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Sample records for airport surface display

  1. Airport surface moving map displays: OpEval-2 evaluation results and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livack, Garret; McDaniel, James I.; Battiste, Vernol

    2001-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), in cooperation with the Cargo Airline Association (CAA) and three of its member airlines (Airborne Express, Federal Express, and United Parcel Service), have embarked upon an aggressive yet phased approach to introduce new Free Flight-enabling technologies into the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS). General aviation is also actively involved, represented primarily by the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA). These new technologies being evaluated include advanced cockpit avionics and a complimentary ground infrastructure. In support of this initiative, a series of operational evaluations (OpEvals) have been conducted or are planned. The OpEvals have evaluated in-flight as well as airport surface movement applications. Results from the second OpEval, conducted at Louisville, Kentucky in October 2000, indicated that runway incursions might be significantly reduced with the introduction of a cockpit-based moving map system derived from emerging technologies. An additional OpEval is planned to evaluate the utility of an integrated cockpit and airport surface architecture that provides enhanced pilot and controller awareness of airport surface operations. It is believed that the combination of such an airborne and a ground-based system best addresses many of the safety issues surrounding airport surface operations. Such a combined system would provide both flight crews and controllers with a common awareness, or shared picture of airport surface operations.

  2. Integrated Airport Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczo, S.

    1998-01-01

    The current air traffic environment in airport terminal areas experiences substantial delays when weather conditions deteriorate to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Research activity at NASA has culminated in the development, flight test and demonstration of a prototype Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) system. A NASA led industry team and the FAA developed the system which integrated airport surface surveillance systems, aeronautical data links, DGPS navigation, automation systems, and controller and flight deck displays. The LVLASO system was demonstrated at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport using a Boeing 757-200 aircraft during August, 1997. This report documents the contractors role in this testing particularly in the area of data link and DGPS navigation.

  3. Airport Surface Network Architecture Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thanh C.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Bretmersky, Steven C.; Lawas-Grodek, Fran; Ellis, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, airport surface communications are fragmented across multiple types of systems. These communication systems for airport operations at most airports today are based dedicated and separate architectures that cannot support system-wide interoperability and information sharing. The requirements placed upon the Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) systems in airports are rapidly growing and integration is urgently needed if the future vision of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) 2025 concept are to be realized. To address this and other problems such as airport surface congestion, the Space Based Technologies Project s Surface ICNS Network Architecture team at NASA Glenn Research Center has assessed airport surface communications requirements, analyzed existing and future surface applications, and defined a set of architecture functions that will help design a scalable, reliable and flexible surface network architecture to meet the current and future needs of airport operations. This paper describes the systems approach or methodology to networking that was employed to assess airport surface communications requirements, analyze applications, and to define the surface network architecture functions as the building blocks or components of the network. The systems approach used for defining these functions is relatively new to networking. It is viewing the surface network, along with its environment (everything that the surface network interacts with or impacts), as a system. Associated with this system are sets of services that are offered by the network to the rest of the system. Therefore, the surface network is considered as part of the larger system (such as the NAS), with interactions and dependencies between the surface network and its users, applications, and devices. The surface network architecture includes components such as addressing/routing, network management, network

  4. Airport surface operations requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, John L.; Vonbokern, Greg J.; Wray, Rick L.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Airport Surface Operations Requirements Analysis (ASORA) study. This study was conducted in response to task 24 of NASA Contract NAS1-18027. This study is part of NASA LaRC's Low Visibility Surface Operations program, which is designed to eliminate the constraints on all-weather arrival/departure operations due to the airport/aircraft ground system. The goal of this program is to provide the capability for safe and efficient aircraft operations on the airport surface during low visibility conditions down to zero. The ASORA study objectives were to (1) develop requirements for operation on the airport surface in visibilities down to zero; (2) survey and evaluate likely technologies; (3) develop candidate concepts to meet the requirements; and (4) select the most suitable concept based on cost/benefit factors.

  5. Airport Surface Movement Technologies: Atlanta Demonstrations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted in August 1997 at the Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) International Airport as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. This research was aimed at investigating technology to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft movements on the surface during the operational phases of roll-out, turnoff, and taxi in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. The system tested at ATL was composed of airborne and ground-based components that were integrated to provide both the flight crew and controllers with supplemental information to enable safe, expedient surface operations. Experimental displays were installed on a Boeing 757-200 research aircraft in both headup and head-down formats. On the ground, an integrated system maintained surveillance of the airport surface and a controller interface provided routing and control instructions. While at ATL, the research aircraft performed a series of flight and taxi operations to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. The concept was demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the LVLASO system and ATL test activities.

  6. Surface Operations Systems Improve Airport Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Ames Research Center, Mosaic ATM of Leesburg, Virginia created software to analyze surface operations at airports. Surface surveillance systems, which report locations every second for thousands of air and ground vehicles, generate massive amounts of data, making gathering and analyzing this information difficult. Mosaic?s Surface Operations Data Analysis and Adaptation (SODAA) tool is an off-line support tool that can analyze how well the airport surface operation is working and can help redesign procedures to improve operations. SODAA helps researchers pinpoint trends and correlations in vast amounts of recorded airport operations data.

  7. Multi-modal cockpit interface for improved airport surface operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J. (Inventor); Bailey, Randall E. (Inventor); Prinzel, III, Lawrence J. (Inventor); Kramer, Lynda J. (Inventor); Williams, Steven P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for multi-modal cockpit interface during surface operation of an aircraft comprises a head tracking device, a processing element, and a full-color head worn display. The processing element is configured to receive head position information from the head tracking device, to receive current location information of the aircraft, and to render a virtual airport scene corresponding to the head position information and the current aircraft location. The full-color head worn display is configured to receive the virtual airport scene from the processing element and to display the virtual airport scene. The current location information may be received from one of a global positioning system or an inertial navigation system.

  8. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Movement Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Atlanta Hartsfield International Airport in Atlanta, GA. The test aircraft was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. Qualitative and quantitative results are discussed.

  9. Flight demonstration of integrated airport surface automation concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1995-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted to address airport surface movement area capacity issues by providing pilots with enhanced situational awareness information. The demonstration showed an integration of several technologies to government and industry representatives. These technologies consisted of an electronic moving map display in the cockpit, a Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) receiver, a high speed VHF data link, an ASDE-3 radar, and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS). Aircraft identification was presented to an air traffic controller on AMASS. The onboard electronic map included the display of taxi routes, hold instructions, and clearances, which were sent to the aircraft via data link by the controller. The map also displayed the positions of other traffic and warning information, which were sent to the aircraft automatically from the ASDE-3/AMASS system. This paper describes the flight demonstration in detail, along with preliminary results.

  10. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Technologies for Increased Capacity and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.; Wills, Robert W.; Smith, Kathryn A.; Shipman, Floyd S.; Bryant, Wayne H.; Eckhardt, Dave E., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted to address airport surface movement area capacity and safety issues by providing pilots with enhanced situational awareness information. The demonstration presented an integration of several technologies to government and industry representatives. These technologies consisted of an electronic moving map display in the cockpit, a Differential Global Positioning system (DGPS) receiver, a high speed very high frequency (VHF) data link, an Airport Surface Detection Equipment (ASDE-3) radar, and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS). Aircraft identification was presented to an air traffic controller on an AMASS display. The onboard electronic map included the display of taxi routes, hold instructions, and clearances, which were sent to the aircraft via data link by the controller. The map also displayed the positions of other traffic and warning information, which were sent to the aircraft automatically from the ASDE-3/AMASS system. This paper describes the flight demonstration in detail, along with test results.

  11. Considerations on symbology, data requirements, and operational concept for integral NOTAM visualization on airport moving map displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleken, Christoph; Urvoy, Carole; Klingauf, Uwe

    2008-04-01

    Surface Movement is one of the most challenging phases of flight. To support the flight crew in this critical flight phase and to prevent serious incidents and accidents, of which Runway Incursions are the by far most safety-critical, the electronic airport moving map display has evolved as the key technology to increase the flight crew's situational awareness on the airport surface over the past decade. However, the airport moving map is limited to quasi-static airport information due to the envisaged 28 day update cycle of the underlying Aerodrome Mapping Database (AMDB), and thus does not include information on safety-relevant short-term and temporary changes such as runway closures or restrictions. Currently, these are conveyed on paper through the Pre-Flight Information Bulletin (PIB), a plain-language compilation of current Notices to Airmen (NOTAM) and other information of urgent character. In this context, the advent of airport moving map technology leads to a disparity in the conspicuousness of information, resulting in the danger that e.g. a runway that is not displayed as closed on the airport moving map might be perceived as open even if contrary NOTAM information exists on paper elsewhere in the cockpit. This calls for an integrated representation of PIB/NOTAM and airport moving map information. Piloted evaluations conducted by the Institute of Flight Systems and Automatic Control have already confirmed the high operational relevance of presenting runway closures on an airport moving map. Based on the results of these trials, this paper expands our previous work by addressing the various pre-requisites of an integral NOTAM visualization, ranging from the development of appropriate symbology to an operational concept enabling the transition from conventional to electronic, machine-readable NOTAM information without shifting responsibility and workload from the dispatcher to the flight deck. Employing Synthetic Vision techniques, a complete symbology set

  12. 14 CFR 77.28 - Military airport imaginary surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Military airport imaginary surfaces. 77.28 Section 77.28 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE (Eff. until 1-18-11) Obstruction Standards § 77.28 Military airport imaginary surfaces....

  13. 14 CFR 77.25 - Civil airport imaginary surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil airport imaginary surfaces. 77.25 Section 77.25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE Obstruction Standards § 77.25 Civil airport imaginary surfaces. The following civil...

  14. Airport databases for 3D synthetic-vision flight-guidance displays: database design, quality assessment, and data generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Axel; Raabe, Helmut; Schiefele, Jens; Doerr, Kai Uwe

    1999-07-01

    In future aircraft cockpit designs SVS (Synthetic Vision System) databases will be used to display 3D physical and virtual information to pilots. In contrast to pure warning systems (TAWS, MSAW, EGPWS) SVS serve to enhance pilot spatial awareness by 3-dimensional perspective views of the objects in the environment. Therefore all kind of aeronautical relevant data has to be integrated into the SVS-database: Navigation- data, terrain-data, obstacles and airport-Data. For the integration of all these data the concept of a GIS (Geographical Information System) based HQDB (High-Quality- Database) has been created at the TUD (Technical University Darmstadt). To enable database certification, quality- assessment procedures according to ICAO Annex 4, 11, 14 and 15 and RTCA DO-200A/EUROCAE ED76 were established in the concept. They can be differentiated in object-related quality- assessment-methods following the keywords accuracy, resolution, timeliness, traceability, assurance-level, completeness, format and GIS-related quality assessment methods with the keywords system-tolerances, logical consistence and visual quality assessment. An airport database is integrated in the concept as part of the High-Quality- Database. The contents of the HQDB are chosen so that they support both Flight-Guidance-SVS and other aeronautical applications like SMGCS (Surface Movement and Guidance Systems) and flight simulation as well. Most airport data are not available. Even though data for runways, threshold, taxilines and parking positions were to be generated by the end of 1997 (ICAO Annex 11 and 15) only a few countries fulfilled these requirements. For that reason methods of creating and certifying airport data have to be found. Remote sensing and digital photogrammetry serve as means to acquire large amounts of airport objects with high spatial resolution and accuracy in much shorter time than with classical surveying methods. Remotely sensed images can be acquired from satellite

  15. Flight Testing of an Airport Surface Guidance, Navigation, and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 (B-757) research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport (ATL) in Atlanta, GA. The B-757 was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range (RVR) of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. The integrated ground and airborne components resulted in a system that has the potential to significantly improve the safety and efficiency of airport surface movements particularly as weather conditions deteriorate. Several advanced technologies were employed to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate flight simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. Results show that while the maturity of some of the technologies does not permit immediate implementation, the operational concept is valid and the performance is more than adequate in many areas.

  16. Effect of Traffic Position Accuracy for Conducting Safe Airport Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Barnes, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept proposes many revolutionary operational concepts and technologies, such as display of traffic information and movements, airport moving maps (AMM), and proactive alerts of runway incursions and surface traffic conflicts, to deliver an overall increase in system capacity and safety. A piloted simulation study was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center to evaluate the ability to conduct safe and efficient airport surface operations while utilizing an AMM displaying traffic of various position accuracies as well as the effect of traffic position accuracy on airport conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capability. Nominal scenarios and off-nominal conflict scenarios were conducted using 12 airline crews operating in a simulated Memphis International Airport terminal environment. The data suggest that all traffic should be shown on the airport moving map, whether qualified or unqualified, and conflict detection and resolution technologies provide significant safety benefits. Despite the presence of traffic information on the map, collisions or near collisions still occurred; when indications or alerts were generated in these same scenarios, the incidences were averted.

  17. Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) New R&D Simulator for Airport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorighi, Nancy S.

    1997-01-01

    A new simulator, the Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) is under construction at the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Jointly funded by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NASA, the SDTF will be a testbed for airport surface automation technologies of the future. The SDTF will be operational in the third quarter of 1998. The SDTF will combine a virtual tower with simulated ground operations to allow evaluation of new technologies for safety, effectiveness, reliability, and cost benefit. The full-scale level V tower will provide a seamless 360 degree high resolution out-the-window view, and a full complement of ATC (air traffic control) controller positions. The imaging system will be generated by two fully-configured Silicon Graphics Onyx Infinite Reality computers, and will support surface movement of up to 200 aircraft and ground vehicles. The controller positions, displays and consoles can be completely reconfigured to match the unique layout of any individual airport tower. Dedicated areas will accommodate pseudo-airport ramp controllers, pseudo-airport operators, and pseudo-pilots. Up to 33 total personnel positions will be able to participate in simultaneous operational scenarios. A realistic voice communication infrastructure will emulate the intercom and telephone communications of a real airport tower. Multi-channel audio and video recording and a sophisticated data acquisition system will support a wide variety of research and development areas, such as evaluation of automation tools for surface operations, human factors studies, integration of terminal area and airport technologies, and studies of potential airport physical and procedural modifications.

  18. 14 CFR 77.25 - Civil airport imaginary surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... relation to the airport and to each runway. The size of each such imaginary surface is based on the... and dimensions of the approach surface applied to each end of a runway are determined by the most precise approach existing or planned for that runway end. (a) Horizontal surface. A horizontal plane...

  19. Safely Conducting Airport Surface Trajectory-Based Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Barnes, James R.

    2014-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) to evaluate the ability to safely conduct surface trajectory-based operations (STBO) by assessing the impact of providing traffic intent information, conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) system capability, and the display of STBO guidance to the flight crew on both head-down and head-up displays (HUD). Nominal and off-nominal conflict scenarios were conducted using 12 airline crews operating in a simulated Memphis International Airport terminal environment. The flight crews met their required time-of-arrival at route end within 10 seconds on 98 percent of the trials, well within the acceptable performance bounds of 15 seconds. Traffic intent information was found to be useful in determining the intent of conflict traffic, with graphical presentation preferred. The CD&R system was only minimally effective during STBO because the prevailing visibility was sufficient for visual detection of incurring traffic. Overall, the pilots indicated STBO increased general situation awareness but also negatively impacted workload, reduced the ability to watch for other traffic, and increased head-down time.

  20. Lunar Surface Radiation Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, James; Albalat, Andrea Jaime; Tlustos, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    Effects of the lunar surface environment can be observed with a simple passive experiment consisting of small material samples placed in view of a lander or rover camera. This paper will describe, advocate and demonstrate the creation, ideally by students or young professionals, of a small standard sample holder, for example a string of different glass beads in front of a white or detector background, that can be replicated and installed on any of the coming series of lunar surface spacecraft. Effects of solar and cosmic ionizing radiation and local temperature, such as darkening and annealing, will be readily apparent in different kinds of glass, plastic and crystalline beads. Costs of preparation and installation, and impact on the main mission, can be kept to a level essentially negligible in proportion to project budgets.

  1. Infrared augmentation system for collision avoidance on airport surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Elizabeth A.

    1998-07-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration is examining a variety of technologies for augmenting surface radar detection at airports. This paper describes the testing of infrared cameras and operational concepts to improve detection and tracking of targets on airport surfaces. Three different cameras were tested during summer and winter months and during inclement weather. Two operational concepts were tested at Dulles International Airport. A prototype image processing system is described that extracts target coordinates from camera video output and passes them to an AMASS simulator for fusion with radar and other target tracking data. All three cameras evaluated were able to detect and recognize a variety of targets on a runway surface including humans, vehicles, and small and large airplanes. The range to detection and recognition varies with each camera's instantaneous FOV, thermal sensitivity, atmospheric conditions and operating conditions. Each camera was found to meet specific FAA requirements in unique ways.

  2. Flight Test Comparison of Synthetic Vision Display Concepts at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Louis J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Arthur, Trey; Parrish, Russell V.; Barry, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Limited visibility is the single most critical factor affecting the safety and capacity of worldwide aviation operations. Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) technology can solve this visibility problem with a visibility solution. These displays employ computer-generated terrain imagery to present 3D, perspective out-the-window scenes with sufficient information and realism to enable operations equivalent to those of a bright, clear day, regardless of weather conditions. To introduce SVS display technology into as many existing aircraft as possible, a retrofit approach was defined that employs existing HDD display capabilities for glass cockpits and HUD capabilities for the other aircraft. This retrofit approach was evaluated for typical nighttime airline operations at a major international airport. Overall, 6 evaluation pilots performed 75 research approaches, accumulating 18 hours flight time evaluating SVS display concepts that used the NASA LaRC's Boeing B-757-200 aircraft at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. Results from this flight test establish the SVS retrofit concept, regardless of display size, as viable for tested conditions. Future assessments need to extend evaluation of the approach to operations in an appropriate, terrain-challenged environment with daytime test conditions.

  3. Airport Surface Delays and Causes: A Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, David K.; Goldberg, Jay; Tang, Tammy

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes FAA Program Analysis and Operations Research Service (ASD-400)/Lockheed Martin activities and findings related to airport surface delays and causes, in support of NASA Langley Research Center's Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program. The activities described in this report were initiated in June 1995. A preliminary report was published on September 30, 1995. The final report incorporates data collection forms filled out by traffic managers, other FAA staff, and an airline for the New York City area, some updates, data previously requested from various sources to support this analysis, and further quantification and documentation than in the preliminary report. This final report is based on data available as of April 12, 1996. This report incorporates data obtained from review and analysis of data bases and literature, discussions/interviews with engineers, air-traffic staff, other FAA technical personnel, and airline staff, site visits, and a survey on surface delays and causes. It includes analysis of delay statistics; preliminary findings and conclusions on surface movement, surface delay sources and causes, runway occupancy time (ROT), and airport characteristics impacting surface operations and delays; and site-specific data on the New York City area airports, which are the focus airports for this report.

  4. Wireless Channel Characterization in the Airport Surface Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, Joshua T.

    2004-01-01

    Given the anticipated increase in air traffic in the coming years, modernization of the National Airspace System (NAS) is a necessity. Part of this modernization effort will include updating current communication, navigation, and surveillance (CNS) systems to deal with the increased traffic as well as developing advanced CNS technologies for the systems. An example of such technology is the integrated CNS (ICNS) network being developed by the Advanced CNS Architecture and Systems Technology (ACAST) group for use in the airport surface environment. The ICNS network would be used to convey voice/data between users in a secure and reliable manner. The current surface system only supports voice and does so through an obsolete physical infrastructure. The old system is vulnerable to outages and costly to maintain. The proposed ICNS network will include a wireless radio link. To ensure optimal performance, a thorough and accurate characterization of the channel across which the link would operate is necessary. The channel is the path the signal takes from the transmitter to the receiver and is prone to various forms of interference. Channel characterization involves a combination of analysis, simulation, and measurement. My work this summer was divided into four tasks. The first task required compiling and reviewing reference material that dealt with the characterization and modeling of aeronautical channels. The second task involved developing a systematic approach that could be used to group airports into classes, e.g. small airfields, medium airports, large open airports, large cluttered airports, etc. The third task consisted of implementing computer simulations of existing channel models. The fourth task entailed measuring possible interference sources in the airport surface environment via a spectrum analyzer.

  5. 14 CFR 77.19 - Civil airport imaginary surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Civil airport imaginary surfaces. 77.19 Section 77.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... feet at a slope of 40 to 1 for all precision instrument runways. (3) The outer width of an...

  6. Integrated Display System for Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beskenis, Sharon Otero; Green, David F., Jr.; Hyer, Paul V.; Johnson, Edward J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the software products and system architectures developed by Lockheed Martin in support of the Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) program at NASA Langley Research Center. It presents an overview of the technical aspects, capabilities, and system integration issues associated with an integrated display system (IDS) that collects, processes and presents information to an aircraft flight crew during all phases of landing, roll-out, turn-off, inbound taxi, outbound taxi and takeoff. Communications hardware, drivers, and software provide continuous real-time data at varying rates and from many different sources to the display programs for presentation on a head-down display (HDD) and/or a head-up display (HUD). An electronic moving map of the airport surface is implemented on the HDD which includes the taxi route assigned by air traffic control, a text messaging system, and surface traffic and runway status information. Typical HUD symbology for navigation and control of the aircraft is augmented to provide aircraft deceleration guidance after touchdown to a pilot selected exit and taxi guidance along the route assigned by ATC. HUD displays include scene-linked symbolic runways, runway exits and taxiways that are conformal with the actual locations on the airport surface. Display formats, system architectures, and the various IDS programs are discussed.

  7. 75 FR 14483 - Third Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Third Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless...: Airport Surface Wireless Communications meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications. DATES:...

  8. 77 FR 55894 - Thirteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Thirteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless...: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless Communications. SUMMARY: The FAA is..., Airport Surface Wireless Communications. DATES: The meeting will be held October 2-3, 2012, from 9...

  9. 75 FR 30899 - Fourth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fourth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless...: Airport Surface Wireless Communications meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications. DATES:...

  10. 78 FR 33145 - Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless...: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless Communications. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of the meeting of the RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport...

  11. Target detection using radar images of an airport surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Hayden B.; Wyschogrod, Daniel; Harman, William H.; Sasiela, Richard J.; Bush, Richard W.

    1994-07-01

    Automation aids which increase the efficiency of the controller and enhance safety are being sought by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This paper describes the target detection algorithms developed by the MIT Lincoln Laboratory as part of the airport surface traffic automation (ASTA) and runway surface safety light system (RSLS) programs sponsored by the FAA that were demonstrated at Logan International Airport in Boston, Mass. from September 1992 through December 1993. A companion paper to this conference describes the ASTA and RSLS system demonstration. Another companion paper describes the tracking algorithms. Real-time, parallel processing implementations of these surveillance algorithms are written in C++ on a Silicon Graphics Inc. Unix multiprocessor. The heavy reliance on commercial hardware, standard operating systems, object oriented design, and high-level computer languages allows a rapid transition from a research environment to a production environment.

  12. SARDA: An Integrated Concept for Airport Surface Operations Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Gautam; Hoang, Ty; Jung, Yoon Chul

    2013-01-01

    The Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) is an integrated decision support tool for airlines and air traffic control tower enabling surface collaborative decision making (CDM) and departure metering in order to enhance efficiency of surface operations at congested airports. The presentation describes the concept and architecture of the SARDA as a CDM tool, and the results from a human-in-the-loop simulation of the tool conducted in 2012 at the FutureFlight Central, the tower simulation facility. Also, presented is the current activities and future plan for SARDA development. The presentation was given at the meeting with the FAA senior advisor of the Surface Operations Office.

  13. Conducting Safe and Efficient Airport Surface Operations in a NextGen Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Barnes, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) vision proposes many revolutionary operational concepts, such as surface trajectory-based operations (STBO) and technologies, including display of traffic information and movements, airport moving maps (AMM), and proactive alerts of runway incursions and surface traffic conflicts, to deliver an overall increase in system capacity and safety. A piloted simulation study was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center to evaluate the ability of a flight crew to conduct safe and efficient airport surface operations while utilizing an AMM. Position accuracy of traffic was varied, and the effect of traffic position accuracy on airport conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) capability was measured. Another goal was to evaluate the crew's ability to safely conduct STBO by assessing the impact of providing traffic intent information, CD&R system capability, and the display of STBO guidance to the flight crew on both head-down and head-up displays (HUD). Nominal scenarios and off-nominal conflict scenarios were conducted using 12 airline crews operating in a simulated Memphis International Airport terminal environment. The data suggest that all traffic should be shown on the airport moving map, whether qualified or unqualified, and conflict detection and resolution technologies provide significant safety benefits. Despite the presence of traffic information on the map, collisions or near-collisions still occurred; when indications or alerts were generated in these same scenarios, the incidents were averted. During the STBO testing, the flight crews met their required time-of-arrival at route end within 10 seconds on 98 percent of the trials, well within the acceptable performance bounds of 15 seconds. Traffic intent information was found to be useful in determining the intent of conflicting traffic, with graphical presentation preferred. The CD&R system was only

  14. Progress on the Development of Future Airport Surface Wireless Communications Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Budinger, James M.; Brooks, David E.; Franklin, Morgan; DeHart, Steve; Dimond, Robert P.; Borden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Continuing advances in airport surface management and improvements in airport surface safety are required to enable future growth in air traffic throughout the airspace, as airport arrival and departure delays create a major system bottleneck. These airport management and safety advances will be built upon improved communications, navigation, surveillance, and weather sensing, creating an information environment supporting system automation. The efficient movement of the digital data generated from these systems requires an underlying communications network infrastructure to connect data sources with the intended users with the required quality of service. Current airport surface communications consists primarily of buried copper or fiber cable. Safety related communications with mobile airport surface assets occurs over 25 kHz VHF voice and data channels. The available VHF spectrum, already congested in many areas, will be insufficient to support future data traffic requirements. Therefore, a broadband wireless airport surface communications network is considered a requirement for the future airport component of the air transportation system. Progress has been made on defining the technology and frequency spectrum for the airport surface wireless communications network. The development of a test and demonstration facility and the definition of required testing and standards development are now underway. This paper will review the progress and planned future work.

  15. Development of Airport Surface Required Navigation Performance (RNP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Rick; Smith, Alex; Hicok, Dan

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. and international aviation communities have adopted the Required Navigation Performance (RNP) process for defining aircraft performance when operating the en-route, approach and landing phases of flight. RNP consists primarily of the following key parameters - accuracy, integrity, continuity, and availability. The processes and analytical techniques employed to define en-route, approach and landing RNP have been applied in the development of RNP for the airport surface. To validate the proposed RNP requirements several methods were used. Operational and flight demonstration data were analyzed for conformance with proposed requirements, as were several aircraft flight simulation studies. The pilot failure risk component was analyzed through several hypothetical scenarios. Additional simulator studies are recommended to better quantify crew reactions to failures as well as additional simulator and field testing to validate achieved accuracy performance, This research was performed in support of the NASA Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations Programs.

  16. Wireless Channel Characterization in the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Airport Surface Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David W.

    2007-01-01

    In this project final report, entitled "Wireless Channel Characterization in the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Airport Surface Areas," we provide a detailed description and model representation for the wireless channel in the airport surface environment in this band. In this executive summary, we review report contents, describe the achieved objectives and major findings, and highlight significant conclusions and recommendations.

  17. 77 FR 37732 - Fourteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Fourteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless...: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless Communications. SUMMARY: The FAA is... Wireless Communications. DATES: The meeting will be held July 24-25, 2012, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m....

  18. 76 FR 20436 - Ninth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Ninth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless... of RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is... Wireless Communications. DATES: The meeting will be held May 3-5, 2011 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADDRESSES:...

  19. 75 FR 66423 - Seventh Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Seventh Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless... of RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is... Wireless Communications. DATES: The meeting will be held November 16-17, 2010 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m....

  20. 75 FR 54421 - Sixth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Sixth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless... of RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is... Wireless Communications. DATES: The meeting will be held September 28-30, 2010 from 0900 a.m.- 1600...

  1. 76 FR 6179 - Eighth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Eighth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless... of RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is... Wireless Communications. DATES: The meeting will be held February 22-23, 2011 from 9 a.m. to 5...

  2. 76 FR 38740 - Tenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Tenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless... of RTCA Special Committee 223: Airport Surface Wireless Communications meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is... Wireless Communications. DATES: The meeting will be held August 9-10, 2011 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m....

  3. 77 FR 71028 - Twelfth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Twelfth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless...: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 223, Airport Surface Wireless Communications. SUMMARY: The FAA is... Wireless Communications. DATES: The meeting will be held December 4-6, 2012, from 9:00 a.m.-5:00...

  4. 14 CFR 77.29 - Airport imaginary surfaces for heli-ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport imaginary surfaces for heli-ports. 77.29 Section 77.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE Obstruction Standards § 77.29 Airport imaginary surfaces for heli-ports. (a)...

  5. Optimizing integrated airport surface and terminal airspace operations under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosson, Christabelle S.

    In airports and surrounding terminal airspaces, the integration of surface, arrival and departure scheduling and routing have the potential to improve the operations efficiency. Moreover, because both the airport surface and the terminal airspace are often altered by random perturbations, the consideration of uncertainty in flight schedules is crucial to improve the design of robust flight schedules. Previous research mainly focused on independently solving arrival scheduling problems, departure scheduling problems and surface management scheduling problems and most of the developed models are deterministic. This dissertation presents an alternate method to model the integrated operations by using a machine job-shop scheduling formulation. A multistage stochastic programming approach is chosen to formulate the problem in the presence of uncertainty and candidate solutions are obtained by solving sample average approximation problems with finite sample size. The developed mixed-integer-linear-programming algorithm-based scheduler is capable of computing optimal aircraft schedules and routings that reflect the integration of air and ground operations. The assembled methodology is applied to a Los Angeles case study. To show the benefits of integrated operations over First-Come-First-Served, a preliminary proof-of-concept is conducted for a set of fourteen aircraft evolving under deterministic conditions in a model of the Los Angeles International Airport surface and surrounding terminal areas. Using historical data, a representative 30-minute traffic schedule and aircraft mix scenario is constructed. The results of the Los Angeles application show that the integration of air and ground operations and the use of a time-based separation strategy enable both significant surface and air time savings. The solution computed by the optimization provides a more efficient routing and scheduling than the First-Come-First-Served solution. Additionally, a data driven analysis is

  6. Methods for Determining Aircraft Surface State at Lesser-Equipped Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Keenan; Null, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Tactical departure scheduling within a terminal airspace must accommodate a wide spectrum of surveillance and communication capabilities at multiple airports. The success of such a scheduler is highly dependent upon the knowledge of a departure's state while it is still on the surface. Airports within a common Terminal RAdar CONtrol (TRACON) airspace possess varying levels of surface surveillance infrastructure which directly impacts uncertainties in wheels-off times. Large airports have access to surface surveillance data, which is shared with the TRACON, while lesser-equipped airports still rely solely on controllers in Air Traffic Control Towers (Towers). Coordination between TRACON and Towers can be greatly enhanced when the TRACON controller has access to the surface surveillance and the associated decision-support tools at well-equipped airports. Similar coordination at lesser-equipped airports is still based on verbal communications. This paper investigates possible methods to reduce the uncertainty in wheels-off time predictions at the lesser-equipped airports through the novel use of Over-the-Air (OTA) data transmissions. We also discuss the methods and equipment used to collect sample data at lesser-equipped airports within a large US TRACON, as well as the data evaluation to determine if meaningful information can be extracted from it.

  7. The monocular visual imaging technology model applied in the airport surface surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhe; Wang, Jian; Huang, Chao

    2013-08-01

    At present, the civil aviation airports use the surface surveillance radar monitoring and positioning systems to monitor the aircrafts, vehicles and the other moving objects. Surface surveillance radars can cover most of the airport scenes, but because of the terminals, covered bridges and other buildings geometry, surface surveillance radar systems inevitably have some small segment blind spots. This paper presents a monocular vision imaging technology model for airport surface surveillance, achieving the perception of scenes of moving objects such as aircrafts, vehicles and personnel location. This new model provides an important complement for airport surface surveillance, which is different from the traditional surface surveillance radar techniques. Such technique not only provides clear objects activities screen for the ATC, but also provides image recognition and positioning of moving targets in this area. Thereby it can improve the work efficiency of the airport operations and avoid the conflict between the aircrafts and vehicles. This paper first introduces the monocular visual imaging technology model applied in the airport surface surveillance and then the monocular vision measurement accuracy analysis of the model. The monocular visual imaging technology model is simple, low cost, and highly efficient. It is an advanced monitoring technique which can make up blind spot area of the surface surveillance radar monitoring and positioning systems.

  8. Towards Determination of Visual Requirements for Augmented Reality Displays and Virtual Environments for the Airport Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    The visual requirements for augmented reality or virtual environments displays that might be used in real or virtual towers are reviewed wi th respect to similar displays already used in aircraft. As an example of the type of human performance studies needed to determine the use ful specifications of augmented reality displays, an optical see-thro ugh display was used in an ATC Tower simulation. Three different binocular fields of view (14 deg, 28 deg, and 47 deg) were examined to det ermine their effect on subjects# ability to detect aircraft maneuveri ng and landing. The results suggest that binocular fields of view much greater than 47 deg are unlikely to dramatically improve search perf ormance and that partial binocular overlap is a feasible display tech nique for augmented reality Tower applications.

  9. Towards Determination of Visual Requirements for Augmented Reality Displays and Virtual Environments for the Airport Tower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    The visual requirements for augmented reality or virtual environments displays that might be used in real or virtual towers are reviewed with respect to similar displays already used in aircraft. As an example of the type of human performance studies needed to determine the useful specifications of augmented reality displays, an optical see-through display was used in an ATC Tower simulation. Three different binocular fields of view (14deg, 28deg, and 47deg) were examined to determine their effect on subjects ability to detect aircraft maneuvering and landing. The results suggest that binocular fields of view much greater than 47deg are unlikely to dramatically improve search performance and that partial binocular overlap is a feasible display technique for augmented reality Tower applications.

  10. Ground-water and surface-water elevations in the Fairbanks International Airport area, Alaska, 1990-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claar, D.V.; Lilly, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water elevation data were collected at 52 sites from 1990 to 1994 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, Fairbanks International Airport. Water elevations were measured in 32 ground-water observation wells and at 20 surface-water sites to help characterize the geohydrology of the Fairbanks International Airport area. From 1990 to 1993, data were collected in the vicinity of the former fire-training area at the airport. From 1993 to 1994, the data-collection area was expanded to include the entire airport area.

  11. 14 CFR 77.29 - Airport imaginary surfaces for heli-ports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport imaginary surfaces for heli-ports. 77.29 Section 77.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE (Eff. until 1-18-11)...

  12. NASA Research on an Integrated Concept for Airport Surface Operations Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Surface operations at airports in the US are based on tactical operations, where departure aircraft primarily queue up and wait at the departure runways. There have been attempts to address the resulting inefficiencies with both strategic and tactical tools for metering departure aircraft. This presentation gives an overview of Spot And Runway Departure Advisor with Collaborative Decision Making (SARDA-CDM): an integrated strategic and tactical system for improving surface operations by metering departure aircraft. SARDA-CDM is the augmentation of ground and local controller advisories through sharing of flight movement and related operations information between airport operators, flight operators and air traffic control at the airport. The goal is to enhance the efficiency of airport surface operations by exchanging information between air traffic control and airline operators, while minimizing adverse effects on stakeholders and passengers. The presentation motivates the need for departure metering, and provides a brief background on the previous work on SARDA. Then, the concept of operations for SARDA-CDM is described. Then the preliminary results from testing the concept in a real-time automated simulation environment are described. Results indicate benefits such as reduction in taxiing delay and fuel consumption. Further, the preliminary implementation of SARDA-CDM seems robust for two minutes delay in gate push-back times.

  13. Interactive Display of Surfaces Using Subdivision Surfaces and Wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Duchaineau, M A; Bertram, M; Porumbescu, S; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-10-03

    Complex surfaces and solids are produced by large-scale modeling and simulation activities in a variety of disciplines. Productive interaction with these simulations requires that these surfaces or solids be viewable at interactive rates--yet many of these surfaced solids can contain hundreds of millions of polygondpolyhedra. Interactive display of these objects requires compression techniques to minimize storage, and fast view-dependent triangulation techniques to drive the graphics hardware. In this paper, we review recent advances in subdivision-surface wavelet compression and optimization that can be used to provide a framework for both compression and triangulation. These techniques can be used to produce suitable approximations of complex surfaces of arbitrary topology, and can be used to determine suitable triangulations for display. The techniques can be used in a variety of applications in computer graphics, computer animation and visualization.

  14. Effect of Surface Traffic Count on Taxi Time at Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, Matthew Stephen; Gupta, Gautam

    2008-01-01

    As the amount of air traffic increases over the years, most airports simply do not have the means of expanding to handle the intensified traffic on the surface that will ensue. Precise surveillance equipment and automation concepts, as well as advanced surface traffic algorithms are being developed to improve airport efficiency. These surface algorithms require inputs unique to each airport to ensure maximum efficiency, and minimal taxi delay. This study analyzes surface traffic at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) to determine the effect of the number of aircraft on the surface and the amount of stop and go situations they experience to the amount of additional taxi time encountered. If the surface capacity of an airport is known, minimal delay can be accomplished by limiting the number of taxiing aircraft to that capacity. This concept is related to highways, where traffic flow drastically decreases as more cars occupy the road. An attempt to minimize this effect on highways is seen with the use of metering lights at freeway on-ramps. Since the surface traffic at airports is highly regulated, and aircraft are less mobile on the ground, limiting the surface count to a certain number can greatly reduce the amount of additional taxi time encountered, as well as reduce hazardous emissions. This study will also find the regions of an airport that encounter the most additional taxi time when the number of aircraft in that area is increased. This could help surface traffic algorithms avoid congesting that area, or re-route aircraft to different runways when that area reaches its capacity. The relationship between the amount of stop and go situations an aircraft encounters and their effect on the taxi time of that aircraft will also be investigated. This will help to determine the effect of holding an aircraft on the taxiway as opposed to re-routing it. The lesser of the two should be used when developing surface traffic algorithms to further minimize the

  15. 14 CFR 77.19 - Civil airport imaginary surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to each runway. The size of each such imaginary surface is based on the category of each runway... approach surface applied to each end of a runway are determined by the most precise approach procedure existing or planned for that runway end. (a) Horizontal surface. A horizontal plane 150 feet above...

  16. 14 CFR 77.19 - Civil airport imaginary surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to each runway. The size of each such imaginary surface is based on the category of each runway... approach surface applied to each end of a runway are determined by the most precise approach procedure existing or planned for that runway end. (a) Horizontal surface. A horizontal plane 150 feet above...

  17. 14 CFR 77.28 - Military airport imaginary surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... same width as the primary surface. (3) Approach clearance surface. An inclined plane, symmetrical about... United States. (1) Inner horizontal surface. A plane is oval in shape at a height of 150 feet above the established airfield elevation. The plane is constructed by scribing an arc with a radius of 7,500 feet...

  18. Navigating the airport surface: Electronic vs. paper maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, Vernon M.; Harris, Randall L., Sr.; Hunt, Patricia J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advances in the Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and ground/aircraft data-links provide a basis for the generation of an accurate cockpit navigational map display including data-linked ATC-cleared ground routes. Such an electronic map may have the potential to improve pilots' situation awareness and taxi performance and thereby lessen runway incursions. The objective of this simulator study was to assess the potential improvements in these areas when using an advanced electronic map (compared to using today's paper map) under two outside scene visibility levels. Results showed average taxi speed increased under both good and poor visibilities, by as much as 24 percent, due in part to eliminating the time used for orientation with the paper map. Pilots made only one-third as many errors as well and commented that they believed that the electronic map gave them better awareness.

  19. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2010-01-01

    A Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pilot reaction to conflict events in the TMA near the airport, different alert timings for various scenarios, alerting display concepts, and directive alerting concepts. This paper gives an overview of the conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) concept, simulation study, and test results

  20. Wireless Channel Characterization: Modeling the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Future Airport Surface Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, D. W.; Apaza, Rafael; Foore, Lawrence R.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a recently completed wideband wireless channel characterization project for the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System (MLS) extension band, for airport surface areas. This work included mobile measurements at large and small airports, and fixed point-to-point measurements. Mobile measurements were made via transmission from the air traffic control tower (ATCT), or from an airport field site (AFS), to a receiving ground vehicle on the airport surface. The point-to-point measurements were between ATCT and AFSs. Detailed statistical channel models were developed from all these measurements. Measured quantities include propagation path loss and power delay profiles, from which we obtain delay spreads, frequency domain correlation (coherence bandwidths), fading amplitude statistics, and channel parameter correlations. In this paper we review the project motivation, measurement coordination, and illustrate measurement results. Example channel modeling results for several propagation conditions are also provided, highlighting new findings.

  1. Applications of yeast surface display for protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cherf, Gerald M.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    The method of displaying recombinant proteins on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae via genetic fusion to an abundant cell wall protein, a technology known as yeast surface display, or simply, yeast display, has become a valuable protein engineering tool for a broad spectrum of biotechnology and biomedical applications. This review focuses on the use of yeast display for engineering protein affinity, stability, and enzymatic activity. Strategies and examples for each protein engineering goal are discussed. Additional applications of yeast display are also briefly presented, including protein epitope mapping, identification of protein-protein interactions, and uses of displayed proteins in industry and medicine. PMID:26060074

  2. Roughness Perception of Haptically Displayed Fractal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Michael A.; Cutkosky, Mark R.; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Surface profiles were generated by a fractal algorithm and haptically rendered on a force feedback joystick, Subjects were asked to use the joystick to explore pairs of surfaces and report to the experimenter which of the surfaces they felt was rougher. Surfaces were characterized by their root mean square (RMS) amplitude and their fractal dimension. The most important factor affecting the perceived roughness of the fractal surfaces was the RMS amplitude of the surface. When comparing surfaces of fractal dimension 1.2-1.35 it was found that the fractal dimension was negatively correlated with perceived roughness.

  3. Head-Worn Display Concepts for Surface Operations for Commerical Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Williams, Steven P.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Norman, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Experiments and flight tests have shown that a Head-Up Display (HUD) and a head-down electronic moving map (EMM) can be enhanced with Synthetic Vision for airport surface operations. While great success in ground operations was demonstrated with a HUD, the research noted that two major HUD limitations during ground operations were its monochrome form and limited, fixed field-of-regard. A potential solution to these limitations found with HUDs may be emerging with Head Worn Displays (HWDs). HWDs are small display devices that may be worn without significant encumbrance to the user. By coupling the HWD with a head tracker, unlimited field-of-regard may be realized. The results of three ground simulation experiments conducted at NASA Langley Research Center are summarized. The experiments evaluated the efficacy of head-worn display applications of Synthetic Vision and Enhanced Vision technology to improve transport aircraft surface operations. The results of the experiments showed that the fully integrated HWD provided greater pilot performance with respect to staying on the path compared to using paper charts alone. Further, when comparing the HWD with the HUD concept, there were no differences in path performance. In addition, the HWD and HUD concepts were rated via paired-comparisons the same in terms of situation awareness and workload.

  4. A Concept and Implementation of Optimized Operations of Airport Surface Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoon C.; Hoang, Ty; Montoya, Justin; Gupta, Gautam; Malik, Waqar; Tobias, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new concept of optimized surface operations at busy airports to improve the efficiency of taxi operations, as well as reduce environmental impacts. The suggested system architecture consists of the integration of two decoupled optimization algorithms. The Spot Release Planner provides sequence and timing advisories to tower controllers for releasing departure aircraft into the movement area to reduce taxi delay while achieving maximum throughput. The Runway Scheduler provides take-off sequence and arrival runway crossing sequence to the controllers to maximize the runway usage. The description of a prototype implementation of this integrated decision support tool for the airport control tower controllers is also provided. The prototype decision support tool was evaluated through a human-in-the-loop experiment, where both the Spot Release Planner and Runway Scheduler provided advisories to the Ground and Local Controllers. Initial results indicate the average number of stops made by each departure aircraft in the departure runway queue was reduced by more than half when the controllers were using the advisories, which resulted in reduced taxi times in the departure queue.

  5. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development, Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward; Isaacs, James; Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen. Steve

    2010-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." The proposed future C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface communication system, referred to as the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS), is anticipated to increase overall air-to-ground data communications systems capacity by using a new spectrum (i.e., not very high frequency (VHF)). Although some critical services could be supported, AeroMACS will also target noncritical services, such as weather advisory and aeronautical information services as part of an airborne System Wide Information Management (SWIM) program. AeroMACS is to be designed and implemented in a manner that will not disrupt other services operating in the C-band. This report defines the AeroMACS concepts of use, high-level system requirements, and architecture; the performance of supporting system analyses; the development of AeroMACS test and demonstration plans; and the establishment of an operational AeroMACS capability in support of C-band aeronautical data communications standards to be advanced in both international (International Civil Aviation Organization, ICAO) and national (RTCA) forums. This includes the development of system parameter profile recommendations for AeroMACS based on existing Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE) 802.16e- 2009 standards

  6. Yeast surface display for protein engineering and characterization.

    PubMed

    Gai, S Annie; Wittrup, K Dane

    2007-08-01

    Yeast surface display is being employed to engineer desirable properties into proteins for a broad variety of applications. Labeling with soluble ligands enables rapid and quantitative analysis of yeast-displayed libraries by flow cytometry, while cell-surface selections allow screening of libraries with insoluble or even as-yet-uncharacterized binding targets. In parallel, the utilization of yeast surface display for protein characterization, including in particular the mapping of functional epitopes mediating protein-protein interactions, represents a significant recent advance. PMID:17870469

  7. Antifouling Polymer Brushes Displaying Antithrombogenic Surface Properties.

    PubMed

    de Los Santos Pereira, Andres; Sheikh, Sonia; Blaszykowski, Christophe; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Fedorov, Kiril; Thompson, Michael; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar

    2016-03-14

    The contact of blood with artificial materials generally leads to immediate protein adsorption (fouling), which mediates subsequent biological processes such as platelet adhesion and activation leading to thrombosis. Recent progress in the preparation of surfaces able to prevent protein fouling offers a potential avenue to mitigate this undesirable effect. In the present contribution, we have prepared several types of state-of-the-art antifouling polymer brushes on polycarbonate plastic substrate, and investigated their ability to prevent platelet adhesion and thrombus formation under dynamic flow conditions using human blood. Moreover, we compared the ability of such brushes-grafted on quartz via an adlayer analogous to that used on polycarbonate-to prevent protein adsorption from human blood plasma, assessed for the first time by means of an ultrahigh frequency acoustic wave sensor. Results show that the prevention of such a phenomenon constitutes one promising route toward enhanced resistance to thrombus formation, and suggest that antifouling polymer brushes could be of service in biomedical applications requiring extensive blood-material surface contact. PMID:26882214

  8. Synthetic Vision Enhanced Surface Operations With Head-Worn Display for Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Norman, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments and flight tests have shown that airport surface operations can be enhanced by using synthetic vision and associated technologies, employed on a Head-Up Display (HUD) and head-down display electronic moving maps (EMM). Although HUD applications have shown the greatest potential operational improvements, the research noted that two major limitations during ground operations were its monochrome form and limited, fixed field-of-regard. A potential solution to these limitations may be the application of advanced Head Worn Displays (HWDs) particularly during low-visibility operations wherein surface movement is substantially limited because of the impaired vision of pilots and air traffic controllers. The paper describes the results of ground simulation experiments conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. The results of the experiments showed that the fully integrated HWD concept provided significantly improved path performance compared to using paper charts alone. When comparing the HWD and HUD concepts, there were no statistically-significant differences in path performance or subjective ratings of situation awareness and workload. Implications and directions for future research are described.

  9. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  10. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells.

    PubMed

    Stickney, Zachary; Losacco, Joseph; McDevitt, Sophie; Zhang, Zhiwen; Lu, Biao

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell-cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy. PMID:26902116

  11. Tangible display systems: bringing virtual surfaces into the real world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferwerda, James A.

    2012-03-01

    We are developing tangible display systems that enable natural interaction with virtual surfaces. Tangible display systems are based on modern mobile devices that incorporate electronic image displays, graphics hardware, tracking systems, and digital cameras. Custom software allows the orientation of a device and the position of the observer to be tracked in real-time. Using this information, realistic images of surfaces with complex textures and material properties illuminated by environment-mapped lighting, can be rendered to the screen at interactive rates. Tilting or moving in front of the device produces realistic changes in surface lighting and material appearance. In this way, tangible displays allow virtual surfaces to be observed and manipulated as naturally as real ones, with the added benefit that surface geometry and material properties can be modified in real-time. We demonstrate the utility of tangible display systems in four application areas: material appearance research; computer-aided appearance design; enhanced access to digital library and museum collections; and new tools for digital artists.

  12. Surface Display of Recombinant Proteins on Bacillus subtilis Spores

    PubMed Central

    Isticato, Rachele; Cangiano, Giuseppina; Tran, Hoa T.; Ciabattini, Annalisa; Medaglini, Donata; Oggioni, Marco R.; De Felice, Maurilio; Pozzi, Gianni; Ricca, Ezio

    2001-01-01

    We developed a novel surface display system based on the use of bacterial spores. A protein of the Bacillus subtilis spore coat, CotB, was found to be located on the spore surface and used as fusion partner to express the 459-amino-acid C-terminal fragment of the tetanus toxin (TTFC). Western, dot blot and fluorescent-activated cell sorting analyses were used to monitor TTFC surface expression on purified spores. We estimated that more than 1.5 × 103 TTFC molecules were exposed on the surface of each spore and recognized by TTFC-specific antibodies. The efficient surface presentation of the heterologous protein, together with the simple purification procedure and the high stability and safety record of B. subtilis spores, makes this spore-based display system a potentially powerful approach for surface expression of bioactive molecules. PMID:11591673

  13. Airport Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan Paluska/Flickr Denver Airport Security Screening Introduction With air travel regaining popularity and increased secu- rity measures, airport security screening has become an area of interest for ...

  14. High Resolution Digital Surface Model For Production Of Airport Obstruction Charts Using Spaceborne SAR Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Henrique; Rodrigues, Marco; Radius, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Airport Obstruction Charts (AOCs) are graphical representations of natural or man-made obstructions (its locations and heights) around airfields, according to International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Annexes 4, 14 and 15. One of the most important types of data used in AOCs production/update tasks is a Digital Surface Model (first reflective surface) of the surveyed area. The development of advanced remote sensing technologies provide the available tools for obstruction data acquisition, while Geographic Information Systems (GIS) present the perfect platform for storing and analyzing this type of data, enabling the production of digital ACOs, greatly contributing to the increase of the situational awareness of pilots and enhancing the air navigation safety level [1]. Data acquisition corresponding to the first reflective surface can be obtained through the use of Airborne Laser-Scanning and Light Detection and Ranging (ALS/LIDAR) or Spaceborne SAR Systems. The need of surveying broad areas, like the entire territory of a state, shows that Spaceborne SAR systems are the most adequate in economic and feasibility terms of the process, to perform the monitoring and producing a high resolution Digital Surface Model (DSM). The high resolution DSM generation depends on many factors: the available data set, the used technique and the setting parameters. To increase the precision and obtain high resolution products, two techniques are available using a stack of data: the PS (Permanent Scatterers) technique [2], that uses large stack of data to identify many stable and coherent targets through multi- temporal analysis, removing the atmospheric contribution and to minimize the estimation errors, and the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) technique ([3],[4]), that relies on the use of small baseline SAR interferograms and on the application of the so called singular value decomposition (SVD) method, in order to link independent SAR acquisition data sets, separated by large

  15. Ground-water and surface-water elevations in the Fairbanks International Airport area, Alaska, 1990-96, and selected geohydrologic report references

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claar, David V.; Lilly, Michael R.

    1997-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water elevation data were collected at 61 sites from 1990 to 1996 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, Fairbanks International Airport. Water-surface elevations were measured in 41 ground-water observation wells and at 20 surface-water sites to help characterize the geohydrology of the Fairbanks International Airport area. From 1990 to 1993, data were collected in the vicinity of the former fire-training area at the airport. From 1993 to 1996, the data-collection area was expanded to include the entire airport area. The total number of data-collection sites varied each year because of changing project objectives and increased understanding of the geohydrology in the area.

  16. Dynamic Stereo Display And Interaction With Surfaces Of Medical Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Gabor T.

    1986-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface display is an alternate way of presenting to the physician information that is available in a sequence of two-dimensional CT or MRI scans. The aim is to present organs (or parts of organs) as they would appear if they were removed from the body, possibly cut open, and viewed from user-selected directions. In recent years there have been a number of papers discussing the clinical utility of this approach. In nearly all these papers the presentation of the surface consists of single images of the objects of interest. In these monoscopic images, depth perception is conveyed by the differential shading that is computed as if light were shining on the surface. This is augmented by the silhouette of the external features. Since shading is dependent on the distance from the light source and the angle of the surface to the light rays, these two effects may oppose each other, especially with perception of details in depths of cavities. In addition, the detail inside a cavity cannot be silhouetted at any viewing angle. Since many anatomical surfaces have significant information in the depths of cavities (e.g., orbits, neural foramina, cardiac cavities), the addition of stereoscopic depth perception and motion should be clinically useful. In a recent article, we presented 3D surface displays in stereo, thereby providing an important additional cue for correct 3D depth perception. Here we discuss issues of software and hardware for dynamic stereo display and for 3D interaction with the stereoscopic images.

  17. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability on or Near the Airport Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David F.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. In this report, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS). CAAT research is conducted jointly under NASA's Airspace Systems Program, Airportal Project and the Aviation Safety Program, Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Project.

  18. Design and testing of an unlimited field-of-regard synthetic vision head-worn display for commercial aircraft surface operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, J. J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence, III; Shelton, Kevin; Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Norman, Robert M.

    2007-04-01

    Experiments and flight tests have shown that a Head-Up Display (HUD) and a head-down, electronic moving map (EMM) can be enhanced with Synthetic Vision for airport surface operations. While great success in ground operations was demonstrated with a HUD, the research noted that two major HUD limitations during ground operations were their monochrome form and limited, fixed field of regard. A potential solution to these limitations found with HUDs may be emerging Head Worn Displays (HWDs). HWDs are small, lightweight full color display devices that may be worn without significant encumbrance to the user. By coupling the HWD with a head tracker, unlimited field-of-regard may be realized for commercial aviation applications. In the proposed paper, the results of two ground simulation experiments conducted at NASA Langley are summarized. The experiments evaluated the efficacy of head-worn display applications of Synthetic Vision and Enhanced Vision technology to enhance transport aircraft surface operations. The two studies tested a combined six display concepts: (1) paper charts with existing cockpit displays, (2) baseline consisting of existing cockpit displays including a Class III electronic flight bag display of the airport surface; (3) an advanced baseline that also included displayed traffic and routing information, (4) a modified version of a HUD and EMM display demonstrated in previous research; (5) an unlimited field-of-regard, full color, head-tracked HWD with a conformal 3-D synthetic vision surface view; and (6) a fully integrated HWD concept. The fully integrated HWD concept is a head-tracked, color, unlimited field-of-regard concept that provides a 3-D conformal synthetic view of the airport surface integrated with advanced taxi route clearance, taxi precision guidance, and data-link capability. The results of the experiments showed that the fully integrated HWD provided greater path performance compared to using paper charts alone. Further, when

  19. Design and Testing of an Unlimited Field-of-regard Synthetic Vision Head-worn Display for Commercial Aircraft Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Norman, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments and flight tests have shown that a Head-Up Display (HUD) and a head-down, electronic moving map (EMM) can be enhanced with Synthetic Vision for airport surface operations. While great success in ground operations was demonstrated with a HUD, the research noted that two major HUD limitations during ground operations were their monochrome form and limited, fixed field of regard. A potential solution to these limitations found with HUDs may be emerging Head Worn Displays (HWDs). HWDs are small, lightweight full color display devices that may be worn without significant encumbrance to the user. By coupling the HWD with a head tracker, unlimited field-of-regard may be realized for commercial aviation applications. In the proposed paper, the results of two ground simulation experiments conducted at NASA Langley are summarized. The experiments evaluated the efficacy of head-worn display applications of Synthetic Vision and Enhanced Vision technology to enhance transport aircraft surface operations. The two studies tested a combined six display concepts: (1) paper charts with existing cockpit displays, (2) baseline consisting of existing cockpit displays including a Class III electronic flight bag display of the airport surface; (3) an advanced baseline that also included displayed traffic and routing information, (4) a modified version of a HUD and EMM display demonstrated in previous research; (5) an unlimited field-of-regard, full color, head-tracked HWD with a conformal 3-D synthetic vision surface view; and (6) a fully integrated HWD concept. The fully integrated HWD concept is a head-tracked, color, unlimited field-of-regard concept that provides a 3-D conformal synthetic view of the airport surface integrated with advanced taxi route clearance, taxi precision guidance, and data-link capability. The results of the experiments showed that the fully integrated HWD provided greater path performance compared to using paper charts alone. Further, when

  20. Application of a method for the automatic detection and Ground-Based Velocity Track Display (GBVTD) analysis of a tornado crossing the Hong Kong International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, P. W.; Wurman, J.; Shun, C. M.; Robinson, P.; Kosiba, K.

    2012-03-01

    A weak tornado with a maximum Doppler velocity shear of about 40 m s - 1 moved across the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) during the evening of 20 May 2002. The tornado caused damage equivalent to F0 on the Fujita Scale, based on a damage survey. The Doppler velocity data from the Hong Kong Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) are studied using the Ground-Based Velocity Track Display (GBVTD) method of single Doppler analysis. The GBVTD analysis is able to clearly depict the development and decay of the tornado though it appears to underestimate its magnitude. In the pre-tornadic state, the wind field is characterized by inflow toward the center near the ground and upward motion near the center. When the tornado attains its maximum strength, an eye-like structure with a downdraft appears to form in the center. Several minutes later the tornado begins to decay and outflow dominates at low levels. Assuming cyclostrophic balance, the pressure drop 200 m from the center of the tornado at its maximum strength is calculated to be about 6 hPa. To estimate the maximum ground-relative wind speed of the tornado, the TDWR's Doppler velocities are adjusted for the ratio of the sample-volume size of the radar and the radius of the tornado, resulting in a peak wind speed of 28 m s - 1 , consistent with the readings from a nearby ground-based anemometers and the F0 damage observed. An automatic tornado detection algorithm based on Doppler velocity difference (delta-V) and temporal and spatial continuity is applied to this event. The locations and the core flow radii of the tornado as determined by the automatic method and by subjective analysis agree closely.

  1. CONNECTICUT AIRPORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer that includes all of the airports that appear on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7½ minute topographic quadrangle maps that cover the State of Connecticut. It includes the perimeter of airport, heliport, and seaplane landing areas as depicted...

  2. Surveillance of ground vehicles for airport security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Wang, Zhonghai; Shen, Dan; Ling, Haibin; Chen, Genshe

    2014-06-01

    Future surveillance systems will work in complex and cluttered environments which require systems engineering solutions for such applications such as airport ground surface management. In this paper, we highlight the use of a L1 video tracker for monitoring activities at an airport. We present methods of information fusion, entity detection, and activity analysis using airport videos for runway detection and airport terminal events. For coordinated airport security, automated ground surveillance enhances efficient and safe maneuvers for aircraft, unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) operating within airport environments.

  3. Versatile microbial surface-display for environmental remediation and biofuels production

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Cindy H.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, wilfred

    2008-02-14

    Surface display is a powerful technique that utilizes natural microbial functional components to express proteins or peptides on the cell exterior. Since the reporting of the first surface-display system in the mid-1980s, a variety of new systems have been reported for yeast, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Non-conventional display methods are emerging, eliminating the generation of genetically modified microorganisms. Cells with surface display are used as biocatalysts, biosorbents and biostimulants. Microbial cell-surface display has proven to be extremely important for numerous applications ranging from combinatorial library screening and protein engineering to bioremediation and biofuels production.

  4. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  5. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  6. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  7. 43 CFR 2651.6 - Airport and air navigation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport and air navigation facilities... Village Selections § 2651.6 Airport and air navigation facilities. (a) Every airport and air navigation.... (b) The surface of all other lands of existing airport sites, airway beacons, or other...

  8. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 2: Test Bed Performance Evaluation and Final AeroMACS Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward; Magner, James

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II (this document) describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  9. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 1: Concepts of Use, Initial System Requirements, Architecture, and AeroMACS Design Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward; Isaacs, James; Henriksen, Steve; Zelkin, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this document) is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  10. Heterologous surface display on lactic acid bacteria: non-GMO alternative?

    PubMed Central

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut; Berlec, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are food-grade hosts for surface display with potential applications in food and therapy. Alternative approaches to surface display on LAB would avoid the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetically-modified organism (GMO)-related regulatory requirements. Non-covalent surface display of proteins can be achieved by fusing them to various cell-wall binding domains, of which the Lysine motif domain (LysM) is particularly well studied. Fusion proteins have been isolated from recombinant bacteria or from their growth medium and displayed on unmodified bacteria, enabling heterologous surface display. This was demonstrated on non-viable cells devoid of protein content, termed bacteria-like particles, and on various species of genus Lactobacillus. Of the latter, Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 was recently shown to be particularly amenable for LysM-mediated display. Possible regulatory implications of heterologous surface display are discussed, particularly those relevant for the European Union. PMID:25880164

  11. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2009-01-01

    An initial Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the initial concept for an aircraft-based method of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) in the TMA focusing on conflict detection algorithms and alerting display concepts. This paper gives an overview of the CD&R concept, simulation study, and test results.

  12. 14 CFR 77.21 - Department of Defense (DOD) airport imaginary surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... same width as the primary surface. (3) Approach clearance surface. An inclined plane, symmetrical about.... (1) Inner horizontal surface. A plane that is oval in shape at a height of 150 feet above the established airfield elevation. The plane is constructed by scribing an arc with a radius of 7,500 feet...

  13. 14 CFR 77.21 - Department of Defense (DOD) airport imaginary surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... same width as the primary surface. (3) Approach clearance surface. An inclined plane, symmetrical about.... (1) Inner horizontal surface. A plane that is oval in shape at a height of 150 feet above the established airfield elevation. The plane is constructed by scribing an arc with a radius of 7,500 feet...

  14. 14 CFR 77.21 - Department of Defense (DOD) airport imaginary surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... same width as the primary surface. (3) Approach clearance surface. An inclined plane, symmetrical about.... (1) Inner horizontal surface. A plane that is oval in shape at a height of 150 feet above the established airfield elevation. The plane is constructed by scribing an arc with a radius of 7,500 feet...

  15. The use of interpractive graphic displays for interpretation of surface design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talcott, N. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive computer graphics technique known as the Graphic Display Data method has been developed to provide a convenient means for rapidly interpreting large amounts of surface design data. The display technique should prove valuable in such disciplines as aerodynamic analysis, structural analysis, and experimental data analysis. To demonstrate the system's features, an example is presented of the Graphic Data Display method used as an interpretive tool for radiation equilibrium temperature distributions over the surface of an aerodynamic vehicle. Color graphic displays were also examined as a logical extension of the technique to improve its clarity and to allow the presentation of greater detail in a single display.

  16. Highly elevated levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate and other perfluorinated acids found in biota and surface water downstream of an international airport, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    de Solla, S R; De Silva, A O; Letcher, R J

    2012-02-01

    Per- and poly-fluorinated compounds (PFCs), which include perfluorinated carboxylates (PFCAs) and sulfonates (PFSAs) and various precursors, are used in a wide variety of industrial, commercial and domestic products. This includes aqueous film forming foam (AFFF), which is used by military and commercial airports as fire suppressants. In a preliminary assessment prior to this study, very high concentrations (>1 ppm wet weight) of the PFSA, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), were discovered in the plasma of snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) collected in 2008 from Lake Niapenco in southern Ontario, Canada. We presently report on a suite of C(6) to C(15) PFCAs, C(4), C(6), C(8) and C(10) PFSAs, several PFC precursors (e.g. perfluorooctane sulfonamide, PFOSA), and a cyclic perfluorinated acid used in aircraft hydraulic fluid, perfluoroethylcyclohexane sulfonate (PFECHS) in surface water from the Welland River and Lake Niapenco, downstream of the John C. Munro International Airport, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Amphipods, shrimp, and water were sampled from the Welland River and Lake Niapenco, as well as local references. The same suite of PFCs in turtle plasma from Lake Niapenco was compared to those from other southern Ontario sites. PFOS dominated the sum PFCs in all substrates (e.g., >99% in plasma of turtles downstream the Hamilton Airport, and 72.1 to 94.1% at all other sites). PFOS averaged 2223(±247.1SE) ng/g in turtle plasma from Lake Niapenco, and ranged from 9.0 to 171.4 elsewhere. Mean PFOS in amphipods and in water were 518.1(±83.8)ng/g and 130.3(±43.6) ng/L downstream of the airport, and 19.1(±2.7) ng/g and 6.8(±0.5) ng/L at reference sites, respectively. Concentrations of selected PFCs declined with distance downstream from the airport. Although there was no known spill event or publicly reported use of AFFF associated with a fire event at the Hamilton airport, the airport is a likely major source of PFC contamination in the Welland River. PMID

  17. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Engineering-Initial High-Level Safety Risk Assessment and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." ITT has completed a safety hazard analysis providing a preliminary safety assessment for the proposed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface communication system. The assessment was performed following the guidelines outlined in the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Risk Management Guidance for System Acquisitions document. The safety analysis did not identify any hazards with an unacceptable risk, though a number of hazards with a medium risk were documented. This effort represents an initial high-level safety hazard analysis and notes the triggers for risk reassessment. A detailed safety hazards analysis is recommended as a follow-on activity to assess particular components of the C-band communication system after the profile is finalized and system rollout timing is determined. A security risk assessment has been performed by NASA as a parallel activity. While safety analysis is concerned with a prevention of accidental errors and failures, the security threat analysis focuses on deliberate attacks. Both processes identify the events that affect operation of the system; and from a safety perspective the security threats may present safety risks.

  18. Staphylococcal surface display of metal-binding polyhistidyl peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, P.; Wernerus, H.; Svedberg, M.; Staahl, S.

    2000-03-01

    Recombinant Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus carnosus strains were generated with surface-exposed chimeric proteins containing polyhistidyl peptides designed for binding to divalent metal ions. Surface accessibility of the chimeric surface proteins was demonstrated and the chimeric surface proteins were found to be functional in terms of metal binding, since the recombinant staphylococcal cells were shown to have gained Ni{sup 2+}- and Cd{sup 2+}-binding capacity, suggesting that such bacteria could find use in bioremediation of heavy metals. This is, to their knowledge, the first time that recombinant, surface-exposed metal-binding peptides have been expressed on gram-positive bacteria. Potential environmental or biosensor applications for such recombinant staphylococci as biosorbents are discussed.

  19. Surface modification of inorganic black particles for electrophoretic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Deuk; Ahn, Woo Jin; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2014-11-01

    Inorganic black particles (Black 444) were modified with poly(methyl methacrylate) as a shell material by using dispersion polymerization to improve their dispersion stability in a medium oil for electrophoretic display applications. They were also positively charged with vinylimidazole to enhance their electrophoretic mobility. The morphology and the shape of the composite particles were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy. The thermal properties and the chemical structure of the samples were examined by using thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. In addition, the electrophoretic mobility and the zeta-potential of the black444/PMMA/vinylimidazole particles in a dielectric fluid were measured by using optical microscopy and electrophoretic light scattering. With increasing positive charge, the black444/PMMA/vinylimidazole particles showed improved electrophoretic characteristics compared to pristine Black 444.

  20. Pilot Navigation Errors on the Airport Surface: Identifying Contributing Factors and Mitigating Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooey, Becky L.; Foyle, David C.

    2006-01-01

    A taxonomy of navigation errors (pilot deviations) during taxi operations was developed that defines 3 classes of errors: planning, decision, and execution errors. This taxonomy was applied to error data from 2 full-mission simulation studies that included trials that replicated current-day operations and trials with advanced cockpit technologies including datalink, electronic moving maps (EMM), and head-up displays (HUDs). Pilots committed navigation errors on 17% of current-day operations trials (in low-visibility and night), distributed roughly equally across the 3 error classes. Each error class was associated with a unique set of contributing factor s and mitigating solutions. Planning errors were mitigated by technologies that provided an unambiguous record of the clearance (datalink and the EMM, which possessed a text-based clearance). Decision errors were mitigated by technologies that provided both local and global awareness including information about the distance to and direction of the next turn, current township location, and a graphical depiction of the route (as provided by the EMM and HUD together). Execution errors were best mitigated by the HUD, which disambiguated the environment and depicted the clear ed taxi route. Implications for technology design and integration are provided.

  1. Continuous hierarchical slope-aspect color display for parametric surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moellering, Harold J. (Inventor); Kimerling, A. Jon (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method for generating an image of a parametric surface, such as the aspect of terrain which maximizes color contrast to permit easy discrimination of the magnitude, ranges, intervals or classes of a surface parameter while making it easy for the user to visualize the form of the surface, such as a landscape. The four pole colors of the opponent process color theory are utilized to represent intervals or classes at 90 degree angles. The color perceived as having maximum measured luminance is selected to portray the color having an azimuth of an assumed light source and the color showing minimum measured luminance portrays the diametrically opposite azimuth. The 90 degree intermediate azimuths are portrayed by unique colors of intermediate measured luminance, such as red and green. Colors between these four pole colors are used which are perceived as mixtures or combinations of their bounding colors and are arranged progressively between their bounding colors to have perceived proportional mixtures of the bounding colors which are proportional to the interval's angular distance from its bounding colors.

  2. Protein secretion and surface display in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2012-01-01

    The cell wall peptidoglycan of Gram-positive bacteria functions as a surface organelle for the transport and assembly of proteins that interact with the environment, in particular, the tissues of an infected host. Signal peptide-bearing precursor proteins are secreted across the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. Some precursors carry C-terminal sorting signals with unique sequence motifs that are cleaved by sortase enzymes and linked to the cell wall peptidoglycan of vegetative forms or spores. The sorting signals of pilin precursors are cleaved by pilus-specific sortases, which generate covalent bonds between proteins leading to the assembly of fimbrial structures. Other precursors harbour surface (S)-layer homology domains (SLH), which fold into a three-pronged spindle structure and bind secondary cell wall polysaccharides, thereby associating with the surface of specific Gram-positive microbes. Type VII secretion is a non-canonical secretion pathway for WXG100 family proteins in mycobacteria. Gram-positive bacteria also secrete WXG100 proteins and carry unique genes that either contribute to discrete steps in secretion or represent distinctive substrates for protein transport reactions. PMID:22411983

  3. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  4. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability On or Near the Airport Surface, Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. The term ATMA was created to reflect the fact that the CD&R concept area of operation is focused near the airport within the terminal maneuvering area. In the following, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS).

  5. Virtual Surface Characteristics of a Tactile Display Using Magneto-Rheological Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul-Hee; Jang, Min-Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Virtual surface characteristics of tactile displays are investigated to characterize the feeling of human touch for a haptic interface application. In order to represent the tactile feeling, a prototype tactile display incorporating Magneto-Rheological (MR) fluid has been developed. Tactile display devices simulate the finger’s skin to feel the sensations of contact such as compliance, friction, and topography of the surface. Thus, the tactile display can provide information on the surface of an organic tissue to the surgeon in virtual reality. In order to investigate the compliance feeling of a human finger’s touch, normal force responses of a tactile display under various magnetic fields have been assessed. Also, shearing friction force responses of the tactile display are investigated to simulate the action of finger dragging on the surface. Moreover, different matrix arrays of magnetic poles are applied to form the virtual surface topography. From the results, different tactile feelings are observed according to the applied magnetic field strength as well as the arrays of magnetic poles combinations. This research presents a smart tactile display technology for virtual surfaces. PMID:22163769

  6. Virtual surface characteristics of a tactile display using magneto-rheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Hee; Jang, Min-Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Virtual surface characteristics of tactile displays are investigated to characterize the feeling of human touch for a haptic interface application. In order to represent the tactile feeling, a prototype tactile display incorporating Magneto-Rheological (MR) fluid has been developed. Tactile display devices simulate the finger's skin to feel the sensations of contact such as compliance, friction, and topography of the surface. Thus, the tactile display can provide information on the surface of an organic tissue to the surgeon in virtual reality. In order to investigate the compliance feeling of a human finger's touch, normal force responses of a tactile display under various magnetic fields have been assessed. Also, shearing friction force responses of the tactile display are investigated to simulate the action of finger dragging on the surface. Moreover, different matrix arrays of magnetic poles are applied to form the virtual surface topography. From the results, different tactile feelings are observed according to the applied magnetic field strength as well as the arrays of magnetic poles combinations. This research presents a smart tactile display technology for virtual surfaces. PMID:22163769

  7. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  8. Aircraft-Based Satellite Navigation Augmentation to Enable Automated Landing and Movement on the Airport Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeidat, Qasem Turki

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) enables a paralyzed user to interact with an external device through brain signals. A BCI measures identifies patterns within these measured signals, translating such patterns into commands. The P300 is a pattern of a scalp potentials elicited by a luminance increment of an attended target rather than a non-target character of an alphanumeric matrix. The Row-Column Paradigm (RCP) can utilize responses to series of illuminations of matrix target and non-target characters to spell out alphanumeric strings of P300-eliciting target characters, yet this popular RCP speller faces three challenges. Theadjacent problem concerns the proximity of neighboring characters, the crowding problem concerns their number. Both adjacent and crowding problems concern how these factors impede BCI performance. The fatigue problem concerns how RCP use is tiring. This dissertation addressed these challenges for both desktop and mobile platforms. A new P300 speller interface, the Zigzag Paradigm (ZP), reduced the adjacent problem by increasing the distance between adjacent characters, as well as the crowding problem, by reducing the number neighboring characters. In desktop study, the classification accuracy was significantly improved 91% with the ZP VS 80.6% with the RCP. Since the ZP is not suitable for mobile P300 spellers with a small screen size, a new P300 speller interface was developed in this study, the Edges Paradigm (EP). The EP reduced the adjacent and crowding problems by adding flashing squares located upon the outer edges of the character matrix in the EP. The classification accuracy of the EP (i.e., 93.3%) was significantly higher than the RCP (i.e., 82.1%). We further compared three speller paradigms (i.e., RCP, ZP, and EP), and the result indicated that the EP produced the highest accuracy and caused less fatigue. Later, the EP is implemented in a simulator of a Samsung galaxy smart phone on the Microsoft Surface Pro 2. The mobile EP was

  9. G-Protein Coupled Receptors: Surface Display and Biosensor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurchie, Edward; Leifert, Wayne

    Signal transduction by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) underpins a multitude of physiological processes. Ligand recognition by the receptor leads to the activation of a generic molecular switch involving heterotrimeric G-proteins and guanine nucleotides. With growing interest and commercial investment in GPCRs in areas such as drug targets, orphan receptors, high-throughput screening of drugs and biosensors, greater attention will focus on assay development to allow for miniaturization, ultrahigh-throughput and, eventually, microarray/biochip assay formats that will require nanotechnology-based approaches. Stable, robust, cell-free signaling assemblies comprising receptor and appropriate molecular switching components will form the basis of future GPCR/G-protein platforms, which should be able to be adapted to such applications as microarrays and biosensors. This chapter focuses on cell-free GPCR assay nanotechnologies and describes some molecular biological approaches for the construction of more sophisticated, surface-immobilized, homogeneous, functional GPCR sensors. The latter points should greatly extend the range of applications to which technologies based on GPCRs could be applied.

  10. Flight Deck Display Technologies for 4DT and Surface Equivalent Visual Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Jones, Denis R.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Allamandola, Angela S.; Foyle, David C.; Hooey, Becky L.

    2009-01-01

    NASA research is focused on flight deck display technologies that may significantly enhance situation awareness, enable new operating concepts, and reduce the potential for incidents/accidents for terminal area and surface operations. The display technologies include surface map, head-up, and head-worn displays; 4DT guidance algorithms; synthetic and enhanced vision technologies; and terminal maneuvering area traffic conflict detection and alerting systems. This work is critical to ensure that the flight deck interface technologies and the role of the human participants can support the full realization of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) and its novel operating concepts.

  11. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology. PMID:26060076

  12. Identification of Posttranslational Modification-Dependent Protein Interactions Using Yeast Surface Displayed Human Proteome Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact specifically with posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation is often necessary to understand cellular signaling pathways. Numerous methods for identifying proteins that interact with posttranslational modifications have been utilized, including affinity-based purification and analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and tethered catalysis. Although these techniques have been used successfully, each has limitations. Recently, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries have been utilized to identify protein fragments with affinity for various target molecules, including phosphorylated peptides. When coupled with fluorescently activated cell sorting and high throughput methods for the analysis of selection outputs, yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries can rapidly and efficiently identify protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including posttranslational modifications. In this review we compare the use of yeast surface display libraries to other methods for the identification of interactions between proteins and posttranslational modifications and discuss future applications of the technology. PMID:26060076

  13. An air pollution modeling study using three surface coverings near the New International Airport of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Jazcilevich, Arón D; García, Agustín R; Ruiz-Suárez, Luis-Gerardo

    2003-10-01

    The dry lakebed of what once was the lake of Texcoco is the location selected for the New International Airport of Mexico City. This project will generate an important urban development near the airport with regional implications on air quality. Using a prognostic air quality model, the consequences of photochemical air pollution in the metropolitan area of Mexico City resulting from three possible coverings for the areas of the lakebed that are not occupied by the runway and terminal building are investigated. These coverings are desert, grassland, and water and occupy an area of 63 km2. This study is based on a representative high pollution episode. In addition to reducing the emission of primary natural particles, the water covering generates a land-water breeze capable of maintaining enough ventilation to reduce pollutant concentrations over a localized region of the metropolitan area and may enhance the wind speed on the coasts of the proposed lake. PMID:14604339

  14. Surface Display and Bioactivity of Bombyx mori Acetylcholinesterase on Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    He, Yong-Sheng; Beier, Ross C.; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Xu, Zhen-Lin; Wu, Wei-Jian; Shen, Yu-Dong; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Lai, Li-Na; Wang, Hong; Yang, Jin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    A Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) cell surface display system of Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase (BmAChE) was constructed and its bioactivity was studied. The modified Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase gene (bmace) was fused with the anchor protein (AGα1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and transformed into P. pastoris strain GS115. The recombinant strain harboring the fusion gene bmace-AGα1 was induced to display BmAChE on the P. pastoris cell surface. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry assays revealed that the BmAChE was successfully displayed on the cell surface of P. pastoris GS115. The enzyme activity of the displayed BmAChE was detected by the Ellman method at 787.7 U/g (wet cell weight). In addition, bioactivity of the displayed BmAChE was verified by inhibition tests conducted with eserine, and with carbamate and organophosphorus pesticides. The displayed BmAChE had an IC50 of 4.17×10−8 M and was highly sensitive to eserine and five carbamate pesticides, as well as seven organophosphorus pesticides. Results suggest that the displayed BmAChE had good bioactivity. PMID:23940577

  15. Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a directs cell surface display of tick BM95 immunogenic peptides on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Canales, Mario; Almazán, Consuelo; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; de la Fuente, José

    2008-07-31

    The surface display of heterologous proteins on live Escherichia coli using anchoring motifs from outer membranes proteins has impacted on many areas of biochemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology. The Anaplasma marginale major surface protein 1a (MSP1a) contains N-terminal surface-exposed repeated peptides (28-289 amino acids) that are involved in pathogen interaction with host cell receptors and is surface-displayed when the recombinant protein is expressed in E. coli. Therefore, it was predicted that MSP1a would surface display on E. coli peptides inserted in the N-terminal repeats region of the protein. The Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus BM86 and BM95 glycoproteins are homologous proteins that protect cattle against tick infestations. In this study, we demonstrated that a recombinant protein comprising tick BM95 immunogenic peptides fused to the A. marginale MSP1a N-terminal region is displayed on the E. coli surface and is recognized by anti-BM86 and anti-MSP1a antibodies. This system provides a novel approach to the surface display of heterologous antigenic proteins on live E. coli and suggests the possibility to use the recombinant bacteria for immunization studies against cattle tick infestations. PMID:18582976

  16. Capture and printing of fixed stromal cell membranes for bioactive display on PDMS surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Wang, Jennifer B.; Bersani, Francesca; Parekkadan, Biju

    2013-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has emerged as an extremely useful polymer for various biological applications. The conjugation of PDMS with bioactive molecules to create functional surfaces is feasible, yet limited to single molecule display with imprecise localization of the molecules on PDMS. Here we report a robust technique that can transfer and print the membrane surface of glutaraldehyde-fixed stromal cells intact to a PDMS substrate using an intermediate polyvinylalcohol (PVA) film as a transporter system. The cell-PVA film capturing the entirety of surface molecules can be peeled off and subsequently printed onto PDMS while maintaining the spatial display of the original cell surface molecules. Proof-of-concept studies are described using human bone marrow stromal cell membranes, including the demonstration of bioactivity of transferred membranes to capture and adhere hematopoietic cells. The presented process is applicable to virtually any adherent cell and can broaden the functional display of biomolecules on PDMS for biotechnology applications. PMID:23927769

  17. Electrochemical Glucose Biosensor Based on Glucose Oxidase Displayed on Yeast Surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwei; Lang, Qiaolin; Liang, Bo; Liu, Aihua

    2015-01-01

    The conventional enzyme-based biosensor requires chemical or physical immobilization of purified enzymes on electrode surface, which often results in loss of enzyme activity and/or fractions immobilized over time. It is also costly. A major advantage of yeast surface display is that it enables the direct utilization of whole cell catalysts with eukaryote-produced proteins being displayed on the cell surface, providing an economic alternative to traditional production of purified enzymes. Herein, we describe the details of the display of glucose oxidase (GOx) on yeast cell surface and its application in the development of electrochemical glucose sensor. In order to achieve a direct electrochemistry of GOx, the entire cell catalyst (yeast-GOx) was immobilized together with multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the electrode, which allowed sensitive and selective glucose detection. PMID:26060079

  18. Display of recombinant proteins at the surface of lactic acid bacteria: strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    Michon, C; Langella, P; Eijsink, V G H; Mathiesen, G; Chatel, J M

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are promising vectors of choice to deliver active molecules to mucosal tissues. They are recognized as safe by the World Health Organization and some strains have probiotic properties. The wide range of potential applications of LAB-driven mucosal delivery includes control of inflammatory bowel disease, vaccine delivery, and management of auto-immune diseases. Because of this potential, strategies for the display of proteins at the surface of LAB are gaining interest. To display a protein at the surface of LAB, a signal peptide and an anchor domain are necessary. The recombinant protein can be attached to the membrane layer, using a transmembrane anchor or a lipoprotein-anchor, or to the cell wall, by a covalent link using sortase mediated anchoring via the LPXTG motif, or by non-covalent liaisons employing binding domains such as LysM or WxL. Both the stability and functionality of the displayed proteins will be affected by the kind of anchor used. The most commonly surfaced exposed recombinant proteins produced in LAB are antigens and antibodies and the most commonly used LAB are lactococci and lactobacilli. Although it is not necessarily so that surface-display is the preferred localization in all cases, it has been shown that for certain applications, such as delivery of the human papillomavirus E7 antigen, surface-display elicits better biological responses, compared to cytosolic expression or secretion. Recent developments include the display of peptides and proteins targeting host cell receptors, for the purpose of enhancing the interactions between LAB and host. Surface-display technologies have other potential applications, such as degradation of biomass, which is of importance for some potential industrial applications of LAB. PMID:27142045

  19. Surface display of a borrelial lipoprotein on meningococcal outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Salverda, Merijn L M; Meinderts, Sanne M; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; Wagemakers, Alex; Hovius, Joppe W R; van der Ark, Arno; Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-02-17

    Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs) are gaining attention as vaccine candidates. The successful expression of heterologous antigens in OMVs, with the OMV functioning both as adjuvant and delivery vehicle, has greatly enhanced their vaccine potential. Since there are indications that surface exposed antigens might induce a superior immune response, targeting of heterologous antigens to the OMV surface is of special interest. Several systems for surface display of heterologous antigens on OMVs have been developed. However, these systems have not been used to display lipidated membrane-associated proteins known as lipoproteins, which are emerging as key targets for protective immunity. We were therefore interested to see whether we could express a foreign lipoprotein on the outer surface of OMVs. When outer surface protein A (OspA), a borrelial surface-exposed lipoprotein, was expressed in meningococci, it was found that although OspA was present in OMVs, it was no longer surface-exposed. Therefore, a set of fusions of OspA to different regions of factor H binding protein (fHbp), a meningococcal surface-exposed lipoprotein, were designed and tested for their surface-exposure. An N-terminal part of fHbp was found to be necessary for the successful surface display of OspA on meningococcal OMVs. When mice were immunized with this set of OMVs, an OspA-specific antibody response was only elicited by OMVs with clearly surface-exposed OspA, strengthening the idea that the exact positioning of an antigen in the OMV affects the immune response. This method for the surface display of heterologous lipoproteins on OMVs is a step forward in the development of OMVs as a vaccine platform. PMID:26801064

  20. Method and System for Producing Full Motion Media to Display on a Spherical Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starobin, Michael A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and system for producing full motion media for display on a spherical surface is described. The method may include selecting a subject of full motion media for display on a spherical surface. The method may then include capturing the selected subject as full motion media (e.g., full motion video) in a rectilinear domain. The method may then include processing the full motion media in the rectilinear domain for display on a spherical surface, such as by orienting the full motion media, adding rotation to the full motion media, processing edges of the full motion media, and/or distorting the full motion media in the rectilinear domain for instance. After processing the full motion media, the method may additionally include providing the processed full motion media to a spherical projection system, such as a Science on a Sphere system.

  1. Homing endonuclease target determination using SELEX adapted for yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Kyle; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the target sequence of a DNA-binding protein is vital in obtaining fundamental characteristics of the protein and evaluating properties of the protein-DNA interaction. For example, novel homing endonucleases cannot be proven to be functional until a predicted target site is tested. Unfortunately, target site prediction is not always easy, or even possible, depending on the amount of sequence data available. Here we describe a modification of SELEX using yeast surface display that can quickly and inexpensively resolve DNA-binding targets in high throughput for proteins without any prior assumptions or knowledge regarding the target site. This protocol is easily integrated into the yeast surface display pipeline and is leveraged by the expansive number of existing tools for both SELEX and yeast surface display. PMID:24510268

  2. Escherichia coli surface display of single-chain antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Xu; Mellon, Michael; Bowder, Dane; Quinn, Meghan; Shea, Danielle; Wood, Charles; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2015-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. - Highlights: • Designed single-chain VRC01 antibody was demonstrated to bind HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Single-chain VRC01 antibody was successfully displayed on the surface of E. coli. • Engineered bacteria can absorb HIV-1 particles and prevent HIV-1 infection in cell culture.

  3. Engineering of Immunoglobulin Fc Heterodimers Using Yeast Surface-Displayed Combinatorial Fc Library Screening

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye-Ji; Kim, Ye-Jin; Choi, Dong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin Fc heterodimers, which are useful scaffolds for the generation of bispecific antibodies, have been mostly generated through structure-based rational design methods that introduce asymmetric mutations into the CH3 homodimeric interface to favor heterodimeric Fc formation. Here, we report an approach to generate heterodimeric Fc variants through directed evolution combined with yeast surface display. We developed a combinatorial heterodimeric Fc library display system by mating two haploid yeast cell lines, one haploid cell line displayed an Fc chain library (displayed FcCH3A) with mutations in one CH3 domain (CH3A) on the yeast cell surface, and the other cell line secreted an Fc chain library (secreted FcCH3B) with mutations in the other CH3 domain (CH3B). In the mated cells, secreted FcCH3B is displayed on the cell surface through heterodimerization with the displayed FcCH3A, the detection of which enabled us to screen the library for heterodimeric Fc variants. We constructed combinatorial heterodimeric Fc libraries with simultaneous mutations in the homodimer-favoring electrostatic interaction pairs K370-E357/S364 or D399-K392/K409 at the CH3 domain interface. High-throughput screening of the libraries using flow cytometry yielded heterodimeric Fc variants with heterodimer-favoring CH3 domain interface mutation pairs, some of them showed high heterodimerization yields (~80–90%) with previously unidentified CH3 domain interface mutation pairs, such as hydrogen bonds and cation-π interactions. Our study provides a new approach for engineering Fc heterodimers that could be used to engineer other heterodimeric protein-protein interactions through directed evolution combined with yeast surface display. PMID:26675656

  4. Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

    2008-07-01

    These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

  5. Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

    2009-08-02

    These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magneticactivated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks, resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

  6. Rapidly rendering cells phagocytic through a cell surface display technique and concurrent Rac activation.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Hiroki; Komatsu, Toru; Arita, Makoto; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Nagano, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takanari

    2014-07-15

    Cell surfaces represent a platform through which extracellular signals that determine diverse cellular processes, including migration, division, adhesion, and phagocytosis, are transduced. Techniques to rapidly reconfigure the surface properties of living cells should thus offer the ability to harness these cellular functions. Although the molecular mechanism of phagocytosis is well characterized, the minimal molecular players that are sufficient to activate this elaborate process remain elusive. We developed and implemented a technique to present a molecule of interest at the cell surface in an inducible manner on a time scale of minutes. We simultaneously induced the cell surface display of the C2 domain of milk fat globule epidermal growth factor factor 8 (MFG-E8) and activated the intracellular small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, which stimulates actin polymerization at the cell periphery. The C2 domain binds to phosphatidylserine, a lipid exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells. By integrating the stimulation of these two processes, we converted HeLa cells into a phagocytic cell line that bound to and engulfed apoptotic human Jurkat cells. Inducing either the cell surface display of the C2 domain or activating Rac alone was not sufficient to stimulate phagocytosis, which suggests that attachment to the target cell and actin reorganization together constitute the minimal molecular events that are needed to induce phagocytosis. This cell surface display technique might be useful as part of a targeted, cell-based therapy in which unwanted cells with characteristic surface molecules could be rapidly consumed by engineered cells. PMID:25028719

  7. Rapidly rendering cells phagocytic through a cell-surface display technique and concurrent Rac activation

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Hiroki; Arita, Makoto; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Cell surfaces represent a platform through which extracellular signals that determine diverse cellular processes, including migration, division, adhesion, and phagocytosis, are transduced. Techniques to rapidly reconfigure the surface properties of living cells should thus offer the ability to harness these cellular functions. Although the molecular mechanism of phagocytosis is well-characterized, the minimal molecular players that are sufficient to activate this elaborate process remain elusive. We developed and implemented a technique to present a molecule of interest at the cell surface in an inducible manner on a timescale of minutes. We simultaneously induced the cell-surface display of the C2 domain of milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) and activated the intracellular small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, which stimulates actin polymerization at the cell periphery. The C2 domain binds to phosphatidylserine, a lipid exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells. By integrating the stimulation of these two processes, we converted HeLa cells into a phagocytic cell line that bound to and engulfed apoptotic human Jurkat cells. Inducing either the cell-surface display of the C2 domain or activating Rac alone was not sufficient to stimulate phagocytosis, which suggests that attachment to the target cell and actin reorganization together constitute the minimal molecular events that are needed to induce phagocytosis. This cell-surface display technique might be useful as part of a targeted, cell-based therapy in which unwanted cells with characteristic surface molecules could be rapidly consumed by engineered cells. PMID:25028719

  8. Detection of the mandibular canal via shaded surface display and multiplanar reconstruction of CT data.

    PubMed

    Solar, P; Gahleitner, A; Bednar, A; Rodinger, S; Watzek, G

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of conventional two-dimensional (2D) multisection images (multiplanar rendering, MPR) and registered three-dimensional (3D) shaded surface images (shaded surface display, SSD) of standard axial computed tomography (CT) data for detecting the mandibular canal (MC) in the lower jaw of 136 patients. The patients, who had different indications for mandibular CT, were examined using standard axial CT scanning. Two post-processing programs were used for 3D visualization of the data sets. The cross-sectional rendered images and the shaded surface 3D images were graded for detection of the MC, the presence of artefacts, overall quality and clinical relevance. A 3D display of the MC was achieved using the MPR technique in 100% with high image quality. The surface rendered display depicted the MC in 80%. Artefacts markedly degraded the 3D displays obtained using the surface rendering technique; thus, SSD is an inappropriate technique for imaging the entire MC without manual segmentation. MPR-CT improves the sensitivity of CT imaging in the detection of the MC with very little time needed for post-processing compared with the SSD method. This post-processing modality should, therefore, be considered for serial studies of patients undergoing dental CT. The sensitivity of the MPR method is even superior to the standard axial CT slices. PMID:11394371

  9. Tangible display systems: direct interfaces for computer-based studies of surface appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Benjamin A.; Ferwerda, James A.

    2010-02-01

    When evaluating the surface appearance of real objects, observers engage in complex behaviors involving active manipulation and dynamic viewpoint changes that allow them to observe the changing patterns of surface reflections. We are developing a class of tangible display systems to provide these natural modes of interaction in computer-based studies of material perception. A first-generation tangible display was created from an off-the-shelf laptop computer containing an accelerometer and webcam as standard components. Using these devices, custom software estimated the orientation of the display and the user's viewing position. This information was integrated with a 3D rendering module so that rotating the display or moving in front of the screen would produce realistic changes in the appearance of virtual objects. In this paper, we consider the design of a second-generation system to improve the fidelity of the virtual surfaces rendered to the screen. With a high-quality display screen and enhanced tracking and rendering capabilities, a secondgeneration system will be better able to support a range of appearance perception applications.

  10. CLINICAL SURFACES - Activity-Based Computing for Distributed Multi-Display Environments in Hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardram, Jakob E.; Bunde-Pedersen, Jonathan; Doryab, Afsaneh; Sørensen, Steffen

    A multi-display environment (MDE) is made up of co-located and networked personal and public devices that form an integrated workspace enabling co-located group work. Traditionally, MDEs have, however, mainly been designed to support a single “smart room”, and have had little sense of the tasks and activities that the MDE is being used for. This paper presents a novel approach to support activity-based computing in distributed MDEs, where displays are physically distributed across a large building. CLINICAL SURFACES was designed for clinical work in hospitals, and enables context-sensitive retrieval and browsing of patient data on public displays. We present the design and implementation of CLINICAL SURFACES, and report from an evaluation of the system at a large hospital. The evaluation shows that using distributed public displays to support activity-based computing inside a hospital is very useful for clinical work, and that the apparent contradiction between maintaining privacy of medical data in a public display environment can be mitigated by the use of CLINICAL SURFACES.

  11. Differential Bacterial Surface Display of Peptides by the Transmembrane Domain of OmpA

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, Gertjan S.; Alexeeva, Svetlana; Dogterom, Marileen; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2009-01-01

    Peptide libraries or antigenic determinants can be displayed on the surface of bacteria through insertion in a suitable outer membrane scaffold protein. Here, we inserted the well-known antibody epitopes 3xFLAG and 2xmyc in exterior loops of the transmembrane (TM) domain of OmpA. Although these highly charged epitopes were successfully displayed on the cell surface, their levels were 10-fold reduced due to degradation. We verified that the degradation was not caused by the absence of the C-terminal domain of OmpA. In contrast, a peptide that was only moderately charged (SA-1) appeared to be stably incorporated in the outer membrane at normal protein levels. Together, these results suggest that the display efficiency is sensitive to the charge of the inserted epitopes. In addition, the high-level expression of OmpA variants with surface-displayed epitopes adversely affected growth in a strain dependent, transient manner. In a MC4100 derived strain growth was affected, whereas in MC1061 derived strains growth was unaffected. Finally, results obtained using a gel-shift assay to monitor β-barrel folding in vivo show that the insertion of small epitopes can change the heat modifiability of the OmpA TM domain from ‘aberrant’ to normal, and predict that some β-barrels will not display any significant heat-modifiability at all. PMID:19707582

  12. Development of novel cell surface display in Corynebacterium glutamicum using porin.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Toshihiro; Hatada, Kazuki; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a novel cell surface display in Corynebacterium glutamicum using porin proteins as anchor proteins. Porins are localized at C. glutamicum mycolic acid layer and exist as a hexamer. We used alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148 (AmyA) as a model protein to be displayed on the C. glutamicum cell surface. AmyA was fused to the C terminus of the porins PorB, PorC, or PorH. Expression vectors using fused proteins under the control of the cspB promoter were constructed and introduced into the C. glutamicum Cm strain. Immunostaining microscopy and flow cytometric analysis revealed that PorB-AmyA, PorC-AmyA, and PorH-AmyA were displayed on the C. glutamicum cell surface. AmyA activity was only detected in the cell fraction of C. glutamicum cells that displayed AmyA fused to PorB, PorC or PorH and AmyA activity was not detected in the supernatants of C. glutamicum culture broths after 72 h cultivation. Thus, we have demonstrated that C. glutamicum porins are very efficient anchor proteins for protein display in C. glutamicum. PMID:19430772

  13. Preparation of Sticky Escherichia coli through Surface Display of an Adhesive Catecholamine Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joseph P.; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  14. Preparation of sticky Escherichia coli through surface display of an adhesive catecholamine moiety.

    PubMed

    Park, Joseph P; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  15. Surface display and bioactivity of Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase on Pichia pastoris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To construct the Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) cell surface display system of Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase (BmAChE), the gene for the anchor protein (AGa1) was obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and was fused with the modified Bombyx mori acetylcholinesterase gene (bmace) and transformed int...

  16. Art at the Airport: An Exploration of New Art Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Many airports have transformed empty waiting spaces into mini malls, children's play areas, and displays of beautiful art, making a long wait a bit more pleasant. For the modern airport, showcasing art has become an important component, with perks including a built-in global audience, as well as the vast spaces of modern architecture. For the art…

  17. Relevant uses of surface proteins – display on self‐organized biological structures

    PubMed Central

    Jahns, Anika C.; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Proteins are often found attached to surfaces of self‐assembling biological units such as whole microbial cells or subcellular structures, e.g. intracellular inclusions. In the last two decades surface proteins were identified that could serve as anchors for the display of foreign protein functions. Extensive protein engineering based on structure–function data enabled efficient display of technically and/or medically relevant protein functions. Small size, diversity of the anchor protein as well as support structure, genetic manipulability and controlled cultivation of phages, bacterial cells and yeasts contributed to the establishment of designed and specifically functionalized tools for applications as sensors, catalysis, biomedicine, vaccine development and library‐based screening technologies. Traditionally, phage display is employed for library screening but applications in biomedicine and vaccine development are also perceived. For some diagnostic purposes phages are even too small in size so other carrier materials where needed and gave way for cell and yeast display. Only recently, intracellular inclusions such as magnetosomes, polyhydroxyalkanoate granules and lipid bodies were conceived as stable subcellular structures enabling the display of foreign protein functions and showing potential as specific and tailor‐made devices for medical and biotechnological applications. PMID:21906264

  18. Escherichia coli Surface Display of Single-Chain Antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin-Xu; Mellon, Michael; Bowder, Dane; Quinn, Meghan; Shea, Danielle; Wood, Charles; Xiang, Shi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission and infection occur mainly via the mucosal surfaces. The commensal bacteria residing in these surfaces can potentially be employed as a vehicle for delivering inhibitors to prevent HIV-1 infection. In this study, we have employed a bacteria-based strategy to display a broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01, which could potentially be used to prevent HIV-1 infection. The VRC01 antibody mimics CD4-binding to gp120 and has broadly neutralization activities against HIV-1. We have designed a construct that can express the fusion peptide of the scFv-VRC01 antibody together with the autotransporter β-barrel domain of IgAP gene from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which enabled surface display of the antibody molecule. Our results indicate that the scFv-VRC01 antibody molecule was displayed on the surface of the bacteria as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. The engineered bacteria can capture HIV-1 particles via surface-binding and inhibit HIV-1 infection in cell culture. PMID:25482819

  19. Construction of a food-grade cell surface display system for Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiayang; Wang, Xiuwen; Kong, Jian; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a food-grade cell surface display host/vector system for Lactobacillus casei was constructed. The food-grade host L. casei Q-5 was a lactose-deficient derivative of L. casei ATCC 334 obtained by plasmid elimination. The food-grade cell surface display vector was constructed based on safe DNA elements from lactic acid bacteria containing the following: pSH71 replicon from Lactococcus lactis, lactose metabolism genes from L. casei ATCC 334 as complementation markers, and surface layer protein gene from Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 for cell surface display. The feasibility of the new host/vector system was verified by the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) on L. casei. Laser scanning confocal microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis using anti-GFP antibody confirmed that GFP was anchored on the surface of the recombinant cells. The stability of recombinant L. casei cells in artificial gastrointestinal conditions was verified, which is beneficial for oral vaccination applications. These results indicate that the food-grade host/vector system can be an excellent antigen delivery vehicle in oral vaccine construction. PMID:24598012

  20. Recent advances in yeast cell-surface display technologies for waste biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nan-Qi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Waste biorefinery aims to maximize the output of value-added products from various artificial/agricultural wastes by using integrated bioprocesses. To make waste biorefinery economically feasible, it is thus necessary to develop a low-cost, environment-friendly technique to perform simultaneous biodegradation and bioconversion of waste materials. Cell-surface display engineering is a novel, cost-effective technique that can auto-immobilize proteins on the cell exterior of microorganisms, and has been applied for use with waste biofinery. Through tethering different enzymes (e.g., cellulase, lipase, and protease) or metal-binding peptides on cell surfaces, various yeast strains can effectively produce biofuels and biochemicals from sugar/protein-rich waste materials, catalyze waste oils into biodiesels, or retrieve heavy metals from wastewater. This review critically summarizes recent applications of yeast cell-surface display on various types of waste biorefineries, highlighting its potential and future challenges with regard to commercializing this technology. PMID:27039354

  1. Surface display of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans autotransporter Aae and dispersin B hybrid act as antibiofilm agents.

    PubMed

    Ragunath, C; DiFranco, K; Shanmugam, M; Gopal, P; Vyas, V; Fine, D H; Cugini, C; Ramasubbu, N

    2016-08-01

    Among the various proteins expressed by the periodontopathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, two proteins play important roles for survival in the oral cavity. The autotransporter Aae facilitates the attachment of the pathogen to oral epithelial cells, which act as a reservoir, while the biofilm-degrading glycoside hydrolase dispersin B facilitates the movement of daughter cells from the mature biofilm to a new site. The objective of this study was to use the potential of these two proteins to control biofilms. To this end, we generated a hybrid construct between the Aae C-terminal translocating domain and dispersin B, and mobilized it into Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) pLysS cells. Immunofluorescence analysis of the modified E. coli cells confirmed the presence of dispersin B on the surface. Further, the membrane localization of the displayed dispersin B was confirmed with Western blot analysis. The integrity of the E. coli cells displaying the dispersin B was confirmed through FACS analysis. The hydrolytic activity of the surface-displayed dispersin B was confirmed by using 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-d-glucopyranoside as the substrate. The detachment ability of the dispersin B surface-displaying E. coli cells was shown using Staphylococcus epidermidis and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae biofilms in a microtiter assay. We concluded that the Aae β-domain is sufficient to translocate foreign enzymes in the native folded form and that the method of Aae-mediated translocation of surface displayed enzymes might be useful for control of biofilms. PMID:26280561

  2. Cell surface display of chimeric glycoproteins via the S-layer of Paenibacillus alvei

    PubMed Central

    Zarschler, Kristof; Janesch, Bettina; Kainz, Birgit; Ristl, Robin; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive, mesophilic bacterium Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051T possesses a two-dimensional crystalline protein surface layer (S-layer) with oblique lattice symmetry composed of a single type of O-glycoprotein species. Herein, we describe a strategy for nanopatterned in vivo cell surface co-display of peptide and glycan epitopes based on this S-layer glycoprotein self-assembly system. The open reading frame of the corresponding structural gene spaA codes for a protein of 983 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 24 amino acids. The mature S-layer protein has a theoretical molecular mass of 105.95 kDa and a calculated pI of 5.83. It contains three S-layer homology domains at the N-terminus that are involved in anchoring of the glycoprotein via a non-classical, pyruvylated secondary cell wall polymer to the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. For this polymer, several putative biosynthesis enzymes were identified upstream of the spaA gene. For in vivo cell surface display, the hexahistidine tag and the enhanced green fluorescent protein, respectively, were translationally fused to the C-terminus of SpaA. Immunoblot analysis, immunofluorescence staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the fused epitopes were efficiently expressed and successfully displayed via the S-layer glycoprotein matrix on the surface of P. alvei CCM 2051T cells. In contrast, exclusively non-glycosylated chimeric SpaA proteins were displayed, when the S-layer of the glycosylation-deficient wsfP mutant was used as a display matrix. PMID:20513375

  3. Cell surface display of chimeric glycoproteins via the S-layer of Paenibacillus alvei.

    PubMed

    Zarschler, Kristof; Janesch, Bettina; Kainz, Birgit; Ristl, Robin; Messner, Paul; Schäffer, Christina

    2010-07-01

    The Gram-positive, mesophilic bacterium Paenibacillus alvei CCM 2051(T) possesses a two-dimensional crystalline protein surface layer (S-layer) with oblique lattice symmetry composed of a single type of O-glycoprotein species. Herein, we describe a strategy for nanopatterned in vivo cell surface co-display of peptide and glycan epitopes based on this S-layer glycoprotein self-assembly system. The open reading frame of the corresponding structural gene spaA codes for a protein of 983 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 24 amino acids. The mature S-layer protein has a theoretical molecular mass of 105.95kDa and a calculated pI of 5.83. It contains three S-layer homology domains at the N-terminus that are involved in anchoring of the glycoprotein via a non-classical, pyruvylated secondary cell wall polymer to the peptidoglycan layer of the cell wall. For this polymer, several putative biosynthesis enzymes were identified upstream of the spaA gene. For in vivo cell surface display, the hexahistidine tag and the enhanced green fluorescent protein, respectively, were translationally fused to the C-terminus of SpaA. Immunoblot analysis, immunofluorescence staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the fused epitopes were efficiently expressed and successfully displayed via the S-layer glycoprotein matrix on the surface of P. alvei CCM 2051(T) cells. In contrast, exclusively non-glycosylated chimeric SpaA proteins were displayed, when the S-layer of the glycosylation-deficient wsfP mutant was used as a display matrix. PMID:20513375

  4. Microbial surface displaying formate dehydrogenase and its application in optical detection of formate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aihua; Feng, Ruirui; Liang, Bo

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, NAD(+)-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH), encoded by fdh gene from Candida boidinii was successfully displayed on Escherichia coli cell surface using ice nucleation protein (INP) from Pseudomonas borealis DL7 as an anchoring protein. Localization of matlose binding protein (MBP)-INP-FDH fusion protein on the E. coli cell surface was characterized by SDS-PAGE and enzymatic activity assay. FDH activity was monitored through the oxidation of formate catalyzed by cell-surface-displayed FDH with its cofactor NAD(+), and the production of NADH can be detected spectrometrically at 340nm. After induction for 24h in Luria-Bertani medium containing isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside, over 80% of MBP-INP-FDH fusion protein present on the surface of E. coli cells. The cell-surface-displayed FDH showed optimal temperature of 50°C and optimal pH of 9.0. Additionally, the cell-surface-displayed FDH retained its original enzymatic activity after incubation at 4°C for one month with the half-life of 17days at 40°C and 38h at 50°C. The FDH activity could be inhibited to different extents by some transition metal ions and anions. Moreover, the E. coli cells expressing FDH showed different tolerance to solvents. The recombinant whole cell exhibited high formate specificity. Finally, the E. coli cell expressing FDH was used to assay formate with a wide linear range of 5-700μM and a low limit of detection of 2μM. It is anticipated that the genetically engineered cells may have a broad application in biosensors, biofuels and cofactor regeneration system. PMID:27444330

  5. Clinical evaluation of accommodation and ocular surface stability relavant to visual asthenopia with 3D displays

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To validate the association between accommodation and visual asthenopia by measuring objective accommodative amplitude with the Optical Quality Analysis System (OQAS®, Visiometrics, Terrassa, Spain), and to investigate associations among accommodation, ocular surface instability, and visual asthenopia while viewing 3D displays. Methods Fifteen normal adults without any ocular disease or surgical history watched the same 3D and 2D displays for 30 minutes. Accommodative ability, ocular protection index (OPI), and total ocular symptom scores were evaluated before and after viewing the 3D and 2D displays. Accommodative ability was evaluated by the near point of accommodation (NPA) and OQAS to ensure reliability. The OPI was calculated by dividing the tear breakup time (TBUT) by the interblink interval (IBI). The changes in accommodative ability, OPI, and total ocular symptom scores after viewing 3D and 2D displays were evaluated. Results Accommodative ability evaluated by NPA and OQAS, OPI, and total ocular symptom scores changed significantly after 3D viewing (p = 0.005, 0.003, 0.006, and 0.003, respectively), but yielded no difference after 2D viewing. The objective measurement by OQAS verified the decrease of accommodative ability while viewing 3D displays. The change of NPA, OPI, and total ocular symptom scores after 3D viewing had a significant correlation (p < 0.05), implying direct associations among these factors. Conclusions The decrease of accommodative ability after 3D viewing was validated by both subjective and objective methods in our study. Further, the deterioration of accommodative ability and ocular surface stability may be causative factors of visual asthenopia in individuals viewing 3D displays. PMID:24612686

  6. Surface display of malolactic enzyme from Oenococcus oeni on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuyan; Hou, Xiaoyan; Liang, Fang; Chen, Fusheng; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-04-01

    In order to display malolactic enzyme (MLE) on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a yeast cell surface display plasmid pADH1-AGG was constructed by fusing the α-factor signal encoding sequence (267 bp) and the C-terminal half of α-agglutinin encoding sequence (1,645 bp) into the plasmid pADH1. The pADH1-AGG could successfully express and anchor the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) onto the yeast cell surface when the EGFP was used to verify its function. Then the pADH1-MLE was constructed by inserting the MLE encoding sequence (1,600 bp) into the pADH1-AGG and introduced into S. cerevisiae cells. The positive strain carrying pADH1-MLE was confirmed by use of the 6× His monoclonal antibody and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG. All results indicated that the MLE was displayed successfully on the cell surface of positive transformant. The MLE activity of genetically engineered yeast strain could turn 21.11 % L-malate into lactic acid after 12 h reaction with L-malate. The constructed yeast strain might be used to conduct malolactic fermentation (MLF) in wine to solve the important issues of sluggish MLF, microbial spoilage, and adverse metabolic substances produced by the lactic acid bacteria. PMID:23446978

  7. Capture and printing of fixed stromal cell membranes for bioactive display on PDMS surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwoo; Wang, Jennifer B; Bersani, Francesca; Parekkadan, Biju

    2013-08-27

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) has emerged as an extremely useful polymer for various biological applications. The conjugation of PDMS with bioactive molecules to create functional surfaces is feasible yet limited to a single-molecule display with imprecise localization of the molecules on PDMS. Here we report a robust technique that can transfer and print the membrane surface of glutaraldehyde-fixed stromal cells intact onto a PDMS substrate using an intermediate polyvinylalcohol (PVA) film as a transporter system. The cell-PVA film capturing the entirety of surface molecules can be peeled off and subsequently printed onto PDMS while maintaining the spatial display of the original cell surface molecules. Proof-of-concept studies are described using human bone marrow stromal cell membranes including a demonstration of the bioactivity of transferred membranes to capture and adhere hematopoietic cells. The presented process is applicable to virtually any adherent cell and can broaden the functional display of biomolecules on PDMS for biotechnology applications. PMID:23927769

  8. [Surface display of phytase on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient bioethanol production from corn starch].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Chen, Xianzhong; Shen, Wei; Yang, Haiquan; Fan, You

    2015-12-01

    Production of bioethanol using starch as raw material has become a very prominent technology. However, phytate in the raw material not only decreases ethanol production efficiency, but also increases phosphorus discharge. In this study, to decrease phytate content in an ethanol fermentationprocess, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered forheterologous expression of phytase on the cell surface. The phy gene encoding phytase gene was fused with the C-terminal-half region of α-agglutinin and then inserted downstream of the secretion signal gene, to produce a yeast surface-display expression vector pMGK-AG-phy, which was then transformed into S. cerevisiae. The recombinant yeast strain, PHY, successfully displayed phytase on the surface of cells producing 6.4 U/g wet cells and its properties were further characterized. The growthrate and ethanol production of the PHY strain were faster than the parent S. cerevisiae strain in the fermentation medium by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Moreover, the phytate concentration decreased by 91% in dry vinasse compared to the control. In summary, we constructed recombinant S. cerevisiae strain displaying phytase on the cell surface, which could effectively reduce the content of phytate, improve the utilization value of vinasse and reduce the discharge of phosphorus. The strain reported here represents a useful novel engineering platform for developing an environment-friendly system for bioethanol production from a corn substrate. PMID:27093833

  9. Human Enterovirus 71 Protein Displayed on the Surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an Oral Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Congdang; Wang, Yi; Ma, Shuzhi; Li, Leike; Chen, Liyun; Yan, Huimin; Peng, Tao

    2016-06-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV-A71), a major agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease, has become an important public health issue in recent years. No effective antiviral or vaccines against EV-A71 infection are currently available. EV-A71 infection intrudes bodies through the gastric mucosal surface and it is necessary to enhance mucosal immune response to protect children from these pathogens. Recently, the majority of EV-A71 vaccine candidates have been developed for parenteral immunization. However, parenteral vaccine candidates often induce poor mucosal responses. On the other hand, oral vaccines could induce effective mucosal and systemic immunity, and could be easily and safely administered. Thus, proper oral vaccines have attached more interest compared with parenteral vaccine. In this study, the major immunogenic capsid protein of EV-A71 was displayed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Oral immunization of mice with surface-displayed VP1 S. cerevisiae induced systemic humoral and mucosal immune responses, including virus-neutralizing titers, VP1-specific antibody, and the induction of Th1 immune responses in the spleen. Furthermore, oral immunization of mother mice with surface-displayed VP1 S. cerevisiae conferred protection to neonatal mice against the lethal EV-A71 infection. Furthermore, we observed that multiple boost immunization as well as higher immunization dosage could induce higher EV-A71-specific immune response. Our results demonstrated that surface-displayed VP1 S. cerevisiae could be used as potential oral vaccine against EV-A71 infection. PMID:27259043

  10. Automatic detection method for mura defects on display film surface using modified Weber's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung-Muk; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2014-07-01

    We propose a method that automatically detects mura defects on display film surfaces using a modified version of Weber's law. The proposed method detects mura defects regardless of their properties and shapes by identifying regions perceived by human vision as mura using the brightness of pixel and image distribution ratio of mura in an image histogram. The proposed detection method comprises five stages. In the first stage, the display film surface image is acquired and a gray-level shift performed. In the second and third stages, the image histogram is acquired and analyzed, respectively. In the fourth stage, the mura range is acquired. This is followed by postprocessing in the fifth stage. Evaluations of the proposed method conducted using 200 display film mura image samples indicate a maximum detection rate of ˜95.5%. Further, the results of application of the Semu index for luminance mura in flat panel display (FPD) image quality inspection indicate that the proposed method is more reliable than a popular conventional method.

  11. Fixation and stabilization of Escherichia coli cells displaying genetically engineered cell surface proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, A.; Abramov, S.; Georgiou, G.

    1996-12-05

    A large biotechnological potential is inherent in the display of proteins. Applications such as immobilized whole-cell biocatalysts or cellular adsorbents require cell fixation to prevent disintegration, stabilization of the anchored protein from leakage, denaturation or proteolysis, and total loss of cell viability, preventing medium and potential product contamination with cells. In this article the authors describe the adaptation of a simple two-stage chemical crosslinking procedure based on bi-layer encagement for stabilizing Escherichia coli cells expressing an Lpp-OmpA-{beta}-lactamase fusion that displays {beta}-lactamase on the cell surface. Bilayer crosslinking and coating the bacteria with a polymeric matrix is accomplished by treating the cells first with either glutaraldehyde or polyglutaraldehyde, followed by secondary crosslinking with polyacrylamide hydrazide. These treatments resulted in a 5- to 25-fold reduction of the thermal inactivation rate constant at 55 C of surface anchored {beta}-lactamase and completely prevented the deterioration of the cells for at least a week of storage at 4 C. The stabilization procedure developed paves the way to scalable biotechnological applications of E. coli displaying surface anchored proteins as whole-cell biocatalysts and adsorbents.

  12. Hollow Au/Ag nanostars displaying broad plasmonic resonance and high surface-enhanced Raman sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Torreggiani, Armida; Garcia-Ramos, Jose Vicente; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    Bimetallic Au/Ag hollow nanostar (HNS) nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared in this work. These nanoplatforms were obtained by changing the experimental conditions (concentration of silver and chemical reductors, hydroxylamine and citrate) and by using Ag nanostars as template nanoparticles (NPs) through galvanic replacement. The goal of this research was to create bimetallic Au/Ag star-shaped nanoparticles with advanced properties displaying a broader plasmonic resonance, a cleaner exposed surface, and a high concentration of electromagnetic hot spots on the surface provided by the special morphology of nanostars. The size, shape, and composition of Ag as well as their optical properties were studied by extinction spectroscopy, hyperspectral dark field microscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Finally, the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of these HNS was investigated by using thioflavin T, a biomarker of the β-amyloid fibril formation, responsible for Alzheimer's disease. Lucigenin, a molecule displaying different SERS activities on Au and Ag, was also used to explore the presence of these metals on the NP surface. Thus, a relationship between the morphology, plasmon resonance and SERS activity of these new NPs was made.Bimetallic Au/Ag hollow nanostar (HNS) nanoparticles with different morphologies were prepared in this work. These nanoplatforms were obtained by changing the experimental conditions (concentration of silver and chemical reductors, hydroxylamine and citrate) and by using Ag nanostars as template nanoparticles (NPs) through galvanic replacement. The goal of this research was to create bimetallic Au/Ag star-shaped nanoparticles with advanced properties displaying a broader plasmonic resonance, a cleaner exposed surface, and a high concentration of electromagnetic hot spots on the surface provided by the special morphology of nanostars

  13. Incorporation of Nasutitermes takasagoensis endoglucanase into cell surface-displayed minicellulosomes in Pichia pastoris X33.

    PubMed

    Ou, Jingshen; Cao, Yicheng

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the yeast Pichia pastoris was genetically modified to assemble minicellulosomes on its cell surface by the heterologous expression of a truncated scaffoldin CipA from Clostridium acetobutylicum. Fluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis confirmed that CipA was targeted to the yeast cell surface and that NtEGD, the Nasutitermes takasagoensis endoglucanase that was fused with dockerin, interacted with CipA on the yeast cell surface, suggesting that the cohesin and dockerin domains and cellulose-binding module of C. acetobutylicum were functional in the yeasts. The enzymatic activities of the cellulases in the minicellulosomes that were displayed on the yeast cell surfaces increased dramatically following interaction with the cohesin-dockerin domains. Additionally, the hydrolysis efficiencies of NtEGD for carboxymethyl cellulose, microcrystal cellulose, and filter paper increased up to 1.4-fold, 2.0-fold, and 3.2-fold, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the expression of C. acetobutylicum minicellulosomes in yeast and the incorporation of animal cellulases into cellulosomes. This strategy of heterologous cellulase incorporation lends novel insight into the process of cellulosome assembly. Potentially, the surface display of cellulosomes, such as that reported in this study, may be utilized in the engineering of S. cerevisiae for ethanol production from cellulose and additional future applications. PMID:24851815

  14. Surface display of heterologous proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis using a peptidoglycan hydrolase anchor

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaohu; Jiang, Mengtian; Yu, Ziniu; Cai, Hao; Li, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have revealed that the lysin motif (LysM) domains of bacterial cell wall-degrading enzymes are able to bind to peptidoglycan moieties of the cell wall. This suggests an approach for a cell surface display system in Gram-positive bacteria using a LysM-containing protein as the anchoring motif. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in B. thuringiensis using a LysM-containing peptidoglycan hydrolase, endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Mbg), as the anchor protein. Results Homology searching in the B. thuringiensis YBT-1520 genome revealed a putative peptidoglycan hydrolase gene. The encoded protein, Mbg, exhibited substantial cell-wall binding capacity. The deduced amino acid sequence of Mbg was structurally distinguished as an N-terminal domain with two tandemly aligned LysMs and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A GFP-fusion protein was expressed and used to verify the surface localization by Western blot, flow cytometry, protease accessibility, SDS sensitivity, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy assays. Low-level constitutive expression of Mbg was elevated by introducing a sporulation-independent promoter of cry3Aa. Truncated Mbg domains with separate N-terminus (Mbgn), C-terminus (Mbgc), LysM1, or LysM2 were further compared for their cell-wall displaying efficiencies. The Mbgn moiety contributed to cell-wall anchoring, while LysM1 was the active domain. Two tandemly repeated Mbgns exhibited the highest display activity, while the activity of three repeated Mbgns was decreased. A heterologous bacterial multicopper oxidase (WlacD) was successfully displayed onto the surface of B. thuringiensis target cells using the optimum (Mbgn)2 anchor, without radically altering its catalytic activity. Conclusion Mbg can be a functional anchor protein to target different heterologous proteins onto the surface of B. thuringiensis cells. Since the LysM domain appears to be universal in Gram-positive bacteria, the strategy

  15. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  16. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  17. Construction and characterization of a thermostable whole-cell chitinolytic enzyme using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Jin, Xiaobao; Lu, Xuemei; Chu, Fujiang; Shen, Juan; Ma, Yan; Liu, Manyu; Zhu, Jiayong

    2014-10-01

    To develop a novel yeast whole-cell biocatalyst by yeast surface display technology that can hydrolyze chitin, the chitinaseC gene from Serratia marcescens AS1.1652 strain was cloned and subcloned into the yeast surface display plasmid pYD1, and the recombinant plasmid pYD1/SmchiC was electroporated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY100 cell. Aga2p-SmChiC fusion protein was expressed and anchored on the yeast cell surface by induction with galactose, which was verified by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blotting. The chitinolytic activity of the yeast whole-cell biocatalyst or partially purified enzyme was detected by agar plate clear zone test, SDS-PAGE zymography and dinitrosalicylic acid method. The results showed that the chitinaseC gene from S. marcescens AS1.1652 strain was successfully cloned and expressed on the yeast cell surface, Aga2p-SmChiC fusion protein with molecular weight (67 kDa) was determined. Tests on the effect of temperature and pH on enzyme activity and stability revealed that the yeast whole-cell biocatalyst and partially purified enzyme possessed both thermal stability and activity, and even maintained some activity under acidic and weakly alkaline conditions. The optimum reaction temperature and pH value were set at 52 °C and 5.0, respectively. Yeast surface display technology succeeded in preparing a yeast whole-cell biocatalyst with chitinolytic activity, and the utilization of chitin could benefit from this process of enzyme preparation. PMID:24906465

  18. Display of Peptides and Proteins on the Surface of Bacteriophage λ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Nat; Hoess, Ronald H.

    1995-02-01

    The display of peptides or proteins on the surface of viruses is an important technology for studying peptides or proteins and their interaction with other molecules. Here we describe a display vehicle based on bacteriophage λ that incorporates a number of features distinct from other currently used display systems. Fusions of peptides or protein domains have been made to the amino terminus of the 11-kDa D protein of the λ capsid. These fusions assemble onto the viral capsid and appear to be accessible to ligand interactions, based on the ability of a monoclonal antibody to recognize an epitope fused to the D protein on phage heads. To produce large D fusion display libraries and yet avoid the cumbersome task of cloning many fragments into λ DNA, we have used the Cre-loxP site-specific recombination system in vivo to incorporate plasmids encoding the D fusions into the phage genome. Finally, we show that D fusion proteins can be added in vitro to phage lacking D protein and be assembled onto the viral capsid.

  19. Optic design of head-up displays with freeform surfaces specified by NURBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Peter

    2008-09-01

    The imaging system of a head-up display of production-vehicles in automobile industry includes the windshield which is different for each automobile type. Thus, the the imaging system has to be matched to it. This requires an effcient optic design procedure in order to minimize the development costs. One challenge is the layout of the freeform surfaces of the imaging reflectors because there is a lack of procedures comparable to classical imaging systems like first order design or aberration theory. Additionally, reference systems are not published. Onother big issue is consistent data management. It is usual practice in automotive industriy that the surface data of the imaging surfaces will be imported in CAD systems. Often, from these systems manufacturing code is automaticall generated. Importing surface date is delicate, because the surface describtion in CAD systems is done by NURBS (non-uniform rational B-Splines) which are not or insufficently implemented in commercial optic design software. Thus, a conversion of the surface is performed by the software tools. This conversion is normally not much documented and problems with e.g. accuracy, surface continuity often arrise. In this contribution some methods for the design of an imaging reflector for a head-up display and some resulting designs are presented. Additionally it is shown that already in the design phase the freeform surface can be described by NURBS without any lack of performance. This kind of describtion can then easily be transfered to CAD systems by standardized formats like IGES or STEP without any error-prone conversion.

  20. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure. This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  1. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deWit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure, This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  2. A simplified process design for P450 driven hydroxylation based on surface displayed enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ströhle, Frank W; Kranen, Eva; Schrader, Jens; Maas, Ruth; Holtmann, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    New production routes for fine and bulk chemicals are important to establish further sustainable processes in industry. Besides the identification of new biocatalysts and new production routes the optimization of existing processes in regard to an improved utilization of the catalysts are needed. In this paper we describe the successful expression of P450BM3 on the surface of E. coli cells with the Autodisplay system. The successful hydroxylation of palmitic acid by using surface-displayed P450BM3 was shown. Besides optimization of surface protein expression, several cofactor regeneration systems were compared and evaluated. Afterwards, the development of a suitable process for the biocatalytic hydroxylation of fatty acids based on the re-use of the catalysts after a simple centrifugation was investigated. It was shown that the catalyst can be used for several times without any loss in activity. By using surface-displayed P450s in combination with an enzymatic cofactor regeneration system a total turnover number of up to 54,700 could be reached, to the knowledge of the authors the highest value reported for a P450 monooxygenase to date. Further optimizations of the described reaction system can have an enormous impact on the process design for more sustainable bioprocesses. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1225-1233. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26574191

  3. Field Control of the Surface Electroclinic Effect in Liquid Crystal Displays II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappitelli, Kara; Hipolite, Dana; Saunders, Karl

    2012-11-01

    As previously introduced in the presentation by Dana Hipolite, chiral, smectic liquid crystal molecules aligned in layers can be controlled by the application of an electric field, which has a variety of implications for the quality of LCD displays. Both the bulk electroclinic effect (BECE) and surface electroclinic effect (SECE) impact the angle at which the molecules tilt with respect to the director in different areas of the cell. Certain LC's exhibit a continuous Sm-A* to Sm-C* transition, where the angle of the surface and bulk molecules change continually with the electric field. Other LC's exhibit first order transitions where we see jumps in the tilt at different values of the applied electric field for the bulk and surface molecules respectively. The difference in angle of the bulk and surface molecules in both of these situations causes discrepancies in the layer spacing within the LC cell. These discrepancies lead to frustrations within the cell, which can be quantified by the strain (?). These frustrations can be relieved in multiple ways, however the method of relief may lead to negative impacts on the alignment quality of the display itself.

  4. Head-mounted display for interactive inspection of painted free-form surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammel, Soeren; Puente Leon, Fernando

    2003-09-01

    Defects of painted surfaces have proven to be visually disturbing even when their depth is only a few microns. Most inspection approaches neither enable a reliable classification of small defects nor provide a suitable human-machine interface to identify areas to be refinished. Consequently, in most cases the inspection still takes place manually and visually - an unsatisfactory compromise that lacks both objectivity and reproducibility. Our approach combines the reliability of automated methods with the acceptance and flexibility of human-based techniques. The measurement principle is based on deflectometry, and features a significantly higher sensitivity than triangulation methods. The developed system consists of a light source based on a digital micromirror device (DMD), a screen where defined patterns are projected on, as well as a mobile inspection device equipped with a head-mounted display (HMD) and a video camera. During operation, the camera captures images of different patterns reflected in the surface. By combining several images using one of the two techniques described to enhance surface defects, the resulting feature image is displayed in the HMD. This procedure takes place in real time and is repeated continuously. The system performance is demonstrated with the visual inspection of car doors. Promising results show that our prototype allows a reliable yet cost-efficient inspection of painted surfaces matching the needs of automotive industry.

  5. Positioning System Accuracy Assessment for the Runway Incursion Prevention System Flight Test at the Dallas/Ft. Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quach, Cuong C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA/Langley Research Center collaborated with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to test a Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) at the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in October 2000. The RIPS combines airborne and ground sensor data with various cockpit displays to improve pilots' awareness of traffic conditions on the airport surface. The systems tested at DFW involved surface radar and data systems that gather and send surface traffic information to a research aircraft outfitted with the RIPS software, cockpit displays, and data link transceivers. The data sent to the airborne systems contained identification and GPS location of traffic. This information was compared with the own-ship location from airborne GPS receivers to generate incursion alerts. A total of 93 test tracks were flown while operating RIPS. This report compares the accuracy of the airborne GPS systems that gave the own-ship position of the research aircraft for the 93 test tracks.

  6. A Framework for Realistic Modeling and Display of Object Surface Appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Benjamin A.

    With advances in screen and video hardware technology, the type of content presented on computers has progressed from text and simple shapes to high-resolution photographs, photorealistic renderings, and high-definition video. At the same time, there have been significant advances in the area of content capture, with the development of devices and methods for creating rich digital representations of real-world objects. Unlike photo or video capture, which provide a fixed record of the light in a scene, these new technologies provide information on the underlying properties of the objects, allowing their appearance to be simulated for novel lighting and viewing conditions. These capabilities provide an opportunity to continue the computer display progression, from high-fidelity image presentations to digital surrogates that recreate the experience of directly viewing objects in the real world. In this dissertation, a framework was developed for representing objects with complex color, gloss, and texture properties and displaying them onscreen to appear as if they are part of the real-world environment. At its core, there is a conceptual shift from a traditional image-based display workflow to an object-based one. Instead of presenting the stored patterns of light from a scene, the objective is to reproduce the appearance attributes of a stored object by simulating its dynamic patterns of light for the real viewing and lighting geometry. This is accomplished using a computational approach where the physical light sources are modeled and the observer and display screen are actively tracked. Surface colors are calculated for the real spectral composition of the illumination with a custom multispectral rendering pipeline. In a set of experiments, the accuracy of color and gloss reproduction was evaluated by measuring the screen directly with a spectroradiometer. Gloss reproduction was assessed by comparing gonio measurements of the screen output to measurements of the

  7. Yeast Surface Display of Trifunctional Minicellulosomes for Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Cellulose to Ethanol▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Fei; Sun, Jie; Zhao, Huimin

    2010-01-01

    By combining cellulase production, cellulose hydrolysis, and sugar fermentation into a single step, consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) represents a promising technology for biofuel production. Here we report engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains displaying a series of uni-, bi-, and trifunctional minicellulosomes. These minicellulosomes consist of (i) a miniscaffoldin containing a cellulose-binding domain and three cohesin modules, which was tethered to the cell surface through the yeast a-agglutinin adhesion receptor, and (ii) up to three types of cellulases, an endoglucanase, a cellobiohydrolase, and a β-glucosidase, each bearing a C-terminal dockerin. Cell surface assembly of the minicellulosomes was dependent on expression of the miniscaffoldin, indicating that formation of the complex was dictated by the high-affinity interactions between cohesins and dockerins. Compared to the unifunctional and bifunctional minicellulosomes, the quaternary trifunctional complexes showed enhanced enzyme-enzyme synergy and enzyme proximity synergy. More importantly, surface display of the trifunctional minicellulosomes gave yeast cells the ability to simultaneously break down and ferment phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose to ethanol with a titer of ∼1.8 g/liter. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a recombinant yeast strain capable of producing cell-associated trifunctional minicellulosomes. The strain reported here represents a useful engineering platform for developing CBP-enabling microorganisms and elucidating principles of cellulosome construction and mode of action. PMID:20023102

  8. Unique secreted–surface protein complex of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, identified by phage display

    PubMed Central

    Gagic, Dragana; Wen, Wesley; Collett, Michael A; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are the most diverse structures on bacterial surfaces; hence, they are candidates for species- and strain-specific interactions of bacteria with the host, environment, and other microorganisms. Genomics has decoded thousands of bacterial surface and secreted proteins, yet the function of most cannot be predicted because of the enormous variability and a lack of experimental data that would allow deduction of function through homology. Here, we used phage display to identify a pair of interacting extracellular proteins in the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001. A secreted protein, SpcA, containing two bacterial immunoglobulin-like domains type 3 (Big-3) and a domain distantly related to plant pathogen response domain 1 (PR-1-like) was identified by screening of an L. rhamnosus HN001 library using HN001 cells as bait. The SpcA-“docking” protein, SpcB, was in turn detected by another phage display library screening, using purified SpcA as bait. SpcB is a 3275-residue cell-surface protein that contains general features of large glycosylated Serine-rich adhesins/fibrils from gram-positive bacteria, including the hallmark signal sequence motif KxYKxGKxW. Both proteins are encoded by genes within a L. rhamnosus-unique gene cluster that distinguishes this species from other lactobacilli. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a secreted-docking protein pair identified in lactobacilli. PMID:23233310

  9. Bioadsorption of rare earth elements through cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Park, Dan M.; Reed, David W.; Yung, Mimi C.; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M.; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E.; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-02-02

    In this study, with the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb3+ could be effectively recovered using citrate,more » consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb3+ by citrate. No reduction in Tb3+ adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation.« less

  10. Bioadsorption of Rare Earth Elements through Cell Surface Display of Lanthanide Binding Tags.

    PubMed

    Park, Dan M; Reed, David W; Yung, Mimi C; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Fujita, Yoshiko; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Jiao, Yongqin

    2016-03-01

    With the increasing demand for rare earth elements (REEs) in many emerging clean energy technologies, there is an urgent need for the development of new approaches for efficient REE extraction and recovery. As a step toward this goal, we genetically engineered the aerobic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus for REE adsorption through high-density cell surface display of lanthanide binding tags (LBTs) on its S-layer. The LBT-displayed strains exhibited enhanced adsorption of REEs compared to cells lacking LBT, high specificity for REEs, and an adsorption preference for REEs with small atomic radii. Adsorbed Tb(3+) could be effectively recovered using citrate, consistent with thermodynamic speciation calculations that predicted strong complexation of Tb(3+) by citrate. No reduction in Tb(3+) adsorption capacity was observed following citrate elution, enabling consecutive adsorption/desorption cycles. The LBT-displayed strain was effective for extracting REEs from the acid leachate of core samples collected at a prospective rare earth mine. Our collective results demonstrate a rapid, efficient, and reversible process for REE adsorption with potential industrial application for REE enrichment and separation. PMID:26836847

  11. Cell surface display of carbonic anhydrase on Escherichia coli using ice nucleation protein for CO₂ sequestration.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Hai; Liu, Ning; Yu, Ming-Rui; Yang, Shang-Tian; Chen, Huan-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) has recently gained renewed interests for its potential as a mass-transfer facilitator for CO(2) sequestration. However, the low stability and high price severely limit its applications. In this work, the expression of α-CA from Helicobacter pylori on the outer membrane of Escherichia coli using a surface-anchoring system derived from ice nucleation protein (INP) from Pseudomonas syringae was developed. To find the best surface anchoring motif, full-length INP (114 kDa), truncated INP (INP-NC, 33 kDa), and INP's N-domain with first two subunits (INP-N, 22 kDa) were evaluated. Two vectors, pKK223-3 and pET22b(+), with different promoters (T7 and Tac) were used to construct the fusion genes, and for each vector, three recombinant strains, each expressing a different length of the fusion protein, were obtained. SDS-PAGE, Western blot, immunofluorescence microscopy, FACS, and whole-cell ELISA confirmed the expression of fusion proteins on the surface of E. coli. The smallest fusion protein with INP-N as the anchoring motif had the highest expression level and CA activity, suggesting that INP-N is the best carrying protein due to its smaller size. Also, the T7 promoter in pET22b(+) induced with 0.2 mM IPTG gave high protein expression levels, whereas the Tac promoter in pKK223-3 gave low expression levels. The surface displayed CA was at least twofold more stable than that of the free form, and did not show any adverse effect on cell growth and outer membrane integrity. Cells with surface displayed CA were successfully used to facilitate CO(2) sequestration in contained liquid membrane (CLM). PMID:21732326

  12. Rare TREM2 variants associated with Alzheimer's disease display reduced cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Sirkis, Daniel W; Bonham, Luke W; Aparicio, Renan E; Geier, Ethan G; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Wang, Qing; Karydas, Anna; Miller, Zachary A; Miller, Bruce L; Coppola, Giovanni; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Rare variation in TREM2 has been associated with greater risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). TREM2 encodes a cell surface receptor expressed on microglia and related cells, and the R47H variant associated with AD appears to affect the ability of TREM2 to bind extracellular ligands. In addition, other rare TREM2 mutations causing early-onset neurodegeneration are thought to impair cell surface expression. Using a sequence kernel association (SKAT) analysis in two independent AD cohorts, we found significant enrichment of rare TREM2 variants not previously characterized at the protein level. Heterologous expression of the identified variants showed that novel variants S31F and R47C displayed significantly reduced cell surface expression. In addition, we identified rare variant R136Q in a patient with language-predominant AD that also showed impaired surface expression. The results suggest rare TREM2 variants enriched in AD may be associated with altered TREM2 function and that AD risk may be conferred, in part, from altered TREM2 surface expression. PMID:27589997

  13. Fishing for lectins from diverse sequence libraries by yeast surface display - an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Ryckaert, Stefan; Callewaert, Nico; Jacobs, Pieter P; Dewaele, Sylviane; Dewerte, Isabelle; Contreras, Roland

    2008-02-01

    The establishment of a robust technology platform for the expression cloning of carbohydrate-binding proteins remains a key challenge in glycomics. Here we explore the utility of using yeast surface display (YSD) technology in the interaction-based lectin cloning from complete cDNA libraries. This should pave the way for more detailed studies of protein-carbohydrate interactions. To evaluate the performance of this system, lectins representing three different subfamilies (galectins, siglecs, and C-type lectins) were successfully displayed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris as a-agglutinin and/or alpha-agglutinin fusions. The predicted carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected for three out of five lectins tested (galectin-1, galectin-3, and siaoadhesin). For galectin-4 and E-selectin, no specific carbohydrate-binding activity could be detected. We also demonstrate that proteins with carbohydrate affinity can be specifically isolated from complex metazoan cDNA libraries through multiple rounds of FACS sorting, employing multivalent, fluorescent-labeled polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates. PMID:18086821

  14. Scanning pupil approach to aspheric surface slope error tolerancing in head-up display optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon, V. P.

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel approach to tolerancing slope errors of aspheric surfaces in relay optics of typical avionics head-up displays (HUD). In these systems, a beamlet entering the pilot eye occupies only a tiny fraction of HUD entrance pupil/eyebox with a typical diameter of 125mm. Consequently the beam footprint on any HUD optical surface is a small fraction of its clear aperture. This presents challenges to HUD tolerancing which is typically based on parallax (angular difference in line of sight between left and right eyes) analysis. Aspheric surfaces manufactured by sub-aperture grinding/polishing techniques add another source of error - surface slope error. This type of error not only degrades image quality of observed HUD symbology but also leads to its "waviness" and "floating" especially noticeable when a pilot moves his head within the HUD eyebox. The suggested approach allows aspheric surface slope error tolerancing that ensures an acceptable level of symbology "waviness". A narrow beamlet is traced from a pilot eye position backwards through the HUD optics until it hits the light source. Due to the small beamlet size, slope error of the aspheric surface acts primarily as an overall tilt/wedge that deviates the beam and causes it to shift. The slope error is acceptable when this shift is not resolved by a pilot eye. The beamlet is scanned over entire eyebox and field of view and the slope error tolerance is established for several zones in the aspheric surface clear aperture. The procedure is then repeated for each aspheric surface.

  15. The application of magnetic measurements for the characterization of atmospheric particulate pollution within the airport environment.

    PubMed

    Jones, S; Richardson, N; Bennett, M; Hoon, S R

    2015-01-01

    The significant increase in global air travel which has occurred during the last fifty years has generated growing concern regarding the potential impacts associated with increasing emissions of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on health and the environment. PM within the airport environment may be derived from a range of sources. To date, however, the identification of individual sources of airport derived PM has remained elusive but constitutes a research priority for the aviation industry.The aim of this research was to identify distinctive and characteristic fingerprints of atmospheric PM derived from various sources in an airport environment through the use of environmental magnetic measurements. PM samples from aircraft engine emissions, brake wear and tire wear residues have been obtained from a range of different aircraft and engine types. Samples have been analyzed utilizing a range of magnetic mineral properties indicative of magnetic mineralogy and grain size. Results indicate that the dusts from the three 'aircraft' sources, (i.e. engines, brakes and tires) display distinctive magnetic mineral characteristics which may serve as 'magnetic fingerprints' for these sources. Magnetic measurements of runway dusts collected at different locations on the runway surface also show contrasting magnetic characteristics which, when compared with those of the aircraft-derived samples, suggest that they may relate to different sources characteristic of aircraft emissions at various stages of the take-off/landing cycle. The findings suggest that magnetic measurements could have wider applicability for the differentiation and identification of PM within the airport environment. PMID:25265399

  16. Engineering yeast consortia for surface-display of complex cellulosome structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wilfred

    2014-03-31

    As our society marches toward a more technologically advanced future, energy and environmental sustainability are some of the most challenging problems we face today. Biomass is one of the most abundant renewable-feedstock for sustainable production of biofuels. However, the main technological obstacle to more widespread uses of this resource is the lack of low-cost technologies to overcome the recalcitrant nature of the cellulosic structure, especially the hydrolysis step on highly ordered celluloses. In this proposal, we successfully engineered several efficient and inexpensive whole-cell biocatalysts in an effort to produce economically compatible and sustainable biofuels, namely cellulosic ethanol. Our approach was to display of a highly efficient cellulolytic enzyme complex, named cellulosome, on the surface of a historical ethanol producer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the simultaneous and synergistic saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to ethanol. We first demonstrated the feasibility of assembling a mini-cellulosome by incubating E. coli lysates expressing three different cellulases. Resting cells displaying mini-cellulosomes produced 4-fold more ethanol from phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose (PASC) than cultures with only added enzymes. The flexibility to assemble the mini-cellulosome structure was further demonstrated using a synthetic yeast consortium through intracellular complementation. Direct ethanol production from PASC was demonstrated with resting cell cultures. To create a microorganism suitable for a more cost-effective process, called consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), a synthetic consortium capable of displaying mini-cellulosomes on the cell surface via intercellular complementation was created. To further improve the efficiency, a new adaptive strategy of employing anchoring and adaptor scaffoldins to amplify the number of enzymatic subunits was developed, resulting in the creation of an artificial tetravalent cellulosome on the

  17. Yeast surface display is a novel tool for the rapid immunological characterization of plant-derived food allergens.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Milica; Prodanovic, Radivoje; Ostafe, Raluca; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2015-03-01

    High-throughput characterization of allergens relies often on phage display technique which is subject to the limitations of a prokaryotic expression system. Substituting the phage display platform with a yeast surface display could lead to fast immunological characterization of allergens with complex structures. Our objective was to evaluate the potential of yeast surface display for characterization of plant-derived food allergens. The coding sequence of mature actinidin (Act d 1) was cloned into pCTCON2 surface display vector. Flow cytometry was used to confirm localization of recombinant Act d 1 on the surface of yeast cells using rabbit polyclonal antisera IgG and IgE from sera of kiwifruit-allergic individuals. Immunological (dot blot, immunoblot ELISA and ELISA inhibition), biochemical (enzymatic activity in gel) and biological (basophil activation) characterization of Act d 1 after solubilization from the yeast cell confirmed that recombinant Act d 1 produced on the surface of yeast cell is similar to its natural counterpart isolated from green kiwifruit. Yeast surface display is a potent technique that enables fast immunochemical characterization of allergens in situ without the need for protein purification and offers an alternative that could lead to improvement of standard immunodiagnostic and immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:25537533

  18. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection. PMID:26073813

  19. A verification and errors analysis of the model for object positioning based on binocular stereo vision for airport surface surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan-huan; Wang, Jian; Liu, Feng; Cao, Hai-juan; Wang, Xiang-jun

    2014-12-01

    A test environment is established to obtain experimental data for verifying the positioning model which was derived previously based on the pinhole imaging model and the theory of binocular stereo vision measurement. The model requires that the optical axes of the two cameras meet at one point which is defined as the origin of the world coordinate system, thus simplifying and optimizing the positioning model. The experimental data are processed and tables and charts are given for comparing the positions of objects measured with DGPS with a measurement accuracy of 10 centimeters as the reference and those measured with the positioning model. Sources of visual measurement model are analyzed, and the effects of the errors of camera and system parameters on the accuracy of positioning model were probed, based on the error transfer and synthesis rules. A conclusion is made that measurement accuracy of surface surveillances based on binocular stereo vision measurement is better than surface movement radars, ADS-B (Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast) and MLAT (Multilateration).

  20. Production and cell surface display of recombinant anthrax protective antigen on the surface layer of attenuated Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-chun; Yuan, Sheng-ling; Tao, Hao-xia; Wang, Ling-chun; Zhang, Zhao-shan; Liu, Chun-jie

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the surface display of the anthrax protective antigen (PA) on attenuated Bacillus anthracis, a recombinant B. anthracis strain, named AP429 was constructed by integrating into the chromosome a translational fusion harboring the DNA fragments encoding the cell wall-targeting domain of the S-layer protein EA1 and the anthrax PA. Crerecombinase action at the loxP sites excised the antibiotic marker. Western blot analysis, fluorescence-activated cell sorting and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that PA was successfully expressed on the S-layer of the recombinant antibiotic marker-free strain. Notwithstanding extensive proteolytic degradation of the hybrid protein SLHs-PA, quantitative ELISA revealed that approximately 8.1 × 10(6) molecules of SLHs-PA were gained from each Bacillus cell. Moreover, electron microscopy assay indicated that the typical S-layer structures could be clearly observed from the recombinant strain micrographs. PMID:25504373

  1. Enhancement of surface ligand display on PLGA nanoparticles with amphiphilic ligand conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jason; Mattessich, Thomas; Jay, Steven M.; Agawu, Atu; Saltzman, W. Mark; Fahmy, Tarek M.

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles are widely recognized as efficacious drug delivery vehicles, yet the rational engineering of nanoparticle surfaces in order to improve biodistribution, reduce clearance, and/or improve targeting remains a significant challenge. We have previously demonstrated that an amphiphilic conjugate of avidin and palmitic acid can be used to modify poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particle surfaces to display functional avidin groups, allowing for the facile attachment of biotinylated ligands for targeting or steric stabilization. Here, we hypothesized that the incorporation, density, and stability of surface-presented avidin could be modulated through varying the lipophilicity of its fatty acid conjugate partner. We tested this hypothesis by generating a set of novel conjugates incorporating avidin and common fatty acids. We found that conjugation to linoleic acid resulted in a ∼60% increase in the incorporation of avidin on the nanoparticle surface compared to avidin–palmitic acid, which exhibited the highest avidin incorporation in previous studies. Further, the linoleic acid–avidin conjugate yielded nanoparticles with enhanced ability to bind biotinylated ligands compared to the previous method; nanoparticles modified with avidin–linoleic acid bound ∼170% more biotin–HRP than those made with avidin–palmitic acid and ∼1300% more than particles made without conjugated avidin. Most critically, increased ligand density on anti-CD4-targeted nanoparticles formulated with the linoleic acid–avidin conjugate resulted in a 5% increase in binding of CD4+ T cells. Thus we conclude that the novel avidin–linoleic acid conjugate facilitates enhanced ligand density on PLGA nanoparticles, resulting in functional enhancement of cellular targeting. PMID:21723893

  2. Northern New Mexico regional airport market feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1998-06-01

    This report is about the market for airline travel in northern New Mexico. Interest in developing a northern New Mexico regional airport has periodically surfaced for a number of years. The New Mexico State Legislature passed a memorial during the 1998 Second Session calling for the conduct of a study to determine the feasibility of building a new regional airport in NNM. This report is a study of the passenger market feasibility of such an airport. In addition to commercial passenger market feasibility, there are other feasibility issues dealing with siting, environmental impact, noise, economic impact, intermodal transportation integration, region-wide transportation services, airport engineering requirements, and others. These other feasibility issues are not analyzed in any depth in this report although none were discovered to be show-stoppers as a by-product of the authors doing research on the passenger market itself. Preceding the need for a detailed study of these other issues is the determination of the basic market need for an airport with regular commercial airline service in the first place. This report is restricted to an in-depth look at the market for commercial passenger air service in NNM. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Cinematic three-dimensional surface display of cardiac blood pool tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, N.; Machida, K.; Takishima, T.; Mamiya, T.; Takahashi, T.; Kamano, T.; Tamaki, S.; Ban, R. )

    1991-02-01

    A method of three-dimensional cinematic display (3D cine) of cardiac blood pool tomography is described. ECG-gated transaxial blood pool imaging was obtained from a set of projection images that were collected from 32 images with 10 ECG-gated images per projection during a 180 degrees arc of a rotating gamma camera. A surface contour of the blood pool was determined by a set of isocount lines (40-55% of the maximum pixel counts) of the transaxial images. 3D cine was made by a depth-shading method, in which brightness of a given point on the contour was set proportional to the distance between the viewing plane and the point and to the incident angle formed by the viewing line and the surface of the point. In 15 patients, 3D cine showed hypokinesia, akinesia, dyskinesia, ventricular aneurysm, and opposite motions of the atria and ventricles. Diagnoses of left ventricular motion by 3D cine agreed well with those by echocardiography and contrast left ventriculography.

  4. Surface Immobilization of Human Arginase-1 with an Engineered Ice Nucleation Protein Display System in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Tang, Rongxin; Bian, Lu; Mei, Meng; Li, Chunhua; Ma, Xiangdong; Yi, Li; Ma, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation protein (INP) is frequently used as a surface anchor for protein display in gram-negative bacteria. Here, MalE and TorA signal peptides, and three charged polypeptides, 6×Lys, 6×Glu and 6×Asp, were anchored to the N-terminus of truncated INP (InaK-N) to improve its surface display efficiency for human Arginase1 (ARG1). Our results indicated that the TorA signal peptide increased the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N and human ARG1 fused InaK-N (InaK-N/ARG1) by 80.7% and 122.4%, respectively. Comparably, the MalE signal peptide decreased the display efficiencies of both the non-protein fused InaK-N and InaK-N/ARG1. Our results also suggested that the 6×Lys polypeptide significantly increased the surface display efficiency of K6-InaK-N/ARG1 by almost 2-fold, while also practically abolishing the surface translocation of non-protein fused InaK-N, indicating the interesting roles of charged polypeptides in bacteria surface display systems. Cell surface-immobilized K6-InaK-N/ARG1 presented an arginase activity of 10.7 U/OD600 under the optimized conditions of 40°C, pH 10.0 and 1 mM Mn2+, which could convert more than 95% of L-Arginine (L-Arg) to L-Ornithine (L-Orn) in 16 hours. The engineered InaK-Ns expanded the INP surface display system, which aided in the surface immobilization of human ARG1 in E. coli cells. PMID:27479442

  5. Native display of complete foreign protein domains on the surface of hepatitis B virus capsids

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Peter A.; Böttcher, Bettina; Nassal, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The nucleocapsid of hepatitis B virus (HBV), or HBcAg, is a highly symmetric structure formed by multiple dimers of a single core protein that contains potent T helper epitopes in its 183-aa sequence. Both factors make HBcAg an unusually strong immunogen and an attractive candidate as a carrier for foreign epitopes. The immunodominant c/e1 epitope on the capsid has been suggested as a superior location to convey high immunogenicity to a heterologous sequence. Because of its central position, however, any c/e1 insert disrupts the core protein’s primary sequence; hence, only peptides, or rather small protein fragments seemed to be compatible with particle formation. According to recent structural data, the epitope is located at the tips of prominent surface spikes formed by the very stable dimer interfaces. We therefore reasoned that much larger inserts might be tolerated, provided the individual parts of a corresponding fusion protein could fold independently. Using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model insert, we show that the chimeric protein efficiently forms fluorescent particles; hence, all of its structurally important parts must be properly folded. We also demonstrate that the GFP domains are surface-exposed and that the chimeric particles elicit a potent humoral response against native GFP. Hence, proteins of at least up to 238 aa can be natively displayed on the surface of HBV core particles. Such chimeras may not only be useful as vaccines but may also open the way for high resolution structural analyses of nonassembling proteins by electron microscopy. PMID:10051569

  6. Displaying Lipase B from Candida antarctica in Pichia pastoris Using the Yeast Surface Display Approach: Prospection of a New Anchor and Characterization of the Whole Cell Biocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Marcelo Victor Holanda; da Silva, Giulia Pontes; Machado, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves; Freire, Denise Maria Guimarães; Almeida, Rodrigo Volcan

    2015-01-01

    Yeast Surface Display (YSD) is a strategy to anchor proteins on the yeast cell wall which has been employed to increase enzyme stability thus decreasing production costs. Lipase B from Candida antarctica (LipB) is one of the most studied enzymes in the context of industrial biotechnology. This study aimed to assess the biochemical features of this important biocatalyst when immobilized on the cell surface of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris using the YSD approach. For that purpose, two anchors were tested. The first (Flo9) was identified after a prospection of the P. pastoris genome being related to the family of flocculins similar to Flo1 but significantly smaller. The second is the Protein with Internal Repeats (Pir1) from P. pastoris. An immunolocalization assay showed that both anchor proteins were able to display the reporter protein EGFP in the yeast outer cell wall. LipB was expressed in P. pastoris fused either to Flo9 (FLOLIPB) or Pir1 (PIRLIPB). Both constructions showed hydrolytic activity towards tributyrin (>100 U/mgdcw and >80 U/mgdcw, respectively), optimal hydrolytic activity around 45°C and pH 7.0, higher thermostability at 45°C and stability in organic solvents when compared to a free lipase. PMID:26510006

  7. Toxicity and chemical analyses of airport runoff waters in Poland.

    PubMed

    Sulej, Anna Maria; Polkowska, Zaneta; Wolska, Lidia; Cieszynska, Monika; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicological effects of various compounds in complex airport effluents using a chemical and ecotoxicological integrated strategy. The present work deals with the determination of sum of PCBs, PAHs, pesticides, cations, anions, phenols, anionic, cationic, non-ionic detergents, formaldehyde and metals--as well as TOC and conductivity--in runoff water samples collected from 2009 to 2011 at several locations on two Polish international airports. Two microbiotests (Vibrio fischeri bacteria and the crustacean Thamnocephalus platyurus) have been used to determine the ecotoxicity of airport runoff waters. The levels of many compounds exceeded several or even several tens of times the maximum permissible levels. Analysis of the obtained data shows that samples that displayed maximum toxicity towards the bioindicators Vibrio fischeri were not toxic towards Thamnocephalus platyurus. Levels of toxicity towards T. platyurus are strongly correlated with pollutants that originate from the technological operations related to the maintenance of airport infrastructure. The integrated (chemical-ecotoxicological) approach to environmental contamination assessment in and around airports yields extensive information on the quality of the environment. These methodologies can be then used as tools for tracking the environmental fate of these compounds and for assessing the environmental effect of airports. Subsequently, these data will provide a basis for airport infrastructure management. PMID:24668023

  8. Synthetic phytochelatin surface display in Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 for enhanced metals bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Biondo, Ronaldo; da Silva, Felipe Almeida; Vicente, Elisabete José; Souza Sarkis, Jorge Eduardo; Schenberg, Ana Clara Guerrini

    2012-08-01

    This work describes the effects of the cell surface display of a synthetic phytochelatin in the highly metal tolerant bacterium Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. The EC20sp synthetic phytochelatin gene was fused between the coding sequences of the signal peptide (SS) and of the autotransporter β-domain of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae IgA protease precursor (IgAβ), which successfully targeted the hybrid protein toward the C. metallidurans outer membrane. The expression of the SS-EC20sp-IgAβ gene fusion was driven by a modified version of the Bacillus subtilis mrgA promoter showing high level basal gene expression that is further enhanced by metal presence in C. metallidurans. The recombinant strain showed increased ability to immobilize Pb(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Mn(2+), and Ni(2+) ions from the external medium when compared to the control strain. To ensure plasmid stability and biological containment, the MOB region of the plasmid was replaced by the E. coli hok/sok coding sequence. PMID:22794785

  9. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papasin, Richard; Gawdiak, Yuri; Maluf, David A.; Leidich, Christopher; Tran, Peter B.

    2001-01-01

    Remote Tower Sensor Systems (RTSS) are proof-of-concept prototypes being developed by NASA/Ames Research Center (NASA/ARC) with collaboration with the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NOAA (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration). RTSS began with the deployment of an Airport Approach Zone Camera System that includes real-time weather observations at San Francisco International Airport. The goal of this research is to develop, deploy, and demonstrate remotely operated cameras and sensors at several major airport hubs and un-towered airports. RTSS can provide real-time weather observations of airport approach zone. RTSS will integrate and test airport sensor packages that will allow remote access to realtime airport conditions and aircraft status.

  10. Enhanced/synthetic vision and head-worn display technologies for terminal maneuvering area NextGen operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Norman, R. Mike

    2011-06-01

    NASA is researching innovative technologies for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) to provide a "Better-Than-Visual" (BTV) capability as adjunct to "Equivalent Visual Operations" (EVO); that is, airport throughputs equivalent to that normally achieved during Visual Flight Rules (VFR) operations rates with equivalent and better safety in all weather and visibility conditions including Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). These new technologies build on proven flight deck systems and leverage synthetic and enhanced vision systems. Two piloted simulation studies were conducted to access the use of a Head-Worn Display (HWD) with head tracking for synthetic and enhanced vision systems concepts. The first experiment evaluated the use a HWD for equivalent visual operations to San Francisco International Airport (airport identifier: KSFO) compared to a visual concept and a head-down display concept. A second experiment evaluated symbology variations under different visibility conditions using a HWD during taxi operations at Chicago O'Hare airport (airport identifier: KORD). Two experiments were conducted, one in a simulated San Francisco airport (KSFO) approach operation and the other, in simulated Chicago O'Hare surface operations, evaluating enhanced/synthetic vision and head-worn display technologies for NextGen operations. While flying a closely-spaced parallel approach to KSFO, pilots rated the HWD, under low-visibility conditions, equivalent to the out-the-window condition, under unlimited visibility, in terms of situational awareness (SA) and mental workload compared to a head-down enhanced vision system. There were no differences between the 3 display concepts in terms of traffic spacing and distance and the pilot decision-making to land or go-around. For the KORD experiment, the visibility condition was not a factor in pilot's rating of clutter effects from symbology. Several concepts for enhanced implementations of an unlimited field

  11. Enhanced/Synthetic Vision and Head-Worn Display Technologies for Terminal Maneuvering Area NextGen Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzell, Lawrence J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Shelton, Kevin J.; Norman, R. Mike

    2011-01-01

    NASA is researching innovative technologies for the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) to provide a "Better-Than-Visual" (BTV) capability as adjunct to "Equivalent Visual Operations" (EVO); that is, airport throughputs equivalent to that normally achieved during Visual Flight Rules (VFR) operations rates with equivalent and better safety in all weather and visibility conditions including Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). These new technologies build on proven flight deck systems and leverage synthetic and enhanced vision systems. Two piloted simulation studies were conducted to access the use of a Head-Worn Display (HWD) with head tracking for synthetic and enhanced vision systems concepts. The first experiment evaluated the use a HWD for equivalent visual operations to San Francisco International Airport (airport identifier: KSFO) compared to a visual concept and a head-down display concept. A second experiment evaluated symbology variations under different visibility conditions using a HWD during taxi operations at Chicago O'Hare airport (airport identifier: KORD). Two experiments were conducted, one in a simulated San Francisco airport (KSFO) approach operation and the other, in simulated Chicago O'Hare surface operations, evaluating enhanced/synthetic vision and head-worn display technologies for NextGen operations. While flying a closely-spaced parallel approach to KSFO, pilots rated the HWD, under low-visibility conditions, equivalent to the out-the-window condition, under unlimited visibility, in terms of situational awareness (SA) and mental workload compared to a head-down enhanced vision system. There were no differences between the 3 display concepts in terms of traffic spacing and distance and the pilot decision-making to land or go-around. For the KORD experiment, the visibility condition was not a factor in pilot's rating of clutter effects from symbology. Several concepts for enhanced implementations of an unlimited field

  12. Slam is an outer membrane protein that is required for the surface display of lipidated virulence factors in Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Yogesh; Lai, Christine Chieh-Lin; Judd, Andrew; Buckwalter, Carolyn M; Shin, Hyejin Esther; Gray-Owen, Scott D; Moraes, Trevor F

    2016-01-01

    Lipoproteins decorate the surface of many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, playing essential roles in immune evasion and nutrient acquisition. In Neisseria spp., the causative agents of gonorrhoea and meningococcal meningitis, surface lipoproteins (SLPs) are required for virulence and have been extensively studied as prime candidates for vaccine development. However, the machinery and mechanism that allow for the surface display of SLPs are not known. Here, we describe a transposon (Tn5)-based search for the proteins required to deliver SLPs to the surface of Neisseria meningitidis, revealing a family of proteins that we have named the surface lipoprotein assembly modulator (Slam). N. meningitidis contains two Slam proteins, each exhibiting distinct substrate preferences. The Slam proteins are sufficient to reconstitute SLP transport in laboratory strains of Escherichia coli, which are otherwise unable to efficiently display these lipoproteins on their cell surface. Immunoprecipitation and domain probing experiments suggest that the SLP, TbpB, interacts with Slam during the transit process; furthermore, the membrane domain of Slam is sufficient for selectivity and proper surface display of SLPs. Rather than being a Neisseria-specific factor, our bioinformatic analysis shows that Slam can be found throughout proteobacterial genomes, indicating a conserved but until now unrecognized virulence mechanism. PMID:27572441

  13. Amended Final Report - Antibodies to Radionuclides. Engineering by Surface Display for Immunosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.

    2013-06-14

    The relatively new techniques of antibody display, which permit molecular engineering of antibody structure and function, have the potential to revolutionize the way scientists generate binding proteins for specific applications. However, the skills required to efficiently use antibody display techniques have proven difficult for other laboratories to acquire without hands-on training and exchange of laboratory personnel. This research project is designed bring important expertise in antibody display to the State of Louisiana while pursuing a project with direct relevance to the DOE’s EM program.

  14. Display of a PorA peptide from Neisseria meningitidis on the bacteriophage T4 capsid surface.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, J; Abu-Shilbayeh, L; Rao, V B

    1997-01-01

    The exterior of bacteriophage T4 capsid is coated with two outer capsid proteins, Hoc (highly antigenic outer capsid protein; molecular mass, 40 kDa) and Soc (small outer capsid protein; molecular mass, 9 kDa), at symmetrical positions on the icosahedron (160 copies of Hoc and 960 copies of Soc per capsid particle). Both these proteins are nonessential for phage infectivity and viability and assemble onto the capsid surface after completion of capsid assembly. We developed a phage display system which allowed in-frame fusions of foreign DNA at a unique cloning site in the 5' end of hoc or soc. A DNA fragment corresponding to the 36-amino-acid PorA peptide from Neisseria meningitidis was cloned into the display vectors to generate fusions at the N terminus of Hoc or Soc. The PorA-Hoc and PorA-Soc fusion proteins retained the ability to bind to the capsid surface, and the bound peptide was displayed in an accessible form as shown by its reactivity with specific monoclonal antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. By employing T4 genetic strategies, we show that more than one subtype-specific PorA peptide can be displayed on the capsid surface and that the peptide can also be displayed on a DNA-free empty capsid. Both the PorA-Hoc and PorA-Soc recombinant phages are highly immunogenic in mice and elicit strong antipeptide antibody titers even with a weak adjuvant such as Alhydrogel or no adjuvant at all. The data suggest that the phage T4 hoc-soc system is an attractive system for display of peptides on an icosahedral capsid surface and may emerge as a powerful system for construction of the next generation multicomponent vaccines. PMID:9353063

  15. Display of fungal hydrophobin on the Pichia pastoris cell surface and its influence on Candida antarctica lipase B.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; He, Jie; Sun, Yufei; Reynolds, Matthew; Zhang, Li; Han, Shuangyan; Liang, Shuli; Sui, Haixin; Lin, Ying

    2016-07-01

    To modify the Pichia pastoris cell surface, two classes of hydrophobins, SC3 from Schizophyllum commune and HFBI from Trichoderma reesei, were separately displayed on the cell wall. There was an observable increase in the hydrophobicity of recombinant strains. Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) was then co-displayed on the modified cells, generating strains GS115/SC3-61/CALB-51 and GS115/HFBI-61/CALB-51. Interestingly, the hydrolytic and synthetic activities of strain GS115/HFBI-61/CALB-51 increased by 37 and 109 %, respectively, but decreased by 26 and 43 %, respectively, in strain GS115/SC3-61/CALB-51 compared with the hydrophobin-minus recombinant strain GS115/CALB-GCW51. The amount of glycerol by-product from the transesterification reaction adsorbed on the cell surface was significantly decreased following hydrophobin modification, removing the glycerol barrier and allowing substrates to access the active sites of lipases. Electron micrographs indicated that the cell wall structures of both recombinant strains appeared altered, including changes to the inner glucan layer and outer mannan layer. These results suggest that the display of hydrophobins can change the surface structure and hydrophobic properties of P. pastoris and affect the catalytic activities of CALB displayed on the surface of P. pastoris cells. PMID:26969039

  16. Supersonics--Airport Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2007-01-01

    At this, the first year-end meeting of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, an overview of the Airport Noise discipline of the Supersonics Project leads the presentation of technical plans and achievements in this area of the Project. The overview starts by defining the Technical Challenges targeted by Airport Noise efforts, and the Approaches planned to meet these challenges. These are fleshed out in Elements, namely Prediction, Diagnostics, and Engineering, and broken down into Tasks. The Tasks level is where individual researchers' work is defined and from whence the technical presentations to follow this presentation come. This overview also presents the Milestones accomplished to date and to be completed in the next year. Finally, the NASA Research Announcement cooperative agreement activities are covered and tied to the Tasks and Milestones.

  17. RGD Peptide Cell-Surface Display Enhances the Targeting and Therapeutic Efficacy of Attenuated Salmonella-mediated Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung-Hwan; Zheng, Jin Hai; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Szardenings, Michael; Min, Jung Hyun; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E.; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-based anticancer therapies aim to overcome the limitations of current cancer therapy by actively targeting and efficiently removing cancer. To achieve this goal, new approaches that target and maintain bacterial drugs at sufficient concentrations during the therapeutic window are essential. Here, we examined the tumor tropism of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium displaying the RGD peptide sequence (ACDCRGDCFCG) on the external loop of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). RGD-displaying Salmonella strongly bound to cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3, but weakly bound to αvβ3-negative cancer cells, suggesting the feasibility of displaying a preferential homing peptide on the bacterial surface. In vivo studies revealed that RGD-displaying Salmonellae showed strong targeting efficiency, resulting in the regression in αvβ3-overexpressing cancer xenografts, and prolonged survival of mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and human melanoma (MDA-MB-435). Thus, surface engineering of Salmonellae to display RGD peptides increases both their targeting efficiency and therapeutic effect. PMID:27446500

  18. RGD Peptide Cell-Surface Display Enhances the Targeting and Therapeutic Efficacy of Attenuated Salmonella-mediated Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Hwan; Zheng, Jin Hai; Nguyen, Vu Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Szardenings, Michael; Min, Jung Hyun; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria-based anticancer therapies aim to overcome the limitations of current cancer therapy by actively targeting and efficiently removing cancer. To achieve this goal, new approaches that target and maintain bacterial drugs at sufficient concentrations during the therapeutic window are essential. Here, we examined the tumor tropism of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium displaying the RGD peptide sequence (ACDCRGDCFCG) on the external loop of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). RGD-displaying Salmonella strongly bound to cancer cells overexpressing αvβ3, but weakly bound to αvβ3-negative cancer cells, suggesting the feasibility of displaying a preferential homing peptide on the bacterial surface. In vivo studies revealed that RGD-displaying Salmonellae showed strong targeting efficiency, resulting in the regression in αvβ3-overexpressing cancer xenografts, and prolonged survival of mouse models of human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) and human melanoma (MDA-MB-435). Thus, surface engineering of Salmonellae to display RGD peptides increases both their targeting efficiency and therapeutic effect. PMID:27446500

  19. REAL-Select: Full-Length Antibody Display and Library Screening by Surface Capture on Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Ralf; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald; Hock, Björn

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel approach named REAL-Select for the non-covalent display of IgG-molecules on the surface of yeast cells for the purpose of antibody engineering and selection. It relies on the capture of secreted native full-length antibodies on the cell surface via binding to an externally immobilized ZZ domain, which tightly binds antibody Fc. It is beneficial for high-throughput screening of yeast-displayed IgG-libraries during antibody discovery and development. In a model experiment, antibody-displaying yeast cells were isolated from a 1∶1,000,000 mixture with control cells confirming the maintenance of genotype-phenotype linkage. Antibodies with improved binding characteristics were obtained by affinity maturation using REAL-Select, demonstrating the ability of this system to display antibodies in their native form and to detect subtle changes in affinity by flow cytometry. The biotinylation of the cell surface followed by functionalization with a streptavidin-ZZ fusion protein is an approach that is independent of the genetic background of the antibody-producing host and therefore can be expected to be compatible with other eukaryotic expression hosts such as P. pastoris or mammalian cells. PMID:25501029

  20. Construction of cell surface-engineered yeasts displaying antigen to detect antibodies by immunofluorescence and yeast-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu Qian; Han, Shuang Yan; Zheng, Hong; Wu, Lin; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Wang, Xiao Ning; Lin, Ying

    2008-07-01

    In order to detect monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from insufficient and unavailable human proteins, yeast cells were engineered to display human antigens on their surface and consequently endowed with the ability to specifically bind antibodies. Thus, a fusion gene for the expression of the human proteasome subunit alpha 6 (hPSA6) and human profilin I (hProI) were assembled, respectively, with a His.tag marker at the C-terminal and displayed on yeast surface. With anti-His.tag MAb as the primary antibody and the fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated goat anti-mouse Immunoglobulin G as the second antibody, the surface display of hPSA6 and hProI were verified by immunofluorescence labeling. The antigen-displayed yeast particles were used for MAbs detection from ascites through both immunofluorescence and yeast-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The results were verified by Western blotting and indirect ELISA. By improving the sensitivity, the novel MAbs detection can be applied in the generation and screening of positive hybridoma. It is suggested that by combining the DNA immunization, the present study can evolve into a quick and protein-free way of MAbs production for insufficient and unavailable antigen. PMID:18542951

  1. 78 FR 7476 - Airport Improvement Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Improvement Program AGENCY: Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration. ACTION: Invitation to comment on draft FAA Order 5100-38, Airport Improvement...-38D, Airport Improvement Program Handbook. When finalized, this Order will replace Order...

  2. Single-cell Characterization of Autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli Surface Display of Disulfide Bond-containing Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-01-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  3. Single-cell characterization of autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli surface display of disulfide bond-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-11-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  4. Development and characterization of membrane surface display system using molecular chaperon, prsA, of Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June-Hyung; Park, In-Suk; Kim, Byung-Gee . E-mail: byungkim@snu.ac.kr

    2005-09-09

    We report a new membrane surface display system based on molecular chaperon, prsA, of Bacillus subtilis. Clostridium thermocellum cellulase, celA, was fused to C-terminal end of PrsA. Cellulase activity of B. subtilis protoplast, which expressed PrsA-CelA was 15 times higher compared to control strain. More than 85% of total cellulase activity was observed in surface displayed format and less than 15% of total cellulase activity was found in supernatant. Flow cytometric analysis of protoplast of PrsA-CelA fusion expressing bacteria provided another proof of uniform expression of fusion protein onto cytoplasmic membrane of B. subtilis. Without lysozyme treatment, only part of cellulase activity (10%) was observed in whole cell fraction.

  5. An Alternative Approach to Synthesizing Galactooligosaccharides by Cell-Surface Display of β-Galactosidase on Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    An, Jin; Zhang, Lebin; Li, Lijuan; Liu, Dawen; Cheng, Huiling; Wang, Hengwei; Nawaz, Muhammad Zohaib; Cheng, Hairong; Deng, Zixin

    2016-05-18

    An alternative strategy for synthesizing galactooligosaccharides (GOS) from an erythritol-producing yeast Yarrowia lipolytica using surface display technology was demonstrated. The engineered strain CGMCC11369 was developed by fusion of the β-galactosidase gene from Aspergillus oryzae to the YlPir1 gene, which codes for a cell wall protein. β-Galactosidase was effectively displayed on the cell surface of Yarrowia lipolytica start strain CGMCC7326. This engineered strain with surface-displayed β-galactosidase efficiently synthesized GOS from lactose. An amount of 160 g/L GOS was produced within 6 h in a solution of 500 g/L lactose and 5 mg/mL cell (dry weight) at pH 5.5 and 60 °C, with a yield of 51% of consumed lactose monohydrate. This newly developed method was applied with waste yeast paste from erythritol industry at least 10 times. The optimal reaction temperature increased to 60 °C, about 20 °C higher than that of free β-galactosidase, which was helpful for enhancing the reaction rate and GOS production. PMID:27090877

  6. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts using donor splenocytes engineered to display on their surface an exogenous fas ligand protein.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Esma S; Gu, Xiao; Lacelle, Chantale; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2008-07-15

    The critical role played by Fas ligand (FasL) in immune homeostasis renders this molecule an attractive target for immunomodulation to achieve tolerance to auto- and transplantation Ags. Immunomodulation with genetically modified cells expressing FasL was shown to induce tolerance to alloantigens. However, genetic modification of primary cells in a rapid, efficient, and clinically applicable manner proved challenging. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of donor splenocytes rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface a chimeric form of FasL protein (SA-FasL) for tolerance induction to cardiac allografts. The i.p. injection of ACI rats with Wistar-Furth rat splenocytes displaying SA-FasL on their surface resulted in tolerance to donor, but not F344 third-party cardiac allografts. Tolerance was associated with apoptosis of donor reactive T effector cells and induction/expansion of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells. Treg cells played a critical role in the observed tolerance as adoptive transfer of sorted Treg cells from long-term graft recipients into naive unmanipulated ACI rats resulted in indefinite survival of secondary Wistar-Furth grafts. Immunomodulation with allogeneic cells rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface SA-FasL protein provides an effective and clinically applicable means of cell-based therapy with potential application to regenerative medicine, transplantation, and autoimmunity. PMID:18606644

  7. Salmonella outer membrane vesicles displaying high densities of pneumococcal antigen at the surface offer protection against colonization.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Kirsten; Daleke-Schermerhorn, Maria H; Jong, Wouter S P; ten Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M; van Opzeeland, Fred; Simonetti, Elles; Luirink, Joen; de Jonge, Marien I

    2015-04-21

    Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are attractive vaccine formulations because they have intrinsic immunostimulatory properties. In principle, heterologous antigens incorporated into OMVs will elicit specific immune responses, especially if presented at the vesicle surface and thus optimally exposed to the immune system. In this study, we explored the feasibility of our recently developed autotransporter Hbp platform, designed to efficiently and simultaneously display multiple antigens at the surface of bacterial OMVs, for vaccine development. Using two Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins as model antigens, we showed that intranasally administered Salmonella OMVs displaying high levels of antigens at the surface induced strong protection in a murine model of pneumococcal colonization, without the need for a mucosal adjuvant. Importantly, reduction in bacterial recovery from the nasal cavity was correlated with local production of antigen-specific IL-17A. Furthermore, the protective efficacy and the production of antigen-specific IL-17A, and local and systemic IgGs, were all improved at increased concentrations of the displayed antigen. This discovery highlights the importance of an adequate antigen expression system for development of recombinant OMV vaccines. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the suitability of the Hbp platform for development of a new generation of OMV vaccines, and illustrate the potential of using this approach to develop a broadly protective mucosal pneumococcal vaccine. PMID:25776921

  8. Improved delivery of the OVA-CD4 peptide to T helper cells by polymeric surface display on Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Autotransporter proteins represent a treasure trove for molecular engineers who modify Gram-negative bacteria for the export or secretion of foreign proteins across two membrane barriers. A particularly promising direction is the development of autotransporters as antigen display or secretion systems. Immunologists have been using ovalbumin as a reporter antigen for years and have developed sophisticated tools to detect specific T cells that respond to ovalbumin. Although ovalbumin-expressing bacteria are being used to trace T cell responses to colonizing or invading pathogens, current constructs for ovalbumin presentation have not been optimized. Results The activation of T helper cells in response to ovalbumin was improved by displaying the OVA-CD4 reporter epitope as a multimer on the surface of Salmonella and fused to the autotransporter MisL. Expression was optimized by including tandem in vivo promoters and two post-segregational killing systems for plasmid stabilization. Conclusions The use of an autotransporter protein to present relevant epitope repeats on the surface of bacteria, combined with additional techniques favoring stable and efficient in vivo transcription, optimizes antigen presentation to T cells. The technique of multimeric epitope surface display should also benefit the development of new Salmonella or other enterobacterial vaccines. PMID:24898796

  9. Software Tools to Support Research on Airport Departure Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Francis; Evans, Antony; Feron, Eric; Clarke, John-Paul

    2003-01-01

    A simple, portable and useful collection of software tools has been developed for the analysis of airport surface traffic. The tools are based on a flexible and robust traffic-flow model, and include calibration, validation and simulation functionality for this model. Several different interfaces have been developed to help promote usage of these tools, including a portable Matlab(TM) implementation of the basic algorithms; a web-based interface which provides online access to automated analyses of airport traffic based on a database of real-world operations data which covers over 250 U.S. airports over a 5-year period; and an interactive simulation-based tool currently in use as part of a college-level educational module. More advanced applications for airport departure traffic include taxi-time prediction and evaluation of "windowing" congestion control.

  10. Airport Pricing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pels, Eric; Verhoef, Erik T.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional economic wisdom suggests that congestion pricing would be an appropriate response to cope with the growing congestion levels currently experienced at many airports. Several characteristics of aviation markets, however, may make naive congestion prices equal to the value of marginal travel delays a non-optimal response. This paper has developed a model of airport pricing that captures a number of these features. The model in particular reflects that airlines typically have market power and are engaged in oligopolistic competition at different sub-markets; that part of external travel delays that aircraft impose are internal to an operator and hence should not be accounted for in congestion tolls. We presented an analytical treatment for a simple bi-nodal symmetric network, which through the use of 'hyper-networks' would be readily applicable to dynamic problems (in discrete time) such as peak - off-peak differences, and some numerical exercises for the same symmetric network, which was only designed to illustrate the possible comparative static impacts of tolling, in addition to marginal equilibrium conditions as could be derived for the general model specification. Some main conclusions are that second-best optimal tolls are typically lower than what would be suggested by congestion costs alone and may even be negative, and that the toll as derived by Brueckner (2002) may not lead to an increase in total welfare. While Brueckner (2002) has made clear that congestion tolls on airports may be smaller than expected when congestion costs among aircraft are internal for a firm, our analysis adds to this that a further downward adjustment may be in order due to market power. The presence of market power (which causes prices to exceed marginal costs) may cause the pure congestion toll to be suboptimal, because the resulting decrease in demand is too high (the pure congestion tall does not take into account the decrease in consumer surplus). The various

  11. Some New Caves under Airport in Dubrovnik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasic, Mladen; Garasic, Davor

    2013-04-01

    Till today six speleological sites are known to exist at the premises of the Dubrovnik Airport in Croatia. This is a highly weathered area that has been in the focus of attention of speleologists ever since the airport was built in 1961/62. Two vertical caves measuring 31 m and 10.5 m in depth were discovered at that time. These two caves are now situated right underneath the new control tower of the Dubrovnik Airport. A tunnel entrance to the cave that has been known to local population for a long time is situated in the immediate vicinity of the control tower. In late 1950's the entrance to the cave was closed with concrete because of a military airport construction, but a tunnel was built so as to enable access to the cave. The cave is about 200 meters long and it fully occupies the space underneath the concrete runways of the Dubrovnik Airport. Thanks to efforts made by speleologists in 2006-2010 the cave was adapted to enable tourist visits, and it is now the world's only tourist cave underneath an operating airport. During apron extension activities in May 2012, three additional speleological sites were discovered and examined, together with other previously discovered caves, from the standpoint of geophysics, geology and speleology. Results of exploration shows that there are several faults zones in karstified limestones. The water flow in the caverns varies depending on climatic conditions on the ground surface. Water reaches the caverns via joints directly from the ground surface (to a lesser extent) or in deeper parts via joints and paraclases from other parts of Cretaceous carbonate formations (in most cases). The weathering zone depth in the area of these speleological features, are estimated at 300 to 500 meters (included under sea levels) , and the zone of vertical circulation varies from 50 to 150 m. It is followed by the zone of horizontal circulation in which the ground water is carried via Cretaceous limestones toward submarine springs in the

  12. Yeast Surface Display of Two Proteins Previously Shown to Be Protective Against White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Ananphongmanee, Vorawit; Srisala, Jiraporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Boonchird, Chuenchit

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface display using the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris has been extensively developed for application in bioindustrial processes. Due to the rigid structure of their cell walls, a number of proteins have been successfully displayed on their cell surfaces. It was previously reported that the viral binding protein Rab7 from the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmRab7) and its binding partner envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) could independently protect shrimp against WSSV infection. Thus, we aimed to display these two proteins independently on the cell surfaces of 2 yeast clones with the ultimate goal of using a mixture of the two clones as an orally deliverable, antiviral agent to protect shrimp against WSSV infection. PmRab7 and VP28 were modified by N-terminal tagging to the C-terminal half of S. cerevisiae α-agglutinin. DNA fragments, harboring fused-gene expression cassettes under control of an alcohol oxidase I (AOX1) promoter were constructed and used to transform the yeast cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to both proteins demonstrated that mutated PmRab7 (mPmRab7) and partial VP28 (pVP28) were localized on the cell surfaces of the respective clones, and fluorescence intensity for each was significantly higher than that of control cells by flow cytometry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) using cells displaying mPmRab7 or pVP28 revealed that the binding of specific antibodies for each was dose-dependent, and could be saturated. In addition, the binding of mPmRab7-expressing cells with free VP28, and vice versa was dose dependent. Binding between the two surface-expressed proteins was confirmed by an assay showing agglutination between cells expressing complementary mPmRab7 and pVP28. In summary, our genetically engineered P. pastoris can display biologically active mPmRab7 and pVP28 and is now ready for evaluation of efficacy in protecting shrimp against WSSV by oral

  13. Yeast Surface Display of Two Proteins Previously Shown to Be Protective Against White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ananphongmanee, Vorawit; Srisala, Jiraporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Boonchird, Chuenchit

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface display using the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris has been extensively developed for application in bioindustrial processes. Due to the rigid structure of their cell walls, a number of proteins have been successfully displayed on their cell surfaces. It was previously reported that the viral binding protein Rab7 from the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmRab7) and its binding partner envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) could independently protect shrimp against WSSV infection. Thus, we aimed to display these two proteins independently on the cell surfaces of 2 yeast clones with the ultimate goal of using a mixture of the two clones as an orally deliverable, antiviral agent to protect shrimp against WSSV infection. PmRab7 and VP28 were modified by N-terminal tagging to the C-terminal half of S. cerevisiae α-agglutinin. DNA fragments, harboring fused-gene expression cassettes under control of an alcohol oxidase I (AOX1) promoter were constructed and used to transform the yeast cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to both proteins demonstrated that mutated PmRab7 (mPmRab7) and partial VP28 (pVP28) were localized on the cell surfaces of the respective clones, and fluorescence intensity for each was significantly higher than that of control cells by flow cytometry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) using cells displaying mPmRab7 or pVP28 revealed that the binding of specific antibodies for each was dose-dependent, and could be saturated. In addition, the binding of mPmRab7-expressing cells with free VP28, and vice versa was dose dependent. Binding between the two surface-expressed proteins was confirmed by an assay showing agglutination between cells expressing complementary mPmRab7 and pVP28. In summary, our genetically engineered P. pastoris can display biologically active mPmRab7 and pVP28 and is now ready for evaluation of efficacy in protecting shrimp against WSSV by oral

  14. Direct L-lysine production from cellobiose by Corynebacterium glutamicum displaying beta-glucosidase on its cell surface.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Noriko; Takahashi, Chihiro; Ono-Murota, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Rie; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2013-08-01

    We constructed beta-glucosidase (BGL)-displaying Corynebacterium glutamicum, and direct L-lysine fermentation from cellobiose was demonstrated. After screening active BGLs, Sde1394, which is a BGL from Saccharophagus degradans, was successfully displayed on the C. glutamicum cell surface using porin as an anchor protein, and cellobiose was directly assimilated as a carbon source. The optical density at 600 nm of BGL-displaying C. glutamicum grown on cellobiose as a carbon source reached 23.5 after 48 h of cultivation, which was almost the same as that of glucose after 24 h of cultivation. Finally, Sde1394-displaying C. glutamicum produced 1.08 g/l of L-lysine from 20 g/l of cellobiose after 4 days of cultivation, which was about threefold higher than the amount of produced L-lysine using BGL-secretory C. glutamicum strains (0.38 g/l after 5 days of cultivation). This is the first report on amino acid production using cellobiose as a carbon source by BGL-expressing C. glutamicum. PMID:23749228

  15. Development of a novel rDNA based plasmid for enhanced cell surface display on Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a novel rDNA based plasmid was developed for display of heterologous proteins on the cell surface of Yarrowia lipolytica using the C-terminal end of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored Y. lipolytica cell wall protein 1 (YlCWP1). mCherry was used as a model protein to assess the efficiency of the constructed plasmid. Y. lipolytica transformants harbouring the expression cassettes showed a purple colour phenotype on selective YNB-casamino plates as compared to control cells indicating that mCherry was displayed on the cells. Expression of mCherry on cells of Y. lipolytica was confirmed by both fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time-of (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) confirmed that the protein cleaved from the yeast cells using enterokinase was mCherry. Efficient cleavage of mCherry reported in this work offers an alternative purification method for displayed heterologous proteins on Y. lipolytica cells using the plasmid constructed in this study. The developed displaying system offers great potential for industrial production and purification of heterologous proteins at low cost. PMID:22608131

  16. Operational Characteristics Identification and Simulation Model Verification for Incheon International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, Yeonju; Jeon, Daekeun; Lee, Hanbong; Zhu, Zhifan; Jung, Yoon C.; Jeong, Myeongsook; Kim, Hyounkyong; Oh, Eunmi; Hong, Sungkwon; Lee, Junwon

    2016-01-01

    Incheon International Airport (ICN) is one of the hub airports in East Asia. Airport operations at ICN have been growing more than 5 percent per year in the past five years. According to the current airport expansion plan, a new passenger terminal will be added and the current cargo ramp will be expanded in 2018. This expansion project will bring 77 new stands without adding a new runway to the airport. Due to such continuous growth in airport operations and future expansion of the ramps, it will be highly likely that airport surface traffic will experience more congestion, and therefore, suffer from efficiency degradation. There is a growing awareness in aviation research community of need for strategic and tactical surface scheduling capabilities for efficient airport surface operations. Specific to ICN airport operations, a need for A-CDM (Airport - Collaborative Decision Making) or S-CDM (Surface - Collaborative Decision Making), and controller decision support tools for efficient air traffic management has arisen since several years ago. In the United States, there has been independent research efforts made by academia, industry, and government research organizations to enhance efficiency and predictability of surface operations at busy airports. Among these research activities, the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) developed and tested by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a decision support tool to provide tactical advisories to the controllers for efficient surface operations. The effectiveness of SARDA concept, was successfully verified through the human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations for both spot release and runway operations advisories for ATC Tower controllers of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in 2010 and 2012, and gate pushback advisories for the ramp controller of Charlotte-Douglas International Airport (CLT) in 2014. The SARDA concept for tactical surface scheduling is further enhanced and is being

  17. Operational Characteristics Identification and Simulation Model Verification for Incheon International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, Yeonju; Jeon, Daekeun; Lee, Hanbong; Zhu, Zhifan; Jung, Yoon C.; Jeong, Myeongsook; Kim, Hyounkyong; Oh, Eunmi; Hong, Sungkwon; Lee, Junwon

    2016-01-01

    Incheon International Airport (ICN) is one of the hub airports in East Asia. Airport operations at ICN have been growing more than 5% per year in the past five years. According to the current airport expansion plan, a new passenger terminal will be added and the current cargo ramp will be expanded in 2018. This expansion project will bring 77 new stands without adding a new runway to the airport. Due to such continuous growth in airport operations and future expansion of the ramps, it will be highly likely that airport surface traffic will experience more congestion, and therefore, suffer from efficiency degradation. There is a growing awareness in aviation research community of need for strategic and tactical surface scheduling capabilities for efficient airport surface operations. Specific to ICN airport operations, a need for A-CDM (Airport - Collaborative Decision Making) or S-CDM(Surface - Collaborative Decision Making), and controller decision support tools for efficient air traffic management has arisen since several years ago. In the United States, there has been independent research efforts made by academia, industry, and government research organizations to enhance efficiency and predictability of surface operations at busy airports. Among these research activities, the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) developed and tested by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a decision support tool to provide tactical advisories to the controllers for efficient surface operations. The effectiveness of SARDA concept, was successfully verified through the human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations for both spot release and runway operations advisories for ATC Tower controllers of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) in 2010 and 2012, and gate pushback advisories for the ramp controller of Charlotte/Douglas International Airport (CLT) in 2014. The SARDA concept for tactical surface scheduling is further enhanced and is being integrated into

  18. Surface-Roughness-Based Virtual Textiles: Evaluation Using a Multi-Contactor Display.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Matthew; Summers, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Virtual textiles, generated in response to exploratory movements, are presented to the fingertip via a 24-contactor vibrotactile array. Software models are based on surface-roughness profiles from real textiles. Results suggest that distinguishable "textile-like" surfaces are produced, but these lack the necessary accuracy for reliable matching to real textiles. PMID:25781954

  19. Cell Surface Display of Four Types of Solanum nigrum Metallothionein on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Biosorption of Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qinguo; Zhang, Honghai; Guo, Dongge; Ma, Shisheng

    2016-05-28

    We displayed four types of Solanum nigrum metallothionein (SMT) for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using an α-agglutinin-based display system. The SMT genes were amplified by RT-PCR. The plasmid pYES2 was used to construct the expression vector. Transformed yeast strains were confirmed by PCR amplification and custom sequencing. Surface-expressed metallothioneins were indirectly indicated by the enhanced cadmium sorption capacity. Flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to examine the concentration of Cd(2+) in this study. The transformed yeast strains showed much higher resistance ability to Cd(2+) compared with the control. Strikingly, their Cd(2+) accumulation was almost twice as much as that of the wild-type yeast cells. Furthermore, surface-engineered yeast strains could effectively adsorb ultra-trace cadmium and accumulate Cd(2+) under a wide range of pH levels, from 3 to 7, without disturbing the Cu(2+) and Hg(2+). Four types of surfaceengineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were constructed and they could be used to purify Cd(2+)-contaminated water and adsorb ultra-trace cadmium effectively. The surface-engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains would be useful tools for the bioremediation and biosorption of environmental cadmium contaminants. PMID:26838339

  20. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  1. Surface-Based Display of Volume-Averaged Cerebellar Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Diedrichsen, Jörn; Zotow, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a flat representation of the human cerebellum, useful for visualizing functional imaging data after volume-based normalization and averaging across subjects. Instead of reconstructing individual cerebellar surfaces, the method uses a white- and grey-matter surface defined on volume-averaged anatomical data. Functional data can be projected along the lines of corresponding vertices on the two surfaces. The flat representation is optimized to yield a roughly proportional relationship between the surface area of the 2D-representation and the volume of the underlying cerebellar grey matter. The map allows users to visualize the activation state of the complete cerebellar grey matter in one concise view, equally revealing both the anterior-posterior (lobular) and medial-lateral organization. As examples, published data on resting-state networks and task-related activity are presented on the flatmap. The software and maps are freely available and compatible with most major neuroimaging packages. PMID:26230510

  2. Auctioning Airport Slots?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruyer, Nicolas; Lenoir, Nathalie

    2003-01-01

    The current allocation of slots on congested European airports constitutes an obstacle to the effective liberalisation of air transportation undertaken in Europe. With a view to favouring effluent slot utilisation and competition, as is the goal of the Euopean commission, we propose to use a market mechanism, based on temporary" utilisation licences. In order to allocate those licences, we propose and describe an iterated combinatorial auction mechanism where a percentage of licences would be reallocated each season. A secondary market would also be set up in order to reallocate slots during a season. Since a combinatorial auction involve a complex optimisation procedure, we describe how it can be made to work in the case of auctions.

  3. Synthetic aperture radar imagery of airports and surrounding areas: Philadelphia Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.

    1990-01-01

    The statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area is addressed. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data were collected at the Philadelphia Airport. These data and the results of the clutter study are described. This 13 km x 10 km scene was imaged at 9.38 GHz and HH-polarization and contained airport grounds and facilities (6 percent), industrial (14 percent), residential (14 percent), fields (10 percent), forest (8 percent), and water (33 percent). Incidence angles ranged from 40 to 84 deg. Even at the smallest incidence angles, the distributed targets such as forest, fields, water, and residential rarely had mean scattering coefficients greater than -10 dB. Eighty-seven percent of the image had scattering coefficients less than -17.5 dB. About 1 percent of the scattering coefficients exceeded 0 dB, with about 0.1 percent above 10 dB. Sources which produced the largest cross sections were largely confined to the airport grounds and areas highly industrialized. The largest cross sections were produced by observing broadside large buildings surrounded by smooth surfaces.

  4. Applications of yeast cell-surface display in bio-refinery.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Akihiko; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Ogino, Chiaki

    2010-11-01

    The dependency on depleting natural resources is a challenge for energy security that can be potentially answered by bioenergy. Bioenergy is derived from starchy and lignocellulosic biomass in the form of bioethanol or from vegetable oils in the form of biodiesel fuel. The acid and enzymatic methods have been developed for the hydrolysis of biomass and for transesterifiaction of plant oils. However, acid hydrolysis results in the production of unnatural compounds which has adverse effects on yeast fermentation. Recent advancements in the yeast cell surface engineering developed strategies to genetically immobilize amylolytic, cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes on yeast cell surface for the production of fuel ethanol from biomass. This review gives an insight in to the recent technological developments in the production of bioenergy, i.e, bioethanol using surface engineered yeast. PMID:21171959

  5. Cell Surface Display Fungal Laccase as a Renewable Biocatalyst for Degradation of Persistent Micropollutants Bisphenol A and Sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingying; Stemple, Brooke; Kumar, Manish; Wei, Na

    2016-08-16

    Fungal laccases have high activity in degrading various persistent organic pollutants. However, using enzymes in solution for water treatment has limitations of nonreusability, short enzyme lifetimes, and high cost of single use. In this study, we developed a new type of biocatalyst by immobilizing fungal laccase on the surface of yeast cells using synthetic biology techniques. The biocatalyst, referred to as surface display laccase (SDL), had an enzyme activity of 104 ± 3 mU/g dry cell (with 2,2-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS)). The SDL retained over 90% of the initial enzyme activity after 25 days storage at room temperature, while, in contrast, activity of free laccase declined to 60% of its initial activity. The SDL could be reused with high stability as it retained 74% of initial activity after eight repeated batch reactions. Proof-of-concept evaluations of the effectiveness of SDL in treating contaminants of emerging concern were performed with bisphenol A and sulfamethoxazole. Results from contaminant degradation kinetics and the effects of redox mediator amendment provided insights into the factors affecting the efficacy of the SDL system. This study reports, for the first time, the development of a surface display enzyme biocatalyst as an effective and renewable alternative for treating recalcitrant organic micropollutants. PMID:27414990

  6. 78 FR 48044 - Safety Zone; San Diego International Airport Terminal Two West Grand Opening Fireworks; San Diego...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego International Airport Terminal... support of a fireworks display for the Grand Opening of Lindbergh Airport Terminal Two West on August...

  7. Display of phytase on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to degrade phytate phosphorus and improve bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianzhong; Xiao, Yan; Shen, Wei; Govender, Algasan; Zhang, Liang; Fan, You; Wang, Zhengxiang

    2016-03-01

    Currently, development of biofuels as an alternative fuel has gained much attention due to resource and environmental challenges. Bioethanol is one of most important and dominant biofuels, and production using corn or cassava as raw materials has become a prominent technology. However, phytate contained in the raw material not only decreases the efficiency of ethanol production, but also leads to an increase in the discharge of phosphorus, thus impacting on the environment. In this study, to decrease phytate and its phosphorus content in an ethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered through a surface-displaying system utilizing the C-terminal half of the yeast α-agglutinin protein. The recombinant yeast strain, PHY, was constructed by successfully displaying phytase on the surface of cells, and enzyme activity reached 6.4 U/g wet biomass weight. Ethanol productions using various strains were compared, and the results demonstrated that the specific growth rate and average fermentation rate of the PHY strain were higher 20 and 18 %, respectively, compared to the control strain S. cerevisiae CICIMY0086, in a 5-L bioreactor process by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. More importantly, the phytate phosphorus concentration decreased by 89.8 % and free phosphorus concentration increased by 142.9 % in dry vinasse compared to the control in a 5-L bioreactor. In summary, we constructed a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain displaying phytase on the cell surface, which could improve ethanol production performance and effectively reduce the discharge of phosphorus. The strain reported here represents a useful novel engineering platform for developing an environment-friendly system for bioethanol production from a corn substrate. PMID:26610799

  8. Proteome-wide Identification of Novel Ceramide-binding Proteins by Yeast Surface cDNA Display and Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Ha, Kevin; Lee, Nam-Kyung; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Although the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide is an important cell signaling molecule, relatively few direct ceramide-interacting proteins are known. We used an approach combining yeast surface cDNA display and deep sequencing technology to identify novel proteins binding directly to ceramide. We identified 234 candidate ceramide-binding protein fragments and validated binding for 20. Most (17) bound selectively to ceramide, although a few (3) bound to other lipids as well. Several novel ceramide-binding domains were discovered, including the EF-hand calcium-binding motif, the heat shock chaperonin-binding motif STI1, the SCP2 sterol-binding domain, and the tetratricopeptide repeat region motif. Interestingly, four of the verified ceramide-binding proteins (HPCA, HPCAL1, NCS1, and VSNL1) and an additional three candidate ceramide-binding proteins (NCALD, HPCAL4, and KCNIP3) belong to the neuronal calcium sensor family of EF hand-containing proteins. We used mutagenesis to map the ceramide-binding site in HPCA and to create a mutant HPCA that does not bind to ceramide. We demonstrated selective binding to ceramide by mammalian cell-produced wild type but not mutant HPCA. Intriguingly, we also identified a fragment from prostaglandin D2synthase that binds preferentially to ceramide 1-phosphate. The wide variety of proteins and domains capable of binding to ceramide suggests that many of the signaling functions of ceramide may be regulated by direct binding to these proteins. Based on the deep sequencing data, we estimate that our yeast surface cDNA display library covers ∼60% of the human proteome and our selection/deep sequencing protocol can identify target-interacting protein fragments that are present at extremely low frequency in the starting library. Thus, the yeast surface cDNA display/deep sequencing approach is a rapid, comprehensive, and flexible method for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions, particularly for the study of non-protein ligands. PMID

  9. Display of active enzymes on the cell surface of Escherichia coli using PgsA anchor protein and their application to bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Narita, Junya; Okano, Kenji; Tateno, Toshihiro; Tanino, Takanori; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Sung, Moon-Hee; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a novel Escherichia coli cell surface display system by employing PgsA as an anchoring motif. In our display system, C-terminal fusion to PgsA anchor protein from Bacillus subtilis was used. The enzymes selected for display were alpha-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 and lipase B (CALB) from Candida antarctica. The molecular mass values of AmyA and CALB are approximately 77 and 34 kDa, respectively. The enzymes were displayed on the surface as a fusion protein with a FLAG peptide tag at the C terminus. Both the PgsA-AmyA-FLAG and PgsA-CALB-FLAG fusion proteins were shown to be displayed by immunofluorescence labeling using anti-FLAG antibody. The displayed enzymes were active forms, and AmyA and CALB activities reached 990 U/g (dry cell weight) and 4.6 U/g (dry cell weight), respectively. AmyA-displaying E. coli cells grew utilizing cornstarch as the sole carbon source, while CALB-displaying E. coli cells catalyzed enantioselective transesterification, indicating that they are effective whole-cell biocatalysts. Since a target enzyme with a size of 77 kDa and an industrially useful lipase have been successfully displayed on the cell surface of E. coli for the first time, PgsA protein is probably a useful anchoring motif to display various enzymes. PMID:16133338

  10. Engineering Bacterial Surface Displayed Human Norovirus Capsid Proteins: A Novel System to Explore Interaction Between Norovirus and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Mengya; Yu, Qianqian; Tian, Peng; Gao, Zhiyong; Wang, Dapeng; Shi, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are major contributors to acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks. Many aspects of HuNoVs are poorly understood due to both the current inability to culture HuNoVs, and the lack of efficient small animal models. Surrogates for HuNoVs, such as recombinant viral like particles (VLPs) expressed in eukaryotic system or P particles expressed in prokaryotic system, have been used for studies in immunology and interaction between the virus and its receptors. However, it is difficult to use VLPs or P particles to collect or isolate potential ligands binding to these recombinant capsid proteins. In this study, a new strategy was used to collect HuNoVs binding ligands through the use of ice nucleation protein (INP) to display recombinant capsid proteins of HuNoVs on bacterial surfaces. The viral protein-ligand complex could be easily separated by a low speed centrifugation step. This system was also used to explore interaction between recombinant capsid proteins of HuNoVs and their receptors. In this system, the VP1 capsid encoding gene (ORF2) and the protruding domain (P domain) encoding gene (3′ terminal fragment of ORF2) of HuNoVs GI.1 and GII.4 were fused with 5′ terminal fragment of INP encoding gene (inaQn). The results demonstrated that the recombinant VP1 and P domains of HuNoVs were expressed and anchored on the surface of Escherichia coli BL21 cells after the bacteria were transformed with the corresponding plasmids. Both cell surface displayed VP1 and P domains could be recognized by HuNoVs specific antibodies and interact with the viral histo-blood group antigens receptors. In both cases, displayed P domains had better binding abilities than VP1. This new strategy of using displayed HuNoVs capsid proteins on the bacterial surface could be utilized to separate HuNoVs binding components from complex samples, to investigate interaction between the virus and its receptors, as well as to develop an oral vaccine for HuNoVs. PMID

  11. M13 bacteriophage display framework that allows sortase-mediated modification of surface-accessible phage proteins.

    PubMed

    Hess, Gaelen T; Cragnolini, Juan J; Popp, Maximilian W; Allen, Mark A; Dougan, Stephanie K; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde L; Belcher, Angela M; Guimaraes, Carla P

    2012-07-18

    We exploit bacterial sortases to attach a variety of moieties to the capsid proteins of M13 bacteriophage. We show that pIII, pIX, and pVIII can be functionalized with entities ranging from small molecules (e.g., fluorophores, biotin) to correctly folded proteins (e.g., GFP, antibodies, streptavidin) in a site-specific manner, and with yields that surpass those of any reported using phage display technology. A case in point is modification of pVIII. While a phage vector limits the size of the insert into pVIII to a few amino acids, a phagemid system limits the number of copies actually displayed at the surface of M13. Using sortase-based reactions, a 100-fold increase in the efficiency of display of GFP onto pVIII is achieved. Taking advantage of orthogonal sortases, we can simultaneously target two distinct capsid proteins in the same phage particle and maintain excellent specificity of labeling. As demonstrated in this work, this is a simple and effective method for creating a variety of structures, thus expanding the use of M13 for materials science applications and as a biological tool. PMID:22759232

  12. Microbial surface displayed enzymes based biofuel cell utilizing degradation products of lignocellulosic biomass for direct electrical energy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shuqin; Hou, Chuantao; Liang, Bo; Feng, Ruirui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a bacterial surface displaying enzyme based two-compartment biofuel cell for the direct electrical energy conversion from degradation products of lignocellulosic biomass is reported. Considering that the main degradation products of the lignocellulose are glucose and xylose, xylose dehydrogenase (XDH) displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria) and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) displayed bacteria (GDH-bacteria) were used as anode catalysts in anode chamber with methylene blue as electron transfer mediator. While the cathode chamber was constructed with laccase/multi-walled-carbon nanotube/glassy-carbon-electrode. XDH-bacteria exhibited 1.75 times higher catalytic efficiency than GDH-bacteria. This assembled enzymatic fuel cell exhibited a high open-circuit potential of 0.80 V, acceptable stability and energy conversion efficiency. Moreover, the maximum power density of the cell could reach 53 μW cm(-2) when fueled with degradation products of corn stalk. Thus, this finding holds great potential to directly convert degradation products of biomass into electrical energy. PMID:26051524

  13. Flow-Cytometric Isolation of Human Antibodies from a Nonimmune Saccharomyces cerevisiae Surface Display Library

    SciTech Connect

    Feldhaus, Michael ); Siegel, Robert W. ); Opresko, Lee ); Coleman, James R. ); Feldhaus, Jane M. ); Yeung, Yik A.; Cochran, Jennifer R.; Heinzelman, Peter; Colby, David; Swers, Jeffrey; Graff, Christilyn; Wiley, H Steven ); Wittrup, K D.

    2003-02-28

    A nonimmune library of 109 human antibody scFv fragments has been cloned and expressed on the surface of yeast, and nanomolar-affinity scFvs routinely obtained by magnetic bead screening and flow cytometric sorting. The yeast library can be amplified 1010-fold without measurable loss of clonal diversity, enabling effectively indefinite expansion of the library. The expression, stability, and antigen binding properties of more than 50 isolated scFv clones were assessed directly on the yeast cell surface by immunofluorescent labeling and flow cytometry, obviating separate subcloning, expression, and purification steps and thereby expediting the isolation of novel affinity reagents. The ability to use multiplex library screening demonstrates the utility of this approach for high throughput antibody isolation for proteomics applications.

  14. Temporin-SHa peptides grafted on gold surfaces display antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Lombana, Andres; Raja, Zahid; Casale, Sandra; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Foulon, Thierry; Ladram, Ali; Humblot, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Development of resistant bacteria onto biomaterials is a major problem leading to nosocomial infections. Antimicrobial peptides are good candidates for the generation of antimicrobial surfaces because of their broad-spectrum activity and their original mechanism of action (i.e. rapid lysis of the bacterial membrane) making them less susceptible to the development of bacterial resistance. In this study, we report on the covalent immobilisation of temporin-SHa on a gold surface modified by a thiolated self-assembled monolayer. Temporin-SHa (FLSGIVGMLGKLF amide) is a small hydrophobic and low cationic antimicrobial peptide with potent and very broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and parasites. We have analysed the influence of the binding mode of temporin-SHa on the antibacterial efficiency by using a covalent binding either via the peptide NH2 groups (random grafting of α- and ε-NH2 to the surface) or via its C-terminal end (oriented grafting using the analogue temporin-SHa-COOH). The surface functionalization was characterised by IR spectroscopy (polarisation modulation reflection absorption IR spectroscopy) while antibacterial activity against Listeria ivanovii was assessed by microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with a field emission gun. Our results revealed that temporin-SHa retains its antimicrobial activity after covalent grafting. A higher amount of bound temporin-SHa is observed for the C-terminally oriented grafting compared with the random grafting (NH2 groups). Temporin-SHa therefore represents an attractive candidate as antimicrobial coating agent. PMID:24919960

  15. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Leidichj, Christopher; Papasin, Richard; Tran, Peter B.; Bass, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Networks of video cameras, meteorological sensors, and ancillary electronic equipment are under development in collaboration among NASA Ames Research Center, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These networks are to be established at and near airports to provide real-time information on local weather conditions that affect aircraft approaches and landings. The prototype network is an airport-approach-zone camera system (AAZCS), which has been deployed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and San Carlos Airport (SQL). The AAZCS includes remotely controlled color video cameras located on top of SFO and SQL air-traffic control towers. The cameras are controlled by the NOAA Center Weather Service Unit located at the Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center and are accessible via a secure Web site. The AAZCS cameras can be zoomed and can be panned and tilted to cover a field of view 220 wide. The NOAA observer can see the sky condition as it is changing, thereby making possible a real-time evaluation of the conditions along the approach zones of SFO and SQL. The next-generation network, denoted a remote tower sensor system (RTSS), will soon be deployed at the Half Moon Bay Airport and a version of it will eventually be deployed at Los Angeles International Airport. In addition to remote control of video cameras via secure Web links, the RTSS offers realtime weather observations, remote sensing, portability, and a capability for deployment at remote and uninhabited sites. The RTSS can be used at airports that lack control towers, as well as at major airport hubs, to provide synthetic augmentation of vision for both local and remote operations under what would otherwise be conditions of low or even zero visibility.

  16. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  17. A mutant Escherichia coli that attaches peptidoglycan to lipopolysaccharide and displays cell wall on its surface

    PubMed Central

    Grabowicz, Marcin; Andres, Dorothee; Lebar, Matthew D; Malojčić, Goran; Kahne, Daniel; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) forms the surface-exposed leaflet of the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, an organelle that shields the underlying peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall. Both LPS and PG are essential cell envelope components that are synthesized independently and assembled by dedicated transenvelope multiprotein complexes. We have identified a point-mutation in the gene for O-antigen ligase (WaaL) in Escherichia coli that causes LPS to be modified with PG subunits, intersecting these two pathways. Synthesis of the PG-modified LPS (LPS*) requires ready access to the small PG precursor pool but does not weaken cell wall integrity, challenging models of precursor sequestration at PG assembly machinery. LPS* is efficiently transported to the cell surface without impairing OM function. Because LPS* contains the canonical vancomycin binding site, these surface-exposed molecules confer increased vancomycin-resistance by functioning as molecular decoys that titrate the antibiotic away from its intracellular target. This unexpected LPS glycosylation fuses two potent pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05334.001 PMID:25551294

  18. Threat displays for final approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Chad Warren

    During periods of good visibility, airports can conduct Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches (CSPA) and simultaneously operate parallel runways separated by more than 750 feet. When visibility degrades to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) and pilots must fly exclusively by the instruments, the runway separation required to operate parallel runways increases to 3400 feet or more. For many airports around the country and the world this means the second runway must be closed and the airport operates at half capacity. To alleviate the delays caused by this capacity reduction many airports worldwide are planning to expand and build new runways. The projected cost of the ten largest airport projects in the United States is $8-16 Billion. Perhaps a less expensive solution can be found with innovative technology rather than real estate? This research presents the first ever design, implementation, and characterization of a synthetic vision display and the supporting flight system to attempt to achieve this solution. The display uses 3D graphics and an air to air datalink called Automatic Dependent Surveillance--Broadcast to present the pilot with the information necessary to aviate, navigate and monitor traffic. This thesis also documents the first series of flight experiments to test the applicability of synthetic vision displays to both runway incursion avoidance and CSPA. Finally, utilizing the results from the flight testing in a Monte Carlo analysis, the effect of deploying this display on minimum safe runway separation is calculated. It has been found that the minimum safe runway separation for IMC operation can safely be reduced to 1900 feet. If, in addition, significant changes are made in Air Traffic Control procedures for longitudinal aircraft spacing, the analysis shows that the display system presented herein will allow for runway separation of 1400 feet with no new restrictions on aircraft size or crosswind. Furthermore, with certain restrictions on

  19. Detection of glutamate release from neurons by genetically encoded surface-displayed FRET nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Looger, Loren L.; Micheva, Kristina D.; Reimer, Richard J.; Smith, Stephen J.; Frommer, Wolf B.

    2005-06-01

    Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. Once released, its rapid removal from the synaptic cleft is critical for preventing excitotoxicity and spillover to neighboring synapses. Despite consensus on the role of glutamate in normal and disease physiology, technical issues limit our understanding of its metabolism in intact cells. To monitor glutamate levels inside and at the surface of living cells, genetically encoded nanosensors were developed. The fluorescent indicator protein for glutamate (FLIPE) consists of the glutamate/aspartate binding protein ybeJ from Escherichia coli fused to two variants of the green fluorescent protein. Three sensors with lower affinities for glutamate were created by mutation of residues peristeric to the ybeJ binding pocket. In the presence of ligands, FLIPEs show a concentration-dependent decrease in FRET efficiency. When expressed on the surface of rat hippocampal neurons or PC12 cells, the sensors respond to extracellular glutamate with a reversible concentration-dependent decrease in FRET efficiency. Depolarization of neurons leads to a reduction in FRET efficiency corresponding to 300 nM glutamate at the cell surface. No change in FRET was observed when cells expressing sensors in the cytosol were superfused with up to 20 mM glutamate, consistent with a minimal contribution of glutamate uptake to cytosolic glutamate levels. The results demonstrate that FLIPE sensors can be used for real-time monitoring of glutamate metabolism in living cells, in tissues, or in intact organisms, providing tools for studying metabolism or for drug discovery. aspartate | hippocampal neuron | neurotransmitter | secretion | transport

  20. Data-Link and Surface Map Traffic Intent Displays for NextGen 4DT and Equivalent Visual Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Kevin J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Jones, Deise R.; Allamandola, Angela S.; Bailey, Randall E.

    2009-01-01

    By 2025, U.S. air traffic is predicted to increase 3-fold and may strain the current air traffic management system, which may not be able to accommodate this growth. In response to this challenge, a consortium of industry, academia and government agencies have proposed a revolutionary new concept for U.S. aviation operations, termed the Next Generation Air Transportation System or "NextGen". Many key capabilities are being identified to enable NextGen, including the concept of "net-centric" operations whereby each aircraft and air services provider shares information to allow real-time adaptability to ever-changing factors such as weather, traffic, flight trajectories, and security. Data-link is likely to be the primary source of communication in NextGen. Because NextGen represents a radically different approach to air traffic management and requires a dramatic shift in the tasks, roles, and responsibilities for the flight deck, there are numerous research issues and challenges that must be overcome to ensure a safe, sustainable air transportation system. Flight deck display and crew-vehicle interaction concepts are being developed that proactively investigate and overcome potential technology and safety barriers that might otherwise constrain the full realization of NextGen.

  1. 76 FR 15028 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Interim Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property (75 FR 54946..., Safety Management System for Certificated Airports (75 FR 62008, October 7, 2010). However, the...

  2. Input-Output Modeling and Control of the Departure Process of Congested Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pujet, Nicolas; Delcaire, Bertrand; Feron, Eric

    2003-01-01

    A simple queueing model of busy airport departure operations is proposed. This model is calibrated and validated using available runway configuration and traffic data. The model is then used to evaluate preliminary control schemes aimed at alleviating departure traffic congestion on the airport surface. The potential impact of these control strategies on direct operating costs, environmental costs and overall delay is quantified and discussed.

  3. Creation of a Cellooligosaccharide-Assimilating Escherichia coli Strain by Displaying Active Beta-Glucosidase on the Cell Surface via a Novel Anchor Protein ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kawabata, Hitomi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated direct assimilation of cellooligosaccharide using Escherichia coli displaying beta-glucosidase (BGL). BGL from Thermobifida fusca YX (Tfu0937) was displayed on the E. coli cell surface using a novel anchor protein named Blc. This strain was grown successfully on 0.2% cellobiose, and the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was 1.05 after 20 h. PMID:21742905

  4. Preparation and surface encapsulation of hollow TiO nanoparticles for electrophoretic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qian; Tan, Tingfeng; Qi, Peng; Wang, Shirong; Bian, Shuguang; Li, Xianggao; An, Yong; Liu, Zhaojun

    2011-02-01

    Hollow black TiO nanosparticles were obtained via deposition of inorganic coating on the surface of hollow core-shell polymer latex with Ti(OBu)4 as precursor and subsequent calcination in ammonia gas. Hollow TiO particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. Encapsulation of TiO via dispersion polymerization was promoved by pretreating the pigments with 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate, making it possible to prepare hollow TiO-polymer particles. When St and DVB were used as polymerization monomer, hollow TiO-polymer core-shell particles came into being via dispersion polymerization, and the lipophilic degree is 28.57%. Glutin-arabic gum microcapsules containing TiO-polymer particles electrophoretic liquid were prepared using via complex coacervation. It was founded that hollow TiO-polymer particles had enough electrophoretic mobility after coating with polymer.

  5. Yeast actin filaments display ATP-dependent sliding movement over surfaces coated with rabbit muscle myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Kron, S J; Drubin, D G; Botstein, D; Spudich, J A

    1992-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to study the function of components of the actin cytoskeleton in vivo, mainly because it is easy to derive and characterize mutations affecting these proteins. In contrast, biochemical studies have generally used proteins derived from higher eukaryotes. We have devised a simple procedure to prepare, in high yield, homogeneous native actin from wild-type and act1 mutant yeast. Using intensified video fluorescence microscopy, we found that actin filaments polymerized from these preparations exhibit ATP-dependent sliding movement over surfaces coated with rabbit skeletal muscle myosin. The rates of sliding movement of the wild-type and mutant yeast actins were each about half that of rabbit skeletal muscle actin under similar conditions. We conclude that over the large evolutionary distance between yeast and mammals there has been significant conservation of actin function, specifically the ability to be moved by interaction with myosin. Images PMID:1533933

  6. NASA Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) Atlanta Demonstration: Surveillance Systems Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Rick; Evers, Carl; Hicok, Dan; Lee, Derrick

    1999-01-01

    NASA conducted a series of flight experiments at Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport as part of the Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) Program. LVLASO is one of the subelements of the NASA Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program, which is focused on providing technology and operating procedures for achieving clear-weather airport capacity in instrument-weather conditions, while also improving safety. LVLASO is investigating various technologies to be applied to airport surface operations, including advanced flight deck displays and surveillance systems. The purpose of this report is to document the performance of the surveillance systems tested as part of the LVLASO flight experiment. There were three surveillance sensors tested: primary radar using Airport Surface Detection Equipment (ASDE-3) and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS), Multilateration using the Airport Surface Target Identification System (ATIDS), and Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) operating at 1090 MHz. The performance was compared to the draft requirements of the ICAO Advanced Surface Movement Guidance and Control System (A-SMGCS). Performance parameters evaluated included coverage, position accuracy, and update rate. Each of the sensors was evaluated as a stand alone surveillance system.

  7. Collagen fibril surface displays a constellation of sites capable of promoting fibril assembly, stability, and hemostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Orgel, J.P.; Antipova, O.; Sagi, I.; Bitler, A.; Qiu, D.; Wang, R.; Xu, Y.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2011-12-14

    Fibrillar collagens form the structural basis of organs and tissues including the vasculature, bone, and tendon. They are also dynamic, organizational scaffolds that present binding and recognition sites for ligands, cells, and platelets. We interpret recently published X-ray diffraction findings and use atomic force microscopy data to illustrate the significance of new insights into the functional organization of the collagen fibril. These data indicate that collagen's most crucial functional domains localize primarily to the overlap region, comprising a constellation of sites we call the 'master control region.' Moreover, the collagen's most exposed aspect contains its most stable part - the C-terminal region that controls collagen assembly, cross-linking, and blood clotting. Hidden beneath the fibril surface exists a constellation of 'cryptic' sequences poised to promote hemostasis and cell - collagen interactions in tissue injury and regeneration. These findings begin to address several important, and previously unresolved, questions: How functional domains are organized in the fibril, which domains are accessible, and which require proteolysis or structural trauma to become exposed? Here we speculate as to how collagen fibrillar organization impacts molecular processes relating to tissue growth, development, and repair.

  8. Selection of high expressing mammalian cells by surface display of reporters.

    PubMed

    DeMaria, Christine T

    2012-01-01

    A flow cytometry method using a nonfluorescent reporter protein was developed for rapid, early-stage identification of cells producing high levels of a recombinant protein of interest. A cell surface reporter protein is coexpressed with the protein of interest, and the reporter protein is detected using a fluorescently labeled antibody. The genes encoding the reporter protein and the protein of interest are linked by an IRES so that they are transcribed in the same mRNA but are translated independently. Since they each arise from a common mRNA, the reporter protein's expression level accurately predicts, on a per cell basis, the relative expression level of the protein of interest. This method provides an effective process for selecting cells that express high levels of recombinant proteins, with the benefits of rapid and accurate 96-well plate clone screening (that is both quantitative and qualitative) and elimination of unstable clones during subsequent scale up and culture. Furthermore, because this method does not rely on the availability of a detection reagent specific for the protein of interest that is expressed, it can be easily implemented into any cell line development process. PMID:21987245

  9. Surface Map Traffic Intent Displays and Net-Centric Data-link Communications for NextGen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Kevin J.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Jones, Denise R.; Allamandola, Angela S.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Bailey, Randall E.

    2009-01-01

    By 2025, U.S. air traffic is predicted to increase three fold and may strain the current air traffic management system, which may not be able to accommodate this growth. In response to this challenge, a revolutionary new concept has been proposed for U.S. aviation operations, termed the Next Generation Air Transportation System or "NextGen". Many key capabilities are being identified to enable NextGen, including the use of data-link communications. Because NextGen represents a radically different approach to air traffic management and requires a dramatic shift in the tasks, roles, and responsibilities for the flight deck, there are numerous research issues and challenges that must be overcome to ensure a safe, sustainable air transportation system. Flight deck display and crew-vehicle interaction concepts are being developed that proactively investigate and overcome potential technology and safety barriers that might otherwise constrain the full realization of NextGen. The paper describes simulation research, conducted at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center, examining data-link communications and traffic intent data during envisioned four-dimensional trajectory (4DT)-based and equivalent visual (EV) surface operations. Overall, the results suggest that controller pilot data-link communications (CPDLC) with the use of mandatory pilot read-back of all clearances significantly enhanced situation awareness for 4DT and EV surface operations. The depiction of graphical traffic state and intent information on the surface map display further enhanced off-nominal detection and pilot qualitative reports of safety and awareness.

  10. Mammalian Cell Surface Display as a Novel Method for Developing Engineered Lectins with Novel Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Keisuke; Abo, Hirohito; Qin, Sheng-Ying; Kyoutou, Takuya; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Leguminous lectins have a conserved carbohydrate recognition site comprising four loops (A–D). Here, we randomly mutated the sequence and length of loops C and D of peanut agglutinin (PNA) and expressed the proteins on the surface of mouse green fluorescent protein (GFP)-reporter cells. Flow cytometry, limiting dilution, and cDNA cloning were used to screen for several mutated PNAs with distinct properties. The mutated PNA clones obtained using NeuAcα2-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAc as a ligand showed preference for NeuAcα2-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAc rather than non-sialylated Galβ1-3GlcNAc, whereas wild-type PNA binds to Galβ1-3GlcNAc but not sialylated Galβ1-3GalNAc. Sequence analyses revealed that for all of the glycan-reactive mutated PNA clones, (i) loop C was eight amino acids in length, (ii) loop D was identical to that of wild-type PNA, (iii) residue 127 was asparagine, (iv) residue 125 was tryptophan, and (v) residue 130 was hydrophobic tyrosine, phenylalanine, or histidine. The sugar-binding ability of wild-type PNA was increased nine-fold when Tyr125 was mutated to tryptophan, and that of mutated clone C was increased more than 30-fold after His130 was changed to tyrosine. These results provide an insight into the relationship between the amino acid sequences of the carbohydrate recognition site and sugar-binding abilities of leguminous lectins. PMID:26287256

  11. Mammalian Cell Surface Display as a Novel Method for Developing Engineered Lectins with Novel Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Soga, Keisuke; Abo, Hirohito; Qin, Sheng-Ying; Kyoutou, Takuya; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Naoki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Leguminous lectins have a conserved carbohydrate recognition site comprising four loops (A-D). Here, we randomly mutated the sequence and length of loops C and D of peanut agglutinin (PNA) and expressed the proteins on the surface of mouse green fluorescent protein (GFP)-reporter cells. Flow cytometry, limiting dilution, and cDNA cloning were used to screen for several mutated PNAs with distinct properties. The mutated PNA clones obtained using NeuAcα2-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAc as a ligand showed preference for NeuAcα2-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAc rather than non-sialylated Galβ1-3GlcNAc, whereas wild-type PNA binds to Galβ1-3GlcNAc but not sialylated Galβ1-3GalNAc. Sequence analyses revealed that for all of the glycan-reactive mutated PNA clones, (i) loop C was eight amino acids in length, (ii) loop D was identical to that of wild-type PNA, (iii) residue 127 was asparagine, (iv) residue 125 was tryptophan, and (v) residue 130 was hydrophobic tyrosine, phenylalanine, or histidine. The sugar-binding ability of wild-type PNA was increased nine-fold when Tyr125 was mutated to tryptophan, and that of mutated clone C was increased more than 30-fold after His130 was changed to tyrosine. These results provide an insight into the relationship between the amino acid sequences of the carbohydrate recognition site and sugar-binding abilities of leguminous lectins. PMID:26287256

  12. Improvement of LysM-Mediated Surface Display of Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins) in Recombinant and Nonrecombinant Strains of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut

    2015-01-01

    Safety and probiotic properties make lactic acid bacteria (LAB) attractive hosts for surface display of heterologous proteins. Protein display on nonrecombinant microorganisms is preferred for therapeutic and food applications due to regulatory requirements. We displayed two designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), each possessing affinity for the Fc region of human IgG, on the surface of Lactococcus lactis by fusing them to the Usp45 secretion signal and to the peptidoglycan-binding C terminus of AcmA, containing lysine motif (LysM) repeats. Growth medium containing a secreted fusion protein was used to test its heterologous binding to 10 strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus, using flow cytometry, whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and fluorescence microscopy. The fusion proteins bound to the surfaces of all lactobacilli; however, binding to the majority of bacteria was only 2- to 5-fold stronger than that of the control. Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 demonstrated exceptionally strong binding (32- to 55-fold higher than that of the control) and may therefore be an attractive host for nonrecombinant surface display. Genomic comparison of the species indicated the exopolysaccharides of Lb. salivarius as a possible reason for the difference. Additionally, a 15-fold concentration-dependent increase in nonrecombinant surface display on L. lactis was demonstrated by growing bacteria with sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics chloramphenicol and erythromycin. Nonrecombinant surface display on LAB, based on LysM repeats, was optimized by selecting Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 as the optimal host and by introducing antibiotics as additives for increasing surface display on L. lactis. Additionally, effective display of DARPins on the surfaces of nonrecombinant LAB has opened up several new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:25576617

  13. Production of L-Lysine from starch by Corynebacterium glutamicum displaying alpha-amylase on its cell surface.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Toshihiro; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2007-04-01

    We engineered a Corynebacterium glutamicum strain displaying alpha-amylase from Streptococcus bovis 148 (AmyA) on its cell surface to produce amino acids directly from starch. We used PgsA from Bacillus subtilis as an anchor protein, and the N-terminus of alpha-amylase was fused to the PgsA. The genes of the fusion protein were integrated into the homoserine dehydrogenase gene locus on the chromosome by homologous recombination. L-Lysine fermentation was carried out using C. glutamicum displaying AmyA in the growth medium containing 50 g/l soluble starch as the sole carbon source. We performed L-lysine fermentation at various temperatures (30-40 degrees C) and pHs (6.0-7.0), as the optimal temperatures and pHs of AmyA and C. glutamicum differ significantly. The highest L-lysine yield was recorded at 30 degrees C and pH 7.0. The amount of soluble starch was reduced to 18.29 g/l, and 6.04 g/l L-lysine was produced in 24 h. The L-lysine yield obtained using soluble starch as the sole carbon source was higher than that using glucose as the sole carbon source after 24 h when the same amount of substrates was added. The results shown in the current study demonstrate that C. glutamicum displaying alpha-amylase has a potential to directly convert soluble starch to amino acids. PMID:17216452

  14. Enhanced bioaccumulation of heavy metal ions by bacterial cells due to surface display of short metal binding peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kotrba, P.; Ruml, T.; Doleckova, L.; Lorenzo, V. de

    1999-03-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd{sup 2+}-to-HP and Cd{sup 2+}-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd{sup 2+} binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd{sup 2+} from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. However, Cu{sup 2+} ceased contribution of HP for Cd{sup 2+} accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu{sup 2+} to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal.

  15. Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metal Ions by Bacterial Cells Due to Surface Display of Short Metal Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kotrba, Pavel; Dolečková, Lucie; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Ruml, Tomas

    1999-01-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd2+-to-HP and Cd2+-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd2+ binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd2+ from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu2+ and Zn2+. However, Cu2+ ceased contribution of HP for Cd2+ accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu2+ to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal. PMID:10049868

  16. Isolation of a recombinant antibody specific for a surface marker of the corneal endothelium by phage display

    PubMed Central

    Dorfmueller, Simone; Tan, Hwee Ching; Ngoh, Zi Xian; Toh, Kai Yee; Peh, Gary; Ang, Heng-Pei; Seah, Xin-Yi; Chin, Angela; Choo, Andre; Mehta, Jodhbir S.; Sun, William

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface antigens are important targets for monoclonal antibodies, but they are often difficult to work with due to their association with the cell membrane. Phage display is a versatile technique that can be applied to generate binders against difficult targets. Here we used antibody phage display to isolate a binder for a rare and specialized cell, the human corneal endothelial cell. The human corneal endothelium is a medically important cell layer; defects in this layer account for about half of all corneal transplants. Despite its importance, no specific antigens have been found to mark this cell type. By panning a phage library directly on human corneal endothelial cells, we isolated an antibody that bound to these cells and not the other types of corneal cells. Subsequently, we identified the antibody’s putative target to be CD166 by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. This approach can be used to isolate antibodies against other poorly-characterized cell types, such as stem cells or cancer cells, without any prior knowledge of their discriminating markers. PMID:26902886

  17. Isolation of a recombinant antibody specific for a surface marker of the corneal endothelium by phage display.

    PubMed

    Dorfmueller, Simone; Tan, Hwee Ching; Ngoh, Zi Xian; Toh, Kai Yee; Peh, Gary; Ang, Heng-Pei; Seah, Xin-Yi; Chin, Angela; Choo, Andre; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Sun, William

    2016-01-01

    Cell surface antigens are important targets for monoclonal antibodies, but they are often difficult to work with due to their association with the cell membrane. Phage display is a versatile technique that can be applied to generate binders against difficult targets. Here we used antibody phage display to isolate a binder for a rare and specialized cell, the human corneal endothelial cell. The human corneal endothelium is a medically important cell layer; defects in this layer account for about half of all corneal transplants. Despite its importance, no specific antigens have been found to mark this cell type. By panning a phage library directly on human corneal endothelial cells, we isolated an antibody that bound to these cells and not the other types of corneal cells. Subsequently, we identified the antibody's putative target to be CD166 by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. This approach can be used to isolate antibodies against other poorly-characterized cell types, such as stem cells or cancer cells, without any prior knowledge of their discriminating markers. PMID:26902886

  18. Airport surveillance using a solid state coherent lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. Milton; Hannon, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    The utility of solid state coherent LIDAR was assessed in the following application areas: (1) wake vortices; (2) dry and wet microburst windshear; (3) gusts; (4) vertical and general wind profiling; and (5) cloud ceiling. The system performance model described was based on a concept definition, system sizing, measurement planning, and algorithm and graphics display development. Data were collected at the Kennedy Space Center and the National Weather Service site adjacent to Denver's Stapleton Airport.

  19. High performance twisted nematic liquid crystal display with solution-derived YZO surface modification via ion-beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Won; Park, Hong-Gyu; Jeong, Hae-Chang; Jang, Sang-Bok; Park, Tae-Kyu; Seo, Dae-Shik

    2014-12-15

    Solution-derived YZO films were investigated as liquid crystal (LC) alignment layers modified by ion beam (IB) irradiation. Solution processing was adopted in place of the sputtering method for the deposition of YZO films as LC alignment layers. Uniform and homogeneous LC alignment was achieved to produce a high performance LC system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that surface reformation of YZO films by annealing and IB irradiation affects the uniformity of the LC alignment. Superior electro-optical characteristics of twisted nematic LC cells constructed from IB-irradiated YZO films were observed, which indicates that the proposed solution-derived YZO films have strong potential for use in the production of advanced LC displays. PMID:25607088

  20. FIELD EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING AT CDG AIRPORTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.

    2009-12-01

    Richard Ramaroson1,4, Klaus Schaefer2, Stefan Emeis2, Carsten Jahn2, Gregor Schürmann2, Maria Hoffmann2, Mikhael Zatevakhin3, Alexandre Ignatyev3. 1ONERA, Châtillon, France; 4SEAS, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA; 2FZK, Garmisch, Germany; (3)FSUE SPbAEP, St Petersburg, Russia. 2-month field campaigns have been organized at CDG airports in autumn 2004 and summer 2005. Air quality and ground air traffic emissions have been monitored continuously at terminals and taxi-runways, along with meteorological parameters onboard trucks and with a SODAR. This paper analyses the commercial engine emissions characteristics at airports and their effects on gas pollutants and airborne particles coupled to meteorology. LES model results for PM dispersion coupled to microphysics in the PBL are compared to measurements. Winds and temperature at the surface and their vertical profiles have been stored with turbulence. SODAR observations show the time-development of the mixing layer depth and turbulent mixing in summer up to 800m. Active low level jets and their regional extent have been observed and analyzed. PM number and mass size distribution, morphology and chemical contents are investigated. Formation of new ultra fine volatile (UFV) particles in the ambient plume downstream of running engines is observed. Soot particles are mostly observed at significant level at high power thrusts at take-off (TO) and on touch-down whereas at lower thrusts at taxi and aprons ultra the UFV PM emissions become higher. Ambient airborne PM1/2.5 is closely correlated to air traffic volume and shows a maximum beside runways. PM number distribution at airports is composed mainly by volatile UF PM abundant at apron. Ambient PM mass in autumn is higher than in summer. The expected differences between TO and taxi emissions are confirmed for NO, NO2, speciated VOC and CO. NO/NO2 emissions are larger at runways due to higher power. Reactive VOC and CO are more produced at low powers during idling at

  1. Adjuvant effect of B domain of staphyloccocal protein A displayed on the surface of hepatitis B virus capsid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Ahn, Keum-Young; Bae, Kyung Dong; Lee, Jiyun; Sim, Sang Jun; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsid-based recombinant particles, which display both major hydrophilic region of HBV surface antigen (HBV-MHR) and B domain of Staphylococcal protein A (SPAB ), were produced using Escherichia coli as expression host. SPAB was used as an adjuvant to elicit the immune response to HBV-MHR, and its adjuvant effect in the immunized mice was estimated with varying the position and amount of SPAB on the HBV capsid particles. Compared to the emulsified aluminum gel (alum gel) that is a currently commercialized vaccine adjuvant, SPAB caused the significantly higher level of anti-HBV immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and seroconversion rate, and notably SPAB at the most surface-exposed position on the recombinant particle led to the highest immune response. Moreover, SPAB caused much lower ratio of IgG1 to IgG2a compared to alum gel, indicating that helper T-cell 1-mediated immune response (responsible for cytotoxic T-cell stimulation) is relatively more stimulated by SPAB , unlike alum gel that mainly stimulates helper T-cell 2-mediated immune response (responsible for B-cell stimulation). Although HBV-MHR and HBV capsid particle were used as proof-of-concept in this study, SPAB can be used as a highly effective adjuvant with other disease-specific antigens on the surface of other virus-like particles to produce various recombinant vaccines with high potency. PMID:26222886

  2. Design, tolerance, and fabrication of an optical see-through head-mounted display with free-form surface elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Cheng, Dewen; Wang, Yongtian; Hua, Hong; Jin, Guofan

    2013-03-01

    Free-form surfaces (FFSs) provide more freedom to design an optical system with fewer elements and hence to reduce the size and weight of the overall system than rotationally symmetric optical surfaces. In this paper, an optical see-through (OST), head-mounted display (HMD) consisting of a free-form, wedge-shaped prism and a free-form lens is designed and fabricated through the injection molding method. The free-form prism for the projection system is designed with a field-of-view (FOV) of 36°; the free-form lens is cemented to the prism for the see-through system to achieve a FOV of 50°. The free-form prism and lens are expanded at the edge area during the design stage in order to reduce the effects of surface deformation in the working area in molding fabrication process and to improve ergonomic fit with the head of a user. The tolerance analyzes considering the mold design for the free-form optical systems are carried out using the Monte Carlo method. The FFS optical elements are successfully fabricated and the system performance is carefully examined. The results indicate that the performance of the OST-HMD is sufficient for both entertainment and scientific applications. PMID:23458822

  3. 77 FR 4394 - Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL AGENCY... provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties 12.4 acres at the Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL from the conditions, release certain properties from all terms, conditions, reservations...

  4. Evolution of Chinese airport network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Cao, Xian-Bin; Du, Wen-Bo; Cai, Kai-Quan

    2010-09-01

    With the rapid development of the economy and the accelerated globalization process, the aviation industry plays a more and more critical role in today’s world, in both developed and developing countries. As the infrastructure of aviation industry, the airport network is one of the most important indicators of economic growth. In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the Chinese airport network (CAN) via complex network theory. It is found that although the topology of CAN has remained steady during the past few years, there are many dynamic switchings inside the network, which have changed the relative importance of airports and airlines. Moreover, we investigate the evolution of traffic flow (passengers and cargoes) on CAN. It is found that the traffic continues to grow in an exponential form and has evident seasonal fluctuations. We also found that cargo traffic and passenger traffic are positively related but the correlations are quite different for different kinds of cities.

  5. Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.; Hall, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To help increase the capacity and efficiency of the nation s airports, a secure wideband wireless communications system is proposed for use on the airport surface. This paper provides an overview of the research and development process for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). AeroMACS is based on a specific commercial profile of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.16 standard known as Wireless Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access or WiMAX (WiMax Forum). The paper includes background on the need for global interoperability in air/ground data communications, describes potential AeroMACS applications, addresses allocated frequency spectrum constraints, summarizes the international standardization process, and provides findings and recommendations from the world s first AeroMACS prototype implemented in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

  6. Noise monitoring in airport communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, W. K.

    Current noise monitoring practices at airports are surveyed, with emphasis placed on extent, implementation, and rationale. It is noted that contemporary aircraft monitoring systems can perform a wide variety of functions in support of an airport noise abatement program. In establishing a system, the importance of developing the program before locating the stations and specifying functions is stressed. Among the basic design considerations are the location and type of the central station, the number and locations of the remote stations, the type of data output, the amount of data to be stored, and the operating costs.

  7. Implementing Solar Technologies at Airports

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-07-01

    Federal agencies, such as the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security, as well as numerous private entities are actively pursuing the installation of solar technologies to help reduce fossil fuel energy use and associated emissions, meet sustainability goals, and create more robust or reliable operations. One potential approach identified for siting solar technologies is the installation of solar energy technologies at airports and airfields, which present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to large amounts of open land. This report focuses largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) policies toward siting solar technologies at airports.

  8. 14 CFR 1204.1403 - Available airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... provided in accordance with 14 CFR part 139. (b) Wallops Airport—(1) Runways. There are three hard surfaced... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Available airport facilities. 1204.1403 Section 1204.1403 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION...

  9. 14 CFR 1204.1403 - Available airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provided in accordance with 14 CFR part 139. (b) Wallops Airport—(1) Runways. There are three hard surfaced... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Available airport facilities. 1204.1403 Section 1204.1403 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION...

  10. Subunits of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Cluster of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Are Surface-Displayed Proteins that Bind and Activate Human Plasminogen

    PubMed Central

    Gründel, Anne; Friedrich, Kathleen; Pfeiffer, Melanie; Jacobs, Enno; Dumke, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The dual role of glycolytic enzymes in cytosol-located metabolic processes and in cell surface-mediated functions with an influence on virulence is described for various micro-organisms. Cell wall-less bacteria of the class Mollicutes including the common human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae possess a reduced genome limiting the repertoire of virulence factors and metabolic pathways. After the initial contact of bacteria with cells of the respiratory epithelium via a specialized complex of adhesins and release of cell-damaging factors, surface-displayed glycolytic enzymes may facilitate the further interaction between host and microbe. In this study, we described detection of the four subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHA-D) among the cytosolic and membrane-associated proteins of M. pneumoniae. Subunits of PDH were cloned, expressed and purified to produce specific polyclonal guinea pig antisera. Using colony blotting, fractionation of total proteins and immunofluorescence experiments, the surface localization of PDHA-C was demonstrated. All recombinant PDH subunits are able to bind to HeLa cells and human plasminogen. These interactions can be specifically blocked by the corresponding polyclonal antisera. In addition, an influence of ionic interactions on PDHC-binding to plasminogen as well as of lysine residues on the association of PDHA-D with plasminogen was confirmed. The PDHB subunit was shown to activate plasminogen and the PDHB-plasminogen complex induces degradation of human fibrinogen. Hence, our data indicate that the surface-associated PDH subunits might play a role in the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae infections by interaction with human plasminogen. PMID:25978044

  11. Planning, Management, and Economics of Airport Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, J.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the role of the airport in the transportation complex and in the community is presented. The establishment of the airport including its requirements in regional planning and the operation of the airport as a social and economic force are discussed.

  12. 75 FR 39090 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... procedures to be used in applications for exemption under the Airport Privatization Pilot Program (62 FR... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... application for participation in the airport privatization pilot program received under 49 U.S.C....

  13. Display of ISKNV orf086 protein on the surface of Aeromonas hydrophila and its immunogenicity in Chinese perch (Siniperca chuatsi).

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaozhe; Lin, Qiang; Liu, Lihui; Liang, Hongru; Huang, Zhibin; Li, Ningqiu

    2016-09-01

    Co-infection with infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) and Aeromonas hydrophila is becoming ever more widespread in Chinese perch (Siniperca chuatsi) aquaculture industry, so that it's necessary to develop the combined vaccine against ISKNV and A. hydrophila disease. The surface display of heterologous on bacteria using anchoring motifs from outer membranes proteins has already been explored as an effective delivery system of viral antigens. In present study, the ISKNV orf086 gene, which is verified as a protective antigen, was inserted into ompA gene cassette of A. hydrophila GYK1 strain by homologous recombination. And an ompA-orf086 fusion A. hydrophila mutant strain K28 was constructed. Then the ISKNV orf086 was verified to express on the surface of A. hydrophila K28 by RT-PCR, western blot and indirect immunofluorescence assay. Next, Chinese perch were intraperitoneally inoculated with formalin inactivated A. hydrophila k28 emulsified with ISA763 adjuvant with a dose of 9 × 10(8) CFU per fish. Transcriptional analysis of non-specific and specific immune related genes revealed that the expression levels of IRF-7, IRAK1, Mx, Viperin, Lysozyme and IgM were strongly up-regulated in Chinese perch post-inoculation. In addition, specific antibodies were detected by ELISA, and the results showed that antibody titer against ISKNV or A. hydrophila reached the highest with 1:800 or 1:1200 on 14dpv, respectively. Lymphocyte proliferation were detected by MTT methods, and the results showed that the SI values of AH-K28 vaccinated group to three different stimulators were significantly higher than those of control group. At last, protective efficacy were determined by challenge trials. The cumulative mortality rates of vaccinated groups were significantly lower than the control one (P < 0.05) after ISKNV or A. hydrophila challenge, and the relative percentage survival (RPS) value was 73.3% and 60%, respectively. This system provides a novel approach to

  14. Cloning, protein expression and display of synthetic multi-epitope mycobacterial antigens on Salmonella typhi Ty21a cell surface.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Mohammed A A; Musa, Mustaffa; Zainuddin, Zainul F

    2011-09-01

    Expressing proteins of interest as fusion to proteins of bacterial envelope is a powerful technique for biotechnological and medical applications. The synthetic gene (VacII) encoding for T-cell epitopes of selected genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis namely, ESAT6, MTP40, 38 kDa, and MPT64 was fused with N- terminus of Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein (INP) outer membrane protein. The fused genes were cloned into a bacterial expression vector pKK223-3. The recombinant protein was purified by Ni-NAT column. VacII gene was displayed on the cell surface of Salmonella typhi Ty21a using N-terminal region of ice nucleation proteins (INP) as an anchoring motif. Glycine method confirmed that VacII was anchored on the cell surface. Western blot analysis further identified the synthesis of INP derivatives containing the N-terminal domain INP- VacII fusion protein of the expected size (52 kDa). PMID:21941936

  15. The Development of an Electronic Aircraft Taxi Navigation Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, Anthony D.; Sridhar, Banavar (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an electronic aircraft taxi navigation display as part of NASA's Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program. The impetus for the development of this specific display, and the TAP program as a whole, is the current bottleneck in surface operations experienced during low-visibility operations. Simply stated, while modern aircraft are equipped to fly and land in low-visibility conditions, they lack the related technology required to allow them to efficiently and safely navigation from the runway to the gate. Pilots under such conditions consequently taxi slower, sometimes get lost and have to stop, and occasionally collide with other aircraft. Based on a review of available display and navigation sensor technologies, and a one-year information requirements study conducted aboard several commercial aircraft flights, it was determined that an electronic aircraft taxi navigation display was the most viable option for improving the efficiency of low-visibility taxi operations. Based on flight deck observations and pilot interviews, previous map display research, other taxi map display efforts, and part-task taxi map research, an advanced taxi navigation display has been developed and is currently being tested. The taxi navigation display is presented as a head-down cockpit display and includes a track-up perspective airport surface view, taxiway, gate and runway labels, ownship position, traffic icons and collision annunciation, graphical route guidance, heading indicator, rotating compass, RVR wedge, stop bars, zoom control, and datalink message window. The development and support for each of the features will be discussed in detail. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S.; Taube, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential. PMID:26629902

  17. Mass data graphics requirements for symbol generators: example 2D airport navagation and 3D terrain function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefele, Jens; Bader, Joachim; Kastner, S.; Wiesemann, Thorsten; von Viebahn, Harro

    2002-07-01

    Next generation of cockpit display systems will display mass data. Mass data includes terrain, obstacle, and airport databases. Display formats will be two and eventually 3D. A prerequisite for the introduction of these new functions is the availability of certified graphics hardware. The paper describes functionality and required features of an aviation certified 2D/3D graphics board. This graphics board should be based on low-level and hi-level API calls. These graphic calls should be very similar to OpenGL. All software and the API must be aviation certified. As an example application, a 2D airport navigation function and a 3D terrain visualization is presented. The airport navigation format is based on highly precise airport database following EUROCAE ED-99/RTCA DO-272 specifications. Terrain resolution is based on EUROCAE ED-98/RTCA DO-276 requirements.

  18. English for Airport Ground Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  19. 19 CFR 122.153 - Limitations on airport of entry or departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Airport. Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Chicago... International Airport. Houston, Texas George Bush Intercontinental Airport. Jamaica, New York John F....

  20. 19 CFR 122.153 - Limitations on airport of entry or departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Airport. Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Chicago... International Airport. Houston, Texas George Bush Intercontinental Airport. Jamaica, New York John F....

  1. Affinity maturation of single-chain variable fragment specific for aflatoxin B(1) using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Min, Won-Ki; Kim, Sung-Gun; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    As aflatoxin B1 is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, it is important to detect and to quantify aflatoxin B1 accurately by immunological methods. To enhance aflatoxin B1-binding affinity of the single-chain variable fragment, yeast surface display technique combined with fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied. A randomly mutated scFv library was subjected to 4 rounds of fluorescence-activated cell sorting, resulting in isolation of 5 scFv variants showing an affinity improvement compared to the parental wild type scFv. The best scFv with a 9-fold improvement in affinity for aflatoxin B1 exhibited similar specificity to the monoclonal antibody. Most of the mutations in scFv-M37 were located outside of the canonical antigen-contact loops, suggesting that its affinity improvement might be driven by an allosteric effect inducing scFv-M37 to form a more favorable binding pocket for aflatoxin B1 than the wild type scFv. PMID:26041237

  2. Site-Specific Labeling of Protein Kinase CK2: Combining Surface Display and Click Chemistry for Drug Discovery Applications.

    PubMed

    Nienberg, Christian; Retterath, Anika; Becher, Kira-Sophie; Saenger, Thorsten; Mootz, Henning D; Jose, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Human CK2 is a heterotetrameric constitutively active serine/threonine protein kinase and is an emerging target in current anti-cancer drug discovery. The kinase is composed of two catalytic CK2α subunits and two regulatory CK2β subunits. In order to establish an assay to identify protein-protein-interaction inhibitors (PPI) of the CK2α/CK2β interface, a bioorthogonal click reaction was used to modify the protein kinase α-subunit with a fluorophore. By expanding the genetic code, the unnatural amino acid para azidophenylalanine (pAzF) could be incorporated into CK2α. Performing the SPAAC click reaction (Strain-Promoted Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition) by the use of a dibenzylcyclooctyne-fluorophore (DBCO-fluorophore) led to a specifically labeled human protein kinase CK2α. This site-specific labeling does not impair the phosphorylation activity of CK2, which was evaluated by capillary electrophoresis. Furthermore a dissociation constant (KD) of 631 ± 86.2 nM was determined for the substrate αS1-casein towards CK2α. This labeling strategy was also applied to CK2β subunit on Escherichia coli, indicating the site-specific modifications of proteins on the bacterial cell surface when displayed by Autodisplay. PMID:27355959

  3. Structural analysis and insertion study reveal the ideal sites for surface displaying foreign peptides on a betanodavirus-like particle.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junfeng; Li, Kunpeng; Gao, Yuanzhu; Huang, Runqing; Lai, Yuxiong; Shi, Yan; Yang, Shaowei; Zhu, Guohua; Zhang, Qinfen; He, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Betanodavirus infection causes fatal disease of viral nervous necrosis in many cultured marine and freshwater fish worldwide and the virus-like particles (VLP) are effective vaccines against betanodavirus. But vaccine and viral vector designs of betanodavirus VLP based on their structures remain lacking. Here, the three-dimensional structure of orange-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (OGNNV) VLP (RBS) at 3.9 Å reveals the organization of capsid proteins (CP). Based on the structural results, seven putative important sites were selected to genetically insert a 6× histidine (His)-tag for VLP formation screen, resulting in four His-tagged VLP (HV) at positions N-terminus, Ala220, Pro292 and C-terminus. The His-tags of N-terminal HV (NHV) were concealed inside virions while those of 220HV and C-terminal HV (CHV) were displayed at the outer surface. NHV, 220HV and CHV maintained the same cell entry ability as RBS in the Asian sea bass (SB) cell line, indicating that their similar surface structures can be recognized by the cellular entry receptor(s). For application of vaccine design, chromatography-purified CHV could provoke NNV-specific antibody responses as strong as those of RBS in a sea bass immunization assay. Furthermore, in carrying capacity assays, N-terminus and Ala220 can only carry short peptides and C-terminus can even accommodate large protein such as GFP to generate fluorescent VLP (CGV). For application of a viral vector, CGV could be real-time visualized to enter SB cells in invasion study. All the results confirmed that the C-terminus of CP is a suitable site to accommodate foreign peptides for vaccine design and viral vector development. PMID:26754256

  4. NASA diagonal-braked test vehicle evaluation of traction characteristics of grooved and ungrooved runway surfaces at Miami International Airport, Miami, Florida, 8-9 May 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Two runways were evaluated under artificially wetted conditions with the NASA diagonal-braked vehicle (DBV). Results of the evaluation which included a pavement drainage analysis, a pavement skid resistance analysis, and a DBV wet/dry stopping distance ratio analysis indicated that the ungrooved runway surfaces had poor water drainage characteristics and poor skid resistance under wet conditions at high speeds especially in rubbercoated areas of the runways. Grooving runways to a transverse 1-1/4 x 1/4 x 1/4 inch pattern greatly improved both the water drainage and pavement skid resistance capability of these asphaltic concrete surfaces.

  5. The ATC evaluation of the prototype Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP) at Orlando International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Radame

    1993-03-01

    The Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP), also known as Airport Surveillance Radar-9 (ASR-9) modification for low altitude wind shear detection, is a production ASR-9 with an expanded weather channel for added processing capabilities. The primary mission of the ASR-WSP is to enhance the safety of air travel through the timely detection and reporting of hazardous wind shear in and near the terminal approach and departure zones of the airport. It will also improve the management of air traffic (AT) in the terminal area through the forecast of precipitation, and ultimately the detection of other hazardous weather phenomena. The ASR-WSP may be used as a stand-alone system at airports without a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) or Enhanced-Low Level Wind Shear Alert System (E-LLWAS), or in an integrated mode with either or both the TDWR and E-LLWAS. An operational evaluation of a prototype ASR-WSP, developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratories (MIT/LL), was conducted at the Orlando International Airport (MCO) in Orlando, Florida, during the period 29 Jun. to 31 Aug. 1992. The objective of the evaluation was to obtain Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic controller reaction to the prototype ASR-WSP weather data and display equipment. The following are highlights of the evaluation: (1) the ASW-WSP is very useful when making runway configuration changes; (2) the ASR-WSP is not perceived to be as accurate as the prototype TDWR; (3) the gust front prediction feature is not reliable; and (4) the information provided on both the RDT and the GSD is very useful.

  6. Tailored fog climatology for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leander, R.

    2010-07-01

    Like many airports, Amsterdam Airport Schiphol is vulnerable to climate change. The airport is situated in a complex and fragile urban area where fundamental changes take place in design and use of the region. To maintain its competitive position, the airport is beginning to respond to changes in weather and climate by formulating adaptation strategies, based on tailored climate information. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), Amsterdam Airport Schiphol (AAS) and Air Trafic Control the Netherlands (LVNL) are working together to provide just that type of information. Due to safety regulations, reduced horizontal visibility on airports can have an immediate impact on the availability of runways and hence the airport capacity. Fog is therefore one of the most relevant meteorological phenomena to airport operations. A study has started in which the statistics of fog occurrence and visibility at Amsterdam Airport are assessed. The aim is describing the current climate (from 1970 onward) as well as making projections into the future (up to 2040). For the latter, the identification and attribution of trends is relevant. Another point of interrest is the spatial pattern of fog potential over the airport, in particular the related questions whether some runways are more prone to fog occurrence than others and whether these runways require a separate forecast. To answer these questions it is crucial to distinguish between large-scale and local influences. The preliminary results of this study are presented here.

  7. Taxi Time Prediction at Charlotte Airport Using Fast-Time Simulation and Machine Learning Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Hanbong

    2016-01-01

    Accurate taxi time prediction is required for enabling efficient runway scheduling that can increase runway throughput and reduce taxi times and fuel consumptions on the airport surface. Currently NASA and American Airlines are jointly developing a decision-support tool called Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA) that assists airport ramp controllers to make gate pushback decisions and improve the overall efficiency of airport surface traffic. In this presentation, we propose to use Linear Optimized Sequencing (LINOS), a discrete-event fast-time simulation tool, to predict taxi times and provide the estimates to the runway scheduler in real-time airport operations. To assess its prediction accuracy, we also introduce a data-driven analytical method using machine learning techniques. These two taxi time prediction methods are evaluated with actual taxi time data obtained from the SARDA human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulation for Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) using various performance measurement metrics. Based on the taxi time prediction results, we also discuss how the prediction accuracy can be affected by the operational complexity at this airport and how we can improve the fast time simulation model before implementing it with an airport scheduling algorithm in a real-time environment.

  8. LH2 airport requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the facilities and equipment which will be required at a representative airport is provided so liquid hydrogen LH2 can be used as fuel in long range transport aircraft in 1995-2000. A complete facility was conceptually designed, sized to meet the projected air traffic requirement. The facility includes the liquefaction plant, LH2, storage capability, and LH2 fuel handling system. The requirements for ground support and maintenance for the LH2 fueled aircraft were analyzed. An estimate was made of capital and operating costs which might be expected for the facility. Recommendations were made for design modifications to the reference aircraft, reflecting results of the analysis of airport fuel handling requirements, and for a program of additional technology development for air terminal related items.

  9. 14 CFR 152.109 - Project eligibility: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport planning. 152....109 Project eligibility: Airport planning. (a) Airport master planning. A proposed project for airport master planning is not approved unless— (1) The location of the existing or proposed airport is...

  10. Teaching at Logan International Airport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    Although Terminal C at Logan airport does not look like a classroom, for about fifty minutes on this author's way back from Boston it was for him. Like many public spaces, Logan now has a very robust Wi-Fi wireless network and this enabled him to take advantage of a departure delay to "teach" his class. In 1970 when the author started teaching,…

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of H5N1 influenza vaccine based on baculovirus surface display system of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongzhong; Lv, Zhengbing; Chen, Qin; Quan, Yanping; Zhang, Haihua; Li, Si; Chen, Guogang; Zheng, Qingliang; Jin, Lairong; Wu, Xiangfu; Chen, Jianguo; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2008-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (H5N1) has caused serious infections in human beings. This virus has the potential to emerge as a pandemic threat in humans. Effective vaccines against H5N1 virus are needed. A recombinant Bombyx mori baculovirus, Bmg64HA, was constructed for the expression of HA protein of H5N1 influenza virus displaying on the viral envelope surface. The HA protein accounted for approximately 3% of the total viral proteins in silkworm pupae infected with the recombinant virus. Using a series of separation and purification methods, pure Bmgp64HA virus was isolated from these silkworm pupae bioreactors. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant was used for an H5N1 influenza vaccine. Immunization with this vaccine at doses of 2 mg/kg and 0.67 mg/kg was carried out to induce the production of neutralizing antibodies, which protected monkeys against influenza virus infection. At these doses, the vaccine induced 1:40 antibody titers in 50% and 67% of the monkeys, respectively. The results of safety evaluation indicated that the vaccine did not cause any toxicity at the dosage as large as 3.2 mg/kg in cynomolgus monkeys and 1.6 mg/kg in mice. The results of dose safety evaluation of vaccine indicated that the safe dose of the vaccine were higher than 0.375 mg/kg in rats and 3.2 mg/kg in cynomolgus monkeys. Our work showed the vaccine may be a candidate for a highly effective, cheap, and safe influenza vaccine for use in humans. PMID:19079592

  12. Display of VP1 on the Surface of Baculovirus and Its Immunogenicity against Heterologous Human Enterovirus 71 Strains in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kiener, Tanja K.; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Kwang, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    Background Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in young children. It is often associated with severe neurological diseases and has caused high mortalities in recent outbreaks across the Asia Pacific region. Currently, there is no effective vaccine and antiviral agents available against EV71 infections. VP1 is one of the major immunogenic capsid protein of EV71 and plays a crucial role in viral infection. Antibodies against VP1 are important for virus neutralization. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present study, infectious EV71 viruses were generated from their synthetic complementary DNA using the human RNA polymerase I reverse genetics system. Secondly, the major immunogenic capsid protein (VP1) of EV71-Fuyang (subgenogroup C4) was displayed on the surface of recombinant baculovirus Bac-Pie1-gp64-VP1 as gp64 fusion protein under a novel White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) immediate early ie1 promoter. Baculovirus expressed VP1 was able to maintain its structural and antigenic conformity as indicated by immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis. Interestingly, our results with confocal microscopy revealed that VP1 was able to localize on the plasma membrane of insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus. In addition, we demonstrated with transmission electron microscopy that baculovirus successfully acquired VP1 from the insect cell membrane via the budding process. After two immunizations in mice, Bac-Pie1-gp64-VP1 elicited neutralization antibody titer of 1∶64 against EV71 (subgenogroup C4) in an in vitro neutralization assay. Furthermore, the antisera showed high cross-neutralization activities against all 11 subgenogroup EV71 strains. Conclusion Our results illustrated that Bac-Pie1-gp64-VP1 retained native epitopes of VP1 and acted as an effective EV71 vaccine candidate which would enable rapid production without any biosafety concerns. PMID:21747954

  13. Improved eIF4E Binding Peptides by Phage Display Guided Design: Plasticity of Interacting Surfaces Yield Collective Effects

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Chandra S.; Liu, Yun; Lane, David P.; Brown, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4E is over-expressed in many types of cancer such as breast, head and neck, and lung. A consequence of increased levels of eIF4E is the preferential translation of pro-tumorigenic proteins (e.g. c-Myc and vascular endothelial growth factor) and as a result is regarded as a potential therapeutic target. In this work a novel phage display peptide has been isolated against eIF4E. From the phage sequence two amino acids were delineated which improved binding when substituted into the eIF4G1 sequence. Neither of these substitutions were involved in direct interactions with eIF4E and acted either via optimization of the helical capping motif or restricting the conformational flexibility of the peptide. In contrast, substitutions of the remaining phage derived amino acids into the eIF4G1 sequence disrupted binding of the peptide to eIF4E. Interestingly when some of these disruptive substitutions were combined with key mutations from the phage peptide, they lead to improved affinities. Atomistic computer simulations revealed that the phage and the eIF4G1 derivative peptide sequences differ subtly in their interaction sites on eIF4E. This raises the issue, especially in the context of planar interaction sites such as those exhibited by eIF4E, that given the intricate plasticity of protein surfaces, the construction of structure-activity relationships should account for the possibility of significant movement in the spatial positioning of the peptide binding interface, including significant librational motions of the peptide. PMID:23094039

  14. Airport noise complaint patterns and interviews of frequent complainers at two major air carrier airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaggers, Nicholas; Eiff, Gary

    2005-09-01

    The complex and highly sensitive topic of aircraft noise and population annoyance continues to be a major inhibitor to airport development plans. The projected growth of air travel necessitates expanded capacity at many existing airports and the development and construction of new airports in order to accommodate burgeoning traveler needs. Concerns by citizens near major airports about their economic, health, and social welfare continue to generate community and individual declarations of annoyance and concern which threaten timely solutions to airport expansion plans. A deeper understanding of the nature of these concerns is important to more effectively cope with airport expansion concerns among adjacent communities and surrounding neighbors. This study analyzed existing noise complaints registered at Denver International Airport (DEN) and Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL) in an attempt to gain greater understanding of noise complaint drivers and public annoyance. Interviews of frequent complainers were utilized in order to gain richer data concerning individual annoyance issues.

  15. 78 FR 22024 - Request To Release Airport Property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL), Oakley, Kansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ...), Oakley, Kansas, under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47107(h)(2). DATES: Comments must be received on or... 2.5 acres of airport property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL) under the provisions of 49...

  16. Identification of Novel Protein–Ligand Interactions by Exon Microarray Analysis of Yeast Surface Displayed cDNA Library Selection Outputs

    PubMed Central

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Yeast surface display is widely utilized to screen large libraries for proteins or protein fragments with specific binding properties. We have previously constructed and utilized yeast surface displayed human cDNA libraries to identify protein fragments that bind to various target ligands. Conventional approaches employ monoclonal screening and sequencing of polyclonal outputs that have been enriched for binding to a target molecule by several rounds of affinity-based selection. Frequently, a small number of clones will dominate the selection output, making it difficult to comprehensively identify potentially important interactions due to low representation in the selection output. We have developed a novel method to address this problem. By analyzing selection outputs using high-density human exon microarrays, the full potential of selection output diversity can be revealed in one experiment. FACS-based selection using yeast surface displayed human cDNA libraries combined with exon microarray analysis of the selection outputs is a powerful way of rapidly identifying protein fragments with affinity for any soluble ligand that can be fluorescently detected, including small biological molecules and drugs. In this report we present protocols for exon microarray-based analysis of yeast surface display human cDNA library selection outputs. PMID:26060075

  17. Expression and display of a novel thermostable esterase from Clostridium thermocellum on the surface of Bacillus subtilis using the CotB anchor protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huayou; Zhang, Tianxi; Jia, Jinru; Vastermark, Ake; Tian, Rui; Ni, Zhong; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Keping; Yang, Shengli

    2015-11-01

    Esterases expressed in microbial hosts are commercially valuable, but their applications are limited due to high costs of production and harsh industrial processes involved. In this study, the esterase-DSM (from Clostridium thermocellum) was expressed and successfully displayed on the spore surface, and the spore-associated esterase was confirmed by western blot analysis and activity measurements. The optimal temperature and pH of spore surface-displayed DSM was 60 and 8.5 °C, respectively. It also demonstrates a broad temperature and pH optimum in the range of 50-70, 7-9.5 °C. The spore surface-displayed esterase-DSM retained 78, 68 % of its original activity after 5 h incubation at 60 and 70 °C, respectively, which was twofold greater activity than that of the purified DSM. The recombinant spores has high activity and stability in DMSO, which was 49 % higher than the retained activity of the purified DSM in DMSO (20 % v/v), and retained 65.2 % of activity after 7 h of incubation in DMSO (20 % v/v). However, the recombinant spores could retain 77 % activity after 3 rounds of recycling. These results suggest that enzyme displayed on the surface of the Bacillus subtilis spore could serve as an effective approach for enzyme immobilization. PMID:26318029

  18. 76 FR 31823 - Technical Amendment to List of User Fee Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Airports: Addition of Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport, Dallas, TX AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... revising the list of user fee airports to reflect the recent user fee airport designation for Dallas Love... of user fee status for Dallas Love Field Municipal Airport. This document updates the list of...

  19. Air Traffic Control Response to Delays: A System Study of Newark International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Antony D.; Clarke, John-Paul

    2002-01-01

    Airport delays are a significant problem in the United States air transportation system. Between 1999 and 2000 the number of flights delayed increased by 20 percent despite only a 0.4% increase in total operations. Newark International Airport (EWR), one of New York City's primary airports, is one of the airports in the United States most impacted by delays. Newark had the highest percentage of operations delayed in 1999, and was second only to LaGuardia Airport in 2000. Nearly 85% of delays at Newark are caused by adverse weather impacting an airport that may be characterized as having limited capacity and a very full schedule. Although Newark is heavily impacted by weather, delays have not increased significantly since 1998. This indicates that the airlines, air traffic control (ATC), and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey have successfully adapted. On June 29, 2000, a research team from MIT visited Newark airport to assess the effectiveness of any adaptations made, and to collect data on airline and ATC departure operations, and of the national and local weather affecting the airport. Airline and ATC personnel were also interviewed. Results of this study indicate that airspace capacity limitations downstream of the airport are a primary flow constraint at the airport, and that these constraints are the source of most surface delays. A number of tactical ATC responses to delays were examined, including the application of restrictions, re-routing with the help of the National Playbook, and the use of decision-aiding tools such as the Dynamic Spacing Program (DSP) and the Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS). Improved interfacility communications and further utilization of runway 11-29 were identified as other tactical responses to delays, whilst the formation of the Air Traffic Control System Command Center and the New York Airspace redesign were identified as thekey strategic ATC responses to delays. Particularly the New York airspace redesign has

  20. Airport electrotechnology resource guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Geba, V.; Nesbit, M.

    1998-06-01

    Electrotechnologies offer utilities a cutting edge marketing tool to work with airport customers to increase passenger comfort, and achieve environmental and economic goals. At the same time, utility objectives such as customer retention, and revenue and sales goals can be enhanced. This guide provides electric utility marketing staff with the necessary information to market electrotechnologies in airport applications. The airport industry is profiled and an overview of airport building, infrastructure technologies and electric vehicles is provided. In addition, the guide offers market strategies for customer targeting, market research, market plan development and development of trade ally partnerships.

  1. Components of the airport access system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The organizations and agencies which make up or influence the airport access system are examined. These include the airport, the airline industry, the public and private transit agencies which provide ground access to the airport, and the regulatory agencies which affect all of these organizations and their actions. Each component, with the exception of the regulatory agencies is described in terms of its legal status, its sources of funds, and the nature of its relationship with the other components. Conclusions regarding the system components' effects on airport access and recommendations for changes which appear practical are presented.

  2. FAA Airport Design Competition for Universities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Raise awareness of the importance of airports to the National Airspace System infrastructure. Increase the involvement of the academic community in addressing airport operations and infrastructure issues and needs. Engage U.S. students in the conceptualization of applications, systems and equipment capable of addressing related challenges in a robust, reliable and comprehensive manner. Encourage U.S. undergraduate and graduate students to contribute innovative ideas and solutions to airport and runway safety issues. Provide the framework and incentives for quality educational experiences for university students. d Develop an awareness of and an interest in airports as a vital and interesting area for engineering and technology careers.

  3. 76 FR 54287 - Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ..., and the FAA Airports District Office, 5950 Hazeltine National Drive, Suite 400, Orlando, FL 32822... Manager, Orlando Airports District Office, 5950 Hazeltine National Drive, Suite 400, Orlando, FL 32822-5024. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rebecca R. Henry, Program Manager, Orlando Airports...

  4. 61 FR 25729 - Security Measures; Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-05-22

    ... Security Measures; Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece Summary The Secretary of Transportation has now determined that Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece, maintains and carries out... that Hellenikon International Airport, Athens, Greece, did not maintain and carry out...

  5. Display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, A. W. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A situational display and a means for creating the display are disclosed. The display comprises a moving line or raster, on a cathode ray tube, which is disposed intermediate of two columns of lamps or intensifications on the cathode ray tube. The raster and lights are controlled in such a manner that pairs of lights define a line which is either tracked or chased by the raster in accordance with the relationship between the optimum and actual values of a monitored parameter.

  6. Efficient co-displaying and artificial ratio control of α-amylase and glucoamylase on the yeast cell surface by using combinations of different anchoring domains.

    PubMed

    Inokuma, Kentaro; Yoshida, Takanobu; Ishii, Jun; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant yeast strains that display heterologous amylolytic enzymes on their cell surface via the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchoring system are considered as promising biocatalysts for direct ethanol production from starchy materials. For the effective hydrolysis of these materials, the ratio optimization of multienzyme activity displayed on the cell surface is important. In this study, we have presented a ratio control system of multienzymes displayed on the yeast cell surface by using different GPI-anchoring domains. The novel gene cassettes for the cell-surface display of Streptococcus bovis α-amylase and Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase were constructed using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SED1 promoter and two different GPI-anchoring regions derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae SED1 or SAG1. These gene cassettes were integrated into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome in different combinations. Then, the cell-surface α-amylase and glucoamylase activities and ethanol productivity of these recombinant strains were evaluated. The combinations of the gene cassettes of these enzymes affected the ratio of cell-surface α-amylase and glucoamylase activities and ethanol productivity of the recombinant strains. The highest ethanol productivity from raw starch was achieved by the strain harboring one α-amylase gene cassette carrying the SED1-anchoring region and two glucoamylase gene cassettes carrying the SED1-anchoring region (BY-AASS/GASS/GASS). This strain yielded 22.5 ± 0.6 g/L of ethanol from 100 g/L of raw starch in 120 h of fermentation. PMID:25432675

  7. 78 FR 20168 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Boulder Municipal Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Boulder Municipal Airport, Boulder, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... real property for airport purposes pursuant to Section 16 of the Federal Airport Act (60 Stat. 179)...

  8. 49 CFR 1542.113 - Airport tenant security programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY Airport..., and may be subject to civil penalties for failing to protect sensitive security information....

  9. 49 CFR 1542.113 - Airport tenant security programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY Airport..., and may be subject to civil penalties for failing to protect sensitive security information....

  10. 49 CFR 1542.113 - Airport tenant security programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY Airport..., and may be subject to civil penalties for failing to protect sensitive security information....

  11. 49 CFR 1542.113 - Airport tenant security programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY Airport..., and may be subject to civil penalties for failing to protect sensitive security information....

  12. Display Tactics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetlow, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Display took a wide variety of forms ranging from students presenting their initial planning and thought processes, to displays of their finished work, and their suggestions for extending the task should they, or others, have time to return to it in the future. A variety of different media were used from traditional posters in many shapes and…

  13. The B7-1 Cytoplasmic Tail Enhances Intracellular Transport and Mammalian Cell Surface Display of Chimeric Proteins in the Absence of a Linear ER Export Motif

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Chieh; Chen, Bing-Mae; Lu, Wei-Cheng; Su, Chien-I; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Chung, Wen-Chuan; Wu, Pei-Yu; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Lee, I-Chiao; Juan, Ting-Yi; Roffler, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane-tethered proteins (mammalian surface display) are increasingly being used for novel therapeutic and biotechnology applications. Maximizing surface expression of chimeric proteins on mammalian cells is important for these applications. We show that the cytoplasmic domain from the B7-1 antigen, a commonly used element for mammalian surface display, can enhance the intracellular transport and surface display of chimeric proteins in a Sar1 and Rab1 dependent fashion. However, mutational, alanine scanning and deletion analysis demonstrate the absence of linear ER export motifs in the B7 cytoplasmic domain. Rather, efficient intracellular transport correlated with the presence of predicted secondary structure in the cytoplasmic tail. Examination of the cytoplasmic domains of 984 human and 782 mouse type I transmembrane proteins revealed that many previously identified ER export motifs are rarely found in the cytoplasmic tail of type I transmembrane proteins. Our results suggest that efficient intracellular transport of B7 chimeric proteins is associated with the structure rather than to the presence of a linear ER export motif in the cytoplasmic tail, and indicate that short (less than ~ 10-20 amino acids) and unstructured cytoplasmic tails should be avoided to express high levels of chimeric proteins on mammalian cells. PMID:24073236

  14. 75 FR 39091 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Program (62 FR 48693). A request for participation in the Pilot Program must be initiated by the filing of... Mu oz Mar n International Airport (SJU), San Juan, Puerto Rico. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation... December 1, 2009. The Puerto Rico Ports Authority, the airport sponsor, may select a private...

  15. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units,...

  16. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  17. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units,...

  18. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airports. 141.38 Section 141.38 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Personnel, Aircraft, and Facilities Requirements § 141.38 Airports. (a) An applicant for a pilot...

  19. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airports. 141.38 Section 141.38 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Personnel, Aircraft, and Facilities Requirements § 141.38 Airports. (a) An applicant for a pilot...

  20. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airports. 141.38 Section 141.38 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Personnel, Aircraft, and Facilities Requirements § 141.38 Airports. (a) An applicant for a pilot...

  1. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  2. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  3. Airport Economics: Management Control Financial Reporting Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchbinder, A.

    1972-01-01

    The development of management control financial reporting systems for airport operation is discussed. The operation of the system to provide the reports required for determining the specific revenue producing facilities of airports is described. The organization of the cost reporting centers to show the types of information provided by the system is analyzed.

  4. 14 CFR 141.38 - Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airports. 141.38 Section 141.38 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Personnel, Aircraft, and Facilities Requirements § 141.38 Airports. (a) An applicant for a pilot...

  5. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135.229 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder...

  6. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135.229 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder...

  7. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135.229 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder...

  8. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135.229 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder...

  9. 14 CFR 135.229 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport requirements. 135.229 Section 135.229 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.229 Airport requirements. (a) No certificate holder...

  10. Career Unit. Careers at an Airport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booker, Billie

    This career exploration instructional unit on airport careers is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). This unit is designed to help students become aware of the different types of jobs connected with running an airport (e.g., ticket agent, pilot, skycap, traffic…

  11. World-wide precision airports for SVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefele, Jens; Lugsch, Bill; Launer, Marc; Baca, Diana

    2004-08-01

    Future cockpit and aviation applications require high quality airport databases. Accuracy, resolution, integrity, completeness, traceability, and timeliness [1] are key requirements. For most aviation applications, attributed vector databases are needed. The geometry is based on points, lines, and closed polygons. To document the needs for aviation industry RTCA and EUROCAE developed in a joint committee, the DO-272/ED-99 document. It states industry needs for data features, attributes, coding, and capture rules for Airport Mapping Databases (AMDB). This paper describes the technical approach Jeppesen has taken to generate a world-wide set of three-hundred AMDB airports. All AMDB airports are DO-200A/ED-76 [1] and DO-272/ED-99 [2] compliant. Jeppesen airports have a 5m (CE90) accuracy and an 10-3 integrity. World-wide all AMDB data is delivered in WGS84 coordinates. Jeppesen continually updates the databases.

  12. Siting Solar Photovoltaics at Airports: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-06-01

    Airports present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to their open land; based on a 2010 Federal Aviation Administration study, the US Department of Agriculture, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service, there's potential for 116,704 MW of solar photovoltaics (PV) on idle lands at US airports. PV has a low profile and likely low to no impact on flight operations. This paper outlines guidance for implementing solar technologies at airports and airfields, focusing largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's policies. The paper also details best practices for siting solar at airports, provides information on the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool, and highlights a case study example where solar has been installed at an airport.

  13. Airport noise impact reduction through operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1981-01-01

    The airport-noise levels and annoyance model (ALAMO) developed at NASA Langley Research Center is comprised of a system of computer programs which is capable of quantifying airport community noise impact in terms of noise level, population distribution, and human subjective response to noise. The ALAMO can be used to compare the noise impact of an airport's current operating scenario with the noise impact which would result from some proposed change in airport operations. The relative effectiveness of number of noise-impact reduction alternatives is assessed for a major midwest airport. Significant reductions in noise impact are predicted for certain noise abatement strategies while others are shown to result in relatively little noise relief.

  14. Airport cleanup rises above problems

    SciTech Connect

    Pressly, N.; Lucas, B.; Frumer, B.; Roth, R.

    1996-07-01

    Engineers used a treatment combination to improve the in-situ bioremediation system`s efficiency in removing underground fuel leaks at JFK Airport. John F. Kennedy International Airport, in New York City, on Jamaica Bay, has an above-ground storage capacity of about 32 million gallons of jet fuel, which flow through about 50 miles of high-pressure underground pipe to the central terminal area. EAch terminal`s fuel hydrant system was the major source os subsurface contamination at the site. The site is covered by 1 to 1.5 feet of reinforced concrete pavement. Liquid phase jet fuel (free product) was measured on the water table with true thickness ranging from less than 1 inch to 1 foot. After analysis of core samples, contamination was found adsorbed to the soil with maximum levels at the water table. This article describes the clean up, covering the following topics: microbial conditions during system operation; above-ground treatment challenges: free product emulsification, presence of biomass; evaluation of enhancements: dissolved air floatation, coagulation and flocculation, retention time adjustments; conclusions.

  15. Display of alpha-amylase on the surface of Lactobacillus casei cells by use of the PgsA anchor protein, and production of lactic acid from starch.

    PubMed

    Narita, Junya; Okano, Kenji; Kitao, Tomoe; Ishida, Saori; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Sung, Moon-Hee; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2006-01-01

    We developed a new cell surface engineering system based on the PgsA anchor protein from Bacillus subtilis. In this system, the N terminus of the target protein was fused to the PgsA protein and the resulting fusion protein was expressed on the cell surface. Using this new system, we constructed a novel starch-degrading strain of Lactobacillus casei by genetically displaying alpha-amylase from the Streptococcus bovis strain 148 with a FLAG peptide tag (AmyAF). Localization of the PgsA-AmyA-FLAG fusion protein on the cell surface was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis. The lactic acid bacteria which displayed AmyAF showed significantly elevated hydrolytic activity toward soluble starch. By fermentation using AmyAF-displaying L. casei cells, 50 g/liter of soluble starch was reduced to 13.7 g/liter, and 21.8 g/liter of lactic acid was produced within about 24 h. The yield in terms of grams of lactic acid produced per gram of carbohydrate utilized was 0.60 g per g of carbohydrate consumed at 24 h. Since AmyA was immobilized on the cells, cells were recovered after fermentation and used repeatedly. During repeated utilization of cells, the lactic acid yield was improved to 0.81 g per g of carbohydrate consumed at 72 h. These results indicate that efficient simultaneous saccharification and fermentation from soluble starch to lactic acid were carried out by recombinant L. casei cells with cell surface display of AmyA. PMID:16391053

  16. Display of α-Amylase on the Surface of Lactobacillus casei Cells by Use of the PgsA Anchor Protein, and Production of Lactic Acid from Starch

    PubMed Central

    Narita, Junya; Okano, Kenji; Kitao, Tomoe; Ishida, Saori; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Sung, Moon-Hee; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2006-01-01

    We developed a new cell surface engineering system based on the PgsA anchor protein from Bacillus subtilis. In this system, the N terminus of the target protein was fused to the PgsA protein and the resulting fusion protein was expressed on the cell surface. Using this new system, we constructed a novel starch-degrading strain of Lactobacillus casei by genetically displaying α-amylase from the Streptococcus bovis strain 148 with a FLAG peptide tag (AmyAF). Localization of the PgsA-AmyA-FLAG fusion protein on the cell surface was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometric analysis. The lactic acid bacteria which displayed AmyAF showed significantly elevated hydrolytic activity toward soluble starch. By fermentation using AmyAF-displaying L. casei cells, 50 g/liter of soluble starch was reduced to 13.7 g/liter, and 21.8 g/liter of lactic acid was produced within about 24 h. The yield in terms of grams of lactic acid produced per gram of carbohydrate utilized was 0.60 g per g of carbohydrate consumed at 24 h. Since AmyA was immobilized on the cells, cells were recovered after fermentation and used repeatedly. During repeated utilization of cells, the lactic acid yield was improved to 0.81 g per g of carbohydrate consumed at 72 h. These results indicate that efficient simultaneous saccharification and fermentation from soluble starch to lactic acid were carried out by recombinant L. casei cells with cell surface display of AmyA. PMID:16391053

  17. Projection displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, George L.; Yang, Kei H.

    1998-08-01

    Projection display in today's market is dominated by cathode ray tubes (CRTs). Further progress in this mature CRT projector technology will be slow and evolutionary. Liquid crystal based projection displays have gained rapid acceptance in the business market. New technologies are being developed on several fronts: (1) active matrix built from polysilicon or single crystal silicon; (2) electro- optic materials using ferroelectric liquid crystal, polymer dispersed liquid crystals or other liquid crystal modes, (3) micromechanical-based transducers such as digital micromirror devices, and grating light valves, (4) high resolution displays to SXGA and beyond, and (5) high brightness. This article reviews the projection displays from a transducer technology perspective along with a discussion of markets and trends.

  18. Induction of Tolerance to Cardiac Allografts Using Donor Splenocytes Engineered to Display on Their Surface an Exogenous FasL Protein1

    PubMed Central

    Yolcu, Esma S.; Gu, Xiao; Lacelle, Chantale; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2008-01-01

    The critical role played by FasL in immune homeostasis renders this molecule as an attractive target for immunomodulation to achieve tolerance to auto and transplantation antigens. Immunomodulation with genetically modified cells expressing FasL was shown to induce tolerance to alloantigens. However, genetic modification of primary cells in a rapid, efficient, and clinically applicable manner proved challenging. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of donor splenocytes rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface a chimeric form of FasL protein (SA-FasL) for tolerance induction to cardiac allografts. Intraperitoneal injection of ACI rats with WF splenocytes displaying SA-FasL on their surface resulted in tolerance to donor, but not F344 third party, cardiac allografts. Tolerance was associated with apoptosis of donor reactive T effector cells and induction/expansion of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells. Treg cells played a critical role in the observed tolerance as adoptive transfer of sorted Treg cells from long-term graft recipients into naïve unmanipulated ACI rats resulted in indefinite survival of secondary WF grafts. Immunomodulation with allogeneic cells rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface SA-FasL protein provides an effective and clinically applicable means of cell-based therapy with potential application to regenerative medicine, transplantation, and autoimmunity. PMID:18606644

  19. Meteorological and air pollution modeling for an urban airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, P. R.; Lee, I. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of numerical experiments modeling meteorology, multiple pollutant sources, and nonlinear photochemical reactions for the case of an airport in a large urban area with complex terrain. A planetary boundary-layer model which predicts the mixing depth and generates wind, moisture, and temperature fields was used; it utilizes only surface and synoptic boundary conditions as input data. A version of the Hecht-Seinfeld-Dodge chemical kinetics model is integrated with a new, rapid numerical technique; both the San Francisco Bay Area Air Quality Management District source inventory and the San Jose Airport aircraft inventory are utilized. The air quality model results are presented in contour plots; the combined results illustrate that the highly nonlinear interactions which are present require that the chemistry and meteorology be considered simultaneously to make a valid assessment of the effects of individual sources on regional air quality.

  20. New strategy for enhancement of microbial viability in simulated gastric conditions based on display of starch-binding domain on cell surface.

    PubMed

    Tarahomjoo, Shirin; Katakura, Yoshio; Shioya, Suteaki

    2008-05-01

    The C-terminal region of the peptidoglycan hydrolase (CPH) of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 fused to the linker region and the starch-binding domain (SBD) of the *-amylase of Streptococcus bovis 148 was produced intracellularly in Escherichia coli. The fusion protein (CPH-SBD) was able to bind to the cell surface of Lactobacillus casei NRRL B-441 and to corn starch. Therefore, adhesion of cells to corn starch was mediated by the fusion protein. At a cell density of 10(9) cfu/ml and a starch concentration of 5 mg/ml, CPH-SBD-displaying L. casei cells aggregated with corn starch, whereas the free cells of L. casei did not form any aggregates with corn starch. After incubation in simulated gastric juice (pH 3.0, 1 h), the survival percentages of free cells, amylose-coated free cells, and free cells mixed with corn starch were 0.074%, 7.2%, and 3.1% respectively. When CPH-SBD-displaying bacteria aggregated with corn starch, their survival percentage was 8% higher than that of free cells mixed with corn starch. The survival of the amylose-coated CPH-SBD-displaying L. casei cells was comparable to that of amylose-coated free cells, whereas the survival percentage of amylose-coated aggregates of CPH-SBD-displaying bacteria with corn starch was 28% higher than that of amylose-coated mixture of free cells with corn starch. These results demonstrate the potential usefulness of the cell-surface display technique for enhancement of the delivery of viable microorganisms to the intestinal tract. PMID:18558341

  1. When day is done and shadows fall, we miss the airport most of all. [visual accommodation and aircraft flight safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roscoe, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    Both the effectiveness of pilot training and the safety of flight can be influenced by the distribution of texture in the visual scene, the distance to which the eyes accommodate, and the associated shifts in the apparent size and distance of objects in central and peripheral vision. Studies reviewed and original results presented indicate that these factors are involved in various misjudgments and illusions experienced by pilots: (1) when searching for other airborne traffic or targets, (2) when making approaches to airports over water at night, (3) when breaking out of low clouds on a final approach to a landing by reference to head-up or head-down displays, and (4) when practicing simulated approaches and landings or air-to-surface weapon deliveries by reference to synthetically generated visual systems.

  2. Functional Cell Surface Display and Controlled Secretion of Diverse Agarolytic Enzymes by Escherichia coli with a Novel Ligation-Independent Cloning Vector Based on the Autotransporter YfaL

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Park, Eunhye; Song, Joseph; Yang, Taek Ho; Lee, Hee Jong; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2012-01-01

    Autotransporters have been employed as the anchoring scaffold for cell surface display by replacing their passenger domains with heterologous proteins to be displayed. We adopted an autotransporter (YfaL) of Escherichia coli for the cell surface display system. The critical regions in YfaL for surface display were identified for the construction of a ligation-independent cloning (LIC)-based display system. The designed system showed no detrimental effect on either the growth of the host cell or overexpressing heterologous proteins on the cell surface. We functionally displayed monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1) as a reporter protein and diverse agarolytic enzymes from Saccharophagus degradans 2-40, including Aga86C and Aga86E, which previously had failed to be functional expressed. The system could display different sizes of proteins ranging from 25.3 to 143 kDa. We also attempted controlled release of the displayed proteins by incorporating a tobacco etch virus protease cleavage site into the C termini of the displayed proteins. The maximum level of the displayed protein was 6.1 × 104 molecules per a single cell, which corresponds to 5.6% of the entire cell surface of actively growing E. coli. PMID:22344647

  3. 78 FR 65417 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Regional Airport (EAR), Kearney, Nebraska. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invites public comment on... request to release approximately 67.72 acres of airport property at the Kearney Regional Airport (EAR... property at the Kearney Regional Airport (EAR) submitted by the Sponsor meets the procedural...

  4. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... water or marsh lands adjacent to the airport that are crossed by the approach and departure flight paths... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airport emergency plan. 139.325 Section 139... AIRPORTS Operations § 139.325 Airport emergency plan. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator,...

  5. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... water or marsh lands adjacent to the airport that are crossed by the approach and departure flight paths... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airport emergency plan. 139.325 Section 139... AIRPORTS Operations § 139.325 Airport emergency plan. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator,...

  6. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... water or marsh lands adjacent to the airport that are crossed by the approach and departure flight paths... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airport emergency plan. 139.325 Section 139... AIRPORTS Operations § 139.325 Airport emergency plan. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator,...

  7. 49 CFR 1542.113 - Airport tenant security programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airport tenant security programs. 1542.113 Section 1542.113 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY Airport Security Program § 1542.113 Airport...

  8. 14 CFR 152.107 - Project eligibility: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport development....107 Project eligibility: Airport development. (a) Except in the case of approved stage development, each project for airport development must provide for— (1) Development of an airport or unit of...

  9. 14 CFR 152.107 - Project eligibility: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport development....107 Project eligibility: Airport development. (a) Except in the case of approved stage development, each project for airport development must provide for— (1) Development of an airport or unit of...

  10. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false List of international airports. 122.13 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.13 List of international airports. The following is a list of international airports of entry designated by the Secretary of the Treasury....

  11. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  12. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  13. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  14. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false List of international airports. 122.13 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.13 List of international airports. The following is a list of international airports of entry designated by the Secretary of the Treasury....

  15. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  16. 19 CFR 122.11 - Designation as international airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Designation as international airport. 122.11...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.11 Designation as international airport. (a) Procedure. International airports, as defined in § 122.1(e), will be designated after...

  17. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false List of international airports. 122.13 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.13 List of international airports. The following is a list of international airports of entry designated by the Secretary of the Treasury....

  18. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false List of international airports. 122.13 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.13 List of international airports. The following is a list of international airports of entry designated by the Secretary of the Treasury....

  19. 19 CFR 122.13 - List of international airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false List of international airports. 122.13 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.13 List of international airports. The following is a list of international airports of entry designated by the Secretary of the Treasury....

  20. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  1. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  2. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  3. 14 CFR 125.369 - Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate airport weather minimums. 125.369... § 125.369 Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in the flight release unless the appropriate weather reports or forecasts, or any combination...

  4. 14 CFR 125.369 - Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate airport weather minimums. 125.369... § 125.369 Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in the flight release unless the appropriate weather reports or forecasts, or any combination...

  5. 14 CFR 125.369 - Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate airport weather minimums. 125.369... § 125.369 Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in the flight release unless the appropriate weather reports or forecasts, or any combination...

  6. 78 FR 9770 - Notice of Request to Release Airport Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... at the Colonel James Jabara Airport (AAO), Wichita, KS. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invites public comment on the release of land at the Colonel James Jabara Airport (AAO), Wichita, Kansas, under... D. Martin, Airports Compliance Specialist, Federal Aviation Administration, Airports Division,...

  7. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  8. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  9. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  10. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  11. 14 CFR 93.123 - High density traffic airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High density traffic airports. 93.123... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93.123 High density traffic airports. (a) Each of the following airports is designated as a...

  12. 14 CFR 125.369 - Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate airport weather minimums. 125.369... § 125.369 Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in the flight release unless the appropriate weather reports or forecasts, or any combination...

  13. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  14. 14 CFR 121.625 - Alternate Airport weather minima.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate Airport weather minima. 121.625... Alternate Airport weather minima. Except as provided in § 121.624 for ETOPS Alternate Airports, no person may list an airport as an alternate in the dispatch or flight release unless the appropriate...

  15. 14 CFR 125.369 - Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate airport weather minimums. 125.369... § 125.369 Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may list an airport as an alternate airport in the flight release unless the appropriate weather reports or forecasts, or any combination...

  16. 14 CFR 152.325 - Financial status report: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.325 Financial... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial status report: Airport planning... agency conducting a project for airport system planning shall submit a financial status report on a...

  17. 14 CFR 152.107 - Project eligibility: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport development....107 Project eligibility: Airport development. (a) Except in the case of approved stage development, each project for airport development must provide for— (1) Development of an airport or unit of...

  18. 14 CFR 152.107 - Project eligibility: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport development....107 Project eligibility: Airport development. (a) Except in the case of approved stage development, each project for airport development must provide for— (1) Development of an airport or unit of...

  19. 14 CFR 152.107 - Project eligibility: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport development....107 Project eligibility: Airport development. (a) Except in the case of approved stage development, each project for airport development must provide for— (1) Development of an airport or unit of...

  20. 14 CFR 139.325 - Airport emergency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airport emergency plan. 139.325 Section 139... AIRPORTS Operations § 139.325 Airport emergency plan. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must develop and maintain an airport emergency plan designed to minimize the...

  1. Initial Investigation of Operational Concept Elements for NASA's NextGen-Airportal Project Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary; Lee, Jonathan; Poage, James L.; Tobias, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    The NextGen-Airportal Project is organized into three research focus areas: Safe and Efficient Surface Operations, Coordinated Arrival/Departure Operations Management, and Airportal Transition and Integration Management. The content in this document was derived from an examination of constraints and problems at airports for accommodating future increases in air traffic, and from an examination of capabilities envisioned for NextGen. The concepts are organized around categories of constraints and problems and therefore do not precisely match, but generally reflect, the research focus areas. The concepts provide a framework for defining and coordinating research activities that are, and will be, conducted by the NextGen-Airportal Project. The concepts will help the research activities function as an integrated set focused on future needs for airport operations and will aid aligning the research activities with NextGen key capabilities. The concepts are presented as concept elements with more detailed sub-elements under each concept element. For each concept element, the following topics are discussed: constraints and problems being addressed, benefit descriptions, required technology and infrastructure, and an initial list of potential research topics. Concept content will be updated and more detail added as the research progresses. The concepts are focused on enhancing airportal capacity and efficiency in a timeframe 20 to 25 years in the future, which is similar to NextGen's timeframe.

  2. Air pollution simulation and geographical information systems (GIS) applied to Athens International Airport.

    PubMed

    Theophanides, Mike; Anastassopoulou, Jane

    2009-07-01

    This study presents an improved methodology for analysing atmospheric pollution around airports using Gaussian-plume numerical simulation integrated with Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The new methodology focuses on streamlining the lengthy analysis process for Airport Environmental Impact Assessments by integrating the definition of emission sources, simulating and displaying the results in a GIS environment. One of the objectives of the research is to validate the methodology applied to the Athens International Airport, "Eleftherios Venizelos", to produce a realistic estimate of emission inventories, dispersion simulations and comparison to measured data. The methodology used a combination of the Emission Dispersion and Modelling System (EDMS) and the Atmospheric Dispersion and Modelling system (ADMS) to improve the analysis process. The second objective is to conduct numerical simulations under various adverse conditions (e.g. scenarios) and assess the dispersion in the surrounding areas. The study concludes that the use of GIS in environmental assessments provides a valuable advantage for organizing data and entering accurate geographical/topological information for the simulation engine. Emissions simulation produced estimates within 10% of published values. Dispersion simulations indicate that airport pollution will affect neighbouring cities such as Rafina and Loutsa. Presently, there are no measured controls in these areas. In some cases, airport pollution can contribute to as much as 40% of permissible EU levels in VOCs. PMID:19731833

  3. 75 FR 9017 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... CFR Sec. 93.227 (DCA); 74 FR 51648 (Oct. 7, 2009) (EWR); 74 FR 51650 (Oct. 7, 2009) (JFK); 74 FR 51653... Airport, LaGuardia Airport and Newark Liberty International Airport; High Density Rule at Reagan National... Density Rule and orders limiting scheduled operations at the airports, slots must be used at least...

  4. Construction and Immunological Evaluation of Dual Cell Surface Display of HIV-1 Gag and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium FliC in Lactobacillus acidophilus for Vaccine Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kajikawa, Akinobu; Zhang, Lin; Long, Julie; Nordone, Shila; Stoeker, Laura; LaVoy, Alora; Bumgardner, Sara; Klaenhammer, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Oral vaccines that elicit a mucosal immune response may be effective against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) because its transmission occurs mainly at the mucosa. The aim of this study was to construct recombinant Lactobacillus for oral delivery of oral vaccines against HIV-1 and to evaluate their immunogenicity. A recombinant Lactobacillus acidophilus strain expressing the HIV-1 Gag on the bacterial cell surface was established by fusion with the signal peptide and anchor motif of a mucus binding protein (Mub) from L. acidophilus with or without coexpression of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium flagellin (FliC) fused to a different Mub signal peptide and anchor. Using HEK293 cells engineered to express Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), the biological activity of FliC on the bacterial cell surfaces was determined. The surface-exposed flagellin retained its TLR5-stimulating activity, suggesting that the recombinant strain with Gag and FliC dual display might provide a different immunopotency than the strain expressing only Gag. The immunological properties of the recombinant strains were assessed by coculture with human myeloid dendritic cells (DCs). The heterologous antigens on the cell surface affected maturation and cytokine responses of DCs. Acquired immune responses were also investigated by intragastric immunization of mice. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay showed induction of gamma interferon-producing cells at local mucosa after immunization of mice with the Gag-producing strain. Meanwhile, the immunization with L. acidophilus displaying both Gag and FliC resulted in an increase of Gag-specific IgA-secreting cells. These results suggested that the Gag-displaying L. acidophilus elicited specific immune responses and the coexistence of FliC conferred an adjuvant effect on local IgA production. PMID:22761297

  5. Numerical Model Simulation of Atmosphere above A.C. Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutes, Tiffany; Trout, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    In this research project, the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) is used to investigate past and present weather conditions. The Atlantic City Airport area in southern New Jersey is the area of interest. Long-term hourly data is analyzed and model simulations are created. By inputting high resolution surface data, a more accurate picture of the effects of different weather conditions will be portrayed. Currently, the impact of gridded model runs is being tested, and the impact of surface characteristics is being investigated.

  6. Geophysical characterization of permafrost terrain at Iqaluit International Airport, Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenborger, Greg A.; LeBlanc, Anne-Marie

    2015-12-01

    Iqaluit International Airport presently suffers from instabilities and subsidence along its runway, taxiways and apron. In particular, asphalt surfaces are significantly impacted by settlement and cracking. These instabilities may be related to permafrost, permafrost degradation and associated drainage conditions. Low induction number electromagnetic measurements along with galvanic and capacitive electrical resistivity surveys were performed over selected areas within the airport boundary and in the near vicinity to assist with permafrost characterization and to investigate active permafrost processes. Electrical resistivity images suggest distinct electrical signatures for different terrain units and sediment types, and for ice-rich material including ice wedges. Anomalous regions are identified that are coincident with localized settlement problems. Repeated resistivity maps reveal seasonal changes indicative of high unfrozen water content and freeze/thaw of groundwater beneath airport infrastructure in distinct regions related to surficial geology. Even with continuous permafrost and cold permafrost temperatures, the resistivity models reveal anomalously conductive material at depth that is not obviously correlated to mapped surficial sediments and that may represent thaw susceptible sediments or significant unfrozen water content.

  7. EM-ANIMATE - COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR DISPLAYING AND ANIMATING THE STEADY-STATE TIME-HARMONIC ELECTROMAGNETIC NEAR FIELD AND SURFACE-CURRENT SOLUTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hom, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    The EM-ANIMATE program is a specialized visualization program that displays and animates the near-field and surface-current solutions obtained from an electromagnetics program, in particular, that from MOM3D (LAR-15074). The EM-ANIMATE program is windows based and contains a user-friendly, graphical interface for setting viewing options, case selection, file manipulation, etc. EM-ANIMATE displays the field and surface-current magnitude as smooth shaded color fields (color contours) ranging from a minimum contour value to a maximum contour value for the fields and surface currents. The program can display either the total electric field or the scattered electric field in either time-harmonic animation mode or in the root mean square (RMS) average mode. The default setting is initially set to the minimum and maximum values within the field and surface current data and can be optionally set by the user. The field and surface-current value are animated by calculating and viewing the solution at user selectable radian time increments between 0 and 2pi. The surface currents can also be displayed in either time-harmonic animation mode or in RMS average mode. In RMS mode, the color contours do not vary with time, but show the constant time averaged field and surface-current magnitude solution. The electric field and surface-current directions can be displayed as scaled vector arrows which have a length proportional to the magnitude at each field grid point or surface node point. These vector properties can be viewed separately or concurrently with the field or surface-current magnitudes. Animation speed is improved by turning off the display of the vector arrows. In RMS modes, the direction vectors are still displayed as varying with time since the time averaged direction vectors would be zero length vectors. Other surface properties can optionally be viewed. These include the surface grid, the resistance value assigned to each element of the grid, and the power

  8. Accumulation and Decay Characteristics of Exoelectron Sources at MgO Protective Layer Surface in Alternating-Current Plasma Display Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Kyohei; Nagatomi, Takaharu; Morita, Yukihiro; Oue, Toshiyasu; Kosugi, Naoki; Nishitani, Mikihiko; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Takai, Yoshizo

    2010-08-01

    The accumulation and decay characteristics of exoelectron sources at a MgO protective layer surface in alternating-current plasma display panels (AC-PDPs) were investigated. The positively charged MgO surface provides a larger number of exoelectrons than the negatively charged surface, indicating that electrons trapped in shallow carrier traps coexist with trapped holes, and exoelectrons are emitted through Auger and/or photoionization processes after their recombination. The exoelectron sources are accumulated by sustain discharges and always decay. The half-life of the decay of the exoelectron sources is relatively long, of the order of a few tens of ms, confirming that the exoelectron emission property at the address discharge in a certain television (TV) field is strongly affected by sustain firings in the previous two TV fields or more. The effects of such a long-term decay of the exoelectron sources should be taken into consideration when designing the driving waveforms of AC-PDPs.

  9. 14 CFR 125.49 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) No pilot of an airplane carrying passengers at night may take off from, or land on, an airport unless...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000...

  10. 14 CFR 125.49 - Airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) No pilot of an airplane carrying passengers at night may take off from, or land on, an airport unless...: AIRPLANES HAVING A SEATING CAPACITY OF 20 OR MORE PASSENGERS OR A MAXIMUM PAYLOAD CAPACITY OF 6,000...

  11. 75 FR 68018 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... procedures to be used in applications for exemption under Airport Privatization Pilot Program (62 FR 48693... public review at http://www.regulations.gov . The docket number is FAA Docket Number 2010-1052....

  12. Aircraft and airport noise control prospective outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, N.

    1982-01-01

    In a perspective look at aircraft and airport noise control over the past ten years or more - or more is added here because the Federal Aviation Regulation Part 36 of 1969 is a more significant milestone for the air transportation system than is the Noise Control Act of 1972 - we see an appreciable reduction in the noise emitted by newly designed and newly produced airplanes, particularly those powered by the new high bypass engines, but only, at best, a moderate alleviation of airport noise. The change in airport noise exposure was the consequence of the introduction of some new, quieter airplanes into the airlines fleets and some operational modifications or restrictions at the airports.

  13. Pilot preference and procedures at uncontrolled airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. C.

    1975-01-01

    The report presents the results of a pilot questionnaire utilized at the 1974 Reading, Pennsylvania Air Show to obtain data on pilot procedures and preference in the terminal airspace of uncontrolled airports.

  14. EM-ANIMATE - COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR DISPLAYING AND ANIMATING THE STEADY-STATE TIME-HARMONIC ELECTROMAGNETIC NEAR FIELD AND SURFACE-CURRENT SOLUTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hom, K. W.

    1994-01-01

    The EM-ANIMATE program is a specialized visualization program that displays and animates the near-field and surface-current solutions obtained from an electromagnetics program, in particular, that from MOM3D (LAR-15074). The EM-ANIMATE program is windows based and contains a user-friendly, graphical interface for setting viewing options, case selection, file manipulation, etc. EM-ANIMATE displays the field and surface-current magnitude as smooth shaded color fields (color contours) ranging from a minimum contour value to a maximum contour value for the fields and surface currents. The program can display either the total electric field or the scattered electric field in either time-harmonic animation mode or in the root mean square (RMS) average mode. The default setting is initially set to the minimum and maximum values within the field and surface current data and can be optionally set by the user. The field and surface-current value are animated by calculating and viewing the solution at user selectable radian time increments between 0 and 2pi. The surface currents can also be displayed in either time-harmonic animation mode or in RMS average mode. In RMS mode, the color contours do not vary with time, but show the constant time averaged field and surface-current magnitude solution. The electric field and surface-current directions can be displayed as scaled vector arrows which have a length proportional to the magnitude at each field grid point or surface node point. These vector properties can be viewed separately or concurrently with the field or surface-current magnitudes. Animation speed is improved by turning off the display of the vector arrows. In RMS modes, the direction vectors are still displayed as varying with time since the time averaged direction vectors would be zero length vectors. Other surface properties can optionally be viewed. These include the surface grid, the resistance value assigned to each element of the grid, and the power

  15. 76 FR 21420 - Policy and Procedures Concerning the Use of Airport Revenue; Policy Regarding Airport Rates and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ...This notice requests comments on a petition to accept an air service incentive program at McCarran International Airport (Airport) as consistent with Federal law and policies on the use of airport revenue and on airport rates and charges. The petitioner Clark County Department of Aviation is the owner and operator of the Airport. The petitioner is the recipient of Federal grants under the......

  16. Bee venom phospholipase A2 as a membrane-binding vector for cell surface display or internalization of soluble proteins.

    PubMed

    Babon, Aurélie; Wurceldorf, Thibault; Almunia, Christine; Pichard, Sylvain; Chenal, Alexandre; Buhot, Cécile; Beaumelle, Bruno; Gillet, Daniel

    2016-06-15

    We showed that bee venom phospholipase A2 can be used as a membrane-binding vector to anchor to the surface of cells a soluble protein fused to its C-terminus. ZZ, a two-domain derivative of staphylococcal protein A capable of binding constant regions of antibodies was fused to the C-terminus of the phospholipase or to a mutant devoid of enzymatic activity. The fusion proteins bound to the surface of cells and could themselves bind IgGs. Their fate depended on the cell type to which they bound. On the A431 carcinoma cell line the proteins remained exposed on the cell surface. In contrast, on human dendritic cells the proteins were internalized into early endosomes. PMID:26253725

  17. Display of both N- and C-terminal target fusion proteins on the Aspergillus oryzae cell surface using a chitin-binding module

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, Soichiro; Ito, Junji; Adachi, Takashi; Ishida, Hiroki; Hata, Yoji; Okazaki, Fumiyoshi; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki

    2010-01-01

    A novel cell surface display system in Aspergillus oryzae was established by using a chitin-binding module (CBM) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an anchor protein. CBM was fused to the N or C terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the fusion proteins (GFP-CBM and CBM-GFP) were expressed using A. oryzae as a host. Western blotting and fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that both GFP-CBM and CBM-GFP were successfully expressed on the cell surface. In addition, cell surface display of triacylglycerol lipase from A. oryzae (tglA), while retaining its activity, was also successfully demonstrated using CBM as an anchor protein. The activity of tglA was significantly higher when tglA was fused to the C terminus than N terminus of CBM. Together, these results show that CBM used as a first anchor protein enables the fusion of both the N and/or C terminus of a target protein. PMID:20499230

  18. An Exopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutant of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Efficiently Displays a Protective Llama Antibody Fragment against Rotavirus on Its Surface

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Beatriz; Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Martínez, Noelia; Günaydın, Gökçe; Lin, Yin; Martín, M. Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A.; Hammarström, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, where it causes a high number of deaths among infants. Two vaccines are available, being highly effective in developed countries although markedly less efficient in developing countries. As a complementary treatment to the vaccines, a Lactobacillus strain producing an anti-rotavirus antibody fragment in the gastrointestinal tract could potentially be used. In order to develop such an alternative therapy, the effectiveness of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG to produce and display a VHH antibody fragment (referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 [ARP1]) on the surface was investigated. L. rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized probiotic bacteria and has intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Among four L. rhamnosus GG strains [GG (CMC), GG (ATCC 53103), GG (NCC 3003), and GG (UT)] originating from different sources, only GG (UT) was able to display ARP1 on the bacterial surface. The genomic analysis of strain GG (UT) showed that the genes welE and welF of the EPS cluster are inactivated, which causes a defect in exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, allowing efficient display of ARP1 on its surface. Finally, GG (UT) seemed to confer a level of protection against rotavirus-induced diarrhea similar to that of wild-type GG (NCC 3003) in a mouse pup model, indicating that the EPS may not be involved in the intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Most important, GG (EM233), a derivative of GG (UT) producing ARP1, was significantly more protective than the control strain L. casei BL23. PMID:26092449

  19. An Exopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutant of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Efficiently Displays a Protective Llama Antibody Fragment against Rotavirus on Its Surface.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Beatriz; Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Martínez, Noelia; Günaydın, Gökçe; Lin, Yin; Martín, M Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2015-09-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, where it causes a high number of deaths among infants. Two vaccines are available, being highly effective in developed countries although markedly less efficient in developing countries. As a complementary treatment to the vaccines, a Lactobacillus strain producing an anti-rotavirus antibody fragment in the gastrointestinal tract could potentially be used. In order to develop such an alternative therapy, the effectiveness of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG to produce and display a VHH antibody fragment (referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 [ARP1]) on the surface was investigated. L. rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized probiotic bacteria and has intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Among four L. rhamnosus GG strains [GG (CMC), GG (ATCC 53103), GG (NCC 3003), and GG (UT)] originating from different sources, only GG (UT) was able to display ARP1 on the bacterial surface. The genomic analysis of strain GG (UT) showed that the genes welE and welF of the EPS cluster are inactivated, which causes a defect in exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, allowing efficient display of ARP1 on its surface. Finally, GG (UT) seemed to confer a level of protection against rotavirus-induced diarrhea similar to that of wild-type GG (NCC 3003) in a mouse pup model, indicating that the EPS may not be involved in the intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Most important, GG (EM233), a derivative of GG (UT) producing ARP1, was significantly more protective than the control strain L. casei BL23. PMID:26092449

  20. CELL-SURFACE DISPLAY OF SYNTHETIC PHYTOCHELATINS USING ICE NUCLEATION PROTEIN FOR ENHANCED HEAVY-METAL BIOACCUMULATION. (R827227)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synthetic phytochelatins (ECs) composed of (Glu–Cys)nGly are protein analogs of phytochelatin that exhibit improved metal-binding capacity over metallothioneins (MTs). Expression of EC20 on the surface of E. coli using the Lpp-OmpA anchor resulted in i...

  1. CSF-1 receptor signalling is governed by pre-requisite EHD1 mediated receptor display on the macrophage cell surface.

    PubMed

    Cypher, Luke R; Bielecki, Timothy Alan; Huang, Lu; An, Wei; Iseka, Fany; Tom, Eric; Storck, Matthew D; Hoppe, Adam D; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is the master regulator of macrophage biology. CSF-1 can bind CSF-1R resulting in receptor activation and signalling essential for macrophage functions such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, polarization, phagocytosis, cytokine secretion, and motility. CSF-1R activation can only occur after the receptor is presented on the macrophage cell surface. This process is reliant upon the underlying macrophage receptor trafficking machinery. However, the mechanistic details governing this process are incompletely understood. C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain-containing (EHD) proteins have recently emerged as key regulators of receptor trafficking but have not yet been studied in the context of macrophage CSF-1R signalling. In this manuscript, we utilize primary bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) to reveal a novel function of EHD1 as a regulator of CSF-1R abundance on the cell surface. We report that EHD1-knockout (EHD1-KO) macrophages cell surface and total CSF-1R levels are significantly decreased. The decline in CSF-1R levels corresponds with reduced downstream macrophage functions such as cell proliferation, migration, and spreading. In EHD1-KO macrophages, transport of newly synthesized CSF-1R to the macrophage cell surface was reduced and was associated with the shunting of the receptor to the lysosome, which resulted in receptor degradation. These findings reveal a novel and functionally important role for EHD1 in governing CSF-1R signalling via regulation of anterograde transport of CSF-1R to the macrophage cell surface. PMID:27224507

  2. Airport Noise Tech Challenge Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    The Supersonics Project, operating under NASA Aeronautics Mission Directorate#s Fundamental Aero Program, has been organized around the Technical Challenges that have historically precluded commercial supersonic flight. One of these Challenges is making aircraft that are capable of such high aerodynamic performance quiet enough around airports that they will not be objectionable. It is recognized that a successful civilian supersonic aircraft will be a system where many new technologies will come together, and for this to happen not only will new low noise propulsion concepts be required, but new engineering tools that predict the noise of the aircraft as these technologies are combined and compromised with the rest of the aircraft design. These are the two main objectives of the Airport Noise Tech Challenge. " ! As a Project in the Fundamental Aero Program, we work at a relatively low level of technology readiness. However, we have high level milestones which force us to integrate our efforts to impact systems-level activities. To keep the low-level work tied to delivering engineering tools and low-noise concepts, we have structured our milestones around development of the concepts and organized our activities around developing and applying our engineering tools to these concepts. The final deliverables in these milestones are noise prediction modules validated against the best embodiment of each concept. These will then be used in cross-disciplinary exercises to demonstrate the viability of aircraft designs to meet all the Technical Challenges. Some of the concepts being developed are shown: Fan Flow Diverters, Multi-jet Shielding, High-Aspect Ratio Embedded Nozzles, Plasma Actuated Instability Manipulation, Highly Variable Cycle Mixer- Ejectors, and Inverted Velocity Profiles. These concepts are being developed for reduced jet noise along with the design tools which describe how they perform when used in various aircraft configurations. Several key upcoming

  3. Friction evaluation of concrete paver blocks for airport pavement applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    The development and use of concrete paver blocks is reviewed and some general specifications for application of this type of pavement surface at airport facilities are given. Two different shapes of interlocking concrete paver blocks installed in the track surface at NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) are described. Preliminary cornering performance results from testing of 40 x 14 radial-belted and bias-ply aircraft tires are reviewed. These tire tests are part of a larger, ongoing joint NASA/FAA/Industry Surface Traction and Radial Tire (START) Program involving several different tire sizes. Both dry and wet surface conditions were evaluated on the two concrete paver block test surfaces and a conventional, nongrooved Portland cement concrete surface. Future test plans involving evaluation of other concrete paver block designs at the ALDF are indicated.

  4. Monitoring Aircraft Motion at Airports by LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, C.; Jozkow, G.; Koppanyi, Z.; Young, S.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D.

    2016-06-01

    Improving sensor performance, combined with better affordability, provides better object space observability, resulting in new applications. Remote sensing systems are primarily concerned with acquiring data of the static components of our environment, such as the topographic surface of the earth, transportation infrastructure, city models, etc. Observing the dynamic component of the object space is still rather rare in the geospatial application field; vehicle extraction and traffic flow monitoring are a few examples of using remote sensing to detect and model moving objects. Deploying a network of inexpensive LiDAR sensors along taxiways and runways can provide both geometrically and temporally rich geospatial data that aircraft body can be extracted from the point cloud, and then, based on consecutive point clouds motion parameters can be estimated. Acquiring accurate aircraft trajectory data is essential to improve aviation safety at airports. This paper reports about the initial experiences obtained by using a network of four Velodyne VLP- 16 sensors to acquire data along a runway segment.

  5. Evaluation of immune protective efficacies of Eimeria tenella EtMic1 polypeptides with different domain recombination displayed on yeast surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peipei; Lv, Junfeng; Zhang, Jie; Sun, Hui; Chen, Zhengtao; Li, Hongmei; Wang, Fangkun; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, three different live oral vaccines using the EBY100/pCTCON-2 yeast surface display system with different Eimeria tenella microneme-1 (EtMic1) protein domain recombination were constructed and their protective efficacies against homologous challenge were compared by evaluating the body weight gains, relative growth rate, cecal lesion scores, oocyst output, oocyst decrease ratio, anti-coccidial index, the serum antibody levels and the proliferation ability of blood lymphocytes. The results indicated that all the three constructed live oral vaccines expressing different EtMic1 polypeptides provided excellent protection against homologous challenge by significantly increasing weight gains, reducing cecal lesions, achieving a high ACI, elevating specific antibody response and splenocyte proliferation ability compared with controls. The yeasts displaying the EtMic1 polypeptide-III (expressed TSP-2, TSP-3 and TSP-4 domains) provided better protection against challenge than the yeasts displaying either the EtMic1 polypeptide-I (expressed I-domain, TSP-1 and TSP-2) or polypeptide-II (expressed I-domain and all the five TSP domains) did. Considering the exclusion of antibiotic resistant gene in the system, the strain EBY100 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae may be a better choice for coccidian antigen delivery. PMID:25956946

  6. Prediction of Weather Impacted Airport Capacity using Ensemble Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2011-01-01

    Ensemble learning with the Bagging Decision Tree (BDT) model was used to assess the impact of weather on airport capacities at selected high-demand airports in the United States. The ensemble bagging decision tree models were developed and validated using the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation System Performance Metrics (ASPM) data and weather forecast at these airports. The study examines the performance of BDT, along with traditional single Support Vector Machines (SVM), for airport runway configuration selection and airport arrival rates (AAR) prediction during weather impacts. Testing of these models was accomplished using observed weather, weather forecast, and airport operation information at the chosen airports. The experimental results show that ensemble methods are more accurate than a single SVM classifier. The airport capacity ensemble method presented here can be used as a decision support model that supports air traffic flow management to meet the weather impacted airport capacity in order to reduce costs and increase safety.

  7. 78 FR 42419 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ...This action adopts a Policy Statement, based on Federal law, concerning through-the-fence access to a federally-obligated airport from an adjacent or nearby property, when that property is used as a residence. This Policy Statement replaces FAA's previously published Interim Policy (76 FR 15028; March 18, 2011) with regard to commercial service airports, and establishes how FAA will implement......

  8. Performance specification for control tower display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleva, Denise L.; Meyer, Frederick M.

    2003-09-01

    Personnel in airport control towers monitor and direct the takeoff of outgoing aircraft, landing of incoming aircraft and all movements of aircraft on the ground. Although the primary source of information for the Local Controller, Assistant Local Controller and the Ground Controller is the real world viewed through the windows of the control tower, electronic displays are also used to provide situation awareness. Due to the criticality of the work to be performed by the controllers and the rather unique environment of the air traffic control tower, display hardware standards, which have been developed for general use, are not directly applicable. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requested assistance of Air Force Research Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate in producing a document which can be adopted as a Tower Display Standard usable by display engineers, human factors practitioners and system integrators. Particular emphasis was placed on human factors issues applicable to the control tower environment and controller task demands.

  9. Prehospital care at a major international airport.

    PubMed

    Cwinn, A A; Dinerman, N; Pons, P T; Marlin, R

    1988-10-01

    Medical emergencies at a major metropolitan airport have a significant impact on prehospital care capabilities for the rest of the community in which the airport is located. Stapleton International Airport in Denver, Colorado, is a facility that in 1985 had 14.4 million passengers and a static employee population of 12,000 to 15,000. In 1981, there were 1,182 ambulance trips to the airport, 40.4% of which did not result in the transport of a patient. The expense of sending an ambulance and fire engine out on such calls was great, and paramedics were out of service for approximately 300 hours on these nontransport cases. In order to improve prehospital services to the airport and the city, a paramedic has been stationed in the concourse at the airport 16 hours a day since 1982. The records for airport paramedic services for the 12 months ending September 1985 were reviewed. Paramedic services were requested for 1,952 patients. Of these, 696 (35.7%) were transported to hospital by ambulance; 115 (5.9%) went by private car; 284 (14.6%) refused any paramedic care or transport; and 857 (43.9%) were released, after base station contact, with instructions to seek definitive care at the final destination. Presenting complaints were classified into 55 categories and the frequencies and dispositions are described. The most common presentations resulting in transport were chest pain, 110 (5.6%); syncope, 60 (3.1%); psychiatric, 57 (2.9%); abdominal pain, 49 (2.5%); seizure, 36 (1.8%); fracture, 31 (1.6%); and cardiac arrest, 29 (1.5%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3177992

  10. Low temperature biodegradation of airport de-icing fluids.

    PubMed

    Revitt, D M; Worrall, P

    2003-01-01

    The biodegradabilities of glycol- and acetate-based aircraft de-icing fluids on airport surfaces have been investigated at three temperatures between 0 degrees C and 10 degrees C. The aqueous solubilities of these substances can result in high BOD loadings in runoff and pose serious toxicity problems in receiving waters. The measured surface biodegradation rates for de-icing products based on ethylene/diethylene glycol (Konsin), propylene glycol (Kilfrost) and potassium acetate (Clearway) at 4 degrees C were 0.082, 0.073 and 0.033 day(-1). The resulting reductions in the potential BOD loadings, of a single application of a typical mixture of these products, over a 5 day biodegradation period are predicted to be 32.9%, 30.2% and 21.4%, respectively at 8 degrees C, 4 degrees C and 1 degrees C. For consecutive daily applications, the comparable cumulative reductions over 5 days are 20.8%, 18.9% and 13.3%. The subsequent savings in the amount of treatment required for airport runoff prior to safe discharge to receiving waters are discussed and hence the relevance of surface biodegradation processes to the design of stormwater treatment systems involving the wash-off of biodegradable pollutants following retention on urban surfaces. PMID:14703144

  11. Flight Test Evaluation of Synthetic Vision Concepts at a Terrain Challenged Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Prince, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randell E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Parrish, Russell V.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) Project is striving to eliminate poor visibility as a causal factor in aircraft accidents as well as enhance operational capabilities of all aircraft through the display of computer generated imagery derived from an onboard database of terrain, obstacle, and airport information. To achieve these objectives, NASA 757 flight test research was conducted at the Eagle-Vail, Colorado airport to evaluate three SVS display types (Head-up Display, Head-Down Size A, Head-Down Size X) and two terrain texture methods (photo-realistic, generic) in comparison to the simulated Baseline Boeing-757 Electronic Attitude Direction Indicator and Navigation/Terrain Awareness and Warning System displays. The results of the experiment showed significantly improved situation awareness, performance, and workload for SVS concepts compared to the Baseline displays and confirmed the retrofit capability of the Head-Up Display and Size A SVS concepts. The research also demonstrated that the tunnel guidance display concept used within the SVS concepts achieved required navigation performance (RNP) criteria.

  12. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (Baltimore Washington International Airport) Boston, MA (General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport) Chantilly, VA (Washington Dulles International Airport) Charlotte, NC (Charlotte/Douglas International...) Honolulu, HI (Honolulu International Airport) Houston, TX (George Bush Intercontinental...

  13. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (Baltimore Washington International Airport) Boston, MA (General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport) Chantilly, VA (Washington Dulles International Airport) Charlotte, NC (Charlotte/Douglas International...) Honolulu, HI (Honolulu International Airport) Houston, TX (George Bush Intercontinental...

  14. ICAO's anti-SARS airport activities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Silvio; Curdt-Christiansen, Claus M

    2003-11-01

    To prevent SARS from spreading through air travel and in order to rebuild the confidence of the traveling public in the safety of air travel, ICAO has set up an "Anti-SARS Airport Evaluation Project." The first phase of this project was to develop a set of protective measures for international airports in affected areas to adopt and implement and then to send out, on the request of Contracting States, a team of inspectors to evaluate and assess airports and issue a "statement of evaluation" that the airport inspected complies with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. In cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO), the first part of phase 1 was completed in early June this year, and the second part of phase 1 followed soon after. By mid-July, five international airports in Southeast Asia had been inspected and found to be in full compliance with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. The success of this ICAO project is believed to have contributed significantly to the recovery of international air travel and related industries now taking place. Phase 2 of the project is now being developed. It is aimed at preventing a resurgence of SARS, but it also contains elements to make the methodology developed applicable to future outbreaks of any other communicable disease in which the mode of transmission could involve aviation and/or the need to prevent the spread of the disease by air travel. PMID:14620481

  15. Yeager Airport Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Williams

    2015-10-01

    The scope of this project was changed during the course of the project. Phase I of the project was designed to have the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC), together with its partners, manage the Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project at the Yeager Airport in conjunction with the Central West Virginia Regional Airport Authority (CWVRAA) in coordination with the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE NETL). This program would allow testing and evaluation of the use of hydrogen vehicles in the state of West Virginia utilizing the hydrogen fueling station at Yeager Airport. The NAFTC and CWVRAA to raise awareness and foster a greater understanding of hydrogen fuel and hydrogen-powered vehicles through a targeted utilization and outreach and education effort. After initial implementation of the project, the project added, determine the source(s) of supply for hydrogen powered vehicles that could be used for the testing. After completion of this, testing was begun at Yeager Airport. During the course of the project, the station at Yeager Airport was closed and moved to Morgantown and the West Virginia University Research Corporation. The vehicles were then moved to Morgantown and a vehicle owned by the CWVRAA was purchased to complete the project at the new location. Because of a number of issues detailed in the report for DE-FE0002994 and in this report, this project did not get to evaluate the effectiveness of the vehicles as planned.

  16. Evaluation of Head-Worn Display Concepts for Commercial Aircraft Taxi Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Kramer, Lynda J.

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a Head-Up Display (HUD) can be used to enable more capacity and safer aircraft surface operations. This previous research also noted that the HUD exhibited two major limitations which hindered the full potential of the display concept: 1) the monochrome HUD format; and, 2) a limited, fixed field of regard. Full-color Head Worn Displays (HWDs) with very small sizes and weights are emerging to the extent that this technology may be practical for commercial and business aircraft operations. By coupling the HWD with a head tracker, full-color, out-the-window display concepts with an unlimited field-of-regard may be realized to improve efficiency and safety in surface operations. A ground simulation experiment was conducted at NASA Langley to evaluate the efficacy of head-worn display applications which may directly address the limitations of the HUD while retaining all of its advantages in surface operations. The simulation experiment used airline crews to evaluate various displays (HUD, HWD) and display concepts in an operationally realistic environment by using a Chicago, O Hare airport database. The results pertaining to the implications of HWDs for commercial business and transport aviation applications are presented herein. Overall HWD system latency was measured and found to be acceptable, but not necessarily optimal. A few occurrences of simulator sickness were noted while wearing the HWD, but overall there appears to be commercial pilot acceptability and usability to the concept. Many issues were identified which need to be addressed in future research including continued reduction in user encumbrance due to the HWD, and improvement in image alignment, accuracy, and boresighting.

  17. Evaluation of head-worn display concepts for commercial aircraft taxi operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, J. J., III; Prinzel, Lance, III; Kramer, Lynda J.

    2007-04-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that a Head-Up Display (HUD) can be used to enable more capacity and safer aircraft surface operations. This previous research also noted that the HUD exhibited two major limitations which hindered the full potential of the display concept: 1) the monochrome HUD format; and, 2) a limited, fixed field of regard. Full-color Head Worn Displays (HWDs) with very small sizes and weights are emerging to the extent that this technology may be practical for commercial and business aircraft operations. By coupling the HWD with a head tracker, full-color, out-the-window display concepts with an unlimited field-of-regard may be realized to improve efficiency and safety in surface operations. A ground simulation experiment was conducted at NASA Langley to evaluate the efficacy of head-worn display applications which may directly address the limitations of the HUD while retaining all of its advantages in surface operations. The simulation experiment used airline crews to evaluate various displays (HUD, HWD) and display concepts in an operationally realistic environment by using a Chicago, O'Hare airport database. The results pertaining to the implications of HWDs for commercial business and transport aviation applications are presented herein. Overall HWD system latency was measured and found to be acceptable, but not necessarily optimal. A few occurrences of simulator sickness were noted while wearing the HWD, but overall there appears to be commercial pilot acceptability and usability to the concept. Many issues were identified which need to be addressed in future research including continued reduction in user encumbrance due to the HWD, and improvement in image alignment, accuracy, and boresighting.

  18. Efficient Surface Display of Diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFPase) in E. coli for Biodegradation of Toxic Organophosphorus Compounds (DFP and Cp).

    PubMed

    Latifi, Ali Mohammad; Karami, Ali; Khodi, Samaneh

    2015-10-01

    Compounds including organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and chemical nerve agents are toxic compounds synthesized recently which disrupt the mechanisms of neural transmission. Therefore, a critical requirement is the development of a bio-refining technology to facilitate the biodegradation of organophosphorus pollutants. The diisopropylfluorophosphatase (DFPase, EC 3.1.8.2) from the ganglion and brain of Loligo vulgaris acts on P-F bonds present in some OPs. Intracellular production of OPs-degrading enzymes or the use of native bacteria and fungi leads to a low degradation rate of OPs due to a mass transfer issue which reduces the overall catalytic efficiency. To overcome this challenge, we expressed DFPase on the surface of E. coli for the first time by employing the N-terminal domain of the ice nucleation protein (InaV-N) as an anchoring motif. Tracking the recombinant protein confirmed that DFPase is successfully located on the outer membrane. Further studies on its activity to degrade diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) showed its significant ability for the biodegradation of diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) with a specific activity of 500 U/mg of wet cell weight. Recombinant cells could also degrade chlorpyrifos (Cp) with an activity equivalent to a maximum value of 381.44 U/ml with a specific activity of 476.75 U/mg of cell, analyzed using HPLC technique. The optimum activity of purified DFPase was found at 30 °C. A more increased activity was also obtained in the presence of glucose-mineral-salt (GMS) supplemented with tryptone and 100 mg/L Co(2+) ion. These results highlight the high potential of the InaV-N anchoring domain to produce an engineered bacterium that can be used in the bioremediation of pesticide-contaminated environments. PMID:26239441

  19. Aerial overview of the Denver International Airport site, looking southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial overview of the Denver International Airport site, looking southwest - Denver International Airport Site, Between Fifty-sixth & 128th Avenues, Buckley Road & Box Elder Creek, Denver, Denver County, CO

  20. 77 FR 28667 - Land Release for Plattsburgh International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Plattsburgh International Airport AGENCY: Federal... Secretary may waive a Sponsor's Federal obligation to use certain airport land for aeronautical use....

  1. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Airport Capacity and Delay Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, David A.; Nelson, Caroline; Shapiro, Gerald

    1998-01-01

    The ASAC Airport Capacity Model and the ASAC Airport Delay Model support analyses of technologies addressing airport capacity. NASA's Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Airport Capacity Model estimates the capacity of an airport as a function of weather, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) procedures, traffic characteristics, and the level of technology available. Airport capacity is presented as a Pareto frontier of arrivals per hour versus departures per hour. The ASAC Airport Delay Model allows the user to estimate the minutes of arrival delay for an airport, given its (weather dependent) capacity. Historical weather observations and demand patterns are provided by ASAC as inputs to the delay model. The ASAC economic models can translate a reduction in delay minutes into benefit dollars.

  2. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 122.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... Airport. Orlando, Florida Orlando Executive Airport. Palm Springs, California Palm Springs...

  3. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 122.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... Airport. Orlando, Florida Orlando Executive Airport. Palm Springs, California Palm Springs...

  4. 19 CFR 122.15 - User fee airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Federal Register citations affecting § 122.15, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... Municipal Airport. Orlando, Florida Orlando Executive Airport. Palm Springs, California Palm...

  5. Overview of environmental and hydrogeologic conditions at the Merle K. "Mudhole" Smith Airport near Cordova, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorava, J.M.; Sokup, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Air service to Cordova, Alaska and the surrounding region is provided by the Merle K. "Mudhole" Smith Airport, 21 kilometers east of the townsite. The Federal Aviation Administration owns or operates support facilities at the airport and wishes to consider the environmental setting and hydro- geologic conditions when evaluating options for remediation of potential contamination at these facilities. The airport is within the Copper River Delta wetlands area and the Chugach National Forest. Silts, sands, and gravels of fluvial origin underlie the airport. Potential flooding may be caused by outbursts of glacier-dammed lakes, glacier icemelt, snowmelt runoff, or precipitation. Surface spills and disposal of hazardous materials in conjunction with precipitation or flooding may adversely affect the quality of ground water. Drinking water at the airport is currently supplied by wells. Alternative drinking-water sources include local rivers and streams, transporting city water from Cordova, or undiscovered aquifers. Each alternative source, however, would likely cost significantly more to develop than using the existing shallow aquifer supply.

  6. Phage and Yeast Display.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jared; Marasco, Wayne A

    2015-02-01

    Despite the availability of antimicrobial drugs, the continued development of microbial resistance--established through escape mutations and the emergence of resistant strains--limits their clinical utility. The discovery of novel, therapeutic, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offers viable clinical alternatives in the treatment and prophylaxis of infectious diseases. Human mAb-based therapies are typically nontoxic in patients and demonstrate high specificity for the intended microbial target. This specificity prevents negative impacts on the patient microbiome and avoids driving the resistance of nontarget species. The in vitro selection of human antibody fragment libraries displayed on phage or yeast surfaces represents a group of well-established technologies capable of generating human mAbs. The advantage of these forms of microbial display is the large repertoire of human antibody fragments present during a single selection campaign. Furthermore, the in vitro selection environments of microbial surface display allow for the rapid isolation of antibodies--and their encoding genes--against infectious pathogens and their toxins that are impractical within in vivo systems, such as murine hybridomas. This article focuses on the technologies of phage display and yeast display, as these strategies relate to the discovery of human mAbs for the treatment and vaccine development of infectious diseases. PMID:26104550

  7. Role of helicopters in airport access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dajani, J. S.; Snyder, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper briefly reviews the role of helicopter systems in the provision of airport access services and evaluates the potential for the future development of such services in major metropolitan areas in the United States. The evaluation is based on a computer simulation of potential helicopter system proposed for 20 metropolitan areas. The simulation provides two indicators that are used to gage the extent of the feasibility of developing successful systems in these areas: (1) the cost per seat mile, and (2) the break-even number of passengers, expressed as a percentage of total air travelers. It is found that a few metropolitan areas presently have the potential of marginally supporting intra-urban helicopter airport access service. The access systems offer a viable alternative for air passengers placing a high value on their time, and provides the opportunity for better integrating the air transportation service of multiple airports in a given urban region.

  8. TRIZ Tool for Optimization of Airport Runway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Venkata; Selladurai, V.; Saravanan, R.

    TRIZ tool is used for conceptual design and layout of the novel ascending and descending runway model for the effective utilization of short length airports. Handling bigger aircrafts at smaller airports become the necessity for economic consideration and for the benefit of vast airliners and the aspiring air travelers of the region. The authors’ proposal of ascending and descending runway would enable the operational need of wide body aircrafts such as Boeing 747 and Airbus A380-800. Negotiating take-off and landing of bigger aircrafts at less than 10000 feet runway is an optimization solution. This conceptual model and the theoretical design with its layout is dealt in this paper as Part - I. The computer-aided design and analysis using MATLAB with Simulink tool box to confirm the adequacy of the runway length for the bigger aircrafts at smaller airports is however dealt in subsequent papers.

  9. Structural evolution of the Brazilian airport network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Rocha, Luis E. C.

    2009-04-01

    The aviation sector is profitable, but sensitive to economic fluctuations, geopolitical constraints and governmental regulations. As for other means of transportation, the relation between origin and destination results in a complex map of routes, which can be complemented with information associated with the routes themselves, for instance, frequency, traffic load and distance. The theory of networks provides a natural framework for investigating the dynamics on the resulting structure. Here, we investigate the structure and evolution of the Brazilian airport network (BAN) as regards several quantities: routes, connections, passengers and cargo. Some structural features are in accordance with previous results for other airport networks. The analysis of the evolution of the BAN shows that its structure is dynamic, with changes in the relative relevance of some airports and routes. The results indicate that the connections converge to specific routes. The network shrinks at the route level but grows in number of passengers and amount of cargo, which more than doubled during the period studied.

  10. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N.; Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  11. Productivity Analysis of Public and Private Airports: A Causal Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasigh, Bijan; Gorjidooz, Javad

    2007-01-01

    Around the world, airports are being viewed as enterprises, rather than public services, which are expected to be managed efficiently and provide passengers with courteous customer services. Governments are, increasingly, turning to the private sectors for their efficiency in managing the operation, financing, and development, as well as providing security for airports. Operational and financial performance evaluation has become increasingly important to airport operators due to recent trends in airport privatization. Assessing performance allows the airport operators to plan for human resources and capital investment as efficiently as possible. Productivity measurements may be used as comparisons and guidelines in strategic planning, in the internal analysis of operational efficiency and effectiveness, and in assessing the competitive position of an airport in transportation industry. The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate the operational and financial efficiencies of 22 major airports in the United States and Europe. These airports are divided into three groups based on private ownership (7 British Airport Authority airports), public ownership (8 major United States airports), and a mix of private and public ownership (7 major European Union airports. The detail ownership structures of these airports are presented in Appendix A. Total factor productivity (TFP) model was utilized to measure airport performance in terms of financial and operational efficiencies and to develop a benchmarking tool to identify the areas of strength and weakness. A regression model was then employed to measure the relationship between TFP and ownership structure. Finally a Granger causality test was performed to determine whether ownership structure is a Granger cause of TFP. The results of the analysis presented in this paper demonstrate that there is not a significant relationship between airport TFP and ownership structure. Airport productivity and efficiency is

  12. The noise impact of proposed runway alternatives at Craig Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1982-01-01

    Four proposed runway expansion alternatives at Craig Airport in Jacksonville, Florida have been assessed with respect to their forecasted noise impact in the year 2005. The assessment accounts for population distributions around the airport and human subjective response to noise, as well as the distribution of noise levels in the surrounding community (footprints). The impact analysis was performed using the Airport-noise Levels and Annoyance Model (ALAMO), an airport community response model recently developd at Langley Research Center.

  13. Differential GPS and system integration of the Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, James M.

    1994-01-01

    The LVLASO Flight Demonstration of ASTA concepts (FDAC) integrates NASA-Langley's electronic moving map display and Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) (a modified Boeing 737 aircraft); ARINC's VHF data link, GPS ground station, and automated controller workstation; and Norden's surface radar/airport movement safety system. Aircraft location is shown on the electronic map display in the cockpit. An approved taxi route as well as other aircraft and surface traffic are also displayed. An Ashtech Z12 Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver on the TSRV estimates the aircraft's position. In Differential mode (DSPS), the Ashtech receiver accepts differential C/A code pseudorange corrections from a GPS ground station. The GPS ground station provides corrections up to ten satellites. The corrections are transmitted on a VHF data link at a 1 Hz. rate using the RTCM-104 format. DGPS position estimates will be within 5 meters of actual aircraft position. DGPS position estimates are blended with position, velocity, acceleration, and heading data from the TSRV Air Data/Inertial Reference System (ADIRS). The ADIRS data is accurate in the short-term, but drifts over time. The DGPS data is used to keep the ADIRS position accurate. Ownship position, velocity, heading, and turn rate are sent at a 20 Hz. rate to the electronic map display. Airport traffic is detected by the airport surface radar system. Aircraft and vehicles such as fuel trucks and baggage carts are detected. The traffic's location, velocity, and heading are sent to the TSRV. To prevent traffic symbology from jumping each second when a location update arrives, velocity and heading are used to predict a new traffic location for each display update. Possible runway incursions and collisions can be shown on the electronic map. Integrating the different systems used in the FDAC requires attention to the underlying coordinate systems. The airport diagram displayed on the electronic map is obtained from published

  14. Development of compact blue-green lasers for projection display based on Novalux extended-cavity surface-emitting laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchegrov, Andrei V.; Watson, Jason P.; Lee, Dicky; Umbrasas, Arvydas; Hallstein, Sascha; Carey, Glen P.; Hitchens, William R.; Scholz, Ken; Cantos, Brad D.; Niven, Greg; Jansen, Michael; Pelaprat, Jean-Michel; Mooradian, Aram

    2005-03-01

    Compact and efficient blue-green lasers have been receiving increasing interest in the last few years due to their applications in various industries: bio-instrumentation, reprographics, microscopy, etc. We report on the latest developments in frequency-doubled, compact blue-green lasers, based on Novalux extended-cavity surface emitting laser (NECSEL) technology. This discussion will touch upon using NECSEL technology to go beyond a 5-20 milliwatt cw laser design for instrumentation applications and obtain a compact design that is scalable to higher power levels in an array-based architecture. Such a blue-green laser array platform can address the needs of laser light sources in the projection display consumer electronics markets, particularly in rear-projection televisions.

  15. 77 FR 27857 - Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC-Operation Exemption-Kingman Airport Authority, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC--Operation Exemption--Kingman Airport Authority, Inc. Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC (KTRR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of....--Continuance in Control Exemption--Kingman Terminal Railroad, LLC, Docket No. FD 35619, wherein...

  16. A selective and sensitive D-xylose electrochemical biosensor based on xylose dehydrogenase displayed on the surface of bacteria and multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Liang, Bo; Shi, Jianguo; Li, Feng; Mascini, Marco; Liu, Aihua

    2012-03-15

    A novel Nafion/bacteria-displaying xylose dehydrogenase (XDH)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composite film-modified electrode was fabricated and applied for the sensitive and selective determination of d-xylose (INS 967), where the XDH-displayed bacteria (XDH-bacteria) was prepared using a newly identified ice nucleation protein from Pseudomonas borealis DL7 as an anchoring motif. The XDH-displayed bacteria can be used directly, eliminating further enzyme-extraction and purification, thus greatly improved the stability of the enzyme. The optimal conditions for the construction of biosensor were established: homogeneous Nafion-MWNTs composite dispersion (10 μL) was cast onto the inverted glassy carbon electrode, followed by casting 10-μL of XDH-bacteria aqueous solution to stand overnight to dry, then a 5-μL of Nafion solution (0.05 wt%) is syringed to the electrode surface. The bacteria-displaying XDH could catalyze the oxidization of xylose to xylonolactone with coenzyme NAD(+) in 0.1M PBS buffer (pH7.4), where NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) is reduced to NADH (the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). The resultant NADH is further electrocatalytically oxidized by MWNTs on the electrode, resulting in an obvious oxidation peak around 0.50 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). In contrast, the bacteria-XDH-only modified electrode showed oxidation peak at higher potential of 0.7 V and less sensitivity. Therefore, the electrode/MWNTs/bacteria-XDH/Nafion exhibited good analytical performance such as long-term stability, a wide dynamic range of 0.6-100 μM and a low detection limit of 0.5 μM D-xylose (S/N=3). No interference was observed in the presence of 300-fold excess of other saccharides including D-glucose, D-fructose, D-maltose, D-galactose, D-mannose, D-sucrose, and D-cellbiose as well as 60-fold excess of L-arabinose. The proposed microbial biosensor is stable, specific, sensitive, reproducible, simple, rapid and cost-effective, which holds

  17. Mucosal Immunization with Surface-Displayed Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein on Lactobacillus casei Induces Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Soo; Poo, Haryoung; Han, Dong P.; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Kwang; Cho, Michael W.; Kim, Eun; Sung, Moon-Hee; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2006-01-01

    Induction of mucosal immunity may be important for preventing SARS-CoV infections. For safe and effective delivery of viral antigens to the mucosal immune system, we have developed a novel surface antigen display system for lactic acid bacteria using the poly-γ-glutamic acid synthetase A protein (PgsA) of Bacillus subtilis as an anchoring matrix. Recombinant fusion proteins comprised of PgsA and the Spike (S) protein segments SA (residues 2 to 114) and SB (residues 264 to 596) were stably expressed in Lactobacillus casei. Surface localization of the fusion protein was verified by cellular fractionation analyses, immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Oral and nasal inoculations of recombinant L. casei into mice resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgA, as demonstrated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using S protein peptides. More importantly, these antibodies exhibited potent neutralizing activities against severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) pseudoviruses. Orally immunized mice mounted a greater neutralizing-antibody response than those immunized intranasally. Three new neutralizing epitopes were identified on the S protein using a peptide neutralization interference assay (residues 291 to 308, 520 to 529, and 564 to 581). These results indicate that mucosal immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing SARS-associated coronavirus S protein on its surface provides an effective means for eliciting protective immune response against the virus. PMID:16571824

  18. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  19. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  20. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  1. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  2. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  3. Un Viaje al Aeropuerto (A Trip to the Airport).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This illustrated, bilingual Spanish-English intermediate reader describes a class trip to an airport, in which the class tours the airport, and learns about airport activities, the parts of an airplane, and other related topics. Each page of the text is illustrated with a drawing. The narrative is followed by a list of 24 suggested learning…

  4. 14 CFR 151.3 - National Airport Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false National Airport Plan. 151.3 Section 151.3 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS... provide a system of public airports adequate to anticipate and meet the needs of civil aeronautics. (b)...

  5. 14 CFR 151.3 - National Airport Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false National Airport Plan. 151.3 Section 151.3 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS... provide a system of public airports adequate to anticipate and meet the needs of civil aeronautics. (b)...

  6. 14 CFR 151.3 - National Airport Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false National Airport Plan. 151.3 Section 151.3 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS... provide a system of public airports adequate to anticipate and meet the needs of civil aeronautics. (b)...

  7. 14 CFR 151.3 - National Airport Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false National Airport Plan. 151.3 Section 151.3 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS... provide a system of public airports adequate to anticipate and meet the needs of civil aeronautics. (b)...

  8. 14 CFR 151.3 - National Airport Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false National Airport Plan. 151.3 Section 151.3 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS... provide a system of public airports adequate to anticipate and meet the needs of civil aeronautics. (b)...

  9. 76 FR 78967 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Intent To Rule on Request to Release Airport Property at the Liberal Mid-America Regional Airport & Airport Industrial Park Liberal, KS. SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to rule and invites public comment on the release of land at the Liberal Mid-America Regional...

  10. 49 CFR 37.33 - Airport transportation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... systems operated by public airport operators, which provide designated public transportation and connect.... Public airports which operate fixed route transportation systems are subject to the requirements of this... part. (b) Fixed-route transportation systems operated by public airport operators between the...

  11. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  12. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  13. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  14. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  15. 14 CFR 137.45 - Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.45 Nonobservance of airport traffic pattern. Notwithstanding part 91 of this chapter, the pilot in command of an aircraft may deviate from an airport...

  16. Airports, Hotel, and Ground Transportation Information | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Airports in and near Washington, DC Reagan National Approximate 30 minute drive from Rockville* Has its own Metro stop on the blue and yellow lines in Virginia NOTE: This airport may be the closest and easiest option if not renting a car or do not want to pay for an airport cab/shuttle.   Dulles International Approximate 1 hour drive from Rockville* |

  17. 49 CFR 1542.3 - Airport security coordinator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airport security coordinator. 1542.3 Section 1542.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRPORT SECURITY General § 1542.3 Airport security coordinator. (a) Each...

  18. 14 CFR 152.103 - Sponsors: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sponsors: Airport development. 152.103 Section 152.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Sponsors: Airport development. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for airport development...

  19. 14 CFR 152.103 - Sponsors: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sponsors: Airport development. 152.103 Section 152.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Sponsors: Airport development. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for airport development...

  20. 14 CFR 152.323 - Budget revision: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Budget revision: Airport development. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.323 Budget... change in the budget estimates, the sponsor shall submit a request for budget revision on a...

  1. 14 CFR 152.323 - Budget revision: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Budget revision: Airport development. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.323 Budget... change in the budget estimates, the sponsor shall submit a request for budget revision on a...

  2. 14 CFR 152.323 - Budget revision: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Budget revision: Airport development. 152... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT AID PROGRAM Accounting and Reporting Requirements § 152.323 Budget... change in the budget estimates, the sponsor shall submit a request for budget revision on a...

  3. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  4. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  5. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  6. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport...

  7. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  8. 14 CFR 135.221 - IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums... VFR/IFR Operating Limitations and Weather Requirements § 135.221 IFR: Alternate airport weather minimums. No person may designate an alternate airport unless the weather reports or forecasts, or...

  9. 77 FR 17492 - Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... selection process, and the initial airport locations. See 77 FR 5681 and 8 CFR 235.12. Travelers who wish to... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Expansion of Global Entry to Additional Airports AGENCY: U.S.... This document announces the expansion of the program to include four additional airports. DATES:...

  10. 14 CFR 152.103 - Sponsors: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sponsors: Airport development. 152.103 Section 152.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Sponsors: Airport development. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for airport development...

  11. 14 CFR 152.103 - Sponsors: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sponsors: Airport development. 152.103 Section 152.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Sponsors: Airport development. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for airport development...

  12. 14 CFR 152.103 - Sponsors: Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sponsors: Airport development. 152.103 Section 152.103 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Sponsors: Airport development. (a) To be eligible to apply for a project for airport development...

  13. 19 CFR 122.14 - Landing rights airport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... landing. Permission to land is not required for an emergency or forced landing (covered under § 122.35... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Landing rights airport. 122.14 Section 122.14... TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Classes of Airports § 122.14 Landing rights airport. (a) Permission...

  14. 14 CFR 135.223 - IFR: Alternate airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) to— (1) Complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing; (2) Fly from that airport to... not apply if part 97 of this chapter prescribes a standard instrument approach procedure for the first... airport is forecast to be at least three miles, or two miles more than the lowest applicable...

  15. 14 CFR 135.223 - IFR: Alternate airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) to— (1) Complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing; (2) Fly from that airport to... not apply if part 97 of this chapter prescribes a standard instrument approach procedure for the first... airport is forecast to be at least three miles, or two miles more than the lowest applicable...

  16. 14 CFR 135.223 - IFR: Alternate airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) to— (1) Complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing; (2) Fly from that airport to... not apply if part 97 of this chapter prescribes a standard instrument approach procedure for the first... airport is forecast to be at least three miles, or two miles more than the lowest applicable...

  17. 14 CFR 135.223 - IFR: Alternate airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) to— (1) Complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing; (2) Fly from that airport to... not apply if part 97 of this chapter prescribes a standard instrument approach procedure for the first... airport is forecast to be at least three miles, or two miles more than the lowest applicable...

  18. 14 CFR 135.223 - IFR: Alternate airport requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) to— (1) Complete the flight to the first airport of intended landing; (2) Fly from that airport to... not apply if part 97 of this chapter prescribes a standard instrument approach procedure for the first... airport is forecast to be at least three miles, or two miles more than the lowest applicable...

  19. Environmental fog/rain visual display system for aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An environmental fog/rain visual display system for aircraft simulators is described. The electronic elements of the system include a real time digital computer, a caligraphic color display which simulates landing lights of selective intensity, and a color television camera for producing a moving color display of the airport runway as depicted on a model terrain board. The mechanical simulation elements of the system include an environmental chamber which can produce natural fog, nonhomogeneous fog, rain and fog combined, or rain only. A pilot looking through the aircraft wind screen will look through the fog and/or rain generated in the environmental chamber onto a viewing screen with the simulated color image of the airport runway thereon, and observe a very real simulation of actual conditions of a runway as it would appear through actual fog and/or rain.

  20. Demonstration of Land and Hold Short Technology at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyer, Paul V.; Jones, Denise R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A guidance system for assisting in Land and Hold Short operations was developed and then tested at the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. This system displays deceleration advisory information on a head-up display (HUD) in front of the airline pilot during landing. The display includes runway edges, a trend vector, deceleration advisory, locations of the hold line and of the selected exit, and alphanumeric information about the progress of the aircraft. Deceleration guidance is provided to the hold short line or to a pilot selected exit prior to this line. Logic is provided to switch the display automatically to the next available exit. The report includes descriptions of the algorithms utilized in the displays, and a report on the techniques of HUD alignment, and results.

  1. Plastic (wire-combed) grooving of a slip-formed concrete runway overlay at Patrick Henry Airport: An initial evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlin, E. C.; Horne, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    A wire-comb technique is described for transversely grooving the surface of a freshly laid (plastic state) slip-formed concrete overlay installed at Patrick Henry Airport. This method of surface texturing yields better water drainage and pavement skid resistance than that obtained with an older conventional burlap drag concrete surface treatment installed on an adjacent portion of the runway.

  2. 77 FR 16891 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Tulsa International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Tulsa International Airport, Tulsa, OK AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Request... release of land at the Tulsa International Airport under the provision of Section 817 of the...

  3. 75 FR 23841 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the Reading Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... Reading Regional Airport, Reading, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) DOT. ACTION: Notice of... release of land at the Reading Regional Airport, Reading, Pennsylvania under the provisions of Section...: Terry P. Sroka, Manager, Reading Regional Airport Authority, 2501 Bernville Road, Reading, PA 19605,...

  4. 76 FR 19517 - Orders Limiting Scheduled Operations at John F. Kennedy International Airport, LaGuardia Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ....\\1\\ \\1\\ 75 FR 9017 (Feb. 26, 2010). ATA also stated the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...\\ 14 CFR 93.227 (DCA); 74 FR 51648 (Oct. 7, 2009) (EWR); 74 FR 51650 (Oct. 7, 2009) (JFK); 74 FR 51653... Airport, LaGuardia Airport, and Newark Liberty International Airport; High Density Rule at Reagan...

  5. 75 FR 41922 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Fort Smith Regional Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Smith Regional Airport, Fort Smith, AR AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... comment on the release of land at Fort Smith Regional Airport under the provisions of Title 49, U.S.C... comments submitted to the FM must be mailed or delivered to Mr. John Parker, Airport Director, Fort...

  6. 77 FR 23598 - Technical Amendment to Cuba Airport List: Addition of Recently Approved Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... FR 5058) that amended the CBP regulations to establish such procedures and airport eligibility..., 1594, 1623, 1624, 1644, 1644a, 2071 note. * * * * * ] 0 2. In Sec. 122.153, revise paragraph (c)...

  7. 75 FR 54946 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... Federal Register on October 13, 2009 (74 FR 52524). Comments were due on March 31, 2010. Comments on the... the airport in local politics. Response: Owners of residential lots with through-the-fence...

  8. A review of smoking policies in airports around the world

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, Frances A; Soong, Andrea; Kleb, Cerise; Grant, Ashley; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review smoking policies of major international airports, to compare these policies with corresponding incountry tobacco control legislation and to identify areas of improvement for advancing smoke-free policy in airports. Methods We reviewed smoking policies of 34 major international airports in five world regions, and collected data on current national and subnational legislation on smoke-free indoor places in the corresponding airport locations. We then compared airport smoking policies with local legislation. Additionally, we collected anecdotal information concerning smoking rules and practices in specific airports from an online traveller website. Results We found that 52.9% of the airports reviewed had indoor smoking rooms or smoking areas; smoking policy was unknown or unstated for two airports. 55.9% of the airports were located in countries where national legislation allowed designated smoking rooms and areas, while 35.3% were in smoke-free countries. Subnational legislation restricted smoking in 60% of the airport locations, while 40% were smoke-free. 71.4% of the airport locations had subnational legislation that allowed smoke-free laws to be more stringent than at the national level, but only half of these places had enacted such laws. Conclusions Despite the increasing presence of smoke-free places and legal capacity to enact stricter legislation at the local level, airports represent a public and occupational space that is often overlooked in national or subnational smoke-free policies. Secondhand smoke exposure in airports can be reduced among travellers and workers by implementing and enforcing smoke-free policies in airports. Additionally, existing information on smoke-free legislation lacks consistent terminology and definitions, which are needed to inform future tobacco control policy within airports and in the law. PMID:24638966

  9. Aircraft noise in the region of the Bucharest-Otopeni Airport. [noise pollution in airport environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costescu, M.; Gherghel, C.; Curtoglu, A.

    1974-01-01

    Aircraft noise, especially in the region adjoining airports, constitutes a problem that will be aggravated in the near future because of increasing aircraft traffic and the appearance of new types of large tonnage aircraft with continuously increasing powers and speeds. Criteria for the evaluation of aircraft noise are reported and some results of studies carried out in the region of Bucharest-Otopeni Airport are detailed.

  10. Airport vulnerability assessment: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarick, Richard T.

    1998-12-01

    The Airport Vulnerability Assessment Project (AVAP) is the direct result of congressional funding of recommendation 3.13 of the White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security. This project takes a new approach to the assessment of U.S. commercial airports. AVAP uses automation, analytical methods and tools to evaluate vulnerability and risk, and to analyze cost/benefits in a more quantitative manner. This paper addresses both the process used to conduct this program, as well as a generalized look at the results, which have been achieved for the initial airport assessments. The process description covers the acquisition approach, the project structure, and a review of the various methodologies and tools being used by the sever performing organizations (Abacus Technology, Battelle, CTI, Lockwood Greene, Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, SAIC, and Science & Engineering Associates). The tools described include ASSESS, SAM, RiskWatch, CASRAP, and AVAT. Included in the process is the utilization of an advisory panel made up predominantly of experts from the National Laboratories 9Sandia, Oak Ridge, Argonne and Brookhaven). The results portion addresses the findings and products resulting from the initial airport assessments. High level (unrestricted) summaries of the results are presented, along with initial trends in commonly recommended security improvements (countermeasures). Opportunities for the application of optics technology are identified.

  11. 77 FR 58208 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... Federal Register 48693-48708 (September 16, 1997) (Notice) (as modified, 62 FR 63211, Nov. 26, 1997). A... application from the Puerto Rico Ports Authority and Puerto Rico Public-Private Partnerships Authority for the participation of Luis Mu oz Mar n International Airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico (SJU) in the...

  12. 32 CFR 644.428 - Airport property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Airport property. 644.428 Section 644.428 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.428...

  13. 32 CFR 644.423 - Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 21)—nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Airport development. 644.423 Section 644.423... development. (a) Authority. 49 U.S.C. 1723 provides that (a) . . . whenever the Secretary of...

  14. 32 CFR 644.423 - Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 21)—nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Airport development. 644.423 Section 644.423... development. (a) Authority. 49 U.S.C. 1723 provides that (a) . . . whenever the Secretary of...

  15. Airport noise impact reduction through operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deloach, R.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of various aeronautical, operational, and land-use noise impact reduction alternatives are assessed for a major midwestern airport. Specifically, the relative effectiveness of adding sound absorbing material to aircraft engines, imposing curfews, and treating houses with acoustic insulation are examined.

  16. 49 CFR 27.71 - Airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Access Act rules (49 CFR part 382) for carriers. (g) If an airport operator who receives Federal... 305 of the U.S. Department of Justice's 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design, 28 CFR 35.104 (defining the “2010 Standards” for title II as the requirements set forth in appendices B and D to 36...

  17. 32 CFR 644.423 - Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 21)—nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Airport development. 644.423 Section 644.423... development. (a) Authority. 49 U.S.C. 1723 provides that (a) . . . whenever the Secretary of...

  18. 32 CFR 644.423 - Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 21)—nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Airport development. 644.423 Section 644.423... development. (a) Authority. 49 U.S.C. 1723 provides that (a) . . . whenever the Secretary of...

  19. 32 CFR 644.423 - Airport development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 21)—nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Airport development. 644.423 Section 644.423... development. (a) Authority. 49 U.S.C. 1723 provides that (a) . . . whenever the Secretary of...

  20. Analysis and Modeling of Ground Operations at Hub Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, Stephen (Technical Monitor); Andersson, Kari; Carr, Francis; Feron, Eric; Hall, William D.

    2000-01-01

    Building simple and accurate models of hub airports can considerably help one understand airport dynamics, and may provide quantitative estimates of operational airport improvements. In this paper, three models are proposed to capture the dynamics of busy hub airport operations. Two simple queuing models are introduced to capture the taxi-out and taxi-in processes. An integer programming model aimed at representing airline decision-making attempts to capture the dynamics of the aircraft turnaround process. These models can be applied for predictive purposes. They may also be used to evaluate control strategies for improving overall airport efficiency.