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Sample records for airs infrared sensor

  1. Near infrared testbed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. B.; McCalmont, J. F.; Montgomery, J. B.; Johnson, R. S.; McDermott, D. J.

    2007-04-01

    A new tactical airborne multicolor missile warning testbed was developed and fielded as part of an Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) initiative focusing on clutter and missile signature measurements for algorithm development. Multicolor discrimination is one of the most effective ways of improving the performance of infrared missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. Its utility has been demonstrated in multiple fielded sensors. Traditionally, multicolor discrimination has been performed in the mid-infrared, 3-5 μm band, where the molecular emission of CO and CO2 characteristic of a combustion process is readily distinguished from the continuum of a black body radiator. Current infrared warning sensor development is focused on near infrared (NIR) staring mosaic detector arrays that provide similar spectral discrimination in different bands to provide a cost effective and mechanically simpler system. This, in turn, has required that multicolor clutter data be collected for both analysis and algorithm development. The developed sensor test bed is a multi-camera system 1004x1004 FPA coupled with optimized filters integrated with the optics. The collection portion includes a ruggedized field-programmable gate array processor coupled with with an integrated controller/tracker and fast disk array capable of real-time processing and collection of up to 60 full frames per second. This configuration allowed the collection and real-time processing of temporally correlated, radiometrically calibrated data in multiple spectral bands that was then compared to background and target imagery taken previously

  2. Foveating infrared image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarley, Paul L.; Massie, Mark A.; Curzan, Jon P.

    2007-09-01

    Nova Sensors, under sponsorship of the Munitions Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory, has developed a readout integrated circuit (ROIC) technology for focal plane arrays (FPAs) that permits an intelligent use of the available image data; this is especially effective for dealing with the large volume of data produced by today's large format FPAs. The "Variable Acuity Superpixel Imaging" (VASI TM) ROIC architecture allows for coverage of the entire field of view at high frame rates by permitting larger "superpixels" to be dynamically formed on the FPA in regions of relative unimportance, thus reducing the total number of pixel values required to be multiplexed off the FPA. In addition, multiple high-resolution "foveal" regions may be "flown" around the imager's field of view at a frame rate such that high-value targets may be sampled at the highest possible spatial resolution that the imager can produce. Nova Sensors has built numerous camera systems using 320 x 256 and 1K x 1K pixel versions of visible and infrared VASI TM FPAs. This paper reviews the technology and discusses numerous applications for this new class of imaging sensors.

  3. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Rockstad, Howard K. (Inventor); Reynolds, Joseph K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane which would otherwise change deflection depending upon incident infrared radiation. The resulting infrared sensor will meet or exceed the performance of all other broadband, uncooled, infrared sensors and can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. The technology is readily implemented as a small-format linear array suitable for commercial and spacecraft applications.

  4. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  5. Small infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Stuart B.; Lohrmann, Dieter; Miller, James E.; McCormack, Kent; Newsome, Gwendolyn W.; Brown, James C.; Campbell, James, Jr.; Perconti, Philip; Klager, Gene A.

    2001-09-01

    Small, low cost, low poer infrared imaging sensors are relatively recent innovation, employing the most advanced MEMS processing techniques, integrated circuit design, optical materials, and focal plane array packaging. We will review the rationale behind the development of low cost, small IR cameras, discuss several of the medium performance applications for these sensors via a modeling analysis, discuss the goals and status of our applied research uncooled focal plane array technology programs, and discuss the future of uncooled focal plane arrays.

  6. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  7. Real-time monitoring of ozone in air using substrate-integrated hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensors.

    PubMed

    da Silveira Petruci, João Flávio; Fortes, Paula Regina; Kokoric, Vjekoslav; Wilk, Andreas; Raimundo, Ivo Milton; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidant that is globally used as disinfection agent for many purposes including indoor building air cleaning, during food preparation procedures, and for control and killing of bacteria such as E. coli and S. aureus. However, it has been shown that effective ozone concentrations for controlling e.g., microbial growth need to be higher than 5 ppm, thereby exceeding the recommended U.S. EPA threshold more than 10 times. Consequently, real-time monitoring of such ozone concentration levels is essential. Here, we describe the first online gas sensing system combining a compact Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a new generation of gas cells, a so-called substrate-integrated hollow waveguide (iHWG). The sensor was calibrated using an UV lamp for the controlled generation of ozone in synthetic air. A calibration function was established in the concentration range of 0.3-5.4 mmol m⁻³ enabling a calculated limit of detection (LOD) at 0.14 mmol m⁻³ (3.5 ppm) of ozone. Given the adaptability of the developed IR sensing device toward a series of relevant air pollutants, and considering the potential for miniaturization e.g., in combination with tunable quantum cascade lasers in lieu of the FTIR spectrometer, a wide range of sensing and monitoring applications of beyond ozone analysis are anticipated. PMID:24213678

  8. Air Sensor Guidebook

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Air Sensor Guidebook has been developed by the U.S. EPA to assist those interested in potentially using lower cost air quality sensor technologies for air quality measurements. Its development was in direct response to a request for such a document following a recent scienti...

  9. Air Conditioning Overflow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center helped a local inventor develop a prototype of an attachment for central air conditioners and heat pumps that helps monitor water levels to prevent condensation overflow. The sensor will indicate a need for drain line maintenance and prevent possible damage caused by drain pan water spillover. An engineer in the Stennis Space Center prototype Development Laboratory used SSC sensor technology in the development of the sensor.

  10. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2013-05-28

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  11. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2014-11-25

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  12. Scanning mirror for infrared sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. H.; Bernstein, S. B.

    1972-01-01

    A high resolution, long life angle-encoded scanning mirror, built for application in an infrared attitude sensor, is described. The mirror uses a Moire' fringe type optical encoder and unique torsion bar suspension together with a magnetic drive to meet stringent operational and environmental requirements at a minimum weight and with minimum power consumption. Details of the specifications, design, and construction are presented with an analysis of the mirror suspension that allows accurate prediction of performance. The emphasis is on mechanical design considerations, and brief discussions are included on the encoder and magnetic drive to provide a complete view of the mirror system and its capabilities.

  13. Micromachined electron tunneling infrared sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Kaiser, W. J.; Podosek, J. A.; Rockstad, H. K.; Reynolds, J. K.

    1993-01-01

    The development of an improved Golay cell is reported. This new sensor is constructed entirely from micromachined silicon components. A silicon oxynitride (SiO(x)N(y)) membrane is deflected by the thermal expansion of a small volume of trapped gas. To detect the motion of the membrane, an electron tunneling transducer is used. This sensor detects electrons which tunnel through the classically forbidden barrier between a tip and a surface; the electron current is exponentially dependent on the separation between the tip and the surface. The sensitivity of tunneling transducers constructed was typically better than 10(exp -3) A/square root of Hz. Through use of the electron tunneling transducer, the scaling laws which have prevented the miniaturization of the Golay cell are avoided. This detector potentially offers low cost fabrication, compatibility with silicon readout electronics, and operation without cooling. Most importantly, this detector may offer better sensitivity than any other uncooled infrared sensor, with the exception of the original Golay cell.

  14. Overview of Emerging Air Sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    These slides will be presented at the 2014 National Ambient Air Monitoring Conference in Atlanta, GA during August 11-15, 2014. The goal is to provide an overview of air sensor technology and the audience will be primarily state air monitoring agencies and EPA Regions.

  15. Near infrared missile warning testbed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, D. J.; Johnson, R. S.; Montgomery, J. B.; Sanderson, R. B.; McCalmont, J. F.; Taylor, M. J.

    2008-04-01

    Multicolor discrimination is one of the most effective ways of improving the performance of infrared missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. A new tactical airborne multicolor missile warning testbed was developed and fielded as part of a continuing Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) initiative focusing on clutter and missile signature measurements for effective missile warning algorithms. The developed sensor test bed is a multi-camera system 1004x1004 FPA coupled with optimized spectral filters integrated with the optics; a reduced form factor microprocessor-based video data recording system operating at 48 Hz; and a real time field programmable gate array processor for algorithm and video data processing capable of 800B Multiply/Accumulates operations per second. A detailed radiometric calibration procedure was developed to overcome severe photon-limited operating conditions due to the sub-nanometer bandwidth of the spectral filters. This configuration allows the collection and real-time processing of temporally correlated, radiometrically calibrated video data in multiple spectral bands. The testbed was utilized to collect false alarm sources spectra and Man-Portable Air Defense System (MANPADS) signatures under a variety of atmospheric and solar illuminating conditions. Signatures of approximately 100 missiles have been recorded.

  16. AIRS - the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigsten, Bjorn H.; Fetzer, Eric; Fishbein, Evan; Lee, Sung-Yung; Paganao, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched in 2002, along with two companion microwave sounders. This AIRS sounding suite is the most advanced atmospheric sounding system to date, with measurement accuracies far surpassing those of current weather satellites. From its sun synchronous polar orbit, the AIRS system provides more than 90% of the globe every 24 hours. Much of the post-launch period has been devoted to optimizing the 'retrieval' system used to derive atmospheric and other parameters from the observations and to validate those parameters. The geophysical parameters have been produced since the beginning of 2003 - the first data were released to the public in mid-2003, and future improved versions will be released periodically. The ongoing calibration/validation effort has confirmed that the system is very accurate and stable. There are a number of applications for the AIRS products, ranging from numerical weather prediction - where positive impact on forecast accuracy has already been demonstrated, to atmospheric research - where the AIRS water vapor products near the surface and in the mid and upper troposphere as well as in the stratosphere promise to make it possible to characterize and model phenomena that are key for short-term atmospheric processes, from weather patterns to long-term processes, such as interannual variability and climate change.

  17. Infrared-Proximity-Sensor Modules For Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parton, William; Wegerif, Daniel; Rosinski, Douglas

    1995-01-01

    Collision-avoidance system for articulated robot manipulators uses infrared proximity sensors grouped together in array of sensor modules. Sensor modules, called "sensorCells," distributed processing board-level products for acquiring data from proximity-sensors strategically mounted on robot manipulators. Each sensorCell self-contained and consists of multiple sensing elements, discrete electronics, microcontroller and communications components. Modules connected to central control computer by redundant serial digital communication subsystem including both serial and a multi-drop bus. Detects objects made of various materials at distance of up to 50 cm. For some materials, such as thermal protection system tiles, detection range reduced to approximately 20 cm.

  18. Boeing infrared sensor (BIRS) calibration facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen, John D.; Scorsone, L. V.

    1990-01-01

    The Boeing Infrared Sensor (BIRS) Calibration Facility represents a major capital investment in optical and infrared technology. The facility was designed and built for the calibration and testing of the new generation large aperture long wave infrared (LWIR) sensors, seekers, and related technologies. Capability exists to perform both radiometric and goniometric calibrations of large infrared sensors under simulated environmental operating conditions. The system is presently configured for endoatmospheric calibrations with a uniform background field which can be set to simulate the expected mission background levels. During calibration, the sensor under test is also exposed to expected mission temperatures and pressures within the test chamber. Capability exists to convert the facility for exoatmospheric testing. The configuration of the system is described along with hardware elements and changes made to date are addressed.

  19. Carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposite infrared sensor.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Basudev; Setyowati, Kristina; Liu, Haiying; Waldeck, David H; Chen, Jian

    2008-04-01

    The infrared photoresponse in the electrical conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is dramatically enhanced by embedding SWNTs in an electrically and thermally insulating polymer matrix. The conductivity change in a 5 wt % SWNT-polycarbonate nanocomposite is significant (4.26%) and sharp upon infrared illumination in the air at room temperature. While the thermal effect predominates in the infrared photoresponse of a pure SWNT film, the photoeffect predominates in the infrared photoresponse of SWNT-polycarbonate nanocomposites. PMID:18333623

  20. Infrared point sensors for homeland defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ross C.; Carter, Michael T.; Homrighausen, Craig L.

    2004-03-01

    We report recent progress toward the development of infrared point sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agents and explosive related chemicals, which pose a significant threat to both health and environment. Technical objectives have focused on the development of polymer sorbents to enhance the infrared response of these hazardous organic compounds. For example, infrared point sensors which part-per-billion detection limits have been developed that rapidlypartition chemical warfare agents and explosive related chemicals into polymer thin films with desirable chemical and physical properties. These chemical sensors demonstrate novel routes to reversible sensing of hazardous organic compounds. The development of small, low-power, sensitive, and selective instruments employing these chemical sensors would enhance the capabilities of federal, state, and local emergency response to incidents involving chemical terrorism. Specific applications include chemical defense systems for military personnel and homeland defense, environmental monitors for remediation and demilitarization, and point source detectors for emergency and maintenance response teams.

  1. Report of the direct infrared sensors panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, Craig; Bharat, R.; Capps, R.; Forrest, W.; Hoffman, A.; Mcmurray, R.; Moseley, H.; Reine, M.; Richards, P.; Smith, D.

    1991-01-01

    The direct infrared sensors panel considered a wide range of options for technologies relevant to the science goals of the Astrotech 21 mission set. Among the technologies assessed are: large format arrays; photon counting detectors; higher temperature 1 to 10 micro-m arrays; impurity band conduction (IBC) or blocked impurity band (BIB) detectors; readout electronics; and adapting the Space Infrared Telescope Facility and Hubble Space Telescope. Detailed development plans were presented for each of these technology areas.

  2. Infrared sensor with precisely patterned Au black absorption layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Masaki; Morita, Shinichi

    1998-10-01

    Thermoelectric infrared sensors has been fabricated by adding to the CMOS process a surface micromachining technique and a highly accurate process for forming an infrared radiation absorbing layer. The sensor, or thermopile, consists of alternating areas of p-type and n-type polysilicon connected in series on a Si3N4 layer. An anisotropic etching technique using hydrazine is employed to form a thermally isolated membrane. While a Au-black layer for infrared radiation absorption provides the best absorption efficiency over a broad infrared wavelength region, it has been difficult to pattern the layer precisely. Patterning is accomplished by forming the Au-black layer by a low-pressure vapor deposition technique on amorphous Si and a PSG sacrificial layer and then removing it on PSG by the lift-off technique or wet etching PSG. This technique makes it possible to obtain a Au-black pattern with the same degree of accuracy as with the CMOS process. As a result, sensor performance has been improved and a device array has also been achieved. A simple sensor design method has been established by which simulations are easily conducted using a thermal equivalent circuit based on the CMOS process. Prototype sensors, having external dimensions of 160 micrometer X 160 micrometer, achieved responsivity of 300, 149 and 60 V/W and a time constant of 2.0, 0.46 and 0.27 msec in the air, respectively. These performance figures surpass the performance reported to date for thermoelectric infrared sensors.

  3. Infrared Spectral Radiance Intercomparisons With Satellite and Aircraft Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement system validation is critical for advanced satellite sounders to reach their full potential of improving observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for enabling enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Experimental field campaigns, focusing on satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft, are an essential part of the validation task. Airborne FTS systems can enable an independent, SI-traceable measurement system validation by directly measuring the same level-1 parameters spatially and temporally coincident with the satellite sensor of interest. Continuation of aircraft under-flights for multiple satellites during multiple field campaigns enables long-term monitoring of system performance and inter-satellite cross-validation. The NASA / NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a significant contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This presentation gives an overview of benefits achieved using airborne sensors such as NAST-I utilizing examples from recent field campaigns. The methodology implemented is not only beneficial to new sensors such as the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) flying aboard the Suomi NPP and future JPSS satellites but also of significant benefit to sensors of longer flight heritage such as the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the AQUA and METOP-A platforms, respectively, to ensure data quality continuity important for climate and other applications. Infrared spectral radiance inter-comparisons are discussed with a particular focus on usage of NAST-I data for enabling inter-platform cross-validation.

  4. Design considerations for infrared fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Anheier, Norman C., Jr.; Osantowski, Robert E.; Matlock, Charlene A.; Olsen, Khris B.

    1994-03-01

    This presentation focuses on mechanical and electro-optical design considerations embodied in VOtectTM -- an infrared fiber optic sensor for volatile organic compounds. Presently, the VOtectTM system is configured for remote detection of hydrocarbon vapors associated with gasoline and other internal-combustion fuels. Using commercially available zirconate glass optical fibers, the sensor exploits the overlap of absorption spectra due to carbon-hydrogen stretching vibrations between 3.3 and 3.6 microns, with the optical output of an infrared HeNe laser operating at 3.39 microns. Compensation for position-dependent fiber bending losses is achieved using 1.15-micron radiation simultaneously emitted by the laser source. Initial laboratory evaluations of the VOtectTM system indicates detection sensitivities well below the lower explosion limits for petroleum distillates, indicating the usefulness of the sensor for petrochemical safety applications. The sensor is intrinsically safe (e.g., explosion-proof), since no electrical power is required at the probe tip. Preliminary sensor optical power budget calculations indicate that the zirconate fiber optic umbilical, which connects the sensor probe to the electro-optical detection system, can be as long as several hundred meters. Calibration data for a variety of hydrocarbons indicate linear relationships between ln(V/Vo) and vapor concentration, suggesting that the sensor should prove useful for on-line, real-time process control applications.

  5. Flight evaluation of advanced third-generation midwave infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chyau N.; Donn, Matthew

    1998-08-01

    In FY-97 the Counter Drug Optical Upgrade (CDOU) demonstration program was initiated by the Program Executive Office for Counter Drug to increase the detection and classification ranges of P-3 counter drug aircraft by using advanced staring infrared sensors. The demonstration hardware is a `pin-for-pin' replacement of the AAS-36 Infrared Detection Set (IRDS) located under the nose radome of a P-3 aircraft. The hardware consists of a 3rd generation mid-wave infrared (MWIR) sensor integrated into a three axis-stabilized turret. The sensor, when installed on the P- 3, has a hemispheric field of regard and analysis has shown it will be capable of detecting and classifying Suspected Drug Trafficking Aircraft and Vessels at ranges several factors over the current IRDS. This paper will discuss the CDOU system and it's lab, ground, and flight evaluation results. Test targets included target templates, range targets, dedicated target boats, and targets of opportunity at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division and at operational test sites. The objectives of these tests were to: (1) Validate the integration concept of the CDOU package into the P-3 aircraft. (2) Validate the end-to-end functionality of the system, including sensor/turret controls and recording of imagery during flight. (3) Evaluate the system sensitivity and resolution on a set of verified resolution targets templates. (4) Validate the ability of the 3rd generation MWIR sensor to detect and classify targets at a significantly increased range.

  6. Uncooled infrared sensor development trends and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Skidmore, George D.; Han, C. J.

    2011-10-01

    Uncooled infrared sensor markets have grown dramatically over the past decade due to significant improvements in sensor performance, producibility and cost reductions. Current uncooled sensors are dominated by VOx and amorphous silicon based microbolometers with spectral responses in the 7-14 μm wavelength region (LWIR). The majority of uncooled microbolometer focal plane array (UFPA) formats currently in production are 160x120, 320x240, 640x480 with 20 to 38 um pixel pitch. Most suppliers have reported good UFPA performance with less than 50 mK NETD(f/1 optics, 30 -60 Hz frame rates). Recently, 17 μm pixel pitch UFPAs have been introduced to the market. The smaller detector pixel pitch allows manufacturing of larger format such as 1024x768 UFPAs without photolithographic stitching. In the past, uncooled IR sensor developments were primarily driven by military needs; however, as low cost uncooled sensors began to proliferate in the commercial market, uncooled sensors with FPA formats of 320x240 and smaller are rapidly becoming commodity items. Reduction of sensor system size, weight, and power (SWaP) as well as cost is the key driver for the next generation of uncooled sensors. This paper presents a brief overview of the uncooled sensors status, developmental trends and challenges facing the industry.

  7. Infrared phased-array sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slovick, Brian A.; Bean, Jeffrey A.; Florence, Lou A.; Boreman, Glenn D.

    2011-06-01

    Metal-oxide-metal (MOM) tunnel diode detectors when integrated with phased-array antennas provide determination of the angle of arrival and degree of coherence of received infrared radiation. Angle-of-arrival measurements are made with a pair of dipole antennas coupled to a MOM diode through a coplanar strip transmission line. The direction of maximum angular response is altered by varying the position of the MOM diode along the transmission line connecting the antenna elements. Phased-array antennas can also be used to measure the degree of coherence of a partially coherent infrared field. With a two-element array, the degree of coherence is a measure of the correlation of electric fields received by the antennas as a function of the element separation. Antenna-coupled MOM diode devices are fabricated using electron beam lithography and thin-film deposition through a resist shadow mask. Measurements at 10.6 μm are substantiated by electromagnetic simulations and compared to analytic results.

  8. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-10-01

    The LWIR-CES report details the progress made on development of cavity-enhanced chemical sensors operating in the long wave infrared during FY03. This includes confirmation of the operating sensitivities and a detailed investigation of the limitations of these techniques. The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting signs of weapons proliferation and/or terrorist activities. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development.

  9. Biomimetic, polymer-based microcantilever infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael Thomas

    This dissertation describes the initial development of a polymer-based, microcantilever infrared sensor. The development of the sensor is bio-inspired and based upon the long-range infrared sensor found in the pyrophilous jewel beetle Melanophila acuminata, which is able to seek out forest fires from more than 50 km away. Based on several proposed models of the infrared detector found in Melanophila acuminata, as well as published in vivo experiments, the feasibility of polymer-based infrared thermal sensors was explored and developed. Polymer materials were chosen due to their high absorptivity in the infrared range due to vibrational resonance modes characteristic of their organic bonds. Polymeric materials investigated in the course of this work include the polysaccharide and biomaterial chitin, its deacetylated derivative, chitosan, and the work-horse polymer of the semiconductor industry, novolak-resin-based photoresist. Chitin and chitosan are particularly noteworthy polymers for exploration in infrared detection due to their natural absorbance of infrared radiation near the 3 mum and 10 mum bands, which are important for the detection of the temperatures of warm engines and human body temperature, respectively. Because only limited work (primarily focused on electrodeposition) has been focused on the microscale patterning of chitosan, a photolithography process for chitosan and chitin was developed to allow the integration of the material into a variety of microelectromechanical systems processes. In addition to optical/infrared sensing, this process has a variety of potential applications in tissue engineering, protein engineering, and lab-on-a-chip devices. To demonstrate these areas of use, surface functionalization was demonstrated using bioconjugation to attach a protein to a patterned chitosan surface. Thin films of chitosan and chitin were characterized using laser profilometry to identify the effect of temperature on the film stress, and contact

  10. Development and application of an optical sensor for ethene in ambient air using near infra-red cavity ring down spectroscopy and sample preconcentration.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M S I; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    An automated near infra-red (IR) continuous wave cavity ring down spectrometer with sample preconcentration has been developed for the measurement of ethene (C₂H₄) in air. The spectrometer incorporated a distributed feedback diode laser operating at wavelengths λ∼ 1.6 μm and a pre-concentration system containing an adsorbent, molecular sieve 4A (MS4A). An absorption line located at 6148.58 cm⁻¹, and free from spectral overlap with other atmospheric molecules, was used for ethene detection. The spectrometer has a capacity for determination of atmospheric ethene mixing ratios at half hour time intervals, with a detection limit (2 SD above baseline noise) of 280 ppt. Both weekday and weekend measurements were performed in ambient air for periods of up to 30 hours. Average daytime mixing ratios of ethene were observed to be 2 ppbv and 1 ppbv during weekdays and weekends respectively. The mixing ratios of ethene varied from 0.6 ppbv to 1.2 ppbv in Bristol air during the weekend, with influence of meteorological conditions. The observed variations are discussed with consideration of probable sources and various meteorological parameters. A correlation is observed in the mixing ratio of ethene and nitrogen dioxide. PMID:23132283

  11. Infrared hyperspectral imaging sensor for gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    2000-11-01

    A small light weight man portable imaging spectrometer has many applications; gas leak detection, flare analysis, threat warning, chemical agent detection, just to name a few. With support from the US Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a small man portable hyperspectral imaging sensor with an embedded DSP processor for real time processing that is capable of remotely imaging various targets such as gas plums, flames and camouflaged targets. Based upon their spectral signature the species and concentration of gases can be determined. This system has been field tested at numerous places including White Mountain, CA, Edwards AFB, and Vandenberg AFB. Recently evaluation of the system for gas detection has been performed. This paper presents these results. The system uses a conventional infrared camera fitted with a diffractive optic that images as well as disperses the incident radiation to form spectral images that are collected in band sequential mode. Because the diffractive optic performs both imaging and spectral filtering, the lens system consists of only a single element that is small, light weight and robust, thus allowing man portability. The number of spectral bands are programmable such that only those bands of interest need to be collected. The system is entirely passive, therefore, easily used in a covert operation. Currently Pacific Advanced Technology is working on the next generation of this camera system that will have both an embedded processor as well as an embedded digital signal processor in a small hand held camera configuration. This will allow the implementation of signal and image processing algorithms for gas detection and identification in real time. This paper presents field test data on gas detection and identification as well as discuss the signal and image processing used to enhance the gas visibility. Flow rates as low as 0.01 cubic feet per minute have been imaged with this system.

  12. Highlights from the Air Sensors 2014 Workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    In June 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hosted its fourth next-generation air monitoring workshop to discuss the current state of the science in air sensor technologies and their applications for environmental monitoring, Air Sensors 2014: A New Frontier. Th...

  13. Monolithic Active-Pixel Infrared Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Krabach, Timothy N.; Staller, Craig O.

    1995-01-01

    Monolithic arrays of active-pixel junction field-effect (JFET) devices made from InGaAs proposed for use as imaging sensors sensitive to light in visible and short-wavelength infrared parts of electromagnetic spectrum. Each pixel of such array comprises photodetector monolithically integrated with JFET output-amplifier circuit of source-follower type - structure similar to charge-coupled device (CCD). Sizes of instruments reduced because large cooling systems not needed.

  14. Distributed-aperture infrared sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusgard, Thomas C.

    1999-07-01

    The on-going maturation of electro-optic technology in which the advent of third generation focal plane array is being combined with the capabilities of increasingly powerful signal processing algorithm now points to a new direction in design of electro-optic sensor system for both military and non-military applications. Taking advantage of those advances. Distributed Aperture IR Sensor systems (DAIRS) are currently in development within the Defense Department for installation in a variety of platforms for utilization in a wide variety of tactical scenarios. DAIRS employs multiple fixed identical sensor to obtain the functionality that was previously obtained using specialized sensors for each function. In its role in tactical scenarios. DAIRS employs multiple fixed identical sensor to obtain the functionality that was previously obtained using specialized sensor for each function. In its role in tactical aircraft, DAIRS uses an array of six strategically located sensors which provide 4(pi) steradian sensor coverage, i.e., full sphere situational awareness (SA), to the aircrew. That awareness provides: missile threat warning, IR Search and Track, battle damage assessment, targeting assistance, and pilotage. DAIRS has applicability in providing expanded SA for surface ships, armored land vehicles and unmanned air combat vehicles. A typical sensor design has less than twenty-five percent of the weight, volume, and electrical power demand of current federated airborne IR sensor system and can become operational with a significant reduction in lifetime system cost. DAIRS, when combined with autocueing, may have a significant role in technological advancement of aircraft proximity warning system for in-flight collision avoidance. DAIRS is currently founded in part by the Office of Naval Research which will result in the IR Distributed Aperture System (MIDAS), which is funded as a Navy Advanced Technology Demonstration, the DAIRS will undergo airborne testing using four

  15. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) task is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic chemical sensing techniques and apply them to detecting proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Our primary application is detecting signatures of WMD production, but LWIR CES techniques are also capable of detecting chemical weapons. The LWIR CES task is concerned exclusively with developing novel point sensors; stand-off detection is addressed by other PNNL tasks and projects. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on LWIR CES sensor development.

  16. Low cost infrared and near infrared sensors for UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aden, S. T.; Bialas, J. P.; Champion, Z.; Levin, E.; McCarty, J. L.

    2014-11-01

    Thermal remote sensing has a wide range of applications, though the extent of its use is inhibited by cost. Robotic and computer components are now widely available to consumers on a scale that makes thermal data a readily accessible resource. In this project, thermal imagery collected via a lightweight remote sensing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) was used to create a surface temperature map for the purpose of providing wildland firefighting crews with a cost-effective and time-saving resource. The UAV system proved to be flexible, allowing for customized sensor packages to be designed that could include visible or infrared cameras, GPS, temperature sensors, and rangefinders, in addition to many data management options. Altogether, such a UAV system could be used to rapidly collect thermal and aerial data, with a geographic accuracy of less than one meter.

  17. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting weapons proliferation. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development. During FY02, PNNL investigated three LWIR CES implementations beginning with the easiest to implement, direct cavity-enhanced detection (simple CES), including a technique of intermediate difficulty, cavity-dithered phase-sensitive detection (FM recovery CES) through to the most complex technique, that of resonant sideband cavity-enhanced detection also known as noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy, or NICE-OHMS.

  18. Moisture infrared sensor for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monacelli, Eric; Alayli, Yasser; Lofaso, Frederic

    2003-04-01

    The importance of delivering warm, humidified air to patients ventilated through an endotracheal or tracheostomy tube is widely accepted. The use of modern artificial noses or heat and moisture exchangers made of recently developed material could be a solution to both problems of humidification and heat preservation. For this investigation, an IR optical sensor to measure weak partial pressure of water vapor has been designed and realized. This sensor is based on direct molecular absorption in the near IR corresponding to fundamental mode v1 and it is an extrinsic and amplitude modulation type. In the quasi-linear region between 0 to 30 mbars, the calibration curve that represents the transmited power versus the water vapor partial pressure in air shows a high sensitivity with a minimum detectable of 100 μbars. The experimental setup, test procedure, theory analysis, and data processing of the optical water vapor sensor will be described in this article. The sensor has been designed to monitor water vapor in the modern artificial noses.

  19. Kinematic measurements using an infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, F.; Paulucci, L.

    2016-03-01

    The use of an infrared sensor as a new alternative to measure position as a function of time in kinematic experiments was investigated using a microcontroller as the data acquisition and control device. These are versatile sensors that offer advantages over typical ultrasound devices. The setup described in this paper enables students to develop their own experiments, promoting opportunities for learning physical concepts such as the different types of forces that can act on a body (gravitational, elastic, drag, etc) and the resulting types of movements with good sensitivity within the 4-30 cm range. As a proof of concept we also present the application of a prototype designed to record the kinematics of mass-spring systems.

  20. Multiple Human Tracking Using Binary Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Kasama, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    To create a context-aware environment, human locations and movement paths must be considered. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that tracks human movement paths using only binary sensed data obtained by infrared (IR) sensors attached to the ceiling of a room. Our algorithm can estimate multiple human movement paths without a priori knowledge of the number of humans in the room. By repeating predictions and estimations of human positions and links from the previous human positions to the estimated ones at each time period, human movement paths can be estimated. Simulation-based evaluation results show that our algorithm can dynamically trace human movement paths. PMID:26061201

  1. Multiple Human Tracking Using Binary Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Kasama, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    To create a context-aware environment, human locations and movement paths must be considered. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that tracks human movement paths using only binary sensed data obtained by infrared (IR) sensors attached to the ceiling of a room. Our algorithm can estimate multiple human movement paths without a priori knowledge of the number of humans in the room. By repeating predictions and estimations of human positions and links from the previous human positions to the estimated ones at each time period, human movement paths can be estimated. Simulation-based evaluation results show that our algorithm can dynamically trace human movement paths. PMID:26061201

  2. Linear air-fuel sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, F.; Miller, C.

    1996-12-14

    The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

  3. Clutter and signatures from near infrared testbed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, R. B.; McCalmont, J. F.; Montgomery, J. B.; Johnson, R. S.; McDermott, D. J.

    2008-04-01

    A new tactical airborne multicolor missile warning testbed was developed as part of an Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) initiative focusing on the development of sensors operating in the near infrared where commercially available silicon detectors can be used. At these wavelengths, the rejection of solar induced false alarms is a critical issue. Multicolor discrimination provides one of the most promising techniques for improving the performance of missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. This, in turn, requires that multicolor clutter data be collected for both analysis and algorithm development. The developed sensor test bed, as described in previous papers1, is a two-camera system with 1004x1004 FPA coupled with optimized filters integrated with the optics. The collection portion includes a high speed processor coupled with a high capacity disk array capable of collecting up to 48 full frames per second. This configuration allows the collection of temporally correlated, radiometrically calibrated data in two spectral bands that provide a basis for evaluating the performance of spectral discrimination algorithms. The presentation will describe background and clutter data collected from ground and flight locations in both detection and guard bands and the statistical analysis to provide a basis for evaluation of sensor performance. In addition, measurements have been made of discrete targets, both threats and false alarms. The results of these measurements have shown the capability of these sensors to provide a useful discrimination capability to distinguish threats from false alarms.

  4. Uncooled VOx infrared sensor development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Skidmore, George D.; Han, C. J.

    2011-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of the recent DRS RSTA, Inc. (DRS) Vanadium Oxide (VOx) uncooled focal plane arrays (UFPA), sensor electronics, and camera development activities. Presently, DRS UFPAs consist of 25 μm and 17 μm pixel pitch detectors in 320x240 and 640x480 formats. Under the Army NVESD sponsored 17 μm Large Format Uncooled FPA Development program and internal projects, DRS has developed a 17 μm pitch 1024x768 UFPA product (U8000). The 17 μm pixel pitch UFPAs provide sensor systems with significant size, weight, and power (SWaP) savings as well as cost reductions over the 25 μm pixel pitch counterparts. There is a growing demand to transition current products to the 17 μm pixel technologies. For example, next generation military systems such as thermal weapon sights (TWS), enhanced night vision goggles (ENVG), driver viewer enhancers (DVE) and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) infrared (IR) surveillance sensors all called for the 17 μm pixel technologies. To meet market demand, DRS has improved its production facilities to accommodate 17 μm pixel detector manufacturing. In conjunction with these efforts, DRS has also developed a family of signal processing electronics based on a new FPGA architecture for various sensor modules and cameras that can be incorporated into commercial OEM products as well as DoD weapon systems. Under the DARPA funded AWARE Multiband (formerly DUDE) program, DRS and Goodrich Sensors Unlimited, Inc are collaborating on the development of a single, integrated, twocolor detector by combining the VOx microbolometer (8-14 μm) and InGaAs (0.4 -1.6 μm) detectors into a single focal plane array. The first AWARE Multiband dual mode focal plane array fabrication is now underway.

  5. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  6. Sensor selection for outdoor air quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, K. L.; Herr, John R.; Pisano, A. P.

    2014-06-01

    Gas chemical monitoring for next-generation robotics applications such as fire fighting, explosive gas detection, ubiquitous urban monitoring, and mine safety require high performance, reliable sensors. In this work, we discuss the performance requirements of fixed-location, mobile vehicle, and personal sensor nodes for outdoor air quality sensing. We characterize and compare the performance of a miniature commercial electrochemical and a metal oxide gas sensor and discuss their suitability for environmental monitoring applications. Metal oxide sensors are highly cross-sensitive to factors that affect chemical adsorption (e.g., air speed, pressure) and require careful enclosure design or compensation methods. In contrast, electrochemical sensors are less susceptible to environmental variations, have very low power consumption, and are well matched for mobile air quality monitoring.

  7. Village Green Project and Air Sensor Kits

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation for the OAQPS Teachers Workshop. Will provide a background overview on the Village Green Project and our air sensor kit for outreach, then have the teachers try putting it together.

  8. Mosaic Infrared Sensor for Space Astronomy (MIRSSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The development of mosaic infrared detector/focal plane arrays for space astronomy is reported. The Mosaic IR Sensor for Space Astronomy (MIRSSA) Program is an effort to develop PV HgCdTe detector arrays with the spectral response of up to 5 micron and silicon CCDs for low temperature applications. Desired background-limited performance (BLIP) for space applications requires an extremely high R sub A product which can be achieved by selecting the detector materials and the operating temperature. The parameters were determined by measurement of HgCdTe PV detector arrays at various temperatures in the SW and MW spectral bands. It is demonstrated that high performance PV HgCdTe detectors can be fabricated for low temperature applications.

  9. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  10. Improved, Easier-To-Use Tunneling Infrared Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard E.; Maker, Paul D.; Vote, Erika C.; Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Podosek, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    Designs of electron-tunneling infrared sensors and micromachining processes used to fabricate them modified to increase sensitivity and to simplify operation, adjustment, and associated circuitry. Corrugations, pinholes, and standard packaging incorporated into design. Deflection voltages reduced, and thermal drifts eliminated. Performances exceed those of other commercially available, uncooled infrared sensors. Operation of sensors simplified to such extent, now feasible to ship them to nonexpert users for routine testing and evaluation in their laboratories.

  11. Shock-swallowing air sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, J.; Sakamoto, G. M.; Webb, L. D.; Couch, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    An air-data probe allows air to flow through it so that supersonic and hypersonic shock waves form behind pressure measuring orifices and tube instead of directly on them. Measured pressures are close to those in free-flowing air and are used to determine mach numbers of flying aircraft.

  12. Sensitivity Analysis for Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) CO2 Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a thermal infrared sensor able to retrieve the daily atmospheric state globally for clear as well as partially cloudy field-of-views. The AIRS spectrometer has 2378 channels sensing from 15.4 micrometers to 3.7 micrometers, of which a small subset in the 15 micrometers region has been selected, to date, for CO2 retrieval. To improve upon the current retrieval method, we extended the retrieval calculations to include a prior estimate component and developed a channel ranking system to optimize the channels and number of channels used. The channel ranking system uses a mathematical formalism to rapidly process and assess the retrieval potential of large numbers of channels. Implementing this system, we identifed a larger optimized subset of AIRS channels that can decrease retrieval errors and minimize the overall sensitivity to other iridescent contributors, such as water vapor, ozone, and atmospheric temperature. This methodology selects channels globally by accounting for the latitudinal, longitudinal, and seasonal dependencies of the subset. The new methodology increases accuracy in AIRS CO2 as well as other retrievals and enables the extension of retrieved CO2 vertical profiles to altitudes ranging from the lower troposphere to upper stratosphere. The extended retrieval method for CO2 vertical profile estimation using a maximum-likelihood estimation method. We use model data to demonstrate the beneficial impact of the extended retrieval method using the new channel ranking system on CO2 retrieval.

  13. Detecting aircraft with a low-resolution infrared sensor.

    PubMed

    Jakubowicz, Jérémie; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Maire, Florian; Moulines, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Existing computer simulations of aircraft infrared signature (IRS) do not account for dispersion induced by uncertainty on input data, such as aircraft aspect angles and meteorological conditions. As a result, they are of little use to estimate the detection performance of IR optronic systems; in this case, the scenario encompasses a lot of possible situations that must be indeed addressed, but cannot be singly simulated. In this paper, we focus on low-resolution infrared sensors and we propose a methodological approach for predicting simulated IRS dispersion of poorly known aircraft and performing aircraft detection on the resulting set of low-resolution infrared images. It is based on a sensitivity analysis, which identifies inputs that have negligible influence on the computed IRS and can be set at a constant value, on a quasi-Monte Carlo survey of the code output dispersion, and on a new detection test taking advantage of level sets estimation. This method is illustrated in a typical scenario, i.e., a daylight air-to-ground full-frontal attack by a generic combat aircraft flying at low altitude, over a database of 90,000 simulated aircraft images. Assuming a white noise or a fractional Brownian background model, detection performances are very promising. PMID:22588114

  14. Miniaturized Mid-Infrared Sensor Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Young, C; Mizaikoff, B

    2007-08-16

    Fundamental vibrational and rotational modes associated with most inorganic and organic molecules are spectroscopically accessible within the mid-infrared (MIR; 3-20 {micro}m) regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. The interaction between MIR photons and organic molecules provides particularly sharp transitions, which - despite the wide variety of organic molecules - provide unique MIR absorption spectra reflecting the molecularly characteristic arrangement of chemical bonds within the probed molecules via the frequency position of the associated vibrational and rotational transitions. Given the inherent molecular selectivity and achievable sensitivity, MIR spectroscopy provides an ideal platform for optical sensing applications. Despite this potential, early MIR sensing applications were limited to localized applications due to the size of the involved instrumentation, and limited availability of appropriately compact MIR optical components including light sources, detectors, waveguides, and spectrometers. During the last decades, engineering advances in photonics and optical engineering have facilitated the translation of benchtop-style MIR spectroscopy into miniaturized optical sensing schemes providing a footprint compatible with portable instrumentation requirements for field deployable analytical tools. In this trend article, we will discuss recent advances and future strategies for miniaturizing MIR sensor technology. The Beer-Lambert law implies that achievable limit of detection (LOD) for any optical sensor system improves by increasing the interaction length between photons and target analyte species such as e.g., folding the optical path multiple times as in multi-pass gas phase sensing; however, this governing paradigm naturally leads to an increase in system dimensions. Hence, miniaturization of optical sensing system requires scaling down of each optical component, yet improving the performance of each optical element within a smaller form factor for

  15. Integrated infrared and visible image sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor imaging devices integrating an array of visible detectors and another array of infrared detectors into a single module to simultaneously detect both the visible and infrared radiation of an input image. The visible detectors and the infrared detectors may be formed either on two separate substrates or on the same substrate by interleaving visible and infrared detectors.

  16. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the status of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). These instruments are on board the EOS Aqua Spacecraft that was launched May 4, 2002. The instruments are working normally. The objectives of the mission were to improve weather forecasting, assist in climate studies, and provide information as to the composition of Earth's atmosphere. The Aqua spacecraft is operating normally, the the primary life-limiting resource is fuel for maneuvers. The presentation also contains charts indicating who are using the data. There is information on the type of data available, and the propsal process. Also there is a few views of some of the planned instruments that were made possible in part due to the success of AIRS.

  17. Compensated infrared absorption sensor for carbon dioxide and other infrared absorbing gases

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.

    2005-11-29

    A gas sensor, whose chamber uses filters and choppers in either a semicircular geometry or annular geometry, and incorporates separate infrared radiation filters and optical choppers. This configuration facilitates the use of a single infrared radiation source and a single detector for infrared measurements at two wavelengths, such that measurement errors may be compensated.

  18. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  19. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  20. NIRATAM-NATO infrared air target model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah, Meg A.; Kristl, Joseph; Schroeder, John W.; Sandford, B. P.

    1991-08-01

    NIRATAM (the NATO Infrared Air Target Model) was developed by the NATO AC 243, Panel IV, Research Study Group 6 (RSG-6). RSG-6 is composed of representatives from Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and Canada (as an observer). NIRATAM is based on theoretical studies, field measurements, and infrared data analysis performed over many years. The model encompasses all the major signature components required to simulate the infrared signature of an aircraft and the atmosphere. The vehicle fuselage, facet, model includes radiation due to aerodynamic heating, internal heat sources, reflected sky, earth, and solar radiation. Plume combustion gas emissions are calculated for H(subscript 2)O, CO(subscript 2), CO, and other gases as well as solid particles. Lowtran 7 is used for the atmospheric transmission and radiance. The software generates graphical outputs of the target wireframe, plume flowfield, atmospheric transmission, total signature, and plume signature. Imagery data can be used for system development and evaluation. NIRATAM can be used for many applications such as measurement planning, data analysis, systems design, and aircraft development. Ontar has agreed to assist the RSG-6 by being the NIRATAM distribution center in the United States for users approved by the national representatives. Arrangements have also been made to distribute a user-friendly NIRATAM interface. This paper describes the model, presents results, makes comparisons with measured field data, and describes the availability and procedure for obtaining the software.

  1. Evaluation of air acidity through optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Heras, M; Kromka, K; Faber, J; Karaszkiewicz, P; Villegas, M A

    2005-05-15

    Optical sensors developed from dye-doped coatings obtained through the sol-gel method were designed and produced to evaluate air acidity. Both laboratory calibration and field test measurements in several locales of downtown Cracow, Poland, were undertaken with the aim of assessing the sensors' behavior. As a first approach, SO2 was considered as the main gaseous pollutant with acid properties capable of sensitizing the sensors under humid conditions. A relationship between the SO2 concentration measured by conventional automatic air pollution monitoring stations and the optical response of the sensors was established. To correlate such a relationship with the air acidity, a simple calculation, which also takes into account relative humidity, temperature, and atmospheric pressure, was done. Following this calculation, the sensors' detection threshold for pH was found to be 0.05, approximately. The sensors can be a very useful analytical tool to alert against acid rain risks in preventive conservation of historical materials, among other applications. PMID:15952380

  2. A smart indoor air quality sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jin

    2006-03-01

    The indoor air quality (IAQ) has an important impact on public health. Currently, the indoor air pollution, caused by gas, particle, and bio-aerosol pollutants, is considered as the top five environmental risks to public health and has an estimated cost of $2 billion/year due to medical cost and lost productivity. Furthermore, current buildings are especially vulnerable for chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agent contamination because the central air conditioning and ventilation system serve as a nature carrier to spread the released agent from one location to the whole indoor environment within a short time period. To assure the IAQ and safety for either new or existing buildings, real time comprehensive IAQ and CBW measurements are needed. With the development of new sensing technologies, economic and reliable comprehensive IAQ and CBW sensors become promising. However, few studies exist that examine the design and evaluation issues related to IAQ and CBW sensor network. In this paper, relevant research areas including IAQ and CBW sensor development, demand control ventilation, indoor CBW sensor system design, and sensor system design for other areas such as water system protection, fault detection and diagnosis, are reviewed and summarized. Potential research opportunities for IAQ and CBW sensor system design and evaluation are discussed.

  3. Arrays of Nano Tunnel Junctions as Infrared Image Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Son, Kyung-Ah; Moon, Jeong S.; Prokopuk, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    Infrared image sensors based on high density rectangular planar arrays of nano tunnel junctions have been proposed. These sensors would differ fundamentally from prior infrared sensors based, variously, on bolometry or conventional semiconductor photodetection. Infrared image sensors based on conventional semiconductor photodetection must typically be cooled to cryogenic temperatures to reduce noise to acceptably low levels. Some bolometer-type infrared sensors can be operated at room temperature, but they exhibit low detectivities and long response times, which limit their utility. The proposed infrared image sensors could be operated at room temperature without incurring excessive noise, and would exhibit high detectivities and short response times. Other advantages would include low power demand, high resolution, and tailorability of spectral response. Neither bolometers nor conventional semiconductor photodetectors, the basic detector units as proposed would partly resemble rectennas. Nanometer-scale tunnel junctions would be created by crossing of nanowires with quantum-mechanical-barrier layers in the form of thin layers of electrically insulating material between them (see figure). A microscopic dipole antenna sized and shaped to respond maximally in the infrared wavelength range that one seeks to detect would be formed integrally with the nanowires at each junction. An incident signal in that wavelength range would become coupled into the antenna and, through the antenna, to the junction. At the junction, the flow of electrons between the crossing wires would be dominated by quantum-mechanical tunneling rather than thermionic emission. Relative to thermionic emission, quantum mechanical tunneling is a fast process.

  4. Barriers Keep Drops Of Water Out Of Infrared Gas Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Sean K.

    1996-01-01

    Infrared-sensor cells used for measuring partial pressures of CO(2) and other breathable gases modified to prevent entry of liquid water into sensory optical paths of cells. Hydrophobic membrane prevents drops of water entrained in flow from entering optical path from lamp to infrared detectors.

  5. Laterally stacked Schottky diodes for infrared sensor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Laterally stacked Schottky diodes for infrared sensor applications are fabricated utilizing porous silicon having pores. A Schottky metal contract is formed in the pores, such as by electroplating. The sensors may be integrated with silicon circuits on the same chip with a high quantum efficiency, which is ideal for IR focal plane array applications due to uniformity and reproducibility.

  6. Uncooled infrared monolithic imaging sensor using pyroelectric polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutures, Jean-Louis; Lemaitre, Regine; Pourquier, E.; Boucharlat, Gilles C.; Tribolet, Philippe

    1995-09-01

    P(VF2-TrFE) pyroelectric copolymer is chosen for its high level of compatibility with existing microelectronics processes, and convenient electrical properties for infrared (IR) 8 to 14 micrometer imagery in the performance range of NETD 0.1 K to 1 K. Low cost sensors, achievable thanks to the monolithic silicon wafer processing, standard package assembly, and uncooled operations, allow us to address a lot of low-end applications in which conventional IR imaging techniques -- high priced hybrid mercury cadmium telluride or indium antimonide arrays, liquid nitrogen cooling and sophisticated image processing -- are nowadays incompatible with large volume user's needs and market prices. The paper describes pyroelectric device trade-offs, architecture, and process. Based on the interline architecture, the sensor performances of the TH 7441A 128 by 128 area array infrared detector are presented: compatible with 1 inch optics, the square array is made of an 80 by 80 micrometer squared pixel, on a pixel pitch of 85 micrometer. The CCD multiplexer using patented on-site processing is designed to deliver the image information at the maximum rate of 50 image/s. Lower rates are achievable. Imaging performances are the following: a NETD of 1.7 K is achieved with an integration time of 10 ms and the use of a f/1 optics presenting a transmission of 0.8. Recent improvements in the properties of the pyroelectric sandwich include thermal insulation of the pyroelectric layer through mixed air-polyimide material and pixel side to side insulation. Thanks to on-wafer pixel reticulation, an increased modulation transfer function of 51% at Nyquist frequency is achieved.

  7. Wireless intelligent alarm technology with pyroelectric infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao

    2009-07-01

    Aiming at the defects of monitoring conducted by man in the conventional practice, we study the passive intelligent automatic alarm technology based on the pyroelectric infrared sensor and wireless communication technology. The designed passive infrared wireless alarm is composed of pyroelectric infrared sensors, infrared special chip BISS0001 and their peripheral circuits. When someone enters into the detecting and monitoring range, the alarm will detect the infrared ray of the human radiation by the contactless form and detect the signals of circuit output. Then it translates them into low frequency signals relative with human sports speed, distance and direction, produce corresponding output signals through amplifying by the back state controller, switch on the work power of the wireless transmitting circuit and make it emit the alarm signals. The system enhances the monitoring level and effects and possesses many advantages such as wide detecting range, long detecting distance and high reliability.

  8. Smart Sensors Enable Smart Air Conditioning Control

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants' information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans' intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It's also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection. PMID:24961213

  9. Smart sensors enable smart air conditioning control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants' information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans' intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It's also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection. PMID:24961213

  10. Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection using microoptomechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Rajic, Solobodan; Datskou, Irene C.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for infrared detection are described. An optomechanical photon detector includes a semiconductor material and is based on measurement of a photoinduced lattice strain. A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical detectors. The stack can include one, or more, of the optomechanical photon detectors that function based on the measurement of photoinduced lattice strain. The systems and methods provide advantages in that rapid, sensitive multicolor infrared imaging can be performed without the need for a cooling subsystem.

  11. Estimation of target size using two passive infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damarla, Thyagaraju; Sabatier, James M.

    2013-06-01

    Passive infrared (PIR) sensors are widely used as a part of unattended ground sensor suite for situational awareness. Currently, the PIR sensor is mainly used as a wakeup sensor for the imaging sensor in order to conserve power. Since the PIR sensor mainly responds to the thermal radiation from the target, animals in the vicinity of the sensor can cause many false alarms. The number of false alarms can be cut drastically, if the target's size can be estimated and a decision is made based on target size. For example, if the target is 5 ft 9 in tall and 1.5 ft wide, it is most likely a human being as opposed to an animal. In this paper, we present a technique to estimate target size using two PIR sensors with Fresnel lens arrays. One of the PIR sensors is mounted such that its Fresnel zones are horizontal to the ground, and the second PIR sensor is mounted such that its Fresnel zones are at a slant angle to the horizontal plane. The former is used to estimate the width/length, while the latter is used to estimate the height of the target. The relative signal strength between the two sensors is used to estimate the distance of the target from the sensor. The time it takes to cross the Fresnel zones is used to estimate the speed of the target. The algorithm is tested using the data collected in the woods, where several animals are observed roaming.

  12. Laser photoacoustic sensor for air toxicity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Coorg R.; Lei, Jie; Shi, Wenhui; Li, Guangkun; Dunayevskiy, Ilya; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2012-06-01

    US EPA's Clean Air Act lists 187 hazardous air pollutants (HAP) or airborne toxics that are considered especially harmful to health, and hence the measurement of their concentration is of great importance. Numerous sensor systems have been reported for measuring these toxic gases and vapors. However, most of these sensors are specific to a single gas or able to measure only a few of them. Thus a sensor capable of measuring many of the toxic gases simultaneously is desirable. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) sensors have the potential for true broadband measurement when used in conjunction with one or more widely tunable laser sources. An LPAS gas analyzer equipped with a continuous wave, room temperature IR Quantum Cascade Laser tunable over the wavelength range of 9.4 μm to 9.7 μm was used for continuous real-time measurements of multiple gases/chemical components. An external cavity grating tuner was used to generate several (75) narrow line output wavelengths to conduct photoacoustic absorption measurements of gas mixtures. We have measured various HAPs such as Benzene, Formaldehyde, and Acetaldehyde in the presence of atmospheric interferents water vapor, and carbon dioxide. Using the preliminary spectral pattern recognition algorithm, we have shown our ability to measure all these chemical compounds simultaneously in under 3 minutes. Sensitivity levels of a few part-per-billion (ppb) were achieved with several of the measured compounds with the preliminary laboratory system.

  13. Metal-less silicon plasmonic mid-infrared gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, Sherif M.; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate an ultracompact integrated silicon-based plasmonic sensor for lab-on-chip applications in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral range. Our sensor possesses desirable features such as design simplicity and very high sensitivity. The sensor is designed using a platform for plasmonic effects in the MIR using highly doped silicon. This platform is exploited to create a metal-less plasmonic slot waveguide in the MIR range. This plasmonic waveguide is highly sensitive to any environmental change. Full wave electromagnetic simulations were carried out to design and optimize the structure. The proposed sensor covers a large wavelength span in the MIR range. High spectral sensitivity of 5000 nm/RIU was achieved for our sensor device. Further development of the structure was conducted to extend the sensor operation to multigas sensing.

  14. Research about CCD infrared three-color temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xinmin; Zhou, Juning; Yu, Gongxin

    1996-10-01

    This article introduces a kind of structure for realizing CCD infrared three-color temperature sensor, which consists of narrow and parallel light, CCD components with line matrix, and infrared three-color filter. This method can increase the symmetry and instant function for gathering signal of original radiation light because of the characteristics of CCD components. According to theory of heat radiation, real temperature of the body can be measured directly when technology of computer gathering and handling is used.

  15. Toward On-Chip Mid-Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Sieger, Markus; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2016-06-01

    This Feature highlights recent advances on mid-infrared thin-film waveguide technology and on-chip photonics facilitating next-generation label-free chem/bio sensor and assay platforms. Complemented by more recent advancements toward on-chip semiconductor waveguides, it is anticipated that label-free integrated mid-infrared sensing schemes will readily complement existing chem/bio sensor technologies in applications ranging from process monitoring and environmental analysis to biomedical diagnostics and point-of-care devices. PMID:27081763

  16. Micromachined infrared sensors with device-level encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Aasutosh; Celik-Butler, Zeynep; Butler, Donald P.

    2005-05-01

    There have been recent innovations to reduce the cost of packaging for MEMS devices, without deteriorating their performance. One such novel design for device-level encapsulation (self-packaged) of uncooled infrared (IR) microbolometers is documented here. Device-level vacuum encapsulation has the potential to eliminate some major problems associated with the bolometer performance such as high thermal conductance of the ambient atmosphere, the high cost associated with conventional vacuum packaging, and the degradation of optical transmission at different wavelengths through a conventional package window. The device-level encapsulated bolometers can also be fabricated with flexible substrates, which have the advantage of conforming to non-planar surfaces compared to Si or other rigid substrates. In addition, a flexible superstrate with low shear stress has applications in robotics, aerospace, defense and biomedicine as a "Smart skin", a name given to multisensory arrays on conformal substrates to emulate human skin functions on inanimate objects. Self-packaged uncooled microbolometer arrays of 40x40 μm2 and 60x60 μm2 are fabricated on top of Si wafer with a sacrificial layer using semiconducting Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide (YBCO) as the infrared sensing material. A two-layer surface micromachining technique in conjunction with a resonant cavity and a reflecting mirror are used for the sensor structure. The devices have demonstrated voltage responsivities of 7.9x103 V/W with a temperature coefficient of resistance of -2.5% K-1, and thermal conductivity of 2.95x10-6 W/K. The device performance was similar in air and vacuum, demonstrating vacuum integrity and a good device-level encapsulation.

  17. Terahertz sensor for air pollution monitoring from spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Rui; Guo, Aiyan

    2016-07-01

    Terahertz wave is a radio wave which wavelength between infrared and microwave, substantial is from 0.1-1mm that is 300-3000GHz(0.3-3THz). Compare to microwave and visible/infrared it is advantage of resolution and better penetration in atmosphere respectively, and because of wavelength is similar to scale of micro-particle of air pollution, the absorption coefficient due to the many relevant molecules have a maximum signature in the THz region, such as SO2、CH4、H2S、NH3、CO、O3 etc. of molecules of polluted atmosphere . This paper present a conceptional solution of THz sensor for air pollution sounder which using of large aperture antenna and FSS with 15 channels in 0.183-1.5THz region, each channel with 2MHz by extreme narrow band filter for detecting signature of polluted air. Analysis data show that 2Km spatial resolution at 700km altitude orbit. Sensitive is about 10-12W/Hz1/2 level at cryogenic temp.

  18. The civil air patrol ARCHER hyperspectral sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Brian; O'Connor, Rory; Kendall, William; Stocker, Alan; Schaff, William; Holasek, Rick; Even, Detlev; Alexa, Drew; Salvador, John; Eismann, Michael; Mack, Robert; Kee, Pat; Harris, Steve; Karch, Barry; Kershenstein, John

    2005-05-01

    The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is procuring Airborne Real-time Cueing Hyperspectral Enhanced Reconnaissance (ARCHER) systems to increase their search-and-rescue mission capability. These systems are being installed on a fleet of Gippsland GA-8 aircraft, and will position CAP to gain realworld mission experience with the application of hyperspectral sensor and processing technology to search and rescue. The ARCHER system design, data processing, and operational concept leverage several years of investment in hyperspectral technology research and airborne system demonstration programs by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Each ARCHER system consists of a NovaSol-designed, pushbroom, visible/near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor, a co-boresighted visible panchromatic high-resolution imaging (HRI) sensor, and a CMIGITS-III GPS/INS unit in an integrated sensor assembly mounted inside the GA-8 cabin. ARCHER incorporates an on-board data processing system developed by Space Computer Corporation (SCC) to perform numerous real-time processing functions including data acquisition and recording, raw data correction, target detection, cueing and chipping, precision image geo-registration, and display and dissemination of image products and target cue information. A ground processing station is provided for post-flight data playback and analysis. This paper describes the requirements and architecture of the ARCHER system, including design, components, software, interfaces, and displays. Key sensor performance characteristics and real-time data processing features are discussed in detail. The use of the system for detecting and geo-locating ground targets in real-time is demonstrated using test data collected in Southern California in the fall of 2004.

  19. Investigation of fluids as filling of a biomimetic infrared sensor based on the infrared receptors of pyrophilous insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, T.; Li, N.; Schmitz, H.; Bousack, H.

    2012-04-01

    The beetle Melanophila acuminata is highly dependent on forest fires. The burned wood serves as food for the larvae and the adults copulate on the burned areas to put their eggs in the freshly burned trees. To be able to detect forest fires from great distances the beetle developed a highly sensitive infrared receptor which works according to a photomechanical principle. The beetle has two pit organs, one on each lateral side, of which each houses around 70 dome shaped infrared receptors. These IR-receptors consist of a hard outer cuticular shell and an inner microfluidic core. When IR-radiation is absorbed, the pressure in the core increases due to the thermal expansion. This results in a deflection of a dendritic tip of a mechanosensitiv neuron which generates the signal. This biological principle was transferred into a new kind of un-cooled technical infrared receptor. To demonstrate the functional principle and the feasibility of this IR-sensor a macroscopic demonstrator sensor was build. It consisted of an inner fluid filled cavity (pressure chamber), an IR-transmissive window and a membrane. The deflection of the membrane due to the absorbed IR-energy was measured by a sensitive commercial capacitive sensor. In the experiments ethanol with added black ink, a mix of ethanol and glucose with additional absorber, air with additional absorber and water were used as fillings of the cavity and compared against each other. In order to get insights into the physics of the results of the experiments accompanying simulations using FEM methods and analytical calculations have been performed. The results showed that ethanol and air as fillings of the cavity caused the largest deflection of the membrane. Furthermore it turned out that the thermal expansion of the sensor housing material has an important influence. The comparison of the measured deflection with calculated deflections showed a good concordance.

  20. Infrared Photography as an Air Pollution Surveillance Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casalinuovo, Anthony F.; Sawan, Alan

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the practicality of infrared photographic analysis to air pollution agencies, by the detection of plant damage from pollutants before they are visually identifiable. Results showed that photomicrographic imaging using infrared radiation should be considered a viable surveillance tool in similiar…

  1. The AEDC aerospace chamber 7V: An advanced test capability for infrared surveillance and seeker sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced sensor test capability is now operational at the Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for calibration and performance characterization of infrared sensors. This facility, known as the 7V, is part of a broad range of test capabilities under development at AEDC to provide complete ground test support to the sensor community for large-aperture surveillance sensors and kinetic kill interceptors. The 7V is a state-of-the-art cryo/vacuum facility providing calibration and mission simulation against space backgrounds. Key features of the facility include high-fidelity scene simulation with precision track accuracy and in-situ target monitoring, diffraction limited optical system, NIST traceable broadband and spectral radiometric calibration, outstanding jitter control, environmental systems for 20 K, high-vacuum, low-background simulation, and an advanced data acquisition system.

  2. A real-time infrared imaging simulation method with physical effects modeling of infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ni; Huai, Wenqing; Wang, Shaodan; Ren, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Infrared imaging simulation technology can provide infrared data sources for the development, improvement and evaluation of infrared imaging systems under different environment, status and weather conditions, which is reusable and more economic than physical experiments. A real-time infrared imaging simulation process is established to reproduce a complete physical imaging process. Our emphasis is put on the modeling of infrared sensors, involving physical effects of both spatial domain and frequency domain. An improved image convolution method is proposed based on GPU parallel processing to enhance the real-time simulation ability with ensuring its simulation accuracy at the same time. Finally the effectiveness of the above methods is validated by simulation analysis and result comparison.

  3. Remote sensing and sensor testing via hot air balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, S.M.; Kroutil, R.T.; Traynor, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    Tethered and free-flying manned hot air balloons have been demonstrated as platforms for various remote sensing asks and sensor testing and atmospheric measurements. These platforms are inexpensive to operate, do not cause atmospheric disturbances as do higher speed platforms, and are extremely stable and free of vibrations inherent in aircraft structures. The equipment operated and tested on the balloons in connection with this project includes a prototype multispectral imaging spectrometer, high resolution CCD cameras, mid- and far-infrared cameras, a radiometer, FTIR spectrometers, video recording equipment and portable power generators carried beneath the balloon providing power to the equipment The experiments conducted on and from the balloon include chemical effluents characterization, atmospheric propagation through slant paths, obscurants imaging and scene reflectance. 7 refs.

  4. AIRES: An Airborne Infra-Red Echelle Spectrometer for SOFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Jessie J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, Michael R.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Simpson, Janet P.; Telesco, Charles M.; Pina, Robert K.; Wolf, Juergen; Young, Erick T.

    1999-01-01

    SOFIA will enable astronomical observations with unprecedented angular resolution at infrared wavelengths obscured from the ground. To help open this new chapter in the exploration of the infrared universe, we are building AIRES, an Airborne Infra-Red Echelle Spectrometer. AIRES will be operated as a first generation, general purpose facility instrument by USRA, NASA's prime contractor for SOFIA. AIRES is a long slit spectrograph operating from 17 - 210 microns. In high resolution mode the spectral resolving power is approx. 10(exp 6) microns/A or approx. 10(exp 4) at 100 microns. Unfortunately, since the conference, a low resolution mode with resolving power about 100 times lower has been deleted due to budgetary constraints. AIRES includes a slit viewing camera which operates in broad bands at 18 and 25 microns.

  5. Near-infrared fluorescence sensor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Lawrence, III; Casay, Guillermo A.; Dai, Dong; Patonay, Gabor

    1995-10-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been used extensively to solve environmental problems (including biological, water quality, separation and etc.). Despite its numerous applications, long wavelength, near- infrared (NIR) fluorescence has been the subject of very few studies. This wavelength region is advantageous, if we wish to minimize the effect of background interference. Lowering the background interference is especially advantageous in environmental monitoring applications where very little or no preseparation is necessary to achieve selective measurements. The applications of NIR absorbing fluorophores which usually have high molar absorptivities and good quantum yields can be especially advantageous when laser diodes are employed as the excitation source. This paper will focus on several general practical analytical applications of NIR fluorescence spectroscopy for solving environmental related analytical problems, including but not limited to: use of NIR fluorophores as labels (in conjunction with immunosensor technology) and the use of NIR chromophores as direct probes (pH, metal ion, etc.). Additionally the use of laser diodes and semiconductor detectors (silicon photodiodes and avalanche photodiodes) as light sources and detectors will be discussed.

  6. Near-infrared fluorescence sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L. III; Casay, G.A.; Dai, D.; Patonay, G.

    1995-12-31

    Fluorescence spectroscopy has been used extensively to solve environmental problems (including biological, water quality, separation and etc.). Despite its numerous applications, long wavelength, near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence has been the subject of very few studies. This wavelength region is advantageous, if there is a need to minimize the effect of background interference. Lowering the background interference is especially advantageous in environmental monitoring applications where very little or no preparation is necessary to achieve selective measurements. The application of NIR absorbing fluorophores which usually have high molar absorptivities and good quantum yields can be especially advantageous when laser diodes are employed as the excitation source. This paper will focus on several general practical but not limited to: use of NIR fluorophores as labels (in conjunction with immunosensor technology) and the use of NIR chromophores as direct probes (pH, metal ions, etc.). Additionally the use of laser diodes and semiconductor detectors (silicon photodiodes and avalanche photodiodes) as light sources and detectors will be discussed.

  7. Heat flux sensors for infrared thermography in convective heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  8. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  9. Long-wave infrared profile feature extractor (PFx) sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartain, Ronald B.; Aliberti, Keith; Alexander, Troy; Chiu, David

    2009-05-01

    The Long Wave Infrared (LWIR) Profile Feature Extractor (PFx) sensor has evolved from the initial profiling sensor that was developed by the University of Memphis (Near IR) and the Army Research Laboratory (visible). This paper presents the initial signatures of the LWIR PFx for human with and without backpacks, human with animal (dog), and a number of other animals. The current version of the LWIR PFx sensor is a diverging optical tripwire sensor. The LWIR PFx signatures are compared to the signatures of the Profile Sensor in the visible and Near IR spectral regions. The LWIR PFx signatures were collected with two different un-cooled micro bolometer focal plane array cameras, where the individual pixels were used as stand alone detectors (a non imaging sensor). This approach results in a completely passive, much lower bandwidth, much longer battery life, low weight, small volume sensor that provides sufficient information to classify objects into human Vs non human categories with a 98.5% accuracy.

  10. Human Movement Detection and Idengification Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jaeseok; Lee, Sang-Shin

    2014-01-01

    Pyroelectric infrared (PIR) sensors are widely used as a presence trigger, but the analog output of PIR sensors depends on several other aspects, including the distance of the body from the PIR sensor, the direction and speed of movement, the body shape and gait. In this paper, we present an empirical study of human movement detection and idengification using a set of PIR sensors. We have developed a data collection module having two pairs of PIR sensors orthogonally aligned and modified Fresnel lenses. We have placed three PIR-based modules in a hallway for monitoring people; one module on the ceiling; two modules on opposite walls facing each other. We have collected a data set from eight subjects when walking in three different conditions: two directions (back and forth), three distance intervals (close to one wall sensor, in the middle, close to the other wall sensor) and three speed levels (slow, moderate, fast). We have used two types of feature sets: a raw data set and a reduced feature set composed of amplitude and time to peaks; and passage duration extracted from each PIR sensor. We have performed classification analysis with well-known machine learning algorithms, including instance-based learning and support vector machine. Our findings show that with the raw data set captured from a single PIR sensor of each of the three modules, we could achieve more than 92% accuracy in classifying the direction and speed of movement, the distance interval and idengifying subjects. We could also achieve more than 94% accuracy in classifying the direction, speed and distance and idengifying subjects using the reduced feature set extracted from two pairs of PIR sensors of each of the three modules. PMID:24803195

  11. REMOTE FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED AIR POLLUTION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A commercial Fourier transform infrared interferometer system has been installed in a van and used to make longpath absorption and single-ended emission measurements of gaseous pollutant concentrations at a variety of pollutant sources. The interferometer system is described and ...

  12. The Thermal Infrared Sensor on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Dennis; Richardson, Cathy; Irons, James; Allen, Rick; Anderson, Martha; Budinoff, Jason; Casto, Gordon; Coltharp, Craig; Finneran, Paul; Forsbacka, Betsy; Hale, Taylor; Jennings, Tom; Jhabvala, Murzy; Lunsford, Allen; Magnuson, Greg; Mills, Rick; Morse, Tony; Otero, Veronica; Rohrbach, Scott; Smith, Ramsey; Sullivan, Terry; Tesfaye, Zelalem; Thome, Kurtis; Unger, Glenn; Whitehouse, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), a joint NASA and USGS mission, is scheduled for launch in December, 2012. The LDCM instrument payload will consist of the Operational Land Imager (OLI), provided by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation (BATC} under contract to NASA and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This paper outlines the design of the TIRS instrument and gives an example of its application to monitoring water consumption by measuring evapotranspiration.

  13. A Review of Infrared Readout Electronics for Space Science Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A review of infrared readout electornics for space science sensors is presented. General requirements for scientific IR FPA readout are discussed. Specific approaches to the unit cell electronics are described with respect to operation, complexity, noise and other operating parameters. Recent achievements in IR FPA readout electronics are reviewed. Implementation technologies for realization of IR FPA readout electronics are discussed. Future directions for addressing NASA and other scientific users' needs are suggested.

  14. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Strow, Larrabee

    2001-01-01

    AIRS, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder on the EOS-Aqua, produces global high precision spectra from 3.7 - 15.4 micron with spectral resolving power mu/delta mu = 1200 twice each day from 708 km orbital altitude. AIRS is the first hyperspectral infrared spectrometer designed to support NOAA/NCEP's operational requirements for medium range weather forecasting during its nominal 7 year lifetime. AIRS, together with the AMSU and HSB microwave radiometers, will achieve global retrieval accuracy of better then 1K rms in the lower troposphere under clear and partly cloudy condition. Based on the excellent radiometric and spectral performance demonstrated during the pre-launch testing, the assimilation of AIRS data into the forecast model is expected to result in major forecast improvements. Launch of AIRS on the EOS AQUA is scheduled for May 2001.

  15. AIRS Infrared Polarization Sensitivity and In-Flight Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Elliott, Denis; Broberg, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a space-based instrument that measures the upwelling atmospheric spectrum in the infrared. AIRS is one of several instruments on the EOS-Aqua spacecraft launched on May 4, 2002: Typically, instrument polarization is not a concern in the infrared because the scene is usually not significantly polarized. A small amount of polarization is expected over ocean, which can be seen in the AIRS 3.7 (micro)m window channels. The polarization is seen as a signal difference between two channels with the same center frequency but different polarizations. The observations are compared to a model that relies on measurements of instrument polarization made pre-flight. A first look at a comparison of the observations of sea surface polarization to expectations is presented.

  16. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and modeling of the spectral emission of an atmospheric pressure air plasma at temperatures up to -3400 K have been made. The cold gas injected in the plasma torch contained an estimated mole fraction of water vapor of approximately 4.5 x 10(exp -3) and an estimated carbon dioxide mole fraction of approximately 3.3 x 10(exp -4). Under these conditions, the minimum level of air plasma emission is found to be between 3.9 and 4.15 microns. Outside this narrow region, significant spectral emission is detected that can be attributed to the fundamental and overtone bands of NO and OH, and to the v(sub 3) and the (v(sub 1)+v(sub 3)) bands Of CO2. Special attention was paid to the effects of ambient air absorption in the optical path between the plasma and the detector. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated spectra, which are both on absolute intensity scales, thus lending confidence in the radiation models incorporated into NEQAIR2-IR over the course of this research program.

  17. Predicted NETD performance of a polarized infrared imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Bradley; Hodgkin, Van A.; Thompson, Roger; Leonard, Kevin; Krapels, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Polarization filters are commonly used as a means of increasing the contrast of a scene thereby increasing sensor range performance. The change in the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is a function of the polarization of the target and background, the type and orientation of the polarization filter(s), and the overall transparency of the filter. However, in the mid-wave and longwave infrared bands (MWIR and LWIR), the noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD), which directly affects the SNR, is a function of the filter's re-emission and its reflected temperature radiance. This paper presents a model, by means of a Stokes vector input, that can be incorporated into the Night Vision Integrated Performance Model (NV-IPM) in order to predict the change in SNR, NETD, and noise equivalent irradiance (NEI) for infrared polarimeter imaging systems. The model is then used to conduct a SNR trade study, using a modeled Stokes vector input, for a notional system looking at a reference target. Future laboratory and field measurements conducted at Night Vision Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) will be used to update, validate, and mature the model of conventional infrared systems equipped with polarization filters.

  18. Performance of the LDCM Thermal Infrared Sensor for Evapotranspiration Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, J. R.; Reuter, D. C.; Thome, K. J.; Smith, R. L.; Montanaro, M.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) rate measurements are being made at the scale of individual farm fields with data from the Landsat satellites. A new instrument, the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), has been built and tested for launch aboard the next Landsat satellite, the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), scheduled for launch on February 11, 2013. TIRS performance requirements were specified to ensure that the LDCM will provide the thermal infrared data necessary to continue measuring field scale ET rates. The presentation will compare the prelaunch performance of TIRS to specifications and to requirements for ET rate measurements. The comparisons will be made in terms of noise equivalent change in radiance and temperature, cross-track uniformity of spectral and radiometric response, spatial resolution and sharpness, and other specified characteristics. Performance was measured while TIRS was operated in a thermal vacuum chamber to simulate the space environment and while illuminated by a calibrated source of thermal infrared radiation. Results indicate that TIRS will perform better than earlier Landsat sensors with respect to radiometric requirements for accurately measuring ET rates.

  19. Chemical Sensing Using Infrared Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy: Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (SWIR CRDS) Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard M.; Harper, Warren W.; Aker, Pam M.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2003-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project is to explore and develop the science and technology behind point and stand off infrared (IR) spectroscopic chemical sensors that are needed for detecting weapons proliferation activity and countering terrorism. Missions addressed include detecting chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons and their production; counter terrorism measures that involve screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons and/or their residues; and mapping of contaminated areas. The science and technology developed in this program is dual use in that it additionally supports progress in a diverse set of agendas that include chemical weapons defense programs, air operations activities, emissions monitoring, law enforcement, and medical diagnostics. Sensors for these missions require extremely low limits of detection because many of the targeted signature species are either present in low concentrations or have extremely low vapor pressures. The sensors also need to be highly selective as the environments that they will be operated in will contain a variety of interferent species and false positive detection is not an option. PNNL has been working on developing a class of sensors that draw vapor into optical cavities and use laser-based spectroscopy to identify and quantify the vapor chemical content. The cavity enhanced spectroscopies (CES) afford extreme sensitivity, excellent selectivity, noise immunity, and rapid, real-time, in-situ chemical characterization. PNNL's CES program is currently focused on developing two types of sensors. The first one, which is based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), uses short wave infrared (SWIR) lasers to interrogate species. The second sensor, which is based on noise immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE OHMS), uses long wave infrared (LWIR) quantum cascade

  20. Infrared propagation in the air-sea boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, R.; Preedy, K. A.; Drake, G.

    1990-03-01

    Over the oceans and other large bodies of water the structure of the lowest layers of the atmosphere is often strongly modified by evaporation of water vapor from the water surface. At radio wavelengths this layer will usually be strongly refracting or ducting, and the layer is commonly known as the evaporation duct. However, the refractive index of air at infrared wavelengths differs from that at radio wavelengths, and the effects of the marine boundary layer on the propagation of infrared radiation are examined. Meteorological models of the air-sea boundary layer are used to compute vertical profiles of temperature and water-vapor pressure. From these are derived profiles of atmospheric refractive index at radio wavelengths and at infrared wavelengths in the window regions of low absorption. For duct propagation to occur it is necessary that the refractivity of air decreases rapidly with increasing height above the surface. At radio wavelengths this usually occurs when there is a strong lapse of water vapor pressure with increasing height. By contrast, at infrared wavelengths the refractive index is almost independent of water vapor pressure, and it is found that an infrared duct is formed only when there is a temperature inversion.

  1. Investigation of Infra-red and Nonequilibrium Air Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, Christophe O.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. This program was intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Prior to this work, the radiative emission of air plasmas in the infrared had been the object of few experimental investigations, and although several infrared systems were already modeled in radiation codes such as NEQAIR, measurements were required to validate numerical predictions and indicate whether all transitions of importance were accounted for in the model. The program was further motivated by the fact that 9 excited states (A, B, C, D, B', F, H, and H') of NO radiate in the infrared, especially between 1 and 1.5 microns where at least 9 transitions involving can be observed. Because these IR transitions are relatively well separated from each other, excited NO states concentrations can be easily measured, thus providing essential information on excited-state chemistry for use in optical diagnostics or in electronic excitation model validation. Detailed comparisons between measured and simulated spectra are presented.

  2. History highlights and future trends of infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    Infrared (IR) technologies (materials, devices and systems) represent an area of excellence in science and technology and, even if they have been generally confined to a selected scientific community, they have achieved technological and scientific highlights constituting 'innovation drivers' for neighbouring disciplines, especially in the sensors field. The development of IR sensors, initially linked to astronomical observations, since World War II and for many years has been fostered essentially by defence applications, particularly thermo-vision and, later on, smart vision and detection, for surveillance and warning. Only in the last few decades, the impact of silicon technology has changed the development of IR detectors dramatically, with the advent of integrated signal read-outs and the opening of civilian markets (EO communications, biomedical, environmental, transport and energy applications). The history of infrared sensors contains examples of real breakthroughs, particularly true in the case of focal plane arrays that first appeared in the late 1970s, when the superiority of bi-dimensional arrays for most applications pushed the development of technologies providing the highest number of pixels. An impressive impulse was given to the development of FPA arrays by integration with charge coupled devices (CCD), with strong competition from different technologies (high-efficiency photon sensors, Schottky diodes, multi-quantum wells and, later on, room temperature microbolometers/cantilevers). This breakthrough allowed the development of high performance IR systems of small size, light weight and low cost - and therefore suitable for civil applications - thanks to the elimination of the mechanical scanning system and the progressive reduction of cooling requirements (up to the advent of microbolometers, capable of working at room temperature). In particular, the elimination of cryogenic cooling allowed the development and commercialisation of IR Smart Sensors

  3. Regulatory Considerations of Lower Cost Air Pollution Sensor Data Performance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low-cost, portable air quality sensors could be the next generation of air monitoring, however, this nascent technology is not without risk. This article looks at how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses air monitoring data, the procedures followed to ensure and a...

  4. Sea-air boundary meteorological sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Jose G.

    2015-05-01

    The atmospheric environment can significantly affect radio frequency and optical propagation. In the RF spectrum refraction and ducting can degrade or enhance communications and radar coverage. Platforms in or beneath refractive boundaries can exploit the benefits or suffer the effects of the atmospheric boundary layers. Evaporative ducts and surface-base ducts are of most concern for ocean surface platforms and evaporative ducts are almost always present along the sea-air interface. The atmospheric environment also degrades electro-optical systems resolution and visibility. The atmospheric environment has been proven not to be uniform and under heterogeneous conditions substantial propagation errors may be present for large distances from homogeneous models. An accurate and portable atmospheric sensor to profile the vertical index of refraction is needed for mission planning, post analysis, and in-situ performance assessment. The meteorological instrument used in conjunction with a radio frequency and electro-optical propagation prediction tactical decision aid tool would give military platforms, in real time, the ability to make assessments on communication systems propagation ranges, radar detection and vulnerability ranges, satellite communications vulnerability, laser range finder performance, and imaging system performance predictions. Raman lidar has been shown to be capable of measuring the required atmospheric parameters needed to profile the atmospheric environment. The atmospheric profile could then be used as input to a tactical decision aid tool to make propagation predictions.

  5. Air-Microfluidics: Creating Small, Low-cost, Portable Air Quality Sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air-microfluidics shows great promise in dramatically reducing the size, cost, and power requirements of future air quality sensors without compromising their accuracy. Microfabrication provides a suite of relatively new tools for the development of micro electro mechanical syste...

  6. Ultraspectral Infrared Measurements from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Aqua measures the Earth's water cycle, energy fluxes, vegetation and temperatures. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB) were launched on the EOS Aqua spacecraft in May 2002. AIRS has had good radiometric and spectral sensitivity, stability, and accuracy and is suitable for climate studies. Temperature products compare well with radiosondes and models over the limited test range (|LAT| less than 40 degrees). Early trace gas products demonstrate the potential of AIRS. NASA is developing the next generation of hyperspectral IR imagers. JPL is ready to participate with US government agencies and US industry to transfer AIRS technology and science experience.

  7. Noncontact Monitoring of Respiration by Dynamic Air-Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Tohru; Asada, Tetsunosuke; Sumi, Yoshihisa; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that a dynamic air-pressure sensor system allows respiratory status to be visually monitored for patients in minimally clothed condition. The dynamic air-pressure sensor measures vital information using changes in air pressure. To utilize this device in the field, we must clarify the influence of clothing conditions on measurement. The present study evaluated use of the dynamic air-pressure sensor system as a respiratory monitor that can reliably detect change in breathing patterns irrespective of clothing. Twelve healthy volunteers reclined on a dental chair positioned horizontally with the sensor pad for measuring air-pressure signals corresponding to respiration placed on the seat back of the dental chair in the central lumbar region. Respiratory measurements were taken under 2 conditions: (a) thinly clothed (subject lying directly on the sensor pad); and (b) thickly clothed (subject lying on the sensor pad covered with a pressure-reducing sheet). Air-pressure signals were recorded and time integration values for air pressure during each expiration were calculated. This information was compared with expiratory tidal volume measured simultaneously by a respirometer connected to the subject via face mask. The dynamic air-pressure sensor was able to receive the signal corresponding to respiration regardless of clothing conditions. A strong correlation was identified between expiratory tidal volume and time integration values for air pressure during each expiration for all subjects under both clothing conditions (0.840-0.988 for the thinly clothed condition and 0.867-0.992 for the thickly clothed condition). These results show that the dynamic air-pressure sensor is useful for monitoring respiratory physiology irrespective of clothing. PMID:26398125

  8. Research on the evaluation method for modelling and simulation of infrared imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Shuli; Ren, Jiancun; Liu, Liang; Li, Zhaolong

    2015-10-01

    The validity of infrared image guidance simulation is determined by the fidelity and the accuracy of modelling and simulation of infrared imaging sensor system, and the research on assessment of modelling and simulation of infrared imaging sensor is important to design and assess the IR system. A method is proposed to evaluate simulation of infrared sensor effect based on full reference quality assessment method, the evaluation index system is established to evaluate simulation fidelity of infrared imaging sensor. The accuracy of irradiance and contrast of infrared simulation image can be assessed with one-dimension histogram analysis, and the spatial correlation of image is assessed with two-dimension histogram analysis, and geometrical and gray distribution characteristics are assessed with fidelity function. With the method, modelling and simulation of infrared imaging sensor can be effectively assessed.

  9. Near infrared plasmonic sensor based on Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, S. M.; Shahada, L.; Zografopoulos, D. C.; Beccherelli, R.; Swillam, M.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a compact plasmonic resonator that is capable of generating a Fano resonance in the transmission spectrum. The Fano resonance is observed with its unique lineshape. The proposed design is simple, compact, easy to fabricate and can be easily developed for different applications. The device structure is made of a gold layer, a metalinsulator- metal waveguide, and a rectangular cavity. As an application to the proposed plasmonic resonator, we introduce a gas sensor which is operational at the near infrared spectral range. The sensor possesses a high sensitivity of 1500nm/RIU at the telecom wavelength 1.55μm. FDTD simulation tools were conducted for the optimization of the device structure and obtaining the results.

  10. Infrared Signatures of Laser Induced Plasma in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hening, Alexandru; Lu, Ryan; Ramirez, Ayax; Advanced Technology Team

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of the temporal and spatial evolution of laser generated plasma in air is necessary for the development of potential applications which range from laser induced ionized micro channels and filaments able to transfer high electric pulses over few hundreds of meters, to the generation of plasma artifacts in air, far away from the laser source. This work is focused mainly on the infrared spectrum. The influence of laser parameters (energy per pulse, pulse duration, repetition rate, wavelength and etc.) on the plasma formation and evolution has been investigated. Laser transmission losses through the air as well as through the breakdown plasma as well as their effect on infrared plasma signature are to be presented.

  11. Development of Sensing System for the Estimation of Human's State Using Infrared Sensors Arranged at Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mitsutoshi; Kitazono, Yuhki; Serikawa, Seiichi

    In a bathroom and a toilet, a security camera cannot be used for the conservation of privacy. In order to solve the problem, a sensing system using infrared sensors arranged at grid is proposed in this study. From the output of infrared sensors, human's state is judged. As the result, the human's state is recognized at high accuracy. This system does not use the image focused by lens like a camera and infrared sensor-array.

  12. Ultra-Trace Chemical Sensing with Long-Wave Infrared Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopic Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Williams, Richard M.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-02-20

    The infrared sensors task of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project (Task B of Project PL211) is focused on the science and technology of remote and in-situ spectroscopic chemical sensors for detecting proliferation and coun-tering terrorism. Missions to be addressed by remote chemical sensor development in-clude detecting proliferation of nuclear or chemical weapons, and providing warning of terrorist use of chemical weapons. Missions to be addressed by in-situ chemical sensor development include countering terrorism by screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons, or chemical weapons residues, and mapping contaminated areas. The science and technology is also relevant to chemical weapons defense, air operations support, monitoring emissions from chemi-cal weapons destruction or industrial activities, law enforcement, medical diagnostics, and other applications. Sensors for most of these missions will require extreme chemical sensitivity and selectiv-ity because the signature chemicals of importance are expected to be present in low con-centrations or have low vapor pressures, and the ambient air is likely to contain pollutants or other chemicals with interfering spectra. Cavity-enhanced chemical sensors (CES) that draw air samples into optical cavities for laser-based interrogation of their chemical content promise real-time, in-situ chemical detection with extreme sensitivity to specified target molecules and superb immunity to spectral interference and other sources of noise. PNNL is developing CES based on quantum cascade (QC) lasers that operate in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR - 3 to 5 microns) and long-wave infrared (LWIR - 8 to 14 mi-crons), and CES based on telecommunications lasers operating in the short-wave infrared (SWIR - 1 to 2 microns). All three spectral regions are promising because smaller mo-lecular absorption cross sections in the SWIR are offset

  13. Landsat 8 thermal infrared sensor geometric characterization and calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storey, James C.; Choate, Michael J.; Moe, Donald

    2014-01-01

    The Landsat 8 spacecraft was launched on 11 February 2013 carrying two imaging payloads: the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS). The TIRS instrument employs a refractive telescope design that is opaque to visible wavelengths making prelaunch geometric characterization challenging. TIRS geometric calibration thus relied heavily on on-orbit measurements. Since the two Landsat 8 payloads are complementary and generate combined Level 1 data products, the TIRS geometric performance requirements emphasize the co-alignment of the OLI and TIRS instrument fields of view and the registration of the OLI reflective bands to the TIRS long-wave infrared emissive bands. The TIRS on-orbit calibration procedures include measuring the TIRS-to-OLI alignment, refining the alignment of the three TIRS sensor chips, and ensuring the alignment of the two TIRS spectral bands. The two key TIRS performance metrics are the OLI reflective to TIRS emissive band registration accuracy, and the registration accuracy between the TIRS thermal bands. The on-orbit calibration campaign conducted during the commissioning period provided an accurate TIRS geometric model that enabled TIRS Level 1 data to meet all geometric accuracy requirements. Seasonal variations in TIRS-to-OLI alignment have led to several small calibration parameter adjustments since commissioning.

  14. Self-adaptive calibration for staring infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, William B.; Stocker, Alan D.

    1993-10-01

    This paper presents a new, self-adaptive technique for the correlation of non-uniformities (fixed-pattern noise) in high-density infrared focal-plane detector arrays. We have developed a new approach to non-uniformity correction in which we use multiple image frames of the scene itself, and take advantage of the aim-point wander caused by jitter, residual tracking errors, or deliberately induced motion. Such wander causes each detector in the array to view multiple scene elements, and each scene element to be viewed by multiple detectors. It is therefore possible to formulate (and solve) a set of simultaneous equations from which correction parameters can be computed for the detectors. We have tested our approach with actual images collected by the ARPA-sponsored MUSIC infrared sensor. For these tests we employed a 60-frame (0.75-second) sequence of terrain images for which an out-of-date calibration was deliberately used. The sensor was aimed at a point on the ground via an operator-assisted tracking system having a maximum aim point wander on the order of ten pixels. With these data, we were able to improve the calibration accuracy by a factor of approximately 100.

  15. Application of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data to Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gregorich, David; Gaiser, Steve; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2004-01-01

    The application of hyper spectral radiometric data to climate research requires very high absolute radiometric accuracy and stability. We use cloud-free tropical ocean data from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIR) Calibration Data Subset (ADCS) to show that the radiometric precision and stability required climate applications has been achieved. The sea surface skin temperatures derived from the AIRS 2616cm-1 super window channel are stable relative to the RTG.SST at the better than 8 mK/year level, and the spectral calibration is stable at the 1 ppm/year level. The excellent stability and accuracy are the result of the implementation of AIRS as a grating array spectrometer, which is cooled and stabilized within 10 mK at 155 K. Analysis of daily measurements of the temperature gradient between the surface and 7 km altitude show that the AIRS Calibration Data Subset has applications which extend its original intent for calibration support to climate research. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua satellite was launched into polar orbit in May 2002. AIRS covers the spectral region from 640 to 2700 cm-1 with 2378 independent channels and represents the first of a new generation of hyper spectral resolution sounders in support of global sounding data for weather forecasting and climate research.

  16. Development of Micro Air Reconnaissance Vehicle as a Test Bed for Advanced Sensors and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Vranas, Thomas L.; Fox, Robert L.; Kuhn, Theodore R.; Ingham, John; Logan, Michael J.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Guenther, Benjamin F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Micro/Mini Air Reconnaissance Vehicle for advanced sensors and electronics at NASA Langley Research Center over the last year. This vehicle is expected to have a total weight of less than four pounds, a design velocity of 40 mph, an endurance of 15-20 minutes, and a maximum range of 5km. The vehicle has wings that are simple to detach yet retain the correct alignment. The upper fuselage surface has a quick release hatch used to access the interior and also to mount the varying propulsion systems. The sensor suite developed for this vehicle consists of a Pitot-static measurement system for determining air speed, an absolute pressure measurement for determining altitude, magnetic direction measurement, and three orthogonal gyros to determine body angular rates. Swarming GPS-guidance and in-flight maneuvering is discussed, as well as design and installation of some other advance sensors like MEMS microphones, infrared cameras, GPS, humidity sensors, and an ultrasonic sonar sensor. Also low cost, small size, high performance control and navigation system for the Micro Air Vehicle is discussed. At the end, laboratory characterization of different sensors, motors, propellers, and batteries will be discussed.

  17. Air-sea interaction with multiple sensors - Seasat legacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.; Tang, W.

    2003-01-01

    By flying a number of ocean observing sensors together, Seasat demonstrated potential of not only sensor synergism, but also science synergism, which has illuminated the path of spacebased air-sea interaction studies in more than two decades since its demise.

  18. Uncooled infrared sensors with digital focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Charles A.; Butler, Neal R.; Blackwell, Richard; Murphy, Robert; Breen, Thomas

    1996-06-01

    Loral Infrared & Imaging Systems is developing low cost, high performance, uncooled infrared imaging products for both military and commercial applications. These products are based on the microbolometer technology, a silicon micromachined sensor which combines the wafer level silicon processing with a device structure capable of yielding excellent infrared imaging performance. Here, we report on the development of an uncooled sensor, the LTC500, which incorporates an all digital focal plane array and has a measured NETD of less than 70 mK. The focal plane array and the electronics within the LTC500 have been designed as an integrated unit to meet a broad range of end user applications by providing features such as nonuniformity correction, autogain and level, NTSC video, and digital outputs. The 327 X 245 element focal plane array has a 46.25 micrometers pixel pitch and an on focal plane array 14 bit to analog to digital converter (ADC). The ADC has a measured instantaneous dynamic range of more than 76 dB at a 6.1 MHz output data rate and 60 Hz frame rate. The focal plane array consumes less than 500 mW of power, of which less than 250 mW is used in the ADC. An additional 36 dB of digital coarse offset correction in front of the ADC on the focal plane array results in a total electronic dynamic range of 112 dB. The MRT of the LTC500 camera has been measured at less 0.2 C at f(subscript o).

  19. Novel near infrared sensors for hybrid BCI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almajidy, Rand K.; Le, Khang S.; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2015-07-01

    This study's goal is to develop a low cost, portable, accurate and comfortable NIRS module that can be used simultaneously with EEG in a dual modality system for brain computer interface (BCI). The sensing modules consist of electroencephalography (EEG) electrodes (at the positions Fp1, Fpz and Fp2 in the international 10-20 system) with eight custom made functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) channels, positioned on the prefrontal cortex area with two extra channels to measure and eliminate extra-cranial oxygenation. The NIRS sensors were designed to guarantee good sensor-skin contact, without causing subject discomfort, using springs to press them to the skin instead of pressing them by cap fixture. Two open source software packages were modified to carry out dual modality hybrid BCI experiments. The experimental paradigm consisted of a mental task (arithmetic task or text reading) and a resting period. Both oxygenated hemoglobin concentration changes (HbO), and EEG signals showed an increase during the mental task, but the onset, period and amount of that increase depends on each modality's characteristics. The subject's degree of attention played an important role especially during online sessions. The sensors can be easily used to acquire brain signals from different cerebral cortex parts. The system serves as a simple technological test bed and will be used for stroke patient rehabilitation purposes.

  20. Performance characteristics of a submarine panoramic infrared imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. M.; Waterman, J. R.; Menon, Raghu; Devitt, John

    2010-04-01

    A high-resolution mid-wave infrared panoramic periscope sensor system has been developed. The sensor includes a catadioptric optical system that provides a 360° horizontal azimuth by -10° to +30° elevation field of view without requiring moving components (e.g. rotating mirrors). The focal plane is a 2048 x 2048, 15μm pitch InSb detector operating at 80K. An on-board thermo-electric reference source allows for real-time nonuniformity correction using the two-point correction method. The entire system (detector-dewar assembly, cooler, electronics and optics) is packaged to fit in an 8" high, 6.5" diameter volume. This work describes both the system optics and electronics and presents sample imagery. We also discuss the sensor's radiometric performance, quantified by the NEDT, as a function of key system parameters. The ability of the system to resolve targets as a function of imaged spatial frequency is also presented.

  1. Infrared Laser System for Extended Area Monitoring of Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowman, L. R.; Gillmeister, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution monitoring system using a spectrally scanning laser has been developed by the General Electric Company. This paper will report on an evaluation of a breadboard model, and will discuss applications of the concept to various ambient air monitoring situations. The system is adaptable to other tunable lasers. Operating in the middle infrared region, the system uses retroreflectors to measure average concentrations over long paths at low, safe power levels. The concept shows promise of meeting operational needs in ambient air monitoring and providing new data for atmospheric research.

  2. Plug-in Sensors for Air Pollution Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Manny

    Faristors, a type of plug-in sensors used in analyzing equipment, are described in this technical report presented at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. Their principles of operation, interchangeability, and versatility for measuring air pollution at…

  3. Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  4. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  5. Investigation of infra-red and nonequilibrium air radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes progress on the first year of a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this date, the radiative emission of air plasmas in the infrared has been the object of few experimental investigations, and although several infrared systems are already modeled in radiation codes such as NEQAIR, measurements are required to validate numerical predictions and indicate whether all transitions of importance are accounted for. The present program is motivated by the fact that 9 excited states (A, B, C, D, B', F, H, and H') of NO radiate in the infrared, especially between 1 and 1.5 microns where at least 9 transitions involving can be observed. Because these IR transitions are relatively well separated from each other, excited NO states concentrations can be easily measured, thus providing essential information on excited-state chemistry for use in optical diagnostics or in electronic excitation model validation. Developing accurate collisional-radiative models for these excited NO states is of importance as the UV-VUV transitions of NO (beta, gamma, epsilon, beta prime, gamma prime) produce a major, if not dominant, fraction of the radiation emitted by air plasmas. During the first year of the program, research has focused on the spectral range 1.0 to 1.5 microns, as detailed in Section 2 of this report. The measurements, conducted in a 50 kW radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma torch operating on air at atmospheric pressure, extend previous shock tube investigations by Wray to a wider spectral range (1.0 to 1.5 microns vs 0.9 to 1.2 microns) and higher temperatures (7600 K in the plasma torch versus 6700 K in the shock-tube). These higher temperatures in the present experiment have made it possible to

  6. Terrestrial Applications of the Thermal Infrared Sensor, TIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ramsey L.; Thome, Kurtis; Richardson, Cathleen; Irons, James; Reuter, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Landsat satellites have acquired single-band thermal images since 1978. The next satellile in the heritage, Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), is scheduled to launch in December 2012. LDCM will contain the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), where TIRS operates in concert with, but independently of OLI. This paper will provide an overview of the remote sensing instrument TIRS. The T1RS instrument was designed at National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) where it will be fabricated and calibrated as well. Protecting the integrity of the Scientific Data that will be collected from TIRS played a strong role in definition of the calibration test equipment and procedures used for the optical, radiometric, and spatial calibration. The data that will be produced from LCDM will continue to be used world wide for environment monitoring and resource management.

  7. Infrared receptors in pyrophilous ("fire loving") insects as model for new un-cooled infrared sensors.

    PubMed

    Klocke, David; Schmitz, Anke; Soltner, Helmut; Bousack, Herbert; Schmitz, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Beetles of the genus Melanophila and certain flat bugs of the genus Aradus actually approach forest fires. For the detection of fires and of hot surfaces the pyrophilous species of both genera have developed infrared (IR) receptors, which have developed from common hair mechanoreceptors. Thus, this type of insect IR receptor has been termed photomechanic and shows the following two special features: (i) The formation of a complex cuticular sphere consisting of an outer exocuticular shell as well as of a cavernous microfluidic core and (ii) the enclosure of the dendritic tip of the mechanosensitive neuron inside the core in a liquid-filled chamber. Most probably a photomechanic IR sensillum acts as a microfluidic converter of infrared radiation which leads to an increase in internal pressure inside the sphere, which is measured by a mechanosensitive neuron.A simple model for this biological IR sensor is a modified Golay sensor in which the gas has been replaced by a liquid. Here, the absorbed IR radiation results in a pressure increase of the liquid and the deflection of a thin membrane. For the evaluation of this model analytical formulas are presented, which permits the calculation of the pressure increase in the cavity, the deformation of the membrane and the time constant of an artificial leak to compensate ambient temperature changes. Some organic liquids with high thermal expansion coefficients may improve the deflection of the membrane compared to water. PMID:21977430

  8. Biomimetic infrared sensors based on the infrared receptors of pyrophilous insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Helmut; Kahl, Thilo; Soltner, Helmut; Bousack, Herbert

    2011-04-01

    Beetles of the genus Melanophila and certain flat bugs of the genus Aradus approach forest fires. For the detection of fires and of hot surfaces the pyrophilous species of both genera have developed infrared (IR) receptors, which have developed from common hair mechanoreceptors. Thus this type of insect IR receptor has been termed photomechanic and shows the following two special features: (i) the formation of a complex cuticular sphere consisting of an outer exocuticular shell as well as of a cavernous microfluidic core. (ii) The enclosure of the dendritic tip of a mechanosensitive neuron inside the core in a liquid-filled chamber. Most probably a photomechanic IR sensillum acts as a microfluidic converter of infrared radiation into an increase in internal pressure inside the sphere, which is measured by a mechanosensitive neuron. A simple model for this biological IR sensor is the Golay sensor, which is filled with a liquid instead of gas. Here the absorbed IR radiation results in a pressure increase of the liquid and the deflection of a thin membrane. For the evaluation of this model analytical formulas are presented, which permits the calculation of the pressure increase in the cavity, the deformation of the membrane and the time constant of an artificial leak to compensate ambient temperature changes. Some organic liquids with high thermal expansion coefficients may improve the deflection of the membrane compared to water.

  9. A Comparative Study of Sound Speed in Air at Room Temperature between a Pressure Sensor and a Sound Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison of sound speed measurements in air using two types of sensor that are widely employed in physics and engineering education, namely a pressure sensor and a sound sensor. A computer-based laboratory with pressure and sound sensors was used to carry out measurements of air through a 60 ml syringe. The fast Fourier…

  10. Mobile Sensors and Applications for Air Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Executive Summary The public has long been interested in understanding what pollutants are in the air they breathe so they can best protect their environmental health and welfare. The current air quality monitoring network consists of discrete stations with expensive equipment ...

  11. Development of Thermal Infrared Sensor to Supplement Operational Land Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Peter; Waczynski, Augustyn; Kan, Emily; Wen, Yiting; Rosenberry, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The thermal infrared sensor (TIRS) is a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP)-based instrument intended to supplement the Operational Land Imager (OLI) for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). The TIRS instrument is a far-infrared imager operating in the pushbroom mode with two IR channels: 10.8 and 12 m. The focal plane will contain three 640 512 QWIP arrays mounted onto a silicon substrate. The readout integrated circuit (ROIC) addresses each pixel on the QWIP arrays and reads out the pixel value (signal). The ROIC is controlled by the focal plane electronics (FPE) by means of clock signals and bias voltage value. The means of how the FPE is designed to control and interact with the TIRS focal plane assembly (FPA) is the basis for this work. The technology developed under the FPE is for the TIRS focal plane assembly (FPA). The FPE must interact with the FPA to command and control the FPA, extract analog signals from the FPA, and then convert the analog signals to digital format and send them via a serial link (USB) to a computer. The FPE accomplishes the described functions by converting electrical power from generic power supplies to the required bias power that is needed by the FPA. The FPE also generates digital clocking signals and shifts the typical transistor-to-transistor logic (TTL) to }5 V required by the FPA. The FPE also uses an application- specific integrated circuit (ASIC) named System Image, Digitizing, Enhancing, Controlling, And Retrieving (SIDECAR) from Teledyne Corp. to generate the clocking patterns commanded by the user. The uniqueness of the FPE for TIRS lies in that the TIRS FPA has three QWIP detector arrays, and all three detector arrays must be in synchronization while in operation. This is to avoid data skewing while observing Earth flying in space. The observing scenario may be customized by uploading new control software to the SIDECAR.

  12. LED-based near infrared sensor for cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, Andrey; Ageev, Vladimir; Zabarylo, Urszula; Usenov, Iskander; Schulte, Franziska; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Belikova, Valeria; Minet, Olaf; Feliksberger, E.; Meshkovsky, I.; Artyushenko, Viacheslav

    2016-03-01

    Optical spectroscopic technologies are increasingly used for cancer diagnostics. Feasibility of differentiation between malignant and healthy samples of human kidney using Fluorescence, Raman, MIR and NIR spectroscopy has been recently reported . In the present work, a simplification of NIR spectroscopy method has been studied. Traditional high-resolution NIR spectrometry was replaced by an optical sensor based on a set of light-emitting diodes at selected wavelengths as light sources and a photodiode. Two prototypes of the sensor have been developed and tested using 14 in-vitro samples of seven kidney tumor patients. Statistical evaluation of results using principal component analysis and partial least-squares discriminant analysis has been performed. Despite only partial discrimination between tumor and healthy tissue achieved by the presented new technique, the results evidence benefits of LED-based near-infrared sensing used for oncological diagnostics. Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 4 March, 2016, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 7 April, 2016. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance.

  13. Textile integrated sensors and actuators for near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zysset, Christoph; Nasseri, Nassim; Büthe, Lars; Münzenrieder, Niko; Kinkeldei, Thomas; Petti, Luisa; Kleiser, Stefan; Salvatore, Giovanni A; Wolf, Martin; Tröster, Gerhard

    2013-02-11

    Being the closest layer to our body, textiles provide an ideal platform for integrating sensors and actuators to monitor physiological signals. We used a woven textile to integrate photodiodes and light emitting diodes. LEDs and photodiodes enable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) systems to monitor arterial oxygen saturation and oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin in human tissue. Photodiodes and LEDs are mounted on flexible plastic strips with widths of 4 mm and 2 mm, respectively. The strips are woven during the textile fabrication process in weft direction and interconnected with copper wires with a diameter of 71 μm in warp direction. The sensor textile is applied to measure the pulse waves in the fingertip and the changes in oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin during a venous occlusion at the calf. The system has a signal-to-noise ratio of more than 70 dB and a system drift of 0.37% ± 0.48%. The presented work demonstrates the feasibility of integrating photodiodes and LEDs into woven textiles, a step towards wearable health monitoring devices. PMID:23481780

  14. Development and test of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Paul G.; Bates, Jerry C.; Miller, Christopher R.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; O'Callaghan, Fred; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Karnik, Avinash R.

    1999-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been developed for the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) program for a scheduled launch on the EOS PM-1 spacecraft in December 2000. AIRS, working in concert with complementary microwave instrumentation on EOS PM-1 is designed to provide both new and more accurate data about the atmosphere, land and oceans for application to NASA climate studies and NOAA and DOD weather prediction. Among the important parameters to be derived from AIRS observations are atmospheric temperature profiles with an average accuracy of 1 K in 1 kilometer (km) layers in the troposphere, humidity profiles to 10% accuracy and surface temperatures with an average accuracy of 0.5 K. The AIRS measurement technique is based on passive IR remote sensing using a precisely calibrated, high spectral resolution grating spectrometer operating in the 3.7 - 15.4 micrometer region. The instrument concept uses a passively cooled multi- aperture echelle array spectrometer approach in combination with advanced state of the art focal plane and cryogenic refrigerator technology to achieve unparalleled performance capability in a practical long life configuration. The AIRS instrument, which has been under development since 1991, has been fully integrated and has completed successfully a comprehensive performance verification program. Performance verification included thermal vacuum testing, environmental qualification and a full range of spatial, spectral and radiometric calibrations, which have demonstrated outstanding spectrometric performance. This paper provides a brief overview of the AIRS mission and instrument design along with key results from the test program.

  15. Gas-cell measurements for evaluating longwave-infrared passive-sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Alan S.; Combs, Roger J.; Thomas, Mark J.; Curry, Timothy; Kroutil, Robert T.

    2006-10-01

    A longwave-infrared (LWIR) passive-spectrometer performance was evaluated with a short-pathlength gas cell. This cell was accurately positioned between the sensor and a NIST-traceable blackbody radiance source. Cell contents were varied over the Beer's Law absorbance range from the limit of detection to saturation for the gas analytes of sulfur hexafluoride and hexafluoroethane. The spectral impact of saturation on infrared absorbance was demonstrated for the passive sensor configuration. The gas-cell contents for all concentration-pathlength products was monitored with an active traditional-laboratory Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and was verified by comparison with the established PNNL/DOE vapor-phase infrared (IR) spectral database. For the passive FTIR measurements, the blackbody source employed a range of background temperatures from 5 °C to 50 °C. The passive measurements without the presence of a gas cell permitted a determination of the noise equivalent spectral noise (NESR) for each set of passive gas-cell measurements. In addition, the no-cell condition allowed the evaluation of the effect of gas cell window materials of low density poly(ethylene), potassium chloride, potassium bromide, and zinc selenide. The components of gas cell, different window materials, temperature differentials, and absorbances of target-analyte gases supplied the means of evaluating the LWIR performance of a passive FTIR spectrometer. The various LWIR-passive measurements were found to simulate those often encountered in open-air scenarios important to both industrial and environmental monitoring applications.

  16. Commercial Non-Dispersive Infrared Spectroscopy Sensors for Sub-Ambient Carbon Dioxide Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly S.; McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide produced through respiration can accumulate rapidly within closed spaces. If not managed, a crew's respiratory rate increases, headaches and hyperventilation occur, vision and hearing are affected, and cognitive abilities decrease. Consequently, development continues on a number of CO2 removal technologies for human spacecraft and spacesuits. Terrestrially, technology development requires precise performance characterization to qualify promising air revitalization equipment. On-orbit, instrumentation is required to identify and eliminate unsafe conditions. This necessitates accurate in situ CO2 detection. Recursive compensation algorithms were developed for sub-ambient detection of CO2 with commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) sensors. In addition, the source of the exponential loss in accuracy is developed theoretically. The basis of the loss can be explained through thermal, Doppler, and Lorentz broadening effects that arise as a result of the temperature, pressure, and composition of the gas mixture under analysis. The objective was to develop a mathematical routine to compensate COTS CO2 sensors relying on NDIR over pressures, temperatures, and compositions far from calibration conditions. The routine relies on a power-law relationship for the pressure dependency of the sensors along with an equivalent pressure to account for the composition dependency. A Newton-Raphson iterative technique solves for actual carbon dioxide concentration based on the reported concentration. Moreover, first principles routines were established to predict mixed-gas spectra based on sensor specifications (e.g., optical path length). The first principles model can be used to parametrically optimize sensors or sensor arrays across a wide variety of pressures/temperatures/ compositions. In this work, heuristic scaling arguments were utilized to develop reasonable compensation techniques. Experimental results confirmed this approach and provided

  17. Air-Velocity Sensor For Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, H. Douglas; Hellbaum, Richard F.

    1990-01-01

    New airspeed sensor conceived for accurate measurement of both airspeed and direction of flight of helicopter. Direction of motion of helicopter displayed by lighting of one of series of lamps encircling digital display of airspeed. Pressure transducer measures difference between impact and static pressures at tip of rotor blade by use of conventional pitot-static-tube assembly.

  18. The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on Landsat 8: Design overview and pre-launch characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) on Landsat 8 is the latest thermal sensor in that series of missions. Unlike the previous single channel sensors, TIRS uses two channels to cover the 10-12 micron band. It is also a pushbroom imager; a departure from the previous whiskbroom approach. Nevertheles...

  19. Rapid evolution of air sensor technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Outdoor air pollution measurement approaches have historically been conducted using stationary shelters that require significant space, power, and expertise to operate. The cost and logistical requirements to conduct monitoring have limited the number of locations with continuou...

  20. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  1. Regional Assimilation of NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Lapenta, William; Jediovec, Gary J.; McCarty, William; Mecikalski, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center seeks to accelerate the infusion of NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NW S forecast operations and decision-making. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), is expected to advance climate research and weather prediction into the 21 st century. It is one of six instruments onboard Aqua, a satellite that is part of NASA s Earth Observing System. AIRS, along with two partner microwave sounding instruments, represents the most advanced atmospheric sounding system ever deployed in space. The system is capable of measuring the atmospheric temperature in the troposphere with radiosonde accuracies of 1 K over 1 km-thick layers under both clear and cloudy conditions, while the accuracy of the derived moisture profiles will exceed that obtained by radiosondes. It is imperative that the scientific community is prepared to take full advantage of next-generation satellite data that will become available within the next decade. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure designed to optimally assimilate AIRS data at high spatial resolution over both land and ocean. The assimilation system used in this study is the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) developed at the Forecast System Laboratory used extensively around the globe. Results will focus on quality control issues associated with AIRS, optimal assimilation strategies, and the impact of the AIRS data on subsequent numerical forecasts at 12 km produced by the next generation Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model.

  2. TAMDAR Sensor Validation in 2003 AIRS II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Murray, John J.; Anderson, Mark V.; Mulally, Daniel J.; Jensen, Kristopher R.; Grainger, Cedric A.; Delene, David J.

    2005-01-01

    This study entails an assessment of TAMDAR in situ temperature, relative humidity and winds sensor data from seven flights of the UND Citation II. These data are undergoing rigorous assessment to determine their viability to significantly augment domestic Meteorological Data Communications Reporting System (MDCRS) and the international Aircraft Meteorological Data Reporting (AMDAR) system observational databases to improve the performance of regional and global numerical weather prediction models. NASA Langley Research Center participated in the Second Alliance Icing Research Study from November 17 to December 17, 2003. TAMDAR data taken during this period is compared with validation data from the UND Citation. The data indicate acceptable performance of the TAMDAR sensor when compared to measurements from the UND Citation research instruments.

  3. Compact spectroscopic sensor for air quality monitoring in spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Benjamin; Hamid, Hakim; Rosskopf, Jürgen; Forouhar, Siamak

    2011-01-01

    The air quality of any manned spacecraft needs to be continuously monitored in order to safeguard the health of the crew. Any fire event, accidental release of harmful gaseous contaminants or a malfunction in the air revitalization system has to be detected as fast as possible to provide enough time for the crew to react. In this paper, a fast sensor system based on laser spectroscopy is presented, which is able to detect three important gases: carbon monoxide for fire detection, hydrogen chloride for fire characterization and oxygen to monitor the air vitalization system. To provide a long maintenance-free operation time without the need for any consumables except power, a calibration-free measurement method was developed, which is only based on molecule specific constants which are available from the molecular data base HITRAN. The presented sensor offers the possibility for reliable and crosssensitivity-free air quality monitoring over a large pressure and temperature range.

  4. Overview of benefits, challenges, and requirements of wheeled-vehicle mounted infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John Lester; Clayton, Paul; Olsson, Stefan F.

    2013-06-01

    Requirements for vehicle mounted infrared sensors, especially as imagers evolve to high definition (HD) format will be detailed and analyzed. Lessons learned from integrations of infrared sensors on armored vehicles, unarmored military vehicles and commercial automobiles will be discussed. Comparisons between sensors for driving and those for situation awareness, targeting and other functions will be presented. Conclusions will be drawn regarding future applications and installations. New business requirements for more advanced digital image processing algorithms in the sensor system will be discussed. Examples of these are smarter contrast/brightness adjustments algorithms, detail enhancement, intelligent blending (IR-Vis) modes, and augmented reality.

  5. Thermistor based, low velocity isothermal, air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrita, Admésio A. C. M.; Mendes, Ricardo; Quintela, Divo A.

    2016-03-01

    The semiconductor thermistor technology is applied as a flow sensor to measure low isothermal air velocities (<2 ms-1). The sensor is subjected to heating and cooling cycles controlled by a multifunctional timer. In the heating stage, the alternating current of a main AC power supply source guarantees a uniform thermistor temperature distribution. The conditioning circuit assures an adequate increase of the sensors temperature and avoids the thermal disturbance of the flow. The power supply interruption reduces the consumption from the source and extends the sensors life time. In the cooling stage, the resistance variation of the flow sensor is recorded by the measuring chain. The resistive sensor parameters proposed vary significantly and feature a high sensitivity to the flow velocity. With the aid of a computer, the data transfer, storage and analysis provides a great advantage over the traditional local anemometer readings. The data acquisition chain has a good repeatability and low standard uncertainties. The proposed method measures isothermal air mean velocities from 0.1 ms-1 to 2 ms-1 with a standard uncertainty error less than 4%.

  6. Electron tunneling infrared sensor module with integrated control circuitry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyadzhyan-Sevak, Vardkes V. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    In an integrated electron tunneling sensor, an automatic tunneling control circuit varies a high voltage bias applied to the sensor deflection electrode in response to changes in sensor output to maintain the proper gap between the sensor tip and membrane. The control circuit ensures stable tunneling activity in the presence of large signals and other disturbances to the sensor. Output signals from the module may be derived from the amplified sensor output. The integrated sensor module is particularly well adapted for use in blood glucose measurement and monitoring system.

  7. Wireless sensor networks for indoor air quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tsang-Chu; Lin, Chung-Chih; Chen, Chun-Chang; Lee, Wei-Lun; Lee, Ren-Guey; Tseng, Chao-Heng; Liu, Shi-Ping

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to build an indoor air quality monitoring system based on wireless sensor networks (WSNs) technology. The main functions of the system include (1) remote parameter adjustment and firmware update mechanism for the sensors to enhance the flexibility and convenience of the system, (2) sensor nodes are designed by referring to the IEEE 1451.4 standard. This way, sensor nodes can automatically adjust and be plug and play, and (3) calibration method to strength the measurement value's sensitivity and accuracy. The experimental results show that transmission speed improves 30% than Trickle, transmission volume reduced to 42% of the original volume, updating task in 5*5 network topology can be executed 1.79 times and power consumption reduced to 30%. When baseline drifts, we can use the firmware update mechanism to adjust the reference value. The way can reduce error percentage from 15% to 7%. PMID:22133488

  8. Development of Refrigerant Change Indicator and Dirty Air Filter Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, V.

    2003-06-24

    The most common problems affecting residential and light commercial heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are slow refrigerant leaks and dirty air filters. Equipment users are usually not aware of a problem until most of the refrigerant has escaped or the air filter is clogged with dirt. While a dirty air filter can be detected with a technology based on the air pressure differential across the filter, such as a ''whistling'' indicator, it is not easy to incorporate this technology into existing HVAC diagnostic equipment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a low-cost, nonintrusive refrigerant charge indicator and dirty air filter detection sensor. The sensors, based on temperature measurements, will be inexpensive and easy to incorporate into existing heat pumps and air conditioners. The refrigerant charge indicator is based on the fact that when refrigerant starts to leak, the evaporator coil temperature starts to drop and the level of liquid subcooling drops. When the coil temperature or liquid subcooling drops below a preset reading, a signal, such as a yellow warning light, can be activated to warn the equipment user that the system is undercharged. A further drop of coil temperature or liquid subcooling below another preset reading would trigger a second warning signal, such as a red warning light, to warn the equipment user that the unit now detects a leak and immediate action should be taken. The warning light cannot be turned off until it is re-set by a refrigeration repairman. To detect clogged air filters, two additional temperature sensors can be applied, one each across the evaporator. When the air filter is accumulating buildup, the temperature differential across the evaporator will increase because of the reduced airflow. When the temperature differential reaches a pre-set reading, a signal will be sent to the equipment user that the air filter needs to be changed. A traditional refrigerant charge indicator requires

  9. Application of zonal model on indoor air sensor network design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Lisa; Wen, Jin

    2007-04-01

    Growing concerns over the safety of the indoor environment have made the use of sensors ubiquitous. Sensors that detect chemical and biological warfare agents can offer early warning of dangerous contaminants. However, current sensor system design is more informed by intuition and experience rather by systematic design. To develop a sensor system design methodology, a proper indoor airflow modeling approach is needed. Various indoor airflow modeling techniques, from complicated computational fluid dynamics approaches to simplified multi-zone approaches, exist in the literature. In this study, the effects of two airflow modeling techniques, multi-zone modeling technique and zonal modeling technique, on indoor air protection sensor system design are discussed. Common building attack scenarios, using a typical CBW agent, are simulated. Both multi-zone and zonal models are used to predict airflows and contaminant dispersion. Genetic Algorithm is then applied to optimize the sensor location and quantity. Differences in the sensor system design resulting from the two airflow models are discussed for a typical office environment and a large hall environment.

  10. Fuzzy clustering of infrared images applied in air leak localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Nan; Peng, Guang-zheng; Jiang, Mu-zhou

    2009-07-01

    Most current research into the localization of leaks is focused on leaks of petroleum and natural gas pipelines, while there is very little new work being done on the leakage of vessels. A novel air-leak diagnosis and localization method based on infrared thermography is described in this paper, which is developed in an attempt to overcome the disadvantages of low efficiency and poor anti-jamming ability associated with the traditional approaches to localization of leaks from a vessel. The method achieves leak positioning through a factor θ based kernelized fuzzy clustering segmentation done to weighted differential thermal images of the test objects. The temperature difference factor θ is inventively built as a parameter changed with temperature range of the target region, in order to enhance the robustness and the interference proof ability of the algorithm. Heat transfer simulation with air-leak flow is addressed by the finite element analysis. The experimental results indicate that the method proposed is effective and sensitive. The purpose of air-leak localization has been reached.

  11. Control of Computer Room Air Conditioning using IT Equipment Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Storey, Bill; Patterson, Michael K.

    2009-09-30

    The goal of this demonstration was to show how sensors in IT equipment could be accessed and used to directly control computer room air conditioning. The data provided from the sensors is available on the IT network and the challenge for this project was to connect this information to the computer room air handler's control system. A control strategy was developed to enable separate control of the chilled water flow and the fans in the computer room air handlers. By using these existing sensors in the IT equipment, an additional control system is eliminated (or could be redundant) and optimal cooling can be provided saving significant energy. Using onboard server temperature sensors will yield significant energy reductions in data centers. Intel hosted the demonstration in its Santa Clara, CA data center. Intel collaborated with IBM, HP, Emerson, Wunderlich-Malec Engineers, FieldServer Technologies, and LBNL to install the necessary components and develop the new control scheme. LBNL also validated the results of the demonstration.

  12. AIRS Infrared Radiance Validation Concept Using Earth Scene Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, D. E.; Aumann, H. H.; Pagano, T. S.; Strow, L. L.

    2001-05-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) will fly onboard the NASA Earth Observing Satellite (EOS)polar-orbiting Aqua spacecraft. AIRS, a high resolution infrared spectrometer with visible and near-infrared spectral channels, has been designed to provide atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles at least as accurate as those measured by standard radiosondes. Calibration studies of the response of each of the AIRS 4000+ detectors will begin as soon as the spacecraft orbit and instrument have stabilized. These studies are needed to help assess the contribution of instrument measurement errors to the spectral radiance determination. Some of the uncertainties will be determined from measurements of the onboard calibrators. Other sources of measurement uncertainty, such as scan mirror polarization and spectral response functions, require views of Earth at nadir and at oblique viewing angles, in cloud-free conditions. During early operation of the instrument, the blackbody radiance determination will rely on pre-launch measurements and models of the spectral response functions. During this phase of the operation, we have chosen an approach for initial assessment of the accuracy of the measured radiance that is not dependent on an exact knowledge of the spectral position of the detectors. Radiances will be evaluated in narrow regions that are well removed from spectral line features. There are potentially hundreds of detectors that can be used for this purpose. Our work to date has focused on a subset of these detectors located in atmospheric window regions between 2500-2700 cm-1 and 800-1200 cm-1. Pre-launch thermal-vacuum blackbody calibration results indicate that, using a reasonable cross-section of detectors, it should be possible to extrapolate the performance of a sparse set of detectors to the general state of the instrument calibration. In this paper we describe some initial results using a simple statistical methodology that compares outgoing radiances in

  13. Contemporary infrared sensors and instruments; Proceedings of the Seminar, San Diego, CA, July 29, 30, 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, H.; Zweibaum, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    Topics discussed include infrared detectors and preamplifiers, infrared optics and coatings, radiometric and spectral instruments and measurements, and scanning and imaging instruments. Particular consideration is given to the conceptual design of a spaceborne lightning sensor, a rocket-borne liquid-helium-cooled circular-variable filter spectrometer, a test facility for the measurement of infrared radiation from jet engine exhaust systems, and the profiling of focused CO2 high energy laser microsec pulses with a pyroelectric vidicon camera

  14. The development of a μ-biomimetic uncooled IR-Sensor inspired by the infrared receptors of Melanophila acuminata.

    PubMed

    Siebke, Georg; Holik, Peter; Schmitz, Sam; Tätzner, Simon; Thiesler, Jan; Steltenkamp, Siegfried

    2015-04-01

    The beetle Melanophila acuminata uses a specialized organ to detect infrared radiation. The organ consists of about 100 individual sensilla. The main component of the sensillum is a pressure chamber. Upon absorption of radiation, the pressure increases, and the tip of a dendrite is deformed. A unique feature of the organ is a compensation mechanism that prevents large pressures. The beetle uses this organ to detect forest fires and to navigate inside burning woods. However, the sensitivity is part of a long-lasting discussion, providing thresholds between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. To end the decade-long discussion and to provide a novel type of infrared sensor, we are developing an uncooled μ-biomimetic infrared (IR) sensor inspired by Melanophila acuminata using MEMS technology. Here, we present the development of a μ-capacitor that is used to detect pressure changes and the characterization of the compensation mechanism. We describe the microtechnological fabrication process for air-filled capacitors with a ratio of diameter-to-electrode distance of 1000 and a technique to fill the sensor bubble-free with water. Finally, we estimate the sensitivity of the beetle using a theoretical model of the sensillum. PMID:25822807

  15. Detection of gas plumes in cluttered environments using long-wave infrared hyperspectral sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadwater, Joshua B.; Spisz, Thomas S.; Carr, Alison K.

    2008-04-01

    Long-wave infrared hyperspectral sensors provide the ability to detect gas plumes at stand-off distances. A number of detection algorithms have been developed for such applications, but in situations where the gas is released in a complex background and is at air temperature, these detectors can generate a considerable amount of false alarms. To make matters more difficult, the gas tends to have non-uniform concentrations throughout the plume making it spatially similar to the false alarms. Simple post-processing using median filters can remove a number of the false alarms, but at the cost of removing a significant amount of the gas plume as well. We approach the problem using an adaptive subpixel detector and morphological processing techniques. The adaptive subpixel detection algorithm is able to detect the gas plume against the complex background. We then use morphological processing techniques to isolate the gas plume while simultaneously rejecting nearly all false alarms. Results will be demonstrated on a set of ground-based long-wave infrared hyperspectral image sequences.

  16. Infrared horizon sensor modeling for attitude determination and control - Analysis and mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, S. P.; Phenneger, M. C.; Stengle, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work of the Flight Dynamics Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center in analyzing and evaluating the performance of a variety of infrared horizon sensors on 12 spaceflight missions from 1973 to 1984. Earth infrared radiance modeling, using the LOWTRAN 5 Program, and the Horizon Radiance Modeling Utility are also described. Mission data are presented for Magsat and the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, with analysis to assess the sensor modeling as well as cloud and sun interference effects. Recommendations are made regarding future directions for the infrared horizon technology.

  17. Nano-structure fabrication for HgCdTe ultra-fast infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shao-Wei; Yang, Jianrong; Chen, Yifang; Zhen, Honglou; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei

    2009-09-01

    High-speed infrared sensors are necessary for broad applications in optic fibre communications with high data capacity and high security and distance sensing by laser. In this paper, an ultra-fast infrared sensor with 100 nm ballistic channels has been proposed and successfully fabricated by electron beam lithography. The area of photosensitive surface is as large as 100 μm × 100 μm to ensure its high sensitivity. The principle is based on the ballistic transport of electrons in the nano-scale channels. The frequency is expected to be in the range of 10 GHz, one or two orders higher than conventional photovoltaic sensors.

  18. Spectral Analysis of the Primary Flight Focal Plane Arrays for the Thermal Infrared Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montanaro, Matthew; Reuter, Dennis C.; Markham, Brian L.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Lunsford, Allen W.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Gerace, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) is a (1) New longwave infrared (10 - 12 micron) sensor for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission, (2) 185 km ground swath; 100 meter pixel size on ground, (3) Pushbroom sensor configuration. Issue of Calibration are: (1) Single detector -- only one calibration, (2) Multiple detectors - unique calibration for each detector -- leads to pixel-to-pixel artifacts. Objectives are: (1) Predict extent of residual striping when viewing a uniform blackbody target through various atmospheres, (2) Determine how different spectral shapes affect the derived surface temperature in a realistic synthetic scene.

  19. A novel solid state non-dispersive infrared CO2 gas sensor compatible with wireless and portable deployment.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Desmond; MacGregor, Calum

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes development of a novel mid-infrared light emitting diode (LED) and photodiode (PD) light source/detector combination and use within a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) carbon dioxide gas sensor. The LED/PD based NDIR sensor provides fast stabilisation time (time required to turn on the sensor from cold, warm up, take and report a measurement, and power down again ≈1 second), longevity (>15 years), low power consumption and low cost. Described performance is compatible with "fit and forget" wireless deployed sensors in applications such as indoor air quality monitoring/control & energy conservation in buildings, transport systems, horticultural greenhouses and portable deployment for safety, industrial and medical applications. Fast stabilisation time, low intrinsic power consumption and cycled operation offer typical energy consumption per measurement of mJ's, providing extended operation using battery and/or energy harvesting strategies (measurement interval of ≈ 2 minutes provides >10 years operation from one AA battery). Specific performance data is provided in relation to measurement accuracy and noise, temperature performance, cross sensitivity, measurement range (two pathlength variants are described covering ambient through to 100% gas concentration), comparison with NDIR utilizing thermal source/pyroelectric light source/detector combination and compatibility with energy harvesting. Semiconductor based LED/PD processing together with injection moulded reflective optics and simple assembly provide a route to low cost high volume manufacturing. PMID:23760090

  20. A Novel Solid State Non-Dispersive Infrared CO2 Gas Sensor Compatible with Wireless and Portable Deployment

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Desmond; MacGregor, Calum

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes development of a novel mid-infrared light emitting diode (LED) and photodiode (PD) light source/detector combination and use within a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) carbon dioxide gas sensor. The LED/PD based NDIR sensor provides fast stabilisation time (time required to turn on the sensor from cold, warm up, take and report a measurement, and power down again ≈1 second), longevity (>15 years), low power consumption and low cost. Described performance is compatible with “fit and forget” wireless deployed sensors in applications such as indoor air quality monitoring/control & energy conservation in buildings, transport systems, horticultural greenhouses and portable deployment for safety, industrial and medical applications. Fast stabilisation time, low intrinsic power consumption and cycled operation offer typical energy consumption per measurement of mJ's, providing extended operation using battery and/or energy harvesting strategies (measurement interval of ≈ 2 minutes provides >10 years operation from one AA battery). Specific performance data is provided in relation to measurement accuracy and noise, temperature performance, cross sensitivity, measurement range (two pathlength variants are described covering ambient through to 100% gas concentration), comparison with NDIR utilizing thermal source/pyroelectric light source/detector combination and compatibility with energy harvesting. Semiconductor based LED/PD processing together with injection moulded reflective optics and simple assembly provide a route to low cost high volume manufacturing. PMID:23760090

  1. Uncertainty in air quality observations using low-cost sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castell, Nuria; Dauge, Franck R.; Dongol, Rozina; Vogt, Matthias; Schneider, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution poses a threat to human health, and the WHO has classified air pollution as the world's largest single environmental health risk. In Europe, the majority of the population lives in areas where air quality levels frequently exceed WHO's ambient air quality guidelines. The emergence of low-cost, user-friendly and very compact air pollution platforms allowing observations at high spatial resolution in near real-time, provides us with new opportunities to simultaneously enhance existing monitoring systems as well as enable citizens to engage in more active environmental monitoring (citizen science). However the data sets generated by low-cost sensors show often questionable data quality. For many sensors, neither their error characteristics nor how their measurement capability holds up over time or through a range of environmental conditions, have been evaluated. We have conducted an exhaustive evaluation of the commercial low-cost platform AQMesh (measuring NO, NO2, CO, O3, PM10 and PM2.5) in laboratory and in real-world conditions in the city of Oslo (Norway). Co-locations in field of 24 platforms were conducted over a 6 month period (April to September 2015) allowing to characterize the temporal variability in the performance. Additionally, the field performance included the characterization on different monitoring urban monitoring sites characteristic of both traffic and background conditions. All the evaluations have been conducted against CEN reference method analyzers maintained according to the Norwegian National Reference Laboratory quality system. The results show clearly that a good performance in laboratory does not imply similar performance in real-world outdoor conditions. Moreover, laboratory calibration is not suitable for subsequent measurements in urban environments. In order to reduce the errors, sensors require on-site field calibration. Even after such field calibration, the platforms show a significant variability in the performance

  2. Flexible strain sensor for air muscles using polypyrrole coated rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjahyono, Arief P.; Aw, Kean C.; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka; Li, K. C.

    2010-04-01

    A novel flexible large strain sensor was developed to be use with an air muscle. A piece of butyl rubber was coated with the conducting polymer, polypyrrole through bulk solution and chemical vapour deposition method. The strain sensor was able to response to sudden movements represented by the multiple step functions of the applied strain. Consistency of the sensor's output was studied and the average error in the change of resistance was calculated to be 0.32% and 0.72% for elongation and contraction respectively for the sample made using chemical vapour deposition. However, a hysteresis was observed for this sample for a single cycle of elongation and contraction with the highest error calculated to be 3.2% at a 0% applied strain. SEM images showed the propagation of surface micro-cracks as the cause of the variation in surface resistance with applied strain. In addition, slower relaxation rate of the rubber prevented the surface micro-cracks to open and close at the same rate. The idea of utilizing conducting polymer coating can be applied to the inner rubber tube of the air muscle. As such, a complete integration between actuator and sensor can be realized.

  3. Development of wireless sensor network for monitoring indoor air pollutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Shaharil Mad; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md; Saad, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Yusof @ Kamarudin, Azman Muhamad

    2015-05-01

    The air that we breathe with everyday contains variety of contaminants and particles. Some of these contaminants and particles are hazardous to human health. Most of the people don't realize that the content of air they being exposed to whether it was a good or bad air quality. The air quality whether in indoor or outdoor environment can be influenced by physical factors like dust particles, gaseous pollutants (including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds) and biological like molds and bacteria growth which largely depend on temperature and humidity condition of a room. These kinds of pollutants can affect human health, physical reaction, comfort or work performance. In this study, a wireless sensor network (WSN) monitoring system for monitor air pollutant in indoor environment was developed. The system was divided into three parts: web-based interface program, sensing module and a base station. The measured data was displayed on the web which is can be accessed by the user. The result shows that the overall measured parameters were meet the acceptable limit, requirement and criteria of indoor air pollution inside the building. The research can be used to improve the indoor air quality level in order to create a comfortable working and healthy environment for the occupants inside the building.

  4. Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Shott, John R.; Raqueno, Nina G.; Markham, Brian L.; Radocinski, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Launched in February 2013, the Landsat-8 carries on-board the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), a two-band thermal pushbroom imager, to maintain the thermal imaging capability of the Landsat program. The TIRS bands are centered at roughly 10.9 and 12 micrometers (Bands 10 and 11 respectively). They have 100 m spatial resolution and image coincidently with the Operational Land Imager (OLI), also on-board Landsat-8. The TIRS instrument has an internal calibration system consisting of a variable temperature blackbody and a special viewport with which it can see deep space; a two point calibration can be performed twice an orbit. Immediately after launch, a rigorous vicarious calibration program was started to validate the absolute calibration of the system. The two vicarious calibration teams, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), both make use of buoys deployed on large water bodies as the primary monitoring technique. RIT took advantage of cross-calibration opportunity soon after launch when Landsat-8 and Landsat-7 were imaging the same targets within a few minutes of each other to perform a validation of the absolute calibration. Terra MODIS is also being used for regular monitoring of the TIRS absolute calibration. The buoy initial results showed a large error in both bands, 0.29 and 0.51 W/sq m·sr·micrometers or -2.1 K and -4.4 K at 300 K in Band 10 and 11 respectively, where TIRS data was too hot. A calibration update was recommended for both bands to correct for a bias error and was implemented on 3 February 2014 in the USGS/EROS processing system, but the residual variability is still larger than desired for both bands (0.12 and 0.2 W/sq m·sr·micrometers or 0.87 and 1.67 K at 300 K). Additional work has uncovered the source of the calibration error: out-of-field stray light. While analysis continues to characterize the stray light contribution, the vicarious calibration work proceeds. The additional data have

  5. Infrared sensors to map soil carbon in agricultural ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid methods of measuring soil carbon such as near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy have gained interest but problems of accurate and precise measurement still persist resulting from the high spatial variability of soil carbon within agricultural landscapes. T...

  6. CityAir app: Mapping air-quality perception using people as sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castell, Nuria; Fredriksen, Mirjam; Cole-Hunter, Thomas; Robinson, Johanna; Keune, Hans; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Bartonova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    Outdoor air pollution is a major environmental health problem affecting all people in developed and developing countries alike. Ambient (outdoor) air pollution in both cities and rural areas was estimated to cause 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012. In modern society, people are expending an increasing amount of time in polluted urban environments, thus increasing their exposure and associated health responses. Some cities provide information about air pollution levels to their citizens using air quality monitoring networks. However, due to their high cost and maintenance, the density of the monitoring networks is very low and not capable to capture the high temporal and spatial variability of air pollution. Thus, the citizen lacks a specific answer to the question of "how the air quality is in our surroundings". In the framework of the EU-funded CITI-SENSE project the innovative concept of People as Sensors is being applied to the field of outdoor air pollution. This is being done in eight European cities, including Barcelona, Belgrade, Edinburgh, Haifa, Ljubljana, Oslo, Ostrava and Vienna. People as Sensors defines a measurement model, in which measurements are not only taken by hardware sensors, but in which also humans can contribute with their individual "measurements" such as their subjective perception of air quality and other personal observations. In order to collect the personal observations a mobile app, CityAir, has been developed. CityAir allows citizens to rate the air quality in their surroundings with colour at their current location: green if air quality is very good, yellow if air quality is good, orange if air quality is poor and red if air quality is very poor. The users have also the possibility of indicating the source of pollution (i.e. traffic, industry, wood burning) and writing a comment. The information is on-line and accessible for other app users, thus contributing to create an air-quality map based on citizens' perception

  7. Regional Precipitation Forecast with Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profile Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-H.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedloved, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced technology in hyperspectral sensors such as the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS; Aumann et al. 2003) on NASA's polar orbiting Aqua satellite retrieve higher vertical resolution thermodynamic profiles than their predecessors due to increased spectral resolution. Although these capabilities do not replace the robust vertical resolution provided by radiosondes, they can serve as a complement to radiosondes in both space and time. These retrieved soundings can have a significant impact on weather forecasts if properly assimilated into prediction models. Several recent studies have evaluated the performance of specific operational weather forecast models when AIRS data are included in the assimilation process. LeMarshall et al. (2006) concluded that AIRS radiances significantly improved 500 hPa anomaly correlations in medium-range forecasts of the Global Forecast System (GFS) model. McCarty et al. (2009) demonstrated similar forecast improvement in 0-48 hour forecasts in an offline version of the operational North American Mesoscale (NAM) model when AIRS radiances were assimilated at the regional scale. Reale et al. (2008) showed improvements to Northern Hemisphere 500 hPa height anomaly correlations in NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) global system with the inclusion of partly cloudy AIRS temperature profiles. Singh et al. (2008) assimilated AIRS temperature and moisture profiles into a regional modeling system for a study of a heavy rainfall event during the summer monsoon season in Mumbai, India. This paper describes an approach to assimilate AIRS temperature and moisture profiles into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model using its three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) assimilation system (WRF-Var; Barker et al. 2004). Section 2 describes the AIRS instrument and how the quality indicators are used to intelligently select the highest-quality data for assimilation

  8. Innovative target for integration and early evaluation of infrared sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadson, Carl F.

    1993-11-01

    Evaluation of infrared sensor performance begins with integration on an optical test station and initial acquisition of a source target image. Preliminary performance evaluation includes sensor radiant response, image performance, and sensor alignment. Integration and preliminary performance evaluation may be expedited by the use of an innovative target consisting of a cold background surrounding a hot extended source with a thin, cold wire obscuration. This paper describes an appropriate target geometry and provides a nomogram that allows estimation of sensor focal error based on an observed ratio of target image response between two detector elements.

  9. Application of high-resolution thermal infrared sensors for geothermal exploration at the Salton Sea, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Ramsey, M.; Tratt, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Salton Sea geothermal field straddles the southeast margin of the Salton Sea in California, USA. This field includes approximately 20km2 of mud volcanoes and mud pots and centered on the Mullet Island thermal anomaly. The area has been previously exploited for geothermal power; there are currently seven power plants in the area that produce 1000 MW. The field itself is relatively un-vegetated, which provides for unfettered detection of the surface mineralogy, radiant heat, and emitted gases using air and spaceborne thermal infrared (TIR) sensors. On March 26, 2009, the airborne Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEBASS) sensor was flown over the Salton Sea-Mullet Island area. SEBASS has a spectral resolution of 128 bands in the 7.5-14.5 micron spectral region and a spatial resolution of 1m/pixel from the 3000-ft altitude flown for this study. A large portion of the Calipatria Fault, a NW/SE-trending geothermally active fault that bisects the Mullet Island thermal anomaly, was imaged during this flight and several thermal/mineralogical anomalies were noted. The orbital Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) has only 5 spectral bands at 90m/pixel resolution, but has acquired dozens of visible and TIR datasets over the geothermal field in the 10-year history of the instrument. The thermal-temporal trend of this dataset has been analyzed, and the November 2008 image studied in detail for comparison to SEBASS. The land-leaving TIR radiance data were separated into brightness temperature and surface emissivity. TIR emissivity data are unique to each mineral and a TIR mineral spectral library was used to determine their presence on the ground. Various mineral maps were created showing the distribution surrounding the most active geothermal features. The higher spectral/spatial resolution SEBASS data were used to validate the lower spectral/spatial resolution ASTER data (as well as the higher resolution laboratory TIR

  10. Micro sensor node for air pollutant monitoring: hardware and software issues.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sukwon; Kim, Nakyoung; Cha, Hojung; Ha, Rhan

    2009-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks equipped with various gas sensors have been actively used for air quality monitoring. Previous studies have typically explored system issues that include middleware or networking performance, but most research has barely considered the details of the hardware and software of the sensor node itself. In this paper, we focus on the design and implementation of a sensor board for air pollutant monitoring applications. Several hardware and software issues are discussed to explore the possibilities of a practical WSN-based air pollution monitoring system. Through extensive experiments and evaluation, we have determined the various characteristics of the gas sensors and their practical implications for air pollutant monitoring systems. PMID:22408489

  11. Micro Sensor Node for Air Pollutant Monitoring: Hardware and Software Issues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sukwon; Kim, Nakyoung; Cha, Hojung; Ha, Rhan

    2009-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks equipped with various gas sensors have been actively used for air quality monitoring. Previous studies have typically explored system issues that include middleware or networking performance, but most research has barely considered the details of the hardware and software of the sensor node itself. In this paper, we focus on the design and implementation of a sensor board for air pollutant monitoring applications. Several hardware and software issues are discussed to explore the possibilities of a practical WSN-based air pollution monitoring system. Through extensive experiments and evaluation, we have determined the various characteristics of the gas sensors and their practical implications for air pollutant monitoring systems. PMID:22408489

  12. Development of Level 3 (gridded) products for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, Stephanie L.; Leroy, Stephen S.; Manning, Evan M.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Oliphant, Robert B.; Braverman, Amy; Lee, Sung-Yung; Lambrigtsen, Bjom H.

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) sounding system is a suite of infrared and microwave instruments flown as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) onboard the Aqua platform. The AIRS dataset provides a daily, global view of Earth processes at a finer vertical resolution than ever before. However, analysis of the AIRS data is a daunting task given the sheer volume and complexity of the data. The volume of data produced by the EOS project is unprecedented; the AIRS project alone will produce many terabytes of data over the lifetime of the mission. This paper describes development of AIRS Level 3 data products that will help to alleviate problems of access and usability.

  13. New frontiers for mid-infrared sensors: towards deep sea monitoring with a submarine FT-IR sensor system.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Martin; Jakusch, Michael; Karlowatz, Manfred; Katzir, Abraham; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2003-06-01

    A sub-sea deployable fiber-optic sensor system for the continuous determination of a range of environmentally relevant volatile organic compounds in seawater has been developed. The prototype of a robust, miniaturized Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer for in situ underwater pollution monitoring was designed, developed, and built in our research group. The assembled instrument is enclosed in a sealed aluminium pressure vessel and is capable of maintenance-free operation in an oceanic environment down to depths of at least 300 m. The whole system can be incorporated either in a tow frame or a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). A suitable fiber-optic sensor head was developed, optimized in terms of sensitivity and hydrodynamics, and connected to the underwater FT-IR spectrometer. Due to a modular system design, various other sensor head configurations could be realized and tested, ensuring facile adaptation of the instrument to future tasks. The sensor system was characterized in a series of laboratory and simulated field tests. The sensor proved to be capable of quantitatively detecting a range of chlorinated hydrocarbons and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in seawater down to the low ppb (microg/L) concentration range, including mixtures of up to 6 components. It has been demonstrated that varying amounts of salinity, turbidity, or humic acids, as well as interfering seawater pollutants, such as aliphatic hydrocarbons or phenols, do not significantly influence the sensor characteristics. In addition, the sensor exhibits sufficient long-time stability and a low susceptibility to sensor fouling. PMID:14658689

  14. Hurricane Ivan as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: Microwave 89Ghz imageFigure 2: Visible/near infrared sensor

    Hurricane Ivan is the most powerful hurricane to hit the Caribbean in 10 years. On September 7 and 8 it damaged 90 percent of the homes in Grenada and killed at least 16 people as it swept over Grenada, Barbados and the other islands in the area. By Thursday morning on September 9, Ivan's sustained winds reached 160 mph making it a rare category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. By Monday September 13, Ivan is blamed for 67 deaths and skirts western Cuba with winds clocked at 156 mph. The National Hurricane Center predicted the eye of Ivan will make landfall across Mobile Bay in Alabama late Wednesday or early Thursday.

    These images of Hurricane Ivan were acquired by the AIRS infrared, microwave, and visible sensors on September 15 at 1:30 pm local time as the storm moves in to Alabama. Ivan at category 4 strength is about 150 miles south of Mobile, Alabama and is moving north at 14 mph. Maximum sustained winds are reported to be at 135 mph and extend 105 miles from the center, while tropical storm-force winds extend 290 miles from the center. Ivan pounded the Gulf coast all day Wednesday, and is expected to make landfall between midnight and 3am in Mobile Bay, Alabama.

    This image shows how the storm looks through an AIRS Infrared window channel, and reveals a very large eye - about 75 km (50 miles) across. Window channels measure the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the hurricane. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds, so the purple color indicates the cool cloud tops of the storm. In cloud-free areas, the infrared signal is retrieved at the Earth's surface, revealing warmer temperatures. Cooler areas are pushing to purple

  15. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MATRIX ISOLATION - INFRARED SPECTROMETRY FOR AIR SAMPLE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the application of gas chromatography/matrix- solation infrared (GC/MI-IR) spectrometry to the analysIs of environmental air sample extracts. Samples that were analyzed include extracts from woodsmoke-impacted air, XAD-2 blanks, indoor air, and carpet sample...

  16. Midwave infrared and visible sensor performance modeling: small craft identification discrimination criteria for maritime security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapels, Keith; Driggers, Ronald G.; Deaver, Dawne; Moker, Steven K.; Palmer, John

    2007-10-01

    The new emphasis on Anti-Terrorism and Force Protection (AT/FP), for both shore and sea platform protection, has resulted in a need for infrared imager design and evaluation tools that demonstrate field performance against U.S. Navy AT/FP requirements. In the design of infrared imaging systems for target acquisition, a discrimination criterion is required for successful sensor realization. It characterizes the difficulty of the task being performed by the observer and varies for different target sets. This criterion is used in both assessment of existing infrared sensor and in the design of new conceptual sensors. We collected 12 small craft signatures (military and civilian) in the visible band during the day and the long-wave and midwave infrared spectra in both the day and the night environments. These signatures were processed to determine the targets' characteristic dimension and contrast. They were also processed to band limit the signature's spatial information content (simulating longer range), and a perception experiment was performed to determine the task difficulty (N50 and V50). The results are presented and can be used for Navy and Coast Guard imaging infrared sensor design and evaluation.

  17. PYRAMIR: construction and implementation of the world's first infrared pyramid sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, D.; Baumeister, H.; Bizenberger, P.; Feldt, M.; Henning, Th.; Hippler, S.; Ligori, S.; Mall, U.; Neumann, U.; Salm, N.; Storz, C.; Wagner, K.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the construction and implementation of the unmodulated infrared pyramid wavefront sensor PYRAMIR at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. PYRAMIR is an extension of the existing visible Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system ALFA, which allows wavefront sensing in the near-infrared wavefront regime. We describe the optical setup and the calibration procedure of the pyramid wavefront sensor. We discuss possible drawbacks of the calibration and show the results gained on Calar Alto.

  18. Embedded infrared fiber-optic sensor for thermometry in a high temperature/pressure environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Jang, Kyoung Won; Moon, Jinsoo; Han, Ki-Tek; Jeon, Dayeong; Lee, Bongsoo; Park, Byung Gi

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we developed an embedded infrared fiber-optic temperature sensor for thermometry in high temperature/pressure and water-chemistry environments by using two identical silver-halide optical fibers. The performance of the fabricated temperature sensor was assessed in an autoclave filled with an aqueous coolant solution containing boric acid and lithium hydroxide. We carried out real-time monitoring of the infrared radiation emitted from the signal and reference probes for various temperatures over a temperature range from 95 to 225 °C. In order to decide the temperature of the synthetic coolant solution, we measured the difference between the infrared radiation emitted from the two temperature-sensing probes. Thermometry with the proposed sensor is immune to any changes in the physical conditions and the emissivity of the heat source. From the experimental results, the embedded infrared fiber-optic temperature sensor can withstand, and normally operate in a high temperature/pressure test loop system corresponding to the coolant system used for nuclear power plant simulation. We expect that the proposed sensor can be developed to accurately monitor temperatures in harsh environments.

  19. The Citizen Science Toolbox: A One-Stop Resource for Air Sensor Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The air sensor technology market is exploding with new sensors in all kinds of forms. Developers are putting sensors in wristbands, headphones, and cell phone add-ons. Small, portable and lower-cost measurement devices using sensors are coming on the market with a wide variety of...

  20. Information-based mid-upper tropospheric methane derived from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, X.; Barnet, C.; Wei, J.; Maddy, E.

    2009-07-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) measurements of methane (CH4) generally contain about 1.0 degree of freedom and are therefore dependent on a priori assumptions about the vertical methane distribution as well as the temperature lapse rate and the amount of moisture. Thus it requires that interpretation and/or analysis of the CH4 spatial and temporal variation based on the AIRS retrievals need to use the averaging kernels (AK). To simplify the use of satellite retrieved products for scientific analysis, a method based on the information content of the retrievals is developed, in which the AIRS retrieved CH4 in the layer from 50 to 250 hPa below the tropopause is used to characterize the mid-upper tropospheric CH4 in the mid-high latitude regions. The basis of this method is that in the mid-high latitude regions the maximum sensitive layers of AIRS to CH4 have a good correlation with the tropopause heights, and these layers are usually between 50 and 250 hPa below the tropopause. Validation using the aircraft measurements from NOAA/ESRL/GMD and the campaigns INTEX-A and -B indicated that the correlation of AIRS mid-upper tropospheric CH4 with aircraft measurements is ~0.6-0.7, and its the bias and rms difference are less than ±1% and 1.2%, respectively. Further comparison of the CH4 seasonal cycle indicated that the cycle from AIRS mid-upper tropospheric CH4 is in a reasonable agreement with NOAA aircraft measurements. This method provides a simple way to use the thermal infrared sounders data to approximately analyze the spatial and temporal variation CH4 in the upper free tropospere without referring the AK. This method is applicable to derive tropospheric CH4 as well as other trace gases for any thermal infrared sensors.

  1. Real-time sensor mapping display for airborne imaging sensor test with the adaptive infrared imaging spectroradiometer (AIRIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Megan M.; Cruger, William E.; Gittins, Christopher; Kindle, Harry; Ricks, Timothy P.

    2005-11-01

    Captive flight testing (CFT) of sensors and seekers requires accurate data collection and display for sensor performance evaluation. The U.S. Army Redstone Technical Test Center (RTTC), in support of the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), has developed a data collection suite to facilitate airborne test of hyperspectral chemical/biological sensors. The data collection suite combines global positioning system (GPS) tracking, inertial measurement unit (IMU) data, accurate timing streams, and other test scenario information. This data collection suite also contains an advanced real-time display of aircraft and sensor field-of-view information. The latest evolution of this system has been used in support of the Adaptive InfraRed Imaging Spectroradiometer (AIRIS), currently under development by Physical Sciences Incorporated for ECBC. For this test, images from the AIRIS sensor were overlaid on a digitized background of the test area, with latencies of 1 second or less. Detects of surrogate chemicals were displayed and geo-referenced. Video overlay was accurate and reliable. This software suite offers great versatility in the display of imaging sensor data; support of future tests with the AIRIS sensor are planned as the system evolves.

  2. Air Enquirer's multi-sensor boxes as a tool for High School Education and Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morguí, Josep-Anton; Font, Anna; Cañas, Lidia; Vázquez-García, Eusebi; Gini, Andrea; Corominas, Ariadna; Àgueda, Alba; Lobo, Agustin; Ferraz, Carlos; Nofuentes, Manel; Ulldemolins, Delmir; Roca, Alex; Kamnang, Armand; Grossi, Claudia; Curcoll, Roger; Batet, Oscar; Borràs, Silvia; Occhipinti, Paola; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    An educational tool was designed with the aim of making more comprehensive the research done on Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) in the ClimaDat Spanish network of atmospheric observation stations (www.climadat.es). This tool is called Air Enquirer and it consist of a multi-sensor box. It is envisaged to build more than two hundred boxes to yield them to the Spanish High Schools through the Education department (www.educaixa.com) of the "Obra Social 'La Caixa'", who funds this research. The starting point for the development of the Air Enquirers was the experience at IC3 (www.ic3.cat) in the CarboSchools+ FP7 project (www.carboschools.cat, www.carboschools.eu). The Air Enquirer's multi-sensor box is based in Arduino's architecture and contains sensors for CO2, temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and both infrared and visible luminance. The Air Enquirer is designed for taking continuous measurements. Every Air Enquirer ensemble of measurements is used to convert values to standard units (water content in ppmv, and CO2 in ppmv_dry). These values are referred to a calibration made with Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry (Picarro®) under different temperature, pressure, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Multiple sets of Air Enquirers are intercalibrated for its use in parallel during the experiments. The different experiments proposed to the students will be outdoor (observational) or indoor (experimental, in the lab) focusing on understanding the biogeochemistry of GHGs in the ecosystems (mainly CO2), the exchange (flux) of gases, the organic matter production, respiration and decomposition processes, the influence of the anthropogenic activities on the gases (and particles) exchanges, and their interaction with the structure and composition of the atmosphere (temperature, water content, cooling and warming processes, radiative forcing, vertical gradients and horizontal patterns). In order to ensure Air Enquirers a high-profile research performance the experimental designs

  3. The Thermal Infrared Sensor on the Landsat Data Continutiy Mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The REGularized canopy reFLECtance (REGFLEC) modeling tool integrates leaf optics, canopy reflectance, and atmospheric radiative transfer model components, facilitating accurate retrieval of leaf area index (LAI) and leaf chlorophyll content (Cab) directly from at-sensor radiances in green, red and ...

  4. Evaluation of infrared sensors for oil spill response operations. Final report, October 1994-June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hover, G.L.; Plourde, J.V.

    1995-06-01

    During November 1994, the USCO conducted a field evaluation of several commercially available portable infrared (IR) sensors for their ability to detect oil on water at night. The evaluation was conducted over the natural oil seeps off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA. The portable sensors were operated from the open door of a Coast Guard HH-60J helicopter. Sensors evaluated included the Agema Thermovision 1000 and Texas Instruments LOCUSP operating in the long wave IR (LWIR) and the Cincinnati Electronics IRC-160ST and IRRIS-256ST operating in the medium wave IR (MWIR). The installed FLIR 2000 LWIR system provided a baseline reference of current CG IR capabilities.

  5. A novel system for road surface monitoring using an inexpensive infrared laser sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanshahi, Mohammad R.; Jazizadeh, Farrokh; Masri, Sami F.; Becerik-Gerber, Burcin

    2012-04-01

    In this study, an inexpensive depth sensor is used to identify defects in pavements. This depth sensor consists of an infrared projector and camera. An innovative approach is proposed to interpret the data acquired by this sensor. The proposed system in this study is a breakthrough achievement for autonomous cost-effective condition assessment of roads and transportation systems. Various road conditions including patching, cracks, and potholes can be robustly and autonomously assessed using the proposed approach. Several field experiments have been carried out to evaluate the capabilities of this system. The field tests clearly demonstrate the superior features of the developed system in this study compared to conventional approaches for pavement evaluation.

  6. A model for μ-biomimetic thermal infrared sensors based on the infrared receptors of Melanophila acuminata.

    PubMed

    Siebke, Georg; Holik, Peter; Schmitz, Sam; Schmitz, Helmut; Lacher, Manfred; Steltenkamp, Siegfried

    2014-09-01

    Beetles of the genus Melanophila acuminata detect forest fires from distances as far as 130 km with infrared-sensing organs. Inspired by this extremely sensitive biological device, we are developing an IR sensor that operates at ambient temperature using MEMS technology. The sensor consists of two liquid-filled chambers that are connected by a micro-fluidic system. Absorption of IR radiation by one of these chambers leads to heating and expansion of a liquid. The increasing pressure deflects a membrane covered by one electrode of a plate capacitor. The micro-fluidic system and the second chamber represent a fluidic low-pass filter, preventing slow, but large pressure changes. However, the strong frequency dependence of the filter demands a precise characterization of its properties. Here, we present a theoretical model that describes the frequency-dependent response of the sensor based on material properties and geometrical dimensions. Our model is divided into four distinct parts that address different aspects of the sensor. The model describes the frequency-dependent behaviour of the fluidic filter and a thermal low-pass filter as well as saturation effects at low frequencies. This model allows the calculation of optimal design parameters, and thereby provides the foundation for the development of such a sensor. PMID:24762777

  7. Space-based infrared scanning sensor LOS determination and calibration using star observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Xu, Zhan; An, Wei; Deng, Xin-Pu; Yang, Jun-Gang

    2015-10-01

    This paper provides a novel methodology for removing sensor bias from a space based infrared (IR) system (SBIRS) through the use of stars detected in the background field of the sensor. Space based IR system uses the LOS (line of sight) of target for target location. LOS determination and calibration is the key precondition of accurate location and tracking of targets in Space based IR system and the LOS calibration of scanning sensor is one of the difficulties. The subsequent changes of sensor bias are not been taking into account in the conventional LOS determination and calibration process. Based on the analysis of the imaging process of scanning sensor, a theoretical model based on the estimation of bias angles using star observation is proposed. By establishing the process model of the bias angles and the observation model of stars, using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to estimate the bias angles, and then calibrating the sensor LOS. Time domain simulations results indicate that the proposed method has a high precision and smooth performance for sensor LOS determination and calibration. The timeliness and precision of target tracking process in the space based infrared (IR) tracking system could be met with the proposed algorithm.

  8. Infrared Sensor-Based Temperature Control for Domestic Induction Cooktops

    PubMed Central

    Lasobras, Javier; Alonso, Rafael; Carretero, Claudio; Carretero, Enrique; Imaz, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a precise real-time temperature control system based on infrared (IR) thermometry for domestic induction cooking is presented. The temperature in the vessel constitutes the control variable of the closed-loop power control system implemented in a commercial induction cooker. A proportional-integral controller is applied to establish the output power level in order to reach the target temperature. An optical system and a signal conditioning circuit have been implemented. For the signal processing a microprocessor with 12-bit ADC and a sampling rate of 1 Ksps has been used. The analysis of the contributions to the infrared radiation permits the definition of a procedure to estimate the temperature of the vessel with a maximum temperature error of 5 °C in the range between 60 and 250 °C for a known cookware emissivity. A simple and necessary calibration procedure with a black-body sample is presented. PMID:24638125

  9. On the performance of infrared sensors in earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of infrared sensing systems is dependent upon the radiative properties of targets in addition to constraints imposed by system components. The unclassified state-of-the-art of infrared system performance figures is reviewed to indicate the relevance to system performance of target radiative properties. A theory of rough surface scattering is developed which allows the formulation of the reflective characteristics of extended targets. The thermal radiation emission from extended targets is formulated on the basis of internal radiation characteristics of natural materials and the transmissive scattering effects at the surface. Finally, the total radiative characteristics may be expressed as functions of material properties and incident and received directions, although the expressions are extremely complex functions and do not account for the effects of shadowing or multiple scattering. It is believed that the theory may be extended to include these effects and to incorporate the local radii of curvature of the surface.

  10. Hurricane Ivan as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: Microwave 89Ghz imageFigure 2: Visible/near infrared sensor

    Hurricane Ivan is the most powerful hurricane to hit the Caribbean in 10 years. On September 7 and 8 it damaged 90 percent of the homes in Grenada and killed at least 16 people as it swept over Grenada, Barbados and the other islands in the area. By Thursday morning on September 9, Ivan's sustained winds reached 160 mph making it a rare category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. By Monday September 13, Ivan is blamed for 67 deaths and skirts western Cuba with winds clocked at 156 mph. The National Hurricane Center predicted the eye of Ivan will make landfall across Mobile Bay in Alabama late Wednesday or early Thursday.

    These images of Hurricane Ivan were acquired by the AIRS infrared, microwave, and visible sensors on September 15 at 1:30 pm local time as the storm moves in to Alabama. Ivan at category 4 strength is about 150 miles south of Mobile, Alabama and is moving north at 14 mph. Maximum sustained winds are reported to be at 135 mph and extend 105 miles from the center, while tropical storm-force winds extend 290 miles from the center. Ivan pounded the Gulf coast all day Wednesday, and is expected to make landfall between midnight and 3am in Mobile Bay, Alabama.

    This image shows how the storm looks through an AIRS Infrared window channel, and reveals a very large eye - about 75 km (50 miles) across. Window channels measure the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the hurricane. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds, so the purple color indicates the cool cloud tops of the storm. In cloud-free areas, the infrared signal is retrieved at the Earth's surface, revealing warmer temperatures. Cooler areas are pushing to purple

  11. Center pivot mounted infrared sensors: Retrieval of ET and interface with satellite systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared sensors mounted aboard cener pivot irrigation systems can remotely sense the surface temperatures of the crops and soils, which provides important information on crop water status. This can be used for irrigation management and irrigation automation, which can increase crop water productivi...

  12. Model development and system performance optimization for staring infrared search and track (IRST) sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Craig; Theisen, Michael; Pace, Teresa; Halford, Carl; Driggers, Ronald

    2016-05-01

    The mission of an Infrared Search and Track (IRST) system is to detect and locate (sometimes called find and fix) enemy aircraft at significant ranges. Two extreme opposite examples of IRST applications are 1) long range offensive aircraft detection when electronic warfare equipment is jammed, compromised, or intentionally turned off, and 2) distributed aperture systems where enemy aircraft may be in the proximity of the host aircraft. Past IRST systems have been primarily long range offensive systems that were based on the LWIR second generation thermal imager. The new IRST systems are primarily based on staring infrared focal planes and sensors. In the same manner that FLIR92 did not work well in the design of staring infrared cameras (NVTherm was developed to address staring infrared sensor performance), current modeling techniques do not adequately describe the performance of a staring IRST sensor. There are no standard military IRST models (per AFRL and NAVAIR), and each program appears to perform their own modeling. For this reason, L-3 has decided to develop a corporate model, working with AFRL and NAVAIR, for the analysis, design, and evaluation of IRST concepts, programs, and solutions. This paper provides some of the first analyses in the L-3 IRST model development program for the optimization of staring IRST sensors.

  13. Uncooled infrared sensor technology for hostile fire indication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadav, Shavit; Brodetzki, Guy; Danino, Meir; Zahler, Moti

    2011-06-01

    An evolving combat arena poses an ever-growing hostile fire threat for various ground and airborne targets. Protecting both static posts and moving military platforms against these threats require high performance and affordable solutions, favoring uncooled sensing alert technologies. By analyzing accumulated target and clutter data using new algorithmic and hardware building blocks we establish improved hostile fire indication system configurations. The paper will review new system demonstrations harnessing uncooled IR sensors technology alongside empirical field testing results.

  14. Infrared horizon sensor modeling for attitude determination and control: Analysis and mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phenneger, M. C.; Singhal, S. P.; Lee, T. H.; Stengle, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    The work performed by the Attitude Determination and Control Section at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center in analyzing and evaluating the performance of infrared horizon sensors is presented. The results of studies performed during the 1960s are reviewed; several models for generating the Earth's infrared radiance profiles are presented; and the Horizon Radiance Modeling Utility, the software used to model the horizon sensor optics and electronics processing to computer radiance-dependent attitude errors, is briefly discussed. Also provided is mission experience from 12 spaceflight missions spanning the period from 1973 to 1984 and using a variety of horizon sensing hardware. Recommendations are presented for future directions for the infrared horizon sensing technology.

  15. An infrared hyperspectral sensor for remote sensing of gases in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, Samer; Rusch, Peter; Gerhard, Jõrn-Hinnrich; Harig, Roland

    2010-10-01

    Remote sensing by infrared spectroscopy allows identification and quantification of atmospheric gases as well as airborne pollutants. Infrared hyperspectral sensors deliver high spectral and spatial resolution images of a scene. By analyzing the spectra, gas emissions, for example from industrial plants, chemical accidents, or ships can be identified and quantified from long distances. The image of the cloud can be used to pinpoint the source of the gas as well as to assess the dimension and the dispersion of the cloud. A hyperspectral sensor based on the method of Fourier-transform spectroscopy has been developed. A cube corner Michelson interferometer with large optical apertures has been designed specifically for the task. In addition, the system encompasses a cooled infrared focal plane array detector, a calibration source, and a video camera. The system is compact and field portable. Field measurements were conducted on ship exhausts. Gas clouds were successfully visualized and identified.

  16. Photothermovoltaic effect in carbon nanotubes: En route toward junctionless infrared photocells and light sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omari, M.; Kouklin, N. A.

    2011-06-01

    Optically induced voltage was studied in carbon nanotube films configured as two-terminal resistive elements and operating as junctionless photocells in the infrared. The photovoltage is found to appear only for asymmetric/off-contact illuminations and the effect is explained based on photogenerated heat flow model. The engineered cell prototypes were found to yield electrical powers of ˜30 pW while demonstrating improved conversion efficiency under high-flux illumination. The cell is also shown to act as uncooled infrared sensor with its dark-to-photocurrent ratio improving as temperature increases. The concept might enable nanotube's use in applications ranging from heat recycling to self-powered infrared sensors.

  17. Temperature-modulated graphene oxide resistive humidity sensor for indoor air quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luca, A.; Santra, S.; Ghosh, R.; Ali, S. Z.; Gardner, J. W.; Guha, P. K.; Udrea, F.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) micro-hotplate technology for the monitoring and control of indoor air quality (IAQ). GO powder is obtained by chemical exfoliation, dispersed in water and deposited via ink-jet printing onto a low power micro-hotplate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show the typical layered and wrinkled morphology of the GO. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that the GO flakes possess a significant number of oxygen containing functional groups (epoxy, carbonyl, hydroxyl) extremely attractive for humidity detection. Electro-thermal characterisation of the micro-hotplates shows a thermal efficiency of 0.11 mW per °C, resulting in a sensor DC power consumption of only 2.75 mW at 50 °C. When operated in an isothermal mode, the sensor response is detrimentally affected by significant drift, hysteretic behaviour, slow response/recovery times and hence poor RH level discrimination. Conversely, a temperature modulation technique coupled with a differential readout methodology results in a significant reduction of the sensor drift, improved linear response with a sensitivity of 0.14 mV per %, resolution below 5%, and a maximum hysteresis of +/-5% response and recovery times equal to 189 +/- 49 s and 89 +/- 5 s, respectively. These performance parameters satisfy current IAQ monitoring requirements. We have thus demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating GO on a micro-hotplate CMOS-compatible platform enabling temperature modulation schemes to be easily applied in order to achieve compact, low power, low cost humidity IAQ monitoring.In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary

  18. Tracking and Recognition of Multiple Human Targets Moving in a Wireless Pyroelectric Infrared Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ji; Li, Fangmin; Zhao, Ning; Jiang, Na

    2014-01-01

    With characteristics of low-cost and easy deployment, the distributed wireless pyroelectric infrared sensor network has attracted extensive interest, which aims to make it an alternate infrared video sensor in thermal biometric applications for tracking and identifying human targets. In these applications, effectively processing signals collected from sensors and extracting the features of different human targets has become crucial. This paper proposes the application of empirical mode decomposition and the Hilbert-Huang transform to extract features of moving human targets both in the time domain and the frequency domain. Moreover, the support vector machine is selected as the classifier. The experimental results demonstrate that by using this method the identification rates of multiple moving human targets are around 90%. PMID:24759117

  19. Performance Expectations for Future Moderate Resolution Visible and Infrared Space Instruments Based on AIRS and MODIS In-Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Broberg, Steven E.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Baron, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Lessons learned from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) projects highlight areas where further technology development is needed to address future land, ocean and atmospheric measurement needs. Although not established as requirements at this time, it is anticipated that scientists will expect improvements in the areas of spatial, spectral, radiometric, polarimetric, temporal and calibration performance for future sensors. This paper addresses each of these performance areas and provides lessons learned from MODIS and AIRS. We also present expectations in performance of the system based on information from NASA Instrument Incubator Program and industry reports. Tradeoffs are presented vs orbit altitude (LEO, ME0 and GEO) and provide a 'systems' perspective to future measurement concepts.

  20. Neural Network Model For Fusion Of Visible And Infrared Sensor Outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajjimarangsee, Pongsak; Huntsberger, Terrance L.

    1989-01-01

    Integration of outputs from multiple sensors has been the subject of much of the recent research in the machine vision field. This process is useful in a variety of applications, such as three dimensional interpretation of scenes imaged by multiple cameras, integration of visible and range data, and the fusion of multiple types of sensors. The use of multiple types of sensors for machine vision poses the problem of how to integrate the information from these sensors. This paper presents a neural network model for the fusion of visible and thermal infrared sensor outputs. Since there is no human biological system that can be used as a model for integration of these sensor outputs, alternate biological systems for sensory fusions can serve as starting points. In this paper, a model is developed based upon six types of bimodal neurons found in the optic tectum of the rattlesnake. These neurons integrate visible and thermal infrared sensory inputs. The neural network model has a series of layers which include a layer for unsupervised clustering in the form of self-organizing feature maps, followed by a layer which has multiple filters that are generated by training a neural net with experimental rattlesnake response data. The final layer performs another unsupervised clustering for integration of the output from the filter layer. The results of a number of experiments are also presented.

  1. An Interoperable Architecture for Air Pollution Early Warning System Based on Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadzadegan, F.; Zahmatkesh, H.; Saber, M.; Ghazi khanlou, H. J.

    2013-09-01

    Environmental monitoring systems deal with time-sensitive issues which require quick responses in emergency situations. Handling the sensor observations in near real-time and obtaining valuable information is challenging issues in these systems from a technical and scientific point of view. The ever-increasing population growth in urban areas has caused certain problems in developing countries, which has direct or indirect impact on human life. One of applicable solution for controlling and managing air quality by considering real time and update air quality information gathered by spatially distributed sensors in mega cities, using sensor web technology for developing monitoring and early warning systems. Urban air quality monitoring systems using functionalities of geospatial information system as a platform for analysing, processing, and visualization of data in combination with Sensor Web for supporting decision support systems in disaster management and emergency situations. This system uses Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), which offers a standard framework that allows the integration of sensors and sensor data into spatial data infrastructures. SWE framework introduces standards for services to access sensor data and discover events from sensor data streams as well as definition set of standards for the description of sensors and the encoding of measurements. The presented system provides capabilities to collect, transfer, share, process air quality sensor data and disseminate air quality status in real-time. It is possible to overcome interoperability challenges by using standard framework. In a routine scenario, air quality data measured by in-situ sensors are communicated to central station where data is analysed and processed. The extracted air quality status is processed for discovering emergency situations, and if necessary air quality reports are sent to the authorities. This research proposed an

  2. Infrared sensors and sensor fusion; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 19-21, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Buser, R.G.; Warren, F.B.

    1987-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the fields of IR sensor multifunctional design; image modeling, simulation, and detection; IR sensor configurations and components; thermal sensor arrays; silicide-based IR sensors; and IR focal plane array utilization. Attention is given to the fusion of lidar and FLIR for target segmentation and enhancement, the synergetic integration of thermal and visual images for computer vision, the 'Falcon Eye' FLIR system, multifunctional electrooptics and multiaperture sensors for precision-guided munitions, and AI approaches to data integration. Also discussed are the comparative performance of Ir silicide and Pt silicide photodiodes, high fill-factor silicide monolithic arrays, and the characterization of noise in staring IR focal plane arrays.

  3. Infrared sensor for CVD deposition of dielectric films

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczyk, T.M.; Franke, J.E.; Zhang, S.; Haaland, D.M.

    1994-06-01

    Infrared emission (IRE) spectra were obtained from two borophosphosilicate glass (BPSG) thin-film sample sets. The first set consisted of 21 films deposited on undoped silicon wafers, and the second set consisted of 9 films deposited on patterned and doped (product) wafers. The IRE data were empirically modeled using partial least-squares calibration to simultaneously quantify four BPSG thin-film properties. The standard errors of the determinations when modeling the 21 monitor wafers were

  4. Mid-infrared fiber-coupled QCL-QEPAS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Patimisco, Pietro; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, Jason

    2013-08-01

    An innovative spectroscopic system based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) coupled with a mid-infrared (mid-IR) fiber and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is described. SF6 has been selected as a target gas in demonstration of the system for trace gas sensing. Single mode laser delivery through the prongs of the quartz tuning fork has been obtained employing a hollow waveguide fiber with inner silver-silver iodine (Ag-AgI) coatings and internal core diameter of 300 μm. A detailed design and realization of the QCL fiber coupling and output collimator system allowed almost practically all (99.4 %) of the laser beam to be transmitted through the spectrophone module. The achieved sensitivity of the system is 50 parts per trillion in 1 s, corresponding to a record for QEPAS normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2.7 × 10-10 W cm-1 Hz-1/2.

  5. Mid-Infrared Fiber-Coupled QCl-QEPAS Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, G.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, J.M.

    2013-08-01

    An innovative spectroscopic system based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) coupled with a mid-infrared (mid-IR) fiber and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) is described. SF6 has been selected as a target gas in demonstration of the system for trace gas sensing. Single mode laser delivery through the prongs of the quartz tuning fork has been obtained employing a hollow waveguide fiber with inner silver–silver iodine (Ag–AgI) coatings and internal core diameter of 300 lm. A detailed design and realization of the QCL fiber coupling and output collimator system allowed almost practically all (99.4 %) of the laser beam to be transmitted through the spectrophone module. The achieved sensitivity of the system is 50 parts per trillion in 1 s, corresponding to a record for QEPAS normalized noise-equivalent absorption 2.7 9 10-10 W cm-1 Hz-1/2.

  6. Development of Noninvasive Blood Glucose Sensor Using the Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Keiichi; Tamura, Kazuto; Kaneko, Wataru; Ishizawa, Hiroaki; Toba, Eiji

    Recently, diabetics have been steadily increasing, because change of diet, lack of exercise, increase an alcoholic intake, and increase a stress. It is a very serious problem for us. About 23.6 millions of people in Japan approach the danger of diabetes. Therefore, it is necessary to get insulin injection. And they have to measure blood glucose again and again a day. So, they are burden too heavy. This paper describes a new noninvasive measurement of blood glucose based on optical sensing. This uses Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of attenuated total reflection. Non-invasive measurement was carried out by using 3 methods. And standard error of prediction is about ±20mg/dl by 3 method. This paper also describes practical application of this method.

  7. Improved Products for Assimilation and Model Validation from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft was launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS acquires hyperspectral infrared radiances in the 3.7-15.4 micrometer spectral region with spectral resolution of better than 1200. Key channels from the AIRS Level 1B calibrated radiance product are currently assimilated into operational weather forecasts at NCEP and other international agencies. Additional Level 2 products for assimilation include the AIRS cloud cleared radiances and the geophysical retrieved temperature and water vapor profiles. The AIRS products are also used to validate climate model vertical and horizontal biases and transport of water vapor and key trace gases including Carbon Dioxide and Ozone. The wide variety of products available from the AIRS make it well suited to study processes affecting the interaction of these products.

  8. Chemical agent standoff detection and identification with a hyperspectral imaging infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagueux, Philippe; Vallières, Alexandre; Villemaire, André; Chamberland, Martin; Farley, Vincent; Giroux, Jean

    2009-09-01

    Standoff detection, identification and quantification of chemical agents are fundamental needs in several fields of applications. Additional required sensor characteristics include high sensitivity, low false alarms and high-speed (ideally real-time) operation, all in a compact and robust package. The thermal infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been utilized to implement such chemical sensors, either with spectrometers (with none or moderate imaging capability) or with imagers (with moderate spectral capability). Only with the recent emergence of high-speed, large format infrared imaging arrays, has it been possible to design chemical sensors offering uncompromising performance in the spectral, spatial, as well as the temporal domain. Telops has developed an innovative instrument that can not only provide an early warning for chemical agents and toxic chemicals, but also one that provides a "Chemical Map" in the field of view. To provide to best field imaging spectroscopy instrument, Telops has developed the FIRST, Field-portable Imaging Radiometric Spectrometer Technology, instrument. This instrument is based on a modular design that includes: a high-performance infrared FPA and data acquisition electronics, onboard data processing electronics, a high-performance Fourier transform modulator, dual integrated radiometric calibration targets and a visible boresight camera. These modules, assembled together in an environmentally robust structure, used in combination with Telops' proven radiometric and spectral calibration algorithms make this instrument a world-class passive standoff detection system for chemical imaging. This paper presents chemical detection and identification results obtained with the FIRST sensor.

  9. Temperature-modulated graphene oxide resistive humidity sensor for indoor air quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Santra, S; Ghosh, R; Ali, S Z; Gardner, J W; Guha, P K; Udrea, F

    2016-02-28

    In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) micro-hotplate technology for the monitoring and control of indoor air quality (IAQ). GO powder is obtained by chemical exfoliation, dispersed in water and deposited via ink-jet printing onto a low power micro-hotplate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show the typical layered and wrinkled morphology of the GO. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that the GO flakes possess a significant number of oxygen containing functional groups (epoxy, carbonyl, hydroxyl) extremely attractive for humidity detection. Electro-thermal characterisation of the micro-hotplates shows a thermal efficiency of 0.11 mW per °C, resulting in a sensor DC power consumption of only 2.75 mW at 50 °C. When operated in an isothermal mode, the sensor response is detrimentally affected by significant drift, hysteretic behaviour, slow response/recovery times and hence poor RH level discrimination. Conversely, a temperature modulation technique coupled with a differential readout methodology results in a significant reduction of the sensor drift, improved linear response with a sensitivity of 0.14 mV per %, resolution below 5%, and a maximum hysteresis of ±5%; response and recovery times equal to 189 ± 49 s and 89 ± 5 s, respectively. These performance parameters satisfy current IAQ monitoring requirements. We have thus demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating GO on a micro-hotplate CMOS-compatible platform enabling temperature modulation schemes to be easily applied in order to achieve compact, low power, low cost humidity IAQ monitoring. PMID:26842731

  10. Community Air Sensor Network (CAIRSENSE) Project: Lower Cost, Continuous Ambient Monitoring Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in air pollution sensor technology have enabled the development of small and low cost systems to measure outdoor air pollution. The deployment of numerous sensors across a small geographic area would have potential benefits to supplement existing monitoring networks and ...

  11. Migrating the Mach-Zehnder chemical and bio-sensor to the mid-infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leidner, L.; Ewald, M.; Sieger, M.; Mizaikoff, B.; Gauglitz, G.

    2013-05-01

    The properties of integrated optical phase-modulated Mach-Zehnder interferometers (IO-MZI) are used to set up a new generation of chemical and biochemical sensors working in the mid-infrared. First applications of the MZI principle were introduced in the beginning 1990s. They range from a gas sensor to monitor organic solvent concentrations1 to setting up an immunoassay for the detection of the herbicide simazine2. Most if not all sensors of MZI type operate at wavelengths of the visible or near infrared spectrum. There are several reasons to change this strategy and move into the mid-infrared spectral range (MIR): higher manufacturing tolerances, increased evanescent field penetration depth, signal amplification by surface enhanced infrared absorption effect (SEIRA), species identification by MIR fingerprints. The basis of the planned MIR-MZI is a GaAs waveguide pattern epitaxially grown on a substrate3. As a first step towards nanostructuring the waveguide surface, chemical deposition of Au nanoparticles on GaAs transducers was established. For the use of MIR-MZI sensors in bioanalytical assay development, chemical immobilization of molecular recognition elements on GaAs transducers was carried out. The modified surfaces were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), dark field microscopy, contact angle measurements and ellipsometric data as well as by a modified version of Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (RIfS)4. It was possible to monitor both the immobilization of gold nanoparticles and time-resolved specific binding using a model antibody antigen assay. After successful setup of relevant assays with RIfS, e.g. the detection of bacteria or endocrine disruptors, the assays are designed to be transferred onto the mid-infrared Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  12. ATTIRE (analytical tools for thermal infrared engineering): A sensor simulation and modeling package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Sensor Development Laboratory (ASDL) at the Stennis Space Center develops, maintains and calibrates remote sensing instruments for the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA). To perform system design trade-offs, analysis, and establish system parameters, ASDL has developed a software package for analytical simulation of sensor systems. This package called 'Analytical Tools for Thermal InfraRed Engineering' - ATTIRE, simulates the various components of a sensor system. The software allows each subsystem of the sensor to be analyzed independently for its performance. These performance parameters are then integrated to obtain system level information such as Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Noise Equivalent Radiance (NER), Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) etc. This paper describes the uses of the package and the physics that were used to derive the performance parameters.

  13. Development of a wireless air pollution sensor package for aerial-sampling of emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area pollutant sources, such as prescribed forest burns. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, samplers for particulate matter wi...

  14. Development of a wireless air pollution sensor package for aerial-sampling of emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area pollutant sources, such as prescribed forest burns. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, samplers for particula...

  15. Quantification Method for Electrolytic Sensors in Long-Term Monitoring of Ambient Air Quality.

    PubMed

    Masson, Nicholas; Piedrahita, Ricardo; Hannigan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Traditional air quality monitoring relies on point measurements from a small number of high-end devices. The recent growth in low-cost air sensing technology stands to revolutionize the way in which air quality data are collected and utilized. While several technologies have emerged in the field of low-cost monitoring, all suffer from similar challenges in data quality. One technology that shows particular promise is that of electrolytic (also known as amperometric) sensors. These sensors produce an electric current in response to target pollutants. This work addresses the development of practical models for understanding and quantifying the signal response of electrolytic sensors. Such models compensate for confounding effects on the sensor response, such as ambient temperature and humidity, and address other issues that affect the usability of low-cost sensors, such as sensor drift and inter-sensor variability. PMID:26516860

  16. Quantification Method for Electrolytic Sensors in Long-Term Monitoring of Ambient Air Quality

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Nicholas; Piedrahita, Ricardo; Hannigan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Traditional air quality monitoring relies on point measurements from a small number of high-end devices. The recent growth in low-cost air sensing technology stands to revolutionize the way in which air quality data are collected and utilized. While several technologies have emerged in the field of low-cost monitoring, all suffer from similar challenges in data quality. One technology that shows particular promise is that of electrolytic (also known as amperometric) sensors. These sensors produce an electric current in response to target pollutants. This work addresses the development of practical models for understanding and quantifying the signal response of electrolytic sensors. Such models compensate for confounding effects on the sensor response, such as ambient temperature and humidity, and address other issues that affect the usability of low-cost sensors, such as sensor drift and inter-sensor variability. PMID:26516860

  17. A geostationary thermal infrared sensor to monitor the lowermost troposphere: O3 and CO retrieval studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeyman, M.; Attié, J.-L.; Peuch, V.-H.; El Amraoui, L.; Lahoz, W. A.; Josse, B.; Ricaud, P.; von Clarmann, T.; Höpfner, M.; Orphal, J.; Flaud, J.-M.; Edwards, D. P.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Pasternak, F.; Cantié, R.

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes the capabilities of a nadir thermal infrared (TIR) sensor proposed for embarkation onboard a geostationary platform to monitor ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) for air quality (AQ) purposes. To assess the capabilities of this sensor we perform idealized retrieval studies considering typical atmospheric profiles of O3 and CO over Europe with different instrument configurations (signal to noise ratio and spectral sampling interval) using the KOPRA forward model and the KOPRA-fit retrieval scheme based on the Tikhonov-Phillips regularization. We then select a configuration, referred to as GEO-TIR, optimized for providing information in the lowermost troposphere (LmT; 0-3 km in height). For the GEO-TIR configuration we obtain around 1.5 degrees of freedom for O3 and 2 for CO at altitudes between 0 and 15 km. The error budget of GEO-TIR, calculated taking account of the principal contributions to the error (namely, temperature, measurement error, smoothing error) shows that information in the LmT can be achieved by GEO-TIR. We also retrieve analogous profiles from another geostationary infrared instrument with characteristics similar to the Meteosat Third Generation Infrared Sounder (MTG-IRS) which is dedicated to numerical weather prediction, referred to as GEO-TIR2. Comparison between GEO-TIR and GEO-TIR2 allows us to quantify the added value of GEO-TIR, a mission complementing the AQ observing system. To better characterize the information provided by GEO-TIR and GEO-TIR2 in the LmT, we retrieve two typical profiles of O3 and CO for different thermal contrast ranging from -10 K to 10 K. The shape of the first averaging kernel (corresponding to the surface level) confirms that GEO-TIR has good sensitivity to CO in the LmT and also to O3 for high positive thermal contrast. GEO-TIR2 has very low sensitivity in the LmT to O3 but can have sensitivity to CO with high positive thermal contrast. To quantify these results for a realistic atmosphere, we

  18. Infrared receptors in pyrophilous (“fire loving”) insects as model for new un-cooled infrared sensors

    PubMed Central

    Klocke, David; Schmitz, Anke; Soltner, Helmut; Bousack, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Summary Beetles of the genus Melanophila and certain flat bugs of the genus Aradus actually approach forest fires. For the detection of fires and of hot surfaces the pyrophilous species of both genera have developed infrared (IR) receptors, which have developed from common hair mechanoreceptors. Thus, this type of insect IR receptor has been termed photomechanic and shows the following two special features: (i) The formation of a complex cuticular sphere consisting of an outer exocuticular shell as well as of a cavernous microfluidic core and (ii) the enclosure of the dendritic tip of the mechanosensitive neuron inside the core in a liquid-filled chamber. Most probably a photomechanic IR sensillum acts as a microfluidic converter of infrared radiation which leads to an increase in internal pressure inside the sphere, which is measured by a mechanosensitive neuron. A simple model for this biological IR sensor is a modified Golay sensor in which the gas has been replaced by a liquid. Here, the absorbed IR radiation results in a pressure increase of the liquid and the deflection of a thin membrane. For the evaluation of this model analytical formulas are presented, which permits the calculation of the pressure increase in the cavity, the deformation of the membrane and the time constant of an artificial leak to compensate ambient temperature changes. Some organic liquids with high thermal expansion coefficients may improve the deflection of the membrane compared to water. PMID:21977430

  19. Air Pollution Sensors: Highlights from an EPA Workshop on the Evolution and Revolution in Low-Cost Participatory Air Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article summarizes the findings from the EPA's Apps and Sensors for Air Pollution Workshop that was held March 26-27 of 2012. The workshop brought together researchers, developers, and community-based groups who have been working with sensors and apps in a variety of settin...

  20. Long wave infrared cavity-enhanced sensors using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2005-11-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are becoming well known as convenient and stable semiconductor laser sources operating in the mid- to long-wave infrared, and are able to be fabricated to operate virtually anywhere in the 3.5 to 25 micron region. This makes them an ideal choice for infrared chemical sensing, a topic of great interest at present, spanning at least three critical areas: national security, environmental monitoring and protection, and the early diagnosis of disease through breath analysis. There are many different laser-based spectroscopic chemical sensor architectures in use today, from simple direct detection through to more complex and highly sensitive systems. Many current sensor needs can be met by combining QCLs and appropriate sensor architectures, those needs ranging from UAV-mounted surveillance systems, through to larger ultra-sensitive systems for airport security. In this paper we provide an overview of various laser-based spectroscopic sensing techniques, pointing out advantages and disadvantages of each. As part of this process, we include our own results and observations for techniques under development at PNNL. We also present the latest performance of our ultra-quiet QCL control electronics now being commercialized, and explore how using optimized supporting electronics enables increased sensor performance and decreased sensor footprint for given applications.

  1. Long wave infrared cavity-enhanced sensors using quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2005-12-30

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are becoming well known as convenient and stable semiconductor laser sources operating in the mid- to long-wave infrared, and are able to be fabricated to operate virtually anywhere in the 3.5 to 25 micron region. This makes them an ideal choice for infrared chemical sensing, a topic of great interest at present, spanning at least three critical areas: national security, environmental monitoring and protection, and the early diagnosis of disease through breath analysis. There are many different laser-based spectroscopic chemical sensor architectures in use today, from simple direct detection through to more complex and highly sensitive systems. Many current sensor needs can be met by combining QCLs and appropriate sensor architectures, those needs ranging from UAV-mounted surveillance systems, through to larger ultra-sensitive systems for airport security. In this paper we provide an overview of various laser-based spectroscopic sensing techniques, pointing out advantages and disadvantages of each. As part of this process, we include our own results and observations for techniques under development at PNNL. We also present the latest performance of our ultra-quiet QCL control electronics now being commercialized, and explore how using optimized supporting electronics enables increased sensor performance and decreased sensor footprint for given applications.

  2. Design study of a laser-cooled infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehlen, Markus P.; Boncher, William L.; Love, Steven P.

    2015-03-01

    The performance of a solid-state optical refrigerator is the result of a complex interplay of numerous optical and thermal parameters. We present a first preliminary study of an optical cryocooler using ray-tracing techniques. A numerical optimization identified a non-resonant cavity with astigmatism. This geometry offered more efficient pump absorption by the YLF:10%Yb laser-cooling crystal compared to non-resonant cavities without astigmatism that have been pursued experimentally so far. Ray tracing simulations indicate that ~80% of the incident pump light can absorbed for temperatures down to ~100 K. Calculations of heat loads, cooling power, and net payload heat lift are presented. They show that it is possible to cool a payload to a range of 90-100 K while producing a net payload heat lift of 80 mW and 300 mW when pumping a YLF:10%Yb crystal with 20 W and 50 W at 1020 nm, respectively. This performance is suited to cool HgCdTe infrared detectors that are used for sensing in the 8-12 μm atmospheric window. While the detector noise would be ~6× greater at 100 K than at 77 K, the laser refrigerator would introduce no vibrations and thus eliminate sources of microphonic noise that are limiting the performance of current systems.

  3. Remote detection of biological aerosols at a distance of 3 km with a passive Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) sensor.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Avishai

    2003-03-10

    Bio-aerosols containing Bacillus subtilis var. niger (BG) were detected at a distance of 3 km with a passive Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer in an open-air environment where the thermal contrast was low (~ 1 K). The measurements were analyzed with a new hyperspectral detection, identification and estimation algorithm based on radiative transfer theory and advanced signal processing techniques that statistically subtract the undesired background spectra. The results are encouraging as they suggest for the first time the feasibility of detecting biological aerosols with passive FTIR sensors. The number of detection events was small but statistically significant. We estimate the false alarm rate for this experiment to be 0.0095 and the probability of detection to be 0.61 when a threshold of detection that minimizes the sum of the probabilities of false alarm and of missed detection is chosen. PMID:19461748

  4. Remote detection of biological aerosols at a distance of 3 km with a passive Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Avishai

    2003-03-01

    Bio-aerosols containing Bacillus subtilis var. niger (BG) were detected at a distance of 3 km with a passive Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometer in an open-air environment where the thermal contrast was low (~ 1 K). The measurements were analyzed with a new hyperspectral detection, identification and estimation algorithm based on radiative transfer theory and advanced signal processing techniques that statistically subtract the undesired background spectra. The results are encouraging as they suggest for the first time the feasibility of detecting biological aerosols with passive FTIR sensors. The number of detection events was small but statistically significant. We estimate the false alarm rate for this experiment to be 0.0095 and the probability of detection to be 0.61 when a threshold of detection that minimizes the sum of the probabilities of false alarm and of missed detection is chosen.

  5. Contact-free measurement of respiratory rate using infrared and vibration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erden, Fatih; Alkar, Ali Ziya; Cetin, Ahmet Enis

    2015-11-01

    Respiratory rate is an essential parameter in many practical applications such as apnea detection, patient monitoring, and elderly people monitoring. In this paper, we describe a novel method and a contact-free multi-modal system which is capable of detecting human breathing activity. The multimodal system, which uses both differential pyro-electric infrared (PIR) and vibration sensors, can also estimate the respiratory rate. Vibration sensors pick up small vibrations due to the breathing activity. Similarly, PIR sensors pick up the thoracic movements. Sensor signals are sampled using a microprocessor board and analyzed on a laptop computer. Sensor signals are processed using wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Since breathing is almost periodic, a new multi-modal average magnitude difference function (AMDF) is used to detect the periodicity and the period in the processed signals. By fusing the data of two different types of sensors we achieve a more robust and reliable contact-free human breathing activity detection system compared to systems using only one specific type of sensors.

  6. Development and evaluation of optical fiber NH3 sensors for application in air quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Wieck, Lucas; Tao, Shiquan

    2013-02-01

    Ammonia is a major air pollutant emitted from agricultural practices. Sources of ammonia include manure from animal feeding operations and fertilizer from cropping systems. Sensor technologies with capability of continuous real time monitoring of ammonia concentration in air are needed to qualify ammonia emissions from agricultural activities and further evaluate human and animal health effects, study ammonia environmental chemistry, and provide baseline data for air quality standard. We have developed fiber optic ammonia sensors using different sensing reagents and different polymers for immobilizing sensing reagents. The reversible fiber optic sensors have detection limits down to low ppbv levels. The response time of these sensors ranges from seconds to tens minutes depending on transducer design. In this paper, we report our results in the development and evaluation of fiber optic sensor technologies for air quality monitoring. The effect of change of temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide concentration on fiber optic ammonia sensors has been investigated. Carbon dioxide in air was found not interfere the fiber optic sensors for monitoring NH3. However, the change of humidity can cause interferences to some fiber optic NH3 sensors depending on the sensor's transducer design. The sensitivity of fiber optic NH3 sensors was found depends on temperature. Methods and techniques for eliminating these interferences have been proposed.

  7. Development and Application of a Next Generation Air Sensor Network for the Hong Kong Marathon 2015 Air Quality Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Wong, Ka Chun; Wei, Peng; Ye, Sheng; Huang, Hao; Yang, Fenhuan; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K.K.; Luk, Connie W.Y.; Ning, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the development and evaluation of a next generation air monitoring system with both laboratory and field tests. A multi-parameter algorithm was used to correct for the impact of environmental conditions on the electrochemical sensors for carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollutants. The field evaluation in an urban roadside environment in comparison to designated monitors showed good agreement with measurement error within 5% of the pollutant concentrations. Multiple sets of the developed system were then deployed in the Hong Kong Marathon 2015 forming a sensor-based network along the marathon route. Real-time air pollution concentration data were wirelessly transmitted and the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) for the Green Marathon was calculated, which were broadcast to the public on an hourly basis. The route-specific sensor network showed somewhat different pollutant patterns than routine air monitoring, indicating the immediate impact of traffic control during the marathon on the roadside air quality. The study is one of the first applications of a next generation sensor network in international sport events, and it demonstrated the usefulness of the emerging sensor-based air monitoring technology in rapid network deployment to supplement existing air monitoring. PMID:26861336

  8. Development and Application of a Next Generation Air Sensor Network for the Hong Kong Marathon 2015 Air Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Wong, Ka Chun; Wei, Peng; Ye, Sheng; Huang, Hao; Yang, Fenhuan; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K K; Luk, Connie W Y; Ning, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the development and evaluation of a next generation air monitoring system with both laboratory and field tests. A multi-parameter algorithm was used to correct for the impact of environmental conditions on the electrochemical sensors for carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollutants. The field evaluation in an urban roadside environment in comparison to designated monitors showed good agreement with measurement error within 5% of the pollutant concentrations. Multiple sets of the developed system were then deployed in the Hong Kong Marathon 2015 forming a sensor-based network along the marathon route. Real-time air pollution concentration data were wirelessly transmitted and the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) for the Green Marathon was calculated, which were broadcast to the public on an hourly basis. The route-specific sensor network showed somewhat different pollutant patterns than routine air monitoring, indicating the immediate impact of traffic control during the marathon on the roadside air quality. The study is one of the first applications of a next generation sensor network in international sport events, and it demonstrated the usefulness of the emerging sensor-based air monitoring technology in rapid network deployment to supplement existing air monitoring. PMID:26861336

  9. Thermal stability of piezoelectric properties and infrared sensor performance of spin-coated polyurea thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Koshiba, Yasuko; Misaki, Masahiro; Ishida, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    We have investigated the temperature dependence of the piezoelectric coefficients and infrared sensor performance of spin-coated thin films of polyundecylurea (PUA11). The piezoelectric coefficients of the PUA11 films remained constant at temperatures above 180 °C and these films demonstrated thermal resistance superior to those of poly(vinylidene fluoride/trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF/TrFE)] films. The infrared sensor performance of the PUA11 films was measured after annealing at 125 °C for 500 h and was found to have retained 84% of its preannealing level. The thermal stability of the PUA11 films was higher than that of the P(VDF/TrFE) films; moreover, PUA11 is also expected to have superior electrothermal stability.

  10. Evaluation of Miniaturized Infrared Sensors for Process Control of the Palladium Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lascola, R. J.; Howard, D. W.

    2005-07-31

    We have tested the suitability of a miniaturized infrared sensor for measurements of CO and H{sub 2}O in the inlet stream to the Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR). We demonstrated that both analytes can be measured with absolute accuracies of 2-4% at the process inlet conditions of 120-140 C and approximately 1 atm of each gas. This accuracy must be improved to 1-1.5% for effective PMR process control. The use of a reference detector and independent temperature and pressure measurements to correct the raw signals will improve the accuracy to a level that will approach, if not meet, this goal. With appropriate bandpass filters, the infrared sensors may be used for other gas analysis applications.

  11. Application of Commercial Non-Dispersive Infrared Spectroscopy Sensors for Sub-Ambient Carbon Dioxide Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly; McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration within a spacecraft or spacesuit is critically important to ensuring the safety of the crew. Carbon dioxide uniquely absorbs light at wavelengths of 3.95 micrometers and 4.26 micrometers. As a result, non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) spectroscopy can be employed as a reliable and inexpensive method for the quantification of CO2 within the atmosphere. A multitude of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) NDIR sensors exist for CO2 quantification. The COTS sensors provide reasonable accuracy as long as the measurements are attained under conditions close to the calibration conditions of the sensor (typically 21.1 C (70.0 F) and 1 atmosphere). However, as pressure deviates from atmospheric to the pressures associated with a spacecraft (8.0{10.2 pounds per square inch absolute (psia)) or spacesuit (4.1{8.0 psia), the error in the measurement grows increasingly large. In addition to pressure and temperature dependencies, the infrared transmissivity through a volume of gas also depends on the composition of the gas. As the composition is not known a priori, accurate sub-ambient detection must rely on iterative sensor compensation techniques. This manuscript describes the development of recursive compensation algorithms for sub-ambient detection of CO2 with COTS NDIR sensors. In addition, the source of the exponential loss in accuracy is developed theoretically. The basis of the loss can be explained through thermal, Doppler, and Lorentz broadening effects that arise as a result of the temperature, pressure, and composition of the gas mixture under analysis. This manuscript provides an approach to employing COTS sensors at sub-ambient conditions and may also lend insight into designing future NDIR sensors for aerospace application.

  12. Application of Commercial Non-Dispersive Infrared Spectroscopy Sensors for Sub-Ambient Carbon Dioxide Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly; McMillin, Summer; Boerman, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration within a spacecraft or spacesuit is critically important to ensuring the safety of the crew. Carbon dioxide uniquely absorbs light at wavelengths of 3.95 micrometers and 4.26 micrometers. As a result, non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) spectroscopy can be employed as a reliable and inexpensive method for the quantification of CO2 within the atmosphere. A multitude of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) NDIR sensors exist for CO2 quantification. The COTS sensors provide reasonable accuracy so long as the measurements are attained under conditions close to the calibration conditions of the sensor (typically 21.1 C and 1 atm). However, as pressure deviates from atmospheric to the pressures associated with a spacecraft (8.0-10.2 PSIA) or spacesuit (4.1-8.0 PSIA), the error in the measurement grows increasingly large. In addition to pressure and temperature dependencies, the infrared transmissivity through a volume of gas also depends on the composition of the gas. As the composition is not known a priori, accurate sub-ambient detection must rely on iterative sensor compensation techniques. This manuscript describes the development of recursive compensation algorithms for sub-ambient detection of CO2 with COTS NDIR sensors. In addition, the basis of the exponential loss in accuracy is developed theoretically considering thermal, Doppler, and Lorentz broadening effects which arise as a result of the temperature, pressure, and composition of the gas mixture under analysis. As a result, this manuscript provides an approach to employing COTS sensors at sub-ambient conditions and may also lend insight into designing future NDIR sensors for aerospace application.

  13. A new generation of mid-infrared sensors based on quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Dibyendu; Kohoutek, John; Gelfand, Ryan M.; Bonakder, Alireza; Mohseni, Hooman

    2011-05-01

    Many important bio and chemical molecules have their signature frequency (vibrational resonance) matching the mid infrared region (2-10 μm) of the optical spectrum. But building a bio-sensor, sensitive in this spectral regime, is extremely challenging task. It is because of the weak light-particle interaction strength due to huge dimensional mismatch between the probed molecules (typically ~ 10's of nm) and the probing wavelength (order of micron). We exploit the optical antenna to overcome this problem by squeezing the optical modes. This modal confinement happens only in the near-field region of the antenna and thus we have built an apertureless near-field scanning optical microscope (a-NSOM) to demonstrate it experimentally. Further, we have integrated these plasmonic antennas with mid-infrared sources known as Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL). Our antenna structure is based on metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) and we have shown how they can generate higher electrical field enhancement compared to single metal design. Antenna integrated QCL operated at room temperature and its wavelength of operation was measured to be ~ 6μm. We have used 3D finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) simulations to optimize the different component of the MDM antenna. After optimizing, we fabricated the antenna on the facet of QCL using focused ion beam (FIB) and measured using a-NSOM. We have shown that the optical mode can be squeezed down to a few 100's of nm which is much smaller than the incident light wavelength (λ~6μm). We also propose a microfluidic approach to build a typical mid-infrared bio-sensor where the probed molecules can be transferred to the near field region of the antenna through fluidic channels. Such scheme of building bio-sensor can overcome the barrier of weak light-particle interaction and eventually could lead to building very efficient, compact, mid-infrared bio-sensors.

  14. Split Stirling linear cryogenic cooler for high-temperature infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veprik, A.; Zehter, S.; Vilenchik, H.; Pundak, N.

    2009-05-01

    Infrared imagers play a vital role in the modern tactics of carrying out surveillance, reconnaissance, targeting and navigation operations. The cooled systems are known to be superior to their uncooled competitors in terms of working ranges, resolution and ability to distinguish/track fast moving objects in dynamic infrared scenes. These advantages are primarily due to maintaining the infrared focal plane arrays at cryogenic temperatures using mechanical closed cycle Stirling cryogenic coolers. Recent technological advances in industrial application of high-temperature (up to 200K) infrared detectors has spurred the development of linearly driven microminiature split Stirling cryogenic coolers having inherently longer life spans, lower vibration export and better aural stealth as compared to their rotary driven rivals. Moreover, recent progress in designing highly efficient "moving magnet" resonant linear actuators and dedicated smart electronics have enabled further improvements to the cooler size, weight, power consumption, cooldown time and ownership costs. The authors report on the development and project status of a novel microminiature split Stirling linear cryogenic cooler having a shortened to 19mm cold finger and a high driving frequency (90Hz). The cooler has been specifically designed for cooling 130K infrared sensors of future portable infrared imagers, where compactness, low steady-state power consumption and fast cool-down time are of primary concern.

  15. CO2 isotope sensor using a broadband infrared source, a spectrally narrow 4.4 μm quantum cascade detector, and a Fourier spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstetter, D.; Di Francesco, J.; Hvozdara, L.; Herzig, H.-P.; Beck, M.

    2011-06-01

    We report a prototype CO2 gas sensor based on a simple blackbody infrared source and a spectrally narrow quantum cascade detector (QCD). The detector absorption spectrum is centered at 2260 cm-1 (4.4 μm) and has a full width at half maximum of 200 cm-1 (25 meV). It covers strong absorption bands of two spectrally overlapping CO2 isotopomers, namely the P-branch of 12CO2 and the R-branch of 13CO2. Acquisition of the spectral information and data treatment were performed in a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. By flushing its sample compartment either with nitrogen, dry fresh air, ambient air, or human breath, we were able to determine CO2 concentrations corresponding to the different gas mixtures. A detection limit of 500 ppb was obtained in these experiments.

  16. Atmospheric infrared sounder on AIRS with emphasis on level 2 products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sung-Yung; Fetzer, Eric; Granger, Stephanie; Hearty, Thomas; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Manning, Evan M.; Olsen, Edward; Pagano, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched aboard EOS Aqua in May of 2002. AIRS is a grating spectrometer with almost 2400 channels covering the 3.74 to 15.40 micron spectral region with a nominal spectral resolution ((nu)/(delta)(nu)) of 1200, with some gaps. In addition, AIRS has 4 channels in the NIR/VIS region. The AIRS operates in conjunction with the microwave sounders Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A) and Humidity Sounder of Brazil (HSB). The microwave sounders are mainly used for cloud clearing of IR radiances, or to remove the effect of cloud on the IR radiances.

  17. New sensor for measurement of low air flow velocity. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Hashemian, M.; Riggsbee, E.T.

    1995-08-01

    The project described here is the Phase I feasibility study of a two-phase program to integrate existing technologies to provide a system for determining air flow velocity and direction in radiation work areas. Basically, a low air flow sensor referred to as a thermocouple flow sensor has been developed. The sensor uses a thermocouple as its sensing element. The response time of the thermocouple is measured using an existing in-situ method called the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) test. The response time results are then converted to a flow signal using a response time-versus-flow correlation. The Phase I effort has shown that a strong correlation exists between the response time of small diameter thermocouples and the ambient flow rate. As such, it has been demonstrated that thermocouple flow sensors can be used successfully to measure low air flow rates that can not be measured with conventional flow sensors. While the thermocouple flow sensor developed in this project was very successful in determining air flow velocity, determining air flow direction was beyond the scope of the Phase I project. Nevertheless, work was performed during Phase I to determine how the new flow sensor can be used to determine the direction, as well as the velocity, of ambient air movements. Basically, it is necessary to use either multiple flow sensors or move a single sensor in the monitoring area and make flow measurements at various locations sweeping the area from top to bottom and from left to right. The results can then be used with empirical or physical models, or in terms of directional vectors to estimate air flow patterns. The measurements can be made continuously or periodically to update the flow patterns as they change when people and objects are moved in the monitoring area. The potential for using multiple thermocouple flow sensors for determining air flow patterns will be examined in Phase II.

  18. Infrared-fiber-optic fire sensor developments - Role of measurement uncertainty in evaluation of background limited range. [in spacecraft safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapphorn, Ralph M.; Kays, Randy; Porter, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Fire-detector systems based on distributed infrared fiber-sensors have been investigated for potential applications in the aerospace industry. Responsivities to blackbody and flame radiations were measured with various design configurations of an infrared fiber-optic sensor. Signal processing techniques were also investigated, and the results show significant differences in the fire-sensor performance depending on the design configuration. Measurement uncertainties were used to determine the background-limited ranges for the various fire-sensor concepts, and the probability of producing false alarms caused by fluctuations in the background signals were determined using extreme probability theory. The results of the research show that infrared fiber-optic fire sensors are feasible for application on manned spacecraft; however, additional development work will be required to eliminate false alarms caused by high temperature objects such as incandescent lamps.

  19. Global Monitoring of Air Pollution Using Spaceborne Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Remer, L. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The MODIS sensor onboard EOS-Terra satellite provides not only daily global coverage but also high spectral (36 channels from 0.41 to 14 microns wavelength) and spatial (250m, 500m and 1km) resolution measurements. A similar MODIS instrument will be also configured into EOS-Aqua satellite to be launched soon. Using the complementary EOS-Terra and EOS-Aqua sun-synchronous orbits (10:30 AM and 1:30 PM equator-crossing time respectively), it enables us also to study the diurnal changes of the Earth system. It is unprecedented for the derivation of aerosol properties with such high spatial resolution and daily global converge. Aerosol optical depth and other aerosol properties, e.g., Angstrom coefficient over land and particle size over ocean, are derived as standard products at a spatial resolution of 10 x 10 sq km. The high resolution results are found surprisingly useful in detecting aerosols in both urban and rural regions as a result of urban/industrial pollution and biomass burning. For long-lived aerosols, the ability to monitoring the evolution of these aerosol events could help us to establish an system of air quality especially for highly populated areas. Aerosol scenarios with city pollution and biomass burning will be presented. Also presented are the method used in the derivation of aerosol optical properties and preliminary results will be presented, and issue as well as obstacles in validating aerosol optical depth with AERONET ground-based observations.

  20. A Comparison of the Red Green Blue Air Mass Imagery and Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Folmer, Michael; Dunion, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The Red Green Blue (RGB) Air Mass imagery is derived from multiple channels or paired channel differences. Multiple channel products typically provide additional information than a single channel can provide alone. The RGB Air Mass imagery simplifies the interpretation of temperature and moisture characteristics of air masses surrounding synoptic and mesoscale features. Despite the ease of interpretation of multiple channel products, the combination of channels and channel differences means the resulting product does not represent a quantity or physical parameter such as brightness temperature in conventional single channel satellite imagery. Without a specific quantity to reference, forecasters are often confused as to what RGB products represent. Hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles of temperature, moisture, and ozone can provide insight about the air mass represented on the RGB Air Mass product and provide confidence in the product and representation of air masses despite the lack of a quantity to reference for interpretation. This study focuses on RGB Air Mass analysis of Hurricane Sandy as it moved north along the U.S. East Coast, while transitioning to a hybrid extratropical storm. Soundings and total column ozone retrievals were analyzed using data from the Cross-track Infrared and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder Suite (CrIMSS) on the Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership satellite and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aqua satellite along with dropsondes that were collected from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Air Force research aircraft. By comparing these datasets to the RGB Air Mass, it is possible to capture quantitative information that could help in analyzing the synoptic environment enough to diagnose the onset of extratropical transition. This was done by identifying any stratospheric air intrusions (SAIs) that existed in the vicinity of Sandy as the wind

  1. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward. PMID:21112151

  2. Monitoring of harmful gaseous emissions from land transport vehicles using a mid-infrared optical fibre sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulrooney, Jim; Clifford, John; Fitzpatrick, Colin; Lewis, Elfed

    2006-04-01

    This paper discusses the development of an optical fibre sensor suitable for the detection of gas emissions from motor vehicles based on mid-infrared spectroscopy. Initial measurements are presented for carbon dioxide emissions from a petrol engine using low-cost mid-infrared components, and a practical detection system, which could be fitted to a vehicle, is outlined.

  3. Level 1B products from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, H. H.; Overoye, Ken

    2003-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched May 4, 2002 on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft. A discussion is given of the objectives of the AIRS experiment, including requirements on the data products. We summarize the instrument characteristics, including sensitivity, noise, and spectral response, and preflight calibration results leading to the estimate of the calibration accuracy. The Level 1B calibration algorithm is presented as well as the results of in-flight stability and sensitivity measurements.

  4. Spatiotemporal Evaluation of Nocturnal Cold Air Drainage Over a Simple Slope Using Thermal Infrared Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikani, V.; Chokmani, K.; Fathollahi, L.; Granberg, H.; Fournier, R.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of climatic processes such as cold air drainage flows are problematic over mountainous areas. Observation of cold air drainage is not available in the existing observation network and it requires a special methodology. The main objective of this study was to characterize the cold air drainage over regions with a slope. A high resolution infrared camera, a meteorological station and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) were used. The specific objective was to derive nocturnal cold air drainage velocity over the slope. To address these objectives, a number of infrared measurement campaigns were conducted during calm and clear sky conditions over an agricultural zone (blackcurrant farm) in Canada. Using thermal infrared images, the nocturnal surface temperature gradient were computed in hourly basis. The largest gradient magnitudes were found between 17h -20h. The cooling rates at basin area were two times higher in comparison to the magnitudes observed within slope area. The image analysis illustrated this considerable temperature gradient of the basin may be partly due to transport of cold air drainage into the basin from the slope. The results show that thermal imagery can be used to characterize and understand the microclimate related to the occurrence of radiation frost in the agricultural field. This study provided the opportunity to track the cold air drainage flow and pooling of cold air in low lying areas. The infrared analysis demonstrated that nocturnal drainage flow displayed continuous variation in terms of space and time in response to microscale slope heterogeneities. In addition, the analysis highlighted the periodic aspect for cold air drainage flow.

  5. Portable and low-cost sensors in monitoring air qualities in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Bin; Popoola, Lekan; Jones, Roderic; Li, Chunlin; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-04-01

    The fast dynamics and the associated high spatial variability of the atmosphere calls for monitoring techniques that are robust, portable, low-power and ideally cheap (which thus allows for easy deployment and little maintenance needs over long measurement period), yet still offering sufficient sensitivity for measuring typical air pollutants at their ambient levels. We have over years developed a measuring suite (SNAQ box, Sensor Network for Air Quality), which weighs ~2.5 kg and has dimension of 30 cm (L)*20 cm (W)* 15 cm (H), and is capable of measuring wind speed and direction, relative humidity, gas species CO, NO, NO2, O3, SO2 (all based on electrochemical sensors), CO2 (based on NDIR, non-dispersive infrared) and total VOCs (based on PID, photoionization detector), and size-speciated particles (based on optical counting method with cut-off in size at 0.34 microns). Two of these boxes have been deployed in China during the 2015 Yangtze River campaign led by Fudan University, China during 22nd/Nov and 05th/Dec. One of the two boxes was mounted on a monitoring ship that sailed along the river aiming at capturing primarily emissions from ships, and the other was carried by a van that drove on roads but followed the track of the ship during the same period. Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that measurements were successful on both platforms for most of the targeted species with essentially no need of personnel interference during the entire campaign. Emission ratio of CO against NOx, or that of CO/NOx against CO2, for different dominating emission sources (vehicles vs. ships), can be readily quantified. Ongoing analysis includes correlating the measured pollution levels with different source profiles as well as meteorology conditions and understanding the background aerosol size profiles. We conclude that this technique provides a viable solution not only for routine point measurements of air quality in China, but also as construction unit for building

  6. Adaptive Preheating Duration Control for Low-Power Ambient Air Quality Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Yoonchul; Atiq, Mahin K.; Kim, Hyung Seok

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic gas sensors used for measuring ambient air quality have features suitable for practical applications such as healthcare and air quality management, but have a major drawback—large power consumption to preheat the sensor for accurate measurements. In this paper; the adaptive preheating duration control (APC) method is proposed to reduce the power consumption of ambient air quality sensor networks. APC reduces the duration of unnecessary preheating, thereby alleviating power consumption. Furthermore, the APC can allow systems to meet user requirements such as accuracy and periodicity factor when detecting the concentration of a target gas. A performance evaluation of the power consumption of gas sensors is conducted with various user requirements and factors that affect the preheating duration of the gas sensor. This shows that the power consumption of the APC is lower than that of continuous power supply methods and constant power supply/cutoff methods. PMID:24658619

  7. Exploring infrared sensoring for real time welding defects monitoring in GTAW.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Sadek C A; Franco, Fernand Díaz

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of an infrared sensor for monitoring the welding pool temperature in a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process. The purpose of the study is to develop a real time system control. It is known that the arc welding pool temperature is related to the weld penetration depth; therefore, by monitoring the temperature, the arc pool temperature and penetration depth are also monitored. Various experiments were performed; in some of them the current was varied and the temperature changes were registered, in others, defects were induced throughout the path of the weld bead for a fixed current. These simulated defects resulted in abrupt changes in the average temperature values, thus providing an indication of the presence of a defect. The data has been registered with an acquisition card. To identify defects in the samples under infrared emissions, the timing series were analyzed through graphics and statistic methods. The selection of this technique demonstrates the potential for infrared emission as a welding monitoring parameter sensor. PMID:22219697

  8. Exploring Infrared Sensoring for Real Time Welding Defects Monitoring in GTAW

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Sadek C. A.; Franco, Fernand Díaz

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of an infrared sensor for monitoring the welding pool temperature in a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process. The purpose of the study is to develop a real time system control. It is known that the arc welding pool temperature is related to the weld penetration depth; therefore, by monitoring the temperature, the arc pool temperature and penetration depth are also monitored. Various experiments were performed; in some of them the current was varied and the temperature changes were registered, in others, defects were induced throughout the path of the weld bead for a fixed current. These simulated defects resulted in abrupt changes in the average temperature values, thus providing an indication of the presence of a defect. The data has been registered with an acquisition card. To identify defects in the samples under infrared emissions, the timing series were analyzed through graphics and statistic methods. The selection of this technique demonstrates the potential for infrared emission as a welding monitoring parameter sensor. PMID:22219697

  9. Leaf Chlorophyll Content Estimation of Winter Wheat Based on Visible and Near-Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Han, Wenting; Huang, Lvwen; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Yimian; Hu, Yamin

    2016-01-01

    The leaf chlorophyll content is one of the most important factors for the growth of winter wheat. Visual and near-infrared sensors are a quick and non-destructive testing technology for the estimation of crop leaf chlorophyll content. In this paper, a new approach is developed for leaf chlorophyll content estimation of winter wheat based on visible and near-infrared sensors. First, the sliding window smoothing (SWS) was integrated with the multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) or the standard normal variable transformation (SNV) to preprocess the reflectance spectra images of wheat leaves. Then, a model for the relationship between the leaf relative chlorophyll content and the reflectance spectra was developed using the partial least squares (PLS) and the back propagation neural network. A total of 300 samples from areas surrounding Yangling, China, were used for the experimental studies. The samples of visible and near-infrared spectroscopy at the wavelength of 450,900 nm were preprocessed using SWS, MSC and SNV. The experimental results indicate that the preprocessing using SWS and SNV and then modeling using PLS can achieve the most accurate estimation, with the correlation coefficient at 0.8492 and the root mean square error at 1.7216. Thus, the proposed approach can be widely used for winter wheat chlorophyll content analysis. PMID:27023550

  10. Leaf Chlorophyll Content Estimation of Winter Wheat Based on Visible and Near-Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Han, Wenting; Huang, Lvwen; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Yimian; Hu, Yamin

    2016-01-01

    The leaf chlorophyll content is one of the most important factors for the growth of winter wheat. Visual and near-infrared sensors are a quick and non-destructive testing technology for the estimation of crop leaf chlorophyll content. In this paper, a new approach is developed for leaf chlorophyll content estimation of winter wheat based on visible and near-infrared sensors. First, the sliding window smoothing (SWS) was integrated with the multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) or the standard normal variable transformation (SNV) to preprocess the reflectance spectra images of wheat leaves. Then, a model for the relationship between the leaf relative chlorophyll content and the reflectance spectra was developed using the partial least squares (PLS) and the back propagation neural network. A total of 300 samples from areas surrounding Yangling, China, were used for the experimental studies. The samples of visible and near-infrared spectroscopy at the wavelength of 450,900 nm were preprocessed using SWS, MSC and SNV. The experimental results indicate that the preprocessing using SWS and SNV and then modeling using PLS can achieve the most accurate estimation, with the correlation coefficient at 0.8492 and the root mean square error at 1.7216. Thus, the proposed approach can be widely used for winter wheat chlorophyll content analysis. PMID:27023550

  11. Experimental Basis for Robust On-orbit Uncertainty Estimates for CLARREO InfraRed Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Anderson, J.

    2009-12-01

    As defined by the National Research Council Decadal Survey of 2006, the CLimate Absolute Radiance and REfractivity Observatory (CLARREO) satisfies the need for “a long-term global benchmark record of critical climate variables that are accurate over very long time periods, can be tested for systematic errors by future generations, are unaffected by interruption, and are pinned to international standards.” These observational requirements— testing for systematic errors, accuracy over indefinite time, and linkage to internationally recognized measurement standards—are achievable through an appeal to the concept of SI traceability. That is, measurements are made such that they are linked through an unbroken chain of comparisons, where each comparison has a stated and credible uncertainty, back to the definitions of the International System (SI) Units. While the concept of SI traceability is a straightforward one, achieving credible estimates of uncertainty, particularly in the case of complex sensors deployed in orbit, poses a significant challenge. Recently, a set of principles has been proposed to guide the development of sensors that realize fully the benefits of SI traceability. The application of these principles to the spectral infrared sensor that is part of the CLARREO mission is discussed. These principles include, but are not limited to: basing the sensor calibration on a reproducible physical property of matter, devising experimental tests for known sources of measurement bias (or systematic uncertainty), and providing independent system-level checks for the end-to-end radiometric performance of the sensor. The application of these principles to the infrared sensor leads to the following conclusions. To obtain the lowest uncertainty (or highest accuracy), the calibration should be traceable to the definition of the Kelvin—that is, the triple point of water. Realization of a Kelvin-based calibration is achieved through the use of calibration

  12. Do-It-Yourself Air Sensors – Exploring the Atmosphere and Turning on Light Bulbs!?

    EPA Science Inventory

    These are educational slides that will be presented in a webinar to the National Science Teachers Association. Topics covered include general air quality, current EPA research, and EPA's particle sensor kit that is a classroom activity.

  13. Integrated optics ring-resonator chemical sensor for detection of air contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manfreda, A. M.; Homer, M. L.; Ksendzov, A.

    2004-01-01

    We report a silicon nitride-based ring resonator chemical sensor with sensing polymer coating. Its sensitivity to isopropanol in air is at least 50 ppm - well under the permissible exposure level of 400 ppm.

  14. Intregrated optics ring-resonator chemical sensor for detection of air contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ksendzov, Alexander; Homer, Margie L.; Manfreda, Allison M.

    2004-01-01

    We report a silicon nitride-based ring resonator chemical sensor with sensing polymer coating. Its sensitivity to isopropanol in air is at least 50 ppm - well under the permissible exposure level of 400 ppm.

  15. The Role of Unmanned Aerial Systems-Sensors in Air Quality Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of unmanned aerial systems (UASs) and miniaturized sensors for a variety of scientific and security purposes has rapidly increased. UASs include aerostats (tethered balloons) and remotely controlled, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) including lighter-than-air vessels, fix...

  16. Dark and background response stability for the Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vanderwerff, Kelly; Montanaro, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) is a pushbroom sensor that will be a part of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), which is a joint mission between NASA and the USGS. The TIRS instrument will continue to collect the thermal infrared data that are currently being collected by the Thematic Mapper and the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus on Landsats 5 and 7, respectively. One of the key requirements of the new sensor is that the dark and background response be stable to ensure proper data continuity from the legacy Landsat instruments. Pre launch testing of the instrument has recently been completed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), which included calibration collects that mimic those that will be performed on orbit. These collects include images of a cold plate meant to simulate the deep space calibration source as viewed by the instrument in flight. The data from these collects give insight into the stability of the instrument’s dark and background response, as well as factors that may cause these responses to vary. This paper quantifies the measured background and dark response of TIRS as well as its stability.

  17. An Ensemble Successive Project Algorithm for Liquor Detection Using Near Infrared Sensor.

    PubMed

    Qu, Fangfang; Ren, Dong; Wang, Jihua; Zhang, Zhong; Lu, Na; Meng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis technique based on near infrared (NIR) sensor is a powerful tool for complex information processing and high precision recognition, and it has been widely applied to quality analysis and online inspection of agricultural products. This paper proposes a new method to address the instability of small sample sizes in the successive projections algorithm (SPA) as well as the lack of association between selected variables and the analyte. The proposed method is an evaluated bootstrap ensemble SPA method (EBSPA) based on a variable evaluation index (EI) for variable selection, and is applied to the quantitative prediction of alcohol concentrations in liquor using NIR sensor. In the experiment, the proposed EBSPA with three kinds of modeling methods are established to test their performance. In addition, the proposed EBSPA combined with partial least square is compared with other state-of-the-art variable selection methods. The results show that the proposed method can solve the defects of SPA and it has the best generalization performance and stability. Furthermore, the physical meaning of the selected variables from the near infrared sensor data is clear, which can effectively reduce the variables and improve their prediction accuracy. PMID:26761015

  18. An Ensemble Successive Project Algorithm for Liquor Detection Using Near Infrared Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Fangfang; Ren, Dong; Wang, Jihua; Zhang, Zhong; Lu, Na; Meng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis technique based on near infrared (NIR) sensor is a powerful tool for complex information processing and high precision recognition, and it has been widely applied to quality analysis and online inspection of agricultural products. This paper proposes a new method to address the instability of small sample sizes in the successive projections algorithm (SPA) as well as the lack of association between selected variables and the analyte. The proposed method is an evaluated bootstrap ensemble SPA method (EBSPA) based on a variable evaluation index (EI) for variable selection, and is applied to the quantitative prediction of alcohol concentrations in liquor using NIR sensor. In the experiment, the proposed EBSPA with three kinds of modeling methods are established to test their performance. In addition, the proposed EBSPA combined with partial least square is compared with other state-of-the-art variable selection methods. The results show that the proposed method can solve the defects of SPA and it has the best generalization performance and stability. Furthermore, the physical meaning of the selected variables from the near infrared sensor data is clear, which can effectively reduce the variables and improve their prediction accuracy. PMID:26761015

  19. Remote Sensing of Arctic Environmental Conditions and Critical Infrastructure using Infra-Red (IR) Cameras and Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, M. C.; Webley, P.; Saiet, E., II

    2014-12-01

    Remote Sensing of Arctic Environmental Conditions and Critical Infrastructure using Infra-Red (IR) Cameras and Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) Numerous scientific and logistical applications exist in Alaska and other arctic regions requiring analysis of expansive, remote areas in the near infrared (NIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) bands. These include characterization of wild land fire plumes and volcanic ejecta, detailed mapping of lava flows, and inspection of lengthy segments of critical infrastructure, such as the Alaska pipeline and railroad system. Obtaining timely, repeatable, calibrated measurements of these extensive features and infrastructure networks requires localized, taskable assets such as UAVs. The Alaska Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration (ACUASI) provides practical solutions to these problem sets by pairing various IR sensors with a combination of fixed-wing and multi-rotor air vehicles. Fixed-wing assets, such as the Insitu ScanEagle, offer long reach and extended duration capabilities to quickly access remote locations and provide enduring surveillance of the target of interest. Rotary-wing assets, such as the Aeryon Scout or the ACUASI-built Ptarmigan hexcopter, provide a precision capability for detailed horizontal mapping or vertical stratification of atmospheric phenomena. When included with other ground capabilities, we will show how they can assist in decision support and hazard assessment as well as giving those in emergency management a new ability to increase knowledge of the event at hand while reducing the risk to all involved. Here, in this presentation, we illustrate how UAV's can provide the ideal tool to map and analyze the hazardous events and critical infrastructure under extreme environmental conditions.

  20. Optical design and cryogenic mounting of the optics for a pyramid waterfront sensor working in the near infrared wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizenberger, P.; Baumeister, H.; Büchler Costa, J.; Peter, D.

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes the whole process of designing, manufacturing and assembling the optics for an infrared pyramid wavefront sensor, called PYRAMIR. This sensor is built to work with the adaptive optical system at the 3.5 m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain, which controls a 97 actuator deformable mirror. PYRAMIR is working in combination with an infrared science camera, which is used for observations. Since the wavefront sensor works in the near infrared (1.0 μm to 2.4 μm), the detector, the optics and all the mechanics are cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. For this cryogenic condition, special care has to be taken for the optical design and the mounting of the lenses. We describe in detail the process from infrared optical design and cryo-mechanical engineering, to the final assembly of the opto-mechanical units and testing in the lab. Technical solutions are illustrated and the final performance is demonstrated.

  1. Improving the Air Force Infrared Stellar Calibration Network with High Spectral Resolution Data from the Infrared Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, K. E.; Engelke, C. W.; Price, S. D.

    2004-12-01

    We present preliminary results of a project to improve the spectral resolution of the Air Force Infrared Stellar Calibration Network by incorporating data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). This network and its deriviatives were created by Cohen and colleagues to support infrared calibration for government and civilian ground- and space-based observatories, such as the Infrared Telescope Facility, Gemini, and the Maui Optical Site. The reduced 2.4 to 45 μ m spectra from the ISO Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) are up to 100 times higher spectral resolution than the current network data. Appropriately substituting these spectra for the standard stars will improve the accuracy of the calibration network, particularly in spectral regions where the atmosphere limits ground-based data, and permit more accurate calibration of very narrow spectral bandpasses. The initial effort has photometrically calibrated the SWS spectra for the 9 stellar or secondary standards with composites. The model atmosphere spectrum for α Cen has been replaced by SWS data; the model spectra for α CMa and α Lyr have been retained in order to preserve the common calibration pedigree with the original Cohen et al. network (although see Price et al. 2004, AJ, 128, 889). Where available, high quality photometry from the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) are used, supplemented by photometry from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experment (DIRBE) and the photometry used by Cohen et al. used to create the original composite. The next steps are to 1) replace the 10-15 tertiary standard stars with template spectra with measured spectra for the cases in which the SWS observations have sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratios (this will double the number of secondary standards); 2) develop a set of high spectral resolution infrared templates based on the SWS observations for each MK spectral class of the secondary standards with which to upgrade the entire network; 3) create new templates for

  2. Modelling an infrared Man Portable Air Defence System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchenall, Richard P.; Richardson, Mark A.; Brian, Butters; Roy, Walmsley

    2010-09-01

    The global proliferation of shoulder launched IR Man Portable Air Defence Systems (ManPADS) has resulted in the existence of a serious threat to both civilian and military aircraft from terrorist attack. Some of the older generations of ManPADS can be defeated with modern countermeasures but even the most sophisticated protection still has vulnerabilities to the latest family of ManPADS. This paper describes the work undertaken by the authors to model a second generation ManPAD, based on the Russian SA-14, and assess the vulnerabilities of aircraft both with and without flare countermeasures from these systems. The conclusions are the results of over 11,000 simulated firings against targets of varying aspects, velocities and altitudes.

  3. A Survey of Wireless Sensor Network Based Air Pollution Monitoring Systems.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wei Ying; Lo, Kin Ming; Mak, Terrence; Leung, Kwong Sak; Leung, Yee; Meng, Mei Ling

    2015-01-01

    The air quality in urban areas is a major concern in modern cities due to significant impacts of air pollution on public health, global environment, and worldwide economy. Recent studies reveal the importance of micro-level pollution information, including human personal exposure and acute exposure to air pollutants. A real-time system with high spatio-temporal resolution is essential because of the limited data availability and non-scalability of conventional air pollution monitoring systems. Currently, researchers focus on the concept of The Next Generation Air Pollution Monitoring System (TNGAPMS) and have achieved significant breakthroughs by utilizing the advance sensing technologies, MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). However, there exist potential problems of these newly proposed systems, namely the lack of 3D data acquisition ability and the flexibility of the sensor network. In this paper, we classify the existing works into three categories as Static Sensor Network (SSN), Community Sensor Network (CSN) and Vehicle Sensor Network (VSN) based on the carriers of the sensors. Comprehensive reviews and comparisons among these three types of sensor networks were also performed. Last but not least, we discuss the limitations of the existing works and conclude the objectives that we want to achieve in future systems. PMID:26703598

  4. A Survey of Wireless Sensor Network Based Air Pollution Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Wei Ying; Lo, Kin Ming; Mak, Terrence; Leung, Kwong Sak; Leung, Yee; Meng, Mei Ling

    2015-01-01

    The air quality in urban areas is a major concern in modern cities due to significant impacts of air pollution on public health, global environment, and worldwide economy. Recent studies reveal the importance of micro-level pollution information, including human personal exposure and acute exposure to air pollutants. A real-time system with high spatio-temporal resolution is essential because of the limited data availability and non-scalability of conventional air pollution monitoring systems. Currently, researchers focus on the concept of The Next Generation Air Pollution Monitoring System (TNGAPMS) and have achieved significant breakthroughs by utilizing the advance sensing technologies, MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). However, there exist potential problems of these newly proposed systems, namely the lack of 3D data acquisition ability and the flexibility of the sensor network. In this paper, we classify the existing works into three categories as Static Sensor Network (SSN), Community Sensor Network (CSN) and Vehicle Sensor Network (VSN) based on the carriers of the sensors. Comprehensive reviews and comparisons among these three types of sensor networks were also performed. Last but not least, we discuss the limitations of the existing works and conclude the objectives that we want to achieve in future systems. PMID:26703598

  5. Drying of chilli in a combined infrared and hot air rotary dryer.

    PubMed

    Mihindukulasuriya, Suramya D F; Jayasuriya, Hemantha P W

    2015-08-01

    The investigation of an economical and efficient drying method for chilli is beneficial because it could provide a means of overcoming the drawbacks of traditional drying methods: high operating power and long drying time, which result in a decrease in the quality of the chilli. This study involved the design and development of a combined infrared and hot air laboratory-scale rotary dryer, which consists of three operating modes: hot air, infrared, and combined infrared and hot air. Drying experiments were conducted at five different temperatures (50, 55, 60, 65, and 70 °C). The drying behavior produced with the three operating modes was evaluated. The best mode was determined based on the parameters for evaluating the quality of chilli, the power consumption, and the retention time. The results indicate that the optimal overall drying performance for chilli was achieved at 70, 65, 50 °C drying temperatures in hot air, combined, and IR mode, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between retention time and power consumption with the hot air and the combined modes, while a negative correlation was identified in the IR mode. PMID:26243909

  6. Low cost sensors for PM and related air pollutants in the US and India

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emerging air quality sensors have a variety of possible applications. If accurate and reliable, they have a number of benefits over conventional monitors. They are low-cost, lightweight, and have low power consumption. Because of their low cost, a dense array of sensors instal...

  7. Color filters including infrared cut-off integrated on CMOS image sensor.

    PubMed

    Frey, Laurent; Parrein, Pascale; Raby, Jacques; Pellé, Catherine; Hérault, Didier; Marty, Michel; Michailos, Jean

    2011-07-01

    A color image was taken with a CMOS image sensor without any infrared cut-off filter, using red, green and blue metal/dielectric filters arranged in Bayer pattern with 1.75 µm pixel pitch. The three colors were obtained by a thickness variation of only two layers in the 7-layer stack, with a technological process including four photolithography levels. The thickness of the filter stack was only half of the traditional color resists, potentially enabling a reduction of optical crosstalk for smaller pixels. Both color errors and signal to noise ratio derived from optimized spectral responses are expected to be similar to color resists associated with infrared filter. PMID:21747459

  8. On-instrument wavefront sensor design for the TMT infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jennifer; Reshetov, Vladimir; Atwood, Jenny; Pazder, John; Wooff, Bob; Loop, David; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Moore, Anna M.; Larkin, James E.

    2014-08-01

    The first light instrument on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project will be the InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS will be mounted on a bottom port of the facility AO instrument NFIRAOS. IRIS will report guiding information to the NFIRAOS through the On-Instrument Wavefront Sensor (OIWFS) that is part of IRIS. This will be in a self-contained compartment of IRIS and will provide three deployable wavefront sensor probe arms. This entire unit will be rotated to provide field de-rotation. Currently in our preliminary design stage our efforts have included: prototyping of the probe arm to determine the accuracy of this critical component, handling cart design and reviewing different types of glass for the atmospheric dispersion.

  9. Hollow Waveguide Gas Sensor for Mid-Infrared Trace Gas Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Young, C; Chan, J; Carter, C; Mizaikoff, B

    2007-07-12

    A hollow waveguide mid-infrared gas sensor operating from 1000 cm{sup -1} to 4000 cm{sup -1} has been developed, optimized, and its performance characterized by combining a FT-IR spectrometer with Ag/Ag-halide hollow core optical fibers. The hollow core waveguide simultaneously serves as a light guide and miniature gas cell. CH{sub 4} was used as test analyte during exponential dilution experiments for accurate determination of the achievable limit of detection (LOD). It is shown that the optimized integration of an optical gas sensor module with FT-IR spectroscopy provides trace sensitivity at the few hundreds of parts-per-billion concentration range (ppb, v/v) for CH{sub 4}.

  10. Recent advances of mid-infrared compact, field deployable sensors: principles and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittel, Frank; Gluszek, Aleksander; Hudzikowski, Arkadiusz; Dong, Lei; Li, Chunguang; Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Spagnolo, Vincenzo; Wojtas, Jacek

    2016-04-01

    The recent development of compact interband cascade lasers(ICLs) and quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) based trace gas sensors will permit the targeting of strong fundamental rotational-vibrational transitions in the mid-infrared which are one to two orders of magnitude more intense than transitions in the overtone and combination bands in the near-infrared. This has led to the design and fabrication of mid-infrared compact, field deployable sensors for use in the petrochemical industry, environmental monitoring and atmospheric chemistry. Specifically, the spectroscopic detection and monitoring of four molecular species, methane (CH4) [1], ethane (C2H6), formaldehyde (H2CO) [2] and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) [3] will be described. CH4, C2H6 and H2CO can be detected using two detection techniques: mid-infrared tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) using a compact multi-pass gas cell and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS). Both techniques utilize state-of-the-art mid-IR, continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback (DFB) ICLs and QCLs. TDLAS was performed with an ultra-compact 54.6m effective optical path length innovative spherical multipass gas cell capable of 435 passes between two concave mirrors separated by 12.5 cm. QEPAS used a small robust absorption detection module (ADM) which consists of a quartz tuning fork (QTF), two optical windows, gas inlet/outlet ports and a low noise frequency pre-amplifier. Wavelength modulation and second harmonic detection were employed for spectral data processing. TDLAS and QEPAS can achieve minimum detectable absorption losses in the range from 10-8 to 10-11cm-1/Hz1/2. Several recent examples of real world applications of field deployable gas sensors will be described. For example, an ICL based TDLAS sensor system is capable of detecting CH4 and C2H6 concentration levels of 1 ppb in a 1 sec. sampling time, using an ultra-compact, robust sensor architecture. H2S detection was realized with a THz QEPAS sensor

  11. Calibration of the Thermal Infrared Sensor on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, K; Reuter, D.; Lunsford, D.; Montanaro, M.; Smith, J.; Tesfaye, Z.; Wenny, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Landsat series of satellites provides the longest running continuous data set of moderate-spatial-resolution imagery beginning with the launch of Landsat 1 in 1972 and continuing with the 1999 launch of Landsat 7 and current operation of Landsats 5 and 7. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) will continue this program into a fourth decade providing data that are keys to understanding changes in land-use changes and resource management. LDCM consists of a two-sensor platform comprised of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal Infrared Sensors (TIRS). A description of the applications and design of the TIRS instrument is given as well as the plans for calibration and characterization. Included are early results from preflight calibration and a description of the inflight validation.

  12. Monolithic photovotaic PbS-on-Si infrared-sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Masek, J.; Zogg, H.; Maissen, C.; Blunier, S. ); Ishida, A. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    The authors have grown epitaxial narrow-gap PbS-on-Si substrates using a stacked CaF{sub 2}-BaF{sub 2} intermediate buffer layer, and have fabricated linear arrays of photovoltaic infrared (IR) sensors in the PbS layer for the first time. The sensors of the array exhibit resistance-area products at zero bias of 3{Omega}{center dot}cm{sup 2} at 200 K (3.4-{mu}m cutoff wavelength) and 2{center dot}10{sup 5} {Omega}{center dot}cm{sup 2} at 84 K (4-{mu}m cutoff), with corresponding detectivities of 2{center dot}10{sup 10} and 1{center dot}10{sup 13}cm{center dot}{radical}Hz/W, respectively.

  13. Automatic start control for a three-phase electric motor using infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echenique Lima, Mario; Ramírez Arenas, Francisco; Rodríguez Pedroza, Griselda

    2006-02-01

    We introduce equipment for the automatic activation of a three-phase electric motor (1Hp, 3A, 240V AC) using 2 infrared sensors monitored by a Microchip microcontroller PIC16F62x@4Mhz for the control of a filling system. This project was carried out to Fabrica de Chocolates y Dulces Costanzo, where the automatization of cacao grain supply was required for a machine in charge of cleaning the cacao from its rind. This process demanded the monitoring of the filling level to avoid the spill of toasted cacao.

  14. Bandwidth control of wavelength-selective uncooled infrared sensors using two-dimensional plasmonic absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Kimata, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    Although standard uncooled infrared (IR) sensors can be used to record information such as the shape, position, and average radiant intensity of objects, these devices cannot capture color (that is, wavelength) data. Achieving wavelength selectivity would pave the way for the development of advanced uncooled IR sensors capable of providing color information as well as multi-color image sensors that would have significant advantages in applications such as fire detection, gas analysis, hazardous material recognition, and biological analysis. We have previously demonstrated an uncooled IR sensor incorporating a two-dimensional plasmonic absorber (2D PLA) that exhibits wavelength selectivity over a wide range in the mid- and long-IR regions. This PLA has a 2D Au-based periodic array of dimples, in which surface plasmon modes are induced and wavelength-selective absorption occurs. However, the dependence of the absorption bandwidth on certain structural parameters has yet to be clarified. The bandwidth of such devices is a vital factor when considering the practical application of these sensors to tasks such as gas detection. In the present study, control of the bandwidth was theoretically investigated using a rigorous coupled wave analysis approach. It is demonstrated that the dimple sidewall structure has a significant impact on the bandwidth and can be used to control both narrow- and broadband absorption. Increasing the sidewall slope was found to decrease the bandwidth due to suppression of cavity-mode resonance in the depth direction of the dimples. These results will contribute to the development of high-resolution, wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors.

  15. 3.0-3.7μm infrared sensor system for cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Driesche, Sander; Witarski, Wojciech; Vellekoop, Michael J.

    2009-05-01

    In this contribution we present a novel LED-photodiode based infrared absorbance sensor in the wavelength range of 3.0 - 3.7 μm for cell analysis. Instead of using time consuming and expensive labelling and staining techniques to distinguish healthy from malignant cell types, this IR sensor system can perform faster, cheaper and without the need of additional chemicals. Depending on the used narrow bandpass filters, absorbance due to specific molecular vibration can be measured, such as the functional absorbance peaks at 3.38 μm (CH3-antisymmetric stretch), 3.42 μm (CH2- antisymmetric stretch), 3.48 μm (CH3-symmetric stretch) and 3.51 μm (CH2-symmetric stretch). For normalization and baseline correction the absorbance at wavelengths 3.33 and 3.57 μm are used. By recording the IR absorbance spectra of healthy and malignant epithelial kidney cell lines with an IR spectroscope, we found significant differences in the absorbance ratio 3.51 μm / 3.42 μm (CH2-symmetric/antisymmetric stretch). This result has led us to a sensor concept where only four wavelengths are being measured. In the 3.0 - 3.7 μm wavelength region a low cost LED-photodiode system can be used instead of a spectroscope. Yeast cells, which also contain the CH2 symmetric and antisymmetric stretch bands, are used to validate this sensor system and to make a first comparison of the system to spectroscopic recordings. Sensor experiments on dried spots of baker's yeast on calcium-fluoride slides yielded a comparable CH2 stretch ratio with the IR spectroscope measurement. This confirms the usability of the sensor to measure the CH2 stretch ratio and its potential for fast, label-free and low cost screening of cell samples.

  16. Optical design of a compact near-infrared multispecies gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Joshua; Toor, Fatima

    In this work we present the design of a compact and cost effective near infrared (NIR) gas sensor system that can detect nitrous oxide (NOx) , ammonia (NH3) , and methane (CH4) simultaneously. These three gases were chosen as they are environmental pollutants and their monitoring is especially important in agricultural states like Iowa. As a first step in our design process, we have developed a Matlab model based on Beer-Lambert's law to generate sample sensor data for each of the gases at different concentrations. The data measured from the sensor system will be as a function of time instead of wavelength, so we performed Fourier Transform analysis on the sensor data to convert it to voltage versus time. The simulated sensor data will enable to design software algorithms to separate the absorption signals for each of the three gases. As a second step, we have developed a lab-based sensor system comprising of three components: (i) a NIR lead sulfide (PbS) photodiode, (ii) an LED that emits 1900 nm to 2600 nm, and (iii) an optical cavity where the gases are introduced. We are designing the optical cavity using ray optics COMSOL finite element method simulator using the principles of a compact chaotic cavity that will allow the LED light to have a path length of greater than 100 m within the cavity, enabling high sensitivity gas detection. Our end goal is to have an autonomous drone mounted device that is simple and inexpensive to use. We plan to license this technology to agricultural equipment manufacturers.

  17. In vivo continuous glucose monitoring using a chip based near infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Mohammadi, L.; Sigloch, S.; Frese, I.; Welzel, K.; Göddel, M.; Klotzbücher, T.

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes is a serious health condition considered to be one of the major healthcare epidemics of modern era. An effective treatment of this disease can be only achieved by reliable continuous information on blood glucose levels. In this work we present a minimally invasive, chip-based near infrared (NIR) sensor, combined with microdialysis, for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). The sensor principle is based on difference absorption spectroscopy in the 1st overtone band of the near infrared spectrum. The device features a multi-emitter LED and InGaAs-Photodiodes, which are located on a single electronic board (non-disposable part), connected to a personal computer via Bluetooth. The disposable part consists of a chip containing the fluidic connections for microdialysis, two fluidic channels acting as optical transmission cells and total internally reflecting mirrors for in- and out-coupling of the LED light to the chip and to the detectors. The sensor is combined with an intraveneous microdialysis to separate the glucose from the cells and proteins in the blood and operates without any chemical consumption. In vitro measurements showed a linear relationship between glucose concentration and the integrated difference signal with a coefficient of determination of 99 % in the relevant physiological concentration range from 0 to 400 mg/dl. In vivo measurements on 10 patients showed that the NIR-CGM sensor data reflects the blood reference values adequately, if a proper calibration and signal drift compensation is applied. The MARE (mean absolute relative error) value taken over all patient data is 13.8 %. The best achieved MARE value is at 4.8 %, whereas the worst is 25.8 %, with a standard deviation of 5.5 %.

  18. Conformal Graphene-Decorated Nanofluidic Sensors Based on Surface Plasmons at Infrared Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Nong, Jinpeng; Tang, Linlong; Zhang, Guiwen; Yang, Jun; Luo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    An all-in-one prism-free infrared sensor based on graphene surface plasmons is proposed for nanofluidic analysis. A conformal graphene-decorated nanofluidic sensor is employed to mimic the functions of a prism, sensing plate, and fluidic channel in the tradition setup. Simulation results show that the redshift of the resonant wavelength results in the improvement of sensitivity up to 4525 nm/RIU. To reshape the broadened spectral lines induced by the redshift of the resonant wavelength to be narrower and deeper, a reflection-type configuration is further introduced. By tuning the distance between the graphene and reflective layers, the figure of merit (FOM) of the device can be significantly improved and reaches a maximum value of 37.69 RIU−1, which is 2.6 times that of the former transmission-type configuration. Furthermore, the optimized sensor exhibits superior angle-insensitive property. Such a conformal graphene-decorated nanofluidic sensor offers a novel approach for graphene-based on-chip fluidic biosensing. PMID:27322269

  19. Unobtrusive measurement of indoor energy expenditure using an infrared sensor-based activity monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bosun; Han, Jonghee; Choi, Jong Min; Park, Kwang Suk

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an unobtrusive energy expenditure (EE) measurement system using an infrared (IR) sensor-based activity monitoring system to measure indoor activities and to estimate individual quantitative EE. IR-sensor activation counts were measured with a Bluetooth-based monitoring system and the standard EE was calculated using an established regression equation. Ten male subjects participated in the experiment and three different EE measurement systems (gas analyzer, accelerometer, IR sensor) were used simultaneously in order to determine the regression equation and evaluate the performance. As a standard measurement, oxygen consumption was simultaneously measured by a portable metabolic system (Metamax 3X, Cortex, Germany). A single room experiment was performed to develop a regression model of the standard EE measurement from the proposed IR sensor-based measurement system. In addition, correlation and regression analyses were done to compare the performance of the IR system with that of the Actigraph system. We determined that our proposed IR-based EE measurement system shows a similar correlation to the Actigraph system with the standard measurement system. PMID:19035796

  20. Conformal Graphene-Decorated Nanofluidic Sensors Based on Surface Plasmons at Infrared Frequencies.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Nong, Jinpeng; Tang, Linlong; Zhang, Guiwen; Yang, Jun; Luo, Wei

    2016-01-01

    An all-in-one prism-free infrared sensor based on graphene surface plasmons is proposed for nanofluidic analysis. A conformal graphene-decorated nanofluidic sensor is employed to mimic the functions of a prism, sensing plate, and fluidic channel in the tradition setup. Simulation results show that the redshift of the resonant wavelength results in the improvement of sensitivity up to 4525 nm/RIU. To reshape the broadened spectral lines induced by the redshift of the resonant wavelength to be narrower and deeper, a reflection-type configuration is further introduced. By tuning the distance between the graphene and reflective layers, the figure of merit (FOM) of the device can be significantly improved and reaches a maximum value of 37.69 RIU(-1), which is 2.6 times that of the former transmission-type configuration. Furthermore, the optimized sensor exhibits superior angle-insensitive property. Such a conformal graphene-decorated nanofluidic sensor offers a novel approach for graphene-based on-chip fluidic biosensing. PMID:27322269

  1. Determination of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water Using Highly Sensitive Mid-Infrared Sensor Technology

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Rui; Mizaikoff, Boris; Li, Wen-Wei; Qian, Chen; Katzir, Abraham; Raichlin, Yosef; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons (CHCs) are toxic and carcinogenic contaminants commonly found in environmental samples, and efficient online detection of these contaminants is still challenging at the present stage. Here, we report an advanced Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) sensor for in-situ and simultaneous detection of multiple CHCs, including monochlorobenzene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 1,3-dichlorobenzene, trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and chloroform. The polycrystalline silver halide sensor fiber had a unique integrated planar-cylindric geometry, and was coated with an ethylene/propylene copolymer membrane to act as a solid phase extractor, which greatly amplified the analytical signal and contributed to a higher detection sensitivity compared to the previously reported sensors. This system exhibited a high detection sensitivity towards the CHCs mixture at a wide concentration range of 5~700 ppb. The FTIR-ATR sensor described in this study has a high potential to be utilized as a trace-sensitive on-line device for water contamination monitoring. PMID:23982222

  2. Detection Wavelength Control of Uncooled Infrared Sensors Using Two-Dimensional Lattice Plasmonic Absorbers †

    PubMed Central

    Takagawa, Yousuke; Ogawa, Shinpei; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Wavelength-selective uncooled infrared (IR) sensors are highly promising for a wide range of applications, such as fire detection, gas analysis and biomedical analysis. We have recently developed wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors using square lattice two-dimensional plasmonic absorbers (2-D PLAs). The PLAs consist of a periodic 2-D lattice of Au-based dimples, which allow photons to be manipulated using surface plasmon modes. In the present study, a detailed investigation into control of the detection wavelength was conducted by varying the PLA lattice structure. A comparison was made between wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors with triangular and square PLA lattices that were fabricated using complementary metal oxide semiconductor and micromachining techniques. Selective enhancement of the responsivity could be achieved, and the detection wavelength for the triangular lattice was shorter than that for the square lattice. The results indicate that the detection wavelength is determined by the reciprocal-lattice vector for the PLAs. The ability to control the detection wavelength in this manner enables the application of such PLAs to many types of thermal IR sensors. The results obtained here represent an important step towards multi-color imaging in the IR region. PMID:26067198

  3. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    underlying physics. There are now at least six different disciplines that deal with infrared radiation in one form or another, and in one or several different spectral portions of the whole IR range. These are spectroscopy, astronomy, thermal imaging, detector and source development and metrology, as well the field of optical data transmission. Scientists working in these fields range from chemists and astronomers through to physicists and even photographers. This issue presents examples from some of these fields. All the papers—though some of them deal with fundamental or applied research—include interesting elements that make them directly applicable to university-level teaching at the graduate or postgraduate level. Source (e.g. quantum cascade lasers) and detector development (e.g. multispectral sensors), as well as metrology issues and optical data transmission, are omitted since they belong to fundamental research journals. Using a more-or-less arbitrary order according to wavelength range, the issue starts with a paper on the physics of near-infrared photography using consumer product cameras in the spectral range from 800 nm to 1.1 µm [1]. It is followed by a series of three papers dealing with IR imaging in spectral ranges from 3 to 14 µm [2-4]. One of them deals with laboratory courses that may help to characterize the IR camera response [2], the second discusses potential applications for nondestructive testing techniques [3] and the third gives an example of how IR thermal imaging may be used to understand cloud cover of the Earth [4], which is the prerequisite for successful climate modelling. The next two papers cover the vast field of IR spectroscopy [5, 6]. The first of these deals with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range from 2.5 to 25 µm, studying e.g. ro-vibrational excitations in gases or optical phonon interactions within solids [5]. The second deals mostly with the spectroscopy of liquids such as biofuels and special

  4. Suspended Si/air high contrast subwavelength gratings for long-wavelength infrared reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Justin M.; Phillips, Jamie D.

    2013-03-01

    We report broadband reflectance in the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR, 8-12 μm) utilizing suspended-Si, high-index-contrast subwavelength gratings (HCGs). Iterative design optimization using finite element analysis software has been performed accounting for silicon's wavelength-dependent index of refraction and extinction coefficient. Grating arrays were fabricated using commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates, photolithography and reactive ion etching; subsequent selective wet etching of SiO2 was used to provide suspended Si/air gratings. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy demonstrates broadband, polarization-dependent reflectance between 8.5 and 12 μm, which agrees with the simulated response.

  5. CfAIR2: Near-infrared Light Curves of 94 Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Andrew S.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Marion, G. H.; Challis, Peter; Mandel, Kaisey S.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Modjaz, Maryam; Narayan, Gautham; Hicken, Malcolm; Foley, Ryan J.; Klein, Christopher R.; Starr, Dan L.; Morgan, Adam; Rest, Armin; Blake, Cullen H.; Miller, Adam A.; Falco, Emilio E.; Wyatt, William F.; Mink, Jessica; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2015-09-01

    CfAIR2 is a large, homogeneously reduced set of near-infrared (NIR) light curves (LCs) for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) obtained with the 1.3 m Peters Automated InfraRed Imaging TELescope. This data set includes 4637 measurements of 94 SNe Ia and 4 additional SNe Iax observed from 2005 to 2011 at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. CfAIR2 includes {{JHK}}s photometric measurements for 88 normal and 6 spectroscopically peculiar SN Ia in the nearby universe, with a median redshift of z ˜ 0.021 for the normal SN Ia. CfAIR2 data span the range from -13 days to +127 days from B-band maximum. More than half of the LCs begin before the time of maximum, and the coverage typically contains ˜13-18 epochs of observation, depending on the filter. We present extensive tests that verify the fidelity of the CfAIR2 data pipeline, including comparison to the excellent data of the Carnegie Supernova Project. CfAIR2 contributes to a firm local anchor for SN cosmology studies in the NIR. Because SN Ia are more nearly standard candles in the NIR and are less vulnerable to the vexing problems of extinction by dust, CfAIR2 will help the SN cosmology community develop more precise and accurate extragalactic distance probes to improve our knowledge of cosmological parameters, including dark energy and its potential time variation.

  6. Evaluating the performance of low cost chemical sensors for air pollution research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alastair C; Lee, James D; Edwards, Peter M; Shaw, Marvin D; Evans, Mat J; Moller, Sarah J; Smith, Katie R; Buckley, Jack W; Ellis, Matthew; Gillot, Stefan R; White, Andrew

    2016-07-18

    Low cost pollution sensors have been widely publicized, in principle offering increased information on the distribution of air pollution and a democratization of air quality measurements to amateur users. We report a laboratory study of commonly-used electrochemical sensors and quantify a number of cross-interferences with other atmospheric chemicals, some of which become significant at typical suburban air pollution concentrations. We highlight that artefact signals from co-sampled pollutants such as CO2 can be greater than the electrochemical sensor signal generated by the measurand. We subsequently tested in ambient air, over a period of three weeks, twenty identical commercial sensor packages alongside standard measurements and report on the degree of agreement between references and sensors. We then explore potential experimental approaches to improve sensor performance, enhancing outputs from qualitative to quantitative, focusing on low cost VOC photoionization sensors. Careful signal handling, for example, was seen to improve limits of detection by one order of magnitude. The quantity, magnitude and complexity of analytical interferences that must be characterised to convert a signal into a quantitative observation, with known uncertainties, make standard individual parameter regression inappropriate. We show that one potential solution to this problem is the application of supervised machine learning approaches such as boosted regression trees and Gaussian processes emulation. PMID:27104223

  7. Cirrus cloud optical and microphysical properties determined from AIRS infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Qing; Liou, K. N.

    2009-03-01

    We developed an efficient thermal infrared radiative transfer model on the basis of the delta-four-stream approximation to facilitate high-spectral-resolution remote sensing applications under cirrus cloudy conditions in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data. Numerical experiments demonstrated that sensitivity in the 800-1130 cm-1 thermal infrared window spectral region is sufficiently distinct for the inference of cirrus optical depth and ice crystal mean effective size and shape factor. We analyzed 312 nighttime cirrus pixels in two AIRS granules over ARM TWP sites and applied the radiative transfer model to these cases to determine cirrus optical depth and ice crystal mean effective size, based on a look-up table approach. The retrieval program has been evaluated through an error budget analysis and validation effort by comparing AIRS-retrieved results with those determined from ground-based millimeter-wave cloud radar data at ARM TWP sites, for five AIRS pixels that were collocated and coincident with ground-based measurements.

  8. Thin-Film Air-Mass-Flow Sensor of Improved Design Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a new air-mass-flow sensor to solve the problems of existing mass flow sensor designs. NASA's design consists of thin-film resistors in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement. The resistors are fabricated on a thin, constant-thickness airfoil to minimize disturbance to the airflow being measured. The following photograph shows one of NASA s prototype sensors. In comparison to other air-mass-flow sensor designs, NASA s thin-film sensor is much more robust than hot wires, causes less airflow disturbance than pitot tubes, is more accurate than vane anemometers, and is much simpler to operate than thermocouple rakes. NASA s thin-film air-mass-flow sensor works by converting the temperature difference seen at each leg of the thin-film Wheatstone bridge into a mass-flow rate. The following figure shows a schematic of this sensor with air flowing around it. The sensor operates as follows: current is applied to the bridge, which increases its temperature. If there is no flow, all the arms are heated equally, the bridge remains in balance, and there is no signal. If there is flow, the air passing over the upstream legs of the bridge reduces the temperature of the upstream legs and that leads to reduced electrical resistance for those legs. After the air has picked up heat from the upstream legs, it continues and passes over the downstream legs of the bridge. The heated air raises the temperature of these legs, increasing their electrical resistance. The resistance difference between the upstream and downstream legs unbalances the bridge, causing a voltage difference that can be amplified and calibrated to the airflow rate. Separate sensors mounted on the airfoil measure the temperature of the airflow, which is used to complete the calculation for the mass of air passing by the sensor. A current application for air-mass-flow sensors is as part of the intake system for an internal combustion engine. A mass-flow sensor is

  9. Design, fabrication, and characterization of Fresnel lens array with spatial filtering for passive infrared motion sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirino, Giuseppe A.; Barcellos, Robson; Morato, Spero P.; Bereczki, Allan; Neto, Luiz G.

    2006-09-01

    A cubic-phase distribution is applied in the design, fabrication and characterization of inexpensive Fresnel lens arrays for passive infrared motion sensors. The resulting lens array produces a point spread function (PSF) capable of distinguish the presence of humans from pets by the employment of the so-called wavefront coding method. The cubic phase distribution used in the design can also reduce the optical aberrations present in the system. This aberration control allows a high tolerance in the fabrication of the lenses and in the alignment errors of the sensor. In order to proof the principle, a lens was manufactured on amorphous hydrogenated carbon thin film, by well-known micro fabrication process steps. The optical results demonstrates that the optical power falling onto the detector surface is attenuated for targets that present a mass that is horizontally distributed in space (e.g. pets) while the optical power is enhanced for targets that present a mass vertically distributed in space (e.g. humans). Then a mould on steel was fabricated by laser engraving, allowing large-scale production of the lens array in polymeric material. A polymeric lens was injected and its optical transmittance was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry technique, which has shown an adequate optical transmittance in the 8-14 μm wavelength range. Finally the performance of the sensor was measured in a climate-controlled test laboratory constructed for this purpose. The results show that the sensor operates normally with a human target, with a 12 meter detection zone and within an angle of 100 degrees. On the other hand, when a small pet runs through a total of 22 different trajectories no sensor trips are observed. The novelty of this work is the fact that the so-called pet immunity function was implemented in a purely optical filtering. As a result, this approach allows the reduction of some hardware parts as well as decreasing the software complexity, once the

  10. Room temperature infrared imaging sensors based on highly purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Wei, Nan; Zhao, Qingliang; Zhang, Dehui; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2015-04-01

    High performance infrared (IR) imaging systems usually require expensive cooling systems, which are highly undesirable. Here we report the fabrication and performance characteristics of room temperature carbon nanotube (CNT) IR imaging sensors. The CNT IR imaging sensor is based on aligned semiconducting CNT films with 99% purity, and each pixel or device of the imaging sensor consists of aligned strips of CNT asymmetrically contacted by Sc and Pd. We found that the performance of the device is dependent on the CNT channel length. While short channel devices provide a large photocurrent and a rapid response of about 110 μs, long channel length devices exhibit a low dark current and a high signal-to-noise ratio which are critical for obtaining high detectivity. In total, 36 CNT IR imagers are constructed on a single chip, each consists of 3 × 3 pixel arrays. The demonstrated advantages of constructing a high performance IR system using purified semiconducting CNT aligned films include, among other things, fast response, excellent stability and uniformity, ideal linear photocurrent response, high imaging polarization sensitivity and low power consumption.High performance infrared (IR) imaging systems usually require expensive cooling systems, which are highly undesirable. Here we report the fabrication and performance characteristics of room temperature carbon nanotube (CNT) IR imaging sensors. The CNT IR imaging sensor is based on aligned semiconducting CNT films with 99% purity, and each pixel or device of the imaging sensor consists of aligned strips of CNT asymmetrically contacted by Sc and Pd. We found that the performance of the device is dependent on the CNT channel length. While short channel devices provide a large photocurrent and a rapid response of about 110 μs, long channel length devices exhibit a low dark current and a high signal-to-noise ratio which are critical for obtaining high detectivity. In total, 36 CNT IR imagers are constructed on a

  11. Study of the turbocharger shaft motion by means of infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, J. R.; Guardiola, C.; Dolz, V.; López, M. A.; Bouffaud, F.

    2015-05-01

    This work describes a technique for measuring the precession movement of the shaft of small automotive turbochargers. The main novelty is that the technique is based on infrared light diode sensors. With presented technique it is possible to perform secure mounting of electronics and also to measure, with good accuracy, far enough from the turbocharger shaft. Both advantages allow applying it even in critical lubrication conditions and when blade contact occurs. The technique's main difficulties arise from the small size of the turbocharger shaft and the high precession movement in critical conditions. In order to generate the optimum albedo reflection for infrared measurement, a special cylindrical nut with larger diameter than the original one is assembled at the shaft tip in the compressor side. Following, shaft balancing, the calibration of the sensors and the compensation of errors from different sources are needed steps before the method is able to identify the main frequencies of shaft motion. Once synchronous and sub-synchronous frequencies have been obtained it is possible to reconstruct the instantaneous position of the shaft to determine its precession movement.

  12. Shortwave infrared for night vision applications: illumination levels and sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adomeit, Uwe; Krieg, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Radiation created by stimulation and recombination/deactivation of atoms and molecules in the higher earth atmosphere is called nightglow. This nightglow can be found in the spectral range from the ultraviolet up to the thermal infrared, with a maximum in the shortwave infrared (SWIR). During moonless nights the illumination in the SWIR is by an order of magnitude higher than the visual one. Within the last years the SWIR sensor technology improved to a level of using the nightglow for night vision applications. This necessitates understanding of the highly variable illumination levels created by the nightglow and the performance assessment of the SWIR detectors in comparison to the image intensifiers respectively Si focal plane array detectors. Whereas the night illumination levels for the visual are standardized, corresponding ones for the SWIR are missing. IOSB started measuring and comparing night illumination levels and camera performance in both spectral ranges based on continuous illumination measurements as well as recording imagery of reflectance reference targets with cameras and analyzing the resulting signal-to-noise ratios. To date the number of illumination measurements are not yet statistically sufficient to standardize the levels, but at least allowed a first comparison of the two technologies for moonless night, clear sky conditions. With comparable F-number, integration time and frame rate, the SWIR sensors available in Europe were found to be inferior to the visual technology. An improvement of at least one magnitude would be necessary to ensure similarity between SWIR and visual technologies for all environmental conditions.

  13. Chalcogenide glass mid-infrared on-chip sensor for chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hongtao

    Chemical sensing in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) has been considered to be significant for molecular detection for decades, but until recently has mostly relied on benchtop spectroscopic instruments like Fourier transform infrared spectrometers, etc. Recent strides in planar photonic integration envision compact, standalone "sensor-on-a-chip" devices for molecular analysis as a potentially disruptive technology as compared to their conventional bulky counterparts. However, the difficulty of achieving adequate sensitivity in integrated optical sensors is still a key barrier towards their practical application, limited by the weak interactions between photons and molecules over the short optical path length accessible on a chip. To solve the sensitivity challenge, a novel mid-IR photothermal spectroscopic sensing technique was proposed and theoretically examined. Through dramatically amplified photothermal effects in an optical nano-cavity doubly resonant at both mid-IR pump and near infrared probe wavelengths, a device design based on nested 1-D nanobeam photonic crystal cavities is numerically analyzed to demonstrate the technique's potential for single small gas molecule detection without the need for cryogenically cooled mid-IR photo-detectors. Furthermore, since silica becomes opaque at wavelengths beyond 3.5 microm, new material platforms and fabrication techniques are needed for mid-IR on-chip chemical sensors. Chalcogenide glasses (ChG), amorphous compounds containing S, Se and Te, are ideal material choices for mid-IR chemical sensors given their broad mid-IR transparency window, large photothermal figure-of-merit, amorphous structure and low processing temperature. A ChG lift-off process and a nano-fabrication technique using focused ion beam milling have been developed to fabricate mid-IR ChG resonators and photonic crystal waveguide cavities. ChG resonators on CaF2 substrate claimed a high quality factor around 4 x 105. Using these devices, we have also

  14. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) High Spectral Resolution Radiance Climate-Quality Dataset for Validating Climate Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.; Zhou, L.; Liu, X.; Cheng, Z.

    2009-12-01

    There is growing consensus that persistent and increasing anthropogenic emissions, since the beginning of the industrial revolution in the 19th century, are increasing atmospheric temperatures, increasing sea levels, melting ice caps and glaciers, increasing the occurrence of severe weather, and causing regional shifts in precipitation patterns. Changes in these parameters or occurrences are responses to changes in climate forcing terms, notably greenhouse gases. The NASA Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), launched in May of 2002, is the first high spectral resolution infrared sounder with nearly complete global coverage on a daily basis. High spectral resolution in the infrared provides sensitivity to nearly all climate forcings, responses and feedbacks. The AIRS radiances are sensitive to changes in carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, ozone, water vapor, temperature, clouds, aerosols, and surface characteristics, and also have been demonstrated through intercomparisons with airborne interferometers and with the EUMETSAT Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer(IASI) to have excellent accuracy, stability and precision. Such "benchmark" attributes are important for validating climate models and analyses. The AIRS data are applied to generate the first ever spectrally resolved infrared radiance (SRIR) dataset (2002- 2006) for monitoring changes in atmospheric temperature and constituents and for assessing the accuracy of climate and weather model analyses and forecasts. The SRIR dataset is a very powerful climate application. Spectral signatures derived from the dataset confirmed the largest depletion of ozone over the Arctic in 2005, and also verified that the European Center for Medium Range Weather (ECMWF) model analysis water vapor fields are significantly more accurate than the analyses of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The NCEP moisture fields are generally 20% more moist than those from ECMWF. Applications included

  15. Hurricane Katrina as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: click on image for larger AIRS microwave image

    At 1:30 a.m. local time this morning, the remnants of (now Tropical Depression) Katrina were centered on the Mississippi-Tennessee border. This microwave image from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument on NASA's Aqua spacecrat shows that the area of most intense precipitation was concentrated to the north of the center of activity.

    The infrared image shows how the storms look through an AIRS Infrared window channel. Window channels measure the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the hurricane. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds, so the purple color indicates the cool cloud tops of the storm. In cloud-free areas, the infrared signal is retrieved at the Earth's surface, revealing warmer temperatures. Cooler areas are pushing to purple and warmer areas are pushing to red.

    The microwave image (figure 1) reveals where the heaviest precipitation in the hurricane is taking place. The blue areas within the storm show the location of this heavy precipitation. Blue areas outside of the storm where there are moderate or no clouds are where the cold (in the microwave sense) sea surface shines through.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard

  16. Far-infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST): sensor calibration performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Gail E.; Latvakoski, Harri M.; Wellard, Stanley J.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Johnson, David G.; Traub, Wesley A.; Jucks, Kenneth W.

    2005-01-01

    The radiative balance of the troposphere, and hence global climate, is dominated by the infrared absorption and emission of water vapor, particularly at far-infrared (far-IR) wavelengths from 15-50 &mum. Water vapor is the principal absorber and emitter in this region. The distribution of water vapor and associated far-IR radiative forcings and feedbacks are widely recognized as major uncertainties in our understanding of current and the prediction of future climate. Cirrus clouds modulate the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) in the far-IR. Up to half of the OLR from the Earth occurs beyond 15.4 &mum (650 cm-1). Current and planned operational and research satellites observe the midinfrared to only about 15.4 &mum, leaving space or airborne spectral measurement of the far-IR region unsupported. NASA has now developed the sensor required to make regular far-IR measurements of the Earth's atmosphere possible. Far InfraRed Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) was developed for NASA's Instrument Incubator Program under the direction of the Langley Research Center. The objective of FIRST is to provide a balloon-based demonstration of the key technologies required for a space-based sensor. The FIRST payload will also be proposed for science flights in support of validation of the various experiments on the Earth Observing System (EOS). We discuss the FIRST Fourier transform spectrometer system (0.6 cm-1 unapodized resolution), along with its radiometric calibration in the spectral range from 10 to 100 μm (1000 to 100 cm-1). FIRST incorporates a broad bandpass beamsplitter, a cooled (~180 K) high throughput optical system, and an image type detector system. We also discuss the actual performance of the FIRST instrument relative to its performance goal of a NE(delta)T of 0.2 K from 10 to 100 &mum.

  17. Infrared sensor system using robotics technology for inter-planetary mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hihara, Hiroki; Takano, Yousuke; Sano, Junpei; Iwase, Kaori; Kawakami, Satoko; Otake, Hisashi; Okada, Tatsuaki; Funase, Ryu; Takada, Jun; Masuda, Tetsuya

    2015-09-01

    Infrared sensor system is a major concern for inter-planetary missions in order to investigate the nature and the formation processes of planets and asteroids. Since it takes long time for the communication of inter-planetary probes, automatic and autonomous functions are essential for provisioning observation sequence including the setup procedures of peripheral equipment. Robotics technology which has been adopted on HAYABUSA2 asteroid probe provides functions for setting up onboard equipment, sensor signal calibration, and post signal processing. HAYABUSA2 was launched successfully in 2014 for the exploration of C class near-Earth asteroid 162173 (1999JU3). An optical navigation camera with telephoto lens (ONC-T), a thermal-infrared imager (TIR), and a near infrared spectrometer (NIRS3) have been developed for the observation of geology, thermo-physical properties, and organic or hydrated materials on the asteroid. ONC-T and TIR are used for those scientific purposes as well as assessment of landing site selection and safe descent operation onto the asteroid surface for sample acquisition. NIRS3 is used to characterize the mineralogy of the asteroid surface by observing the 3-micron band, where the particular diagnostic absorption features due to hydrated minerals appear. Modifications were required in order to apply robotics technology for the probe due to the difference of operation on satellites from robot operation environment. The major difference is time line consideration, because the standardized robotics operation software development system is based on event driven framework. The consistency between the framework of time line and event driven scheme was established for the automatic and autonomous operation for HAYABUSA2.

  18. Demonstrating the Operational Value of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Profiles in the Pre-Convective Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, Danielle; Zavodsky, Bradley; Stano, Geoffrey; Jedlovec, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) is a project to transition those NASA observations and research capabilities to the weather forecasting community to improve the short-term regional forecasts. This poster reviews the work to demonstrate the value to these forecasts of profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on board the Aqua satellite with particular assistance in predicting thunderstorm forecasts by the profiles of the pre-convective environment.

  19. Measuring air gap width of permanent magnet linear generators using search coil sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, R.; Danielsson, O.; Leijon, M.

    2007-01-01

    A concept for a wave power plant is being developed at the Centre for Renewable Electric Energy Conversion at the Ångström Laboratory at Uppsala University. The concept is based on a permanent magnet linear generator placed on the seabed, directly driven by a surface following buoy. Critical for the survival of the generator is that the air gap between the moving and static parts of the generator is constantly fixed at the designed width to prevent the moving and static parts from connecting during operation. This paper shows the design and evaluation of an inductive sensor for measuring the air gap width during generator operation. In order to survive during years on the seafloor inside the wave power plants, the sensor has deliberately been chosen to be a passive component, as well as robust and compact. A coil etched on a printed circuit board, i.e., a search coil, was the chosen basis for the sensor. The sensor has been tested on an existing test rig of a wave power plant and the results have been compared with finite element simulations.The results show that a search coil magnetic sensor etched on a printed circuit board is a suitable concept for measuring the air gap width. Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated sensor signals show very good agreement. The setup has a sensitivity of ±0.4mm in the range of 4-9.5mm air gap. The potential for future improvements of the sensitivity is considerable.

  20. Measuring air gap width of permanent magnet linear generators using search coil sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.; Danielsson, O.; Leijon, M.

    2007-01-15

    A concept for a wave power plant is being developed at the Centre for Renewable Electric Energy Conversion at the Angstroem Laboratory at Uppsala University. The concept is based on a permanent magnet linear generator placed on the seabed, directly driven by a surface following buoy. Critical for the survival of the generator is that the air gap between the moving and static parts of the generator is constantly fixed at the designed width to prevent the moving and static parts from connecting during operation. This paper shows the design and evaluation of an inductive sensor for measuring the air gap width during generator operation. In order to survive during years on the seafloor inside the wave power plants, the sensor has deliberately been chosen to be a passive component, as well as robust and compact. A coil etched on a printed circuit board, i.e., a search coil, was the chosen basis for the sensor. The sensor has been tested on an existing test rig of a wave power plant and the results have been compared with finite element simulations.The results show that a search coil magnetic sensor etched on a printed circuit board is a suitable concept for measuring the air gap width. Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated sensor signals show very good agreement. The setup has a sensitivity of {+-}0.4 mm in the range of 4-9.5 mm air gap. The potential for future improvements of the sensitivity is considerable.

  1. Path-dependent human identification using a pyroelectric infrared sensor and fresnel lens arrays.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jian-Shuen; Hao, Qi; Brady, David J; Shankar, Mohan; Guenther, Bob D; Pitsianis, Nikos P; Hsu, Ken Y

    2006-01-23

    This paper presents a design and development of a low power consumption, and low cost, human identification system using a pyroelectric infrared (PIR) sensor whose visibility is modulated by a Fresnel lens array. The optimal element number of the lens array for the identification system was investigated and the experimental results suggest that the lens array with more elements can yield a better performance in terms of identification and false alarm rates. The other parameters of the system configuration such as the height of sensor location and sensor-to-object distance were also studied to improve spectral distinctions among sensory data of human objects. The identification process consists of two parts: training and testing. For the data training, we employed a principal components regression (PCR) method to cluster data with respect to different registered objects at different speed levels. The feature data of different objects walking along the same path in training yet at random speeds are then tested against the pre-trained clusters to decide whether the target is registered, and which member of the registered group it is. PMID:19503378

  2. Evolution of miniature detectors and focal plane arrays for infrared sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    Sensors that are sensitive in the infrared spectral region have been under continuous development since the WW2 era. A quest for the military advantage of 'seeing in the dark' has pushed thermal imaging technology toward high spatial and temporal resolution for night vision equipment, fire control, search track, and seeker 'homing' guidance sensing devices. Similarly, scientific applications have pushed spectral resolution for chemical analysis, remote sensing of earth resources, and astronomical exploration applications. As a result of these developments, focal plane arrays (FPA) are now available with sufficient sensitivity for both high spatial and narrow bandwidth spectral resolution imaging over large fields of view. Such devices combined with emerging opto-electronic developments in integrated FPA data processing techniques can yield miniature sensors capable of imaging reflected sunlight in the near IR and emitted thermal energy in the Mid-wave (MWIR) and longwave (LWIR) IR spectral regions. Robotic space sensors equipped with advanced versions of these FPA's will provide high resolution 'pictures' of their surroundings, perform remote analysis of solid, liquid, and gas matter, or selectively look for 'signatures' of specific objects. Evolutionary trends and projections of future low power micro detector FPA developments for day/night operation or use in adverse viewing conditions are presented in the following test.

  3. Room temperature infrared imaging sensors based on highly purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wei, Nan; Zhao, Qingliang; Zhang, Dehui; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2015-04-21

    High performance infrared (IR) imaging systems usually require expensive cooling systems, which are highly undesirable. Here we report the fabrication and performance characteristics of room temperature carbon nanotube (CNT) IR imaging sensors. The CNT IR imaging sensor is based on aligned semiconducting CNT films with 99% purity, and each pixel or device of the imaging sensor consists of aligned strips of CNT asymmetrically contacted by Sc and Pd. We found that the performance of the device is dependent on the CNT channel length. While short channel devices provide a large photocurrent and a rapid response of about 110 μs, long channel length devices exhibit a low dark current and a high signal-to-noise ratio which are critical for obtaining high detectivity. In total, 36 CNT IR imagers are constructed on a single chip, each consists of 3 × 3 pixel arrays. The demonstrated advantages of constructing a high performance IR system using purified semiconducting CNT aligned films include, among other things, fast response, excellent stability and uniformity, ideal linear photocurrent response, high imaging polarization sensitivity and low power consumption. PMID:25807291

  4. Status report of PYRAMIR: a near-infrared pyramid wavefront sensor for ALFA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Joana B.; Feldt, Markus; Wagner, Karl; Bizenberger, Peter; Hippler, Stefan; Baumeister, Harald; Stumpf, Micaela; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Esposito, Simone; Henning, Thomas

    2004-10-01

    A new wavefront sensor based on the pyramid principle is being built at MPIA, with the objective of integration in the Calar Alto adaptive optics system ALFA. This sensor will work in the near-infrared wavelength range (J, H and K bands). We present here an update of this project, named PYRAMIR, which will have its first light in some months. Along with the description of the optical design, we discuss issues like the image quality and chromatic effects due to band sensing. We will show the characterization of the tested pyramidal components as well as refer to the difficulties found in the manufacturing process to meet our requirements. Most of the PYRAMIR instrument parts are kept inside a liquid nitrogen cooled vacuum dewar to reduce thermic radiation. The mechanical design of the cold parts is described here. To gain experience, a laboratory pyramid wavefront sensor was set up, with its optical design adapted to PYRAMIR. Different tests were already performed. The electronic and control systems were designed to integrate in the existing ALFA system. We give a description of the new components. An update on the future work is presented.

  5. Evolution of miniature detectors and focal plane arrays for infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Louis A.

    1993-06-01

    Sensors that are sensitive in the infrared spectral region have been under continuous development since the WW2 era. A quest for the military advantage of 'seeing in the dark' has pushed thermal imaging technology toward high spatial and temporal resolution for night vision equipment, fire control, search track, and seeker 'homing' guidance sensing devices. Similarly, scientific applications have pushed spectral resolution for chemical analysis, remote sensing of earth resources, and astronomical exploration applications. As a result of these developments, focal plane arrays (FPA) are now available with sufficient sensitivity for both high spatial and narrow bandwidth spectral resolution imaging over large fields of view. Such devices combined with emerging opto-electronic developments in integrated FPA data processing techniques can yield miniature sensors capable of imaging reflected sunlight in the near IR and emitted thermal energy in the Mid-wave (MWIR) and longwave (LWIR) IR spectral regions. Robotic space sensors equipped with advanced versions of these FPA's will provide high resolution 'pictures' of their surroundings, perform remote analysis of solid, liquid, and gas matter, or selectively look for 'signatures' of specific objects. Evolutionary trends and projections of future low power micro detector FPA developments for day/night operation or use in adverse viewing conditions are presented in the following test.

  6. Multi-Sensor Fusion of Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared (TIR) and Panchromatic (PAN) Images

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyung-Sup; Park, Sung-Whan

    2014-01-01

    Data fusion is defined as the combination of data from multiple sensors such that the resulting information is better than would be possible when the sensors are used individually. The multi-sensor fusion of panchromatic (PAN) and thermal infrared (TIR) images is a good example of this data fusion. While a PAN image has higher spatial resolution, a TIR one has lower spatial resolution. In this study, we have proposed an efficient method to fuse Landsat 8 PAN and TIR images using an optimal scaling factor in order to control the trade-off between the spatial details and the thermal information. We have compared the fused images created from different scaling factors and then tested the performance of the proposed method at urban and rural test areas. The test results show that the proposed method merges the spatial resolution of PAN image and the temperature information of TIR image efficiently. The proposed method may be applied to detect lava flows of volcanic activity, radioactive exposure of nuclear power plants, and surface temperature change with respect to land-use change. PMID:25529207

  7. Multi-sensor fusion of Landsat 8 thermal infrared (TIR) and panchromatic (PAN) images.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyung-Sup; Park, Sung-Whan

    2014-01-01

    Data fusion is defined as the combination of data from multiple sensors such that the resulting information is better than would be possible when the sensors are used individually. The multi-sensor fusion of panchromatic (PAN) and thermal infrared (TIR) images is a good example of this data fusion. While a PAN image has higher spatial resolution, a TIR one has lower spatial resolution. In this study, we have proposed an efficient method to fuse Landsat 8 PAN and TIR images using an optimal scaling factor in order to control the trade-off between the spatial details and the thermal information. We have compared the fused images created from different scaling factors and then tested the performance of the proposed method at urban and rural test areas. The test results show that the proposed method merges the spatial resolution of PAN image and the temperature information of TIR image efficiently. The proposed method may be applied to detect lava flows of volcanic activity, radioactive exposure of nuclear power plants, and surface temperature change with respect to land-use change. PMID:25529207

  8. Improved Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Radiance Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction (NWP) have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Retrieved profiles from AIRS contain much of the information that is contained in the radiances and may be able to reveal reasons for this reduced impact. Assimilating AIRS retrieved profiles in an identical analysis configuration to the radiances, tracking the quantity and quality of the assimilated data in each technique, and examining analysis increments and forecast impact from each data type can yield clues as to the reasons for the reduced impact. By doing this with regional scale models individual synoptic features (and the impact of AIRS on these features) can be more easily tracked. This project examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing operational techniques used for AIRS radiances and research techniques used for AIRS retrieved profiles. Parallel versions of a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) that mimics the analysis methodology, domain, and observational datasets for the regional North American Mesoscale (NAM) model run at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) are run to examine the impact of each type of AIRS data set. The first configuration will assimilate the AIRS radiance data along with other conventional and satellite data using techniques implemented within the operational system; the second configuration will assimilate AIRS retrieved profiles instead of AIRS radiances in the same manner. Preliminary results of this study will be presented and focus on the analysis impact of the radiances and profiles for selected cases.

  9. Development of a 2-Channel Embedded Infrared Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor Using Silver Halide Optical Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Jang, Kyoung Won; Seo, Jeong Ki; Moon, Jinsoo; Han, Ki-Tek; Park, Jang-Yeon; Park, Byung Gi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2011-01-01

    A 2-channel embedded infrared fiber-optic temperature sensor was fabricated using two identical silver halide optical fibers for accurate thermometry without complicated calibration processes. In this study, we measured the output voltages of signal and reference probes according to temperature variation over a temperature range from 25 to 225 °C. To decide the temperature of the water, the difference between the amounts of infrared radiation emitted from the two temperature sensing probes was measured. The response time and the reproducibility of the fiber-optic temperature sensor were also obtained. Thermometry with the proposed sensor is immune to changes if parameters such as offset voltage, ambient temperature, and emissivity of any warm object. In particular, the temperature sensing probe with silver halide optical fibers can withstand a high temperature/pressure and water-chemistry environment. It is expected that the proposed sensor can be further developed to accurately monitor temperature in harsh environments. PMID:22163711

  10. High-performance air acoustic detection and classification sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Richard; Raines, Robert; Jones, Barry

    2009-05-01

    Acoustic signals are a principal detection modality for unattended sensor systems. However, the performance of these systems is frequently suboptimal due to insufficient dynamic range in small systems or excess power consumption in larger systems. This paper discusses an approach to developing an unattended ground sensor (UGS) system that has the best features of both worlds. This system, developed by McQ Inc., has exceptional dynamic range (> 100 dB) while operating at power levels of 1.5-5 watts. The system also has a user definable signal parameter library and automated detection methodology that will be described.

  11. Far-infrared spectroscopy of the troposphere (FIRST): sensor development and performance drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Gail E.; Latvakoski, Harri M.; Wellard, Stanley J.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Johnson, David G.; Traub, Wesley A.; Jucks, Kenneth W.

    2003-11-01

    The radiative balance of the troposphere, and hence global climate, is dominated by the infrared absorption and emission of water vapor, particularly at far-infrared (far-IR) wavelengths from 15-50 μm. Water vapor is the principle absorber and emitter in this region. The distribution of water vapor and associated far-IR radiative forcings and feedbacks are widely recognized as major uncertainties in our understanding of current and the prediction of future climate. Cirrus clouds modulate the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) in the far-IR, and up to half of the OLR from the Earth occurs beyond 15.4 μm (650 cm-1). Current and planned operational and research satellites observe the mid-infrared to only about 15.4 μm, leaving space or airborne spectral measurement of the far-IR region unsupported. NASA is now developing the technology required to make regular far-IR measurements of the Earth"s atmosphere possible. Far InfraRed Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) is being developed for NASA"s Instrument Incubator Program under the direction of the Langley Research Center. The objective of FIRST is to provide a balloon-based demonstration of the key technologies required for a space-based sensor. We discuss the FIRST Fourier transform spectrometer system (0.6 cm-1 unapodized resolution), along with radiometric calibration techniques in the spectral range from 10 to 100 μm (1000 to 100 cm-1). FIRST will incorporate a broad bandpass beamsplitter, a cooled (~180 K) high throughput optical system, and an image type detector system. The FIRST performance goal is a NEΔT of 0.2 K from 10 to 100 μm.

  12. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) sounding evaluation and analysis of the pre-convective environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botes, Danelle; Mecikalski, John R.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2012-05-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral instrument onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite. This study investigates the performance of AIRS soundings in characterizing the stability in the pre-convective environment of the southeastern United States. AIRS soundings are collocated with radiosonde observations within ±1 degree and 2 h of the Aqua overpass. For each case, the AIRS sounding with maximum PBest quality indicator (signifying the pressure level above which the sounding is of best quality) is chosen for analysis. Rapid Update Cycle soundings from 1800 UTC analyses are used to evaluate the results from AIRS. Precipitable water and stability indices including convective available potential energy, convective inhibition, Lifted Index, K-Index, and Total Totals are derived from all soundings. Results indicate that AIRS underestimates instability due to a dry bias at the surface and roughly 900 hPa. A simple method is presented for reconstructing a RAOB-like inversion (in terms of magnitude and altitude) within AIRS soundings, hence developing more representative RAOB-like soundings that can benefit the operational forecaster.

  13. Benefits of Sharing Information from Commercial Airborne Forward-Looking Sensors in the Next Generation Air Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Philip R.; Harrah, Steven; Neece, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    The air transportation system of the future will need to support much greater traffic densities than are currently possible, while preserving or improving upon current levels of safety. Concepts are under development to support a Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) that by some estimates will need to support up to three times current capacity by the year 2025. Weather and other atmospheric phenomena, such as wake vortices and volcanic ash, constitute major constraints on airspace system capacity and can present hazards to aircraft if encountered. To support safe operations in the NextGen environment advanced systems for collection and dissemination of aviation weather and environmental information will be required. The envisioned NextGen Network Enabled Weather (NNEW) infrastructure will be a critical component of the aviation weather support services, providing access to a common weather picture for all system users. By taking advantage of Network Enabled Operations (NEO) capabilities, a virtual 4-D Weather Data Cube with aviation weather information from many sources will be developed. One new source of weather observations may be airborne forward-looking sensors, such as the X-band weather radar. Future sensor systems that are the subject of current research include advanced multi-frequency and polarimetric radar, a variety of Lidar technologies, and infrared imaging spectrometers.

  14. Monitoring Volcanoes by Use of Air-Dropped Sensor Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Sharon; Rivellini, Tommaso; Webb, Frank; Blaes, Brent; Bracho, Caroline; Lockhart, Andrew; McGee, Ken

    2003-01-01

    Sensor packages that would be dropped from airplanes have been proposed for pre-eruption monitoring of physical conditions on the flanks of awakening volcanoes. The purpose of such monitoring is to gather data that could contribute to understanding and prediction of the evolution of volcanic systems. Each sensor package, denoted a volcano monitoring system (VMS), would include a housing with a parachute attached at its upper end and a crushable foam impact absorber at its lower end (see figure). The housing would contain survivable low-power instrumentation that would include a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, an inclinometer, a seismometer, a barometer, a thermometer, and CO2 and SO2 analyzers. The housing would also contain battery power, control, data-logging, and telecommunication subsystems. The proposal for the development of the VMS calls for the use of commercially available sensor, power, and telecommunication equipment, so that efforts could be focused on integrating all of the equipment into a system that could survive impact and operate thereafter for 30 days, transmitting data on the pre-eruptive state of a target volcano to a monitoring center. In a typical scenario, VMSs would be dropped at strategically chosen locations on the flanks of a volcano once the volcano had been identified as posing a hazard from any of a variety of observations that could include eyewitness reports, scientific observations from positions on the ground, synthetic-aperture-radar scans from aircraft, and/or remote sensing from aboard spacecraft. Once dropped, the VMSs would be operated as a network of in situ sensors that would transmit data to a local monitoring center. This network would provide observations as part of an integrated volcano-hazard assessment strategy that would involve both remote sensing and timely observations from the in situ sensors. A similar strategy that involves the use of portable sensors (but not dropping of sensors from aircraft) is

  15. Next Generation Air Monitoring (NGAM) VOC Sensor Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of next generation air monitor (NGAM) volatile organic compound (VOC) evaluations performed using both laboratory as well as field scale settings. These evaluations focused on challenging lower cost (<$2500) NGAM technologies to either controlle...

  16. Air Pollution Monitoring and Mining Based on Sensor Grid in London

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yajie; Richards, Mark; Ghanem, Moustafa; Guo, Yike; Hassard, John

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a distributed infrastructure based on wireless sensors network and Grid computing technology for air pollution monitoring and mining, which aims to develop low-cost and ubiquitous sensor networks to collect real-time, large scale and comprehensive environmental data from road traffic emissions for air pollution monitoring in urban environment. The main informatics challenges in respect to constructing the high-throughput sensor Grid are discussed in this paper. We present a two-layer network framework, a P2P e-Science Grid architecture, and the distributed data mining algorithm as the solutions to address the challenges. We simulated the system in TinyOS to examine the operation of each sensor as well as the networking performance. We also present the distributed data mining result to examine the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  17. Hurricane Frances as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and SeaWinds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows Hurricane Frances as captured by instruments onboard two different satellites: the AIRS infrared instrument onboard Aqua, and the SeaWinds scatterometer onboard QuikSCAT. Both are JPL-managed instruments. AIRS data are used to create global three-dimensional maps of temperature, humidity and clouds, while scatterometers measure surface wind speed and direction over the ocean.

    The red vectors in the image show Frances' surface winds as measured by SeaWinds on QuikSCAT. The background colors show the temperature of clouds and surface as viewed in the infrared by AIRS, with cooler areas pushing to purple and warmer areas are pushing to red. The color scale on the right gives the temperatures in degrees Kelvin. (The top of the scale, 320 degrees Kelvin, corresponds to 117 degrees Fahrenheit, and the bottom, 180 degrees K is -135 degrees F.) The powerful circulation of this storm is evident from the combined data as well as the development of a clearly-defined central 'eye'. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds, so the light blue areas reveal the cold clouds tops associated with strong thunderstorms embedded within the storm. In cloud-free areas the infrared signal comes from Earth's surface, revealing warmer temperatures.

    The power of the SeaWinds scatterometer data set lies in its ability to generate global maps of wind speed and direction, giving us a snapshot of how the atmosphere is circulating. Weather prediction centers, including the Tropical Prediction Center - a branch of NOAA that monitors the creation of ocean-born storms, use scatterometer data to help it 'see' where these storms are brewing so that warnings can be issued and the storms, with often erratic motions, can be tracked.

    While the SeaWinds instrument isn't designed to gather hurricane data, having difficulty seeing the surface in heavy rain, it's data can be used in combination with other data sets to give us an insight into these storms. In

  18. Respirable particulate monitoring with remote sensors. (Public health ecology: Air pollution)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring atmospheric aerosols in the respirable range from air or space platforms was studied. Secondary reflectance targets were located in the industrial area and near Galveston Bay. Multichannel remote sensor data were utilized to calculate the aerosol extinction coefficient and thus determine the aerosol size distribution. Houston Texas air sampling network high volume data were utilized to generate computer isopleth maps of suspended particulates and to establish the mass loading of the atmosphere. In addition, a five channel nephelometer and a multistage particulate air sampler were used to collect data. The extinction coefficient determined from remote sensor data proved more representative of wide areal phenomena than that calculated from on site measurements. It was also demonstrated that a significant reduction in the standard deviation of the extinction coefficient could be achieved by reducing the bandwidths used in remote sensor.

  19. The temperature fields measurement of air in the car cabin by infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pešek, M.

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with the temperature fields measurement of air using the Jenoptic Variocam infrared camera inside the car Škoda Octavia Combi II. The temperature fields with the use of auxiliary material with a high emissivity value were visualized. The measurements through the viewing window with a high transmissivity value were performed. The viewing windows on the side car door were placed. In the rear car area, the temperature fields of air on the spacious sheet of auxiliary material were visualized which is a suitable method for 2D airstreams. In the front car area, the temperature fields in the air were measured with the use of the measuring net which is suitable for 3D airstreams measuring.

  20. In-situ monitoring of carbon dioxide emissions from a diesel engine using a mid-infrared optical fibre sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Elfed; Clifford, John; Fitzpatrick, Colin; Dooly, Gerard; Zhao, Weizhong; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Ken; Lucas, James; Degner, Martin; Ewald, Hartmut; Lochmann, Steffan; Bramann, Gero; Merlone-Borla, Edoardo; Gili, Flavio

    2011-05-01

    A robust optical fibre based CO2 exhaust gas sensor operating in the mid infrared spectral range is described. It is capable of detecting on board carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from both diesel and petrol engines. The optical fibre sensor is not cross sensitive to other gaseous species in the exhaust such as water vapour (H2O), carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) or oxides of sulphur (SOx).The response of the sensor to carbon dioxide present in the exhaust of Fiat Croma diesel engine are presented.

  1. Waveguide-coupled surface phonon resonance sensors with super-resolution in the mid-infrared region.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gaige; Chen, Yunyun; Bu, Lingbing; Xu, Linhua; Su, Wei

    2016-04-01

    A waveguide-coupled surface phonon resonance (SPhR) sensor with super-resolution based on Fano resonance (FR) by using a multilayer system within the Kretschmann configuration in the mid-infrared wavelength region is proposed. Due to the coherent interference of the waveguide and the surface phonon polariton modes, the calculated reflectivity spectrum possesses sharp asymmetric FR dips. An ultra-small linewidth is formed because of the Fano coupling, and the physical features contribute to a highly efficient nano-sensor for refractive index sensing. The bulk and surface sensitivity by intensities are greatly enhanced relative to those of conventional SPhR sensors. PMID:27192292

  2. Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2009-12-31

    This report documents the self-correction algorithms developed in the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls project funded jointly by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The algorithms address faults for temperature sensors, humidity sensors, and dampers in air-handling units and correction of persistent manual overrides of automated control systems. All faults considered create energy waste when left uncorrected as is frequently the case in actual systems.

  3. Design and fabrication of dielectric diaphragm pressure sensors for applications to shock wave measurement in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, W.; Djakov, V.; Barton, J. S.; Watson, S.; MacPherson, W. N.; Stevenson, J. T. M.; Dunare, C. C.

    2007-07-01

    Optical fibre pressure sensors have potential performance advantages over electrical sensors in measuring rapid transients such as shock waves from explosive blasts. We report the development of micromachined optical fibre Fabry-Pérot pressure sensors using a silicon dioxide or nitride diaphragm and detail the fabrication stages of the sensor body and diaphragm. The planar technology used is based on silicon deep etching and direct fusion bonding of silicon wafers. Test results for both types of diaphragm are presented. Sensors with rise times better than 3 µs, range 0.1 to 1 MPa and resolution ~500 Pa have been demonstrated in explosives trials. Despite the difference in the sign of stress for the two diaphragm types, both demonstrated excellent high-speed response to explosively generated air shocks.

  4. Flexible Wing Base Micro Aerial Vehicles: Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) for Surveillance and Remote Sensor Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) will be developed for tracking individuals, locating terrorist threats, and delivering remote sensors, for surveillance and chemical/biological agent detection. The tasks are: (1) Develop robust MAV platform capable of carrying sensor payload. (2) Develop fully autonomous capabilities for delivery of sensors to remote and distant locations. The current capabilities and accomplishments are: (1) Operational electric (inaudible) 6-inch MAVs with novel flexible wing, providing superior aerodynamic efficiency and control. (2) Vision-based flight stability and control (from on-board cameras).

  5. Improving the performance of hollow waveguide-based infrared gas sensors via tailored chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Perez-Guaita, David; Wilk, Andreas; Kuligowski, Julia; Quintás, Guillermo; de la Guardia, Miguel; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2013-10-01

    The use of chemometrics in order to improve the molecular selectivity of infrared (IR) spectra has been evaluated using classic least squares (CLS), partial least squares (PLS), science-based calibration (SBC), and multivariate curve resolution-alternate least squares (MCR-ALS) techniques for improving the discriminatory and quantitative performance of infrared hollow waveguide gas sensors. Spectra of mixtures of isobutylene, methane, carbon dioxide, butane, and cyclopropane were recorded, analyzed, and validated for optimizing the prediction of associated concentrations. PLS, CLS, and SBC provided equivalent results in the absence of interferences. After addition of the spectral characteristics of water by humidifying the sample mixtures, CLS and SBC results were similar to those obtained by PLS only if the water spectrum was included in the calibration model. In the presence of an unknown interferant, CLS revealed errors up to six times higher than those obtained by PLS. However, SBC provided similar results compared to PLS by adding a measured noise matrix to the model. Using MCR-ALS provided an excellent estimation of the spectra of the unknown interference. Furthermore, this method also provided a qualitative and quantitative estimation of the components of an unknown set of samples. In summary, using the most suitable chemometrics approach could improve the selectivity and quality of the calibration model derived for a sensor system, and may avoid the need to analyze expensive calibration data sets. The results obtained in the present study demonstrated that (1) if all sample components of the system are known, CLS provides a sufficiently accurate solution; (2) the selection between PLS and SBC methods depends on whether it is easier to measure a calibration data set or a noise matrix; and (3) MCR-ALS appears to be the most suitable method for detecting interferences within a sample. However, the latter approach requires the most extensive calculations and

  6. Infrared Sensor on Unmanned Aircraft Transmits Time-Critical Wildfire Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pestana, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Since 2006, NASA fs Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) and Ames Research Center have been perfecting and demonstrating a new capability for geolocation of wildfires and the real-time delivery of data to firefighters. Managed for the Western States Fire Mission, the Ames-developed Autonomous Modular Scanner (AMS), mounted beneath a wing of DFRC fs MQ-9 Ikhana remotely piloted aircraft, contains an infrared sensor capable of discriminating temperatures within 0.5 F (approx. = 0.3 C), up to 1,000 F (approx. = 540 C). The AMS operates like a digital camera with specialized filters to detect light energy at visible, infrared, and thermal wavelengths. By placing the AMS aboard unmanned aircraft, one can gather information and imaging for thousands of square miles, and provide critical information about the location, size, and terrain around fires to commanders in the field. In the hands of operational agencies, the benefits of this NASA research and development effort can support nationwide wildfire fighting efforts. The sensor also provides data for post-burn and vegetation regrowth analyses. The MQ-9 Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), a version of the Predator-B, can operate over long distances, staying aloft for over 24 hours, and controlled via a satellite-linked command and control system. This same link is used to deliver the fire location data directly to fire incident commanders, in less than 10 minutes from the time of overflight. In the current method, similarly equipped short-duration manned aircraft, with limited endurance and range, must land, hand-carry, and process data, and then deliver information to the firefighters, sometimes taking several hours in the process. Meanwhile, many fires would have moved over great distances and changed direction. Speed is critical. The fire incident commanders must assess a very dynamic situation, and task resources such as people, ground equipment, and retardant-dropping aircraft, often in mountainous terrain obscured by

  7. Infrared sensors and systems for enhanced vision/autonomous landing applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, J. Richard

    1993-01-01

    There exists a large body of data spanning more than two decades, regarding the ability of infrared imagers to 'see' through fog, i.e., in Category III weather conditions. Much of this data is anecdotal, highly specialized, and/or proprietary. In order to determine the efficacy and cost effectiveness of these sensors under a variety of climatic/weather conditions, there is a need for systematic data spanning a significant range of slant-path scenarios. These data should include simultaneous video recordings at visible, midwave (3-5 microns), and longwave (8-12 microns) wavelengths, with airborne weather pods that include the capability of determining the fog droplet size distributions. Existing data tend to show that infrared is more effective than would be expected from analysis and modeling. It is particularly more effective for inland (radiation) fog as compared to coastal (advection) fog, although both of these archetypes are oversimplifications. In addition, as would be expected from droplet size vs wavelength considerations, longwave outperforms midwave, in many cases by very substantial margins. Longwave also benefits from the higher level of available thermal energy at ambient temperatures. The principal attraction of midwave sensors is that staring focal plane technology is available at attractive cost-performance levels. However, longwave technology such as that developed at FLIR Systems, Inc. (FSI), has achieved high performance in small, economical, reliable imagers utilizing serial-parallel scanning techniques. In addition, FSI has developed dual-waveband systems particularly suited for enhanced vision flight testing. These systems include a substantial, embedded processing capability which can perform video-rate image enhancement and multisensor fusion. This is achieved with proprietary algorithms and includes such operations as real-time histograms, convolutions, and fast Fourier transforms.

  8. Remote Sensing of Almond and Walnut Tree Canopy Temperatures Using an Inexpensive Infrared Sensor on a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Kellen Ethan

    Improving water use efficiency in agriculture will become increasingly important in the face of decreasing water resources and a growing population. Increasing water use efficiency, or water productivity, has been shown to greatly reduce irrigation water usage in many orchard crops with little to no impact on yield. In some specialty crops, improving water productivity can even lead to a higher value crop. Current irrigation practices depend largely on uniform applications of water over large fields with varying degrees of heterogeneity. As a result, much of the field receives more water than it needs. A system to monitor the needs of each plant or smaller groups of plants within the field would be helpful in distributing irrigation water according to each plant or group of plants' needs. Such a system would help conserve water resources. Stomatal conductance is a good indicator of plant water-based stress, as it is the main response a plant has to limit transpiration-related water losses. The difference between leaf temperature and air temperature, when adjusted for environmental conditions, can give a good indication of stomatal conductance. Recent efforts at UC Davis have employed a handheld sensor suite to measure leaf temperature and other environmental variables like wind speed, air temperature, and humidity in almond and walnut trees. Though effective, this method requires walking or driving through the orchard and measuring several leaves on a given tree, so it is impractical for large-scale monitoring. Satellite and aircraft can measure canopy temperatures remotely, but these applications typically do not have the spatial resolution for precise monitoring or the temporal resolution necessary for irrigation decisions, and they are too expensive and impractical for smaller-scale farms. A smaller unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) could employ the same methods as satellite and larger aircraft-based systems, but relatively inexpensively and at a scale catered to

  9. Comparison of vegetation water contents derived from shortwave-infrared and passive-microwave sensors over central Iowa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Retrieval of soil moisture content from microwave sensors also returns an estimate of vegetation water content. Land cover classifications and remotely sensed indices based on liquid water absorption features can be used to estimate canopy water content. The normalized difference infrared index (N...

  10. Regional Sediment Management Experiment Using the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite and the Landsat Data Continuity Mission Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, Leland; Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    The central aim of this RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) experiment is to demonstrate the use of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/ Radiometer Suite and LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission) sensors as key input to the RSM (Regional Sediment Management) GIS (geographic information system) DSS (Decision Support System). The project affects the Coastal Management National Application.

  11. Novel far infrared imaging sensor based on the use of titanium-nickel shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ho-Pui; Chung, Jonathan C. Y.; Ng, Ki-Cheong; Cheng, K. L.; Wu, Shu-Yuen

    2002-11-01

    In this paper we describe a novel imaging sensor design1 that uses the thermo-mechanical properties of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloys (SMAs) for detecting far infrared radiation (FIR). A thin NiTi SMA cantilever is coated with a FIR absorbing layer on one surface, while the other is coated with a highly reflecting metallic layers such as gold. Upon absorption of FIR, the temperature of the cantilever changes. This causes the tilt angle of the cantilever to change as well. The deflection is very large if the temperature change coincides with the temperature range of the phase transformation of the NiTi SMA. The detection of the mechanical movements in the cantilever is achieved by illuminating the reflective side using a visible laser beam. A Michelson interferometer is used to covert the reflected light into optical modulation. In doing this, very small displacement in the cantilever can be visualized as laser intensity variation. A single element device has been fabricated for this purpose and our initial experimental results have demonstrated the successful detection of FIR. An estimation of angular deflection per unit change of temperature suggests that our approach can offer sensitivity higher than the reported design based on the use of bi-material strips. We envisage that a two-dimensional array of such devices can lead to the possibility of realizing a practical low-cost infrared imaging device operating under room temperature conditions.

  12. High-Density, High-Resolution, Low-Cost Air Quality Sensor Networks for Urban Air Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, M. I.; Popoola, O. A.; Stewart, G.; Bright, V.; Kaye, P.; Saffell, J.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring air quality in highly granular environments such as urban areas which are spatially heterogeneous with variable emission sources, measurements need to be made at appropriate spatial and temporal scales. Current routine air quality monitoring networks generally are either composed of sparse expensive installations (incorporating e.g. chemiluminescence instruments) or higher density low time resolution systems (e.g. NO2 diffusion tubes). Either approach may not accurately capture important effects such as pollutant "hot spots" or adequately capture spatial (or temporal) variability. As a result, analysis based on data from traditional low spatial resolution networks, such as personal exposure, may be inaccurate. In this paper we present details of a sophisticated, low-cost, multi species (gas phase, speciated PM, meteorology) air quality measurement network methodology incorporating GPS and GPRS which has been developed for high resolution air quality measurements in urban areas. Sensor networks developed in the Centre for Atmospheric Science (University of Cambridge) incorporated electrochemical gas sensors configured for use in urban air quality studies operating at parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. It has been demonstrated that these sensors can be used to measure key air quality gases such as CO, NO and NO2 at the low ppb mixing ratios present in the urban environment (estimated detection limits <4ppb for CO and NO and <1ppb for NO2. Mead et al (submitted Aug., 2012)). Based on this work, a state of the art multi species instrument package for deployment in scalable sensor networks has been developed which has general applicability. This is currently being employed as part of a major 3 year UK program at London Heathrow airport (the Sensor Networks for Air Quality (SNAQ) Heathrow project). The main project outcome is the creation of a calibrated, high spatial and temporal resolution data set for O3, NO, NO2, SO2, CO, CO2, VOCstotal, size-speciated PM

  13. Sensor gas analyzer for acetone determination in expired air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Vitaly V.

    2001-05-01

    Diseases and changes in the way of life change the concentration and composition of the expired air. Our adaptable gas analyzer is intended for the selective analysis of expired air and can be adapted for the solution of current diagnostic and analytical tasks by the user (a physician or a patient). Having analyzed the existing trends in the development of noninvasive diagnostics we have chosen the method of noninvasive acetone detection in expired air, where the acetone concentration correlates with blood and urine glucose concentrations. The appearance of acetone in expired air is indicative of disorders that may be caused not only by diabetes but also be wrong diet, incorrect sportsmen training etc. To control the disorders one should know the acetone concentration in the human body. This knowledge allows one to judge upon the state of the patient, choose a correct diet that will not cause damage to the patient's health, determine sportsmen training efficiency and results and solve the artificial pancreas problem. Our device provide highly accurate analysis, rapid diagnostics and authentic acetone quantification in the patient's body at any time aimed at prediction of the patient's state and assessing the efficiency of the therapy used. Clinical implementation of the device will improve the health and save lives of many thousands of diabetes sufferers.

  14. Monolithically integrated mid-infrared sensor using narrow mode operation and temperature feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristanic, Daniela; Schwarz, Benedikt; Reininger, Peter; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    A method to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of a monolithically integrated mid-infrared sensor using a distributed feedback laser (DFB) is presented in this paper. The sensor is based on a quantum cascade laser/detector system built from the same epitaxial structure and with the same fabrication approach. The devices are connected via a dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguide with a twofold function: it provides high light coupling efficiency and a strong interaction of the light with the environment (e.g., a surrounding fluid). The weakly coupled DFB quantum cascade laser emits narrow mode light with a FWHM of 2 cm-1 at 1586 cm-1. The room temperature laser threshold current density is 3 kA/cm2 and a pulsed output power of around 200 mW was measured. With the superior laser noise performance, due to narrow mode emission and the compensation of thermal fluctuations, the lower limit of detection was expanded by one order of magnitude to the 10 ppm range.

  15. Turn-On Near-Infrared Fluorescent Sensor for Selectively Imaging Serotonin.

    PubMed

    Hettie, Kenneth S; Glass, Timothy E

    2016-01-20

    A molecular imaging tool that provides for the direct visualization of serotonin would significantly aid in the investigation of neuropsychiatric disorders that are attributed to its neuronal dysregulation. Here, the design, synthesis, and evaluation of NeuroSensor 715 (NS715) is presented. NS715 is the first molecular sensor that exhibits a turn-on near-infrared fluorescence response toward serotonin. Density functional theory calculations facilitated the design of a fluorophore based on a coumarin-3-aldehyde scaffold that derives from an electron-rich 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoxaline framework, which provides appropriate energetics to prevent the hydroxyindole moiety of serotonin from quenching its fluorescence emission. Spectroscopic studies revealed that NS715 produces an 8-fold fluorescence enhancement toward serotonin with an emission maximum at 715 nm. Accompanying binding studies indicated NS715 displays a 19-fold selective affinity for serotonin and a modest affinity for catecholamines over other primary-amine neurotransmitters. The utility of NS715 toward neuroimaging applications was validated by selectively labeling and directly imaging norepinephrine within secretory vesicles using live chromaffin cells, which serve as a model system for specialized neurons that synthesize, package, and release only a single, unique type of neurotransmitter. In addition, NS715 effectively differentiated between cell populations that express distinct neurotransmitter phenotypes. PMID:26521705

  16. Infrared Spectroscope for Electron Bunch-length Measurement: Heat Sensor Parameters Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Domgmo-Momo, Gilles; /Towson U. /SLAC

    2012-09-05

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is used for many experiments. Taking advantage of the free electron laser (FEL) process, scientists of various fields perform experiments of all kind. Some for example study protein folding; other experiments are more interested in the way electrons interact with the molecules before they are destroyed. These experiments among many others have very little information about the electrons x-ray produced by the FEL, except that the FEL is using bunches less than 10 femtoseconds long. To be able to interpret the data collected from those experiments, more accurate information is needed about the electron's bunch-length. Existing bunch length measurement techniques are not suitable for the measurement of such small time scales. Hence the need to design a device that will provide more precise information about the electron bunch length. This paper investigates the use of a pyreoelectric heat sensor that has a sensitivity of about 1.34 micro amps per watt for the single cell detector. Such sensitivity, added to the fact that the detector is an array sensor, makes the detector studied the primary candidate to be integrated to an infrared spectrometer designed to better measure the LCLS electron bunch length.

  17. Simulation of Image Performance Characteristics of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, John; Gerace, Aaron; Brown, Scott; Gartley, Michael; Montanaro, Matthew; Reuter, Dennis C.

    2012-01-01

    The next Landsat satellite, which is scheduled for launch in early 2013, will carry two instruments: the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS). Significant design changes over previous Landsat instruments have been made to these sensors to potentially enhance the quality of Landsat image data. TIRS, which is the focus of this study, is a dual-band instrument that uses a push-broom style architecture to collect data. To help understand the impact of design trades during instrument build, an effort was initiated to model TIRS imagery. The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool was used to produce synthetic "on-orbit" TIRS data with detailed radiometric, geometric, and digital image characteristics. This work presents several studies that used DIRSIG simulated TIRS data to test the impact of engineering performance data on image quality in an effort to determine if the image data meet specifications or, in the event that they do not, to determine if the resulting image data are still acceptable.

  18. Photonically enabled Ka-band radar and infrared sensor subscale testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, Michele B.; Sova, Raymond M.; Funk, Kevin B.; Airola, Marc B.; Dennis, Michael L.; Pavek, Richard E.; Hollenbeck, Jennifer S.; Garrison, Sean K.; Conard, Steven J.; Terry, David H.

    2014-10-01

    A subscale radio frequency (RF) and infrared (IR) testbed using novel RF-photonics techniques for generating radar waveforms is currently under development at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to study target scenarios in a laboratory setting. The linearity of Maxwell's equations allows the use of millimeter wavelengths and scaled-down target models to emulate full-scale RF scene effects. Coupled with passive IR and visible sensors, target motions and heating, and a processing and algorithm development environment, this testbed provides a means to flexibly and cost-effectively generate and analyze multi-modal data for a variety of applications, including verification of digital model hypotheses, investigation of correlated phenomenology, and aiding system capabilities assessment. In this work, concept feasibility is demonstrated for simultaneous RF, IR, and visible sensor measurements of heated, precessing, conical targets and of a calibration cylinder. Initial proof-of-principle results are shown of the Ka-band subscale radar, which models S-band for 1/10th scale targets, using stretch processing and Xpatch models.

  19. Multi-sensor fusion of infrared and electro-optic signals for high resolution night images.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Netravali, Ravi; Man, Hong; Lawrence, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Electro-optic (EO) image sensors exhibit the properties of high resolution and low noise level at daytime, but they do not work in dark environments. Infrared (IR) image sensors exhibit poor resolution and cannot separate objects with similar temperature. Therefore, we propose a novel framework of IR image enhancement based on the information (e.g., edge) from EO images, which improves the resolution of IR images and helps us distinguish objects at night. Our framework superimposing/blending the edges of the EO image onto the corresponding transformed IR image improves their resolution. In this framework, we adopt the theoretical point spread function (PSF) proposed by Hardie et al. for the IR image, which has the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a uniform detector array and the incoherent optical transfer function (OTF) of diffraction-limited optics. In addition, we design an inverse filter for the proposed PSF and use it for the IR image transformation. The framework requires four main steps: (1) inverse filter-based IR image transformation; (2) EO image edge detection; (3) registration; and (4) blending/superimposing of the obtained image pair. Simulation results show both blended and superimposed IR images, and demonstrate that blended IR images have better quality over the superimposed images. Additionally, based on the same steps, simulation result shows a blended IR image of better quality when only the original IR image is available. PMID:23112602

  20. Monolithically integrated mid-infrared sensor using narrow mode operation and temperature feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Ristanic, Daniela; Schwarz, Benedikt Reininger, Peter; Detz, Hermann; Zederbauer, Tobias; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2015-01-26

    A method to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of a monolithically integrated mid-infrared sensor using a distributed feedback laser (DFB) is presented in this paper. The sensor is based on a quantum cascade laser/detector system built from the same epitaxial structure and with the same fabrication approach. The devices are connected via a dielectric-loaded surface plasmon polariton waveguide with a twofold function: it provides high light coupling efficiency and a strong interaction of the light with the environment (e.g., a surrounding fluid). The weakly coupled DFB quantum cascade laser emits narrow mode light with a FWHM of 2 cm{sup −1} at 1586 cm{sup −1}. The room temperature laser threshold current density is 3 kA∕cm{sup 2} and a pulsed output power of around 200 mW was measured. With the superior laser noise performance, due to narrow mode emission and the compensation of thermal fluctuations, the lower limit of detection was expanded by one order of magnitude to the 10 ppm range.

  1. Multi-Sensor Fusion of Infrared and Electro-Optic Signals for High Resolution Night Images

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Netravali, Ravi; Man, Hong; Lawrence, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Electro-optic (EO) image sensors exhibit the properties of high resolution and low noise level at daytime, but they do not work in dark environments. Infrared (IR) image sensors exhibit poor resolution and cannot separate objects with similar temperature. Therefore, we propose a novel framework of IR image enhancement based on the information (e.g., edge) from EO images, which improves the resolution of IR images and helps us distinguish objects at night. Our framework superimposing/blending the edges of the EO image onto the corresponding transformed IR image improves their resolution. In this framework, we adopt the theoretical point spread function (PSF) proposed by Hardie et al. for the IR image, which has the modulation transfer function (MTF) of a uniform detector array and the incoherent optical transfer function (OTF) of diffraction-limited optics. In addition, we design an inverse filter for the proposed PSF and use it for the IR image transformation. The framework requires four main steps: (1) inverse filter-based IR image transformation; (2) EO image edge detection; (3) registration; and (4) blending/superimposing of the obtained image pair. Simulation results show both blended and superimposed IR images, and demonstrate that blended IR images have better quality over the superimposed images. Additionally, based on the same steps, simulation result shows a blended IR image of better quality when only the original IR image is available. PMID:23112602

  2. Near-infrared grating-assisted SPR optical fiber sensors: design rules for ultimate refractometric sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Voisin, Valérie; Albert, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Plasmonic optical fiber sensors are continuously developed for (bio)chemical sensing purposes. Recently, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) generation was achieved in gold-coated tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs). These sensors probe the surrounding medium with near-infrared narrowband resonances, which enhances both the penetration depth of the evanescent field in the external medium and the wavelength resolution of the interrogation. They constitute a unique configuration to probe all the fiber cladding modes individually. We use them to analyze the modal distribution of gold-coated telecommunication-grade optical fibers immersed in aqueous solutions. Theoretical investigations with a finite-difference complex mode solver are confirmed by experimental data obtained on TFBGs. We show that the refractometric sensitivity varies with the mode order and that the global SPR envelope shift in response to surrounding refractive index (SRI) changes higher than 1e-2 RIU (refractive index unit) can be ~25% bigger than the local SPR mode shift arising from SRI changes limited to 1e-4 RIU. We bring clear evidence that the optimum gold thickness for SPR generation lies in the range between 50 and 70 nm while a cladding diameter decrease from 125 µm to 80 µm enhances the refractometric sensitivity by ~20%. Finally, we demonstrate that the ultimate refractometric sensitivity of cladding modes is ~550 nm/RIU when they are probed by gold-coated TFBGs. PMID:25836153

  3. Polarization-selective uncooled infrared sensor using a one-dimensional plasmonic grating absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Takagawa, Yousuke; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-06-01

    A polarization-selective uncooled infrared (IR) sensor has been developed based on a one-dimensional plasmonic grating absorber (1-D PGA). The 1-D PGA has an Au-based one-dimensional periodic grating structure, where photons can be manipulated by surface plasmon resonance. A microelectromechanical systems-based uncooled IR sensor was fabricated using the 1-D PGA with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and micromachining techniques. The 1-D PGA was formed with an Au layer sputtered on a grating pattered SiO2 layer. An Al layer was then introduced onto the backside of the 1-D PGA to reflect scattered light and prevent absorption at the SiO2 backside of the absorber. The responsivity could be selectively enhanced depending on the polarization and the grating direction, and an absorption wavelength longer than the surface period and broadband absorption were realized due to the effect of the resonance in the grating depth direction. The 1-D PGAs enable a detection wavelength longer than the period and broadbandpolarization- selectivity by control of the grating depth in addition to the period. The results obtained in this study will contribute to the advancement of polarimetric IR imaging.

  4. A Noninvasive In Vivo Glucose Sensor Based on Mid-Infrared Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werth, Alexandra; Liakat, Sabbir; Xu, Laura; Gmachl, Claire

    Diabetes affects over 387 million people worldwide; a number which grows every year. The most common method of measuring blood glucose concentration involves a finger prick which for some can be a harrowing process. Therefore, a portable, accurate, noninvasive glucose sensor can significantly improve the quality of life for many of these diabetics who draw blood multiple times a day to monitor their glucose levels. We have implemented a noninvasive, mobile glucose sensor using a mid-infrared (MIR) quantum cascade laser (QCL), integrating sphere, and thermal electrically (TE) cooled detector. The QCL is scanned from 8 - 10 microns wavelength over which are distinct absorption features of glucose molecules with little competition of absorption from other molecules found in the blood and interstitial fluid. The obtained absorption spectra are analyzed using a neural network algorithm which relates the small changes in absorption to the changing glucose concentration. The integrating sphere has increased the signal-to-noise ratio from a previous design, allowing us to use the TE-cooled detector which increases mobility without loss of accuracy.

  5. A minimally invasive chip based near infrared sensor for continuous glucose monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Mohammadi, L.; Sigloch, S.; Frese, I.; Stein, V.; Welzel, K.; Schmitz, F.; Klotzbücher, T.

    2012-06-01

    Assessment of glycaemia in diabetes is crucially important for prevention of both, acute and long term complications. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is certainly the most appropriate way for optimizing the glycaemic control, since it prevents or delays the progression of complications associated with hypo- or hyperglycaemic events, reducing morbidity, mortality, and overall costs in health care systems. In this paper we describe the concept and first in vitro results of a minimally invasive, chip-based NIR-Sensor for continuous glucose monitoring. The sensor concept is based on difference infrared absorption spectroscopy, which was evaluated within laboratory measurements of D+-Glucose dissolved in water. The laboratory measurements revealed a linear relationship between glucose concentration and the integrated difference spectroscopy signal with a coefficient of determination of 99.6% in the concentration range of 0- 500 mg/dL. Suitable wavelength bands were identified in which the correlation is preserved and commercial light sources are available for realisation of a spectrometer-less, integrated NIR-sensor. In the designed sensor the component area (non-disposable) is separated from the detection area (disposable, low-cost). The disposable part of the sensor is fluidically connected to a micro-dialyses needle, accessing glucose subcutaneously via the ISF (interstitial fluid) or intravascularly. The non-disposable part contains all the optical elements, like LED's and photo-detectors. The in- and out-coupling of the optical signal is achieved across the plane of the chip by using total internal reflection on mirrors integrated into the fluidic chip. The glucose is continuously measured by considering the difference signals of light at the corresponding wavelengths, as a function of time or in defined intervals if the light sources are modulated. The in-vitro measurements show an absolute error of about 5 mg/dL with a relative error of 5% for glucose

  6. Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Thermodynamic Profiles on Regional Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Jedlovee, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles with accuracy comparable to that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model using its three-dimension variational (3DVAR) analysis component (WRF-Var). Quality indicators are used to select only the highest quality temperature and moisture profiles for assimilation in both clear and partly cloudy regions. Separate error characteristics for land and water profiles are also used in the assimilation process. Assimilation results indicate that AIRS profiles produce an analysis closer to in situ observations than the background field. Forecasts from a 37-day case study period in the winter of 2007 show that AIRS profile data can lead to improvements in 6-h cumulative precipitation forecasts due to instability added in the forecast soundings by the AIRS profiles. Additionally, in a convective heavy rainfall event from February 2007, assimilation of AIRS profiles produces a more unstable boundary layer resulting in enhanced updrafts in the model. These updrafts produce a squall line and precipitation totals that more closely reflect ground-based observations than a no AIRS control forecast. The location of available high-quality AIRS profiles ahead of approaching storm systems is found to be of paramount importance to the amount of impact the observations will have on the resulting forecasts.

  7. The Impact of Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles on Short-term Weather Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Brad; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William

    2007-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced spacebased atmospheric sounding systems. The combined AlRS/AMSU system provides radiance measurements used to retrieve temperature profiles with an accuracy of 1 K over 1 km layers under both clear and partly cloudy conditions, while the accuracy of the derived humidity profiles is 15% in 2 km layers. Critical to the successful use of AIRS profiles for weather and climate studies is the use of profile quality indicators and error estimates provided with each profile Aside form monitoring changes in Earth's climate, one of the objectives of AIRS is to provide sounding information of sufficient accuracy such that the assimilation of the new observations, especially in data sparse region, will lead to an improvement in weather forecasts. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate highresolution AIRS profile data in a regional analysis/forecast model. The paper will focus on the impact of AIRS profiles on a rapidly developing east coast storm and will also discuss preliminary results for a 30-day forecast period, simulating a quasi-operation environment. Temperature and moisture profiles were obtained from the prototype version 5.0 EOS science team retrieval algorithm which includes explicit error information for each profile. The error profile information was used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture data for every profile location and pressure level for assimilation into the ARPS Data Analysis System (ADAS). The AIRS-enhanced analyses were used as initial fields for the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) system used by the SPORT project for regional weather forecast studies. The ADASWRF system will be run on CONUS domain with an emphasis on the east coast. The preliminary assessment of the impact of the AIRS profiles will focus on quality control issues associated with AIRS

  8. A Simple Drought Product and Indicator Derived from Temperature and Relative Humidity Observed by the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, S. L.; Behrangi, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the United States, drought results in agricultural losses, impacts to industry, power and energy production, natural resources, municipal water supplies and human health making it one of the costliest natural hazards in the nation. Monitoring drought is therefore critical to help local governments, resource managers, and other groups make effective decisions, yet there is no single definition of drought, and because of the complex nature of drought there is no universal best drought indicator. Remote sensing applications in drought monitoring are advantageous due to the large spatial and temporal frequency of observations, leading to a better understanding of the spatial extent of drought and its duration, and in detecting the onset of drought and its intensity. NASA Earth Observing System (EOS)-era data have potential for monitoring and assessing drought and many are already used either directly or indirectly for drought monitoring. Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensor are widely used for agricultural and environmental plant-stress monitoring via the USDM, the VegDRI project and FEWSNet. However there remain underutilized sources of information from NASA satellite observations that may have promise for characterizing and understanding meteorological drought. Once such sensor is NASA's Advanced Infra-Red Sounder (AIRS) aboard the Aqua satellite. AIRS and it's sister sensor the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) that together provide meteorological information of high relevance to meteorological drought, e.g., profiles of water vapor, surface air temperature, and precipitation. Recent work undertaken to develop simple indicators of drought based on temperature and relative humidity from the AIRS suite of instruments is promising. Although there are more sophisticated indicators developed through the application of a variety of

  9. Development of automatic target recognition for infrared sensor-based close-range land mine detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngan, Peter; Garcia, Sigberto A.; Cloud, Eugene L.; Duvoisin, Herbert A., III; Long, Daniel T.; Hackett, Jay K.

    1995-06-01

    Infrared imagery scenes change continuously with environmental conditions. Strategic targets embedded in them are often difficult to be identified with the naked eye. An IR sensor-based mine detector must include Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) to detect and extract land mines from IR scenes. In the course of the ATR development process, mine signature data were collected using a commercial 8-12 (mu) spectral range FLIR, model Inframetrics 445L, and a commercial 3-5 (mu) starting focal planar array FLIR, model Infracam. These sensors were customized to the required field-of-view for short range operation. These baseline data were then input into a specialized parallel processor on which the mine detection algorithm is developed and trained. The ATR is feature-based and consists of several subprocesses to progress from raw input IR imagery to a neural network classifier for final nomination of the targets. Initially, image enhancement is used to remove noise and sensor artifact. Three preprocessing techniques, namely model-based segmentation, multi-element prescreener, and geon detector are then applied to extract specific features of the targets and to reject all objects that do not resemble mines. Finally, to further reduce the false alarm rate, the extracted features are presented to the neural network classifier. Depending on the operational circumstances, one of three neural network techniques will be adopted; back propagation, supervised real-time learning, or unsupervised real-time learning. The Close Range IR Mine Detection System is an Army program currently being experimentally developed to be demonstrated in the Army's Advanced Technology Demonstration in FY95. The ATR resulting from this program will be integrated in the 21st Century Land Warrior program in which the mine avoidance capability is its primary interest.

  10. Dispersive infrared spectroscopy measurements of atmospheric CO₂ using a Fabry-Pérot interferometer sensor.

    PubMed

    Chan, K L; Ning, Z; Westerdahl, D; Wong, K C; Sun, Y W; Hartl, A; Wenig, M O

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, we present the first dispersive infrared spectroscopic (DIRS) measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) using a new scanning Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) sensor. The sensor measures the optical spectra in the mid infrared (3,900 nm to 5,220 nm) wavelength range with full width half maximum (FWHM) spectral resolution of 78.8 nm at the CO2 absorption band (~4,280 nm) and sampling resolution of 20 nm. The CO2 concentration is determined from the measured optical absorption spectra by fitting it to the CO2 reference spectrum. Interference from other major absorbers in the same wavelength range, e.g., carbon monoxide (CO) and water vapor (H2O), was taken out by including their reference spectra in the fit as well. The detailed descriptions of the instrumental setup, the retrieval procedure, a modeling study for error analysis as well as laboratory validation using standard gas concentrations are presented. An iterative algorithm to account for the non-linear response of the fit function to the absorption cross sections due to the broad instrument function was developed and tested. A modeling study of the retrieval algorithm showed that errors due to instrument noise can be considerably reduced by using the dispersive spectral information in the retrieval. The mean measurement error of the prototype DIRS CO2 measurement for 1 minute averaged data is about ±2.5 ppmv, and down to ± 0.8ppmv for 10 minute averaged data. A field test of atmospheric CO2 measurements were carried out in an urban site in Hong Kong for a month and compared to a commercial non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) CO2 analyzer. 10 minute averaged data shows good agreement between the DIRS and NDIR measurements with Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of 0.99. This new method offers an alternative approach of atmospheric CO2 measurement featuring high accuracy, correction of non-linear absorption and interference of water vapor. PMID:24291130

  11. Characterization and validation of methane products from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaozhen; Barnet, Chris; Maddy, Eric; Sweeney, Colm; Liu, Xingpin; Zhou, Lihang; Goldberg, Mitch

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents the characterization and validation of retrievals of atmospheric methane (CH4) vertical profiles by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS/Aqua platform. AIRS channels near 7.6 μm are used for CH4 retrieval, and they are most sensitive to the middle to upper troposphere, i.e., about 200-300 hPa in the tropics and 400-500 hPa in the polar region. The atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, surface skin temperature, and emissivity required to derive CH4 are obtained from retrievals using separate AIRS channels and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). Comparison of AIRS retrieved profiles with some in situ aircraft CH4 profiles implied that the forward model used in the AIRS retrieval system V4.0 required a 2% increase in methane absorption coefficients for strong absorption channels, and this bias adjustment was implemented in the AIRS retrieval system V5.0. As a new operational product in V5.0, AIRS CH4 were validated using in situ aircraft observations at 22 sites of the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division (NOAA/ESRL/GMD), ranging from the Arctic to the tropical South Pacific Ocean, but their altitudes are usually above 300 hPa. The results show the bias of the retrieved CH4 profiles for this version is -1.4˜0.1% and its RMS difference is about 0.5-1.6%, depending on altitude. These validation comparisons provide critical assessment of the retrieval algorithm and will continue using more in situ observations together with future improvement to the retrieval algorithm. AIRS CH4 products include not only the CH4 profile but also the information content. As examples, the products of AIRS CH4 in August 2004 and the difference of CH4 in May and September 2004 are shown. From these results a few features are evident: (1) a large AIRS CH4 plume southwest of the Tibetan plateau that may be associated with deep convection during the Asian summer monsoon; (2) high mixing ratios of AIRS CH4 in

  12. Requirements and methodologies for real-time infrared sensor emulation in hardware-in-the-loop testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; Reynolds, Terry M.

    1998-07-01

    Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing of infrared missile seekers has been a proven method for seeker evaluation for many years. Infrared HWIL testing has two primary modes, projection or injection. With infrared projection HWIL testing, the seeker's optics and detectors are retained as part of the simulation since an infrared scene in the correct waveband is presented to the seeker's optics, and is then detected and processed. When using the injection mode of HWIL testing the infrared scene is injected directly into the seeker's electronics and bypasses the imaging and detection process. When this type of simulation is used it is critical to model the optical and electrical processes that would have degraded the image in a real-world scenario. Real-time modeling of sensor system modulation transfer functions and other forms of image degradation is a computationally intensive task. The types of calculations necessary for real- time sensor modeling often push the processing requirements past the capabilities of standard processors and custom processing hardware is required. This paper discusses solutions to this problem that have been implemented for infrared seekers at the U.S. Army's Aviation and Missile Command's, Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center.

  13. Improving Regional Forecast by Assimilating Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles into WRF Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Brad; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and produce improved forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced space-based atmospheric sounding systems. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate high resolution AIRS profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) version 2.2 using WRF-Var. The paper focuses on development of background error covariances for the regional domain and background type, and an optimal methodology for ingesting AIRS temperature and moisture profiles as separate overland and overwater retrievals with different error characteristics. The AIRS thermodynamic profiles are derived from the version 5.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) science team retrieval algorithm and contain information about the quality of each temperature layer. The quality indicators were used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture data for each profile location and pressure level. The analyses were then used to conduct a month-long series of regional forecasts over the continental U.S. The long-term impacts of AIRS profiles on forecast were assessed against verifying NAM analyses and stage IV precipitation data.

  14. Data Assimilation and Regional Forecasts Using Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary

    2009-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses, which in turn should lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles with an accuracy comparable to that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profiles--obtained from the version 5.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) science team retrieval algorithm-into a regional configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using WRF-Var. The paper focuses on development of background error covariances for the regional domain and background field type, a methodology for ingesting AIRS profiles as separate over-land and over-water retrievals with different error characteristics, and utilization of level-by-level quality indicators to select only the highest quality data. The assessment of the impact of the AIRS profiles on WRF-Var analyses will focus on intelligent use of the quality indicators, optimized tuning of the WRF-Var, and comparison of analysis soundings to radiosondes. The analyses will be used to conduct a month-long series of regional forecasts over the continental U.S. The long-tern1 impact of AIRS profiles on forecast will be assessed against verifying radiosonde and stage IV precipitation data.

  15. Data Assimilation and Regional Forecasts using Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabodsky, Brad; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses, which in turn should lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which, together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles with an accuracy comparable to that of radionsondes. The purpose of this poster is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profiles, obtained from the version 5.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) science team retrieval algorithm, into a regional configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using WRF-Var. The poster focuses on development of background error covariances for the regional domain and background field type, a methodology for ingesting AIRS profiles as separate over-land and over-water retrievals with different error characteristics, and utilization of level-by-level quality indicators to select only the highest quality data. The assessment of the impact of the AIRS profiles on WRF-Var analyses will focus on intelligent use of the quality indicators, optimized tuning of the WRF-Var, and comparison of analysis soundings to radiosondes. The analyses are used to conduct a month-long series of regional forecasts over the continental U.S. The long-term impact of AIRS profiles on forecast will be assessed against NAM analyses and stage IV precipitation data.

  16. Local, regional, and global views of tropospheric carbon monoxide from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, W. Wallace; Yurganov, Leonid

    2008-04-01

    More than five years of CO retrievals from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite reveal variations in tropospheric CO on timescales from twelve hours to five years and on spatial scales from local to global. The shorter timescales are invaluable to monitor daily variations in CO emissions, to enable three-dimensional tracking of atmospheric motions, and to enhance insights into atmospheric mixing. Previous studies have utilized AIRS CO retrievals over the course of days to weeks to track plumes from large forest fires. On the local scale, we will present AIRS observations of pollution from several northern hemisphere Megacities. On the regional scale, we will present AIRS observations of the Mexico City pollution plume. We will illustrate global scale AIRS CO observations of interannual variations linked to the influence of large-scale atmospheric perturbations from the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In particular, we observe a quasi-biennial variation in CO emissions from Indonesia with varying magnitudes in peak emission occurring in 2002, 2004, and 2006. Examining satellite rainfall measurements over Indonesia, we find the enhanced CO emission correlates with occasions of less rainfall during the month of October. Continuing this satellite record of tropospheric CO with measurements from the European IASI instrument will permit construction of a long time-series useful for further investigations of climatological variations in CO emissions and their impact on the health of the atmosphere.

  17. Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) over the Antarctic Plateau: Low Radiance, Low Humidity, and Thin Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of the project has been to use specialized measurements collected at the Antarctic Plateau to provide validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) spectral radiances and some AIRS Level 2 products. As proposed, efforts conducted at the University of Wisconsin are focused on providing technical information, data, and software in support of the validation studies.

  18. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2003-09-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability.

  19. Optical Alignment and Diffraction Analysis for AIRES: An Airborne Infrared Echelle Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The optical design is presented for a long-slit grating spectrometer known as AIRES (Airborne InfraRed Echelle Spectrometer). The instrument employs two gratings in series: a small order sorter and a large steeply blazed echelle. The optical path includes four pupil and four field stops, including two narrow slits. A detailed diffraction analysis is performed using GLAD by Applied Optics Research to evaluate critical trade-offs between optical throughput, spectral resolution, and system weight and volume. The effects of slit width, slit length, oversizing the second slit relative to the first, on- vs off-axis throughput, and clipping at the pupil stops and other optical elements are discussed.

  20. Mid-infrared absorption-spectroscopy-based carbon dioxide sensor network in greenhouse agriculture: development and deployment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianing; Zheng, Lingjiao; Niu, Xintao; Zheng, Chuantao; Wang, Yiding; Tittel, Frank K

    2016-09-01

    A mid-infrared carbon dioxide (CO2) sensor was experimentally demonstrated for application in a greenhouse farm environment. An optical module was developed using a lamp source, a dual-channel pyre-electrical detector, and a spherical mirror. A multi-pass gas chamber and a dual-channel detection method were adopted to effectively enhance light collection efficiency and suppress environmental influences. The moisture-proof function realized by a breathable waterproof chamber was specially designed for the application of such a sensor in a greenhouse with high humidity. Sensor structure of the optical part and electrical part were described, respectively, and related experiments were carried out to evaluate the sensor performance on CO2 concentration. The limit of detection of the sensor is 30 ppm with an absorption length of 30 cm. The relative detection error is less than 5% within the measurement range of 30-5000 ppm. The fluctuations for the long-term (10 h) stability measurements on a 500 ppm CO2 sample and a 2000 ppm CO2 sample are 1.08% and 3.6%, respectively, indicating a good stability of the sensor. A wireless sensor network-based automatic monitoring system was implemented for greenhouse application using multiple mid-infrared CO2 sensor nodes. A monitor software based on LabVIEW was realized via a laptop for real-time environmental data display, storage, and website sharing capabilities. A field experiment of the sensor network was carried out in the town of Shelin in Jilin Province, China, which proved that the whole monitoring system possesses stable sensing performance for practical application under the circumstances of a greenhouse. PMID:27607279

  1. Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Thermodynamic Profiles on Regional Precipitation Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-H.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedloved, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles in clear and cloudy regions with accuracy which approaches that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach to assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model using WRF-Var. Quality indicators are used to select only the highest quality temperature and moisture profiles for assimilation in clear and partly cloudy regions, and uncontaminated portions of retrievals above clouds in overcast regions. Separate error characteristics for land and water profiles are also used in the assimilation process. Assimilation results indicate that AIRS profiles produce an analysis closer to in situ observations than the background field. Forecasts from a 37-day case study period in the winter of 2007 show that AIRS profile data can lead to improvements in 6-h cumulative precipitation forecasts resulting from improved thermodynamic fields. Additionally, in a convective heavy rainfall event from February 2007, assimilation of AIRS profiles produces a more unstable boundary layer resulting in enhanced updrafts in the model. These updrafts produce a squall line and precipitation totals that more closely reflect ground-based observations than a no AIRS control forecast. The location of available high-quality AIRS profiles ahead of approaching storm systems is found to be of paramount importance to the amount of impact the observations will have on the resulting forecasts.

  2. Tapered-fiber-based refractive index sensor at an air/solution interface.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Harris, Jeremie; Wang, Xiaozhen; Lin, Ganbin; Chen, Liang; Bao, Xiaoyi

    2012-10-20

    An approach to achieve refractive index sensing at an air and aqueous glycerol solution interface is proposed using a tapered-fiber-based microfiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MFMZI). Compared to a surrounding uniform medium of air or solutions, the spectral interference visibility of the MFMZI at the air/solution interface is significantly reduced due to a weak coupling between the fundamental cladding mode and high-order asymmetric cladding modes, which are extremely sensitive to the external refractive index. The MFMZI is experimentally demonstrated as an evanescent wave refractive index sensor to measure concentrations of glycerol solutions by monitoring average power attenuation of the tapered fiber. PMID:23089794

  3. Science Highlights and Lessons Learned from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Suda, Jarrod; Licata, Steve

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on the NASA Earth Observing System Aqua spacecraft are facility instruments designed to support measurements of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and a wide range of atmospheric constituents in support of weather forecasting and scientific research in climate and atmospheric chemistry. This paper is an update to the science highlights from a paper by the authors released last year and also looks back at the lessons learned and future needs of the scientific community. These lessons not only include requirements on the measurements, but scientific shortfalls as well. Results from the NASA Science Community Workshop in IR and MW Sounders relating to AIRS and AMSU requirements and concerns are covered and reflect much of what has been learned and what is needed for future atmospheric sounding from Low Earth Orbit.

  4. Infrared pulse characterization using four-wave mixing inside a few cycle pulse filament in air

    SciTech Connect

    Marceau, Claude Thomas, Steven; Kassimi, Yacine; Gingras, Guillaume; Witzel, Bernd

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a four-wave mixing (FWM) technique to measure near- and mid-infrared (IR) laser pulse shapes in time domain. Few cycle 800 nm laser pulses were synchronized with the IR pulse and focused colinearly to generate a plasma filament in air. Second harmonic radiation around 400 nm was generated through FWM, with a yield proportional to the IR pulse intensity. Excellent signal to noise ratio was observed from 2.1 μm to 18 μm. With proper phase stabilization of the IR beam, this technique is a promising step toward direct electric field sensing of near-IR pulses in air.

  5. Thermographic Imaging of the Space Shuttle During Re-Entry Using a Near Infrared Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kerns, Robbie V.; Burke, Eric R.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Spisz, Tom; Gibson, David M.; Shea, Edward J.; Mercer, C. David; Schwartz, Richard J.; Tack, Steve; Bush, Brett C.; Dantowitz, Ronald F.; Kozubal, Marek J.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution calibrated near infrared (NIR) imagery of the Space Shuttle Orbiter was obtained during hypervelocity atmospheric re-entry of the STS-119, STS-125, STS-128, STS-131, STS-132, STS-133, and STS-134 missions. This data has provided information on the distribution of surface temperature and the state of the airflow over the windward surface of the Orbiter during descent. The thermal imagery complemented data collected with onboard surface thermocouple instrumentation. The spatially resolved global thermal measurements made during the Orbiter s hypersonic re-entry will provide critical flight data for reducing the uncertainty associated with present day ground-to-flight extrapolation techniques and current state-of-the-art empirical boundary-layer transition or turbulent heating prediction methods. Laminar and turbulent flight data is critical for the validation of physics-based, semi-empirical boundary-layer transition prediction methods as well as stimulating the validation of laminar numerical chemistry models and the development of turbulence models supporting NASA s next-generation spacecraft. In this paper we provide details of the NIR imaging system used on both air and land-based imaging assets. The paper will discuss calibrations performed on the NIR imaging systems that permitted conversion of captured radiant intensity (counts) to temperature values. Image processing techniques are presented to analyze the NIR data for vignetting distortion, best resolution, and image sharpness. Keywords: HYTHIRM, Space Shuttle thermography, hypersonic imaging, near infrared imaging, histogram analysis, singular value decomposition, eigenvalue image sharpness

  6. Carbon Monoxide Distribution over Peninsular Malaysia from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jaso M.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.

    2009-07-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. It daily coverage of ˜70% of the planet represents a significant evolutionary advance in satellite traces gas remote sensing. AIRS, the part of a large international investment to upgrade the operational meteorological satellite systems, is first of the new generation of meteorological advanced sounders for operational and research use, Providing New Insights into Weather and Climate for the 21st Century. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous, an indoor and outdoor air pollutant, is not a significant greenhouse gas as it absorbs little infrared radiation from the Earth. However, it does have an influence on oxidization in the atmosphere through interaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH), which also react with methane, halocarbons and tropospheric ozone. It produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning, and that it has a role as a smog. The aim of this investigation is to study the (CO) carbon monoxide distribution over Peninsular Malaysia. The land use map of the Peninsular Malaysia was conducted by using CO total column amount, obtained from AIRS data, the map & data was processed and analyzed by using Photoshop & SigmaPlot 11.0 programs and compared for timing of various (day time) (28 August 2005 & 29 August 2007) for both direct comparison and the comparison using the same a priori profile, the CO concentrations in 28/8/2005 higher. The CO maps were generated using Kriging Interpolation technique. This interpolation technique produced high correlation coefficient, R2 and low root mean square error, RMS for CO. This study provided useful information for influence change of CO concentration on varies temperature.

  7. Added value of a geostationary thermal infrared and visible instrument to monitor ozone for air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hache, Emeric; Attié, Jean-Luc; Tourneur, Cyrille; Ricaud, Philippe; Coret, Laurent; Lahoz, William; El Amraoui, Laaziz; Josse, Béatrice; Hamer, Paul; Warner, Juying; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Höpfner, Michael; Spurr, Robert; Natraj, Vijay; Kulawik, Susan; Eldering, Annmarie; Orphal, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    Air quality concerns the atmospheric composition of the lowermost troposphere between the ground and 500 m; it depends on chemical and transport processes and emissions. Air quality has a strong impact on human health, and protecting society from its adverse effects has a high cost (Lahoz et al., 2012). It is thus important to monitor species that are key for air quality - these include ozone, carbon monoxide, NOx and aerosols. In this study we focus on ozone, and compare the capability of two instrument configurations onboard a geostationary (GEO) satellite to sense ozone in the lowermost troposphere (surface and 0-1 km column): 1) in the thermal infrared (GEO TIR), and 2) in the thermal infrared and the visible (GEO TIR+VIS). We consider one week during the Northern Hemisphere summer simulated by the chemical transport model MOCAGE, and use the two GEO instrument configurations to measure ozone. The GEO TIR instrument is described in Claeyman et al. (2011a, b). The GEO TIR+VIS instrument is the GEO TIR instrument with an additional visible Chappuis band to improve the sensitivity of the instrument in the lowermost troposphere. We compare these configurations against each other, and against an ozone reference state and a priori ozone information, to evaluate the benefit of the TIR+VIS in comparison to the TIR in the lowermost troposphere. The results from this work will inform an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) performed to quantify the added value of the GEO TIR+VIS configuration for forecasting air quality conditions.

  8. Performance assessment of future thermal infrared geostationary instruments to monitor air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Dauphin, P.; Dufour, G.; Eremenko, M.; Cuesta, J.; Coman, A.; Forêt, G.; Beekmann, M.; Gaubert, B.; Flaud, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Air quality (AQ) has a recognized onerous impact on human health and the environment, and then on society. It is more and more clear that constantly and efficiently monitoring AQ from space is a valuable step forward towards a more thorough comprehension of pollution processes that can have a relevant impact on the biosphere. In recent years, important progresses in this field have been made, e.g., reliable observations of several pollutants have been obtained, proving the feasibility of monitoring atmospheric composition from space. In this sense, low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal infrared (TIR) space-borne instruments are widely regarded as a useful tool to observe targeted AQ parameters like tropospheric ozone concentrations [1]. However, limitations remain with the current observation systems in particular to observe ozone in the lowermost troposphere (LmT) with a spatial and temporal resolution relevant for monitoring pollution processes at the regional scale. Indeed, LEO instruments are not well adapted to monitor small scale and short term phenomena, owing to their unsatisfactory revisit time. From this point of view, a more satisfactory concept might be based on geostationary (GEO) platforms. Current and planned GEO missions are mainly tailored on meteorological parameters retrieval and do not have sufficient spectral resolutions and signal to noise ratios (SNR) to infer information on trace gases in the LmT. New satellite missions are currently proposed that can partly overcome these limitations. Here we present a group of simulation exercises and sensitivity analyses to set-up future TIR GEO missions adapted to monitor and forecast AQ over Europe, and to evaluate their technical requirements. At this aim, we have developed a general simulator to produce pseudo-observations for different platform/instrument configurations. The core of this simulator is the KOPRA radiative transfer model, including the KOPRAfit inversion module [2]. Note that to assess the

  9. A MEMS-based Air Flow Sensor with a Free-standing Micro-cantilever Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Chia-Yen; Chiang, Che-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a micro-scale air flow sensor based on a free-standing cantilever structure. In the fabrication process, MEMS techniques are used to deposit a silicon nitride layer on a silicon wafer. A platinum layer is deposited on the silicon nitride layer to form a piezoresistor, and the resulting structure is then etched to create a freestanding micro-cantilever. When an air flow passes over the surface of the cantilever beam, the beam deflects in the downward direction, resulting in a small variation in the resistance of the piezoelectric layer. The air flow velocity is determined by measuring the change in resistance using an external LCR meter. The experimental results indicate that the flow sensor has a high sensitivity (0.0284 Ω/ms-1), a high velocity measurement limit (45 ms-1) and a rapid response time (0.53 s).

  10. Mid-infrared point sensor for in situ monitoring of CO2 emissions from large-scale engines.

    PubMed

    Dooly, Gerard; Clifford, John; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber based system that has been developed for the monitoring of carbon dioxide emissions in situ within engines above 500 kW. Conventional sensors, reviewed here, fail to meet monitoring requirements, such as lifespan, accuracy, and robustness. This paper describes a sensor designed as a single point reflective probe configuration using low cost, compact mid-infrared optical components, making it suitable for insertion in large-scale engines including automotive tailpipes. The response of the sensor to carbon dioxide supplied from a cylinder in the laboratory environment is presented, as well as a number of experimental results taken in situ in an exhaust of an automotive diesel engine (smaller than 500 kW). The sensor is shown to have a long term stable operation over a wide range of concentrations (2%-15% CO(2)) with a lower detection limit smaller than the lowest value encountered in modern day engines. PMID:23128714

  11. Source attribution of air pollution by spatial scale separation using high spatial density networks of low cost air quality sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, I.; Bright, V. B.; McLeod, M. W.; Mead, M. I.; Popoola, O. A. M.; Stewart, G. B.; Jones, R. L.

    2015-07-01

    To carry out detailed source attribution for air quality assessment it is necessary to distinguish pollutant contributions that arise from local emissions from those attributable to non-local or regional emission sources. Frequently this requires the use of complex models and inversion methods, prior knowledge or assumptions regarding the pollution environment. In this paper we demonstrate how high spatial density and fast response measurements from low-cost sensor networks may facilitate this separation. A purely measurement-based approach to extract underlying pollution levels (baselines) from the measurements is presented exploiting the different relative frequencies of local and background pollution variations. This paper shows that if high spatial and temporal coverage of air quality measurements are available, the different contributions to the total pollution levels, namely the regional signal as well as near and far field local sources, can be quantified. The advantage of using high spatial resolution observations, as can be provided by low-cost sensor networks, lies in the fact that no prior assumptions about pollution levels at individual deployment sites are required. The methodology we present here, utilising measurements of carbon monoxide (CO), has wide applicability, including additional gas phase species and measurements obtained using reference networks. While similar studies have been performed, this is the first study using networks at this density, or using low cost sensor networks.

  12. The impact of atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) profiles on short-term weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary; Lapenta, William

    2007-04-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced space-based atmospheric sounding systems. Aside from monitoring changes in Earth's climate, one of the objectives of AIRS is to provide sounding information with sufficient accuracy such that the assimilation of the new observations, especially in data sparse regions, will lead to an improvement in weather forecasts. The combined AIRS/AMSU system provides radiance measurements used as input to a sophisticated retrieval scheme which has been shown to produce temperature profiles with an accuracy of 1 K over 1 km layers and humidity profiles with accuracy of 10-15% in 2 km layers in both clear and partly cloudy conditions. The retrieval algorithm also provides estimates of the accuracy of the retrieved values at each pressure level, allowing the user to select profiles based on the required error tolerances of the application. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate high-resolution AIRS profile data in a regional analysis/forecast model. The paper focuses on a U.S. East-Coast cyclone from November 2005. Temperature and moisture profiles-containing information about the quality of each temperature layer-from the prototype version 5.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) science team retrieval algorithm are used in this study. The quality indicators are used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture data for each profile location and pressure level. AIRS data are assimilated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction model using the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS), to produce near-real-time regional weather forecasts over the continental U.S. The preliminary assessment of the impact of the AIRS profiles will focus on intelligent use of the quality indicators, analysis impact, and forecast verification against rawinsondes

  13. Advanced fire observation by the Intelligent Infrared Sensor prototype FOCUS on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel, D.; Haschberger, P.; Tank, V.; Lanzl, F.; Zhukov, B.; Jahn, H.; Briess, K.; Lorenz, E.; Roeser, H.-P.; Ginati, A.; Tobehn, C.; Schulte in den Bäumen, J.; Christmann, U.

    1999-01-01

    Current and planned operational space-borne Earth observation systems provide spatially, radiometrically or temporally crude data for the detection and monitoring of high temperature phenomena on the surface of our planet. High Temperature Events (HTE) very often cause environmental disasters. Such HTE are forest and savannah fires, fires of open coal mines, volcanic activities and others (e.g. fires of oil wells, pipelines etc.). A simultaneous co-registration of a combination of infrared (IR) and visible (VIS) channels is the key for a reliable autonomous on-board detection of High Temperature Events (HTE) on Earth surface, such as vegetation fires and volcano eruptions. This is the main feature of the FOCUS experiment. Furthermore there are ecology-oriented objectives of the FOCUS experiment mainly related to spectrometric/imaging remote inspection and parameter extraction of selected HTEs, and to the assessment of some ecological consequences of HTEs, such as aerosol and gas emission. Based on own experimental work and supported by Co-Investigators from Italy, Greece, France, Spain, Russia and Germany, DLR proposed in 1997 to use the International Space Station (ISS) in its early utilization phase as a platform and test-bed for an Intelligent Infrared Sensor prototype FOCUS of a future Environmental Disaster Recognition Satellite System. FOCUS is considered by ESA as an important mission combining a number of proven technologies and observation techniques to provide the scientific and operational user community with key data for the classification and monitoring of forest fires. FOCUS was selected as one of five European ``Groupings'' to be flown as an externally mounted payload during the early utilisation phase of the ISS. The FOCUS Phase A Study will be performed by OHB-System, DLR and Zeiss from September 1998 until May 1999.

  14. QWIP-based thermal infrared sensor for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhabvala, M.; Reuter, D.; Choi, K.; Jhabvala, C.; Sundaram, M.

    2009-11-01

    The thermal infrared sensor (TIRS) is a QWIP based instrument intended to supplement the Operational Land Imager (OLI) for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) [See Landsat project description at: http://landsathandbook.gsfc.nasa.gov/handbook/handbook_htmls/chapter1/chapter1.html, [1]. The LDCM is planned to be launched in late 2012 and will continue the 35 year legacy of the Landsat program as Landsat 7 degrades. The LDCM is a joint NASA-US Geological Survey (USGS) mission. The TIRS instrument is a far infrared imager operating in the push broom mode with two IR channels: 10.8 μm and 12 μm. The focal plane will contain three 640 × 512 QWIP arrays mounted on a silicon substrate. The readout integrated circuit (ROIC) is intended to be the Indigo 9803. The focal plane operating temperature will be 43 K (nominally). Bandpass filters will define the precise spectral response of the focal plane. Two QWIP designs will be pursued, the corrugated structure and the grating structure. NASA/Goddard, the Army Research Lab and QmagiQ will work closely together to obtain the suite of arrays that will best meet the mission requirements (primarily adequate conversion efficiency at the required wavelengths). This paper will describe the design and fabrication of the TIRS instrument with particular emphasis on the QWIP detectors. The QWIP parameters that are driving the mission requirements include spectral response, dark current, conversion efficiency, read noise, temperature stability, pixel uniformity and pixel yield. Additional mechanical constraints such as co-registration between the three arrays, filter design and assembly and testing will also be discussed.

  15. Bolometric properties of reactively sputtered TiO2-x films for thermal infrared image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Y. Ashok Kumar; Kang, In-Ku; Shin, Young Bong; Lee, Hee Chul

    2015-09-01

    A heat-sensitive layer (TiO2-x ) was successfully deposited by RF reactive magnetron sputtering for infrared (IR) image sensors at different relative mass flow of oxygen gas (R O2) levels. The deposition rate was decreased with an increase in the percentage of R O2 from 3.4% to 3.7%. TiO2-x samples deposited at room temperature exhibited amorphous characteristics. Oxygen deficiency causes a change in the oxidation state and is assumed to decrease the Ti4+ component on the surfaces of TiO2-x films. The oxygen stoichiometry (x) in TiO2-x films decreased from 0.35 to 0.05 with increasing the R O2 level from 3.4% to 3.7%, respectively. In TiO2-x -test-patterned samples, the resistivity decreased with the temperature, confirming the typical semiconducting property. The bolometric properties of the resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR), and the flicker (1/ f) noise parameter were determined at different x values in TiO2-x samples. The rate of TCR dependency with regard to the 1/ f noise parameter is a universal bolometric parameter (β), acting as the dynamic element in a bolometer. It is high when a sample has a relatively low resistivity (0.82 Ω·cm) and a lower 1/ f noise parameter (3.16   ×   10-12). The results of this study indicate that reactively sputtered TiO2-x is a viable bolometric material for uncooled IR image sensor devices.

  16. Advanced shortwave infrared and Raman hyperspectral sensors for homeland security and law enforcement operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueva, Oksana; Nelson, Matthew P.; Gardner, Charles W.; Gomer, Nathaniel R.

    2015-05-01

    Proliferation of chemical and explosive threats as well as illicit drugs continues to be an escalating danger to civilian and military personnel. Conventional means of detecting and identifying hazardous materials often require the use of reagents and/or physical sampling, which is a time-consuming, costly and often dangerous process. Stand-off detection allows the operator to detect threat residues from a safer distance minimizing danger to people and equipment. Current fielded technologies for standoff detection of chemical and explosive threats are challenged by low area search rates, poor targeting efficiency, lack of sensitivity and specificity or use of costly and potentially unsafe equipment such as lasers. A demand exists for stand-off systems that are fast, safe, reliable and user-friendly. To address this need, ChemImage Sensor Systems™ (CISS) has developed reagent-less, non-contact, non-destructive sensors for the real-time detection of hazardous materials based on widefield shortwave infrared (SWIR) and Raman hyperspectral imaging (HSI). Hyperspectral imaging enables automated target detection displayed in the form of image making result analysis intuitive and user-friendly. Application of the CISS' SWIR-HSI and Raman sensing technologies to Homeland Security and Law Enforcement for standoff detection of homemade explosives and illicit drugs and their precursors in vehicle and personnel checkpoints is discussed. Sensing technologies include a portable, robot-mounted and standalone variants of the technology. Test data is shown that supports the use of SWIR and Raman HSI for explosive and drug screening at checkpoints as well as screening for explosives and drugs at suspected clandestine manufacturing facilities.

  17. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging air-flow energy to sustainably power temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Shuhua; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-28

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator with dimensions of 6.7 cm × 4.5 cm × 2 cm and a weight of 42.3 g that consists of two triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and two electromagnetic generators (EMGs) for scavenging air-flow energy. Under an air-flow speed of about 18 m/s, the hybridized nanogenerator can deliver largest output powers of 3.5 mW for one TENG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 8.8 mW/g and 14.6 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 3 MΩ and 1.8 mW for one EMG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 0.3 mW/g and 0.4 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 2 kΩ, respectively. The hybridized nanogenerator can be utilized to charge a capacitor of 3300 μF to sustainably power four temperature sensors for realizing self-powered temperature sensor networks. Moreover, a wireless temperature sensor driven by a hybridized nanogenerator charged Li-ion battery can work well to send the temperature data to a receiver/computer at a distance of 1.5 m. This work takes a significant step toward air-flow energy harvesting and its potential applications in self-powered wireless sensor networks. PMID:25844537

  18. Infrared low-level wind shear work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, Pat

    1988-01-01

    Results of field experiments for the detection of clear air disturbance and low level wind shear utilizing an infrared airborne system are given in vugraph form. The hits, misses and nuisance alarms scores are given. Information is given on the infrared spatial resolution technique. The popular index of aircraft hazard (F= WX over g - VN over AS) is developed for a remote temperature sensor.

  19. Cloud2IR: Infrared thermography and environmental sensors integrated in an autonomoussystem for long term monitoring of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crinière, Antoine; Dumoulin, Jean; Mevel, Laurent; Andrade-Barroso, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    Since late 2014, the project Cloud2SM aims to develop a robust information system able to assess the long term monitoring of civil engineering structures as well as interfacing various sensors and data. Cloud2SM address three main goals, the management of distributed data and sensors network, the asynchronous processing of the data through network and the local management of the sensors themselves [1]. Integrated to this project Cloud2IR is an autonomous sensor system dedicated to the long term monitoring of infrastructures. Past experimentations have shown the need as well as usefulness of such system [2]. Before Cloud2IR an initially laboratory oriented system was used, which implied heavy operating system to be used [3]. Based on such system Cloud2IR has benefited of the experimental knowledge acquired to redefine a lighter architecture based on generics standards, more appropriated to autonomous operations on field and which can be later included in a wide distributed architecture such as Cloud2SM. The sensor system can be divided in two parts. The sensor side, this part is mainly composed by the various sensors drivers themselves as the infrared camera, the weather station or the pyranometers and their different fixed configurations. In our case, as infrared camera are slightly different than other kind of sensors, the system implement in addition an RTSP server which can be used to set up the FOV as well as other measurement parameter considerations. The second part can be seen as the data side, which is common to all sensors. It instantiate through a generic interface all the sensors and control the data access loop (not the requesting). This side of the system is weakly coupled (see data coupling) with the sensor side. It can be seen as a general framework able to aggregate any sensor data, type or size and automatically encapsulate them in various generic data format as HDF5 or cloud data as OGC SWE standard. This whole part is also responsible of the

  20. The Air Sensor Citizen Science Toolbox: A Collaboration in Community Air Quality Monitoring and Mapping?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Project GoalDevelop tools Citizen Scientists can use to assist them in conducting environmental monitoringResearch PlanIdentify a citizen science project as a potential pilot study locationEstablish their pollutant monitoring interestsDevelop a sensor package to meet their needs ...

  1. The Air Sensor Citizen Science Toolbox: A Collaboration in Community Air Quality Monitoring and Mapping

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research in Action: Collect air quality data to characterize near-road/near-source hotspots; Determine potential impact on nearby residences & roadways; Case study of successful use of such data; Relationship between distance to roadways and industrial sources, exposure to...

  2. A barometric pressure sensor based on the air-gap scale effect in a cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh-Dung, Nguyen; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Uchiyama, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2013-09-01

    The most common structure for a conventional barometric pressure sensor consists of a vacuum-sealed cavity and a diaphragm. However, we hypothesize that a simple structure with an unsealed cavity and an ultra-thin cantilever can provide more sensitive measurements. We produced a 300-nm-thick cantilever with a small spring constant, which made the cantilever sensitive to low pressures. We demonstrated that miniaturizing the air-gap of the cantilever enables the sensor to measure barometric pressure changes at a low pressure change rate with a high resolution, which was 1 Pa at 0.05 Hz, and for a gap size of 1.7 μm.

  3. Micromachined Electron-Tunneling Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.; Waltman, Stephen B.

    1993-01-01

    Pneumatic/thermal infrared detectors based partly on Golay-cell concept, but smaller and less fragile. Include containers filled with air or other gas trapped behind diaphragms. Infrared radiation heats sensors, causing gas to expand. Resulting deflections of diaphragms measured by displacement sensors based on principle of electron-tunneling transducers of scanning tunneling microscopes. Exceed sensitivity of all other miniature, uncooled infrared sensors presently available. Expected to include low consumption of power, broadband sensitivity, room-temperature operation, and invulnerability to ionizing radiation.

  4. Pupil and Glint Detection Using Wearable Camera Sensor and Near-Infrared LED Array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Guangyue; Shi, Jiadong

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel pupil and glint detection method for gaze tracking system using a wearable camera sensor and near-infrared LED array. A novel circular ring rays location (CRRL) method is proposed for pupil boundary points detection. Firstly, improved Otsu optimal threshold binarization, opening-and-closing operation and projection of 3D gray-level histogram are utilized to estimate rough pupil center and radius. Secondly, a circular ring area including pupil edge inside is determined according to rough pupil center and radius. Thirdly, a series of rays are shot from inner to outer ring to collect pupil boundary points. Interference points are eliminated by calculating gradient amplitude. At last, an improved total least squares is proposed to fit collected pupil boundary points. In addition, the improved total least squares developed is utilized for the solution of Gaussian function deformation to calculate glint center. The experimental results show that the proposed method is more robust and accurate than conventional detection methods. When interference factors such as glints and natural light reflection are located on pupil contour, pupil boundary points and center can be detected accurately. The proposed method contributes to enhance stability, accuracy and real-time quality of gaze tracking system. PMID:26633416

  5. Shortwave infrared 512 x 2 line sensor for earth resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, J. R.; Pellon, L. E.; Mccarthy, B. M.; Elabd, H.; Moldovan, A. G.; Kosonocky, W. F.; Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.; Tom, D.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the NASA remote-sensing Multispectral Linear Array Program, an edge-buttable 512 x 2 IRCCD line image sensor with 30-micron Pd2Si Schottky-barrier detectors is developed for operation with passive cooling at 120 K in the 1.1-2.5 micron short infrared band. On-chip CCD multiplexers provide one video output for each 512 detector band. The monolithic silicon line imager performance at a 4-ms optical integration time includes a signal-to-noise ratio of 241 for irradiance of 7.2 microwatts/sq cm at 1.65 microns wavelength, a 5000 dynamic range, a modulation transfer function, greater than 60 percent at the Nyquist frequency, and an 18-milliwatt imager chip total power dissipation. Blemish-free images with three percent nonuniformity under illumination and nonlinearity of 1.25 percent are obtained. A five SWIR imager hybrid focal plane was constructed, demonstrating the feasibility of arrays with only a two-detector loss at each joint.

  6. Laboratory design and test procedures for quantitative evaluation of infrared sensors to assess thermal anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.M.; Grot, R.A.; Wood, J.T.

    1985-06-01

    This report presents the description of the laboratory apparatus and preliminary results of the quantitative evaluation of three high-resolution and two low-resolution infrared imaging systems. These systems which are commonly used for building diagnostics are tested under various background temperatures (from -20/sup 0/C to 25/sup 0/C) for their minimum resolvable temperature differences (MRTD) at spatial frequencies from 0.03 to 0.25 cycles per milliradian. The calibration curves of absolute and differential temperature measurements are obtained for three systems. The signal transfer function and line spread function at ambient temperature of another three systems are also measured. Comparisons of the dependence of the MRTD on background temperatures from the measured data with the predicted values given in ASHRAE Standards 101-83 are also included. The dependence of background temperatures for absolute temperature measurements are presented, as well as comparison of measured data and data given by the manufacturer. Horizontal on-axis magnification factors of the geometric transfer function of two systems are also established to calibrate the horizontal axis for the measured line spread function to obtain the modulation transfer function. The variation of the uniformity for horizontal display of these two sensors are also observed. Included are detailed descriptions of laboratory design, equipment setup, and evaluation procedures of each test. 10 refs., 38 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Expansion of Smartwatch Touch Interface from Touchscreen to Around Device Interface Using Infrared Line Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soo-Chul; Shin, Jungsoon; Kim, Seung-Chan; Park, Joonah

    2015-01-01

    Touchscreen interaction has become a fundamental means of controlling mobile phones and smartwatches. However, the small form factor of a smartwatch limits the available interactive surface area. To overcome this limitation, we propose the expansion of the touch region of the screen to the back of the user’s hand. We developed a touch module for sensing the touched finger position on the back of the hand using infrared (IR) line image sensors, based on the calibrated IR intensity and the maximum intensity region of an IR array. For complete touch-sensing solution, a gyroscope installed in the smartwatch is used to read the wrist gestures. The gyroscope incorporates a dynamic time warping gesture recognition algorithm for eliminating unintended touch inputs during the free motion of the wrist while wearing the smartwatch. The prototype of the developed sensing module was implemented in a commercial smartwatch, and it was confirmed that the sensed positional information of the finger when it was used to touch the back of the hand could be used to control the smartwatch graphical user interface. Our system not only affords a novel experience for smartwatch users, but also provides a basis for developing other useful interfaces. PMID:26184202

  8. Demonstration of near-infrared thermography with silicon image sensor cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotrou, Yann; Sentenac, Thierry; Le Maoult, Yannick; Magnan, Pierre; Farre, Jean A.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents a thermal measurement system based on a Silicon image sensor camera operating in the Near Infrared spectral band (0.7-1.1 μm). The goal of the study is to develop a low-cost imaging system which provides an accurate measurement of temperature. A radiometric model is proposed to characterize the camera response by using physical parameters considering the specific spectral band used. After a calibration procedure of the model, measurements of black body temperatures ranging from 300 to 1000°C has been performed. The Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) is lower than +/- 0.18°C at a black body temperature of 600°C. Accurate measurements are provided over the whole temperature range by introducing an automatic exposure time control. The exposure time is adjusted for each frame along the evolution of temperature in order to optimize the temperature sensitivity and the signal-to-noise ratio. The paper also describes the conversion process of the apparent black body temperature to the real temperature of the observed object using its emissivity and surface geometry. The overall method is depicted and the influence of each parameter is analyzed by computing the resulting temperature uncertainty. Finally, preliminary experimental results are presented for monitoring real temperature of moulds in a Super Forming Process (SPF).

  9. Expansion of Smartwatch Touch Interface from Touchscreen to Around Device Interface Using Infrared Line Image Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo-Chul; Shin, Jungsoon; Kim, Seung-Chan; Park, Joonah

    2015-01-01

    Touchscreen interaction has become a fundamental means of controlling mobile phones and smartwatches. However, the small form factor of a smartwatch limits the available interactive surface area. To overcome this limitation, we propose the expansion of the touch region of the screen to the back of the user's hand. We developed a touch module for sensing the touched finger position on the back of the hand using infrared (IR) line image sensors, based on the calibrated IR intensity and the maximum intensity region of an IR array. For complete touch-sensing solution, a gyroscope installed in the smartwatch is used to read the wrist gestures. The gyroscope incorporates a dynamic time warping gesture recognition algorithm for eliminating unintended touch inputs during the free motion of the wrist while wearing the smartwatch. The prototype of the developed sensing module was implemented in a commercial smartwatch, and it was confirmed that the sensed positional information of the finger when it was used to touch the back of the hand could be used to control the smartwatch graphical user interface. Our system not only affords a novel experience for smartwatch users, but also provides a basis for developing other useful interfaces. PMID:26184202

  10. Health sensor for human body by using infrared, acoustic energy and magnetic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jerry

    2013-05-01

    There is a general chain of events that applies to infections. Human body infection could causes by many different types of bacteria and virus in different areas or organ systems. In general, doctor can't find out the right solution/treatment for infections unless some certain types of bacteria or virus are detected. These detecting processes, usually, take few days to one week to accomplish. However, some infections of the body may not be able to detect at first round and the patient may lose the timing to receive the proper treatment. In this works, we base on Chi's theory which is an invisible circulation system existed inside the body and propose a novel health sensor which summarizes human's infrared, acoustic energy and magnetic signature and find out, in minutes, the most possible area or organ system that cause the infection just like what Chi-Kung master can accomplish. Therefore, the detection process by doctor will be shortened and it raises the possibility to give the proper treatment to the patient in the earliest timing.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF OZONE EMISSIONS FROM AIR CLEANERS EQUIPPED WITH OZONE GENERATORS AND SENSOR AND FEEDBACK CONTROL CIRCUITRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper give results of a characterization of ozone emissions from air cleaners equipped with ozone generators and sensor and feedback control circuitry. Ozone emission rates of several consumer appliances, marketed as indoor air treatment or air purification systems, were det...

  12. Near-infrared Laser-induced Temperature Elevation in Optically-trapped Aqueous Droplets in Air.

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Shoji; Ma, Jiang; Fujiwara, Terufumi; Yamauchi, Kunihiro; Kitamura, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared laser-induced temperature elevation in single aqueous ammonium sulfate droplets levitated in air were evaluated by means of laser trapping and Raman spectroscopy. Since the vapor pressure in an aqueous solution droplet should be thermodynamically in equilibrium with that of water in air, the equilibrium size of the droplet varies sensitively through evaporation/condensation of water in accordance with the temperature change of the droplet. In this study, we demonstrated that the changes in the size of an optically levitated aqueous ammonium sulfate droplet were induced by irradiation of a 1064-nm laser beam as a heat source under an optical microscope. Temperature elevation in the droplet was evaluated successfully by means of Raman spectroscopy, and the values determined were shown to be in good agreement with those by the theoretical calculations based on the absorption coefficient of water at 1064-nm and the thermal conductivity of air. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration showing that the absorption coefficient evaluated from changes in the size of optically-trapped aqueous droplets is consistent with that of pure water. PMID:27063715

  13. In vitro glucose measurement using tunable mid-infrared laser spectroscopy combined with fiber-optic sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songlin; Li, Dachao; Chong, Hao; Sun, Changyue; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin

    2013-01-01

    Because mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy is not a promising method to noninvasively measure glucose in vivo, a method for minimally invasive high-precision glucose determination in vivo by mid-IR laser spectroscopy combined with a tunable laser source and small fiber-optic attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor is introduced. The potential of this method was evaluated in vitro. This research presents a mid-infrared tunable laser with a broad emission spectrum band of 9.19 to 9.77μm(1024~1088 cm−1) and proposes a method to control and stabilize the laser emission wavelength and power. Moreover, several fiber-optic ATR sensors were fabricated and investigated to determine glucose in combination with the tunable laser source, and the effective sensing optical length of these sensors was determined for the first time. In addition, the sensitivity of this system was four times that of a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. The noise-equivalent concentration (NEC) of this laser measurement system was as low as 3.8 mg/dL, which is among the most precise glucose measurements using mid-infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, a partial least-squares regression and Clarke error grid were used to quantify the predictability and evaluate the prediction accuracy of glucose concentration in the range of 5 to 500 mg/dL (physiologically relevant range: 30~400 mg/dL). The experimental results were clinically acceptable. The high sensitivity, tunable laser source, low NEC and small fiber-optic ATR sensor demonstrate an encouraging step in the work towards precisely monitoring glucose levels in vivo. PMID:24466493

  14. In vitro glucose measurement using tunable mid-infrared laser spectroscopy combined with fiber-optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Songlin; Li, Dachao; Chong, Hao; Sun, Changyue; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin

    2013-12-17

    Because mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectroscopy is not a promising method to noninvasively measure glucose in vivo, a method for minimally invasive high-precision glucose determination in vivo by mid-IR laser spectroscopy combined with a tunable laser source and small fiber-optic attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor is introduced. The potential of this method was evaluated in vitro. This research presents a mid-infrared tunable laser with a broad emission spectrum band of 9.19 to 9.77[Formula: see text](1024~1088 cm(-1)) and proposes a method to control and stabilize the laser emission wavelength and power. Moreover, several fiber-optic ATR sensors were fabricated and investigated to determine glucose in combination with the tunable laser source, and the effective sensing optical length of these sensors was determined for the first time. In addition, the sensitivity of this system was four times that of a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. The noise-equivalent concentration (NEC) of this laser measurement system was as low as 3.8 mg/dL, which is among the most precise glucose measurements using mid-infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, a partial least-squares regression and Clarke error grid were used to quantify the predictability and evaluate the prediction accuracy of glucose concentration in the range of 5 to 500 mg/dL (physiologically relevant range: 30~400 mg/dL). The experimental results were clinically acceptable. The high sensitivity, tunable laser source, low NEC and small fiber-optic ATR sensor demonstrate an encouraging step in the work towards precisely monitoring glucose levels in vivo. PMID:24466493

  15. Combination of spaceborne sensor(s) and 3-D aerosol models to assess global daily near-surface air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol Particulate Matter (PM), measured by ground-based monitoring stations, is used as a standard by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) to evaluate daily air quality. PM monitoring is particularly important for human health protection because the exposure to suspended particles can contribute, among others, to lung and respiratory diseases and even premature death. However, most of the PM monitoring stations are located close to cities, leaving large areas without any operational data. Satellite remote sensing is well suited for a global coverage of the aerosol load and can provide an independent and supplemental data source to in situ monitoring. Nevertheless, PM at the ground cannot easily be determined from satellite AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) without additional information on the optical/microphysical properties and vertical distribution of the aerosols. The objective of this study is to explore the efficacy and accuracy of combining a 3-D aerosol transport model and satellite remote sensing as a cost-effective approach for estimating ground-level PM on a global and daily basis. The estimation of the near-surface PM will use the vertical distribution (and, if possible, the physicochemical properties) of the aerosols inferred from a transport model and the measured total load of particles in the atmospheric column retrieved by satellite sensor(s). The first step is to select a chemical transport model (CTM) that provides “good” simulated aerosol vertical profiles. A few global (e.g., WRF-Chem-GOCART) or regional (e.g., MM5-CMAQ, PM-CAMx) CTM will be compared during selected airborne campaigns like ARCTAS-CARB (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites- California Air Resources Board). The next step will be to devise an algorithm that combines the satellite and model data to infer PM mass estimates at the ground, after evaluating different spaceborne instruments and possible multi-sensor combinations.

  16. Portable RF-Sensor System for the Monitoring of Air Pollution and Water Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Joonhee; Kim, Jin Young

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring air pollution including the contents of VOC, O3, NO2, and dusts has attracted a lot of interest in addition to the monitoring of water contamination because it affects directly to the quality of living conditions. Most of the current air pollution monitoring stations use the expensive and bulky instruments and are only installed in the very limited area. To bring the information of the air and water quality to the public in real time, it is important to construct portable monitoring systems and distribute them close to our everyday living places. In this work, we have constructed a low-cost portable RF sensor system by using 400 MHz transceiver to achieve this goal. Accuracy of the measurement was comparable to the ones used in the expensive and bulky commercial air pollution forecast systems. PMID:22928151

  17. A near-infrared tip-tilt sensor for the Keck I laser guide star adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wizinowich, Peter; Smith, Roger; Biasi, Roberto; Cetre, Sylvain; Dekany, Richard; Femenia-Castella, Bruno; Fucik, Jason; Hale, David; Neyman, Chris; Pescoller, Dietrich; Ragland, Sam; Stomski, Paul; Andrighettoni, Mario; Bartos, Randy; Bui, Khanh; Cooper, Andrew; Cromer, John; van Dam, Marcos; Hess, Michael; James, Ean; Lyke, Jim; Rodriguez, Hector; Stalcup, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The sky coverage and performance of laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics (AO) systems is limited by the natural guide star (NGS) used for low order correction. This limitation can be dramatically reduced by measuring the tip and tilt of the NGS in the near-infrared where the NGS is partially corrected by the LGS AO system and where stars are generally several magnitudes brighter than at visible wavelengths. We present the design of a near-infrared tip-tilt sensor that has recently been integrated with the Keck I telescope's LGS AO system along with some initial on-sky results. The implementation involved modifications to the AO bench, real-time control system, and higher level controls and operations software that will also be discussed. The tip-tilt sensor is a H2RG-based near-infrared camera with 0.05 arc second pixels. Low noise at high sample rates is achieved by only reading a small region of interest, from 2×2 to 16×16 pixels, centered on an NGS anywhere in the 100 arc second diameter field. The sensor operates at either Ks or H-band using light reflected by a choice of dichroic beamsplitters located in front of the OSIRIS integral field spectrograph.

  18. Refinement of a SPR sensor for application within air-tight buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, Emma; Sommerville, James; Aidoo, Kofi

    2009-08-01

    The development of air-tight buildings to significantly reduce the carbon emissions from buildings is a relatively new building technique. However the side effects of the new approach have not been fully investigated. One potential issue arising is from insufficient ventilation resulting in an increase in poor indoor air quality from exacerbated microbial growth through elevated humidity and temperature. At the moment there is no in situ real-time sensor for the detection of multiple microbes within the built environment. Developing a sensor utilizing the phenomena of Surface Plasmon Resonance as its detection method to continuously monitor in situ multiple microbial species and fungi is being undertaken. The research involves the refinement of the specialised instruments commercially available, simplifying the components and advancing the architecture of the interface allowing for the monitoring of multiple species and a novel output detection method.

  19. Diode laser-based air mass flux sensor for subsonic aeropropulsion inlets.

    PubMed

    Miller, M F; Kessler, W J; Allen, M G

    1996-08-20

    An optical air mass flux sensor based on a compact, room-temperature diode laser in a fiber-coupled delivery system has been tested on a full-scale gas turbine engine. The sensor is based on simultaneous measurements of O(2) density and Doppler-shifted velocity along a line of sight across the inlet duct. Extensive tests spanning engine power levels from idle to full afterburner demonstrate accuracy and precision of the order of 1-2% of full scale in density, velocity, and mass flux. The precision-limited velocity at atmospheric pressure was as low as 40 cm/s. Multiple data-reduction procedures are quantitatively compared to suggest optimal strategies for flight sensor packages. PMID:21102916

  20. Spatio-temporal aggregation of European air quality observations in the Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasch, Christoph; Foerster, Theodor; Autermann, Christian; Pebesma, Edzer

    2012-10-01

    An increasing amount of observations from different applications such as long-term environmental monitoring or disaster management is published in the Web using Sensor Web technologies. The standardization of these technologies eases the integration of heterogeneous observations into several applications. However, as observations differ in spatio-temporal coverage and resolution, aggregation of observations in space and time is needed. We present an approach for spatio-temporal aggregation in the Sensor Web using the Geoprocessing Web. In particular, we define a tailored observation model for different aggregation levels, a process model for aggregation processes and a Spatio-Temporal Aggregation Service. The presented approach is demonstrated by a case study of delivering aggregated air quality observations on-demand in the Sensor Web.

  1. Development of a Zirconia-Based Electrochemical Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, E; Mukundan, R; Lujan, R; Garzon, F; Woo, L; Worsley, M; Glass, B

    2008-07-16

    Mixed potential sensors utilizing a machined, dense indium-tin oxide working electrode (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:SnO{sub 2}; 90%:10%), a Pt wire counter electrode, and porous YSZ electrolyte were prepared using ceramic tape casting methods. The response of these devices to hydrogen concentrations up to 2% in air were studied from 600 to 740 C. The sensor response exhibited a reversible behavior and a fast response time with sensitivity increasing with decreasing temperature. GC analysis confirmed significant heterogeneous oxidation of the H{sub 2} on heated furnace tube wall surfaces thus driving sensor response at H{sub 2} concentrations greater than a few hundred ppm. The transition to a cold wall, miniature platform heater significantly reduced hydrogen oxidation although some flow rate dependence remains.

  2. Diode laser-based air mass flux sensor for subsonic aeropropulsion inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michael F.; Kessler, William J.; Allen, Mark G.

    1996-08-01

    An optical air mass flux sensor based on a compact, room-temperature diode laser in a fiber-coupled delivery system has been tested on a full-scale gas turbine engine. The sensor is based on simultaneous measurements of O 2 density and Doppler-shifted velocity along a line of sight across the inlet duct. Extensive tests spanning engine power levels from idle to full afterburner demonstrate accuracy and precision of the order of 1 2 of full scale in density, velocity, and mass flux. The precision-limited velocity at atmospheric pressure was as low as 40 cm s. Multiple data-reduction procedures are quantitatively compared to suggest optimal strategies for flight sensor packages.

  3. Ram-air sample collection device for a chemical warfare agent sensor

    DOEpatents

    Megerle, Clifford A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2002-01-01

    In a surface acoustic wave sensor mounted within a body, the sensor having a surface acoustic wave array detector and a micro-fabricated sample preconcentrator exposed on a surface of the body, an apparatus for collecting air for the sensor, comprising a housing operatively arranged to mount atop the body, the housing including a multi-stage channel having an inlet and an outlet, the channel having a first stage having a first height and width proximate the inlet, a second stage having a second lower height and width proximate the micro-fabricated sample preconcentrator, a third stage having a still lower third height and width proximate the surface acoustic wave array detector, and a fourth stage having a fourth height and width proximate the outlet, where the fourth height and width are substantially the same as the first height and width.

  4. Performance modeling and assessment of infrared-sensors applicable for TALOS project UGV as a function of target/background and environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbe, Stephane; Krapez, Jean-Claude; Louvet, Yolande

    2012-06-01

    TALOS (Transportable and Autonomous Land bOrder Surveillance system - www.talos-border.eu) is an international research project co-funded from EU 7th Framework Program funds in Security priority. The main objective of TALOS project is to develop and field test the innovative concept of a mobile, autonomous system for protecting European land borders. Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) are major components of TALOS project. The UGVs will be equipped with long range radar for detection of moving vehicle and people, as well as long focal length EO/IR sensors allowing the operator to recognize and identify the detected objects of interest. Furthermore medium focal length IR sensors are used to allow the operator to drive the UGV. Those sensors must fulfill mission requirements for extremely various environmental conditions (backgrounds, topographic characteristics, climatic conditions, weather conditions) existing from Finland in the North and Bulgaria / Turkey in the South of Europe. An infrared sensor performance model was developed at ONERA in order to evaluate target detection, recognition and identification range for several simulations cases representative of the whole environmental variability domain. Results analysis allows assessing the operability domain of the infrared sensors. This paper presents the infrared sensor performance evaluation methodology and the synthesis of a large number of simulation results applied to two infrared sensors of interest: a medium / long range cooled MWIR sensor for observation and a short / medium uncooled LWIR sensor for navigation.

  5. Computer modeling of the sensitivity of a laser water vapor sensor to variations in temperature and air speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, George F.

    1994-01-01

    Currently, there is disagreement among existing methods of determining atmospheric water vapor concentration at dew-points below -40 C. A major source of error is wall effects which result from the necessity of bringing samples into the instruments. All of these instruments also have response times on the order of seconds. NASA Langley is developing a water vapor sensor which utilizes the absorption of the infrared radiation produced by a diode laser to estimate water vapor concentration. The laser beam is directed through an aircraft window to a retroreflector located on an engine. The reflected beam is detected by an infrared detector located near the laser. To maximize signal to noise, derivative signals are analyzed. By measuring the 2f/DC signal and correcting for ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure and air speed (which results in a Doppler shifting of the laser beam), the water vapor concentration can be retrieved. Since this is an in situ measurement there are no wall effects and measurements can be made at a rate of more than 20 per second. This allows small spatial variations of water vapor to be studied. In order to study the sensitivity of the instrument to variations in temperature and air speed, a computer program which generated the 2f, 3f, 4f, DC and 2f/DC signals of the instrument as a function of temperature, pressure and air speed was written. This model was used to determine the effect of errors in measurement of the temperature and air speed on the measured water vapor concentration. Future studies will quantify the effect of pressure measurement errors, which are expected to be very small. As a result of these studied, a retrieval algorithm has been formulated, and will be applied to data taken during the PEM-West atmospheric science field mission. Spectroscopic studies of the water vapor line used by the instrument will be used to refine this algorithm. To prepare for these studies, several lasers have been studied to determine their

  6. Two-photon vibrational excitation of air by long-wave infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Peñano, J.; Johnson, L. A.; Hafizi, B.; Wahlstrand, J. K.; Milchberg, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrashort long-wave infrared (LWIR) laser pulses can resonantly excite vibrations in N2 and O2 through a two-photon transition. The absorptive vibrational component of the ultrafast optical nonlinearity grows in time, starting smaller than but quickly surpassing the electronic, rotational, and vibrational refractive components. The growth of the vibrational component results in a novel mechanism of third-harmonic generation, providing an additional two-photon excitation channel, fundamental + third harmonic. The original and emergent two-photon excitations drive the resonance exactly out of phase, causing spatial decay of the absorptive vibrational nonlinearity. This nearly eliminates two-photon vibrational absorption. Here we present simulations and analytical calculations demonstrating how these processes modify the ultrafast optical nonlinearity in air. The results reveal nonlinear optical phenomena unique to the LWIR regime of ultrashort pulse propagation in the atmosphere.

  7. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2001-08-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) lab currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, LASERs, flares, and lamp-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include real missile seeker hardware mounted in a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. The simulations of aircraft signatures and IR countermeasures are accomplished by using eight xenon arc lamps, located in 9' X 3' cylindrical housings, in the presentation foreground. A mirror system keeps the high intensity IR sources in the missile field of view. Range closure is simulated in the background by zooming in on the scene and in the foreground by separating and controlling the irises of the arc lamp sources for proper spatial and intensity characteristics. All relative motion and range closure is controlled by missile flyout software and aircraft flight-profile software models.

  8. Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Shepherd, Seth D.

    2004-08-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  9. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.; Deyo, Charles R.; Longbottom, Jeff A.; White, Jason C.

    2005-05-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares, and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  10. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Grauvogel, Nathanael L.; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.

    2006-05-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares, and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combine the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  11. Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  12. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R. ); Schmalz, H. Thermal Surveys, Inc., Rockford, IL )

    1992-01-01

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated.

  13. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R.; Schmalz, H. |

    1992-11-01

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated.

  14. MEMS Microphone Array Sensor for Air-Coupled Impact-Echo

    PubMed Central

    Groschup, Robin; Grosse, Christian U.

    2015-01-01

    Impact-Echo (IE) is a nondestructive testing technique for plate like concrete structures. We propose a new sensor concept for air-coupled IE measurements. By using an array of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) microphones, instead of a single receiver, several operational advantages compared to conventional sensing strategies in IE are achieved. The MEMS microphone array sensor is cost effective, less sensitive to undesired effects like acoustic noise and has an optimized sensitivity for signals that need to be extracted for IE data interpretation. The proposed sensing strategy is justified with findings from numerical simulations, showing that the IE resonance in plate like structures causes coherent surface displacements on the specimen under test in an area around the impact location. Therefore, by placing several MEMS microphones on a sensor array board, the IE resonance is easier to be identified in the recorded spectra than with single point microphones or contact type transducers. A comparative measurement between the array sensor, a conventional accelerometer and a measurement microphone clearly shows the suitability of MEMS type microphones and the advantages of using these microphones in an array arrangement for IE. The MEMS microphone array will make air-coupled IE measurements faster and more reliable. PMID:26121610

  15. MEMS Microphone Array Sensor for Air-Coupled Impact-Echo.

    PubMed

    Groschup, Robin; Grosse, Christian U

    2015-01-01

    Impact-Echo (IE) is a nondestructive testing technique for plate like concrete structures. We propose a new sensor concept for air-coupled IE measurements. By using an array of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) microphones, instead of a single receiver, several operational advantages compared to conventional sensing strategies in IE are achieved. The MEMS microphone array sensor is cost effective, less sensitive to undesired effects like acoustic noise and has an optimized sensitivity for signals that need to be extracted for IE data interpretation. The proposed sensing strategy is justified with findings from numerical simulations, showing that the IE resonance in plate like structures causes coherent surface displacements on the specimen under test in an area around the impact location. Therefore, by placing several MEMS microphones on a sensor array board, the IE resonance is easier to be identified in the recorded spectra than with single point microphones or contact type transducers. A comparative measurement between the array sensor, a conventional accelerometer and a measurement microphone clearly shows the suitability of MEMS type microphones and the advantages of using these microphones in an array arrangement for IE. The MEMS microphone array will make air-coupled IE measurements faster and more reliable. PMID:26121610

  16. Comparison of Methane Data Products from the TES and AIRS Infrared Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, T. J.; Pagano, T. S.; Worden, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas with a highly positive radiative forcing of 0.48 W/m2 (IPCC 2013). Global concentrations of methane have been steadily increasing since 2007 (Bruhwiler 2014), raising concerns about methane's impact on the future global climate. For about the last decade, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft has been detecting several trace gas species in the troposphere including methane. The goal of this study is to compare TES methane retrievals to that of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua spacecraft so that scientific investigations may be transferred from TES to AIRS. The two instruments fly in the afternoon constellation (A-Train), providing numerous coincident measurements for comparison. In addition, they also have a similar spectral range, (3.3 to 15.4 µm) for TES (Beer, 2006) and (3.7 to 15.4 µm) for AIRS (Chahine, 2006), making both instruments sensitive to the mid and upper troposphere. This makes them ideal candidates to compare methane data products. However, because AIRS spectral resolution is lower than that of the TES, there may be a difference in vertical sensitivity. In addition, the retrieval techniques and error characteristics are different for the two data sets. The current state of validation for these data products will be presented. To identify conditions in which the data sets agree and dis agree, we present global maps of methane concentrations from monthly level 3 (L3) data products. We also investigate the temporal stability between the two datasets by comparing global zonal averages derived from L3 over the last decade. Finally, we compare L2 retrieval profiles from representative granules in the tropical, mid-latitude and northern latitudes.

  17. Reflectance Infrared Spectroscopy on Operating Surface Acoustic Wave Chemical Sensors During Exposure to Gas-Phase Analytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hierlemann, A.; Hill, M.; Ricco, A.J.; Staton, A.W.; Thomas, R.C.

    1999-01-11

    We have developed instrumentation to enable the combination of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor measurements with direct, in-situ molecular spectroscopic measurements to understand the response of the SAW sensors with respect to the interfacial chemistry of surface-confined sensing films interacting with gas-phase analytes. Specifically, the instrumentation and software was developed to perform in-situ Fourier-transform infrared external-reflectance spectroscopy (FTIR-ERS) on operating SAW devices during dosing of their chemically modified surfaces with analytes. By probing the surface with IR spectroscopy during gas exposure, it is possible to understand in unprecedented detail the interaction processes between the sorptive SAW coatings and the gaseous analyte molecules. In this report, we provide details of this measurement system, and also demonstrate the utility of these combined measurements by characterizing the SAW and FTIR-ERS responses of organic thin-film sensor coatings interacting with gas-phase analytes.

  18. Online analysis of H2S and SO2 via advanced mid-infrared gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Petruci, João Flavio da Silveira; Wilk, Andreas; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2015-10-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are among the most prevalent emitted pollutants in urban and rural atmospheres. Mainly because of the versatility of sulfur regarding its oxidation state (2- to 6+), VSCs are present in a wide variety of redox-environments, concentration levels, and molar ratios. Among the VSCs, hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide are considered most relevant and have simultaneously been detected within naturally and anthropogenically caused emission events (e.g., volcano emissions, food production and industries, coal pyrolysis, and various biological activities). Next to their presence as pollutants, changes within their molar ratio may also indicate natural anomalies. Prior to analysis, H2S- and SO2-containing samples are usually preconcentrated via solid sorbents and are then detected by gas chromatographic techniques. However, such analytical strategies may be of limited selectivity, and the dimensions and operation modalities of the involved instruments prevent routine field usage. In this contribution, we therefore describe an innovative portable mid-infrared chemical sensor for simultaneously determining and quantifying gaseous H2S and SO2 via coupling a substrate-integrated hollow waveguides (iHWG) serving as a highly miniaturized mid-infrared photon conduit and gas cell with a custom-made preconcentration tube and an in-line UV-converter device. Both species were collected onto a solid sorbent within the preconcentrator and then released by thermal desorption into the UV-device. Hydrogen sulfide is detected by UV-assisted quantitative conversion of the rather weak IR-absorber H2S into SO2, which provides a significantly more pronounced and distinctively detectable rovibrational signature. Modulation of the UV-device system (i.e., UV-lamp on/off) enables discriminating between SO2 generated from H2S conversion and abundant SO2 signals. After optimization of the operational parameters, calibrations in the range of 0.75-10 ppmv with a limit

  19. Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) Instrument Thermal Subsystem Design and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otero, Veronica; Mosier, Carol; Neuberger, David

    2013-01-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) is one of two instruments on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), which is scheduled to launch in February of 2013. The TIRS instrument was officially added to the mission later in the flow, which led to a highly aggressive schedule that became one of the main drivers during instrument development. The thermal subsystem design of the TIRS Sensor Unit is comprised of five thermal zones which range in temperature from less than 43 Kelvin to 330 Kelvin. Most zones are proportional heater controlled, and all are within a volume of 35 cu.ft. A two-stage cryocooler is used to cool the "cold stage" including three QWIP detectors to less than 43 Kelvin, and cool the "warm stage" to 105 Kelvin. The excess power dissipation from the cryocooler is rejected via ammonia transport heat pipes to a dedicated Cryocooler Radiator with embedded ammonia heat pipes. The cryogenic subsystem includes a series of shells used to radiatively and conductively isolate the cold stage from the warmer surroundings. The Optical System (telescope) is passively cooled to 180-190 Kelvin using a "thermal link" (comprised of a Flexible Conductive Thermal Strap and an APG Bar) which couples the telescope stage to a dedicated radiator with embedded ethane heat pipes. The Scene Select Mechanism, which is responsible for moving the Scene Select Mirror to three distinct positions (including Nadir, Space, and On-board Black Body Calibrator pointing), runs nominally at 278 Kelvin and is thermally isolated from the cryogenic thermal zones. The On-board Black Body Calibrator requires a dedicated radiator which allows for a temperature range of 260-330 Kelvin at the Source. The detectors are powered by the FPE Box, which is mounted to the nadir external surface of the composite honeycomb structure. There are two additional electronics boxes which are wet-mounted directly to the spacecraft shear panel, the Main Electronics Box and Cryocooler Electronics Box; thermal

  20. Thermographic imaging of the space shuttle during re-entry using a near-infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kerns, Robbie V.; Burke, Eric R.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Spisz, Tom; Gibson, David M.; Shea, Edward J.; Mercer, C. David; Schwartz, Richard J.; Tack, Steve; Bush, Brett C.; Dantowitz, Ronald F.; Kozubal, Marek J.

    2012-06-01

    High resolution calibrated near infrared (NIR) imagery of the Space Shuttle Orbiter was obtained during hypervelocity atmospheric re-entry of the STS-119, STS-125, STS-128, STS-131, STS-132, STS-133, and STS-134 missions. This data has provided information on the distribution of surface temperature and the state of the airflow over the windward surface of the Orbiter during descent. The thermal imagery complemented data collected with onboard surface thermocouple instrumentation. The spatially resolved global thermal measurements made during the Orbiter's hypersonic re-entry will provide critical flight data for reducing the uncertainty associated with present day ground-to-flight extrapolation techniques and current state-of-the-art empirical boundary-layer transition or turbulent heating prediction methods. Laminar and turbulent flight data is critical for the validation of physics-based, semi-empirical boundary-layer transition prediction methods as well as stimulating the validation of laminar numerical chemistry models and the development of turbulence models supporting NASA's next-generation spacecraft. In this paper we provide details of the NIR imaging system used on both air and land-based imaging assets. The paper will discuss calibrations performed on the NIR imaging systems that permitted conversion of captured radiant intensity (counts) to temperature values. Image processing techniques are presented to analyze the NIR data for vignetting distortion, best resolution, and image sharpness.

  1. A Portable Low-Cost High Density Sensor Network for Air Quality at London Heathrow Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popoola, Olalekan; Mead, Iq; Bright, Vivien; Baron, Ronan; Saffell, John; Stewart, Gregor; Kaye, Paul; Jones, Roderic

    2013-04-01

    Outdoor air quality and its impact on human health and the environment have been well studied and it has been projected that poor air quality will surpass poor sanitation as the major course of environmental premature mortality by 2050 (IGAC / IGBP, release statement, 2012). Transport-related pollution has been regulated at various levels by enactment of legislations at local, national, regional and global stages. As part of the mitigation measures, routine measurements of atmospheric pollutants such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have to be established in areas where air quality problems are identified. In addition, emission inventories are also generated for different atmospheric environments including urban areas and airport environments required for air quality models. Whilst recognising that most of the existing sparse monitoring networks provide high temporal measurements, spatial data of these highly variable pollutants are not captured, making it difficult to adequately characterise the highly heterogeneous air quality. Spatial information is often obtained from model data which can only be constrained using measurements from the sparse monitoring networks. The work presented here shows the application of low-cost sensor networks aimed at addressing this missing spatial information. We have shown in previous studies the application of low-cost electrochemical sensor network instruments in monitoring road transport pollutants including CO, NO and NO2 in an urban environment (Mead et. al. 2012, accepted Atmospheric Environment). Modified versions of these instruments which include additional species such as O3, SO2, VOCs and CO2 are currently deployed at London Heathrow Airport (LHR) as part of the Sensor Network for Air Quality (SNAQ) project. Meteorology data such as temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction are also measured as well as size-speciated particulates (0.38 to 17.4 µm). A network of 50

  2. Assimilation of Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles using WRF-Var

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Brad; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William

    2008-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model contains a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) assimilation system (WRF-Var), which allows a user to join data from multiple sources into one coherent analysis. WRF-Var combines observations with a background field traditionally generated using a previous model forecast through minimization of a cost function. In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations may be able to improve analyses and produce improved forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced space-based atmospheric sounding systems. The combined AIRS/AMSU system provides radiance measurements used as input to a sophisticated retrieval scheme which has been shown to produce temperature profiles with an accuracy of 1 K over 1 km layers and humidity profiles with accuracy of 15% in 2 km layers in both clear and partly cloudy conditions. The retrieval algorithm also provides estimates of the accuracy of the retrieved values at each pressure level, allowing the user to select profiles based on the required error tolerances of the application. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate high-resolution AIRS profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) version 2.2 using WRF-Var. The paper focuses on development of background error covariances for the regional domain and background field type using gen_be and an optimal methodology for ingesting AIRS temperature and moisture profiles as separate overland and overwater retrievals with different error characteristics in the WRF-Var. The AIRS thermodynamic profiles are obtained from the version 5.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) science team retrieval algorithm and contain information about the quality of each temperature layer. The quality indicators are used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture

  3. Liquid-air based Fabry-Pérot cavity on fiber tip sensor.

    PubMed

    Llera, Miguel; Aellen, Thierry; Hervas, Javier; Salvadé, Yves; Senn, Pascal; Le Floch, Sébastien; Keppner, Herbert

    2016-04-18

    This paper presents a Fabry-Perot fiber tip sensor based on an air-liquid filled cavity. The cavity is sealed off by a thin gold coated membrane of parylene C, between 300 and 350 nm, creating a particularly flexible diaphragm. In order to retrieve and track the cavity of interest from other cavities formed within the sensor tip, a signal processing of the feedback signal is performed by inverse fast Fourier transform. The experimental sensor has been manufactured and tested for temperature, giving cavity length sensitivities of 6.1 nm/°C and 9.6 nm/°C for temperature increase and decrease respectively. The external gas pressure response gives a sensitivity of 15 nm/kPa. The fiber sensor has also been adapted for force sensing after silicone embedment and has shown a sensitivity of about 8.7 nm/mN. Finally, the sensor has been tested on insertion into a human temporal bone, proving that it could be an interesting candidate for insertion force monitoring for robotic cochlear implantation. PMID:27137244

  4. Air-dropped sensor network for real-time high-fidelity volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Huang, R.; Xu, M.; Ma, A.; Shirazi, B.; LaHusen, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design and deployment experience of an air-dropped wireless sensor network for volcano hazard monitoring. The deployment of five stations into the rugged crater of Mount St. Helens only took one hour with a helicopter. The stations communicate with each other through an amplified 802.15.4 radio and establish a self-forming and self-healing multi-hop wireless network. The distance between stations is up to 2 km. Each sensor station collects and delivers real-time continuous seismic, infrasonic, lightning, GPS raw data to a gateway. The main contribution of this paper is the design and evaluation of a robust sensor network to replace data loggers and provide real-time long-term volcano monitoring. The system supports UTC-time synchronized data acquisition with 1ms accuracy, and is online configurable. It has been tested in the lab environment, the outdoor campus and the volcano crater. Despite the heavy rain, snow, and ice as well as gusts exceeding 120 miles per hour, the sensor network has achieved a remarkable packet delivery ratio above 99% with an overall system uptime of about 93.8% over the 1.5 months evaluation period after deployment. Our initial deployment experiences with the system have alleviated the doubts of domain scientists and prove to them that a low-cost sensor network system can support real-time monitoring in extremely harsh environments. Copyright 2009 ACM.

  5. Hurricane Frances as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) - Total Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Born in the Atlantic, Hurricane Frances became a category 4 hurricane on August 31, 2004. Expectations are the hurricane will hit the Space Coast of Florida in Brevard County early Sunday morning.

    This movie is a time-series of maps that show AIRS observations of the total amount of water vapor present in the atmospheric column above each point of the Earth's surface. If all the water vapor in the column were forced to fall as rain, the depth of the resulting puddle on the surface at that point is equal to the value shown on the map. Fifty millimeters (mm) is about 2 inches. The large band of maximum water vapor in the neighborhood of the equator is the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), a region of strong convection and powerful thunderstorms.

    This movie shows the total precipitable water vapor from August 23 through September 2, 2004. You can see Hurricane Frances as it moves through the Caribbean toward Florida, and the changes in intensity are visible. The eye has been marked with a red spot. The water vapor encompassed by the hurricane is also the result of the very strong convection which is an integral part of the formation and intensification of tropical storms. If you look at the last frame of the movie in the lower right corner, you can see the emergence of a new tropical storm. Ivan makes its debut in the Atlantic.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft

  6. Real-time short-wave infrared hyperspectral conformal imaging sensor for the detection of threat materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Matthew P.; Shi, Lei; Zbur, Lucas; Priore, Ryan J.; Treado, Patrick J.

    2016-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) systems can provide sensitive and specific detection and identification of high value targets in the presence of complex backgrounds. However, current generation sensors are typically large and costly to field, and do not usually operate in real-time. Sensors that are capable of real-time operation have to compromise on the number of spectral bands, image definition, and/or the number of targets being detected. Additionally, these systems command a high cost and are typically designed and configured for specific mission profiles, making them unable to adapt to multiple threats within often rapidly evolving and dynamic missions. Despite these shortcomings, HSI-based sensors have proven to be valuable tools, thus resulting in increased demand for HSI technology. A cost-effective sensor system that can easily and quickly adapt to accomplish significantly different tasks in a changing environment is highly desirable. The capability to detect and identify user-defined targets in complex backgrounds under a range of varying conditions with an easily reconfigured, automated, real-time, portable HSI sensor is a critical need. ChemImage Sensor Systems (CISSTM) is developing a novel real-time, adaptable, compressive sensing short-wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging technology called the Reconfigurable Conformal Imaging Sensor (RCIS). RCIS will address many shortcomings of current generation systems and offer improvements in operational agility and detection performance, while addressing sensor weight, form factor and cost needs. This paper discusses the development of the RCIS system, and considers its application in various use scenarios.

  7. Global and Regional Seasonal Variability of Mid-Tropospheric CO2 as Measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Olsen, Edward T.; Nguyen, Hai

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua Spacecraft, launched on May 4, 2002 into a near polar sun-synchronous orbit. AIRS has 2378 infrared channels ranging from 3.7 ?m to 15.4 ?m and a 13.5 km footprint at nadir. AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), produces temperature profiles with 1K/km accuracy on a global scale, as well as water vapor profiles and trace gas amounts for CO2, CO, SO2, O3 and CH4. AIRS CO2 climatologies have been shown to be useful for identifying anomalies associated with geophysical events such as El Nino-Southern Oscillation or Madden-Julian oscillation. In this study, monthly representations of mid-tropospheric CO2 are constructed from 10 years of AIRS Version 5 monthly Level 3 data. We compare the AIRS mid-tropospheric CO2 representations to ground-based measurements from the Scripps and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Modeling and Diagnostics Laboratory (NOAA CMDL) ground networks to better understand the phase lag of the CO2 seasonal cycle between the surface and middle troposphere. Results show only a small phase lag in the tropics that grows to approximately two months in the northern latitudes.

  8. Measurement of Respiration, Heart Beat and Body Movement on a Bed Using Dynamic Air-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Hiroaki; Takashima, Mitsuru; Okawai, Hiroaki

    In this study, the possibility of the measurement of respiration, heart beat, and body movement on a bed was examined using the dynamic air-pressure sensor aiming at a daily health monitoring. The dynamic air-pressure sensor measures vital information using a change of air pressure. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in this study. The dynamic air-pressure sensor was installed under the bed mat and respiration and heart beat information were measured. This information was compared with the standard waveforms obtained from respiratory belt transducer and the electrocardiograph. As a result, both waveforms demonstrate a high correlation, and confirmed the validity of this method. A change of waveform and a quantitative evaluation of respiration, heart beat, and body movement measured from during sleep using this sensor can be useful for a daily health monitoring.

  9. Personal Air Pollution Exposure Monitoring using Low Cost Sensors in Chennai City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Yasa, Pavan; Shiva, Nagendra S. N.

    2016-04-01

    Air quality in many cities is deteriorating due to rapid urbanization and motorization. In the past, most of the health impacts studies in the urban areas have considered stationary air quality monitoring station data for health impact assessment. Since, there exist a spatial and temporal variation of air quality because of rapid change in land use pattern and complex interaction between emission sources and meteorological conditions, the human exposure assessment using stationary data may not provide realistic information. In such cases low cost sensors monitoring is viable in providing both spatial and temporal variations of air pollutant concentrations. In the present study an attempt has been made to use low cost sensor for monitoring the personal exposure to the two criteria pollutants CO and PM2.5 at 3 different locations of Chennai city. Maximum and minimum concentrations of CO and PM2.5 were found to be 5.4ppm, 0.8ppm and 534.8μg/m3, 1.9μg/m3 respectively. Results showed high concentrations near the intersection and low concentrations in the straight road.

  10. Estimation of Greenland's Ice Cover Melting Area Using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbiriba, B.; Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Hannon, S.; Strow, L. L.

    2012-12-01

    Using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), we are able to detect the melting of Greenland's ice cover for the July 12, 2012 warming event and estimate the corresponding fractional melted area. We collect all of AIRS' overpasses above Greenland, using the reflected solar radiation to avoid cloudy scenes. We perform a retrieval of the skin surface temperature in order to classify a scene as likely frozen (skin temperature well below the freezing point), likely melted (skin temperature well above freezing point), or thawing. Using empirical snow and water emissivity data we retrieve an effective scene snow/water fraction. For this day we estimate that 90% of the ice cover exhibits some thawing and that 53% of the ice cover area was effectivelly covered with liquid water. For contrast we also look at July 8, 2012, and verify that most of the island, 68%, was frozen at that date. We also see a correlation of the thawing area with the solar angle as the day progresses.

  11. EVALUATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MATRIX ISOLATION INFRARED SPECTROMETRY FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR SAMPLE EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capabilities of gas chromatography/matrix isolation-infrared (GC/MI-IR) spectrometry for determination of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in air sample extracts were evaluated. ystematic experiment, using xylene isomers as test compounds, were conducted to determine th...

  12. Microfabricated Air-Microfluidic Sensor for Personal Monitoring of Airborne Particulate Matter: Design, Fabrication, and Experimental Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present the design and fabrication of a micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) air-microfluidic particulate matter (PM) sensor, and show experimental results obtained from exposing the sensor to concentrations of tobacco smoke and diesel exhaust, two commonly occurring P...

  13. Comparison of Three Non-Imaging Angle-Diversity Receivers as Input Sensors of Nodes for Indoor Infrared Wireless Sensor Networks: Theory and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Beatriz R.; Rodríguez, Silvestre; Pérez-Jiménez, Rafael; Ayala, Alejandro; González, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    In general, the use of angle-diversity receivers makes it possible to reduce the impact of ambient light noise, path loss and multipath distortion, in part by exploiting the fact that they often receive the desired signal from different directions. Angle-diversity detection can be performed using a composite receiver with multiple detector elements looking in different directions. These are called non-imaging angle-diversity receivers. In this paper, a comparison of three non-imaging angle-diversity receivers as input sensors of nodes for an indoor infrared (IR) wireless sensor network is presented. The receivers considered are the conventional angle-diversity receiver (CDR), the sectored angle-diversity receiver (SDR), and the self-orienting receiver (SOR), which have been proposed or studied by research groups in Spain. To this end, the effective signal-collection area of the three receivers is modelled and a Monte-Carlo-based ray-tracing algorithm is implemented which allows us to investigate the effect on the signal to noise ratio and main IR channel parameters, such as path loss and rms delay spread, of using the three receivers in conjunction with different combination techniques in IR links operating at low bit rates. Based on the results of the simulations, we show that the use of a conventional angle-diversity receiver in conjunction with the equal-gain combining technique provides the solution with the best signal to noise ratio, the lowest computational capacity and the lowest transmitted power requirements, which comprise the main limitations for sensor nodes in an indoor infrared wireless sensor network. PMID:27428966

  14. Comparison of Three Non-Imaging Angle-Diversity Receivers as Input Sensors of Nodes for Indoor Infrared Wireless Sensor Networks: Theory and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Beatriz R; Rodríguez, Silvestre; Pérez-Jiménez, Rafael; Ayala, Alejandro; González, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    In general, the use of angle-diversity receivers makes it possible to reduce the impact of ambient light noise, path loss and multipath distortion, in part by exploiting the fact that they often receive the desired signal from different directions. Angle-diversity detection can be performed using a composite receiver with multiple detector elements looking in different directions. These are called non-imaging angle-diversity receivers. In this paper, a comparison of three non-imaging angle-diversity receivers as input sensors of nodes for an indoor infrared (IR) wireless sensor network is presented. The receivers considered are the conventional angle-diversity receiver (CDR), the sectored angle-diversity receiver (SDR), and the self-orienting receiver (SOR), which have been proposed or studied by research groups in Spain. To this end, the effective signal-collection area of the three receivers is modelled and a Monte-Carlo-based ray-tracing algorithm is implemented which allows us to investigate the effect on the signal to noise ratio and main IR channel parameters, such as path loss and rms delay spread, of using the three receivers in conjunction with different combination techniques in IR links operating at low bit rates. Based on the results of the simulations, we show that the use of a conventional angle-diversity receiver in conjunction with the equal-gain combining technique provides the solution with the best signal to noise ratio, the lowest computational capacity and the lowest transmitted power requirements, which comprise the main limitations for sensor nodes in an indoor infrared wireless sensor network. PMID:27428966

  15. Fault diagnosis and temperature sensor recovery for an air-handling unit

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.Y.; Shin, D.R.; House, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The presence of faults and the influence they have on system operation is a real concern in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) community. A fault can be defined as an inadmissible or unacceptable property of a system or a component. Unless corrected, faults can lead to increased energy use, shorter equipment life, and uncomfortable and/or unhealthy conditions for building occupants. This paper describes the use of a two-stage artificial neural network for fault diagnosis in a simulated air-handling unit. The stage one neural network is trained to identify the subsystem in which a fault occurs. The stage two neural network is trained to diagnose the specific cause of a fault at the subsystem level. Regression equations for the supply and mixed-air temperatures are obtained from simulation data and are used to compute input parameters to the neutral networks. Simulation results are presented that demonstrate that, after a successful diagnosis of a supply air temperature sensor fault, the recovered estimate of the supply air temperature obtained from the regression equation can be used in a feedback control loop to bring the supply air temperature back to the setpoint value. Results are also presented that illustrate the evolution of the diagnosis of the two-stage artificial neural network from normal operation to various fault modes of operation.

  16. The instrumentation and the contamination control activity of thermal and near-infrared sensor for carbon observation (TANSO) on GOSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Tomoyuki; Kuze, Akihiko; Hamazaki, Takashi; Baba, Naoko; Minami, Shintaro; Saruwatari, Hideki

    2006-08-01

    The Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is a satellite to monitor the carbon dioxide (CO II) and the methane (CH 4) globally from orbit. Two instruments are accommodated on GOSAT. Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) detects the Short wave infrared (SWIR) reflected on the earth's surface as well as the thermal infrared (TIR) radiated from the ground and the atmosphere. TANSO-FTS is capable of detecting wide spectral coverage, specifically, three narrow bands (0.76, 1.6, and 2 micron) and a wide band (5.5-14.3 micron) with 0.24 wavenumber spectral resolution. TANSO Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI) is a radiometer of ultraviolet (UV), visible, and SWIR to correct cloud and aerosol interference. The contaminant deposition on the sensors significantly affects the sensing capability. So the spectroscopic contamination control over wide spectral range is required from the process of GOSAT development to on-orbit operation. The paper presents the instrument design of TANSO-FTS and TANSO-CAI, overview of GOSAT contamination control plan, results from spectral analysis of deposited outgas, test result of hydrazine (rocket and satellite thruster propellant) injection to an optical surface, as well as test result from contamination environment monitoring using a vacuum chamber and contamination witness plates.

  17. A Low Cost High Density Sensor Network for Air Quality at London Heathrow Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, V.; Mead, M. I.; Popoola, O. A.; Baron, R. P.; Saffell, J.; Stewart, G.; Kaye, P.; Jones, R.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric composition within urban areas has a direct effect on the air quality of an environment in which a large majority of people live and work. Atmospheric pollutants including ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) can have a significant effect on human health. As such it is important to determine the potential exposure of individuals to these atmospheric constituents and investigate the processes that lead to the degradation of air quality within the urban environment. Whilst modelled pollutant levels on the local scale often suggest high degrees of spatial and temporal variability, the relatively sparse fixed site automated urban networks only provide low spatial resolution data that do not appear adequate in detecting such small scale variability. In this paper we demonstrate that measurements can now be made using networks of low-cost sensors that utilise a variety of techniques, including electrochemical and optical, to measure concentrations of atmospheric species. Once equipped with GPS and GPRS to determine position and transmit data respectively, these networks have the potential to provide valuable insights into pollutant variability inherent on the local or micro-scale. The methodology has been demonstrated successfully in field campaigns carried out in cities including London and Valencia, and is now being deployed as part of the Sensor Networks for Air Quality currently deployed at London Heathrow airport (SNAQ-Heathrow) which is outlined in the partner paper presented by Mead et al. (this conference). The SNAQ-Heathrow network of 50 sensor nodes will provide an unprecedented data set that includes measurements of O3, NO, NO2, CO, CO2, SO2, total VOCs, size-speciated PM as well as meteorological variables that include temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction. This network will provide high temporal (20 second intervals) and spatial (50 sites within the airport area

  18. Multispecies in situ monitoring of a static internal combustion engine by near-infrared diode laser sensors.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Yvan; Holdsworth, Robert J; Martin, Philip A

    2007-07-01

    A multispecies near-infrared diode laser spectrometer has been constructed for measurements of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane directly in the exhaust of a static internal combustion engine. A wavelength modulation-division multiplexing scheme was implemented for the two distributed feedback diode lasers. Gas concentration variations were observed for changes in operating conditions such as increasing and decreasing the throttle, adjusting the air-fuel ratio, and engine start-up. PMID:17571130

  19. The next generation of low-cost personal air quality sensors for quantitative exposure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedrahita, R.; Xiang, Y.; Masson, N.; Ortega, J.; Collier, A.; Jiang, Y.; Li, K.; Dick, R.; Lv, Q.; Hannigan, M.; Shang, L.

    2014-03-01

    Advances in embedded systems and low-cost gas sensors are enabling a new wave of low cost air quality monitoring tools. Our team has been engaged in the development of low-cost wearable air quality monitors (M-Pods) using the Arduino platform. The M-Pods use commercially available metal oxide semiconductor (MOx) sensors to measure CO, O3, NO2, and total VOCs, and NDIR sensors to measure CO2. MOx sensors are low in cost and show high sensitivity near ambient levels; however they display non-linear output signals and have cross sensitivity effects. Thus, a quantification system was developed to convert the MOx sensor signals into concentrations. Two deployments were conducted at a regulatory monitoring station in Denver, Colorado. M-Pod concentrations were determined using laboratory calibration techniques and co-location calibrations, in which we place the M-Pods near regulatory monitors to then derive calibration function coefficients using the regulatory monitors as the standard. The form of the calibration function was derived based on laboratory experiments. We discuss various techniques used to estimate measurement uncertainties. A separate user study was also conducted to assess personal exposure and M-Pod reliability. In this study, 10 M-Pods were calibrated via co-location multiple times over 4 weeks and sensor drift was analyzed with the result being a calibration function that included drift. We found that co-location calibrations perform better than laboratory calibrations. Lab calibrations suffer from bias and difficulty in covering the necessary parameter space. During co-location calibrations, median standard errors ranged between 4.0-6.1 ppb for O3, 6.4-8.4 ppb for NO2, 0.28-0.44 ppm for CO, and 16.8 ppm for CO2. Median signal to noise (S/N) ratios for the M-Pod sensors were higher for M-Pods than the regulatory instruments: for NO2, 3.6 compared to 23.4; for O3, 1.4 compared to 1.6; for CO, 1.1 compared to 10.0; and for CO2, 42.2 compared to 300

  20. Design of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor with small thermal hysteresis for air data modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jin Woo; Lee, Jang-Sub; An, Jun-Eon; Park, Chan Gook

    2015-06-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation results of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor fabricated by the dry etching process are described in this paper. The proposed sensor is designed to have optimal performances in mid-pressure range from 0 psi to 20 psi suitable for a precision air data module. The piezoresistors with a Wheatstone bridge structure are implanted where the thermal effects are minimized subject to sustainment of the sensitivity. The rectangular-shaped silicon diaphragm is adopted and its dimension is analyzed for improving pressure sensitivity and linearity. The bridge resistors are driven by constant current to compensate temperature effects on sensitivity. The designed differential pressure sensor is fabricated by using MEMS dry etching techniques, and the fabricated sensing element is attached and packaged in a Kovar package in consideration of leakage and temperature hysteresis. The implemented sensors are tested and evaluated as well. The evaluation results show the static RSS (root sum square) accuracy including nonlinearity, non-repeatability, and pressure hysteresis before temperature compensation is about 0.09%, and the total error band which includes the RSS accuracy, the thermal hysteresis, and other thermal effects is about 0.11%, which confirm the validity of the proposed design process.

  1. Design of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor with small thermal hysteresis for air data modules.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin Woo; Lee, Jang-Sub; An, Jun-Eon; Park, Chan Gook

    2015-06-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation results of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor fabricated by the dry etching process are described in this paper. The proposed sensor is designed to have optimal performances in mid-pressure range from 0 psi to 20 psi suitable for a precision air data module. The piezoresistors with a Wheatstone bridge structure are implanted where the thermal effects are minimized subject to sustainment of the sensitivity. The rectangular-shaped silicon diaphragm is adopted and its dimension is analyzed for improving pressure sensitivity and linearity. The bridge resistors are driven by constant current to compensate temperature effects on sensitivity. The designed differential pressure sensor is fabricated by using MEMS dry etching techniques, and the fabricated sensing element is attached and packaged in a Kovar package in consideration of leakage and temperature hysteresis. The implemented sensors are tested and evaluated as well. The evaluation results show the static RSS (root sum square) accuracy including nonlinearity, non-repeatability, and pressure hysteresis before temperature compensation is about 0.09%, and the total error band which includes the RSS accuracy, the thermal hysteresis, and other thermal effects is about 0.11%, which confirm the validity of the proposed design process. PMID:26133864

  2. Hurricane Isabel, AIRS Infrared and SeaWinds Scatterometer Data Combined

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    These two images show Hurricane Isabel as viewed by AIRS and each of the two SeaWinds scatterometers on the ADEOS-2 and QuikScat satellites, all JPL-managed experiments. AIRS data are used to create global three-dimensional maps of temperature, humidity and clouds, while scatterometers measure surface wind speed and direction.

    Figure 1 shows Isabel on September 13, 2003, when it was a Category 5 storm threatening the Caribbean and southern United States. At the time Isabel was the strongest Atlantic storm since hurricane Mitch killed thousands in central America in 1997. The red vectors in the image show Isabel's surface winds as measured by SeaWinds on ADEOS-2, and the background colors show the temperature of clouds and surface, as viewed in the infrared by AIRS. The hurricane's powerful swirling winds are apparent. These winds circle the hurricane's eye, seen as the red dot near the middle top of the image. Light blue areas shows adjacent cold clouds tops associated with strong thunderstorms embedded within the storm.

    Figure 2 shows Isabel as it approached landfall on the outer banks of North Carolina on September 18. The hurricane weakened in the five days since the earlier image was observed, as indicated by a less clearly defined eye. Nevertheless, it was still a powerful storm. The winds blowing onshore north of the eye knocked over trees, blew roofs off buildings, and drove large waves that breached the coastal barrier islands in many places. Water, transportation and power are still not fully restored to many of the areas in the image. The winds apparently blowing away from the eye of the storm are an artifact of one of the hurricane's other destructive phenomena: rain. The darkest blue clouds observed by AIRS show the most intense thunderstorms, and hence the heaviest rains. Hard rain fools the the SeaWinds on Quik

  3. Seluge++: A Secure Over-the-Air Programming Scheme in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Doroodgar, Farzan; Razzaque, Mohammad Abdur; Isnin, Ismail Fauzi

    2014-01-01

    Over-the-air dissemination of code updates in wireless sensor networks have been researchers' point of interest in the last few years, and, more importantly, security challenges toward the remote propagation of code updating have occupied the majority of efforts in this context. Many security models have been proposed to establish a balance between the energy consumption and security strength, having their concentration on the constrained nature of wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes. For authentication purposes, most of them have used a Merkle hash tree to avoid using multiple public cryptography operations. These models mostly have assumed an environment in which security has to be at a standard level. Therefore, they have not investigated the tree structure for mission-critical situations in which security has to be at the maximum possible level (e.g., military applications, healthcare). Considering this, we investigate existing security models used in over-the-air dissemination of code updates for possible vulnerabilities, and then, we provide a set of countermeasures, correspondingly named Security Model Requirements. Based on the investigation, we concentrate on Seluge, one of the existing over-the-air programming schemes, and we propose an improved version of it, named Seluge++, which complies with the Security Model Requirements and replaces the use of the inefficient Merkle tree with a novel method. Analytical and simulation results show the improvements in Seluge++ compared to Seluge. PMID:24618781

  4. Performance of greenhouse gas profiling by infrared-laser and microwave occultation in cloudy air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proschek, V.; Kirchengast, G.; Emde, C.; Schweitzer, S.

    2012-12-01

    ACCURATE is a proposed future satellite mission enabling simultaneous measurements of greenhouse gases (GHGs), wind and thermodynamic variables from Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The measurement principle is a combination of LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO) and microwave occultation (LMO), the LMIO method, where the LIO signals are very sensitive to clouds. The GHG retrieval will therefore be strongly influenced by clouds in parts of the troposphere. The IR-laser signals, at wavelengths within 2--2.5μ m, are chosen to measure six GHGs (H2O, CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, CO; incl.~key isotopes 13CO2, C18OO, HDO). The LMO signals enable to co-measure the thermodynamic variables. In this presentation we introduce the algorithm to retrieve GHG profiles under cloudy-air conditions by using quasi-realistic forward simulations, including also influence of Rayleigh scattering, scintillations and aerosols. Data from CALIPSO--Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations--with highest vertical resolution of about 60 m and horizontal resolution of about 330 m were used for simulation of clouds. The IR-laser signals consist for each GHG of a GHG-sensitive and a close-by reference signal. The key process, ``differencing'' of these two signals, removes the atmospheric ``broadband'' effects, resulting in a pure GHG transmission profile. Very thin ice clouds, like sub-visible cirrus, are fairly transparent to the IR-laser signals, thicker and liquid water clouds block the signals. The reference signal is used to produce a cloud layering profile from zero to blocking clouds and is smoothed in a preprocess to suppress scintillations. Sufficiently small gaps, of width <2 km in the cloud layering profile, are found to enable a decent retrieval of entire GHG profiles over the UTLS under broken cloudiness and are therefore bridged by interpolation. Otherwise in case of essentially continuous cloudiness the profiles are found to terminate at cloud top level. The accuracy of

  5. How Small Can We Go: Exploring the Limitations and Scaling laws of Air-Microfluidic Particulate Matter Sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air-microfluidics is a field that has the potential to dramatically reduce the size, cost, and power requirements of future air quality sensors. Microfabrication provides a suite of relatively new tools for the development of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) that can be ap...

  6. Lessons Learned During Instrument Testing for the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peabody, Hume L.; Otero, Veronica; Neuberger, David

    2013-01-01

    The Themal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) instrument, set to launch on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission in 2013, features a passively cooled telescope and IR detectors which are actively cooled by a two stage cryocooler. In order to proceed to the instrument level test campaign, at least one full functional test was required, necessitating a thermal vacuum test to sufficiently cool the detectors and demonstrate performance. This was fairly unique in that this test occurred before the Pre Environmental Review, but yielded significant knowledge gains before the planned instrument level test. During the pre-PER test, numerous discrepancies were found between the model and the actual hardware, which were revealed by poor correlation between model predictions and test data. With the inclusion of pseudo-balance points, the test also provided an opportunity to perform a pre-correlation to test data prior to the instrument level test campaign. Various lessons were learned during this test related to modeling and design of both the flight hardware and the Ground Support Equipment and test setup. The lessons learned in the pre-PER test resulted in a better test setup for the nstrument level test and the completion of the final instrument model correlation in a shorter period of time. Upon completion of the correlation, the flight predictions were generated including the full suite of off-nominal cases, including some new cases defined by the spacecraft. For some of these ·new cases, some components now revealed limit exceedances, in particular for a portion of the hardware that could not be tested due to its size and chamber limitations.. Further lessons were learned during the completion of flight predictions. With a correlated detalled instrument model, significant efforts were made to generate a reduced model suitable for observatory level analyses. This proved a major effort both to generate an appropriate network as well as to convert to the final model to the required

  7. Monitoring of atmospheric aerosol emissions using a remotely piloted air vehicle (RPV)-Borne Sensor Suite

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a small sensor system, the micro-atmospheric measurement system ({mu}-AMS), to monitor and track aerosol emissions. The system was developed to fly aboard a remotely piloted air vehicle, or other mobile platform, to provide real-time particle measurements in effluent plumes and to collect particles for chemical analysis. The {mu}-AMS instrument measures atmospheric parameters including particle mass concentration and size distribution, temperature, humidity, and airspeed, altitude and position (by GPS receiver) each second. The sensor data are stored onboard and are also down linked to a ground station in real time. The {mu}-AMS is battery powered, small (8 in. dia x 36 in.), and lightweight (15 pounds). Aerosol concentrations and size distributions from above ground explosive tests, airbone urban pollution, and traffic-produced particulates are presented.

  8. Long-Term Record of Arctic and Antarctic Sea and Ice Surface Temperatures from Thermal Infrared Satellite Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luis, Cristina; Dybkjær, Gorm; Eastwood, Steinar; Tonboe, Rasmus; Høyer, Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Surface temperature is among the most important variables in the surface energy balance equation and it significantly affects the atmospheric boundary layer structure, the turbulent heat exchange and, over ice, the ice growth rate. Here we measure the surface temperature using thermal infrared sensors from 10-12 µm wavelength, a method whose primary limitation over sea ice is the detection of clouds. However, in the Arctic and around Antarctica there are very few conventional observations of surface temperature from buoys, and it is sometimes difficult to determine if the temperature is measured at the surface or within the snowpack, the latter of which often results in a warm bias. To reduce this bias, much interest is being paid to alternative remote sensing methods for monitoring high latitude surface temperature. We used Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) global area coverage (GAC) data to produce a high latitude sea surface temperature (SST), ice surface temperature (IST) and ice cap skin temperature dataset spanning 27 years (1982-2009). This long-term climate record is the first of its kind for IST. In this project we used brightness temperatures from the infrared channels of AVHRR sensors aboard NOAA and Metop polar-orbiting satellites. Surface temperatures were calculated using separate split window algorithms for day SST, night SST, and IST. The snow surface emissivity across all angles of the swath were simulated specifically for all sensors using an emission model. Additionally, all algorithms were tuned to the Arctic using simulated brightness temperatures from a radiative transfer model with atmospheric profiles and skin temperatures from European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts (ECMWF) re-analysis data (ERA-Interim). Here we present the results of product quality as compared to in situ measurements from buoys and infrared radiometers, as well as a preliminary analysis of climate trends revealed by the record.

  9. Infrared response from metallic particles embedded in a single-crystal Si matrix - The layered internal photoemission sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Iannelli, J. M.; Nieh, C. W.; Hashimoto, Shin

    1990-01-01

    Infrared radiation at wavelengths of 1-2 microns has been detected in a new device labeled the layered internal photoemission sensor. The device structure, which is grown by molecular beam epitaxy, incorporates epitaxial CoSi2 particles with dimensions of 10-50 nm. Radiation absorbed by these particles photoexcites carriers into a surrounding single-crystal silicon matrix. A peak quantum efficiency of 1.3 percent is measured, which is approximately six times higher than in planar CoSi2 Schottky diodes with 5-nm silicide thickness.

  10. Ultrabroadband conical emission generated from the ultraviolet up to the far-infrared during the optical filamentation in air.

    PubMed

    Théberge, Francis; Châteauneuf, Marc; Ross, Vincent; Mathieu, Pierre; Dubois, Jacques

    2008-11-01

    Ultraviolet and infrared conical emissions were observed during the filamentation in air of powerful femtosecond laser pulses produced by a portable terawatt laser system. The broadband spectrum was measured from 200 nm up to 14 microm and covered the complete optical transmission window of the atmosphere. The angularly resolved spectrum showed some X-wave structure across the frequency range analyzed. However, we demonstrated that the strong conical emission observed in the mid- and far-infrared is mainly owing to the four-wave mixing between the pump pulse and its blueshifted conical emission. PMID:18978905

  11. A low cost mid-infrared sensor for on line contamination monitoring of lubricating oils in marine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Mohammadi, L.; Kullmann, F.; Holzki, M.; Sigloch, S.; Klotzbuecher, T.; Spiesen, J.; Tommingas, T.; Weismann, P.; Kimber, G.

    2010-04-01

    The chemical and physical condition of oils in marine engines must be monitored to ensure optimum performance of the engine and to avoid damage by degraded oil not adequately lubricating the engine. Routine monitoring requires expensive laboratory testing and highly skilled analysts. This work describes the adaptation and implementation of a mid infrared (MIR) sensor module for continued oil condition monitoring in two-stroke and four-stroke diesel engines. The developed sensor module will help to reduce costs in oil analysis by eliminating the need to collect and send samples to a laboratory for analysis. The online MIR-Sensor module measures the contamination of oil with water, soot, as well as the degradation indicated by the TBN (Total Base Number) value. For the analysis of water, TBN, and soot in marine engine oils, four spectral regions of interest have been identified. The optical absorption in these bands correlating with the contaminations is measured simultaneously by using a four-field thermopile detector, combined with appropriate bandpass filters. Recording of the MIR-absorption was performed in a transmission mode using a flow-through cell with appropriate path length. Since in this case no spectrometer is required, the sensor including the light source, the flowthrough- cell, and the detector can be realised at low cost and in a very compact manner. The optical configuration of the sensor with minimal component number and signal intensity optimisation at the four-field detector was implemented by using non-sequential ray tracing simulation. The used calibration model was robust enough to predict accurately the value for soot, water, and TBN concentration for two-stroke and four-stroke engine oils. The sensor device is designed for direct installation on the host engine or machine and, therefore, becoming an integral part of the lubrication system. It can also be used as a portable stand-alone system for machine fluid analysis in the field.

  12. The next generation of low-cost personal air quality sensors for quantitative exposure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedrahita, R.; Xiang, Y.; Masson, N.; Ortega, J.; Collier, A.; Jiang, Y.; Li, K.; Dick, R. P.; Lv, Q.; Hannigan, M.; Shang, L.

    2014-10-01

    Advances in embedded systems and low-cost gas sensors are enabling a new wave of low-cost air quality monitoring tools. Our team has been engaged in the development of low-cost, wearable, air quality monitors (M-Pods) using the Arduino platform. These M-Pods house two types of sensors - commercially available metal oxide semiconductor (MOx) sensors used to measure CO, O3, NO2, and total VOCs, and NDIR sensors used to measure CO2. The MOx sensors are low in cost and show high sensitivity near ambient levels; however they display non-linear output signals and have cross-sensitivity effects. Thus, a quantification system was developed to convert the MOx sensor signals into concentrations. We conducted two types of validation studies - first, deployments at a regulatory monitoring station in Denver, Colorado, and second, a user study. In the two deployments (at the regulatory monitoring station), M-Pod concentrations were determined using collocation calibrations and laboratory calibration techniques. M-Pods were placed near regulatory monitors to derive calibration function coefficients using the regulatory monitors as the standard. The form of the calibration function was derived based on laboratory experiments. We discuss various techniques used to estimate measurement uncertainties. The deployments revealed that collocation calibrations provide more accurate concentration estimates than laboratory calibrations. During collocation calibrations, median standard errors ranged between 4.0-6.1 ppb for O3, 6.4-8.4 ppb for NO2, 0.28-0.44 ppm for CO, and 16.8 ppm for CO2. Median signal to noise (S / N) ratios for the M-Pod sensors were higher than the regulatory instruments: for NO2, 3.6 compared to 23.4; for O3, 1.4 compared to 1.6; for CO, 1.1 compared to 10.0; and for CO2, 42.2 compared to 300-500. By contrast, lab calibrations added bias and made it difficult to cover the necessary range of environmental conditions to obtain a good calibration. A separate user study

  13. Demonstration of a portable near-infrared CH4 detection sensor based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chuan-Tao; Huang, Jian-Qiang; Ye, Wei-Lin; Lv, Mo; Dang, Jing-Min; Cao, Tian-Shu; Chen, Chen; Wang, Yi-Ding

    2013-11-01

    A portable near-infrared (NIR) CH4 detection sensor based on a distributed feedback (DFB) laser modulated at 1.654 μm is experimentally demonstrated. Intelligent temperature controller with an accuracy of -0.07 to +0.09 °C as well as a scan and modulation module generating saw-wave and cosine-wave signals are developed to drive the DFB laser, and a cost effective lock-in amplifier used to extract the second harmonic signal is integrated. Thorough experiments are carried out to obtain detection performances, including detection range, accuracy, stability and the minimum detection limit (MDL). Measurement results show that the absolute detection error relative to the standard value is less than 7% within the range of 0-100%, and the MDL is estimated to be about 11 ppm under an absorption length of 0.2 m and a noise level of 2 mVpp. Twenty-four hours monitoring on two gas samples (0.1% and 20%) indicates that the absolute errors are less than 7% and 2.5%, respectively, suggesting good long term stability. The sensor reveals competitive characteristics compared with other reported portable or handheld sensors. The developed sensor can also be used for the detection of other gases by adopting other DFB lasers with different center-wavelength using the same hardware and slightly modified software.

  14. Characterization of silicon micro-strip sensors with a pulsed infra-red laser system for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.

    2015-03-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR is composed of 8 tracking stations consisting of 1292 double sided silicon micro-strip sensors. For the quality assurance of produced prototype sensors a laser test system (LTS) has been developed. The aim of the LTS is to scan sensors with a pulsed infra-red laser driven by step motor to determine the charge sharing in-between strips and to measure qualitative uniformity of the sensor response over the whole active area. The prototype sensors which are tested with the LTS so far have 256 strips with a pitch of 50 μm on each side. They are read-out using a self-triggering prototype read-out electronic ASIC called n-XYTER. The LTS is designed to measure sensor response in an automatized procedure at several thousand positions across the sensor with focused infra-red laser light (spot size ≈ 12 μm , wavelength = 1060 nm). The pulse with duration (≈ 10 ns) and power (≈ 5 mW) of the laser pulses is selected such, that the absorption of the laser light in the 300 μm thick silicon sensors produces a number of about 24000 electrons, which is similar to the charge created by minimum ionizing particles (MIP) in these sensors. Laser scans different prototype sensors is reported.

  15. Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) version 5 land surface emissivity product over the Namib and Kalahari deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Hook, Simon J.; Manning, Evan; Lee, Sung-Yung; Fetzer, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Hyperspectral infrared sounders require accurate knowledge of the land surface emissivity (LSE) to retrieve important climate variables such as surface temperature, air temperature, and total water vapor from space. This study provides a method for validating and assessing the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) version 5 LSE product using high-spatial resolution data (90 m) from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) which has five bands in the thermal infrared region (8-12 μm, 1250-833 cm-1) and high-spectral resolution laboratory measurements of sand samples collected over the Namib and Kalahari deserts in southern Africa. Results indicate that the mean, absolute daytime LSE difference between AIRS and the laboratory results for six wavelengths in window regions between 3.9 and 11.4 μm (2564-877 cm-1) was 2.3% over the Namib and 0.70% over the Kalahari, while the mean difference with ASTER was 2.3% over the Namib and 2.26% over the Kalahari for four bands between 8 and 12 μm. Systematic modeling and surface dependent AIRS LSE retrieval errors such as large discrepancies between day and nighttime shortwave LSE (up to 15%), unphysical values (LSE >1), and large daytime temporal variations in the shortwave region (up to 30%) are further discussed.

  16. Integrated IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Michael; Trujillo, Edward

    1994-06-01

    Integrated infrared (IR) sensors which exploit modular avionics concepts can provide features such as operational flexibility, enhanced stealthiness, and ease of maintenance to meet the demands of tactical, airborne sensor systems. On-board, tactical airborne sensor systems perform target acquisition, tracking, identification, threat warning, missile launch detection, and ground mapping in support of situation awareness, self-defense, navigation, target attack, weapon support, and reconnaissance activities. The use of sensor suites for future tactical aircraft such as US Air Force's multirole fighter require a blend of sensor inputs and outputs that may vary over time. It is expected that special-role units of these tactical aircraft will be formed to conduct tasks and missions such as anti-shipping, reconnaissance, or suppression of enemy air defenses.

  17. The roles of vibration analysis and infrared thermography in monitoring air-handling equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurzbach, Richard N.

    2003-04-01

    Industrial and commercial building equipment maintenance has not historically been targeted for implementation of PdM programs. The focus instead has been on manufacturing, aerospace and energy industries where production interruption has significant cost implications. As cost-effectiveness becomes more pervasive in corporate culture, even office space and labor activities housed in large facilities are being scrutinized for cost-cutting measures. When the maintenance costs for these facilities are reviewed, PdM can be considered for improving the reliability of the building temperature regulation, and reduction of maintenance repair costs. An optimized program to direct maintenance resources toward a cost effective and pro-active management of the facility can result in reduced operating budgets, and greater occupant satisfaction. A large majority of the significant rotating machinery in a large building environment are belt-driven air handling units. These machines are often poorly designed or utilized within the facility. As a result, the maintenance staff typically find themselves scrambling to replace belts and bearings, going from one failure to another. Instead of the reactive-mode maintenance, some progressive and critical institutions are adopting predictive and proactive technologies of infrared thermography and vibration analysis. Together, these technologies can be used to identify design and installation problems, that when corrected, significantly reduce maintenance and increase reliability. For critical building use, such as laboratories, research facilities, and other high value non-industrial settings, the cost-benefits of more reliable machinery can contribute significantly to the operational success.

  18. Bio-inspired multi-mode optic flow sensors for micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seokjun; Choi, Jaehyuk; Cho, Jihyun; Yoon, Euisik

    2013-06-01

    Monitoring wide-field surrounding information is essential for vision-based autonomous navigation in micro-air-vehicles (MAV). Our image-cube (iCube) module, which consists of multiple sensors that are facing different angles in 3-D space, can be applied to the wide-field of view optic flows estimation (μ-Compound eyes) and to attitude control (μ- Ocelli) in the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) platforms. In this paper, we report an analog/digital (A/D) mixed-mode optic-flow sensor, which generates both optic flows and normal images in different modes for μ- Compound eyes and μ-Ocelli applications. The sensor employs a time-stamp based optic flow algorithm which is modified from the conventional EMD (Elementary Motion Detector) algorithm to give an optimum partitioning of hardware blocks in analog and digital domains as well as adequate allocation of pixel-level, column-parallel, and chip-level signal processing. Temporal filtering, which may require huge hardware resources if implemented in digital domain, is remained in a pixel-level analog processing unit. The rest of the blocks, including feature detection and timestamp latching, are implemented using digital circuits in a column-parallel processing unit. Finally, time-stamp information is decoded into velocity from look-up tables, multiplications, and simple subtraction circuits in a chip-level processing unit, thus significantly reducing core digital processing power consumption. In the normal image mode, the sensor generates 8-b digital images using single slope ADCs in the column unit. In the optic flow mode, the sensor estimates 8-b 1-D optic flows from the integrated mixed-mode algorithm core and 2-D optic flows with an external timestamp processing, respectively.

  19. Evaluating the Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data On Convective Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, Danielle; Zavodsky, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) is a collaborative partnership between NASA and operational forecasting partners, including a number of National Weather Service (NWS) offices. SPoRT provides real-time NASA products and capabilities to its partners to address specific operational forecast challenges. The mission of SPoRT is to transition observations and research capabilities into operations to help improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional scale. Two areas of focus are data assimilation and modeling, which can to help accomplish SPoRT's programmatic goals of transitioning NASA data to operational users. Forecasting convective weather is one challenge that faces operational forecasters. Current numerical weather prediction (NWP) models that operational forecasters use struggle to properly forecast location, timing, intensity and/or mode of convection. Given the proper atmospheric conditions, convection can lead to severe weather. SPoRT's partners in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have a mission to protect the life and property of American citizens. This mission has been tested as recently as this 2011 severe weather season, which has seen more than 300 fatalities and injuries and total damages exceeding $10 billion. In fact, during the three day period from 25-27 April, 1,265 storms reports (362 tornado reports) were collected making this three day period one of most active in American history. To address the forecast challenge of convective weather, SPoRT produces a real-time NWP model called the SPoRT Weather Research and Forecasting (SPoRT-WRF), which incorporates unique NASA data sets. One of the NASA assets used in this unique model configuration is retrieved profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS).The goal of this project is to determine the impact that these AIRS profiles have on the SPoRT-WRF forecasts by comparing to a current operational model and a control SPoRT-WRF model

  20. Faster Array Training and Rapid Analysis for a Sensor Array Intended for an Event Monitor in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, A. V.; Fonollosa, J.; Huerta, R.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental monitoring, in particular, air monitoring, is a critical need for human space flight. Both monitoring and life support systems have needs for closed loop process feedback and quality control for environmental factors. Monitoring protects the air environment and water supply for the astronaut crew and different sensors help ensure that the habitat falls within acceptable limits, and that the life support system is functioning properly and efficiently. The longer the flight duration and the farther the destination, the more critical it becomes to have carefully monitored and automated control systems for life support. There is an acknowledged need for an event monitor which samples the air continuously and provides near real-time information on changes in the air. Past experiments with the JPL ENose have demonstrated a lifetime of the sensor array, with the software, of around 18 months. We are working on a sensor array and new algorithms that will incorporate transient sensor responses in the analysis. Preliminary work has already showed more rapid quantification and identification of analytes and the potential for faster training time of the array. We will look at some of the factors that contribute to demonstrating faster training time for the array. Faster training will decrease the integrated sensor exposure to training analytes, which will also help extend sensor lifetime.

  1. Air cavity-based Fabry-Perot interferometer sensor fabricated using a sawing technique for refractive index measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eun Joo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Kim, Myoung Jin; Hwang, Sung Hwan; Rho, Byung Sup

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated a refractive index sensor based on a fiber optic Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer with an open air cavity fabricated using a one-step mechanical sawing technique. The sensor head consists of a short FP cavity near the fiber patch cord tip, which was assembled by joining a ceramic ferrule and a single-mode fiber together. Owing to the open air cavity in the sensor head, various liquid samples with different refractive index can fill in-line air cavity, which makes the device usable as a refractometer. Moreover, due to the sensor head encircled with the robust ceramic ferrule, the device is attractive for sensing measurement in harsh environments. The sensor was tested in different refractive index solutions. The experimental result shows that the attenuation peak wavelength of the sensor is shifted toward a shorter wavelength with increasing refractive index, and the refractive index sensitivity is ˜92.5 nm/refractive index unit (RIU) and 73.75 dB/RIU. The proposed sensor can be used as an in-line refractometer for many potential applications in the sensing field.

  2. Nanoporous glass-ceramics transparent in infrared range to be used as optical sensor: Mechanical and viscoelastic properties of the TAS (tellurium-arsenic-selenium) glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaizir, Gaelle

    GeS2-Sb2S3-CsCl glass-ceramics with nanoporous surfaces were synthesized and tested as optical elements. The nanoporosity is obtained through a two-step process, including controlled nucleation of CsCl nuclei in the glass matrix followed by selective etching of the nuclei with an acid solution. The porous surface is several hundred nanometers thick and results in a surface area increase of almost four orders of magnitudes. The pores size is approximately 150 nm and can be tailored by controlling the nucleation process and the etching time. It is shown that the creation of the nanoporous surface does not critically affect the optical transmission of these infrared transparent glass-ceramics. These materials can therefore be used for the design of optical elements and an ATR (Attenuated Total Reflections) plate with nanoporous surface was fabricated and tested as an optical infrared sensor. The porous element shows higher detection sensitivity in initial experiments with a coating of silane molecules. The TAS (Te2As3Se5) infrared glass, used as optical sensor in many fields of applications (medicine, environment, etc), exhibits poor mechanical properties rapidly that enable it to be used. Its mechanical properties have been investigated as a function of time and environment. From a general observation, air and vacuum have dramatic effects on TAS fibers tensile strength. When ageing under static stress, they exhibit an increase of tensile strength. The structural relaxation phenomenon is hypothesized to explain these results. The coordination number, , which is a rough measure of the network rigidity, has an influence on the TAS mechanical properties. It is shown that the TAS glass exhibits photosensitive effects. This effect seems to be only a surface effect, not a volume effect in the sense that light has no influence on the kinetic of a stress relaxation experiment. Due to their low glass transition temperature, TAS fibers exhibit viscoelastic behavior at room

  3. Evaluation of the Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Radiance and Profile Data Assimilation in Partly Cloudy Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Jedlovec, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Retrieved profiles from AIRS contain much of the information that is contained in the radiances and may be able to reveal reasons for this reduced impact. Assimilating AIRS retrieved profiles in an identical analysis configuration to the radiances, tracking the quantity and quality of the assimilated data in each technique, and examining analysis increments and forecast impact from each data type can yield clues as to the reasons for the reduced impact. By doing this with regional scale models individual synoptic features (and the impact of AIRS on these features) can be more easily tracked. This project examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing operational techniques used for AIRS radiances and research techniques used for AIRS retrieved profiles. Parallel versions of a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) are run to examine the impact AIRS radiances and retrieved profiles. Statistical evaluation of 6 weeks of forecast runs will be compared along with preliminary results of in-depth investigations for select case comparing the analysis increments in partly cloudy regions and short-term forecast impacts.

  4. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Dennis; Irons, James; Lunsford, Allen; Montanero, Matthew; Pellerano, Fernando; Richardson, Cathleen; Smith, Ramsey; Tesfaye, Zelalem; Thome, Kurtis

    2011-01-01

    The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), a joint NASA and United States Geological Survey (USGS) mission, is scheduled for launch in December, 2012. The LDCM instrument payload will consist of the Operational Land Imager (OLI), provided by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation (BATC) under contract to NASA and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This paper will describe the design, capabilities and status of the OLI and TIRS instruments. The OLI will provide 8 channel multispectral images at a spatial resolution of 30 meters and panchromatic images at 15 meter spatial resolution. The TIRS is a 100 meter spatial resolution push-broom imager whose two spectral channels, centered at 10.8 and 12 microns, split the ETM+ thermal bands. The two channels allow the use of the "split-window" technique to aid in atmospheric correction. The TIRS focal plane consists of three Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) arrays to span the 185 km swath width. The OLI and TIRS instruments will be operated independently but in concert with each other. Data from both instruments will be merged into a single data stream at the (USGS)/Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) facility. The ground system, being developed by USGS, includes an Image Assessment System (lAS), similar to Landsat-7's, to operationally monitor, characterize and update the calibrations of the two sensors.

  5. Self-assembled and highly selective sensors based on air-bridge-structured nanowire junction arrays.

    PubMed

    Park, Won Jeong; Choi, Kyung Jin; Kim, Myung Hwa; Koo, Bon Hyeong; Lee, Jong-Lam; Baik, Jeong Min

    2013-08-14

    We describe a strategy for creating an air-bridge-structured nanowire junction array platform that capable of reliably discriminating between three gases (hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide) in air. Alternatively driven dual nanowire species of ZnO and CuO with the average diameter of ∼30 nm on a single substrate are used and decorated with metallic nanoparticles to form two-dimensional microarray, which do not need to consider the post fabrications. Each individual nanowires in the array form n-n, p-p, and p-n junctions at the micro/nanoscale on single substrate and the junctions act as electrical conducting path for carriers. The adsorption of gas molecules to the surface changes the potential barrier height formed at the junctions and the carrier transport inside the straight semiconductors, which provide the ability of a given sensor array to differentiate among the junctions. The sensors were tested for their ability to distinguish three gases (H2, CO, and NO2), which they were able to do unequivocally when the data was classified using linear discriminant analysis. PMID:23841667

  6. Air Temperature Error Correction Based on Solar Radiation in an Economical Meteorological Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xingming; Yan, Shuangshuang; Wang, Baowei; Xia, Li; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Air temperature (AT) is an extremely vital factor in meteorology, agriculture, military, etc., being used for the prediction of weather disasters, such as drought, flood, frost, etc. Many efforts have been made to monitor the temperature of the atmosphere, like automatic weather stations (AWS). Nevertheless, due to the high cost of specialized AT sensors, they cannot be deployed within a large spatial density. A novel method named the meteorology wireless sensor network relying on a sensing node has been proposed for the purpose of reducing the cost of AT monitoring. However, the temperature sensor on the sensing node can be easily influenced by environmental factors. Previous research has confirmed that there is a close relation between AT and solar radiation (SR). Therefore, this paper presents a method to decrease the error of sensed AT, taking SR into consideration. In this work, we analyzed all of the collected data of AT and SR in May 2014 and found the numerical correspondence between AT error (ATE) and SR. This corresponding relation was used to calculate real-time ATE according to real-time SR and to correct the error of AT in other months. PMID:26213941

  7. Performance expectations for future moderate resolution visible and infrared space instruments based on AIRS and MODIS in-flight experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Broberg, Steven E.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Baron, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Lessons learned from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) projects highlight areas where further technology development is needed to address future land, ocean and atmospheric measurement needs. Although not established as requirements at this time, it is anticipated that scientists will expect improvements in the areas of spatial, spectral, radiometric, polarimetric, temporal and calibration performance for future instruments. This paper addresses each of these performance areas and provides lessons learned from MODIS and AIRS. We also present expectations in performance of a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) Infrared Imaging Spectrometer based on information from the NASA Instrument Incubator Program and industry reports. Tradeoffs are presented vs orbit altitude (LEO, MEO and GEO) and provide a "systems" perspective to future measurement concepts.

  8. Infrared/laser multi-sensor fusion and tracking based on the multi-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingjian; Hao, Jingya; Yi, Xiang; Wu, Feihong; Li, Min; Qin, Hanlin; Huang, Hanqiao

    2016-03-01

    The state estimation problem of targets detected by infrared/laser composite detection system with different sampling rates was studied in this paper. An effective state estimation algorithm based on data fusion is presented. Because sampling rate of infrared detection system is much higher than that of the laser detection system, the theory of multi-scale analysis is used to establish multi-scale model in this algorithm. At the fine scale, angle information provided by infrared detection system is used to estimate the target state through the unscented Kalman filter. It makes full use of the high frequency characteristic of infrared detection system to improve target state estimation accuracy. At the coarse scale, due to the sampling ratio of infrared and laser detection systems is an integer multiple, the angle information can be fused directly with the distance information of laser detection system to determine the target location. The fused information is served as observation, while the converted measurement Kalman filter (CMKF) is used to estimate the target state, which greatly reduces the complexity of filtering process and gets the optimal fusion estimation. The simulation results of tracking a target in 3-D space by infrared and laser detection systems demonstrate that the proposed algorithm in this paper is efficient and can obtain better performance than traditional algorithm.

  9. A far infrared/terahertz micromechanical sensor based on surface plasmons resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastanin, J.; Renotte, Y.; Fleury-Frenette, K.; Defise, J. M.; Habraken, S.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a new concept related to the bolometric micromechanical sensors for detecting far IR and THz radiation. We believe that this concept permits a low cost and ease of fabrication of large bi-dimensional array of sensors with an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. The micromechanical sensor comprises a thermo-sensitive bi-material (multi-material) micro-cantilever beam with a selective absorber dedicated to far IR and THz radiation energy, and optical readout system based on surface plasmon resonance for detecting the bending of the micro-cantilever element. To increase the radiation detector sensitivity, the SPR phenomenon is used for cantilever deflection monitoring.

  10. Infrared fiber-optic fire sensors - Concepts and designs for Space Station applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapphorn, Ralph M.; Porter, Alan R.

    1990-01-01

    Various design configurations used for testing IR fiber-optic (IFO) fire-sensor concepts are presented. Responsibility measurements conducted to select the best concept are reviewed. The results indicate that IFO fire-sensor systems based on distributed fiber sensors are feasible for future aerospace applications. For Space Station Freedom, these systems offer alternative fire detectors for monitoring areas within equipment or stage compartments where the ventilation may be inadequate for proper operation of smoke detectors. They also allow a large number of areas to be monitored by a single central detector unit, which reduces the associated cost and weight.

  11. Infrared fiber-optic fire sensors - Concepts and designs for Space Station applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapphorn, Ralph M.; Porter, Alan R.

    1990-02-01

    Various design configurations used for testing IR fiber-optic (IFO) fire-sensor concepts are presented. Responsibility measurements conducted to select the best concept are reviewed. The results indicate that IFO fire-sensor systems based on distributed fiber sensors are feasible for future aerospace applications. For Space Station Freedom, these systems offer alternative fire detectors for monitoring areas within equipment or stage compartments where the ventilation may be inadequate for proper operation of smoke detectors. They also allow a large number of areas to be monitored by a single central detector unit, which reduces the associated cost and weight.

  12. Long-wave infrared 1 × 2 MMI based on air-gap beneath silicon rib waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuxin; Li, Guoyi; Hao, Yinlei; Li, Yubo; Yang, Jianyi; Wang, Minghua; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2011-08-15

    The undercut long-wave infrared (LWIR) waveguide components with air-gap beneath are analyzed and fabricated on the Si-wafer with simple manufacturing process. A 1 × 2 multimode interference (MMI) splitter based on this structure is presented and measured under the 10.6 μm wavelength experimental setup. The uniformity of the MMI fabricated is 0.76 dB. The relationship among the output power, slab thickness and air-gap width is also fully discussed. Furthermore, undercut straight waveguides based on SOI platform are fabricated for propagation loss evaluation. Ways to reduce the loss are discussed either. PMID:21934942

  13. Revolutionary visible and infrared sensor detectors for the most advanced astronomical AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guieu, Sylvain; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric D.; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Coussement, Jérome; Kolb, Johann; Hubin, Norbert; Derelle, Sophie; Robert, Clélia; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Rochat, Sylvain; Delpoulbé, Alain; Lebouqun, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-07-01

    cooled device without liquid nitrogen in very demanding environmental conditions. A successful test of this device was performed on sky on the PIONIER 4 telescopes beam combiner on the VLTi at ESOParanal in June 2014. First Light Imaging, which will commercialize a camera system using also APD infrared arrays in its proprietary wavefront sensor camera platform. These programs are held with several partners, among them are the French astronomical laboratories (LAM, OHP, IPAG), the detector manufacturers (e2v technologies, Sofradir, CEA/LETI) and other partners (ESO, ONERA, IAC, GTC, First Light Imaging). Funding is: Opticon FP7 from European Commission, ESO, CNRS and Université de Provence, Sofradir, ONERA, CEA/LETI the French FUI (DGCIS), the FOCUS Labex and OSEO.

  14. Separation of presampling and postsampling modulation transfer functions in infrared sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinola, Richard L.; Olson, Jeffrey T.; O'Shea, Patrick D.; Hodgkin, Van A.; Jacobs, Eddie L.

    2006-05-01

    New methods of measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of electro-optical sensor systems are investigated. These methods are designed to allow the separation and extraction of presampling and postsampling components from the total system MTF. The presampling MTF includes all the effects prior to the sampling stage of the imaging process, such as optical blur and detector shape. The postsampling MTF includes all the effects after sampling, such as interpolation filters and display characteristics. Simulation and laboratory measurements are used to assess the utility of these techniques. Knowledge of these components and inclusion into sensor models, such as the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate's NVThermIP, will allow more accurate modeling and complete characterization of sensor performance.

  15. A device and an algorithm for the separation of visible and near infrared signals in a monolithic silicon sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langfelder, G.; Malzbender, T.; Longoni, A. F.; Zaraga, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Transverse Field Detector (TFD) is a filter-less and demosaicking-less color sensitive device that easily allows the design of more than three color acquisition channels at each pixel site. The separation of light into different wavelength bands is based on the generation of transverse electric fields inside the device depleted region, and exploits the properties of the Silicon absorption coefficient. In this work we propose such a device for the joint capture of visible and near infrared (NIR) radiation, for possible applications in videoconferencing and 3D imaging. In these applications the detector is used in combination with suitably generated NIR structured light. The information of the fourth acquisition channel, mainly capturing NIR signals, can be used both for sampling NIR light intensity and for subtracting unwanted NIR crosstalk from visible channels thus avoiding the need for the IR-blocking filter. Together with the presentation of a 4-channel sensor, a suitable algorithm for the processing of signals generated in the visible and infrared bands is described. The goal of the algorithm is to minimize the crosstalk of NIR radiation inside the visible channels and, simultaneously, to maintain good color reproduction and noise performance for the sensor, while holding a good sensitivity of the NIR channel up to 900 nm. The analysis indicates that the algorithm reduces the crosstalk of infrared signals inside R, G and B channels from 31%, 12% and 5% respectively to less than 2%. Concerning noise propagation, the worst coefficient of the color conversion matrix (CCM) is -2.1, comparable to those obtained for CCM of Bayer Color Filter Arrays.

  16. Evaluation of a biomimetic optical-filter based chemical sensor for detection of hazardous chemical vapors in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Kevin J.; Poutous, Menelaos K.; Dunnill, Kevin F.; Ewing, Kenneth J.; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Deguzman, P. C.; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.

    2016-05-01

    Detection of concealed hazardous materials is a pressing need for the global defense community. To address this need, the development of reliable and readily-deployable sensing devices is a key area of research. A multitude of infrared sensing techniques are being studied which allow for reliable sensing of concealed threats. Continued development in this field is working to increase the selectivity of such infrared sensors, while at the same time reducing their complexity, size and cost. We have recently developed a biomimetic optical filter based approach, based on human color vision, that utilizes multiple, broadband, overlapping infrared (IR) filters to clearly discriminate between hazardous target chemicals and interferents with very similar mid-IR spectral signatures. This technique was extensively studied in order to select filters which provide optimum selectivity for specific chemical sets. Using this knowledge, we designed and assembled a gas-phase sensor which uses three broadband mid-IR filters to detect and discriminate between a target chemical, fuel oil, and various interferents with strongly overlapping IR absorption bands in the carbon - hydrogen stretch region of the IR absorption spectrum 2700 cm-1 - 3300 cm-1 (3.0 μm - 3.7 μm). We present an overview of the design and performance of this filter-based system and explore the ability of this system to detect and discriminate between strongly overlapping target and interferent chemicals. The detection results using the filter-based system are compared to numerical methods to demonstrate the operation of this methodology. We present the results of experiments with both target and interferent chemicals present with chemicals both in and out of the detection set, and discuss future field development and application of this approach.

  17. The deployment of carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) for ambient air monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chaiwatpongsakorn, Chaichana; Lu, Mingming; Keener, Tim C; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2014-06-01

    Wireless sensor networks are becoming increasingly important as an alternative solution for environment monitoring because they can reduce cost and complexity. Also, they can improve reliability and data availability in places where traditional monitoring methods are difficult to site. In this study, a carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) was developed to measure carbon monoxide concentrations at a major traffic intersection near the University of Cincinnati main campus. The system has been deployed over two weeks during Fall 2010, and Summer 2011-2012, traffic data was also recorded by using a manual traffic counter and a video camcorder to characterize vehicles at the intersection 24 h, particularly, during the morning and evening peak hour periods. According to the field test results, the 1 hr-average CO concentrations were found to range from 0.1-1.0 ppm which is lower than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) 35 ppm on a one-hour averaging period. During rush hour periods, the traffic volume at the intersection varied from 2,067 to 3,076 vehicles per hour with 97% being passenger vehicles. Furthermore, the traffic volume based on a 1-h average showed good correlation (R2 = 0.87) with the 1-h average CO-WSN concentrations for morning and evening peak time periods whereas CO-WSN results provided a moderate correlation (R2 = 0.42) with 24 hours traffic volume due to fluctuated changes of meteorological conditions. It is concluded that the performance and the reliability of wireless ambient air monitoring networks can be used as an alternative method for real time air monitoring. PMID:24937527

  18. The Deployment of Carbon Monoxide Wireless Sensor Network (CO-WSN) for Ambient Air Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Chaiwatpongsakorn, Chaichana; Lu, Mingming; Keener, Tim C.; Khang, Soon-Jai

    2014-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks are becoming increasingly important as an alternative solution for environment monitoring because they can reduce cost and complexity. Also, they can improve reliability and data availability in places where traditional monitoring methods are difficult to site. In this study, a carbon monoxide wireless sensor network (CO-WSN) was developed to measure carbon monoxide concentrations at a major traffic intersection near the University of Cincinnati main campus. The system has been deployed over two weeks during Fall 2010, and Summer 2011–2012, traffic data was also recorded by using a manual traffic counter and a video camcorder to characterize vehicles at the intersection 24 h, particularly, during the morning and evening peak hour periods. According to the field test results, the 1 hr-average CO concentrations were found to range from 0.1–1.0 ppm which is lower than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) 35 ppm on a one-hour averaging period. During rush hour periods, the traffic volume at the intersection varied from 2,067 to 3,076 vehicles per hour with 97% being passenger vehicles. Furthermore, the traffic volume based on a 1-h average showed good correlation (R2 = 0.87) with the 1-h average CO-WSN concentrations for morning and evening peak time periods whereas CO-WSN results provided a moderate correlation (R2 = 0.42) with 24 hours traffic volume due to fluctuated changes of meteorological conditions. It is concluded that the performance and the reliability of wireless ambient air monitoring networks can be used as an alternative method for real time air monitoring. PMID:24937527

  19. Design of the driving system for visible near-infrared spatial programmable push-broom remote CCD sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhipeng; Wei, Jun; Zhou, Qianting; Weng, Dongshan; Li, Jianwei

    2010-11-01

    VNIR multi-spectral image sensor has wide applications in remote sensing and imaging spectroscopy. An image spectrometer of a spatial remote programmable push-broom sensing satellite requires visible near infrared band ranges from 0.4μm to 1.04μm which is one of the most important bands in remote sensing. This paper introduces a method of design the driving system for 1024x1024 VNIR CCD sensor for programmable push-broom remote sensing. The digital driving signal is generated by the FPGA device. There are seven modules in the FPGA program and all the modules are coded by VHDL. The driving system have five mainly functions: drive the sensor as the demand of timing schedule, control the AD convert device to work, get the parameter via RS232 from control platform, process the data input from the AD device, output the processed data to PCI sample card to display in computer end. All the modules above succeed working on FPGA device APA600. This paper also introduced several important keys when designing the driving system including module synchronization, critical path optimization.

  20. A mid-infrared sensor for the determination of perfluorocarbon-based compounds in aquatic systems for geosequestration purposes.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Florian; Schwenk, Matthias; Pejcic, Bobby; Myers, Matthew; Ho, Koon-Bay; Stalker, Linda; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-12-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) compounds have been used as chemical tracer molecules to understand the movement of supercritical carbon dioxide for geosequestration monitoring and verification purposes. A commonly used method for detecting PFCs involves the collection of a sample from either soil-gas or the atmosphere via carbon-based sorbents which are then analyzed in a laboratory. However, PFC analysis in aquatic environments is neglected and this is an issue that needs to be considered since the PFC is likely to undergo permeation through the overlying water formations. This paper presents for the first time an innovative analytical method for the trace level in situ detection of PFCs in water. It reports on the development of a sensor based on mid-infrared attenuated total reflection (MIR-ATR) spectroscopy for determining the concentration of perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH) and perfluoro-1,3-dimethylcyclohexane (PDCH) in aquatic systems. The sensor comprises a zinc selenide waveguide with the surface modified by a thin polymer film. The sensitivity of this device was investigated as a function of polymer type, coating thickness, and solution flow rates. The limit of detection (LOD) was determined to be 23 ppb and 79 ppb for PMCH and PDCH, respectively when using a 5 μm thick polyisobutylene (PIB) coated waveguide. This study has shown that the MIR-ATR sensor can be used to directly quantify PFC-based chemical tracer compounds in water over the 20-400 ppb concentration range. PMID:25159442

  1. Low-cost visible-near infrared sensor for on-line monitoring of fat and fatty acids content during the manufacturing process of the milk.

    PubMed

    Villar, Alberto; Gorritxategi, Eneko; Aranzabe, Estibaliz; Fernández, Santiago; Otaduy, Deitze; Fernández, Luis A

    2012-12-15

    This paper describes the calibration, validation and testing process of a low-cost on-line visible-near infrared (400-1100 nm) sensor for the monitoring of fat and fatty acids content in milk during the manufacturing process of milk. The optical, mechanical and electronic designs of the sensor have been developed in Tekniker IK4 research centre just as its manufacturing process. The measurement range of the sensor is 400-1100 nm thus it covers the visible range (400-780 nm) and the short-wave near infrared (780-1100 nm). Chemometric techniques were applied with the purpose of obtaining a predictive model for each parameter correlating the spectra obtained by the sensor with the parameters analysed in the laboratory. The models were developed by Partial Least Squares Regression (PLS) obtaining one model for each parameter. The raw milk samples used in this work were provided by CAPSA (Asturias, Spain). PMID:22980869

  2. On the Relative Utility of Infrared (IR) versus Terahertz (THz) for Optical Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Gassman, Paul L.; Atkinson, David A.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Williams, Stephen D.

    2007-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has active programs investigating the optical absorption strengths of several types of molecules including toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), microbiological threats such as bacteria, as well as explosives such as RDX, PETN and TNT. While most of our work has centered on the mid-infrared domain (600 to 6,500 cm-1), more recent work has also included work in the far-infrared, also called the terahertz (THz) region (500 to ~8 cm-1). Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we have been able to compare the relative, and in some cases absolute, IR/THz cross sections of a number of species in the solid and liquid phases. The relative band strengths of a number of species of interest are discussed in terms of both experimental and computational results.

  3. On the relative utility of infrared (IR) versus terahertz (THz) for optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. J.; Valentine, N. B.; Gassman, P. L.; Atkinson, D. A.; Sharpe, S. W.; Williams, Steven D.

    2007-09-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has active programs investigating the optical absorption strengths of several types of molecules including toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), microbiological threats such as bacteria, as well as explosives such as RDX, PETN and TNT. While most of our work has centered on the mid-infrared domain (600 to 6,500 cm-1), more recent work has also included work in the far-infrared, also called the terahertz (THz) region (500 to ~8 cm-1). Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, we have been able to compare the relative, and in some cases absolute, IR/THz cross sections of a number of species in the solid and liquid phases. The relative band strengths of a number of species of interest are discussed in terms of both experimental and computational results.

  4. Atmospheric Chemistry Measurements in Schools and Outreach Activities with Low-cost Air Quality Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Z.; Monks, P. S.; McKenzie, K.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing range of low cost air quality sensors entering the market-place or being developed in-house in the last couple of years has led to many possibilities for using these instruments for public outreach activities or citizen science projects. A range of instruments sent out into local schools for the children to interpret and analyse the data and put the air quality in their area into context. A teaching package with tutorials has been developed to bring the data to life and link in with curriculum.The instruments have also been positioned around the city of Leicester in the UK to help understand the spatial variations in air quality and to assess the impact of retro-fitting buses on a busy bus route. The data is easily accessible online on a near real time basis and the various instruments can be compared with others around the country or the world from classrooms around the world.We will give an overview of the instrumentation with a comparison with commercial and cutting edge research instrumentation, the type of activities that were carried out and the public outreach forums where the data can be used.

  5. Modeling and simulation of adaptive multimodal optical sensors for target tracking in the visible to near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presnar, Michael D.

    This work investigates an integrated aerial remote sensor design approach to address moving target detection and tracking problems within highly cluttered, dynamic ground-based scenes. Sophisticated simulation methodologies and scene phenomenology validations have resulted in advancements in artificial multimodal truth video synthesis. Complex modeling of novel micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) devices, optical systems, and detector arrays has resulted in a proof of concept for a state-of-the-art imaging spectropolarimeter sensor model that does not suffer from typical multimodal image registration problems. Test methodology developed for this work provides the ability to quantify performance of a target tracking application with varying ground scenery, flight characteristics, or sensor specifications. The culmination of this research is an end-to-end simulated demonstration of multimodal aerial remote sensing and target tracking. Deeply hidden target recognition is shown to be enhanced through the fusing of panchromatic, hyperspectral, and polarimetric image modalities. The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation model was leveraged to synthesize truth spectropolarimetric sensor-reaching radiance image cubes comprised of coregistered Stokes vector bands in the visible to near-infrared. An intricate synthetic urban scene containing numerous moving vehicular targets was imaged from a virtual sensor aboard an aerial platform encircling a stare point. An adaptive sensor model was designed with a superpixel array of MOEMS devices fabricated atop a division of focal plane detector. Degree of linear polarization (DoLP) imagery is acquired by combining three adjacent micropolarizer outputs within each 2x2 superpixel whose respective transmissions vary with wavelength, relative angle of polarization, and wire-grid spacing. A novel micromirror within each superpixel adaptively relays light between a panchromatic imaging channel and a hyperspectral

  6. Ratiometric and colorimetric near-infrared sensors for multi-channel detection of cyanide ion and their application to measure β-glucosidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Panfei; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Liu, Shuhui; Lu, Aiping; Sun, Shiguo

    2015-11-01

    A near-infrared sensor for cyanide ion (CN-) was developed via internal charge transfer (ICT). This sensor can selectively detect CN- either through dual-ratiometric fluorescence (logarithm of I414/I564 and I803/I564) or under various absorption (356 and 440 nm) and emission (414, 564 and 803 nm) channels. Especially, the proposed method can be employed to measure β-glucosidase by detecting CN- traces in commercial amygdalin samples.

  7. Ratiometric and colorimetric near-infrared sensors for multi-channel detection of cyanide ion and their application to measure β-glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Panfei; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Liu, Shuhui; Lu, Aiping; Sun, Shiguo

    2015-01-01

    A near-infrared sensor for cyanide ion (CN−) was developed via internal charge transfer (ICT). This sensor can selectively detect CN− either through dual-ratiometric fluorescence (logarithm of I414/I564 and I803/I564) or under various absorption (356 and 440 nm) and emission (414, 564 and 803 nm) channels. Especially, the proposed method can be employed to measure β-glucosidase by detecting CN− traces in commercial amygdalin samples. PMID:26549546

  8. An infrared imaging area sensor for tactical and physical security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, D.A.

    1990-03-01

    Thermal imagers are effective tools for detecting aggressive actions and enhancing physical security in both tactical and peacetime environments. However, from an operator's perspective, these devices are rarely used on a continuous basis because of inconvenience and a requirement to have the operator be the detector'' while using the imager as a sensor. This paper describes an area sensor and assessment system designed to reduce operator fatigue and improve the effectiveness of costly thermal imagers. Several prototypes have been installed and operated at sites worldwide. The device uses a thermal imager as the primary sensor but also incorporates a laser rangefinder, automatic area precision scanning, robust scan-to-scan scene change detection, a deliberate-motion detection features. The system setup, control, and alarm assessment functions of the operator console are described. The digital processing is discussed and performance measures are given. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  9. An infrared imaging area sensor for tactical and physical security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, D.A.

    1990-07-01

    Thermal imagers are effective tools for detecting aggressive actions and enhancing physical security in both tactical and peacetime environments. However, from an operator's perspective, these devices are rarely used on a continuous basis because of inconvenience and a requirement to have the operator be the detector'' while using the imager as a sensor. This paper describes an area sensor and assessment system designed to reduce operator fatigue and improve the effectiveness of costly thermal imagers. Several prototypes have been installed and operated at sites worldwide. The device uses a thermal imager as the primary sensor but also incorporates a laser range-finder, automatic area precision scanning, robust scan-to-scan scene change detection, and deliberate-motion detection features. The system setup, control, and alarm assessment functions of the operator console are described. The digital processing is discussed and performance measures are given. 2 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Clinical performance of a low cost near infrared sensor for continuous glucose monitoring applied with subcutaneous microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Ben Mohammadi, Lhoucine; Klotzbuecher, T; Sigloch, S; Welzel, K; Goeddel, M; Pieber, T R; Schaupp, L

    2015-08-01

    In this work we present a low cost, minimally invasive, and chip-based near infrared (NIR) sensor, combined with subcutaneous microdialysis, for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). The sensor principle is based on difference absorption spectroscopy in the 1st overtone band known to be dominated by glucose-specific absorption features. The device comprises a multi-emitter LED and InGaAs-photodiodes, which are located on a single electronic board (non-disposable part), connected to a personal computer via Bluetooth. The disposable part consists of a chip containing the fluidic connections for microdialysis, two fluidic channels acting as optical transmission cells and total internally reflecting mirrors for in- and out-coupling of the light to the chip and to the detectors. The use of the sensor in conjunction with a subcutaneous microdialysis catheter to separate the glucose from the cells and proteins has been demonstrated to be extremely useful and advantageous for obtaining continuous glucose monitoring data and detecting glycemic levels in real time for a long period. Several in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to test the reliability of the device. In vitro measurements showed a linear relationship between glucose concentration and the integrated difference signal with a coefficient of determination of 99 % at the physiological concentration range. Clinical trial on 6 subjects with Type 1 diabetes showed that the NIR-CGM sensor data reflects the blood reference values adequately, if a proper calibration and signal drift compensation is applied. The MARD (mean absolute relative difference) value taken on retrospective data over all subjects is 8.5 % (range 6-11.5 %). PMID:26141039

  11. Use of Field-based Near Infrared Sensors to Map Soil Carbon in Agricultural Ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ability to detect changes in soil carbon storage is an important component of verifying sequestration of soil carbon within agricultural ecosystems. Rapid methods of measuring soil carbon such as near infrared spectroscopy have gained considerable interest but problems in accurate measurement still...

  12. Development and evaluation of infrared sensitive image sensors for space astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental development and evaluation of infrared vidicons for use in solving high precision high flux broadband astronomical problems are discussed. Data cover the EOS, silicon, and doped germanium vidicons. Results are graphed and problems encountered using the vidicons in electrical cameras are reported.

  13. A noncontact intraocular pressure measurement device using a micro reflected air pressure sensor for the prediagnosis of glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung Hwan; Kim, Byeong Hee; Seo, Young Ho

    2012-03-01

    This study investigates a novel, portable tonometer using a micro reflected air pressure sensor for the prediagnosis of glaucoma. Because glaucoma progresses slowly and is not painful, glaucoma patients require a portable prediagnosis system to periodically measure intraocular pressure at home. Conventionally, intraocular pressure is measured by an air-puff tonometer whereby the cornea is deformed by a short pulse of air pressure and the magnitude of the corneal deformation is measured by optic systems such as a combination of laser- and photodiodes. In this study, a micro reflected air pressure sensor was designed, fabricated, and tested in order to measure the magnitude of corneal deformation without optic systems. In an experimental study, artificial eyes with different internal pressures were fabricated and these pressures were measured by the aforementioned system.

  14. Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS): Sensor improvements for 1994 and 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarture, C. M.; Chrien, T. G.; Green, R. O.; Eastwood, M. L.; Raney, J. J.; Hernandez, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    AVIRIS is a NASA-sponsored Earth-remote-sensing imaging spectrometer designed, built and operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). While AVIRIS has been operational since 1989, major improvements have been completed in most of the sensor subsystems during the winter maintenance cycles. As a consequence of these efforts, the capabilities of AVIRIS to reliably acquire and deliver consistently high quality, calibrated imaging spectrometer data continue to improve annually, significantly over those in 1989. Improvements to AVIRIS prior to 1994 have been described previously. This paper details recent and planned improvements to AVIRIS in the sensor task.

  15. Rapid and mobile determination of alcoholic strength in wine, beer and spirits using a flow-through infrared sensor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ever since Gay-Lussac's time, the alcoholic strength by volume (% vol) has been determined by using densimetric measurements. The typical reference procedure involves distillation followed by pycnometry, which is comparably labour-intensive and therefore expensive. At present, infrared (IR) spectroscopy in combination with multivariate regression is widely applied as a screening procedure, which allows one to determine alcoholic strength in less than 2 min without any sample preparation. The disadvantage is the relatively large investment for Fourier transform (FT) IR or near-IR instruments, and the need for matrix-dependent calibration. In this study, we apply a much simpler device consisting of a patented multiple-beam infrared sensor in combination with a flow-through cell for automated alcohol analysis, which is available in a portable version that allows for on-site measurements. Results During method validation, the precision of the infrared sensor was found to be equal to or better than densimetric or FTIR methods. For example, the average repeatability, as determined in 6 different wine samples, was 0.05% vol and the relative standard deviation was below 0.2%. Accuracy was ensured by analyzing 260 different alcoholic beverages in comparison to densimetric or FTIR results. The correlation was linear over the entire range from alcohol-free beers up to high-proof spirits, and the results were in substantial agreement (R = 0.99981, p < 0.0001, RMSE = 0.279% vol). The applicability of the device was further proven for the analysis of wines during fermentation, and for the determination of unrecorded alcohol (i.e. non-commercial or illicit products). Conclusions The flow-through infrared device is much easier to handle than typical reference procedures, while time-consuming sample preparation steps such as distillation are not necessary. Therefore, the alcoholic strength can be economically and quickly controlled (requiring less than 60 s per sample

  16. The evolution of the clear air convective layer revealed by surface-based remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonkester, V. R.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for simultaneous observations of the growth and decay of the clear-air convective mixing layer near a coastline, which were made with an FM-CW radar, a high-power narrow-beam S-band radar, and an acoustic echo sounder. The main purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the rise rate of the convective depth and the lapse rate of temperature, particularly in the morning hours. The results indicate that the three remote sensors can provide excellent mutually supporting data on the convective depth. It is found that this depth is well behaved during the day and that its rise rate varies roughly linearly with the inverse square root of the temperature lapse rate during the morning. The data suggest that some models concerning the rise rate require modification, since these models imply that the surface heat flux would have to be unreasonably large to produce the observed relationship.

  17. Infrared sensor modeling for discrimination of ground-based human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flug, Eric; Deaver, Dawne

    2008-04-01

    In an initial effort to better understand how motion in human activities influences sensor performance, Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) developed a perception experiment that tests an observer's ability to identify an activity in static and dynamic scenes. Current sensor models such as NVTherm were calibrated using static imagery of military vehicles but, given the current battlefield environment, the focus has shifted more towards discriminating human activities. In these activities, motion plays an important role but this role is not well quantified by the model. This study looks at twelve hostile and non-hostile activities that may be performed on an urban roadside such as digging a hole, raking, surveillance with binoculars, and holding several weapons. The forced choice experiment presents the activities in both static and dynamic scenes so that the effect of adding motion can be evaluated. The results are analyzed and attempts are made at relating observer performance to various static and dynamic metrics and ultimately developing a calibration for the sensor model.

  18. A New CMOS Read-out IC for Uncooled Microbolometer Infrared Image Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sang Joon; Shin, Ho Hyun; Sung, Man Young

    2008-10-01

    An uncooled microbolometer image sensor, used in an IR image sensor, is made by a micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) process, so the value of the microbolometer resistor has a process variation. Also, the reference resistor, which is used to connect to the microbolometer, is fabricated by a standard CMOS process, and the difference between the values of the microbolometer resistor and the reference resistor generates an unwanted output signal for the same input from the sensor array. In order to minimize this problem, a new CMOS read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) was designed. Instead of a single input mode, a differential input mode scheme and a simple method to compensate the resistor value are proposed. Using results from a computer simulation, it is observed that the output characteristic of the ROIC was improved and the effect of the process variation was decreased without using complex compensation circuits. Based on the simulation results, a prototype device including an ROIC that was fabricated by a standard 0.25um CMOS process and a microbolometer with a 16 x 16 sensor array was fabricated and characterized.

  19. Photodiode-based cutting interruption sensor for near-infrared lasers.

    PubMed

    Adelmann, B; Schleier, M; Neumeier, B; Hellmann, R

    2016-03-01

    We report on a photodiode-based sensor system to detect cutting interruptions during laser cutting with a fiber laser. An InGaAs diode records the thermal radiation from the process zone with a ring mirror and optical filter arrangement mounted between a collimation unit and a cutting head. The photodiode current is digitalized with a sample rate of 20 kHz and filtered with a Chebyshev Type I filter. From the measured signal during the piercing, a threshold value is calculated. When the diode signal exceeds this threshold during cutting, a cutting interruption is indicated. This method is applied to sensor signals from cutting mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminum, as well as different material thicknesses and also laser flame cutting, showing the possibility to detect cutting interruptions in a broad variety of applications. In a series of 83 incomplete cuts, every cutting interruption is successfully detected (alpha error of 0%), while no cutting interruption is reported in 266 complete cuts (beta error of 0%). With this remarkable high detection rate and low error rate, the possibility to work with different materials and thicknesses in combination with the easy mounting of the sensor unit also to existing cutting machines highlight the enormous potential for this sensor system in industrial applications. PMID:26974642

  20. Use of an infrared sensor system to take long-term bedside measurements of rest-activity patterns in the elderly with dementia.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshio; Koyama, Emi; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Ito, Takeo; Tamura, Koji; Yaginuma, Masaaki

    2002-06-01

    In order to study long-term rest-activity patterns of elderly residents in care facilities, an infrared sensor system was developed. This sensor system detects a resident's presence or absence from their bed and their activity with little inconvenience. Using this system, the rest-activity patterns of two elderly people with dementia was assessed over a period of 3 months. For both subjects, frequent activity peaks and absences from their beds were often observed during the night. Such a sensor</