environmental Center - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    Poster for the SAB Review detailing the porous pavement parking lot project. The poster describes the design of the parking lot, the research components that were incorporated into the design, and the monitoring plan.

  1. Role of helicopters in airport access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dajani, J. S.; Snyder, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper briefly reviews the role of helicopter systems in the provision of airport access services and evaluates the potential for the future development of such services in major metropolitan areas in the United States. The evaluation is based on a computer simulation of potential helicopter system proposed for 20 metropolitan areas. The simulation provides two indicators that are used to gage the extent of the feasibility of developing successful systems in these areas: (1) the cost per seat mile, and (2) the break-even number of passengers, expressed as a percentage of total air travelers. It is found that a few metropolitan areas presently have the potential of marginally supporting intra-urban helicopter airport access service. The access systems offer a viable alternative for air passengers placing a high value on their time, and provides the opportunity for better integrating the air transportation service of multiple airports in a given urban region.

  2. TRIZ Tool for Optimization of Airport Runway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Venkata; Selladurai, V.; Saravanan, R.

    TRIZ tool is used for conceptual design and layout of the novel ascending and descending runway model for the effective utilization of short length airports. Handling bigger aircrafts at smaller airports become the necessity for economic consideration and for the benefit of vast airliners and the aspiring air travelers of the region. The authors’ proposal of ascending and descending runway would enable the operational need of wide body aircrafts such as Boeing 747 and Airbus A380-800. Negotiating take-off and landing of bigger aircrafts at less than 10000 feet runway is an optimization solution. This conceptual model and the theoretical design with its layout is dealt in this paper as Part - I. The computer-aided design and analysis using MATLAB with Simulink tool box to confirm the adequacy of the runway length for the bigger aircrafts at smaller airports is however dealt in subsequent papers.

  3. The noise impact of proposed runway alternatives at Craig Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1982-01-01

    Four proposed runway expansion alternatives at Craig Airport in Jacksonville, Florida have been assessed with respect to their forecasted noise impact in the year 2005. The assessment accounts for population distributions around the airport and human subjective response to noise, as well as the distribution of noise levels in the surrounding community (footprints). The impact analysis was performed using the Airport-noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO), an airport community response model recently developd at Langley Research Center.

  4. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N.; Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  5. Field environmental evaluation plan for sulfur use in pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylak, D.; Deuel, L. E.; Izatt, J. O.; Jacobs, C.; Zahray, R.; Ham, S.

    1982-07-01

    The use of sulfur in highway paving mixtures is discussed. The evaluation procedures deal with the safety and environmental aspects of storage and handling, formulation, construction, operation and maintenance of highway pavements containing sulfur, including the possible generation of noxious and abnoxious fumes, dust and gases. Methods and equipment for monitoring potential emissions and pollutants are recommended and safety practices for the handling of sulfur and sulfur-modified asphalt mixtures and pavements are discussed.

  6. Measurements of the Stiffness and Thickness of the Pavement Asphalt Layer Using the Enhanced Resonance Search Method

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Nur Mustakiza; Yusoff, Nur Izzi Md.; Hardwiyono, Sentot; Mohd Nayan, Khairul Anuar

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced resonance search (ERS) is a nondestructive testing method that has been created to evaluate the quality of a pavement by means of a special instrument called the pavement integrity scanner (PiScanner). This technique can be used to assess the thickness of the road pavement structure and the profile of shear wave velocity by using the principle of surface wave and body wave propagation. In this study, the ERS technique was used to determine the actual thickness of the asphaltic pavement surface layer, while the shear wave velocities obtained were used to determine its dynamic elastic modulus. A total of fifteen locations were identified and the results were then compared with the specifications of the Malaysian PWD, MDD UKM, and IKRAM. It was found that the value of the elastic modulus of materials is between 3929 MPa and 17726 MPa. A comparison of the average thickness of the samples with the design thickness of MDD UKM showed a difference of 20 to 60%. Thickness of the asphalt surface layer followed the specifications of Malaysian PWD and MDD UKM, while some of the values of stiffness obtained are higher than the standard. PMID:25276854

  7. Measurements of the stiffness and thickness of the pavement asphalt layer using the enhanced resonance search method.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Nur Mustakiza; Yusoff, Nur Izzi Md; Hardwiyono, Sentot; Nayan, Khairul Anuar Mohd; El-Shafie, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced resonance search (ERS) is a nondestructive testing method that has been created to evaluate the quality of a pavement by means of a special instrument called the pavement integrity scanner (PiScanner). This technique can be used to assess the thickness of the road pavement structure and the profile of shear wave velocity by using the principle of surface wave and body wave propagation. In this study, the ERS technique was used to determine the actual thickness of the asphaltic pavement surface layer, while the shear wave velocities obtained were used to determine its dynamic elastic modulus. A total of fifteen locations were identified and the results were then compared with the specifications of the Malaysian PWD, MDD UKM, and IKRAM. It was found that the value of the elastic modulus of materials is between 3929 MPa and 17726 MPa. A comparison of the average thickness of the samples with the design thickness of MDD UKM showed a difference of 20 to 60%. Thickness of the asphalt surface layer followed the specifications of Malaysian PWD and MDD UKM, while some of the values of stiffness obtained are higher than the standard.

  8. Softening agents for recycling asphalt pavement

    SciTech Connect

    Sawatzky, H.; Clelland, F.I.; Farnand, B.A.; Houde, J. Jr.

    1993-08-10

    An asphaltic composition is described consisting essentially of: comminuted aged asphaltic pavement material; an effective amount, from about 2% to about 15 % by weight of a blend of an agent selected from the group consisting of a soft asphalt cement, a conventional asphalt cement, and a cutback asphalt, with a nitrogen-containing, adhesion-improving, anti-stripping agent comprising a sewage sludge-derived oil, or a fraction thereof, said sewage sludge-derived oil comprising a mixture of saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons, monoaromatic hydrocarbons, diaromatic hydrocarbons, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polar compounds and basic, pyridene-soluble compounds, having the following elemental chemical composition: nitrogen, about 3.4% to about 5% by weight; oxygen, about 5.8% to about 6.9% by weight; sulfur, about 0.3% to about 0.8% by weight; hydrogen, about 9.7% to about 10.4%, and carbon, about 76.9% to about 79.8%.

  9. Environmental assessment of pavement infrastructure: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Inyim, Peeraya; Pereyra, Jose; Bienvenu, Michael; Mostafavi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Through a critical review and systematic analysis of pavement life cycle assessment (LCA) studies published over the past two decades, this study shows that the available information regarding the environmental impacts of pavement infrastructure is not sufficient to determine what pavement type is more environmentally sustainable. Limitations and uncertainties related to data, system boundary and functional unit definitions, consideration of use and maintenance phase impacts, are identified as the main reasons for inconsistency of reported results in pavement LCA studies. The study outcomes also highlight the need for advancement of knowledge pertaining to: (1) utilization of performance-adjusted functional units, (2) accurate estimation of use, maintenance, and end-of-life impacts, (3) incorporation of the dynamic and uncertain nature of pavement condition performance in impact assessment; (4) development of region-specific inventory data for impact estimation; and (5) consideration of a standard set of impact categories for comparison of environmental performance of different pavement types. Advancing the knowledge in these areas is critical in providing consistent and reliable results to inform decision-making toward more sustainable roadway infrastructure. PMID:27045541

  10. Urban pavement surface temperature. Comparison of numerical and statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Mario; Khalifa, Abderrahmen; Bues, Michel; Bouilloud, Ludovic; Martin, Eric; Chancibaut, Katia

    2015-04-01

    The forecast of pavement surface temperature is very specific in the context of urban winter maintenance. to manage snow plowing and salting of roads. Such forecast mainly relies on numerical models based on a description of the energy balance between the atmosphere, the buildings and the pavement, with a canyon configuration. Nevertheless, there is a specific need in the physical description and the numerical implementation of the traffic in the energy flux balance. This traffic was originally considered as a constant. Many changes were performed in a numerical model to describe as accurately as possible the traffic effects on this urban energy balance, such as tires friction, pavement-air exchange coefficient, and infrared flux neat balance. Some experiments based on infrared thermography and radiometry were then conducted to quantify the effect fo traffic on urban pavement surface. Based on meteorological data, corresponding pavement temperature forecast were calculated and were compared with fiels measurements. Results indicated a good agreement between the forecast from the numerical model based on this energy balance approach. A complementary forecast approach based on principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-square regression (PLS) was also developed, with data from thermal mapping usng infrared radiometry. The forecast of pavement surface temperature with air temperature was obtained in the specific case of urban configurtation, and considering traffic into measurements used for the statistical analysis. A comparison between results from the numerical model based on energy balance, and PCA/PLS was then conducted, indicating the advantages and limits of each approach.

  11. Influence of pavement condition on horizontal curve safety.

    PubMed

    Buddhavarapu, Prasad; Banerjee, Ambarish; Prozzi, Jorge A

    2013-03-01

    Crash statistics suggest that horizontal curves are the most vulnerable sites for crash occurrence. These crashes are often severe and many involve at least some level of injury due to the nature of the collisions. Ensuring the desired pavement surface condition is one potentially effective strategy to reduce the occurrence of severe accidents on horizontal curves. This study sought to develop crash injury severity models by integrating crash and pavement surface condition databases. It focuses on developing a causal relationship between pavement condition indices and severity level of crashes occurring on two-lane horizontal curves in Texas. In addition, it examines the suitability of the existing Skid Index for safety maintenance of two-lane curves. Significant correlation is evident between pavement condition and crash injury severity on two-lane undivided horizontal curves in Texas. Probability of a crash becoming fatal is appreciably sensitive to certain pavement indices. Data suggested that road facilities providing a smoother and more comfortable ride are vulnerable to severe crashes on horizontal curves. In addition, the study found that longitudinal skid measurement barely correlates with injury severity of crashes occurring on curved portions. The study recommends exploring the option of incorporating lateral friction measurement into Pavement Management System (PMS) databases specifically at curved road segments.

  12. Environmental assessment of pavement infrastructure: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Inyim, Peeraya; Pereyra, Jose; Bienvenu, Michael; Mostafavi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Through a critical review and systematic analysis of pavement life cycle assessment (LCA) studies published over the past two decades, this study shows that the available information regarding the environmental impacts of pavement infrastructure is not sufficient to determine what pavement type is more environmentally sustainable. Limitations and uncertainties related to data, system boundary and functional unit definitions, consideration of use and maintenance phase impacts, are identified as the main reasons for inconsistency of reported results in pavement LCA studies. The study outcomes also highlight the need for advancement of knowledge pertaining to: (1) utilization of performance-adjusted functional units, (2) accurate estimation of use, maintenance, and end-of-life impacts, (3) incorporation of the dynamic and uncertain nature of pavement condition performance in impact assessment; (4) development of region-specific inventory data for impact estimation; and (5) consideration of a standard set of impact categories for comparison of environmental performance of different pavement types. Advancing the knowledge in these areas is critical in providing consistent and reliable results to inform decision-making toward more sustainable roadway infrastructure.

  13. Influence of pavement condition on horizontal curve safety.

    PubMed

    Buddhavarapu, Prasad; Banerjee, Ambarish; Prozzi, Jorge A

    2013-03-01

    Crash statistics suggest that horizontal curves are the most vulnerable sites for crash occurrence. These crashes are often severe and many involve at least some level of injury due to the nature of the collisions. Ensuring the desired pavement surface condition is one potentially effective strategy to reduce the occurrence of severe accidents on horizontal curves. This study sought to develop crash injury severity models by integrating crash and pavement surface condition databases. It focuses on developing a causal relationship between pavement condition indices and severity level of crashes occurring on two-lane horizontal curves in Texas. In addition, it examines the suitability of the existing Skid Index for safety maintenance of two-lane curves. Significant correlation is evident between pavement condition and crash injury severity on two-lane undivided horizontal curves in Texas. Probability of a crash becoming fatal is appreciably sensitive to certain pavement indices. Data suggested that road facilities providing a smoother and more comfortable ride are vulnerable to severe crashes on horizontal curves. In addition, the study found that longitudinal skid measurement barely correlates with injury severity of crashes occurring on curved portions. The study recommends exploring the option of incorporating lateral friction measurement into Pavement Management System (PMS) databases specifically at curved road segments. PMID:23298704

  14. 14 CFR 152.103 - Sponsors: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sponsors: Airport development. 152.103 Section 152.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Sponsors: Airport development. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for airport development...

  15. 14 CFR 139.203 - Contents of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Contents of Airport Certification Manual. 139.203 Section 139.203 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... succession of airport operational responsibility X X X X 2. Each current exemption issued to the airport...

  16. 14 CFR 139.203 - Contents of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Contents of Airport Certification Manual. 139.203 Section 139.203 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... succession of airport operational responsibility X X X X 2. Each current exemption issued to the airport...

  17. 14 CFR 139.203 - Contents of Airport Certification Manual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Contents of Airport Certification Manual. 139.203 Section 139.203 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... succession of airport operational responsibility X X X X 2. Each current exemption issued to the airport...

  18. Airports, Hotel, and Ground Transportation Information | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Airports in and near Washington, DC Reagan National Approximate 30 minute drive from Rockville* Has its own Metro stop on the blue and yellow lines in Virginia NOTE: This airport may be the closest and easiest option if not renting a car or do not want to pay for an airport cab/shuttle.   Dulles International Approximate 1 hour drive from Rockville* |

  19. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  20. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  1. 78 FR 44188 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Gateway Airport/Col. Bud Day Field, Sioux City, Iowa. ] SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invites public comment on the release of land at Sioux Gateway Airport/Col. Bud Day Field, Sioux City, Iowa... Airport/Col. Bud Day Field (SUX) under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47107(h)(2). On April 13, 2013,...

  2. Un Viaje al Aeropuerto (A Trip to the Airport).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This illustrated, bilingual Spanish-English intermediate reader describes a class trip to an airport, in which the class tours the airport, and learns about airport activities, the parts of an airplane, and other related topics. Each page of the text is illustrated with a drawing. The narrative is followed by a list of 24 suggested learning…

  3. 77 FR 12905 - Land Release for Penn Yan Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Penn Yan Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... requesting public comment on the Penn Yan Airport (PEO), Penn Yan, New York, Notice of Proposed Release from Aeronautical Use of approximately 10.00 +/- acres of airport property, to allow for...

  4. 77 FR 28667 - Land Release for Plattsburgh International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Plattsburgh International Airport AGENCY: Federal... Administration is requesting public comment on the Plattsburgh International Airport (PBG), Plattsburgh, New York, Notice of Proposed Release from Aeronautical Use, and from the Airport, of approximately 1.73 +/-...

  5. 77 FR 27272 - Land Release for Dunkirk Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Dunkirk Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... requesting public comment on the Dunkirk Airport (DKK), Dunkirk, New York, Notice of Proposed Release from Aeronautical Use of approximately 2.666 +/- acres of airport property, to allow for...

  6. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport...

  7. 14 CFR 156.4 - Airport and project eligibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport and project eligibility. 156.4... (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS STATE BLOCK GRANT PILOT PROGRAM § 156.4 Airport and project eligibility. (a) A participating State shall use monies distributed pursuant to a State block grant agreement for...

  8. 78 FR 53184 - Land Release for Penn Yan Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Penn Yan Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... requesting public comment on the Penn Yan Airport (PEO), Penn Yan, New York, Notice of Proposed Release from Aeronautical Use of approximately 0.069 +/- acres of airport property, to allow for...

  9. 14 CFR 121.624 - ETOPS Alternate Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false ETOPS Alternate Airports. 121.624 Section... Alternate Airports. (a) No person may dispatch or release an airplane for an ETOPS flight unless enough ETOPS Alternate Airports are listed in the dispatch or flight release such that the airplane...

  10. 14 CFR 135.223 - IFR: Alternate airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) to— (1) Complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing; (2) Fly from that airport to the alternate airport; and (3) Fly after that for 45 minutes at normal cruising speed or, for helicopters, fly after that for 30 minutes at normal cruising speed. (b) Paragraph (a)(2) of this section...

  11. 78 FR 49790 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Request To Release Airport Property AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of intent to rule on request to release airport property at the Ottumwa Regional Airport (OTM), Ottumwa, Iowa. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invites public comment on...

  12. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  13. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  14. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  15. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  16. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  17. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  18. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  19. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  20. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  1. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  2. 14 CFR 152.113 - Application requirements: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Application requirements: Airport planning. 152.113 Section 152.113 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Eligibility Requirements and Application Procedures §...

  3. 77 FR 17492 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... selection process, and the initial airport locations. See 77 FR 5681 and 8 CFR 235.12. Travelers who wish to... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports AGENCY: U.S.... This document announces the expansion of the program to include four additional airports. DATES:...

  4. Assessment of secondary materials for pavement construction: Technical and environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, M.C.M. |; Bridges, M.G.; Dawson, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    Current research at the University of Nottingham to enable the use of secondary materials in road construction covers technical aspects, mechanical properties of waste materials and the environmental implications of their use. Materials studied are minestone, china clay sand, slate waste, pulverized fuel ash and furnace bottom ash. The laboratory program set up for this research and the methodologies suggested for the study of the properties of these materials are presented. The test methods currently used to select pavement aggregates are presented along with current methods for the assessment of the environmental impact of secondary aggregates. The potential of the secondary aggregates is assessed within the current technical and environmental procedures previously presented. Two new methodologies are presented, one for the mechanical examination of secondary aggregates and one for the environmental assessment. The mechanical assessment encompasses conventional characterization and classification tests on both unbound and lightly treated pavement materials, and fundamental tests such as repeated load triaxial tests (RLTT) and repeated load indirect tensile tests (RLITT). Some sample results are presented, suggesting the feasibility and adequacy of this methodology for material discrimination, and evaluation of mechanical properties for design purposes. The environmental assessment indicates how the leaching concentration of contaminants from intensive testing can be used as the first step in assessing the environmental acceptability of a secondary material, and the means of determining a more realistic measure of in situ performance is discussed. The advantages and advancements of the presented methodologies over the basic and inappropriate techniques currently used to assess the suitability of secondary aggregates for use as pavement construction materials are discussed.

  5. Characterization of cementitiously stabilized subgrades for mechanistic-empirical pavement design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Pranshoo

    Pavements are vulnerable to subgrade layer performance because it acts as a foundation. Due to increase in the truck traffic, pavement engineers are challenged to build more strong and long-lasting pavements. To increase the load-bearing capacity of pavements, subgrade layer is often stabilized with cementitious additives. Thus, an overall characterization of stabilized subgrade layer is important for enhanced short- and long-term pavement performance. In this study, the effect of type and amount of additive on the short-term performance in terms of material properties recommended by the new Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) is examined. A total of four soils commonly encountered as subgrades in Oklahoma are utilized. Results show that the changes in the Mr, ME and UCS values stabilized specimens depend on the soil type and properties of additives. The long-term performance (or durability) of stabilized soil specimens is investigated by conducting freeze-thaw (F-T) cycling, vacuum saturation and tube suction tests on 7-day cured P-, K- and C-soil specimens stabilized with 6% lime, 10% CFA and 10% CKD. This study is motivated by the fact that during the service life of pavement stabilized layers are subjected to F-T cycles and moisture variations. It is found that that UCS value of all the stabilized specimens decreased with increase in the number of F-T cycles. A strong correlation was observed between UCS values retained after vacuum saturation and F-T cycles indicating that vacuum saturation could be used as a time-efficient and inexpensive method for evaluating durability of stabilized soils. In this study, short- and long-term observations from stabilization of sulfate bearing soil with locally available low (CFA), moderate (CKD) and high (lime) calcium-based stabilizers are determined to evaluate and compare the effect of additive type on the phenomenon of sulfate-induced heave. The impact of different factors on the development of the

  6. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Technologies for Increased Capacity and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.; Wills, Robert W.; Smith, Kathryn A.; Shipman, Floyd S.; Bryant, Wayne H.; Eckhardt, Dave E., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted to address airport surface movement area capacity and safety issues by providing pilots with enhanced situational awareness information. The demonstration presented an integration of several technologies to government and industry representatives. These technologies consisted of an electronic moving map display in the cockpit, a Differential Global Positioning system (DGPS) receiver, a high speed very high frequency (VHF) data link, an Airport Surface Detection Equipment (ASDE-3) radar, and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS). Aircraft identification was presented to an air traffic controller on an AMASS display. The onboard electronic map included the display of taxi routes, hold instructions, and clearances, which were sent to the aircraft via data link by the controller. The map also displayed the positions of other traffic and warning information, which were sent to the aircraft automatically from the ASDE-3/AMASS system. This paper describes the flight demonstration in detail, along with test results.

  7. Distribution of Blood Pressure Data from People Living Near AN Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GOTO, K.; KANEKO, T.

    2002-02-01

    We observed blood pressure in general health examination data around a city airport and compared the data with those from a calm suburban area of the city. Information was also collected on the short-term history of medication and lifestyle including smoking, drinking and eating salty foods. This cross-sectional study on 469 women showed that systolic and diastolic blood pressure was not associated with aircraft noise levels in the area, even after controlling for variables regarding anti-hypertension treatment and lifestyle factors. A comparative study on 469 women from an area around an airport and 1177 women from a suburban control area showed no significant differences between blood pressure and other medical tests controlling for the variables of medication and lifestyle. Changes in blood pressure after 8 years were observed in 183 women around the airport. No significant differences among three zones with different levels of aircraft noise were found.

  8. 75 FR 55401 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Air Park South Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... reinvested in another eligible airport improvement project for general aviation facilities at the Springfield... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Air Park South Airport (2K2), Ozark, MO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION:...

  9. 75 FR 41922 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Fort Smith Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Smith Regional Airport, Fort Smith, AR AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... comment on the release of land at Fort Smith Regional Airport under the provisions of Title 49, U.S.C... comments submitted to the FM must be mailed or delivered to Mr. John Parker, Airport Director, Fort...

  10. 76 FR 30422 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Helena Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Helena Regional Airport, Helena, Montana AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of Request to Release Airport Property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to...

  11. 76 FR 69321 - Intent To Rule On Request To Release Airport Property at the Malden Regional Airport and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Intent To Rule On Request To Release Airport Property at the Malden Regional Airport and Industrial Park (MAW), Malden, MO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... the Malden Regional Airport & Industrial Park (MAW), Malden, Missouri, under the provisions of 49...

  12. 76 FR 23854 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dubois Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dubois Regional Airport, Reynoldsville, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invite...

  13. 77 FR 12906 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dubois Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Dubois Regional Airport, Reynoldsville, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invite...

  14. 78 FR 20168 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Boulder Municipal Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Boulder Municipal Airport, Boulder, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of request to release airport property. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invite public...

  15. 75 FR 23841 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Reading Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... Reading Regional Airport, Reading, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) DOT. ACTION: Notice of... release of land at the Reading Regional Airport, Reading, Pennsylvania under the provisions of Section...: Terry P. Sroka, Manager, Reading Regional Airport Authority, 2501 Bernville Road, Reading, PA 19605,...

  16. 76 FR 19517 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ....\\1\\ \\1\\ 75 FR 9017 (Feb. 26, 2010). ATA also stated the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...\\ 14 CFR 93.227 (DCA); 74 FR 51648 (Oct. 7, 2009) (EWR); 74 FR 51650 (Oct. 7, 2009) (JFK); 74 FR 51653... Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and Newark Liberty International Airport; High Density Rule at Reagan...

  17. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurements at Denver International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert P.; Wang, Frank Y.; Booth, Earl R.; Watts, Michael E.; Fenichel, Neil; D'Errico, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    Airport capacity is constrained, in part, by spacing requirements associated with the wake vortex hazard. NASA's Wake Vortex Avoidance Project has a goal to establish the feasibility of reducing this spacing while maintaining safety. Passive acoustic phased array sensors, if shown to have operational potential, may aid in this effort by detecting and tracking the vortices. During August/September 2003, NASA and the USDOT sponsored a wake acoustics test at the Denver International Airport. The central instrument of the test was a large microphone phased array. This paper describes the test in general terms and gives an overview of the array hardware. It outlines one of the analysis techniques that is being applied to the data and gives sample results. The technique is able to clearly resolve the wake vortices of landing aircraft and measure their separation, height, and sinking rate. These observations permit an indirect estimate of the vortex circulation. The array also provides visualization of the vortex evolution, including the Crow instability.

  18. 76 FR 5510 - Safety Enhancements Part 139, Certification of Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you may visit http://Dockets... required to conduct pavement surface evaluations to ensure reliability of runway surfaces in wet weather... major step in achieving safer pavement surfaces for aircraft operations in wet weather...

  19. Exposure to wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory cytokine release from human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2006-04-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized to be a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries were studded tires are used. In this work, we investigated the inflammatory effect of PM10 generated from the wear of studded tires on two different types of pavement. As comparison, we also investigated PM10 from a traffic-intensive street, a subway station, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Human monocyte-derived macrophages, nasal epithelial cells (RPMI 2650), and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to the different types of particles, and the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha into the culture medium was measured. The results show a significant release of cytokines from macrophages after exposure for all types of particles. When particles generated from asphalt/granite pavement were compared to asphalt/quartzite pavement, the granite pavement had a significantly higher capacity to induce the release of cytokines. The granite pavement particles induced cytokine release at the same magnitude as the street particles did, which was higher than what particles from both a subway station and DEP did. Exposure of epithelial cells to PM10 resulted in a significant increase of TNF-alpha secreted from BEAS-2B cells for all types of particles used (DEP was not tested), and the highest levels were induced by subway particles. None of the particle types were able to evoke detectable cytokine release from RPMI 2650 cells. The results indicate that PM10 generated by the wear of studded tires on the street surface is a large contributor to the cytokine-releasing ability of particles in traffic-intensive areas and that the type of pavement used is important for the level of this contribution

  20. Exposure to wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory cytokine release from human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2006-04-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized to be a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries were studded tires are used. In this work, we investigated the inflammatory effect of PM10 generated from the wear of studded tires on two different types of pavement. As comparison, we also investigated PM10 from a traffic-intensive street, a subway station, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Human monocyte-derived macrophages, nasal epithelial cells (RPMI 2650), and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to the different types of particles, and the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha into the culture medium was measured. The results show a significant release of cytokines from macrophages after exposure for all types of particles. When particles generated from asphalt/granite pavement were compared to asphalt/quartzite pavement, the granite pavement had a significantly higher capacity to induce the release of cytokines. The granite pavement particles induced cytokine release at the same magnitude as the street particles did, which was higher than what particles from both a subway station and DEP did. Exposure of epithelial cells to PM10 resulted in a significant increase of TNF-alpha secreted from BEAS-2B cells for all types of particles used (DEP was not tested), and the highest levels were induced by subway particles. None of the particle types were able to evoke detectable cytokine release from RPMI 2650 cells. The results indicate that PM10 generated by the wear of studded tires on the street surface is a large contributor to the cytokine-releasing ability of particles in traffic-intensive areas and that the type of pavement used is important for the level of this contribution

  1. Analysis and Modeling of Ground Operations at Hub Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, Stephen (Technical Monitor); Andersson, Kari; Carr, Francis; Feron, Eric; Hall, William D.

    2000-01-01

    Building simple and accurate models of hub airports can considerably help one understand airport dynamics, and may provide quantitative estimates of operational airport improvements. In this paper, three models are proposed to capture the dynamics of busy hub airport operations. Two simple queuing models are introduced to capture the taxi-out and taxi-in processes. An integer programming model aimed at representing airline decision-making attempts to capture the dynamics of the aircraft turnaround process. These models can be applied for predictive purposes. They may also be used to evaluate control strategies for improving overall airport efficiency.

  2. Aircraft noise in the region of the Bucharest-Otopeni Airport. [noise pollution in airport environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costescu, M.; Gherghel, C.; Curtoglu, A.

    1974-01-01

    Aircraft noise, especially in the region adjoining airports, constitutes a problem that will be aggravated in the near future because of increasing aircraft traffic and the appearance of new types of large tonnage aircraft with continuously increasing powers and speeds. Criteria for the evaluation of aircraft noise are reported and some results of studies carried out in the region of Bucharest-Otopeni Airport are detailed.

  3. 49 CFR 27.71 - Airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., shuttle vehicles and people movers, shall comply with applicable requirements of the Department of... Access Act rules (49 CFR part 382) for carriers. (g) If an airport operator who receives Federal... assistive technology. (2) Clear floor or ground space. A clear floor or ground space complying with...

  4. Airport vulnerability assessment: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarick, Richard T.

    1998-12-01

    The Airport Vulnerability Assessment Project (AVAP) is the direct result of congressional funding of recommendation 3.13 of the White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security. This project takes a new approach to the assessment of U.S. commercial airports. AVAP uses automation, analytical methods and tools to evaluate vulnerability and risk, and to analyze cost/benefits in a more quantitative manner. This paper addresses both the process used to conduct this program, as well as a generalized look at the results, which have been achieved for the initial airport assessments. The process description covers the acquisition approach, the project structure, and a review of the various methodologies and tools being used by the sever performing organizations (Abacus Technology, Battelle, CTI, Lockwood Greene, Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, SAIC, and Science & Engineering Associates). The tools described include ASSESS, SAM, RiskWatch, CASRAP, and AVAT. Included in the process is the utilization of an advisory panel made up predominantly of experts from the National Laboratories 9Sandia, Oak Ridge, Argonne and Brookhaven). The results portion addresses the findings and products resulting from the initial airport assessments. High level (unrestricted) summaries of the results are presented, along with initial trends in commonly recommended security improvements (countermeasures). Opportunities for the application of optics technology are identified.

  5. Airport noise impact reduction through operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of various aeronautical, operational, and land-use noise impact reduction alternatives are assessed for a major midwestern airport. Specifically, the relative effectiveness of adding sound absorbing material to aircraft engines, imposing curfews, and treating houses with acoustic insulation are examined.

  6. Update to permeable pavement research at the Edison Environmental Center - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavement including: interlocking concrete permeable...

  7. Update to Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison Environmental Center - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavement including: interlocking concrete permeable ...

  8. Update to Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison Environmental Center - abstract

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavement including: interlocking concrete permeable pavers...

  9. Update to permeable pavement research at the Edison Environmental Center - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The EPA’s Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB) has been monitoring the permeable pavement demonstration site at the Edison Environmental Center, NJ since 2010. This site has three different types of permeable pavement including: interlocking concrete permeable paver...

  10. Research Of Airborne Precision Spacing to Improve Airport Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Baxley, Brian T.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In September 2004, the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL) and the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation to mutually develop, modify, test, and evaluate systems, procedures, facilities, and devices to meet the need for safe and efficient air navigation and air traffic control in the future. In the United States and Europe, these efforts are defined within the architectures of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Program and Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) Program respectively. Both programs have identified Airborne Spacing as a critical component, with Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) as a key enabler. Increased interest in reducing airport community noise and the escalating cost of aviation fuel has led to the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures to reduce noise, emissions, and fuel usage compared to current procedures. To provide these operational enhancements, arrival flight paths into terminal areas are planned around continuous vertical descents that are closer to an optimum trajectory than those in use today. The profiles are designed to be near-idle descents from cruise altitude to the Final Approach Fix (FAF) and are typically without any level segments. By staying higher and faster than conventional arrivals, CDAs also save flight time for the aircraft operator. The drawback is that the variation of optimized trajectories for different types and weights of aircraft requires the Air Traffic Controller to provide more airspace around an aircraft on a CDA than on a conventional arrival procedure. This additional space decreases the throughput rate of the destination airport. Airborne self-spacing concepts have been developed to increase the throughput at high-demand airports by managing the inter-arrival spacing to be more precise and consistent using on-board guidance. It has been proposed that the

  11. 77 FR 29167 - Effluent Limitations Guidelines and New Source Performance Standards for the Airport Deicing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... regulations, called the ``Phase I'' stormwater regulations (55 FR 47990, November 16, 1990), EPA designated... permit authority, the Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) covers airport deicing discharges (73 FR 56572...-reasonableness'' test. EPA explained its methodology for the development of BCT limitations in July 1986 (51...

  12. Airport-area airspace used in simulated operations with an experimental powered-lift STOL airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsby, N. S.; Sawyer, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Simulation tests were made using an experimental powered-lift STOL airplane to help define airport-area airspace requirements for STOL operations. The operational feasibility and airspace used in take-offs followed by climbing turns, offset (bent localizer) approaches, missed approaches, and two-segment (bent glide-slope) approaches were studied. Flight-director guidance was provided for the approach maneuvers.

  13. A novel wireless local positioning system for airport (indoor) security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekavat, Seyed A.; Tong, Hui; Tan, Jindong

    2004-09-01

    A novel wireless local positioning system (WLPS) for airport (or indoor) security is introduced. This system is used by airport (indoor) security guards to locate all of, or a group of airport employees or passengers within the airport area. WLPS consists of two main parts: (1) a base station that is carried by security personnel; hence, introducing dynamic base station (DBS), and (2) a transponder (TRX) that is mounted on all people (including security personnel) present at the airport; thus, introducing them as active targets. In this paper, we (a) draw a futuristic view of the airport security systems, and the flow of information at the airports, (b) investigate the techniques of extending WLPS coverage area beyond the line-of-sight (LoS), and (c) study the performance of this system via standard transceivers, and direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) systems with and without antenna arrays and conventional beamforming (BF).

  14. 23 CFR 972.208 - Federal lands pavement management system (PMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... “Pavement Management Guide,” AASHTO, 2001, is available for inspection as prescribed at 49 CFR part 7. It is... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Federal lands pavement management system (PMS). 972.208....208 Federal lands pavement management system (PMS). In addition to the requirements provided in §...

  15. 23 CFR 970.208 - Federal lands pavement management system (PMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Federal lands pavement management system (PMS). 970.208... Federal lands pavement management system (PMS). In addition to the requirements provided in § 970.204, the...) An inventory of the physical pavement features including the number of lanes, length, width,...

  16. 23 CFR 970.208 - Federal lands pavement management system (PMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Federal lands pavement management system (PMS). 970.208... Federal lands pavement management system (PMS). In addition to the requirements provided in § 970.204, the...) An inventory of the physical pavement features including the number of lanes, length, width,...

  17. 23 CFR 972.208 - Federal lands pavement management system (PMS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... “Pavement Management Guide,” AASHTO, 2001, is available for inspection as prescribed at 49 CFR part 7. It is... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Federal lands pavement management system (PMS). 972.208....208 Federal lands pavement management system (PMS). In addition to the requirements provided in §...

  18. Performance Evaluation of the Approaches and Algorithms for Hamburg Airport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Zhifan; Okuniek, Nikolai; Gerdes, Ingrid; Schier, Sebastian; Lee, Hanbong; Jung, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have been independently developing and testing their own concepts and tools for airport surface traffic management. Although these concepts and tools have been tested individually for European and US airports, they have never been compared or analyzed side-by-side. This paper presents the collaborative research devoted to the evaluation and analysis of two different surface management concepts. Hamburg Airport was used as a common test bed airport for the study. First, two independent simulations using the same traffic scenario were conducted: one by the DLR team using the Controller Assistance for Departure Optimization (CADEO) and the Taxi Routing for Aircraft: Creation and Controlling (TRACC) in a real-time simulation environment, and one by the NASA team based on the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) in a fast-time simulation environment. A set of common performance metrics was defined. The simulation results showed that both approaches produced operational benefits in efficiency, such as reducing taxi times, while maintaining runway throughput. Both approaches generated the gate pushback schedule to meet the runway schedule, such that the runway utilization was maximized. The conflict-free taxi guidance by TRACC helped avoid taxi conflicts and reduced taxiing stops, but the taxi benefit needed be assessed together with runway throughput to analyze the overall performance objective.

  19. Investigation of factors affecting asphalt pavement recycling and asphalt compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Venable, R.L.; Petersen, J.C.; Robertson, R.E.; Plancher, H.

    1983-03-01

    Both economic and environmental factors dictate that asphalt pavement be recycled. Many recycling projects have been completed using a variety of recycling additives, but little work has been done on the physiochemical aspects of pavement recycling. The present exploratory study was undertaken to better define the physiochemical variables of recycling. Objectives of the present study include: (1) to determine if molecular structuring in the asphalt binder could be observed in oxidized (air-aged) asphalt-aggregate briquets, and if so, how was structuring affected during briquits, and if so, how was structuring affected during briquet recycling and (2) to determine if recycling agents penetrate the strongly adsorbed asphalt layer on the aggregate surface. Differences were seen in asphalt component compatibility as judged by the state of peptization parameters. In extreme cases the values of the parameters correlated with properties of asphalts of known compatibility; however, a relationship between the parameters determined on a series of asphalts in pavements was not established. The parameters might be useful in evaluating additives for pavement recycling; however, more systems need to be studied to fully assess their potential usefulness. Finally, the parameters need to be correlated with performance-related measurements such as asphalt rheological and mix properties. Examination of the parameters and their changes on asphalt oxidative aging may also be informative with regard to asphalt durability inasmuch as oxidation-induced changes are a major cause of asphalt pavement failure.

  20. Nondestructive pavement evaluation technique using falling weight deflectometer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Nageim, H.; Al-Hakim, B.; Lesley, L.

    1996-11-01

    An analytical method to predict the mechanical properties of a multi-layer pavement structure is presented. The development of the model is based on a modified back calculation model, using a finite circular plate resting on an elastic layered system. The deflection of the pavement under the dynamic action of the falling weight deflectometer (FWD) is taken as a function of the load action and the characteristic strength of the layers comprising the system including the friction between the individual layers. The responses of the pavement during the impact loading of the falling weight are measured and analyzed to predict the stress, strain and coefficient of friction between the layers making the system. The results revealed that the model which incorporates the interface of friction coefficient in the back-analysis technique allows for a more accurate calculation of the mechanical properties of the pavements and thus can be used as a quality control to assess the state of adhesion between the pavement layer system.

  1. Proteus aircraft over Las Cruces International Airport in New Mexico.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  2. Use of stabilized bottom ash for bound layers of road pavements.

    PubMed

    Toraldo, Emanuele; Saponaro, Sabrina; Careghini, Alessandro; Mariani, Edoardo

    2013-05-30

    This paper reports about the lab scale results obtained by using stabilized bottom ash (SBA) from an Italian municipal solid waste incinerator as aggregates in cement-bound mixes and asphalt concretes for road pavements. The investigation focused on SBA content. From the road construction point of view, performance related to compaction, volumetric and mechanical properties were assessed. The environmental aspects were investigated performing leaching tests. The results suggested that SBA satisfied the environmental Italian law for reuse of non-hazardous waste but affected significantly the stress-strain behavior of the final products. Therefore a maximum percentage of 10% was suggested. PMID:23535513

  3. Water Injection on Commercial Aircraft to Reduce Airport Nitrogen Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, David L.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Fucke, Lars; Eames, David J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The potential nitrogen oxide (NO(x) reductions, cost savings, and performance enhancements identified in these initial studies of waterinjection technology strongly suggest that it be further pursued. The potential for engine maintenance cost savings from this system should make it very attractive to airline operators and assure its implementation. Further system tradeoff studies and engine tests are needed to answer the optimal system design question. Namely, would a low-risk combustor injection system with 70- to 90-percent NO(x) reduction be preferable, or would a low-pressure compressor (LPC) misting system with only 50-percent NO(x) reduction but larger turbine inlet temperature reductions be preferable? The low-pressure compressor injection design and operability issues identified in the report need to be addressed because they might prevent implementation of the LPC type of water-misting system. If water-injection technology challenges are overcome, any of the systems studied would offer dramatic engine NO(x) reductions at the airport. Coupling this technology with future emissions-reduction technologies, such as fuel-cell auxiliary power units will allow the aviation sector to address the serious challenges of environmental stewardship, and NO(x) emissions will no longer be an issue at airports.

  4. 77 FR 73310 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Bozeman Yellowstone International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Airports: Addition of Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, Belgrade, MT AGENCY: U.S. Customs and... user fee airports to reflect the recent user fee airport designation for Bozeman Yellowstone... approving the designation of user fee status for Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport was signed...

  5. 14 CFR 121.187 - Airplanes: Reciprocating engine-powered: Landing limitations: Alternate airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...: Landing limitations: Alternate airport. 121.187 Section 121.187 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: Alternate airport. (a) No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in a dispatch or flight release unless the airplane (at the weight anticipated at the time of arrival at the airport), based on...

  6. 77 FR 16552 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Maryland-Three Airports...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... an individual to serve as an airport security coordinator at one of these three airports. DATES: Send... Maryland airports, or to serve as an airport security coordinator at one of these three airports. Abstract..., of the following collection of information on January 5, 2012, 77 FR 513. This collection...

  7. Feasibility of using 100% Recycled Asphalt Pavement mixtures for road construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Russell Edgar, IV

    Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP) is the largest recycled good in the United States and 80 million tons are recycled yearly, saving taxpayers about $1.5 billion dollars. This paper explores the possibility of utilizing 100% RAP materials in asphalt pavement. Asphalt mixtures are produced at 135°C in a typical asphalt plant. However, at 135°C, not all binder from RAP materials may not become effective for coating aggregates. The main objective of the study is to determine the amount of effective binder available from RAP in the asphalt plant. The 100% RAP mixes have aged binder that can alter mix designs and interaction with virgin binder. In this study, to determine low temperature cracking resistance and fatigue performance, samples were prepared using a 100% RAP mix with no virgin binder and a 100% RAP mix with virgin asphalt binder to achieve the optimum binder content of the mix. Second, to determine the effectiveness of binder from RAP materials, compaction tests were performed by heating RAP materials at various temperatures. It was found that 100% RAP mixes cannot be feasible for field use if additional virgin binder is added to reach the optimum asphalt content. Based on limited test results, the low temperature grade was not within proper limits but the beam fatigue testing results were acceptable. Based on compaction test results, additional heating is needed to increase the effectiveness of asphalt binder from RAP materials.

  8. Rapid Inspection of Pavement Markings Using Mobile LIDAR Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haocheng; Li, Jonathan; Cheng, Ming; Wang, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    This study aims at building a robust semi-automated pavement marking extraction workflow based on the use of mobile LiDAR point clouds. The proposed workflow consists of three components: preprocessing, extraction, and classification. In preprocessing, the mobile LiDAR point clouds are converted into the radiometrically corrected intensity imagery of the road surface. Then the pavement markings are automatically extracted with the intensity using a set of algorithms, including Otsu's thresholding, neighbor-counting filtering, and region growing. Finally, the extracted pavement markings are classified with the geometric parameters using a manually defined decision tree. Case studies are conducted using the mobile LiDAR dataset acquired in Xiamen (Fujian, China) with different road environments by the RIEGL VMX-450 system. The results demonstrated that the proposed workflow and our software tool can achieve 93% in completeness, 95% in correctness, and 94% in F-score when using Xiamen dataset.

  9. Low cost pavement marking materials based on plasticized sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. M.

    1982-04-01

    Pavement marking was made more cost effective by reducing the cost of the marking materials. A low cost marking material based on sulfur was developed. Elemental sulfur is a hard, brittle, crystalline material which, on heating, melts to a thin liquid that can be spray applied. If molten elemental sulfur is spray applied to the road as markings, it will on application solidify, crack and adhere poorly to the road. The first ten high speed trucks that ride over the markings will remove them. To make a useful sulfur based pavement marking material it was necessary to chemically modify (plasticize) the sulfur and mix it with fillers and pigments such that it had all of the characteristics desired of a pavement marking material. Yellow and white formulations were developed. For identification they were given the names YS-EIGHT and WS-EIGHT for the yellow and white formulations.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of microwave-heated asphalt pavement materials

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ohaly, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The potential use of microwave energy to heat asphalt mixtures and pavements has begun attracting attention. Microwave heating is rapid, deep and uniform. With microwaves, heat is generated by the treated material under the excitation of an alternating electromagnetic field caused by the passing microwaves. Some materials such as water heat very well with microwaves, while others such as Teflon do not. Asphalt cement is similar to Teflon, but many aggregates seem to possess favorable microwave heating properties. This thesis focuses on pavement materials and their interaction with microwave energy as a heating method. The interaction between asphalt-pavement materials and the applied microwave energy was evaluated in two phases. First, the effect of microwaves on some properties of virgin and recycled mixtures was investigated. Potential benefits to adhesion and water-stripping resistance of asphalt film to aggregate are promising but need further investigation. Secondly, the effect of several mixture variables on microwave heating efficiency was also studied.

  11. The Airport Gate Assignment Problem: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleb, Mageed A.; Salem, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    The airport gate assignment problem (AGAP) is one of the most important problems operations managers face daily. Many researches have been done to solve this problem and tackle its complexity. The objective of the task is assigning each flight (aircraft) to an available gate while maximizing both conveniences to passengers and the operational efficiency of airport. This objective requires a solution that provides the ability to change and update the gate assignment data on a real time basis. In this paper, we survey the state of the art of these problems and the various methods to obtain the solution. Our survey covers both theoretical and real AGAP with the description of mathematical formulations and resolution methods such as exact algorithms, heuristic algorithms, and metaheuristic algorithms. We also provide a research trend that can inspire researchers about new problems in this area. PMID:25506074

  12. Pore-structure models of hydraulic conductivity for permeable pavement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, X.; Sansalone, J.; Ying, G.; Ranieri, V.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryPermeable pavement functions as a porous infrastructure interface allowing the infiltration and evaporation of rainfall-runoff while functioning as a relatively smooth load-bearing surface for vehicular transport. Hydraulic conductivity ( k) of permeable pavement is an important hydraulic property and is a function of the pore structure. This study examines k for a cementitious permeable pavement (CPP) through a series of pore-structure models. Measurements utilized include hydraulic head as well as total porosity, ( ϕ t), effective porosity ( ϕ e), tortuosity ( L e/ L) and pore size distribution (PSD) indices generated through X-ray tomography (XRT). XRT results indicate that the permeable pavement pore matrix is hetero-disperse, with high tortuosity and ϕ t ≠ ϕ e. Power law models of k- ϕ t and k- ϕ e relationships are developed for a CPP mix design. Results indicate that the Krüger, Fair-Hatch, Hazen, Slichter, Beyer and Terzaghi models based on simple pore-structure indices do not reproduce measured k values. The conventional Kozeny-Carman model (KCM), a more parameterized pore-structure model, did not reproduce measured k values. This study proposes a modified KCM utilizing ϕ e, specific surface area (SSA) pe and weighted tortuosity ( L e/ L) w. Results demonstrate that such permeable pavement pore-structure parameters with the modified KCM can predict k. The k results are combined with continuous simulation modeling using historical rainfall to provide nomographs examining permeable pavement as a low impact development (LID) infrastructure component.

  13. Miami International Airport stormwater NPDES plan

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, A.I.; Goldman, J.Z.; Schmidt, M.F.; Clark, E.E.

    1994-12-31

    Miami International Airport (MIA) is endeavoring to essentially double its traffic volume by the turn of the century. This is a great challenge since the site is already highly developed. Space, safety and other constraints make it difficult to implement conventional detention/retention stormwater practices. Other practices were evaluated to control stormwater quantity/quality, since some of the downstream bodies of water are flood-prone or environmentally sensitive.

  14. The annoyance caused by noise around airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    JOSSE

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive study of noise around selected airports in France was performed. By use of questionnaires, the degree of annoyance caused by aircraft noise was determined. Three approaches used in the study were: (1) analytical study on the influence of noise on sleep; (2) sociological study on the satisfaction of occupants of buildings which conform to laws which are supposed to guarantee sufficient comfort; and (3) statistical study of correlations between external noises and psychological and pathological disturbances in residences.

  15. Noise zoning around airports in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, F. W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The situation in the Netherlands with respect to noise abatement is dominated by a steadily increasing activity both at the political and the administrative level. A new law with respect to the designation of noise zones around existing and future airports and military airfields was enacted on 1 October 1978. A comprehensive new noise nuisance act was signed by the Queen on 16 February 1979. Both laws were accepted by Parliament unanimously. This article describes the new regulations with respect to noise zoning around airports. To maintain the habitability of the environment around airports, a demarcation will be made between the interest of the people living there and those of aviation. A noise zone will be designated outside which the noise load from aircraft movements may not exceed a fixed maximum. Within this area, where a noise load above the fixed maximum is allowed, planning and building design measures will have to be taken. Although the exclusion of new housing within the noise zone is an essential element, the area will be used for other purposes by exchanging previously intended developments with those from areas outside the zone. The Minister in charge of physical planning will issue directives concerning the contents of local development plans and will indicate how such plans, once amended, should be put into effect. Termination of the use or habitation of existing buildings is possible as well as soundproofing of buildings. The costs of measures taken to prevent undesirable new developments and measures taken to improve the existing state of affairs are borne by the central government. But a charge has to be paid by the users of the airports to defray the costs.

  16. The Integrated Airport: Building a Successful NextGen Testbed

    ScienceCinema

    Frederick-Recascino, Christina [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida, United States; Sweigard, Doug [Lockheed Martin Corporation; Lester, Wade [ERAU

    2016-07-12

    This presentation will describe a unique public-private partnership - the Integrated Airport - that was created to engage in research and testing related to NextGen Technology deployment.  NextGen refers to the program that will be initiated to modernize the US National Airspace.  As with any major, multi-decade initiative, such as NextGen, integration of work efforts by multiple partners in the modernization is critical for success.  This talk will focus on the development of the consortium, how the consortium plans for NextGen initiatives, the series of technology demonstrations we have produced and plans for the future of NextGen testing and implementation. 

  17. Impact of compressed natural gas fueled buses on street pavements

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, D.; Harrison, R.

    1995-07-01

    Capital Metro, the Ausin, Texas transit authority, is currently evaluating a number of CNG fueled buses. As part of the U.S. DOT Region Six University Transportation Centers Program (UTCP), a study was instigated into the scale of incremental pavement consumption associated with the operation of these buses. The study suggests that replacing current vehicles with CNG powered models utilizing aluminum storage tanks would raise average network equivalent single rehabilitation costs across the network of over four percent. Finally, it recommends that full cost study be undertaken with evaluation of the adoption of alternative bus fuels - which includes pavement and environmental impacts.

  18. Aircraft hydrocarbon emissions at Oakland International Airport.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Scott C; Wood, Ezra C; Northway, Megan J; Miake-Lye, Richard; Thornhill, Lee; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Anderson, Bruce E; Dowlin, Renee; Dodds, Willard; Knighton, W Berk

    2009-03-15

    To help airports improve emission inventory data, speciated hydrocarbon emission indices have been measured from in-use commercial, airfreight, and general aviation aircraft at Oakland International Airport. The compounds reported here include formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, ethene, propene, and benzene. At idle, the magnitude of hydrocarbon emission indices was variable and reflected differences in engine technology, actual throttle setting, and ambient temperature. Scaling the measured emission indices to the simultaneously measured formaldehyde (HCHO) emission index eliminated most of the observed variability. This result supports a uniform hydrocarbon emissions profile across engine types when the engine is operating near idle, which can greatly simplify how speciated hydrocarbons are handled in emission inventories. The magnitude of the measured hydrocarbon emission index observed in these measurements (ambient temperature range 12-22 degrees C) is a factor of 1.5-2.2 times larger than the certification benchmarks. Using estimates of operational fuel flow rates at idle, this analysis suggests that current emission inventories at the temperatures encountered at this airport underestimate hydrocarbon emissions from the idle phase of operation by 16-45%.

  19. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel. Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, are also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/integraal Luchthaven Competitie Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.

  20. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel, Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, arc also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/Integral Luchthaven Competitive Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.