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Sample records for airs infrared sounder

  1. AIRS - the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigsten, Bjorn H.; Fetzer, Eric; Fishbein, Evan; Lee, Sung-Yung; Paganao, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was launched in 2002, along with two companion microwave sounders. This AIRS sounding suite is the most advanced atmospheric sounding system to date, with measurement accuracies far surpassing those of current weather satellites. From its sun synchronous polar orbit, the AIRS system provides more than 90% of the globe every 24 hours. Much of the post-launch period has been devoted to optimizing the 'retrieval' system used to derive atmospheric and other parameters from the observations and to validate those parameters. The geophysical parameters have been produced since the beginning of 2003 - the first data were released to the public in mid-2003, and future improved versions will be released periodically. The ongoing calibration/validation effort has confirmed that the system is very accurate and stable. There are a number of applications for the AIRS products, ranging from numerical weather prediction - where positive impact on forecast accuracy has already been demonstrated, to atmospheric research - where the AIRS water vapor products near the surface and in the mid and upper troposphere as well as in the stratosphere promise to make it possible to characterize and model phenomena that are key for short-term atmospheric processes, from weather patterns to long-term processes, such as interannual variability and climate change.

  2. Application of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data to Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gregorich, David; Gaiser, Steve; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2004-01-01

    The application of hyper spectral radiometric data to climate research requires very high absolute radiometric accuracy and stability. We use cloud-free tropical ocean data from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIR) Calibration Data Subset (ADCS) to show that the radiometric precision and stability required climate applications has been achieved. The sea surface skin temperatures derived from the AIRS 2616cm-1 super window channel are stable relative to the RTG.SST at the better than 8 mK/year level, and the spectral calibration is stable at the 1 ppm/year level. The excellent stability and accuracy are the result of the implementation of AIRS as a grating array spectrometer, which is cooled and stabilized within 10 mK at 155 K. Analysis of daily measurements of the temperature gradient between the surface and 7 km altitude show that the AIRS Calibration Data Subset has applications which extend its original intent for calibration support to climate research. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua satellite was launched into polar orbit in May 2002. AIRS covers the spectral region from 640 to 2700 cm-1 with 2378 independent channels and represents the first of a new generation of hyper spectral resolution sounders in support of global sounding data for weather forecasting and climate research.

  3. Sensitivity Analysis for Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) CO2 Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, Ilana

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a thermal infrared sensor able to retrieve the daily atmospheric state globally for clear as well as partially cloudy field-of-views. The AIRS spectrometer has 2378 channels sensing from 15.4 micrometers to 3.7 micrometers, of which a small subset in the 15 micrometers region has been selected, to date, for CO2 retrieval. To improve upon the current retrieval method, we extended the retrieval calculations to include a prior estimate component and developed a channel ranking system to optimize the channels and number of channels used. The channel ranking system uses a mathematical formalism to rapidly process and assess the retrieval potential of large numbers of channels. Implementing this system, we identifed a larger optimized subset of AIRS channels that can decrease retrieval errors and minimize the overall sensitivity to other iridescent contributors, such as water vapor, ozone, and atmospheric temperature. This methodology selects channels globally by accounting for the latitudinal, longitudinal, and seasonal dependencies of the subset. The new methodology increases accuracy in AIRS CO2 as well as other retrievals and enables the extension of retrieved CO2 vertical profiles to altitudes ranging from the lower troposphere to upper stratosphere. The extended retrieval method for CO2 vertical profile estimation using a maximum-likelihood estimation method. We use model data to demonstrate the beneficial impact of the extended retrieval method using the new channel ranking system on CO2 retrieval.

  4. Regional Assimilation of NASA Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Lapenta, William; Jediovec, Gary J.; McCarty, William; Mecikalski, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center seeks to accelerate the infusion of NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NW S forecast operations and decision-making. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), is expected to advance climate research and weather prediction into the 21 st century. It is one of six instruments onboard Aqua, a satellite that is part of NASA s Earth Observing System. AIRS, along with two partner microwave sounding instruments, represents the most advanced atmospheric sounding system ever deployed in space. The system is capable of measuring the atmospheric temperature in the troposphere with radiosonde accuracies of 1 K over 1 km-thick layers under both clear and cloudy conditions, while the accuracy of the derived moisture profiles will exceed that obtained by radiosondes. It is imperative that the scientific community is prepared to take full advantage of next-generation satellite data that will become available within the next decade. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure designed to optimally assimilate AIRS data at high spatial resolution over both land and ocean. The assimilation system used in this study is the Local Analysis and Prediction System (LAPS) developed at the Forecast System Laboratory used extensively around the globe. Results will focus on quality control issues associated with AIRS, optimal assimilation strategies, and the impact of the AIRS data on subsequent numerical forecasts at 12 km produced by the next generation Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model.

  5. Development of Level 3 (gridded) products for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, Stephanie L.; Leroy, Stephen S.; Manning, Evan M.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Oliphant, Robert B.; Braverman, Amy; Lee, Sung-Yung; Lambrigtsen, Bjom H.

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) sounding system is a suite of infrared and microwave instruments flown as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) onboard the Aqua platform. The AIRS dataset provides a daily, global view of Earth processes at a finer vertical resolution than ever before. However, analysis of the AIRS data is a daunting task given the sheer volume and complexity of the data. The volume of data produced by the EOS project is unprecedented; the AIRS project alone will produce many terabytes of data over the lifetime of the mission. This paper describes development of AIRS Level 3 data products that will help to alleviate problems of access and usability.

  6. Tropical Storm Beryl as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: AIRS Microwave Image

    This is an infrared image of Tropical Storm Beryl in the western Atlantic, from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on July 20, 2006, 1:30 am local time. This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the hurricane. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red). This infrared image shows three large regions of strong convection surrounding the core of the storm. The largest, on the northern edge of the core, also appears in the companion microwave image to contain intense precipitation.

    The image in figure 1 is created from microwave radiation emitted by Earth's atmosphere and received by the instrument. It shows where the heaviest rainfall is taking place (in blue) in the storm. Blue areas outside of the tropical storm, where there are either some clouds or no clouds indicate where the sea surface shines through.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a

  7. Demonstrating the Operational Value of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Profiles in the Pre-Convective Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, Danielle; Zavodsky, Bradley; Stano, Geoffrey; Jedlovec, Gary

    2011-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) is a project to transition those NASA observations and research capabilities to the weather forecasting community to improve the short-term regional forecasts. This poster reviews the work to demonstrate the value to these forecasts of profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on board the Aqua satellite with particular assistance in predicting thunderstorm forecasts by the profiles of the pre-convective environment.

  8. Improved Products for Assimilation and Model Validation from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft was launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS acquires hyperspectral infrared radiances in the 3.7-15.4 micrometer spectral region with spectral resolution of better than 1200. Key channels from the AIRS Level 1B calibrated radiance product are currently assimilated into operational weather forecasts at NCEP and other international agencies. Additional Level 2 products for assimilation include the AIRS cloud cleared radiances and the geophysical retrieved temperature and water vapor profiles. The AIRS products are also used to validate climate model vertical and horizontal biases and transport of water vapor and key trace gases including Carbon Dioxide and Ozone. The wide variety of products available from the AIRS make it well suited to study processes affecting the interaction of these products.

  9. Science Highlights and Lessons Learned from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Suda, Jarrod; Licata, Steve

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on the NASA Earth Observing System Aqua spacecraft are facility instruments designed to support measurements of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and a wide range of atmospheric constituents in support of weather forecasting and scientific research in climate and atmospheric chemistry. This paper is an update to the science highlights from a paper by the authors released last year and also looks back at the lessons learned and future needs of the scientific community. These lessons not only include requirements on the measurements, but scientific shortfalls as well. Results from the NASA Science Community Workshop in IR and MW Sounders relating to AIRS and AMSU requirements and concerns are covered and reflect much of what has been learned and what is needed for future atmospheric sounding from Low Earth Orbit.

  10. Atmospheric infrared sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkranz, Philip, W.; Staelin, David, H.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of two Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) team members during the first half of 1995. Changes to the microwave first-guess algorithm have separated processing of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A) from AMSU-B data so that the different spatial resolutions of the two instruments may eventually be considered. Two-layer cloud simulation data was processed with this algorithm. The retrieved water vapor column densities and liquid water are compared. The information content of AIRS data was applied to AMSU temperature profile retrievals in clear and cloudy atmospheres. The significance of this study for AIRS/AMSU processing lies in the improvement attributable to spatial averaging and in the good results obtained with a very simple algorithm when all of the channels are used. Uncertainty about the availability of either a Microwave Humidity Sensor (MHS) or AMSU-B for EOS has motivated consideration of possible low-cost alternative designs for a microwave humidity sensor. One possible configuration would have two local oscillators (compared to three for MHS) at 118.75 and 183.31 GHz. Retrieval performances of the two instruments were compared in a memorandum titled 'Comparative Analysis of Alternative MHS Configurations', which is attached.

  11. Hurricane Katrina as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: click on image for larger AIRS microwave image

    At 1:30 a.m. local time this morning, the remnants of (now Tropical Depression) Katrina were centered on the Mississippi-Tennessee border. This microwave image from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument on NASA's Aqua spacecrat shows that the area of most intense precipitation was concentrated to the north of the center of activity.

    The infrared image shows how the storms look through an AIRS Infrared window channel. Window channels measure the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the hurricane. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds, so the purple color indicates the cool cloud tops of the storm. In cloud-free areas, the infrared signal is retrieved at the Earth's surface, revealing warmer temperatures. Cooler areas are pushing to purple and warmer areas are pushing to red.

    The microwave image (figure 1) reveals where the heaviest precipitation in the hurricane is taking place. The blue areas within the storm show the location of this heavy precipitation. Blue areas outside of the storm where there are moderate or no clouds are where the cold (in the microwave sense) sea surface shines through.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard

  12. Improved Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Radiance Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction (NWP) have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Retrieved profiles from AIRS contain much of the information that is contained in the radiances and may be able to reveal reasons for this reduced impact. Assimilating AIRS retrieved profiles in an identical analysis configuration to the radiances, tracking the quantity and quality of the assimilated data in each technique, and examining analysis increments and forecast impact from each data type can yield clues as to the reasons for the reduced impact. By doing this with regional scale models individual synoptic features (and the impact of AIRS on these features) can be more easily tracked. This project examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing operational techniques used for AIRS radiances and research techniques used for AIRS retrieved profiles. Parallel versions of a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) that mimics the analysis methodology, domain, and observational datasets for the regional North American Mesoscale (NAM) model run at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) are run to examine the impact of each type of AIRS data set. The first configuration will assimilate the AIRS radiance data along with other conventional and satellite data using techniques implemented within the operational system; the second configuration will assimilate AIRS retrieved profiles instead of AIRS radiances in the same manner. Preliminary results of this study will be presented and focus on the analysis impact of the radiances and profiles for selected cases.

  13. Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) over the Antarctic Plateau: Low Radiance, Low Humidity, and Thin Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of the project has been to use specialized measurements collected at the Antarctic Plateau to provide validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) spectral radiances and some AIRS Level 2 products. As proposed, efforts conducted at the University of Wisconsin are focused on providing technical information, data, and software in support of the validation studies.

  14. Carbon Monoxide Distribution over Peninsular Malaysia from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jaso M.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.

    2009-07-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. It daily coverage of ˜70% of the planet represents a significant evolutionary advance in satellite traces gas remote sensing. AIRS, the part of a large international investment to upgrade the operational meteorological satellite systems, is first of the new generation of meteorological advanced sounders for operational and research use, Providing New Insights into Weather and Climate for the 21st Century. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous, an indoor and outdoor air pollutant, is not a significant greenhouse gas as it absorbs little infrared radiation from the Earth. However, it does have an influence on oxidization in the atmosphere through interaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH), which also react with methane, halocarbons and tropospheric ozone. It produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning, and that it has a role as a smog. The aim of this investigation is to study the (CO) carbon monoxide distribution over Peninsular Malaysia. The land use map of the Peninsular Malaysia was conducted by using CO total column amount, obtained from AIRS data, the map & data was processed and analyzed by using Photoshop & SigmaPlot 11.0 programs and compared for timing of various (day time) (28 August 2005 & 29 August 2007) for both direct comparison and the comparison using the same a priori profile, the CO concentrations in 28/8/2005 higher. The CO maps were generated using Kriging Interpolation technique. This interpolation technique produced high correlation coefficient, R2 and low root mean square error, RMS for CO. This study provided useful information for influence change of CO concentration on varies temperature.

  15. Data Assimilation and Regional Forecasts Using Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary

    2009-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses, which in turn should lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles with an accuracy comparable to that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profiles--obtained from the version 5.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) science team retrieval algorithm-into a regional configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using WRF-Var. The paper focuses on development of background error covariances for the regional domain and background field type, a methodology for ingesting AIRS profiles as separate over-land and over-water retrievals with different error characteristics, and utilization of level-by-level quality indicators to select only the highest quality data. The assessment of the impact of the AIRS profiles on WRF-Var analyses will focus on intelligent use of the quality indicators, optimized tuning of the WRF-Var, and comparison of analysis soundings to radiosondes. The analyses will be used to conduct a month-long series of regional forecasts over the continental U.S. The long-tern1 impact of AIRS profiles on forecast will be assessed against verifying radiosonde and stage IV precipitation data.

  16. Data Assimilation and Regional Forecasts using Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabodsky, Brad; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses, which in turn should lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which, together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles with an accuracy comparable to that of radionsondes. The purpose of this poster is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profiles, obtained from the version 5.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) science team retrieval algorithm, into a regional configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using WRF-Var. The poster focuses on development of background error covariances for the regional domain and background field type, a methodology for ingesting AIRS profiles as separate over-land and over-water retrievals with different error characteristics, and utilization of level-by-level quality indicators to select only the highest quality data. The assessment of the impact of the AIRS profiles on WRF-Var analyses will focus on intelligent use of the quality indicators, optimized tuning of the WRF-Var, and comparison of analysis soundings to radiosondes. The analyses are used to conduct a month-long series of regional forecasts over the continental U.S. The long-term impact of AIRS profiles on forecast will be assessed against NAM analyses and stage IV precipitation data.

  17. Improving Regional Forecast by Assimilating Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles into WRF Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Brad; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and produce improved forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced space-based atmospheric sounding systems. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate high resolution AIRS profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) version 2.2 using WRF-Var. The paper focuses on development of background error covariances for the regional domain and background type, and an optimal methodology for ingesting AIRS temperature and moisture profiles as separate overland and overwater retrievals with different error characteristics. The AIRS thermodynamic profiles are derived from the version 5.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) science team retrieval algorithm and contain information about the quality of each temperature layer. The quality indicators were used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture data for each profile location and pressure level. The analyses were then used to conduct a month-long series of regional forecasts over the continental U.S. The long-term impacts of AIRS profiles on forecast were assessed against verifying NAM analyses and stage IV precipitation data.

  18. Hurricane Frances as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and SeaWinds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    this combination image, the AIRS infrared data reveals the temperature of the atmosphere around the storm, but doesn't tell us about the wind direction or relative intensity. The directional vectors of the SeaWinds data set show how the air is circulating around the storm.

    Scatterometers measure surface wind speed and direction by bouncing microwave pulses off the ocean's surface. The SeaWinds instruments measure the backscattered radar energy from wind-generated ocean waves. By making multiple measurements from different looks at the same location, we can infer the vector wind averaged over each 25 km resolution cell. The primary mission objective of the SeaWinds and QuikSCAT scatterometers is to obtain long-term, global coverage of the ocean vector winds for oceanographic and climate research. While not specifically designed for detailed mapping and tracking of hurricanes, both instruments have been found to be useful resources for operational forecasters.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Spaceborne Infrared Atmospheric Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas; Macenka, Steven; Kampe, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A report describes the development of the spaceborne infrared atmospheric sounder (SIRAS) - a spectral imaging instrument, suitable for observing the atmosphere of the Earth from a spacecraft, that utilizes four spectrometers to cover the wavelength range of 12 to 15.4 m with a spectral resolution that ranges between 1 part per 900 and 1 part per 1,200 in wavelength. The spectrometers are operated in low orders to minimize filtering requirements. Focal planes receive the dispersed energy and provide a spectrum of the scene. The design of the SIRAS combines advanced, wide-field refractive optics with high-dispersion gratings in a solid-state (no moving parts), diffraction-limited optical system that is the smallest such system that can be constructed for the specified wavelength range and resolution. The primary structure of the SIRAS has dimensions of 10 by 10 by 14 cm and has a mass of only 2.03 kg

  20. The Impact of Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles on Short-term Weather Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Brad; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William

    2007-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced spacebased atmospheric sounding systems. The combined AlRS/AMSU system provides radiance measurements used to retrieve temperature profiles with an accuracy of 1 K over 1 km layers under both clear and partly cloudy conditions, while the accuracy of the derived humidity profiles is 15% in 2 km layers. Critical to the successful use of AIRS profiles for weather and climate studies is the use of profile quality indicators and error estimates provided with each profile Aside form monitoring changes in Earth's climate, one of the objectives of AIRS is to provide sounding information of sufficient accuracy such that the assimilation of the new observations, especially in data sparse region, will lead to an improvement in weather forecasts. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate highresolution AIRS profile data in a regional analysis/forecast model. The paper will focus on the impact of AIRS profiles on a rapidly developing east coast storm and will also discuss preliminary results for a 30-day forecast period, simulating a quasi-operation environment. Temperature and moisture profiles were obtained from the prototype version 5.0 EOS science team retrieval algorithm which includes explicit error information for each profile. The error profile information was used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture data for every profile location and pressure level for assimilation into the ARPS Data Analysis System (ADAS). The AIRS-enhanced analyses were used as initial fields for the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) system used by the SPORT project for regional weather forecast studies. The ADASWRF system will be run on CONUS domain with an emphasis on the east coast. The preliminary assessment of the impact of the AIRS profiles will focus on quality control issues associated with AIRS

  1. Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Thermodynamic Profiles on Regional Weather Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Jedlovee, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles with accuracy comparable to that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model using its three-dimension variational (3DVAR) analysis component (WRF-Var). Quality indicators are used to select only the highest quality temperature and moisture profiles for assimilation in both clear and partly cloudy regions. Separate error characteristics for land and water profiles are also used in the assimilation process. Assimilation results indicate that AIRS profiles produce an analysis closer to in situ observations than the background field. Forecasts from a 37-day case study period in the winter of 2007 show that AIRS profile data can lead to improvements in 6-h cumulative precipitation forecasts due to instability added in the forecast soundings by the AIRS profiles. Additionally, in a convective heavy rainfall event from February 2007, assimilation of AIRS profiles produces a more unstable boundary layer resulting in enhanced updrafts in the model. These updrafts produce a squall line and precipitation totals that more closely reflect ground-based observations than a no AIRS control forecast. The location of available high-quality AIRS profiles ahead of approaching storm systems is found to be of paramount importance to the amount of impact the observations will have on the resulting forecasts.

  2. Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Thermodynamic Profiles on Regional Precipitation Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-H.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedloved, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations can be used to improve analyses and lead to better forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), provides temperature and moisture profiles in clear and cloudy regions with accuracy which approaches that of radiosondes. The purpose of this paper is to describe an approach to assimilate AIRS thermodynamic profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model using WRF-Var. Quality indicators are used to select only the highest quality temperature and moisture profiles for assimilation in clear and partly cloudy regions, and uncontaminated portions of retrievals above clouds in overcast regions. Separate error characteristics for land and water profiles are also used in the assimilation process. Assimilation results indicate that AIRS profiles produce an analysis closer to in situ observations than the background field. Forecasts from a 37-day case study period in the winter of 2007 show that AIRS profile data can lead to improvements in 6-h cumulative precipitation forecasts resulting from improved thermodynamic fields. Additionally, in a convective heavy rainfall event from February 2007, assimilation of AIRS profiles produces a more unstable boundary layer resulting in enhanced updrafts in the model. These updrafts produce a squall line and precipitation totals that more closely reflect ground-based observations than a no AIRS control forecast. The location of available high-quality AIRS profiles ahead of approaching storm systems is found to be of paramount importance to the amount of impact the observations will have on the resulting forecasts.

  3. Hurricane Frances as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) - Total Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Born in the Atlantic, Hurricane Frances became a category 4 hurricane on August 31, 2004. Expectations are the hurricane will hit the Space Coast of Florida in Brevard County early Sunday morning.

    This movie is a time-series of maps that show AIRS observations of the total amount of water vapor present in the atmospheric column above each point of the Earth's surface. If all the water vapor in the column were forced to fall as rain, the depth of the resulting puddle on the surface at that point is equal to the value shown on the map. Fifty millimeters (mm) is about 2 inches. The large band of maximum water vapor in the neighborhood of the equator is the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), a region of strong convection and powerful thunderstorms.

    This movie shows the total precipitable water vapor from August 23 through September 2, 2004. You can see Hurricane Frances as it moves through the Caribbean toward Florida, and the changes in intensity are visible. The eye has been marked with a red spot. The water vapor encompassed by the hurricane is also the result of the very strong convection which is an integral part of the formation and intensification of tropical storms. If you look at the last frame of the movie in the lower right corner, you can see the emergence of a new tropical storm. Ivan makes its debut in the Atlantic.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft

  4. Hurricane Alex as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Carolina, traveling northeast at 6 mph.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] August 1, 2004, 1:30am ET Daylight snapshot from AIRS visible/near-infrared. At the time AIRS made this observation, Alex was still a tropical depression and just getting organized.

    Movies Slice down the atmosphere with the AIRS infrared sensor.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] August 3, 2004, 1:30am ET Alex becomes the first hurricane of the 2004 North Atlantic season with sustained winds at 75 mph.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] August 2, 2004, 1:30pm ET Alex is located about 120 miles southeast of Charleston, South Carolina. Alex has now begun to move to the northeast and a general northeastward track is expected the next couple of days with a gradual acceleration in forward speed as it begins to interact with stronger upper level winds.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] August 2, 2004, 1:30am ET Alex now has sustained winds of 35 knots.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] August 1, 2004, 1:30pm ET Alex is tropical depression and beginning to get organized.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Comparison of Methane Data Products from the TES and AIRS Infrared Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, T. J.; Pagano, T. S.; Worden, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas with a highly positive radiative forcing of 0.48 W/m2 (IPCC 2013). Global concentrations of methane have been steadily increasing since 2007 (Bruhwiler 2014), raising concerns about methane's impact on the future global climate. For about the last decade, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft has been detecting several trace gas species in the troposphere including methane. The goal of this study is to compare TES methane retrievals to that of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua spacecraft so that scientific investigations may be transferred from TES to AIRS. The two instruments fly in the afternoon constellation (A-Train), providing numerous coincident measurements for comparison. In addition, they also have a similar spectral range, (3.3 to 15.4 µm) for TES (Beer, 2006) and (3.7 to 15.4 µm) for AIRS (Chahine, 2006), making both instruments sensitive to the mid and upper troposphere. This makes them ideal candidates to compare methane data products. However, because AIRS spectral resolution is lower than that of the TES, there may be a difference in vertical sensitivity. In addition, the retrieval techniques and error characteristics are different for the two data sets. The current state of validation for these data products will be presented. To identify conditions in which the data sets agree and dis agree, we present global maps of methane concentrations from monthly level 3 (L3) data products. We also investigate the temporal stability between the two datasets by comparing global zonal averages derived from L3 over the last decade. Finally, we compare L2 retrieval profiles from representative granules in the tropical, mid-latitude and northern latitudes.

  6. Regional Precipitation Forecast with Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profile Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S.-H.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedloved, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced technology in hyperspectral sensors such as the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS; Aumann et al. 2003) on NASA's polar orbiting Aqua satellite retrieve higher vertical resolution thermodynamic profiles than their predecessors due to increased spectral resolution. Although these capabilities do not replace the robust vertical resolution provided by radiosondes, they can serve as a complement to radiosondes in both space and time. These retrieved soundings can have a significant impact on weather forecasts if properly assimilated into prediction models. Several recent studies have evaluated the performance of specific operational weather forecast models when AIRS data are included in the assimilation process. LeMarshall et al. (2006) concluded that AIRS radiances significantly improved 500 hPa anomaly correlations in medium-range forecasts of the Global Forecast System (GFS) model. McCarty et al. (2009) demonstrated similar forecast improvement in 0-48 hour forecasts in an offline version of the operational North American Mesoscale (NAM) model when AIRS radiances were assimilated at the regional scale. Reale et al. (2008) showed improvements to Northern Hemisphere 500 hPa height anomaly correlations in NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) global system with the inclusion of partly cloudy AIRS temperature profiles. Singh et al. (2008) assimilated AIRS temperature and moisture profiles into a regional modeling system for a study of a heavy rainfall event during the summer monsoon season in Mumbai, India. This paper describes an approach to assimilate AIRS temperature and moisture profiles into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model using its three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) assimilation system (WRF-Var; Barker et al. 2004). Section 2 describes the AIRS instrument and how the quality indicators are used to intelligently select the highest-quality data for assimilation

  7. Assimilation of Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) Profiles using WRF-Var

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Brad; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Lapenta, William

    2008-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model contains a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) assimilation system (WRF-Var), which allows a user to join data from multiple sources into one coherent analysis. WRF-Var combines observations with a background field traditionally generated using a previous model forecast through minimization of a cost function. In data sparse regions, remotely-sensed observations may be able to improve analyses and produce improved forecasts. One such source comes from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), which together with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), represents one of the most advanced space-based atmospheric sounding systems. The combined AIRS/AMSU system provides radiance measurements used as input to a sophisticated retrieval scheme which has been shown to produce temperature profiles with an accuracy of 1 K over 1 km layers and humidity profiles with accuracy of 15% in 2 km layers in both clear and partly cloudy conditions. The retrieval algorithm also provides estimates of the accuracy of the retrieved values at each pressure level, allowing the user to select profiles based on the required error tolerances of the application. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure to optimally assimilate high-resolution AIRS profile data into a regional configuration of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) version 2.2 using WRF-Var. The paper focuses on development of background error covariances for the regional domain and background field type using gen_be and an optimal methodology for ingesting AIRS temperature and moisture profiles as separate overland and overwater retrievals with different error characteristics in the WRF-Var. The AIRS thermodynamic profiles are obtained from the version 5.0 Earth Observing System (EOS) science team retrieval algorithm and contain information about the quality of each temperature layer. The quality indicators are used to select the highest quality temperature and moisture

  8. Hurricane Ivan as Observed by NASA's Spaceborne Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Evaluating the Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Data On Convective Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, Danielle; Zavodsky, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) is a collaborative partnership between NASA and operational forecasting partners, including a number of National Weather Service (NWS) offices. SPoRT provides real-time NASA products and capabilities to its partners to address specific operational forecast challenges. The mission of SPoRT is to transition observations and research capabilities into operations to help improve short-term weather forecasts on a regional scale. Two areas of focus are data assimilation and modeling, which can to help accomplish SPoRT's programmatic goals of transitioning NASA data to operational users. Forecasting convective weather is one challenge that faces operational forecasters. Current numerical weather prediction (NWP) models that operational forecasters use struggle to properly forecast location, timing, intensity and/or mode of convection. Given the proper atmospheric conditions, convection can lead to severe weather. SPoRT's partners in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have a mission to protect the life and property of American citizens. This mission has been tested as recently as this 2011 severe weather season, which has seen more than 300 fatalities and injuries and total damages exceeding $10 billion. In fact, during the three day period from 25-27 April, 1,265 storms reports (362 tornado reports) were collected making this three day period one of most active in American history. To address the forecast challenge of convective weather, SPoRT produces a real-time NWP model called the SPoRT Weather Research and Forecasting (SPoRT-WRF), which incorporates unique NASA data sets. One of the NASA assets used in this unique model configuration is retrieved profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS).The goal of this project is to determine the impact that these AIRS profiles have on the SPoRT-WRF forecasts by comparing to a current operational model and a control SPoRT-WRF model

  10. Evaluation of the Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Radiance and Profile Data Assimilation in Partly Cloudy Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Jedlovec, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Retrieved profiles from AIRS contain much of the information that is contained in the radiances and may be able to reveal reasons for this reduced impact. Assimilating AIRS retrieved profiles in an identical analysis configuration to the radiances, tracking the quantity and quality of the assimilated data in each technique, and examining analysis increments and forecast impact from each data type can yield clues as to the reasons for the reduced impact. By doing this with regional scale models individual synoptic features (and the impact of AIRS on these features) can be more easily tracked. This project examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing operational techniques used for AIRS radiances and research techniques used for AIRS retrieved profiles. Parallel versions of a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) are run to examine the impact AIRS radiances and retrieved profiles. Statistical evaluation of 6 weeks of forecast runs will be compared along with preliminary results of in-depth investigations for select case comparing the analysis increments in partly cloudy regions and short-term forecast impacts.

  11. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Jin, X.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark datasets for both inter-calibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly compared with IASI on MetOp-A and -B at the finest spectral scale and with AIRS on Aqua in 25 selected spectral regions through one year of simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) observations to evaluate radiometric consistency of these four hyperspectral IR sounders. The spectra from different sounders are paired together through strict spatial and temporal collocation. The uniform scenes are selected by examining the collocated Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) pixels. Their brightness temperature (BT) differences are then calculated by converting the spectra onto common spectral grids. The results indicate that CrIS agrees well with IASI on MetOp-A and IASI on MetOp-B at the longwave IR (LWIR) and middle-wave IR (MWIR) bands with 0.1-0.2 K differences. There are no apparent scene-dependent patterns for BT differences between CrIS and IASI for individual spectral channels. CrIS and AIRS are compared at the 25 spectral regions for both Polar and Tropical SNOs. The combined global SNO datasets indicate that, the CrIS-AIRS BT differences are less than or around 0.1 K among 21 of 25 comparison spectral regions and they range from 0.15 to 0.21 K in the remaining 4 spectral regions. CrIS-AIRS BT differences in some comparison spectral regions show weak scene-dependent features.

  12. Radiometric consistency assessment of hyperspectral infrared sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Jin, X.; Chen, Y.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    The radiometric and spectral consistency among the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) is fundamental for the creation of long-term infrared (IR) hyperspectral radiance benchmark data sets for both intercalibration and climate-related studies. In this study, the CrIS radiance measurements on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite are directly compared with IASI on MetOp-A and MetOp-B at the finest spectral scale and with AIRS on Aqua in 25 selected spectral regions through simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) observations in 2013, to evaluate radiometric consistency of these four hyperspectral IR sounders. The spectra from different sounders are paired together through strict spatial and temporal collocation. The uniform scenes are selected by examining the collocated Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) pixels. Their brightness temperature (BT) differences are then calculated by converting the spectra onto common spectral grids. The results indicate that CrIS agrees well with IASI on MetOp-A and IASI on MetOp-B at the long-wave IR (LWIR) and middle-wave IR (MWIR) bands with 0.1-0.2 K differences. There are no apparent scene-dependent patterns for BT differences between CrIS and IASI for individual spectral channels. CrIS and AIRS are compared at the 25 spectral regions for both polar and tropical SNOs. The combined global SNO data sets indicate that the CrIS-AIRS BT differences are less than or around 0.1 K among 21 of 25 spectral regions and they range from 0.15 to 0.21 K in the remaining four spectral regions. CrIS-AIRS BT differences in some comparison spectral regions show weak scene-dependent features.

  13. A radiance-based method for estimating uncertainties in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) land surface temperature product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Hook, Simon J.

    2012-10-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) has been identified by NASA and other international organizations as an important Earth System Data Record (ESDR). An ESDR is defined as a long-term, well calibrated and validated data set. Identifying uncertainties in LST products with coarse spatial resolutions (>10 km) such as those from hyperspectral infrared sounders is notoriously difficult due to the challenges of making reliable in situ measurements representative of the spatial scales of the output products. In this study we utilize a Radiance-based (R-based) LST method for estimating uncertainties in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) v5 LST product. The R-based method provides estimates of the true LST using a radiative closure simulation without the need for in situ measurements, and requires input air temperature, relative humidity profiles and emissivity data. The R-based method was employed at three validation sites over the Namib Desert, Gran Desierto, and Redwood National Park for all AIRS observations from 2002 to 2010. Results showed daytime LST root-mean square errors (RMSE) of 2-3 K at the Namib and Desierto sites, and 1.5 K at the Redwood site. Nighttime LST RMSEs at the two desert sites were a factor of two less when compared to daytime results. Positive daytime LST biases were found at each site due to an underestimation of the daytime AIRS v5 longwave spectral emissivity, while the reverse occurred at nighttime. In the AIRS v6 product (release 2012), LST biases and RMSEs will be reduced significantly due to improved methodologies for the surface retrieval and emissivity first guess.

  14. Advanced microwave sounding unit study for atmospheric infrared sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenkranz, Philip W.; Staelin, David H.

    1992-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A), and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS, formerly AMSU-B) together constitute the advanced sounding system facility for the Earth Observing System (EOS). A summary of the EOS phase B activities are presented.

  15. Observation of the water cycle from space with the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahine, M. T.; Waliser, D. E.; Fetzer, E. J.; Olsen, E. T.

    2007-12-01

    AIRS is one of six instruments on board the Aqua satellite, part of NASA's Earth Observing System launched in a sun synchronous near polar orbit on May 4, 2002. AIRS and its partner microwave instrument, AMSU A, provide high quality data facilitating studies of the global water and energy cycles, climate variation and trends, and the response of the climate system to increased greenhouse gases. The exceptional stability of the AIRS instrument provides a climate record of thermal infrared radiance spectra spanning the 3.74 15.4 mm spectral band with 2378 channels at a nominal resolution of 1/1200. (Chahine et al, in BAMS, July 2006) Accurate knowledge of the vertical distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere is critically important to the determination of the warming the Earth will experience as a result of anthropogenic forcing. Comparison of the AIRS specific humidity product to state of the art climate models has shown most models exhibit a pattern of drier than observed (by 10 25%) in the tropics below 800 hPa and moister than observed (by 25 100%) between 300 and 600 hPa in the extra tropics (Pierce et al, GRL 2006). The AIRS water vapor measurements also reveal tropospheric moisture perturbations that are much larger than those depicted in previous NCAR/NCEP reanalysis and ECMWF analysis datasets, both of which have been widely used as observations to validate models. This suggests that the impact of convection induced downdrafts on the atmospheric boundary layer is significantly underestimated in both ECMWF and NCEP reanalysis (Fu et al., GRL 2006). AIRS data have led to the discovery of significant differences in the lower troposphere moisture and temperature fields during the spatial temporal evolution of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO). The anomalous lower troposphere temperature structure is observed in detail by AIRS for the Indian and western Pacific Oceans, while it remains much less well defined in the NCEP temperature fields (Tian et al

  16. P.88 Regional Precipitation Forecast with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Prudent assimulation of AIRS thermodynamic profiles and quality indicators can improve initial conditions for regional weather models. In general, AIRS-enhanced analysis more closely resembles radiosondes than the CNTL; forecasts with AIRS profiles are generally closer to NAM analyses than CNTL for sensible weather parameters (not shown here). Assimilation of AIRS leads to an overall QPF improvement in 6-h accumulated precipitation forecases. Including AIRS profiles in assimilation process enhances the low-level instability and produces stronger updrafts and a better precipitation forecast than the CNTL run.

  17. P161 Improved Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Radiance Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    For over 6 years, AIRS radiances have been assimilated operationally into National (e.g. Environmental Modeling Center (EMC)) and International (e.g. European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)), operational centers; assimilated in the North American Mesoscale (NAM) since 2008. Due partly to data latency and operational constraints, hyperspectral radiance assimilation has had less impact on the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system used in the NAM and GFS. Objective of this project is to use AIRS retrieved profiles as a proxy for the AIRS radiances in situations where AIRS radiances are unable to be assimilated in the current operational system by evaluating location and magnitude of analysis increments.

  18. Operational readiness for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the earth observing system aqua spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, T.; Aumann, H.; Chahine, M.; Karnik, A.; Goodson, G.; Schindler, R.; Elliot, D. A.; Hofstadter, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the AIRS science objectives, the instrument design and operation, the in-flight operational scenario, and the calibration plan. All aspects of the program are addressed here to demonstrate that the AIRS program is ready to transition to the flight segment of the program.

  19. Demonstrating the Operational Value of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Retrieved Profiles in the Pre-Convective Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, Danielle M.; Zavodsky, T.; Jedloved, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) is a collaborative partnership between NASA and operational forecasting partners, including a number of National Weather Service offices. SPoRT provides real-time NASA products and capabilities to its partners to address specific operational forecast challenges. One operational forecast challenge is forecasting convective weather in data-void regions such as large bodies of water (e.g. Gulf of Mexico). To address this forecast challenge, SPoRT produces a twice-daily three-dimensional analysis that blends a model first-guess from the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model with retrieved profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) -- a hyperspectral sounding instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite that provides temperature and moisture profiles of the atmosphere. AIRS profiles are unique in that they give a three dimensional view of the atmosphere that is not available through the current rawinsonde network. AIRS has two overpass swaths across North America each day, one valid in the 0700-0900 UTC timeframe and the other in the 1900-2100 UTC timeframe. This is helpful because the rawinsonde network only has data from 0000 UTC and 1200 UTC at specific land-based locations. Comparing the AIRS analysis product with control analyses that include no AIRS data demonstrates the value of the retrieved profiles to situational awareness for the pre-convective (and convective) environment. In an attempt to verify that the AIRS analysis was a good representation of the vertical structure of the atmosphere, both the AIRS and control analyses are compared to a Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) analysis used by operational forecasters. Using guidance from operational forecasters, convective available potential energy (CAPE) was determined to be a vital variable in making convective forecasts and is used herein to demonstrate the utility of the AIRS profiles in changing the vertical

  20. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua: instrument stability and data products for climate observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, M.; Aumann, H.; Strow, L.; Broberg, S.; Gaiser, S.

    2003-01-01

    30th International Symposium on Remote Sensing of the Environment (ISRSE) NASA Honolulu, Hawaii, USAThis paper discusses the stability of the AIRS instrument as measured pre-flight and in-orbit. In order differentiate instrument related changes with true changes in climate observations, the instrument stability must be demonstrated.

  1. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA Aqua Spacecraft: A General Remote Sensing Tool for Understanding Atmospheric Structure, Dynamics and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Fetzer, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft was launched on May 4, 2002. Early in the mission, the AIRS instrument demonstrated its value to the weather forecasting community with better than 6 hours of improvement on the 5 day forecast. Now with over eight years of consistent and stable data from AIRS, scientists are able to examine processes governing weather and climate and look at seasonal and interannual trends from the AIRSdata with high statistical confidence. Naturally, long-term climate trends require a longer data set, but indications are that the Aqua spacecraft and the AIRS instrument should last beyond 2018. This paper briefly describes the AIRS data products and presents some of the most significant findings involving the use of AIRS data in the areas of weather forecast improvement, climate processes and model validation, cloud and polar processes, and atmospheric composition (chemistry and dust).

  2. On Cirrus Cloud Fields Measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Liou, Kuo Nan

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation showing trends in clouds measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is given. The topics include: 1) Trends in clouds measured by AIRS: Are they reasonable? 2) Single and multilayered cloud trends; 3) Retrievals of thin cirrus D(sub e) and tau: Single-layered cloud only; 4) Relationships between ECF, D(sub e), tau, and T(sub CLD); and 5) MODIS vs. AIRS retrievals.

  3. Large Scale Variability of Mid-Tropospheric Carbon Dioxide as Observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Olsen, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft, launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS has 2378 infrared channels ranging from 3.7 microns to 15.4 microns and a 13.5 km footprint. AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), produces temperature profiles with 1K/km accuracy, water vapor profiles (20%/2km), infrared cloud height and fraction, and trace gas amounts for CO2, CO, SO2, O3 and CH4 in the mid to upper troposphere. AIRS wide swath(cedilla) +/-49.5 deg , enables daily global daily coverage for over 95% of the Earth's surface. AIRS data are used for weather forecasting, validating climate model distribution and processes, and observing long-range transport of greenhouse gases. In this study, we examine the large scale and regional horizontal variability in the AIRS Mid-tropospheric Carbon Dioxide product as a function of season and associate the observed variability with known atmospheric transport processes, and sources and sinks of CO2.

  4. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Dickerson, Russell; Schoeberl, Mark; Bloom, Hal; Gordley, Larry; McHugh, Martin; Thompson, Anne; Burrows, John; Zeng, Ning; Marshall, Tom; Fish, Chad; Kim, Jhoon; Park, Rokjin; Warner, Juying; Bhartia, Pawan; Kollonige, Debra

    2013-04-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  5. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gordley, L. L.; McHugh, M. J.; Thompson, A. M.; Burrows, J. P.; Zeng, N.; Marshall, B. T.; Fish, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Kim, J.; Park, R.; Warner, J. X.; Bhartia, P. K.; Kollonige, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century - for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  6. Global Daily Atmospheric State Profiles from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2008-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft, launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS has 2378 infrared channels ranging from 3.7 (micro)m to 15.4 (micro)m and a 13.5 km footprint. AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), produces temperature profiles with 1K/km accuracy on a global scale, as well as water vapor profiles, clouds, dust and trace gas amounts for CO2, CO, SO2, O3 and CH4.[1] AIRS data are used for weather forecasting and studies of global climate change. The AIRS is a 'facility' instrument developed by NASA as an experimental demonstration of advanced technology for remote sensing and the benefits of high resolution infrared spectra to science investigations.

  7. Geophysical Information from Advanced Sounder Infrared Spectral Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Satisfying this type of improvement for inferred geophysical information from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as enhancements to future sensors. This presentation addresses the information content present in infrared spectral radiance from advanced atmospheric sounders with an emphasis on knowledge of thermodynamic state and trace species. Results of trade-off studies conducted to evaluate the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content will be discussed. A focus is placed on information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites which began 28 October 2011.

  8. Channel alignment and radiometry in hyperspectral atmospheric infrared sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Denis A.; Aumanna, H. H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Overoye, Kenneth R.; Schindler, Rudolf A.

    2005-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyper-spectral infrared sounder which covers the 3.7 to 15,4 micron region with 2378 spectral channels. The AIRS instrument specification called for spatial co-registration of all channels to better than 2% of the field of view. Pre-launch testing confirmed that this requirement was met, since the standard deviations in the centroids was about 1% of the 13.5 km IFOV in scan and 3% in track. Detailed analysis of global AIRS data show that the typical scene gradient in 10 micron window channels is about I .3K/km rms. The way these gradients, which are predominantly caused by clouds, manifest themselves in the data depends on the details of the instrument design and the way the spectral channels are used in the data analysis, AIRS temperature and moisture retrievals use 328 of the 2378 channels from 17 independent arrays. As a result, the effect of the boresight misalignment averages to zero mean. Any increase in the effective noise is less than 0.2K. Also, there is no discernable performance degradation of products at the 45 km spatial resolution in the presence of partially cloudy scenes with up to 80% cloudiness. Single pixel radiometric differences between channels with boresight alignment differences can be appreciable and can affect scientific investigations on a single 15km footprint scale, particularly near coastlines, thunderstorms and surface emissivity inhomogeneities.

  9. A Simple Drought Product and Indicator Derived from Temperature and Relative Humidity Observed by the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, S. L.; Behrangi, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the United States, drought results in agricultural losses, impacts to industry, power and energy production, natural resources, municipal water supplies and human health making it one of the costliest natural hazards in the nation. Monitoring drought is therefore critical to help local governments, resource managers, and other groups make effective decisions, yet there is no single definition of drought, and because of the complex nature of drought there is no universal best drought indicator. Remote sensing applications in drought monitoring are advantageous due to the large spatial and temporal frequency of observations, leading to a better understanding of the spatial extent of drought and its duration, and in detecting the onset of drought and its intensity. NASA Earth Observing System (EOS)-era data have potential for monitoring and assessing drought and many are already used either directly or indirectly for drought monitoring. Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensor are widely used for agricultural and environmental plant-stress monitoring via the USDM, the VegDRI project and FEWSNet. However there remain underutilized sources of information from NASA satellite observations that may have promise for characterizing and understanding meteorological drought. Once such sensor is NASA's Advanced Infra-Red Sounder (AIRS) aboard the Aqua satellite. AIRS and it's sister sensor the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) that together provide meteorological information of high relevance to meteorological drought, e.g., profiles of water vapor, surface air temperature, and precipitation. Recent work undertaken to develop simple indicators of drought based on temperature and relative humidity from the AIRS suite of instruments is promising. Although there are more sophisticated indicators developed through the application of a variety of

  10. Assimilation of thermodynamic information from advanced infrared sounders under partially cloudy skies for regional NWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Jun; Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Schmit, Timothy J.; Lim, Agnes H. N.; Li, Zhenglong; Han, Hyojin; Li, Jinlong; Ackerman, Steve A.

    2015-06-01

    Generally, only clear-infrared spectral radiances (not affected by clouds) are assimilated in weather analysis systems. This is due to difficulties in modeling cloudy radiances as well as in observing their vertical structure from space. To take full advantage of the thermodynamic information in advanced infrared (IR) sounder observations requires assimilating radiances from cloud-contaminated regions. An optimal imager/sounder cloud-clearing technique has been developed by the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This technique can be used to retrieve clear column radiances through combining collocated multiband imager IR clear radiances and the sounder cloudy radiances; no background information is needed in this method. The imager/sounder cloud-clearing technique is similar to that of the microwave/IR cloud clearing in the derivation of the clear-sky equivalent radiances. However, it retains the original IR sounder resolution, which is critical for regional numerical weather prediction applications. In this study, we have investigated the assimilation of cloud-cleared IR sounder radiances using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer for three hurricanes, Sandy (2012), Irene (2011), and Ike (2008). Results show that assimilating additional cloud-cleared AIRS radiances reduces the 48 and 72 h temperature forecast root-mean-square error by 0.1-0.3 K between 300 and 850 hPa. Substantial improvement in reducing track forecasts errors in the range of 10 km to 50 km was achieved.

  11. Four Years of Absolutely Calibrated Hyperspectral Data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the Eos Aqua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Broberg, Steve; Elliott, Denis; Gregorich, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews four years of absolute calibration of hyperspectral data from the AIRS instrument located on the EOS AQUA spacecraft. The following topics are discussed: 1) A quick overview of AIRS; 2) What absolute calibration accuracy and stability are required for climate applications?; 3) Validating of radiance accuracy and stability: Results from four years of AIRS data; and 4) Conclusions.

  12. Investigations of the spatial and temporal resolution of retrievals of atmospheric carbon dioxide from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddy, Eric Sean

    As the dominant anthropogenic greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO 2), represents an important component of climate change (IPCC 2007). Owing to burning of fossil fuels and deforestation, atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased over 110 parts-per-million by volume (ppmv) from 270 ppmv to 380 ppmv since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Understanding of the spatial distribution of the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO 2 is necessary not only to predict the future atmospheric abundances but also their effect on future climate. Although designed for deriving high precision temperature and moisture profiles, NASA's Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) IR measurements include broad vertical sensitivity (between 3 and 10 km) to atmospheric CO2 variations. Coupled with AIRS' broad swath pattern and a technique referred to as "cloud-clearing" these measurements enable daily global spatial coverage. Nevertheless, AIRS' ability to determine the spatial distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) is strongly dependent on its ability to separate the radiative effects of CO2 from temperature not to mention measurement uncertainties due to clouds and other geophysical variables such as moisture and ozone. This research presents a thorough investigation into the temporal and spatial scales that the AIRS can separate temperature (and other geophysical variables) from CO2. Through our detailed understanding of the way satellites view the Earth's atmosphere, we have developed an algorithm capable of retrieving global middle-to-upper tropospheric CO2 concentrations in all-weather conditions with total uncertainties ranging between 1 to 2 ppmv. From a radiative perspective, roughly equivalent to 30 mK to 60 mK, 1 to 2 ppmv, is an awesome feat for a space-borne sensor. Necessary for the remarkable performance of this algorithm, we developed methodologies capable of separating the radiative effect of CO2 variability from temperature, improved the fast rapid transmittance algorithm

  13. Cloud Clearing of Infrared Sounder Radiances.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, R.; Serio, C.; Kelly, G.; Tramutoli, V.; McNally, A.

    1994-02-01

    R. RizziEuropean Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, England European Organization for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, Darmstadt, Germany C. SerioDipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Napoli, Italy G. KellyEuropean Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, England V. TramutoliDipartimento di Ingegneria e Fisica deil' Ambiente, Potenza, Italy A. McNallyEuropean Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, EnglandThe paper compares the performance of three different schemes for computing clear-sky brightness temperature from cloud-affected measurements. Both the ability to detect clouds and to estimate the equivalent clear-sky brightness temperature are examined. Simulated brightness temperatures computed from the ECMWF operational analysis are used as a reference, together with Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-derived sea surface temperature and cloud content within High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) fields of view. Cloud masks obtained from the cloud-detection schemes are compared with cloud masks obtained from AVHRR data; clear-column brightness temperatures for HIRS/2 channels 4, 7, and 13 are compared with the simulated ones; simulated clear-column brightness temperatures in the HIRS/2 window channel 8 are validated with equivalent products from AVHRR data. The comparison highlights some problems in the operational implementation of the NESDIS cloud-clearing scheme and with the operational filtering scheme of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office.

  14. Advanced infrared sounder subpixel cloud detection with imagers and its impact on radiance assimilation in NWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Jun; Li, Jinlong; Li, Zhenglong; Schmit, Timothy J.; Bai, Wenguang

    2014-03-01

    Accurate cloud detection is very important for infrared (IR) radiance assimilation; improved cloud detection could reduce cloud contamination and hence improve the assimilation. Although operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers are using IR sounder radiance data for cloud detection, collocated high spatial resolution imager data could help sounder subpixel cloud detection and characterization. IR sounder radiances with improved cloud detection using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were assimilated for Hurricane Sandy (2012). Forecast experiments were run with Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) as the forecast model and the Three-Dimensional Variational Assimilation (3DVAR)-based Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) as the analysis system. Results indicate that forecasts of both hurricane track and intensity are substantially improved when the collocated high spatial resolution MODIS cloud mask is used for AIRS subpixel cloud detection for assimilating radiances. This methodology can be applied to process Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CRIS)/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP)/Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the Metop series for improved radiance assimilation in NWP.

  15. How Well Can Infrared Sounders Observe the Atmosphere and Surface Through Clouds?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Strow, L. Larrabee; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Infrared sounders, such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared sounder (CrIS), have a cloud-impenetrable disadvantage in observing the atmosphere and surface under opaque cloudy conditions. However, recent studies indicate that hyperspectral, infrared sounders have the ability to detect cloud effective-optical and microphysical properties and to penetrate optically thin clouds in observing the atmosphere and surface to a certain degree. We have developed a retrieval scheme dealing with atmospheric conditions with cloud presence. This scheme can be used to analyze the retrieval accuracy of atmospheric and surface parameters under clear and cloudy conditions. In this paper, we present the surface emissivity results derived from IASI global measurements under both clear and cloudy conditions. The accuracy of surface emissivity derived under cloudy conditions is statistically estimated in comparison with those derived under clear sky conditions. The retrieval error caused by the clouds is shown as a function of cloud optical depth, which helps us to understand how well infrared sounders can observe the atmosphere and surface through clouds.

  16. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Version 6 Cloud Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Irion, F. W.; Dang, V. T.; Manning, E. M.; Nasiri, S. L.; Naud, C. M.; Blaisdell, J. M.; Schreier, M. M..; Yue, Q.; Bowman, K. W.; Fetzer, E. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Liou, K. N.; Lubin, D.; Ou, S. C.; Susskind, J.; Takano, Y.; Tian, B.; Worden, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The version 6 cloud products of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) instrument suite are described. The cloud top temperature, pressure, and height and effective cloud fraction are now reported at the AIRS field-of-view (FOV) resolution. Significant improvements in cloud height assignment over version 5 are shown with FOV-scale comparisons to cloud vertical structure observed by the CloudSat 94 GHz radar and the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Cloud thermodynamic phase (ice, liquid, and unknown phase), ice cloud effective diameter D(sub e), and ice cloud optical thickness (t) are derived using an optimal estimation methodology for AIRS FOVs, and global distributions for 2007 are presented. The largest values of tau are found in the storm tracks and near convection in the tropics, while D(sub e) is largest on the equatorial side of the midlatitude storm tracks in both hemispheres, and lowest in tropical thin cirrus and the winter polar atmosphere. Over the Maritime Continent the diurnal variability of tau is significantly larger than for the total cloud fraction, ice cloud frequency, and D(sub e), and is anchored to the island archipelago morphology. Important differences are described between northern and southern hemispheric midlatitude cyclones using storm center composites. The infrared-based cloud retrievals of AIRS provide unique, decadal-scale and global observations of clouds over portions of the diurnal and annual cycles, and capture variability within the mesoscale and synoptic scales at all latitudes.

  17. The TIROS-N high resolution infrared radiation sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS/2) was developed and flown on the Television and Infrared Observation Satellite, N Series (TIROS-N) as one means of obtaining atmospheric vertical profile information. The HIRS/2 receives visible and infrared spectrum radiation through a single telescope and selects 20 narrow spectral channels by means of a rotating filter wheel. A passive radiant cooler provides an operating temperature of 106.7K for the HgCdTe and InSb detectors while the visible detector operates at instrument frame temperature. Low noise amplifiers and digital processing provide 13 bit data for spacecraft data multiplexing and transmission. The qualities of system performance that determine sounding capability are the dynamic range of data collection, the noise equivalent radiance of the system, the registration of the air columns sampled in each channel, and the ability to upgrade the calibration of the instrument to maintain the performance standard throughout life. The basic performance of the instrument in test is described. Early orbital information from the TIROS-N launched on October 13, 1978 are given and some observations on system quality are made.

  18. Validation of the Radiometric Stability of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Elliott, D.; Strow, L. L.

    2012-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that an infrared sounder in low polar orbit is capable of producing climate quality data, if the spectral brightness temperatures have instrumental trends of less than 10 mK/yr. Achieving measurement stability at this level is not only very demanding of the design of the instrument, it is also pushes the state of art of measuring on orbit what stability is actually achieved. We discuss this using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) L1B data collected between 2002 and 2011. We compare the L1B brightness temperature observed in cloud filtered night tropical ocean spectra (obs) to the brightness temperature calculated based on the known surface emissivity, temperature and water vapor profiles from the ECMWF ReAnalysis (ERA) and the growth rates of CO2, N2O and Ozone. The trend in (obs-calc) is a powerful tool for the evaluation of the stability of the 2378 AIRS channels. We divided the channels into seven classes: All channels which sound in the stratosphere (at pressure levels below 150 hPa), 14 micron CO2 sounding, 4 micron CO2 P-branch sounding, 4 micron CO2 R-branch sounding, water vapor sounding, shortwave surface sounding and longwave surface sounding. The peak in the weighting function at 1050 hPa separates sounding and surface channels. The boundary between shortwave and longwave is 5 microns. Except for the stratosphere sounding channels, the remaining six groups have (obs-calc) trends of less than 20 mK/yr. The longwave surface channels have trends of 2 mK/yr, significantly less than the 8 mK/yr trend seem in the shortwave window channels. Based on the design of the instrument, trends within a group of channels should be the same. While the longwave and shortwave trends are less than the canonical 10 mK/yr, the larger trend in the shortwave channels could be an artifact of using the pre-launch determined calibration coefficients. This is currently under evaluation. The trend in (obs-calc) for the non-surface sounding channels, in

  19. Estimation of volcanic ash refractive index from satellite infrared sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, H.; Masuda, K.

    2014-12-01

    The properties of volcanic ash clouds (cloud height, optical depth, and effective radius of the particles) are planned to estimate from the data of the next Japanese geostationary meteorological satellite, Himawari 8/9. The volcanic ash algorithms, such as those proposed by NOAA/NESDIS and by EUMETSAT, are based on the infrared absorption properties of the ash particles, and the refractive index of a typical volcanic rock (i.e. andesite) has been used in the forward radiative transfer calculations. Because of a variety of the absorption properties for real volcanic ash particles at infrared wavelengths (9-13 micron), a large retrieval error may occur if the refractive index of the observed ash particles was different from that assumed in the retrieval algorithm. Satellite infrared sounder provides spectral information for the volcanic ash clouds. If we can estimate the refractive index of the ash particles from the infrared sounder data, a dataset of the optical properties for similar rock type of the volcanic ash can be prepared for the ash retrieval algorithms of geostationary/polar-orbiting satellites in advance. Furthermore, the estimated refractive index can be used for a diagnostic and a correction of the ash particle model in the retrieval algorithm within a period of the volcanic activities. In this work, optimal estimation of the volcanic ash parameters was conducted through the radiative transfer calculations for the window channels of the atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS). The estimated refractive indices are proposed for the volcanic ash particles of some eruption events.

  20. Deep convective cloud characterizations from both broadband imager and hyperspectral infrared sounder measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yufei; Li, Jun; Shi, Wenjing; Schmit, Timothy J.; Cao, Changyong; Li, Wanbiao

    2017-02-01

    Deep convective storms have contributed to airplane accidents, making them a threat to aviation safety. The most common method to identify deep convective clouds (DCCs) is using the brightness temperature difference (BTD) between the atmospheric infrared (IR) window band and the water vapor (WV) absorption band. The effectiveness of the BTD method for DCC detection is highly related to the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the WV band. In order to understand the sensitivity of BTD to spectral resolution and SNR for DCC detection, a BTD to noise ratio method using the difference between the WV and IR window radiances is developed to assess the uncertainty of DCC identification for different instruments. We examined the case of AirAsia Flight QZ8501. The brightness temperatures (Tbs) over DCCs from this case are simulated for BTD sensitivity studies by a fast forward radiative transfer model with an opaque cloud assumption for both broadband imager (e.g., Multifunction Transport Satellite imager, MTSAT-2 imager) and hyperspectral IR sounder (e.g., Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) instruments; we also examined the relationship between the simulated Tb and the cloud top height. Results show that despite the coarser spatial resolution, BTDs measured by a hyperspectral IR sounder are much more sensitive to high cloud tops than broadband BTDs. As demonstrated in this study, a hyperspectral IR sounder can identify DCCs with better accuracy.

  1. Requirements for a Moderate-Resolution Infrared Imaging Sounder (MIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gerber, Andrew J.; Kuai, Le; Gontijo, I.; DeLeon, Berta; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena; Bajpai, Shyam

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of imaging and sounding from space warrants exploration of new methods for obtaining the required information, including changing the spectral band sets, employing new technologies and merging instruments. In some cases we must consider relaxation of the current capability. In others, we expect higher performance. In general our goal is to meet the VIIRS and CrIS requirements while providing the enhanced next generation capabilities: 1) Hyperspectral Imaging in the Vis/NIR bands, 2) High Spatial Resolution Sounding in the Infrared bands. The former will improve the accuracy of ocean color products, aerosols and water vapor, surface vegetation and geology. The latter will enable the high-impact achieved by the current suite of hyperspectral infrared sounders to be achieved by the next generation high resolution forecast models. We examine the spectral, spatial and radiometric requirements for a next generation system and technologies that can be applied from the available inventory within government and industry. A two-band grating spectrometer instrument called the Moderate-resolution Infrared Imaging Sounder (MIRIS) is conceived that, when used with the planned NASA PACE Ocean Color Instrument (OCI) will meet the vast majority of CrIS and VIIRS requirements in the all bands and provide the next generation capabilities desired. MIRIS resource requirements are modest and the Technology Readiness Level is high leading to the expectation that the cost and risk of MIRIS will be reasonable.

  2. Determination of cloud parameters from infrared sounder data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H.-Y. M.

    1984-01-01

    The World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) plan is concerned with the need to develop a uniform global cloud climatology as part of a broad research program on climate processes. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) has been approved as the first project of the WCRP. The ISCCP has the basic objective to collect and analyze satellite radiance data to infer the global distribution of cloud radiative properties in order to improve the modeling of cloud effects on climate. Research is conducted to explore an algorithm for retrieving cloud properties by utilizing the available infrared sounder data from polar-orbiting satellites. A numerical method is developed for computing cloud top heights, amount, and emissivity on the basis of a parameterized infrared radiative transfer equation for cloudy atmospheres. Theoretical studies were carried out by considering a synthetic atmosphere.

  3. Theoretical computation of trace gases retrieval random error from measurements of high spectral resolution infrared sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Hung-Lung; Smith, William L.; Woolf, Harold M.; Theriault, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the trace gas profiling capabilities of future passive high spectral resolution (1 cm(exp -1) or better) infrared (600 to 2700 cm(exp -1)) satellite tropospheric sounders. These sounders, such as the grating spectrometer, Atmospheric InfRared Sounders (AIRS) (Chahine et al., 1990) and the interferometer, GOES High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (GHIS), (Smith et al., 1991) can provide these unique infrared spectra which enable us to conduct this analysis. In this calculation only the total random retrieval error component is presented. The systematic error components contributed by the forward and inverse model error are not considered (subject of further studies). The total random errors, which are composed of null space error (vertical resolution component error) and measurement error (instrument noise component error), are computed by assuming one wavenumber spectral resolution with wavenumber span from 1100 cm(exp -1) to 2300 cm(exp -1) (the band 600 cm(exp -1) to 1100 cm(exp -1) is not used since there is no major absorption of our three gases here) and measurement noise of 0.25 degree at reference temperature of 260 degree K. Temperature, water vapor, ozone and mixing ratio profiles of nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide and methane are taken from 1976 US Standard Atmosphere conditions (a FASCODE model). Covariance matrices of the gases are 'subjectively' generated by assuming 50 percent standard deviation of gaussian perturbation with respect to their US Standard model profiles. Minimum information and maximum likelihood retrieval solutions are used.

  4. Daily global maps of carbon monoxide from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, W. W.; Barnet, C.; Strow, L.; Chahine, M. T.; McCourt, M. L.; Warner, J. X.; Novelli, P. C.; Korontzi, S.; Maddy, E. S.; Datta, S.

    2005-06-01

    We present the first observations of tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. AIRS daily coverage of ~70% of the planet represents a significant evolutionary advance in satellite trace gas remote sensing. Tropospheric CO abundances are retrieved from AIRS 4.55 μm spectral region using the full AIRS retrieval algorithm run in a research mode. The presented AIRS daily global CO maps from 22-29 September 2002 show large-scale, long-range transport of CO from anthropogenic and natural sources, most notably from biomass burning. The sequence of daily maps reveal CO advection from Brazil to the South Atlantic in qualitative agreement with previous observations. Forward trajectory analysis confirms this scenario and indicates much longer range transport into the southern Indian Ocean. Preliminary comparisons to in situ aircraft profiles indicate AIRS CO retrievals are approaching the 15% accuracy target set by pre-launch simulations.

  5. Assimilation of hyperspectral infrared sounder radiances under cloudy skies in a regional NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei

    Satellite measurements are an important source of global observations in support of numerical weather prediction (NWP). The assimilation of satellite radiances under clear skies has greatly improved NWP forecast scores. Since most of the data assimilation models are used for the clear radiances assimilation, an important step for satellite radiances assimilation is the clear location detection. Good clear detection could effectively remove the cloud contamination and keep the clear observations for assimilation. In this dissertation, a new detection method uses collocated high spatial resolution imager data onboard the same platform as the satellite sounders to help IR sounders subpixel cloud detection, such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The MODIS cloud mask provides a level of confidence for the observed skies to help AIRS Field-of-View (FOVs) cloud detection. By reducing the cloud contamination, a cold bias in the temperature field and a wet bias in the moisture field are corrected for the atmospheric analysis fields. These less cloud affected analysis fields further improve hurricane track and intensity forecast. The availability of satellite observations that can be assimilated in the model is limited if only the clear radiances are assimilation. An effective way to use the thermodynamic information under partially cloudy regions is to assimilate the "cloud-cleared" radiances (CCRs); CCRs are also called clear equivalent radiances. Because the CCRs are the equivalent clear radiances from the partially cloudy FOVs, they can be directly assimilated into the current data assimilation models without modifications. The AIRS CCRs are assimilated and compared with the AIRS using stand-alone cloud detection and collocated cloud detection. The assimilation of AIRS cloud-cleared radiances directly affects

  6. Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Connor J.

    2016-03-01

    The Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) measures the absolute infrared (IR) spectral radiance (watts per square meter per steradian per wavenumber) of the sky directly above the instrument. More information about the instrument can be found through the manufacturer’s website. The spectral measurement range of the instrument is 3300 to 520 wavenumbers (cm-1) or 3-19.2 microns for the normal-range instruments and 3300 to 400 cm-1 or 3-25 microns, for the extended-range polar instruments. Spectral resolution is 1.0 cm-1. Instrument field-of-view is 1.3 degrees. Calibrated sky radiance spectra are produced on cycle of about 141 seconds with a group of 6 radiance spectra zenith having dwell times of about 14 seconds each interspersed with 55 seconds of calibration and mirror motion. The ASSIST data is comparable to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data and can be used for 1) evaluating line-by-line radiative transport codes, 2) detecting/quantifying cloud effects on ground-based measurements of infrared spectral radiance (and hence is valuable for cloud property retrievals), and 3) calculating vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor and the detection of trace gases.

  7. Biases in Total Precipitable Water Vapor Climatologies from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Chahine, Moustafa T.

    2006-01-01

    We examine differences in total precipitable water vapor (PWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) experiments sharing the Aqua spacecraft platform. Both systems provide estimates of PWV over water surfaces. We compare AIRS and AMSR-E PWV to constrain AIRS retrieval uncertainties as functions of AIRS retrieved infrared cloud fraction. PWV differences between the two instruments vary only weakly with infrared cloud fraction up to about 70%. Maps of AIRS-AMSR-E PWV differences vary with location and season. Observational biases, when both instruments observe identical scenes, are generally less than 5%. Exceptions are in cold air outbreaks where AIRS is biased moist by 10-20% or 10-60% (depending on retrieval processing) and at high latitudes in winter where AIRS is dry by 5-10%. Sampling biases, from different sampling characteristics of AIRS and AMSR-E, vary in sign and magnitude. AIRS sampling is dry by up to 30% in most high-latitude regions but moist by 5-15% in subtropical stratus cloud belts. Over the northwest Pacific, AIRS samples conditions more moist than AMSR-E by a much as 60%. We hypothesize that both wet and dry sampling biases are due to the effects of clouds on the AIRS retrieval methodology. The sign and magnitude of these biases depend upon the types of cloud present and on the relationship between clouds and PWV. These results for PWV imply that climatologies of height-resolved water vapor from AIRS must take into consideration local meteorological processes affecting AIRS sampling.

  8. The Transition of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Total Ozone Products to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (NASA SPoRT) has transitioned a total column ozone product from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) retrievals to the Weather Prediction Center and Ocean Prediction Center. The total column ozone product is used to diagnose regions of warm, dry, ozone-rich, stratospheric air capable of descending to the surface to create high-impact non-convective winds. Over the past year, forecasters have analyzed the Red, Green, Blue (RGB) Air Mass imagery in conjunction with the AIRS total column ozone to aid high wind forecasts. One of the limitations of the total ozone product is that it is difficult for forecasters to determine whether elevated ozone concentrations are related to stratospheric air or climatologically high values of ozone in certain regions. During the summer of 2013, SPoRT created an AIRS ozone anomaly product which calculates the percent of normal ozone based on a global stratospheric ozone mean climatology. With the knowledge that ozone values 125 percent of normal and greater typically represent stratospheric air; the anomaly product can be used with the total column ozone product to confirm regions of stratospheric air. This paper describes the generation of these products along with forecaster feedback concerning the use of the AIRS ozone products in conjunction with the RGB Air Mass product to access the utility and transition of the products.

  9. Seven Years of Observations of Mid-Tropospheric CO2 from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Olsen, Edward T.

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft was launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS acquires hyperspectral infrared radiances in the 3.7-15.4 um spectral region with spectral resolution of better than 1200. The AIRS was designed to measure temperature and water vapor profiles and cloud properties for improvement in weather forecast and improved parameterization of climate processes. Currently the AIRS Level 1B Radiance Products are assimilated by NWP centers and have shown considerable forecast improvement. Scientists have also demonstrated accurate retrievals of minor gases from AIRS including Carbon Monoxide, Methane, and Ozone. The excellent sensitivity and stability of the AIRS instrument has recently allowed the AIRS team to successfully retrieve Carbon Dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the mid-troposphere (8-10 km) with a horizontal resolution of 100 km and accuracy of 1-2 ppm. The AIRS retrieves over 15,000 measurements per day and can achieve full global coverage in 30 days. The AIRS CO2 accuracy has been validated against a variety of aircraft measurements in the mid-troposphere and upward looking interferometers. Findings from the AIRS data include higher than expected variability in the mid-troposphere, the presence of a belt of CO2 in the southern hemisphere, and numerous observations of atmospheric circulation including the effects of El Nino/La Nina on the CO2 concentrations in the mid-troposphere. The full mid-tropospheric AIRS CO2 data set is now available at the NASA GES/DISC for almost eight years since AIRS has been operational.

  10. Seven years of observations of mid-tropospheric CO 2 from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Olsen, Edward T.

    2011-09-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft was launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS acquires hyperspectral infrared radiances in the 3.7-15.4 μm spectral region with spectral resolving power of better than 1200. The AIRS was designed to measure temperature and water vapor profiles and cloud properties for improvement in weather forecast and improved parameterization of climate processes. Currently a subset of AIRS Level 1B Radiance Products is assimilated by NWP centers, resulting in significant forecast improvement. Scientists have also demonstrated accurate retrievals of minor gases from AIRS including carbon monoxide, methane, and ozone. The excellent sensitivity and stability of the AIRS instrument has recently allowed the AIRS team to successfully retrieve carbon dioxide (CO 2) concentrations in the mid-troposphere (8-10 km) with a horizontal resolution of 100 km and accuracy better than 2 ppm. The AIRS mid-tropospheric CO 2 yield is 15,000 measurements per 24-h period over land and ocean, day and night for clear and cloudy scenes. The AIRS CO 2 accuracy has been validated against a variety of mid-tropospheric aircraft measurements as well as upward looking interferometers. Findings from the AIRS data include higher than expected variability in the mid-troposphere, the presence of a seasonally variable belt of enhanced CO 2 in the southern hemisphere, and observations of impact of atmospheric dynamics on the CO 2 concentrations in the mid-troposphere including the effects of El Nino/La Nina and the Arctic polar vortex. The full mid-tropospheric AIRS CO 2 data set is now available at the NASA GES/DISC for the 8 year time span since AIRS became operational.

  11. Monthly Representations of Mid-Tropospheric Carbon Dioxide from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Olsen, Edward T.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Nguyen, Hai; Jiang, Xun

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Earth Observing System Aqua spacecraft was launched in May of 2002 and acquires hyperspectral infrared spectra used to generate a wide range of atmospheric products including temperature, water vapor, and trace gas species including carbon dioxide. Here we present monthly representations of global concentrations of mid-tropospheric carbon dioxide produced from 8 years of data obtained by AIRS between the years of 2003 and 2010. We define them as "representations" rather than "climatologies" to reflect that the files are produced over a relatively short time period and represent summaries of the Level 3 data. Finally, they have not yet been independently validated. The representations have a horizontal resolution of 2.0 deg x 2.5 deg (Latitude x Longitude) and faithfully reproduce the original 8 years of monthly L3 CO2 concentrations with a standard deviation of 1.48 ppm and less than 2% outliers. The representations are intended for use in studies of the global general circulation of CO2 and identification of anomalies in CO2 typically associated with atmospheric transport. The seasonal variability and trend found in the AIRS CO2 data are discussed.

  12. Value-added Impact from Future Geostationary Hyperspectral Infrared Sounder Observations on Hurricane Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Schmit, T. J.; Li, Z.; Zhu, F.; Lim, A.; Atlas, R. M.; John, P.

    2015-12-01

    Future geostationary (Geo) advanced InfraRed (IR) sounders have finer spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions compared with the existing GOES sounders, providing much improved resolving power of atmospheric thermodynamic information. When quantitatively assessing the value-added impact from such instruments over the current sounding systems onboard the Low Earth Orbit (Leo) satellites, the real question is what is the optimal impact using the current assimilation/forecast systems. More specifically, will assimilation of more observations from Geo IR sounders with the current assimilation/forecast systems yield improved forecast as expected? And if so, how to assimilate the high temporal resolution Geo sounding information and what is the impact on forecasts? Taken tropical cyclone (TC) forecasting as an example, this study tries to address these questions through a quick regional Observing System Simulation Experiments (r-OSSE) study. The synthetic observations are simulated from the sample ECMWF T1279 nature run (NR) for Hurricane Sandy (2012), including RAOB, the Leo AIRS, and Geo AIRS. Various experiments were carried out using WRF 3.6.1 and GSI 3.3 to study the impact on Sandy track forecast. And the study shows that a) it is critical to assign an appropriate observational error (observation error covariance matrix - O matrix) in order to show improved positive impacts from Geo AIRS over Leo AIRS; b) cycling of 3/6-hourly shows improved positive impacts over none cycling, but hourly cycling does not show further improvement on forecasts among all experiments, and c) with thinning (120 ~ 240 km), the impacts have the following order: hourly > 3-hourly > 6-hourly > none cycling. These experiments indicate that while more observations may improve forecasts, much more observations are difficult to show further improvement with the current assimilation/forecast system configurations. There exists a tradeoff between the number of observations to be assimilated

  13. Lossless data compression for infrared hyperspectral sounders: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bormin; Huang, Hung-Lung A.; Ahuja, Alok; Schmit, Timothy J.; Heymann, Roger W.

    2004-10-01

    The compression of hyperspectral sounder data is beneficial for more efficient archive and transfer given its large 3-D volume. Moreover, since physical retrieval of geophysical parameters from hyperspectral sounder data is a mathematically ill-posed problem that is sensitive to the error of the data, lossless or near-lossless compression is desired. This paper provides an update into applications of state-of-the-art 2D and 3D lossless compression algorithms such as 3D EZW, 3D SPIHT, 2D JPEG2000, 2D JPEG-LS and 2D CALIC for hyperspectral sounder data. In addition, in order to better explore the correlations between the remote spectral regions affected by the same type of atmospheric absorbing constituents or clouds, the Bias-Adjusted Reordering (BAR) scheme is presented which reorders the data such that the bias-adjusted distance between any two neighboring vectors is minimized. This scheme coupled with any of the state-of-the-art compression algorithms produces significant compression gains.

  14. Detection of Ice Polar Stratospheric Clouds from Assimilation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Benson, Craig; Liu, Hui-Chun; Pawson, Steven; Chang, Ping; Riishojgaard, Lars Peter

    2006-01-01

    A novel technique is presented for detection of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) that form at extremely low temperatures in the lower polar stratosphere during winter. Temperature is a major factor in determining abundance of PSCs, which in turn provide surfaces for heterogeneous chemical reactions leading to ozone loss and radiative cooling. The technique infers the presence of ice PSCs using radiances from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system. Brightness temperatures are computed from short-term GEOS-5 forecasts for several hundred AIRS channels, using a radiation transfer module. The differences between collocated AIRS observations and these computed values are the observed-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals in the assimilation system. Because the radiation model assumes clear-sky conditions, we hypothesize that these O-F residuals contain quantitative information about PSCs. This is confirmed using sparse data from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III occultation instrument. The analysis focuses on 0-F residuals for the 6.79pm AIRS moisture channel. At coincident locations, when POAM III detects ice clouds, the AIRS O-F residuals for this channel are lower than -2K. When no ice PSCs are evident in POAM III data, the AIRS 0-F residuals are larger. Given this relationship, the high spatial density of AIRS data is used to construct maps of regions where 0-F residuals are lower than -2K, as a proxy for ice PSCs. The spatial scales and spatio-temporal variations of these PSCs in the Antarctic and Arctic are discussed on the basis of these maps.

  15. The Radiative Consistency of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Cloud Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Fishbein, Evan; Nasiri, Shaima L.; Eldering, Annmarie; Fetzer, Eric J.; Garay, Michael J.; Lee, Sung-Yung

    2007-01-01

    The consistency of cloud top temperature (Tc) and effective cloud fraction (f) retrieved by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) observation suite and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the EOS-Aqua platform are investigated. Collocated AIRS and MODIS TC and f are compared via an 'effective scene brightness temperature' (Tb,e). Tb,e is calculated with partial field of view (FOV) contributions from TC and surface temperature (TS), weighted by f and 1-f, respectively. AIRS reports up to two cloud layers while MODIS reports up to one. However, MODIS reports TC, TS, and f at a higher spatial resolution than AIRS. As a result, pixel-scale comparisons of TC and f are difficult to interpret, demonstrating the need for alternatives such as Tb,e. AIRS-MODIS Tb,e differences ((Delta)Tb,e) for identical observing scenes are useful as a diagnostic for cloud quantity comparisons. The smallest values of DTb,e are for high and opaque clouds, with increasing scatter in (Delta)Tb,e for clouds of smaller opacity and lower altitude. A persistent positive bias in DTb,e is observed in warmer and low-latitude scenes, characterized by a mixture of MODIS CO2 slicing and 11-mm window retrievals. These scenes contain heterogeneous cloud cover, including mixtures of multilayered cloudiness and misplaced MODIS cloud top pressure. The spatial patterns of (Delta)Tb,e are systematic and do not correlate well with collocated AIRS-MODIS radiance differences, which are more random in nature and smaller in magnitude than (Delta)Tb,e. This suggests that the observed inconsistencies in AIRS and MODIS cloud fields are dominated by retrieval algorithm differences, instead of differences in the observed radiances. The results presented here have implications for the validation of cloudy satellite retrieval algorithms, and use of cloud products in quantitative analyses.

  16. High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) for the Nimbus F Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Flown on Nimbus F in June 1975, the high resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS) scans with a geographical resolution of 23KM and samples radiance in seventeen selected spectral channels from visible (.7 micron) to far IR (15 micron). Vertical temperature profiles and atmospheric moisture content can be inferred from the output. System operation and test results are described.

  17. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS): measurement of the carbon gases from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M.; Dickerson, R.; Marshall, B. T.; McHugh, M.; Fish, C.; Bloom, H.

    2013-09-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases remain highly uncertain [IPCC1] making quantitative predictions of atmospheric composition and their impacts. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) is a multi-purpose instrument designed to reduce uncertainty associated with atmospheric radiative forcing. GRIPS will measure will measure greenhouse gases and aerosols - two of the most important elements in the earth's radiation budget. GRIPS will observe carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), - the carbon gases, nitrous oxide (N2O), water vapor and aerosols with unprecedented precision through the atmosphere. The GRIPS instrument uses gas filter correlation radiometry (GFCR) to detect reflected and thermal IR radiation to detect the gases and the reflected solar radiation in the visible and short-wave infrared bands for aerosols. GRIPS is designed to have sensitivity down to the Earth's surface at ~2-8km nadir resolution. GRIPS can resolve CO2, CO, and CH4 anomalies in the planetary boundary layer and the free troposphere to quantify lofting, diurnal variations and longrange transport. With repeated measurements throughout the day GRIPS can maximize the number of cloud free measurements determining biogenic and anthropogenic sources, sinks, and fluxes. GRIPS is highly complementary to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, OCO-2, the geostationary Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and other existing and planned missions.

  18. Performance of the HIRS/2 instrument on TIROS-N. [High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1980-01-01

    The High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS/2) was developed and flown on the TIROS-N satellite as one means of obtaining atmospheric vertical profile information. The HIRS/2 receives visible and infrared spectrum radiation through a single telescope and selects 20 narrow radiation channels by means of a rotating filter wheel. A passive radiant cooler provides an operating temperature of 106.7 K for the HgCdTe and InSb detectors while the visible detector operates at instrument frame temperature. Low noise amplifiers and digital processing provide 13 bit data for spacecraft data multiplexing and transmission. The qualities of system performance that determine sounding capability are the dynamic range of data collection, the noise equivalent radiance of the system, the registration of the air columns sampled in each channel and the ability to upgrade the calibration of the instrument to maintain the performance standard throughout life. The basic features, operating characteristics and performance of the instrument in test are described. Early orbital information from the TIROS-N launched on October 13, 1978 is given and some observations on system quality are made.

  19. Nighttime Cirrus Detection using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Window Channels and Total Column Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Liou, Kuo Nan; Lee, Sung-Yung; Fishbein, Evan F.; DeSouza-Machado, Sergio; Eldering, Annmarie; Fetzer, Eric J.; Hannon, Scott E.; Strow, L. Larrabee

    2005-01-01

    A method of cirrus detection at nighttime is presented that utilizes 3.8 and 10.4 (micro)m infrared (IR) window brightness temperature differences (dBT) and total column precipitable water (PW) measurements. This technique is applied to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A) instrument suite on board EOS-Aqua, where dBT is determined from sets of carefully selected AIRS window channels, while PW is derived from the synergistic AIRS and AMSU-A water vapor retrievals. Simulated and observed dBT for a particular value of PW are not constant; several physical factors impact dBT, including the variability in temperature and relative humidity profiles, surface emissivity, instrument noise, and skin/ near-surface air temperature differences. We simulate clear-sky dBT over a realistic range of PWs using 8350 radiosondes that have varying temperature and relative humidity profiles. Thresholds between cloudy and uncertain sky conditions are derived once the scatter in the clear-sky dBT is determined. Simulations of optically thin cirrus indicate that this technique is most sensitive to cirrus optical depth in the 10 (micro)m window of 0.1-0.15 or greater over the tropical and subtropical oceans, where surface emissivity and skin/near-surface air temperature impacts on the IR radiances are minimal. The method at present is generally valid over oceanic regions only, specifically, the tropics and subtropics. The detection of thin cirrus, and other cloud types, is validated using observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program site located at Manus Island in the tropical western Pacific for 89 coincident EOS-Aqua overpasses. Even though the emphasis of this work is on the detection of thin cirrus at nighttime, this technique is sensitive to a broad cloud morphology. The cloud detection technique agrees with ARM-detected clouds 82-84% of the time, which include thin cirrus, as well as other cloud types. Most of

  20. The Arctic is becoming warmer and wetter as revealed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, L. N.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decade, the Arctic has seen unprecedented declines in the summer sea ice area, leading to larger and longer exposed open water areas. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder is a useful yet underutilized tool to study corresponding atmospheric changes and their feedbacks between 2003 and 2013. Most pronounced warming occurs between November and April, with skin and air temperatures increasing on average 2.5 K and 1.5 K over the Arctic Ocean. In response to sea ice loss, evaporation rates (i.e., moisture flux) increased between August and October by 1.5 × 10-3 g m-2 s-1 (3.8 W m-2 latent heat flux energy), increasing the water vapor feedback and cloud cover. Although most trends are positive over the Arctic Ocean, there is considerable interannual variability. Increasing specific humidity in May and corresponding downward moisture fluxes cause earlier melt onset; warming skin temperatures and radiative responses to increased water vapor and cloud cover in autumn delay freeze-up.

  1. Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Water Vapor Retrievals Using Global Positioning System: Case Study in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Jihye; Park, Kwan-Dong; Kim, Dusik; Ha, Jihyun

    2011-12-01

    The atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) sensor loaded on the Aqua satellite observes the global vertical structure of atmosphere and enables verification of the water vapor distribution over the entire area of South Korea. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of the accuracy of the total precipitable water (TPW) provided as the AIRS level 2 standard retrieval product by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) over the South Korean area using the global positioning system (GPS) TPW data. The analysis TPW for the period of one year in 2008 showed that the accuracy of the data produced by the combination of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit sensor with the AIRS sensor to correct the effect of clouds (AIRS-X) was higher than that of the AIRS IR-only data (AIRS-I). The annual means of the root mean square error with reference to the GPS data were 5.2 kg/m2 and 4.3 kg/m2 for AIRS-I and AIRS-X, respectively. The accuracy of AIRS-X was higher in summer than in winter while measurement values of AIRS-I and AIRS-X were lower than those of GPS TPW to some extent.

  2. HIRS-AMTS satellite sounding system test - Theoretical and empirical vertical resolving power. [High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder - Advanced Moisture and Temperature Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, O. E.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the vertical resolving power of satellite-borne temperature sounding instruments. Information is presented on the capabilities of the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) and a proposed sounding instrument called the Advanced Moisture and Temperature Sounder (AMTS). Two quite different methods for assessing the vertical resolving power of satellite sounders are discussed. The first is the theoretical method of Conrath (1972) which was patterned after the work of Backus and Gilbert (1968) The Backus-Gilbert-Conrath (BGC) approach includes a formalism for deriving a retrieval algorithm for optimizing the vertical resolving power. However, a retrieval algorithm constructed in the BGC optimal fashion is not necessarily optimal as far as actual temperature retrievals are concerned. Thus, an independent criterion for vertical resolving power is discussed. The criterion is based on actual retrievals of signal structure in the temperature field.

  3. On the remote sensing of cloud properties from satellite infrared sounder data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. Y. M.

    1984-01-01

    A method for remote sensing of cloud parameters by using infrared sounder data has been developed on the basis of the parameterized infrared transfer equation applicable to cloudy atmospheres. The method is utilized for the retrieval of the cloud height, amount, and emissivity in 11 micro m region. Numerical analyses and retrieval experiments have been carried out by utilizing the synthetic sounder data for the theoretical study. The sensitivity of the numerical procedures to the measurement and instrument errors are also examined. The retrieved results are physically discussed and numerically compared with the model atmospheres. Comparisons reveal that the recovered cloud parameters agree reasonably well with the pre-assumed values. However, for cases when relatively thin clouds and/or small cloud fractional cover within a field of view are present, the recovered cloud parameters show considerable fluctuations. Experiments on the proposed algorithm are carried out utilizing High Resolution Infrared Sounder (HIRS/2) data of NOAA 6 and TIROS-N. Results of experiments show reasonably good comparisons with the surface reports and GOES satellite images.

  4. Lessons from 18 Years of Hyperspectral Infrared Sounder Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Manning, E. M.; Strow, L. L.

    2013-01-01

    By the end of 2013 NASA and EUMETSAT will have accumulated more than 11 years of AIRS, 6 years of IASI and one year of CrIS data. All three instruments were nominally specified to support the NWC for short term weather forecasting with a five year lifetime, but continue to exceed the accuracy requirement needed for weather forecasting alone. This allows use of their data for a much broader range of applications, including the calibration of broad-band instruments in space and climate research. We illustrate calibration aspects with examples from AIRS, IASI and CrIS using spatially uniform clear conditions, simultaneous nadir overpasses and random nadir samples. The differences between AIRS, IASI and CrIS for the purpose of weather forecasting are small and we expect that the excellent forecast impact demonstrated by the combination of AIRS and IASI will be continued by the combination of CrIS and IASI. Clear data are useful for calibration, but contain no climate signal. The analysis of random nadir samples from AIRS and CrIS identifies larger biases for observation of extreme conditions, represented by 1% and 99%tile data than for non-extreme observations. This is relevant for climate analysis. Resolution of these differences require further work, since they can complicate the continuation of trends established by AIRS with CrIS data, at least for extrema. The unequaled stability of the AIRS data allows us to evaluate trends using random nadir sampled data. We see an increasing frequency in severe storms over land, a decreasing frequency over ocean. The 11 years of AIRS data are too short to tell if these trends are significant from a climate change viewpoint, or if they are parts of multi-decadal oscillations.

  5. Global analysis of generation mechanism of ice microphysics inferred from space-borne active sensors and infrared sounder.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Ishimoto, H.; Hagihara, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We examined relationship between ice microphysics and super-saturation by the synergy use of CloudSat cloud radar and CALIPSO lidar and infrared sounder AIRS on Aqua. The retrieval algorithm of ice microphysics was based on Okamoto et al., (2010) but the following improvement was implemented. Ice non-sphericity, orientation and laser pointing angle were considered to estimate scattering properties needed in the analysis of CloudSat and CALIPSO lidar data by the physical optics approximation (Borovoi et al., 2012) and the discrete dipole approximation (Okamoto 2002). Different look up tables were applied for the period of laser-pointing angle of 0.3 degrees off-nadir direction and for the one of 3 degrees off-nadir. Super-saturation was retrieved using 110 temperature and 46 humidity channels of AIRS (Ishimoto 2009 and Ishimoto et al., 2014). The algorithm relied on channel ranking approach to detect clouds by the AIRS information alone so that microwave sounder information was not needed contrary to the AIRS standard product. This achieved three times higher spatial resolution (13.5km) compared with the AIRS standard product so that it is suitable to study super-saturation. We analyzed ice microphysics and super-saturation in the vicinity of the ice clouds to analyze the relation between ice microphysics and super-saturation. AIRS showed relative humidity can reach 160% but majority was below 130%. Super-saturation generally occurred in correspondence with ice clouds. Concept of equivalent ice water content (IWCeq) was introduced as difference between water vapor density and saturation water vapor density. IWCeq was generally larger than IWC. Geophysical patterns between IWCeq and IWC were in good agreement in mid- and high-levels. Global analysis showed IWC increased as IWCeq increased. It was found such relation did not depend on latitudes. Ice formation seemed to occur at about 5 to 10% below relative humidity.

  6. Case study of the March 24, 1976 Elton, Louisiana tornado using satellite infrared imagery, Doppler sounder, rawinsonde, and radar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The Elton, Louisiana tornado on March 24, 1976 has been studied using GOES digital infrared data for the growth and collapse of the cloud top, the temperature-height relationship and air mass instability from rawinsonde data, gravity waves from Doppler sounder records, and radar summaries from storm activity during the three-hour time period immediately preceding the touchdown of the tornado. In this case, the overshooting turret collapsed 30 minutes before the tornado touchdown as the eastward moving cloud reached Elton, Louisiana. Results show that the gravity waves were excited by the enhanced convection of the storm penetrating through the tropopause in the 2.5 hour time period before the tornado touched down.

  7. Thermal Band Atmospheric Correction Using Atmospheric Profiles Derived from Global Positioning System Radio Occultation and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Stewart, Randy; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    This Rapid Prototyping Capability study explores the potential to use atmospheric profiles derived from GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation measurements and by AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) onboard the Aqua satellite to improve surface temperature retrieval from remotely sensed thermal imagery. This study demonstrates an example of a cross-cutting decision support technology whereby NASA data or models are shown to improve a wide number of observation systems or models. The ability to use one data source to improve others will be critical to the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) where a large number of potentially useful systems will require auxiliary datasets as input for decision support. Atmospheric correction of thermal imagery decouples TOA radiance and separates surface emission from atmospheric emission and absorption. Surface temperature can then be estimated from the surface emission with knowledge of its emissivity. Traditionally, radiosonde sounders or atmospheric models based on radiosonde sounders, such as the NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) ARL (Air Resources Laboratory) READY (Real-time Environmental Application and Display sYstem), provide the atmospheric profiles required to perform atmospheric correction. Unfortunately, these types of data are too spatially sparse and too infrequently taken. The advent of high accuracy, global coverage, atmospheric data using GPS radio occultation and AIRS may provide a new avenue for filling data input gaps. In this study, AIRS and GPS radio occultation derived atmospheric profiles from the German Aerospace Center CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload), the Argentinean Commission on Space Activities SAC-C (Satellite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C), and the pair of NASA GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellites are used as input data in atmospheric radiative transport modeling based on the MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric

  8. Assessment of Infrared Sounder Radiometric Noise from Analysis of Spectral Residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, E.; Klonecki, A.; Standfuss, C.; Tournier, B.; Serio, C.; Masiello, G.; Tjemkes, S.; Stuhlmann, R.

    2016-08-01

    For the preparation and performance monitoring of the future generation of hyperspectral InfraRed sounders dedicated to the precise vertical profiling of the atmospheric state, such as the Meteosat Third Generation hyperspectral InfraRed Sounder, a reliable assessment of the instrument radiometric error covariance matrix is needed.Ideally, an inflight estimation of the radiometrric noise is recommended as certain sources of noise can be driven by the spectral signature of the observed Earth/ atmosphere radiance. Also, unknown correlated noise sources, generally related to incomplete knowledge of the instrument state, can be present, so a caracterisation of the noise spectral correlation is also neeed.A methodology, relying on the analysis of post-retreival spectral residuals, is designed and implemented to derive in-flight the covariance matrix on the basis of Earth scenes measurements. This methodology is successfully demonstrated using IASI observations as MTG-IRS proxy data and made it possible to highlight anticipated correlation structures explained by apodization and micro-vibration effects (ghost). This analysis is corroborated by a parallel estimation based on an IASI black body measurement dataset and the results of an independent micro-vibration model.

  9. Calibration of geostationary satellites infrared radiometers using the vertical sounder of a polar orbiting satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beriot, N.

    1981-09-01

    A method for the calibration of infrared radiometers of geostationary satellites using calibrated infrared radiometers of an orbiting satellite is presented. This method relies upon similarities between the weighting functions corresponding to the radiometers on geostationary satellites like Meteosat or the GOES series and the weighting functions of some of the channels of the TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS). It makes use of iso-secant observations of the same scene from both satellites. Many such observations are available every day resulting in a possibly daily calibration curve defined by several hundred of points. This calibration method is shown to be very sensitive, accurate and tractable. This method does not require to collect radiosonde data nor any kind of in-situ experiments and may be completely automatized.

  10. Cloud thermodynamic phase, cirrus cloud optical thickness and effective diameter in the Version 6 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Irion, F. W.; Manning, E. M.; Oliphant, R.; Schreier, M. M.; Yue, Q.; Fetzer, E.; Jin, H.; Nasiri, S. L.; Baum, B. A.; Ou, S. S.; Takano, Y.; Liou, K.

    2011-12-01

    The development of a new set of cloud products produced in the upcoming Version 6 release of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) algorithm is described and initial results are presented. The three new cloud retrieval products include (1) cloud thermodynamic phase, (2) cirrus cloud optical thickness, and (3) cirrus cloud effective diameter. The retrieval methodology of the cirrus cloud parameters is based on an optimal estimation approach that uses Level 1B observed radiances and Level 2 cloud clearing-derived atmospheric profiles that define the atmospheric state, surface temperature and emissivity, and cloud top temperature. The Stand Alone AIRS Radiative Transfer Algorithm (SARTA) is coupled to a delta-4-stream (D4S) approximation (SARTA+D4S) to simulate single-layered cloudy spectra. The same ice scattering models used in the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5 release are also used in the SARTA+D4S model. The error characterization and averaging kernels associated with the retrieved fields, and various challenges to operational implementation, will be highlighted. Statistical comparisons are made to pixel-scale collocated Aqua MODIS retrievals, with similarities and differences quantified in the AIRS products that are sorted into distinct cloud regimes.

  11. Space-borne observation of methane from atmospheric infrared sounder version 6: validation and implications for data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, X.; Weng, F.; Liu, Q.; Olsen, E.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric Methane (CH4) is generated as a standard product in recent version of the hyperspectral Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS-V6) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (NASA/GES/DISC). Significant improvements in AIRS-V6 was expected but without a thorough validation. This paper first introduced the improvements of CH4 retrieval in AIRS-V6 and some characterizations, then presented the results of validation using ~ 1000 aircraft profiles from several campaigns spread over a couple of years and in different regions. It was found the mean biases of AIRS CH4 at layers 343-441 and 441-575 hPa are -0.76 and -0.05 % and the RMS errors are 1.56 and 1.16 %, respectively. Further analysis demonstrates that the errors in the spring and in the high northern latitudes are larger than in other seasons or regions. The error is correlated with Degree of Freedoms (DOFs), particularly in the tropics or in the summer, and cloud amount, suggesting that the "observed" spatiotemporal variation of CH4 by AIRS is imbedded with some artificial impact from the retrieval sensitivity in addition to its variation in reality, so the variation of information content in the retrievals needs to be taken into account in data analysis of the retrieval products. Some additional filtering (i.e. rejection of profiles with obvious oscillation as well as those deviating greatly from the norm) for quality control is recommended for the users to better utilize AIRS-V6 CH4, and their implementation in the future versions of the AIRS retrieval algorithm is under consideration.

  12. A Network of Direct Broadcast Antenna Systems to Provide Real-Time Infrared and Microwave Sounder Data for Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumley, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Space Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is creating a network of direct broadcast satellite data reception stations to acquire and process infrared and microwave sounder data in real-time from polar orbiting meteorological satellites and deliver the resulting products to NOAA with low latency for assimilation in NCEP numerical weather prediction models. The network will include 4 antenna sites that will be operated directly by SSEC, including Madison WI, Honolulu HI, Miami FL, and Mayaguez PR. The network will also include partner antenna sites not directly controlled by SSEC, including Corvallis OR, Monterey CA, Suitland MD, Fairbanks AK, and Guam. All of the antenna sites will have a combined X/L-band reception system capable of receiving data via direct broadcast from polar orbiting satellites including Suomi NPP and JPSS-1, Metop-A/B, POES,Terra, and Aqua. Each site will collect raw data from these satellites locally, process it to Level 1 (SDR) and Level 2 (EDR) products, and transmit the products back to SSEC for delivery to NOAA/NCEP. The primary purpose of the antenna systems is to provide real-time infrared and microwave sounder data from Metop and Suomi-NPP to NOAA to support data assimilation for NOAA/NCEP operational numerical weather prediction models. At present, NOAA/NCEP use of advanced infrared (CrIS, IASI, AIRS) and microwave (ATMS, AMSU) sounder data over North America in NWP data assimilation is limited because of the latency of the products in relation to the cutoff times for assimilation runs. This network will deliver infrared and microwave sounder data to NCEP with the lowest latency possible, via the reception and processing of data received via direct broadcast. CIMSS/SSEC is managing the procurement and installation of the antenna systems at the two new sites, and will operate the stations remotely. NOAA will establish the reception priorities (Metop and SNPP will be at the highest priority) and

  13. Measurement approach and design of the CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Rider, David; Rud, Mayer; Ting, David; Yee, Karl

    2016-09-01

    The CubeSat Infrared Atmospheric Sounder (CIRAS) will measure upwelling infrared radiation of the Earth in the MWIR region of the spectrum from space on a CubeSat. The observed radiances have information of potential value to weather forecasting agencies and can be used to retrieve lower tropospheric temperature and water vapor globally for weather and climate science investigations. Multiple units can be flown to improve temporal coverage or in formation to provide new data products including 3D atmospheric motion vector winds. CIRAS incorporates key new instrument technologies including a 2D array of High Operating Temperature Barrier Infrared Detector (HOT-BIRD) material, selected for its high uniformity, low cost, low noise and higher operating temperatures than traditional materials. The detectors are hybridized to a commercial ROIC and commercial camera electronics. The second key technology is an MWIR Grating Spectrometer (MGS) designed to provide imaging spectroscopy for atmospheric sounding in a CubeSat volume. The MGS has no moving parts and includes an immersion grating to reduce the volume and reduce distortion. The third key technology is an infrared blackbody fabricated with black silicon to have very high emissivity in a flat plate construction. JPL will also develop the mechanical, electronic and thermal subsystems for CIRAS, while the spacecraft will be a commercially available CubeSat. The integrated system will be a complete 6U CubeSat capable of measuring temperature and water vapor profiles with good lower tropospheric sensitivity. The CIRAS is the first step towards the development of an Earth Observation Nanosatellite Infrared (EON-IR) capable of operational readiness to mitigate a potential loss of CrIS on JPSS or complement the current observing system with different orbit crossing times.

  14. Suomi NPP/JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS): Calibration Validation With The Aircraft Based Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. K.; Revercomb, H. E.; Tobin, D.; Knuteson, R. O.; Best, F. A.; Adler, D. A.; Pettersen, C.; Garcia, R. K.; Gero, P.

    2013-12-01

    To better accommodate climate change monitoring and improved weather forecasting, there is an established need for higher accuracy and more refined error characterization of radiance measurements from space and the corresponding geophysical products. This need has led to emphasizing direct tests of on-orbit performance, referred to as validation. Currently, validation typically involves (1) collecting high quality reference data from airborne and/or ground-based instruments during the satellite overpass, and (2) a detailed comparison between the satellite-based radiance measurements and the corresponding high quality reference data. Additionally, for future missions technology advancements at the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) have led to the development of an on-orbit absolute radiance reference utilizing miniature phase change cells to provide direct on-orbit traceability to International Standards (SI). The detailed comparison between the satellite-based radiance measurements and the corresponding measurements made from a high-altitude aircraft must account for instrument noise and scene variations, as well as differences in instrument observation altitudes, view angles, spatial footprints, and spectral response. Most importantly, for the calibration validation process to be both accurate and repeatable the reference data instrument must be extremely well characterized and understood, carefully maintained, and accurately calibrated, with traceability to absolute standards. The Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS) meets and exceeds these requirements and has proven to do so on multiple airborne platforms, each with significantly different instrument operating environments. The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on Suomi NPP, launched 28 October 2011, is designed to give scientists more refined information about Earth's atmosphere and improve weather forecasts and our understanding of climate. CrIS is an

  15. Sensor development in the Shuttle era. [infrared temperature sounders and microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerding, R. B.; Mantarakis, P. Z.; Webber, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    The use of the Space Shuttle in the development of earth observation sensors is examined. Two sensor classes are selected for case histories: infrared temperature sounders and microwave radiometers. The most significant finding in each of the developmental studies of these two sensor classes is considered to be the feasibility and value of using the Shuttle/Spacelab as a test vehicle for the operation in space of a versatile multimode experimental sensor. The Shuttle Electrically Scanned Microwave Radiometer and the Shuttle Infrared Interferometer are found to be the most effective instruments in this context. The Shuttle/Spacelab Sortie mission characteristics provide opportunities for new approaches to the development of sensors, using the Shuttle as a test vehicle to improve the efficiency of the process with respect to time, cost, and/or quality of the final product. As for crew functions, the short-term Spacelab mission requires some near real-time evaluation of data quality and sensor function in order to insure efficient data collection.

  16. Atmospheric, Cloud, and Surface Parameters Retrieved from Satellite Ultra-spectral Infrared Sounder Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L.; Yang, Ping; Schluessel, Peter; Strow, Larrabee

    2007-01-01

    An advanced retrieval algorithm with a fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. This physical inversion scheme has been developed, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiance observed with ultraspectral infrared sounders, to simultaneously retrieve surface, atmospheric thermodynamic, and cloud microphysical parameters. A fast radiative transfer model, which applies to the clouded atmosphere, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. A one-dimensional (1-d) variational multivariable inversion solution is used to improve an iterative background state defined by an eigenvector-regression-retrieval. The solution is iterated in order to account for non-linearity in the 1-d variational solution. This retrieval algorithm is applied to the MetOp satellite Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched on October 19, 2006. IASI possesses an ultra-spectral resolution of 0.25 cm(exp -1) and a spectral coverage from 645 to 2760 cm(exp -1). Preliminary retrievals of atmospheric soundings, surface properties, and cloud optical/microphysical properties with the IASI measurements are obtained and presented.

  17. Atmospheric measurements of volcanic eruptions with the infrared sounder IASI (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarisse, L.

    2012-04-01

    Due to their spatial coverage, satellite sounders are ideal for measuring volcanic emissions. They are able to monitor (dormant) volcanoes in remote parts of the world and measure large plumes from explosive eruptions. Currently over a dozen instruments (operating in the IR and UV spectral ranges) are capable of detecting volcanic ash and/or sulphur dioxide. Satellite measurements are highly relevant for hazard mitigation, locally but also on large scales for air traffic avoidance of volcanic clouds. Their coverage enables to establish an accurate time-record of global volcanic emissions. This is useful from a volcanology perspective, but also for assessing the global climate impact of volcanic emissions. In this talk we give an overview of four years of measurements of large eruptive plumes from the high resolution infrared atmospheric sounding interferometer (IASI). The focus is on the detection and measurement of volcanic aerosol (volcanic ash, ice and sulphuric acid). In the second part of this talk, we discuss sulphur dioxide measurements and the recent first observations of hydrogen sulphide. We conclude with a discussion of open problems and challenges which lie ahead for the remote sensing of volcanic products.

  18. Observing Mesoscale Gravity Waves by Tomographic inversion of Infrared Limb-sounder Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungermann, Joern; Hoffmann, Lars; Preusse, Peter; Kaufmann, Martin; Riese, Martin

    PREMIER is one of three candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer mission that are currently undergoing feasibility studies. The main mission objective is to quantify processes controlling atmospheric composition in the mid/upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, a region of particular importance for climate change. PREMIER will therefore employ the first satellite Fourier transform infrared limb-imager combined with a millimetre-wave limb-sounder. The infrared limb-imager can be operated in a high spatial resolution mode for observations of small-scale structures in atmospheric temperatures and trace gas fields with unprecedented 3D sampling (0.5 km in the vertical direction, 50 km along track, 25 km across track). Global observations of gravity waves (GW) is a major objective of the PREMIER mission. GWs represent an important coupling mechanism for the middle atmosphere. They contribute to the driving of the quasi-biennial oscillation by about 50 %, are the major forcing mechanism of the summer branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation, and contribute 30 to 50 % to the predicted increase of the Brewer-Dobson circulation due to climate change. GWs are also the main driver of mesospheric winds and cause the cold summer mesopause. We present a fast tomographic retrieval scheme, which is designed to fully exploit the high-resolution radiance observations of the dynamics mode. Based on a detailed analysis of the 'observational filter', we show that the dynamics mode provides unique information on global distributions of gravity waves. For comparison we also applied a conventional one-dimensional retrieval scheme, assuming a homogeneously stratified atmosphere. Based on an analysis of small-and meso-scale temperature wave perturbations (which may arise in the stratosphere due GWs) we find that the two-dimensional approach is much better capable of retrieving these structures. The achievable vertical resolution has values between the vertical sampling (0.5 km) of the

  19. SI traceable algorithm for characterizing hyperspectral infrared sounder CrIS noise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Weng, Fuzhong; Han, Yong

    2015-09-10

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Satellite (S-NPP) is a Fourier transform spectrometer and provides the sensor data record (SDR) that can be used to retrieve atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles and can also be directly assimilated in numerical weather prediction models. The noise equivalent differential radiance (NEdN) is part of CrIS SDR products and represents the amount of random noise in the interferometer data. It is a crucial parameter that affects the accuracy of retrieval and satellite radiance assimilation. In this study, we used the international system of units (SI) traceable method Allan deviation to estimate the CrIS NEdN because the internal calibration target (ICT) radiance was slowly varying with time. Compared to the current standard deviation method, this study shows that the NEdN calculated from Allan deviation is converged to a stable value when a number of samples or the average window size is set to 510. Thus, Allan deviation can result in CrIS NEdN SI traceable noise. An optimal averaging window size is 30 if the NEdN is calculated from the standard deviation.

  20. Improved scheme for Cross-track Infrared Sounder geolocation assessment and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Likun; Zhang, Bin; Tremblay, Denis; Han, Yong

    2017-01-01

    An improved scheme for Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) geolocation assessment for all scan angles (from -48.5° to 48.5°) is developed in this study. The method uses spatially collocated radiance measurements from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) image band I5 to evaluate the geolocation performance of the CrIS Sensor Data Records (SDR) by taking advantage of its high spatial resolution (375 m at nadir) and accurate geolocation. The basic idea is to perturb CrIS line-of-sight vectors along the in-track and cross-track directions to find a position where CrIS and VIIRS data matches more closely. The perturbation angles at this best matched position are then used to evaluate the CrIS geolocation accuracy. More importantly, the new method is capable of performing postlaunch on-orbit geometric calibration by optimizing mapping angle parameters based on the assessment results and thus can be further extended to the following CrIS sensors on new satellites. Finally, the proposed method is employed to evaluate the CrIS geolocation accuracy on current Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. The error characteristics are revealed along the scan positions in the in-track and cross-track directions. It is found that there are relatively large errors ( 4 km) in the cross-track direction close to the end of scan positions. With newly updated mapping angles, the geolocation accuracy is greatly improved for all scan positions (less than 0.3 km). This makes CrIS and VIIRS spatially align together and thus benefits the application that needs combination of CrIS and VIIRS measurements and products.

  1. Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) satellite observations of tropospheric ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shephard, M. W.; Cady-Pereira, K. E.

    2015-03-01

    Observations of atmospheric ammonia are important in understanding and modelling the impact of ammonia on both human health and the natural environment. We present a detailed description of a robust retrieval algorithm that demonstrates the capabilities of utilizing Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) satellite observations to globally retrieval ammonia concentrations. Initial ammonia retrieval results using both simulated and real observations show that (i) CrIS is sensitive to ammonia in the boundary layer with peak vertical sensitivity typically around ~ 850-750 hPa (~ 1.5 to 2.5 km), which can dip down close to the surface (~ 900 hPa) under ideal conditions, (ii) it has a minimum detection limit of ~ 1 ppbv (peak profile value typically at the surface), and (iii) the information content can vary significantly with maximum values of ~ 1 degree-of-freedom for signal. Comparisons of the retrieval with simulated "true" profiles show a small positive retrieval bias of 6% with a standard deviation of ~ ± 20% (ranging from ± 12 to ± 30% over the vertical profile). Note that these uncertainty estimates are considered as lower bound values as no potential systematic errors are included in the simulations. The CrIS NH3 retrieval applied over the Central Valley in CA, USA, demonstrates that CrIS correlates well with the spatial variability of the boundary layer ammonia concentrations seen by the nearby Quantum Cascade-Laser (QCL) in situ surface and the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) satellite observations as part of the DISCOVER-AQ campaign. The CrIS and TES ammonia observations show quantitatively similar retrieved boundary layer values that are often within the uncertainty of the two observations. Also demonstrated is CrIS's ability to capture the expected spatial distribution in the ammonia concentrations, from elevated values in the Central Valley from anthropogenic agriculture emissions, to much lower values in the unpolluted or clean surrounding

  2. EOS Microwave Limb Sounder Observations of 'Frozen-in' Anticyclonic Air in Arctic Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Jimenez, C. J.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Santee, M. L.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Waters, J. W.

    2006-01-01

    A previously unreported phenomenon, a 'frozen-in' anticyclone (FrIAC) after the 2005 Arctic spring vortex breakup, was discovered in Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) long-lived trace gas data. A tongue of low-latitude (high-N2O, low-H2O) air was drawn into high latitudes and confined in a tight anticyclone, then advected intact in the summer easterlies through late August. A similar feature in O3 disappeared by early April as a result of chemical processes. The FrIAC was initially advected upright at nearly the same speed at all levels from approx.660 to 1300 K (approx.25-45 km); increasing vertical wind shear after early June tilted the FrIAC and weakened it at higher levels. The associated feature in PV disappeared by early June; transport calculations fail to reproduce the remarkable persistence of the FrIAC, suggesting deficiencies in summer high-latitude winds. The historical PV record suggests that this phenomenon may have occurred several times before. The lack of a persistent signature in O3 or PV, along with its small size and rapid motion, make it unlikely that a FrIAC could have been reliably identified without hemispheric daily longlived trace gas profiles such as those from EOS MLS.

  3. Cross-Track Infrared Sounder Science Data Record Pre-launch Calibration and On-Orbit Validation Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, D. E.; Bingham, G. E.; Predina, J.; Gu, D.; Sabet-Peyman, F.; Wang, C.; de Amici, G.; Plonski, M.; Farrow, S. V.; Hohn, J.; Esplin, M.; Zavyalov, V.; Fish, C. S.; Glumb, R.; Wells, S.; Suwinski, L.; Strong, J.; Behrens, C.; Kilcoyne, H.; Feeley, J.; Kratz, G.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) together with the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder will provide retrievals of atmospheric moisture and temperature profiles for the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). The NPOESS is the next generation of low Earth orbiting weather and climate satellites managed by the tri-agency Integrated Program Office, which includes the Department of Commerce, Department of Defense and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The CrIS is a Fourier-transform Michelson interferometer covering the spectral range of 3.9 to 15.4 microns (650 to 2550 wavenumbers) developed by ITT under contract to Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems. The first deployment of the CrIS (Flight Model 1) is scheduled for 2010 on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite, an early instrument risk reduction component of the NPOESS mission. The analysis and data results from comprehensive TVAC testing of the CrIS FM1 sensor demonstrate a very accurate radiometric and spectral calibration system. We describe instrument performance parameters, and the end-to-end plans and analysis tools for on-orbit verification of sensor characteristics and validation of the SDR radiance products.

  4. Comparison of OLR Data Sets from AIRS, CERES and MERRA 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena; Loeb, Norman; Lim, Young-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Organizers of the NASA Sounder Science Team Meeting would like to post the presentations to a the JPL Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) publicly-available website. The meeting was held in Greenbelt, Maryland, October 13-16, 2015.

  5. Satellite Sounder Observations of Contrasting Tropospheric Moisture Transport Regimes: Saharan Air Layers, Hadley Cells, and Atmospheric Rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Nalli, Nicholas R.; Barnet, Christopher D.; Reale, Tony; Liu, Quanhua; Morris, Vernon R.; Spackman, J. Ryan; Joseph, Everette; Tan, Changyi; Sun, Bomin; Tilley, Frank; Leung, L. Ruby; Wolfe, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    This paper examines the performance of satellite sounder atmospheric vertical moisture proles (AVMP) under tropospheric conditions encompassing moisture contrasts driven by convection and advection transport mechanisms, specifically Atlantic Ocean Saharan air layers (SALs) and Pacific Ocean moisture conveyer belts (MCBs) commonly referred to as atmospheric rivers (ARs), both of these being mesoscale to synoptic meteorological phenomena within the vicinity of subtropical Hadley subsidence zones. Operational AVMP environmental data records retrieved from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) are collocated with dedicated radiosonde observations (RAOBs) obtained from ocean-based intensive field campaigns; these RAOBs provide uniquely independent correlative truth data not assimilated into numerical weather prediction models for satellite sounder validation over open ocean. Using these marine-based data, we empirically assess the performance of the operational NUCAPS AVMP product for detecting and resolving these tropospheric moisture features over otherwise RAOB-sparse regions.

  6. Space View Issues for Hyperspectral Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Evan M.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Broberg, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    The expectation for climate quality measurements from hyperspectral sounders is absolute calibration accuracy at the 100 mK level and stability at the < 40 mK/decade level. The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS)1, Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) hyperspectral sounders currently in orbit have been shown to agree well over most of their brightness temperature range. Some larger discrepancies are seen, however, at the coldest scene temperatures, such as those seen in Antarctic winter and deep convective clouds. A key limiting factor for the calibrated scene radiance accuracy for cold scenes is how well the effective radiance of the cold space view pertains to the scene views. The space view signal is composed of external sources and instrument thermal emission at about 270 K from the scan mirror, external baffles, etc. Any difference in any of these contributions between space views and scene views will impact the absolute calibration accuracy, and the impact can be critical for cold scenes. Any change over time in these will show up as an apparent trend in calibrated radiances. We use AIRS data to investigate the validity of the space view assumption in view of the 100 mK accuracy and 40 mK/decade trend expectations. We show that the space views used for the cold calibration point for AIRS v5 Level-1B products meet these standards except under special circumstances and that AIRS v6 Level-1B products will meet them under all circumstances. This analysis also shows the value of having multiple distinct space views to give operational redundancy and analytic data, and that reaching climate quality requires continuing monitoring of aging instruments and adjustment of calibration.

  7. Impacts of field of view configuration of Cross-track Infrared Sounder on clear-sky observations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Likun; Chen, Yong; Han, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Hyperspectral infrared radiance measurements from satellite sensors contain valuable information on atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles and greenhouse gases, and therefore are directly assimilated into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models as inputs for weather forecasting. However, data assimilations in current operational NWP models still mainly rely on cloud-free observations due to the challenge of simulating cloud-contaminated radiances when using hyperspectral radiances. The limited spatial coverage of the 3×3 field of views (FOVs) in one field of regard (FOR) (i.e., spatial gap among FOVs) as well as relatively large footprint size (14 km) in current Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instruments limits the amount of clear-sky observations. This study explores the potential impacts of future CrIS FOV configuration (including FOV size and spatial coverage) on the amount of clear-sky observations by simulation experiments. The radiance measurements and cloud mask products (VCM) from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to simulate CrIS clear-sky observation under different FOV configurations. The results indicate that, given the same FOV coverage (e.g., 3×3), the percentage of clear-sky FOVs and the percentage of clear-sky FORs (that contain at least one clear-sky FOV) both increase as the FOV size decreases. In particular, if the CrIS FOV size were reduced from 14 km to 7 km, the percentage of clear-sky FOVs increases from 9.02% to 13.51% and the percentage of clear-sky FORs increases from 18.24% to 27.51%. Given the same FOV size but with increasing FOV coverage in each FOR, the clear-sky FOV observations increases proportionally with the increasing sampling FOVs. Both reducing FOV size and increasing FOV coverage can result in more clear-sky FORs, which benefit data utilization of NWP data assimilation.

  8. Development of Infrared and Microwave Techniques for Cloud Parameter Inference from Satellite Imagery and Sounder Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-30

    clouds and precipitation on the Nimbus VI ESMR channel and the use of ESMR vertical and horizontal polarization components for the determination ot...channels of the Nimbus VI satellite. Random error analyses revealed that the cloud sounding technique employin’g a combiration of infrared and...microwave frequencies appears to be theoretically rigorous and practically workable. Thus, applications of the cloud sounding technique to the Nimbus VI

  9. Relationship between Ice Cloud Microphysics and Supersaturation from Spaceborne Cloud Radar, Lidar and Infrared Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Okamoto, H.; Sato, K.; Ishimoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    We examined the relationship between ice cloud microphysics retrieved from cloud radar on CloudSat and CALIOP on CALIPSO and super saturation inferred from AIRS on AQUA. Ice microphysics such as ice water content (IWC) and effective radius was estimated by CloudSat and CALIPSO data. Unique features of the algorithm is that it has been designed to use depolarization ratio from CALIOP addition to radar reflectivity factor from CloudSat and attenuated backscattering coefficient from CALIOP in order to take into account the variation of ice particle shapes and their orientations [Okamoto et al., 2010]. Water vapor density and temperature were retrieved with much finer resolution by the application of Ishimoto's algorithm [2009] compared with standard AIRS products where horizontal resolution is 45km. The algorithm allows retrievals of water vapor density and temperature every 13.5km in horizontal direction with 1km in vertical. The retrievals are carried out when there is no cloud with its cloud top pressure <200hPa. That is, it is possible to report water vapor information above low-level clouds. Then we sampled the amount of water vapor and temperature estimated from AIRS data to match the CloudSat and CALIPSO foot-print and the data were interpolated to have the same space and time resolution of the merged data sets of CloudSat and CALIPSO, i.e., 1.1km and 240m for horizontal and vertical resolutions. In the new AIRS products, ice super saturation often reached 150% while standard AIRS products showed less frequent super saturation. The ECMWF results generally showed smaller fraction of ice super saturation compared with the new AIRS products. In order to quantitatively compare the water vapor amount and retrieved IWC, we estimated the excess of water amount respect to ice saturation by using ice super saturation. The occurrences of ice clouds inferred from CloudSat and CALIOP agreed with the occurrences of ice-supersaturation reported in the new AIRS products. The

  10. An Anomaly Correlation Skill Score for the Evaluation of the Performance of Hyperspectral Infrared Sounders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan; Barnet, Chris; Maddy, Eric; Blackwell, William

    2009-01-01

    With the availability of very accurate forecasts, the metric of accuracy alone for the evaluation of the performance of a retrieval system can produce misleading results. A useful characterization of the quality of a retrieval system and its potential to contribute to an improved weather forecast is its skill, which we define as the ability to make retrievals of geophysical parameters which are closer to the truth than the six hour forecast, when the truth differs significantly from the forecast. We illustrate retrieval skill using one day of AMSU and AIRS data with three different retrieval algorithms, which result in retrievals for more than 90% of the potential retrievals under clear and cloudy conditions. Two of the three algorithms have better than 1 K rms "RAOB quality" accuracy on the troposphere, but only one has skill between 900 and 100 mb. AIRS was launched on the EOS Aqua spacecraft in May 2002 into a 705 km polar sun-synchronous orbit with accurately maintained 1:30 PM ascending node. Essentially uninterrupted data are freely available since September 2002.

  11. A Comparison of the Red Green Blue Air Mass Imagery and Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Folmer, Michael; Dunion, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The Red Green Blue (RGB) Air Mass imagery is derived from multiple channels or paired channel differences. Multiple channel products typically provide additional information than a single channel can provide alone. The RGB Air Mass imagery simplifies the interpretation of temperature and moisture characteristics of air masses surrounding synoptic and mesoscale features. Despite the ease of interpretation of multiple channel products, the combination of channels and channel differences means the resulting product does not represent a quantity or physical parameter such as brightness temperature in conventional single channel satellite imagery. Without a specific quantity to reference, forecasters are often confused as to what RGB products represent. Hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles of temperature, moisture, and ozone can provide insight about the air mass represented on the RGB Air Mass product and provide confidence in the product and representation of air masses despite the lack of a quantity to reference for interpretation. This study focuses on RGB Air Mass analysis of Hurricane Sandy as it moved north along the U.S. East Coast, while transitioning to a hybrid extratropical storm. Soundings and total column ozone retrievals were analyzed using data from the Cross-track Infrared and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder Suite (CrIMSS) on the Suomi National Polar Orbiting Partnership satellite and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aqua satellite along with dropsondes that were collected from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Air Force research aircraft. By comparing these datasets to the RGB Air Mass, it is possible to capture quantitative information that could help in analyzing the synoptic environment enough to diagnose the onset of extratropical transition. This was done by identifying any stratospheric air intrusions (SAIs) that existed in the vicinity of Sandy as the wind

  12. Full Spectral Resolution Data Generation from the Cross-track Infrared Sounder on S-NPP at NOAA and its Use to Investigate Uncertainty in Methane Absorption Band Near 7.66 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, X.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sasakawa, M.; Han, Y.; Chen, Y.; Wang, L.; Tremblay, D.; Jin, X.; Zhou, L.; Liu, Q.; Weng, F.; Machida, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership Satellite (S-NPP) is a Fourier transform spectrometer for atmospheric sounding. CrIS on S-NPP started to provide measurements in 1305 channels in its normal mode since its launch on November 2011 to December 4, 2014, and after that it was switched to the full spectral resolution (FSR) mode, in which the spectral resolutions are 0.625 cm-1 in all the MWIR (1210-1750 cm-1), SWIR (2155-2550 cm-1) and the LWIR bands (650-1095 cm-1) with a total of 2211 channels. While the NOAA operational Sensor Data Record (SDR) processing (IDPS) continues to produce the normal resolution SDRs by truncating full spectrum RDR data, NOAA STAR started to process the FSR SDRs data since December 4, 2014 to present, and the data is being delivered through NOAA STAR website (ftp://ftp2.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/smcd/xxiong/). The current FSR processing algorithm was developed on basis of the CrIS Algorithm Development Library (ADL), and is the baseline of J-1 CrIS SDR algorithm. One major benefit to use the FSR data is to improve the retrieval of atmospheric trace gases, such as CH4, CO and CO2 . From our previous studies to retrieve CH4 using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), it was found the uncertainty in the CH4 absorption band is up to 1-2%. So, in this study we computed the radiance using the community radiative transfer model (CRTM) and line-by-line model, with the inputs of "truth" of atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles from ECMWF model (and/or RAOB sounding) and CH4 profiles from in-situ aircraft measurements, then convoluted with the response function of CrIS. The difference between the simultaed radiance and the collocated CrIS FSR data is used to exam the uncertainty in these strong absorption channels.Through the improved fitting to the transmittance in these channels, it is expected to improve the retrieval of CH4 using CrIS on S

  13. New isostatic mounting concept for a space born Three Mirror Anastigmat (TMA) on the Meteosat Third Generation Infrared Sounder Instrument (MTG-IRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudling, Maximilian; Klammer, Jesko; Lousberg, Gregory; Schumacher, Jean-Marc; Körner, Christian

    2016-07-01

    A novel isostatic mounting concept for a space born TMA of the Meteosat Third Generation Infrared Sounder is presented. The telescope is based on a light-weight all-aluminium design. The mounting concept accommodates the telescope onto a Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (CRFP) structure. This design copes with the high CTE mismatch without introducing high stresses into the telescope structure. Furthermore a Line of Sight stability of a few microrads under geostationary orbit conditions is provided. The design operates with full performance at a temperature 20K below the temperature of the CFRP structure and 20K below the integration temperature. The mounting will sustain launch loads of 47g. This paper will provide the design of the Back Telescope Assembly (BTA) isostatic mounting and will summarise the consolidated technical baseline reached following a successful Preliminary Design Review (PDR).

  14. Low-level water vapor fields from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS) split window channels at 11 and 12 microns. [visible infrared spin scan radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Uccellini, L.; Robinson, W.

    1982-01-01

    A series of high-resolution water vapor fields were derived from the 11 and 12 micron channels of the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) on GOES-5. The low-level tropospheric moisture content was separated from the surface and atmospheric radiances by using the differential adsorption across the 'split window' along with the average air temperature from imbedded radiosondes. Fields of precipitable water are presented in a time sequence of five false color images taken over the United States at 3-hour intervals. Vivid subsynoptic and mesoscale patterns evolve at 15 km horizontal resolution over the 12-hour observing period. Convective cloud formations develop from several areas of enhanced low-level water vapor, especially where the vertical water vapor gradient relatively strong. Independent verification at radiosonde sites indicates fairly good absolute accuracy, and the spatial and temporal continuity of the water vapor features indicates very good relative accuracy. Residual errors are dominated by radiometer noise and unresolved clouds.

  15. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  16. Assessment of error propagation in ultraspectral sounder data via JPEG2000 compression and turbo coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Donald P.; Wang, Charles C.; Sklar, Dean; Huang, Bormin; Ahuja, Alok

    2005-08-01

    Research has been undertaken to examine the robustness of JPEG2000 when corrupted by transmission bit errors in a satellite data stream. Contemporary and future ultraspectral sounders such as Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS), and Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) generate a large volume of three-dimensional data. Hence, compression of ultraspectral sounder data will facilitate data transmission and archiving. There is a need for lossless or near-lossless compression of ultraspectral sounder data to avoid potential retrieval degradation of geophysical parameters due to lossy compression. This paper investigates the simulated error propagation in AIRS ultraspectral sounder data with advanced source and channel coding in a satellite data stream. The source coding is done via JPEG2000, the latest International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Telecommunication Union (ITU) standard for image compression. After JPEG2000 compression the AIRS ultraspectral sounder data is then error correction encoded using a rate 0.954 turbo product code (TPC) for channel error control. Experimental results of error patterns on both channel and source decoding are presented. The error propagation effects are curbed via the block-based protection mechanism in the JPEG2000 codec as well as memory characteristics of the forward error correction (FEC) scheme to contain decoding errors within received blocks. A single nonheader bit error in a source code block tends to contaminate the bits until the end of the source code block before the inverse discrete wavelet transform (IDWT), and those erroneous bits propagate even further after the IDWT. Furthermore, a single header bit error may result in the corruption of almost the entire decompressed granule. JPEG2000 appears vulnerable to bit errors in a noisy channel of

  17. Assimilation of IASI and AIRS Data: Information Content and Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instruments have two orders of magnitude more channels that the current operational infrared sounder (High Resolution Infra-Red Sounder (HIRS)). This data volume presents a technological challenge for using the data in a data assimilation system. Data reduction will be a necessary for assimilation. It is important to understand the information content of the radiance measurements for data reduction purposes. In this talk, I will discuss issues relating to information content and quality control for assimilation of the AIRS and IASI data.

  18. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  19. From Aircraft to GEO: Using Microwave Sounders to Observe the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrigtsen, B.; Brown, S.; Gaier, T.; Tanner, A.; Kangaslahti, P.; Lim, B.; Tanabe, J.

    2010-12-01

    Although hyperspectral infrared sounders, such as AIRS and IASI, have become important weather and climate sensors for both operational and research use, microwave sounders, in spite of their coarser spatial resolution and poorer sounding accuracy, still play a crucial role. That is because infrared sounders do not sample certain weather and climate regimes well, particularly those associated with full cloud cover and storms. In part one this paper we review recent results obtained with the High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR), an aircraft-based microwave sounder developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and recently deployed on the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft as part of the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) hurricane field campaign. Here the emphasis is on the benefits of the high spatial resolution that is possible with suborbital sensors. In part two we will review plans to deploy a microwave sounder on a geostationary satellite in the relatively near future, where the emphasis is on the high temporal resolution that is possible from GEO. We focus on the Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) now being developed at JPL for the Precipitation and All-weather Temperature and Humidity (PATH) mission - one of the 15 missions recommended by the National Research Council in its recent “decadal survey” of Earth satellite missions.

  20. Radiation budget studies using collocated observations from advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, High-Resolution Infrared Sounder/2, and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Steven A.; Frey, Richard A.; Smith, William L.

    1992-01-01

    Collocated observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), High-Resolution Infrared Sounder/2 (HIRS/2), and Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments onboard the NOAA 9 satellite are combined to describe the broadband and spectral radiative properties of the earth-atmosphere system. Broadband radiative properties are determined from the ERBE observations, while spectral properties are determined from the HIRS/2 and AVHRR observations. The presence of clouds, their areal coverage, and cloud top pressure are determined from a combination of the HIRS/2 and the AVHRR observations. The CO2 slicing method is applied to the HIRS/2 to determine the presence of upper level clouds and their effective emissivity. The AVHRR data collocated within the HIRS/2 field of view are utilized to determine the uniformity of the scene and retrieve sea surface temperature. Changes in the top of the atmosphere longwave and shortwave radiative energy budgets, and the spectral distribution of longwave radiation are presented as a function of cloud amount and cloud top pressure. The radiative characteristics of clear sky conditions over oceans are presented as a function of sea surface temperature and atmospheric water vapor structure.

  1. Derivation of Tropospheric Carbon Dioxide and Methane Concentrations in the Boreal Zone from Satellite High Resolution Infrared Sounders Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, Alexander; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Rublev, Alexey; Kukharsky, Alexander; Romanov, Sergey

    2009-03-01

    The presentation describes the approach developed for clear-sky or cloud-cleared AIRS data inversion and retrieval of the atmospheric column-average carbon dioxide mixing ratio QCO2. Its efficiency is demonstrated in the validation effort carried out with real AIRS data for two areas in the boreal zone of Western Siberia. To retrieve the methane column amount CACH4, the original method has been proposed based on the inversion of clear-sky IASI data in four dedicated super- channels or AIRS data in eight channels. The performance of CACH4 retrieval algorithms is evaluated in a case study experiment involving datasets of real IASI and AIRS measurements (Esrange/Kiruna, Sweden).

  2. Impact of Measurement System Characteristics on Advanced Sounder Information Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Achieving such an improvement in geophysical information inferred from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as instrument system enhancements for future sensors. This presentation addresses results of tradeoff studies evaluating the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content, with a specific emphasis on thermodynamic state and trace species information obtainable from advanced atmospheric sounders. Particular attention will be devoted toward information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument to fly aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites expected to begin in late 2011. While all of these systems cover nearly the same infrared spectral extent, they have very different number of channels, instrument line shapes, coverage continuity, and instrument noise. AIRS is a grating spectrometer having 2378 discrete spectral channels ranging from about 0.4 to 2.2/cm resolution; IASI is a Michelson interferometer with 8461 uniformly-spaced spectral channels of 0.5/cm (apodized) resolution; and CrIS is a Michelson interferometer having 1305 spectral channels of 0.625, 1.250, and 2.50/cm (unapodized) spectral resolution, respectively, over its three continuous but non-overlapping bands. Results of tradeoff studies showing information content sensitivity to assumed measurement system characteristics will be presented.

  3. Cirrus Cloud Properties Derived from High Spectral Resolution Infrared Spectrometry during FIRE II. Part I: The High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. L.; Revercomb, H. E.; Knuteson, R. O.; Best, F. A.; Dedecker, R.; Howell, H. B.; Woolf, H. M.

    1995-12-01

    The characteristics of the ER-2 aircraft and ground-based High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) instruments deployed during FIRE II are described. A few example spectra are given to illustrate the HIS cloud and molecular atmosphere remote sensing capabilities.

  4. Inter-Comparison of Suomi NPP CrIS Radiances with AIRS and IASI toward Infrared Hyperspectral Benchmark Radiance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jin, X.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the newly-launched Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) and future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is a Fourier transform spectrometer that provides soundings of the atmosphere with 1305 spectral channels, over 3 wavelength ranges: LWIR (9.14 - 15.38 μm); MWIR (5.71 - 8.26 μm); and SWIR (3.92 - 4.64 μm). The SNPP CrIS, combined with the existed Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA Aqua and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Metop-A and -B, will accumulate decades of hyperspectral spectral infrared measurements with high accuracy, which have potentials for climate monitoring and model assessments. In this presentation, we will 1) evaluate radiance consistency among AIRS, IASI, and CrIS, and 2) thus demonstrate that the CrIS SDR data from SNPP and JPSS can serve as a long-term reference benchmark for inter-calibration and climate-related study just like AIRS and IASI. In the first part of presentation, we will brief major postlaunch calibration and validation activities for SNPP CrIS performed by the NOAA STAR CrIS sensor data record (SDR) team, including the calibration parameter updates, instrument stability monitoring, and data processing quality assurance. Comprehensive assessments of the radiometric, spectral, geometric calibration of CrIS SDR will be presented. In addition, the preparation of CrIS SDR re-processing toward consistent Climate Data Records (CDRs) will be discussed. The purpose of this part is to provide a comprehensive overview of CrIS SDR data quality to the user community. In the second part, we will compare CrIS hyperspectral radiance measurements with the AIRS and IASI on Metop-A and -B to examine spectral and radiometric consistence and differences among three hyperspectral IR sounders. The SNPP CrIS, combined with AIRS and IASI, provide the first-ever inter-calibration opportunity because three hyperspectral IR sounders can observe the Earth and

  5. Sensitivity of thermal infrared sounders to the chemical and micro-physical properties of UTLS secondary sulphate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Legras, B.

    2015-08-01

    Monitoring upper tropospheric-lower stratospheric (UTLS) secondary sulphate aerosols and their chemical and micro-physical properties from satellite nadir observations is crucial to better understand their formation and evolution processes and then to estimate their impact to the UTLS chemistry, and on regional and global radiative balance. Here we present a study aimed at the evaluation of the sensitivity of thermal infrared (TIR) satellite nadir observations to the chemical composition and the size distribution of idealized UTLS sulphate aerosol layers. The extinction properties of sulphuric acid/water droplets, for different sulphuric acid mixing ratios and temperatures, are systematically analysed. The extinction coefficients are derived by means of a Mie code, using refractive indexes taken from the GEISA (Gestion et Étude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Spectroscopic Information) spectroscopic database and log-normal size distributions with different effective radii and number concentrations. IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) pseudo-observations are generated using forward radiative transfer calculations performed with the 4A (Automatized Atmospheric Absorption Atlas) radiative transfer model, to estimate the impact of the extinction of idealized aerosol layers, at typical UTLS conditions, on the brightness temperature spectra observed by this satellite instrument. We found a marked and typical spectral signature of these aerosol layers between 700 and 1200 cm-1, due to the absorption bands of the sulphate and bi-sulphate ions and the undissociated sulphuric acid, with the main absorption peaks at 1170 and 905 cm-1. The dependence of the aerosol spectral signature to the sulphuric acid mixing ratio, and effective number concentration and radius, as well as the role of interferring parameters like the ozone, sulphur dioxide, carbon dioxide and ash absorption, and temperature and water vapour profile

  6. Calibrated infrared ground/air radiometric spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, J. K.; Schildkraut, Elliot Robert; Bauldree, Russell S.; Goodrich, Shawn M.

    1996-06-01

    The calibrated infrared ground/air radiometric spectrometer (CIGARS) is a new high performance, multi-purpose, multi- platform Fourier transform spectrometer (FPS) sensor. It covers the waveband from 0.2 to 12 micrometer, has spectral resolution as fine as 0.3 cm-1, and records over 100 spectra per second. Two CIGARS units are being used for observations of target signatures in the air or on the ground from fixed or moving platforms, including high performance jet aircraft. In this paper we describe the characteristics and capabilities of the CIGARS sensor, which uses four interchangeable detector modules (Si, InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe) and two optics modules, with internal calibration. The data recording electronics support observations of transient events, even without precise information on the timing of the event. We present test and calibration data on the sensitivity, spectral resolution, stability, and spectral rate of CIGARS, and examples of in- flight observations of real targets. We also discuss plans for adapting CIGARS for imaging spectroscopy observations, with simultaneous spectral and spatial data, by replacing the existing detectors with a focal plane array (FPA).

  7. Verification of mesoscale objective analyses of VAS and rawinsode data using the March 1982 AVE/VAS special network data. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment/Visible-infrared spin-scan radiometer Atmospheric Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, James D.; Warner, Thomas T.

    1988-01-01

    Various combinations of VAS (Visible and Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder) data, conventional rawinsonde data, and gridded data from the National Weather Service's (NWS) global analysis, were used in successive-correction and variational objective-analysis procedures. Analyses are produced for 0000 GMT 7 March 1982, when the VAS sounding distribution was not greatly limited by the existence of cloud cover. The successive-correction (SC) Procedure was used with VAS data alone, rawinsonde data alone, and both VAS and rawinsonde data. Variational techniques were applied in three ways. Each of these techniques was discussed.

  8. Performance Expectations for Future Moderate Resolution Visible and Infrared Space Instruments Based on AIRS and MODIS In-Flight Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Broberg, Steven E.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Baron, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    Lessons learned from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) projects highlight areas where further technology development is needed to address future land, ocean and atmospheric measurement needs. Although not established as requirements at this time, it is anticipated that scientists will expect improvements in the areas of spatial, spectral, radiometric, polarimetric, temporal and calibration performance for future sensors. This paper addresses each of these performance areas and provides lessons learned from MODIS and AIRS. We also present expectations in performance of the system based on information from NASA Instrument Incubator Program and industry reports. Tradeoffs are presented vs orbit altitude (LEO, ME0 and GEO) and provide a 'systems' perspective to future measurement concepts.

  9. Team 2: AIRS Only Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sung-Yung; Manning, Evan; Blaisdell, John; Susskind, Joel; Barnet, Chris; Goldberg, Mitch; Cho, Chuck; Staelin, Dave; Blackwelll, Bill

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation makes the case for the retrieval of data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). AIRS only retrieval is not only a risk reduction for failure of AMSU, but also important because NWP centers are reluctant to assimilate AMSU twice.

  10. Filamentation in Air with Ultrashort Mid-Infrared Pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-09

    Filamentation in air with ultrashort mid-infrared pulses Bonggu Shim,1,2 Samuel E. Schrauth,1 and Alexander L. Gaeta1,3 1School of Applied and...filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in air in the mid-infrared regime under conditions in which the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) is anomalous. When a...and propagates several times its diffraction length. Compared with temporal self-compression in gases due to plasma formation and pulse splitting in the

  11. Infrared Photography as an Air Pollution Surveillance Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casalinuovo, Anthony F.; Sawan, Alan

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the practicality of infrared photographic analysis to air pollution agencies, by the detection of plant damage from pollutants before they are visually identifiable. Results showed that photomicrographic imaging using infrared radiation should be considered a viable surveillance tool in similiar…

  12. AIRES: An Airborne Infra-Red Echelle Spectrometer for SOFIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Jessie J.; Erickson, Edwin F.; Haas, Michael R.; Colgan, Sean W. J.; Simpson, Janet P.; Telesco, Charles M.; Pina, Robert K.; Wolf, Juergen; Young, Erick T.

    1999-01-01

    SOFIA will enable astronomical observations with unprecedented angular resolution at infrared wavelengths obscured from the ground. To help open this new chapter in the exploration of the infrared universe, we are building AIRES, an Airborne Infra-Red Echelle Spectrometer. AIRES will be operated as a first generation, general purpose facility instrument by USRA, NASA's prime contractor for SOFIA. AIRES is a long slit spectrograph operating from 17 - 210 microns. In high resolution mode the spectral resolving power is approx. 10(exp 6) microns/A or approx. 10(exp 4) at 100 microns. Unfortunately, since the conference, a low resolution mode with resolving power about 100 times lower has been deleted due to budgetary constraints. AIRES includes a slit viewing camera which operates in broad bands at 18 and 25 microns.

  13. Mars Climate Sounder (Artist's Concept)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist's concept of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter at Mars features one of its instruments -- the Mars Climate Sounder -- in action. Using nine channels across the visible and thermal infrared ranges of the spectrum, the Mars Climate Sounder looks first at space through the atmosphere above the horizon of Mars to get a vertical profile with temperature, pressure, dust and water vapor concentration measurements every 5 kilometers (3 miles) vertically from the ground to about 80 kilometers (about 50 miles) high. It also looks down onto the planet to get surface temperature and column abundances of dust and water vapor between the spacecraft and the surface.

    These 'profiles' and surface measurements are combined into daily, three-dimensional global weather maps for both daytime and nighttime. Observations will be made through the martian year to characterize the large seasonal variations in atmospheric dust loading, humidity and thermal structure, providing scientists with the same type of information meteorologists use to understand and predict weather and climate here on Earth.

  14. Technology Development for a Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Thompson, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term hyperspectral microwave is used to indicate an all-weather sounding instrument that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earths atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions.

  15. The GEISA system in 1996: towards an operational tool for the second generation vertical sounders radiance simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Scott, N. A.; Chedin, A.; Bonnet, B.; Barbe, A.; Tyuterev, V. G.; Champion, J. P.; Winnewisser, M.; Brown, L. R.; Gamache, R.; Golovko, V. F.; Chursin, A. A.

    1998-05-01

    Since their creation, in 1974, the GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmospheriques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) database system (more than 730,000 entries between 0 and 22,656 cm-1, corresponding to 40 molecules and 86 isotopic species, in its 1992 edition) and the associated software have been widely used for forward atmospheric radiative transfer modelling, with the maximum reliability, tractability and efficiency. For the upcoming high spectral resolution sounders like IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) and AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder), more complete and accurate laboratory measurements of spectroscopic parameters, presently included in the databases, are required, and more sophisticated theoretical radiative transfer modelling should be developed. Consequently, it is intended to elaborate the GEISA database as an interactive tool, named GEISA/IASI, designed for providing spectroscopic information tailored to the IASI sounding radiative transfer modelling.

  16. Cloud properties and bulk microphysical properties of semi-transparent cirrus from IR Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubenrauch, Claudia; Feofilov, Artem; Armante, Raymond; Guignard, Anthony

    2013-04-01

    Satellite observations provide a continuous survey of the atmosphere over the whole globe. IR sounders have been observing our planet since 1979. The spectral resolution has improved from TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounders (TOVS) to the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), and to the InfraRed Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI); resolution within the CO2 absorption band makes these passive sounders most sensitive to semi-transparent cirrus (about 30% of all clouds), day and night. The LMD cloud property retrieval method developed for TOVS, has been adapted to the second generation of IR sounders like AIRS and, recently, IASI. It is based on a weighted χ2 method using different channels within the 15 micron CO2 absorption band. Once the cloud physical properties (cloud pressure and IR emissivity) are retrieved, cirrus bulk microphysical properties (De and IWP) are determined from spectral emissivity differences between 8 and 12 μm. The emissivities are determined using the retrieved cloud pressure and are then compared to those simulated by the radiative transfer model. For IASI, we use the latest version of the radiative transfer model 4A (http://4aop.noveltis.com), which has been coupled with the DISORT algorithm to take into account multiple scattering of ice crystals. The code incorporates single scattering properties of column-like or aggregate-like ice crystals provided by MetOffice (Baran et al. (2001); Baran and Francis (2004)). The synergy of AIRS and two active instruments of the A-Train (lidar and radar of the CALIPSO and CloudSat missions), which provide accurate information on vertical cloud structure, allowed the evaluation of cloud properties retrieved by the weighted χ2 method. We present first results for cloud properties obtained with IASI/ Metop-A and compare them with those of AIRS and other cloud climatologies having participated in the GEWEX cloud assessment. The combination of IASI observations at 9:30 AM and 9:30 PM complement

  17. Hurricane Debby - An illustration of the complementary nature of VAS soundings and cloud and water vapor motion winds. [Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Marshall, J. F.; Smith, W. L.; Callan, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) temperature and moisture soundings and cloud and water vapor motion winds in defining a storm and its surroundings at subsynoptic scales has been examined using a numerical analysis and prognosis system. It is shown that the VAS temperature and moisture data, which specify temperature and moisture well in cloud-free areas, are complemented by cloud and water vapor motion data generated in the cloudy areas. The cloud and water vapor 'winds' provide thermal gradient information for interpolating the soundings across cloudy regions. The loss of analysis integrity due to the reduction of VAS sounding density in the cloudy regions associated with synoptic activity is ameliorated by using cloud and water vapor motion winds. The improvement in numerical forecasts resulting from the addition of these data to the numerical analysis is recorded.

  18. Variational assimilation of VAS data into a mesoscale model Assimilation method and sensitivity experiments. [Visible Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cram, J. M.; Kaplan, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The assimilation of temperature and moisture gradient information from the Visible IR Spin-Scan Radiometer's Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) into a mesoscale model is presently undertaken by means of a variational method and followed by tests of the sensitivity of both diabatic and adiabatic versions of the model to VAS data assimilations for the case of July 20-21, 1981. The synoptic scale effects of the assimilation of VAS data are noted to be negligible; the greatest impact was instead on mesoscale forecasts of convective instability patterns. The additional assimilation of relative humidity gradients did not significantly change the patterns of the forecast instabilities. The greatest improvements from assimilation resulted from the resolution of the strong mesoscale temperature gradients by the asynoptic VAS data.

  19. A VAS-numerical model impact study using the Gal-Chen variational approach. [Visible Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer Atmospheric Sounder (VAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aune, Robert M.; Uccellini, Louis W.; Peterson, Ralph A.; Tuccillo, James J.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical experiments to assess the impact of incorporating temperature data from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) using the assimilation technique developed by Gal-Chen (1986) modified for use in the Mesoscale Atmospheric Simulation System (MASS) model were conducted. The scheme is designed to utilize the high temporal and horizontal resolution of satellite retrievals while maintaining the fine vertical structure generated by the model. This is accomplished by adjusting the model lapse rates to reflect thicknesses retrieved from VAS and applying a three-dimensional variational that preserves the distribution of the geopotential fields in the model. A nudging technique whereby the model temperature fields are gradually adjusted toward the updated temperature fields during model integration is also tested. An adiabatic version of MASS is used in all experiments to better isolate mass-momentum imbalances. The method has a sustained impact over an 18 hr model simulation.

  20. Investigation of Infra-red and Nonequilibrium Air Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, Christophe O.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. This program was intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Prior to this work, the radiative emission of air plasmas in the infrared had been the object of few experimental investigations, and although several infrared systems were already modeled in radiation codes such as NEQAIR, measurements were required to validate numerical predictions and indicate whether all transitions of importance were accounted for in the model. The program was further motivated by the fact that 9 excited states (A, B, C, D, B', F, H, and H') of NO radiate in the infrared, especially between 1 and 1.5 microns where at least 9 transitions involving can be observed. Because these IR transitions are relatively well separated from each other, excited NO states concentrations can be easily measured, thus providing essential information on excited-state chemistry for use in optical diagnostics or in electronic excitation model validation. Detailed comparisons between measured and simulated spectra are presented.

  1. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and modeling of the spectral emission of an atmospheric pressure air plasma at temperatures up to -3400 K have been made. The cold gas injected in the plasma torch contained an estimated mole fraction of water vapor of approximately 4.5 x 10(exp -3) and an estimated carbon dioxide mole fraction of approximately 3.3 x 10(exp -4). Under these conditions, the minimum level of air plasma emission is found to be between 3.9 and 4.15 microns. Outside this narrow region, significant spectral emission is detected that can be attributed to the fundamental and overtone bands of NO and OH, and to the v(sub 3) and the (v(sub 1)+v(sub 3)) bands Of CO2. Special attention was paid to the effects of ambient air absorption in the optical path between the plasma and the detector. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated spectra, which are both on absolute intensity scales, thus lending confidence in the radiation models incorporated into NEQAIR2-IR over the course of this research program.

  2. Version 5 Release Status and Plans: AIRS Science Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Steven Z.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of version 5 of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) software. The overarching goal for version 5 is to enhance AIRS software to expand its utility for climate research and to improve the impact on weather forecasting.

  3. Cloud and Thermodynamic Parameters Retrieved from Satellite Ultraspectral Infrared Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Schluessel, Peter; Strow, L. Larrabee; Mango, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric-thermodynamic parameters and surface properties are basic meteorological parameters for weather forecasting. A physical geophysical parameter retrieval scheme dealing with cloudy and cloud-free radiance observed with satellite ultraspectral infrared sounders has been developed and applied to the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS). The retrieved parameters presented herein are from radiance data gathered during the Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx). JAIVEx provided intensive aircraft observations obtained from airborne Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) systems, in-situ measurements, and dedicated dropsonde and radiosonde measurements for the validation of the IASI products. Here, IASI atmospheric profile retrievals are compared with those obtained from dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and the airborne FTS system. The IASI examples presented here demonstrate the ability to retrieve fine-scale horizontal features with high vertical resolution from satellite ultraspectral sounder radiance spectra.

  4. Sensor System Performance Evaluation and Benefits from the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, A.; Zhou, D.; Smith, W.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global-scale measurements of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring, and environmental change detection. Validation of the entire measurement system is crucial to achieving this goal and thus maximizing research and operational utility of resultant data. Field campaigns employing satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft are an essential part of this validation task. The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a fundamental contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This paper focuses on some of the challenges associated with validating advanced atmospheric sounders and the benefits obtained from employing airborne interferometers such as the NAST-I. Select results from underflights of the Aqua Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) obtained during recent field campaigns will be presented.

  5. Community Radiative Transfer Model Applications - A Study of the Retrieval of Trace Gases in the Atmosphere from Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Data of a Full-spectral Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Nalli, N. R.; Tan, C.; Zhang, K.; Iturbide, F.; Wilson, M.; Zhou, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) [3] operationally supports satellite radiance assimilation for weather forecasting, sensor data verification, and the retrievals of satellite products. The CRTM has been applied to UV and visible sensors, infrared and microwave sensors. The paper will demonstrate the applications of the CRTM, in particular radiative transfer in the retrieva algorithm. The NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) operationally generates vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature (AVTP) and moisture (AVMP) from Suomi NPP Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) measurements. Current operational CrIS data have reduced spectral resolution: 1.25 cm-1 for a middle wave band and 2.5 cm-1 for a short-wave wave band [1]. The reduced spectral data largely degraded the retrieval accuracy of trace gases. CrIS full spectral data are also available now which have single spectral resolution of 0.625 cm-1 for all of the three bands: long-wave band, middle wave band, and short-wave band. The CrIS full-spectral resolution data is critical to the retrieval of trace gases such as O3, CO [2], CO2, and CH4. In this paper, we use the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) to study the impact of the CrIS spectral resolution on the retrieval accuracy of trace gases. The newly released CRTM version 2.2.1 can simulates Hamming-apodized CrIS radiance of a full-spectral resolution. We developed a small utility that can convert the CRTM simulated radiance to un-apodized radiance. The latter has better spectral information which can be helpful to the retrievals of the trace gases. The retrievals will be validated using both NWP model data as well as the data collected during AEROSE expeditions [4]. We will also discuss the sensitivity on trace gases between apodized and un-apodized radiances. References[1] Gambacorta, A., et al.(2013), IEEE Lett., 11(9), doi:10.1109/LGRS.2014.230364, 1639-1643. [2] Han, Y., et

  6. Analysis of Co-located Ground- and Space-based Infrared Atmospheric Measurements: AERI, AIRS, CERES, MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P. E.; Anderson, G. P.; Chetwynd, J.; Roman, M.; Schaaf, C. B.; Turner, D. D.; Rutan, D. A.; Berk, A.; Shen, S. S.; Miller, D. P.; Kroutil, R.

    2008-12-01

    Sets of clear-sky, co-located, down-looking infrared data, from the NASA AQUA space-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), have been paired with the DOE Southern Great Plains (SGP) ground-based, up-looking Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). Only 26 cases are included in this study, the 8% of the available 2005 AIRS acquisitions at SGP that were defined as cloud free. These data sets have then been simulated using the MODTRAN® 5 (MOD5) radiative transfer code with auxiliary 'truth' data as input. Since MOD5 is unaffiliated with any of the instruments, its use as a transfer agent among the instrument suites provides important algorithm validation. Of particular interest is the impact, if any, of the Ground Sampling Distance (GSD) of AIRS, CERES and MODIS (13, 26 and 0.5 km, respectively) vs. the soda-straw up-looking mode of AERI. The sensitivity of the larger GSDs on measurements of outgoing long wave radiation (OLR) is an important question for next-stage climate monitoring. In addition to the coincident SGP 'ground truth' data (vertical profile sondes and AERONET measurements) and MODIS products, the AURA Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) has also augmented the available 'truth' input parameters. Initial calculations with MOD5 have replicated both the AERI and AIRS measurements to within 1% RMS. Preliminary calculations of the CERES long wave radiances suggest that differences will fall well within 3%. While these results are not sufficiently precise for specific instrument algorithms, they suggest some confidence in the generic use of MODTRAN® 5 as an integration tool for Climate Change studies.

  7. Infrared Laser System for Extended Area Monitoring of Air Pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowman, L. R.; Gillmeister, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    An atmospheric pollution monitoring system using a spectrally scanning laser has been developed by the General Electric Company. This paper will report on an evaluation of a breadboard model, and will discuss applications of the concept to various ambient air monitoring situations. The system is adaptable to other tunable lasers. Operating in the middle infrared region, the system uses retroreflectors to measure average concentrations over long paths at low, safe power levels. The concept shows promise of meeting operational needs in ambient air monitoring and providing new data for atmospheric research.

  8. AIRS CO2 Retrievals Using the Method of Vanishing Partial Derivatives (VPD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Moustafa; Yung, Yuk; Li, Qinbin; Olsen, Ed; Chen, Luke; Krakauer, Nir

    2006-01-01

    This document consists of presentation slides that review the work being done with observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) using the concept of Vanishing Partial Derivatives. The infrared region is where several minor gases such as CO2, O3, CO, CH4 and SO2 are radiatively active.

  9. Spectral Resolution and Coverage Impact on Advanced Sounder Information Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global measurements of the Earth s atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Achieving such measurement improvements requires instrument system advancements. This presentation focuses on the impact of spectral resolution and coverage changes on remote sensing system information content, with a specific emphasis on thermodynamic state and trace species variables obtainable from advanced atmospheric sounders such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) systems on the MetOp and NPP/NPOESS series of satellites. Key words: remote sensing, advanced sounders, information content, IASI, CrIS

  10. Investigation of infra-red and nonequilibrium air radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes progress on the first year of a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this date, the radiative emission of air plasmas in the infrared has been the object of few experimental investigations, and although several infrared systems are already modeled in radiation codes such as NEQAIR, measurements are required to validate numerical predictions and indicate whether all transitions of importance are accounted for. The present program is motivated by the fact that 9 excited states (A, B, C, D, B', F, H, and H') of NO radiate in the infrared, especially between 1 and 1.5 microns where at least 9 transitions involving can be observed. Because these IR transitions are relatively well separated from each other, excited NO states concentrations can be easily measured, thus providing essential information on excited-state chemistry for use in optical diagnostics or in electronic excitation model validation. Developing accurate collisional-radiative models for these excited NO states is of importance as the UV-VUV transitions of NO (beta, gamma, epsilon, beta prime, gamma prime) produce a major, if not dominant, fraction of the radiation emitted by air plasmas. During the first year of the program, research has focused on the spectral range 1.0 to 1.5 microns, as detailed in Section 2 of this report. The measurements, conducted in a 50 kW radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma torch operating on air at atmospheric pressure, extend previous shock tube investigations by Wray to a wider spectral range (1.0 to 1.5 microns vs 0.9 to 1.2 microns) and higher temperatures (7600 K in the plasma torch versus 6700 K in the shock-tube). These higher temperatures in the present experiment have made it possible to

  11. A Microwave Pressure Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    An instrument to measure atmospheric pressure at the earth's surface from an orbiting satellite would be a valuable addition to the expanding inventory of remote sensors. The subject of this report is such an instrument - the Microwave Pressure Sounder (MPS). It is shown that global-ocean coverage is attainable with sufficient accuracy, resolution and observational frequency for meteorological, oceanographic and climate research applications. Surface pressure can be deduced from a measurement of the absorption by an atmospheric column at a frequency in the wing of the oxygen band centered on 60 GHz. An active multifrequency instrument is needed to make this measurement with sufficient accuracy. The selection of optimum operating frequencies is based upon accepted models of surface reflection, oxygen, water vapor and cloud absorption. Numerical simulation using a range of real atmospheres defined by radiosonde observations were used to validate the frequency selection procedure. Analyses are presented of alternative system configurations that define the balance between accuracy and achievable resolution.

  12. AIRS Retrieved Temperature Isotherms over Southern Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    AIRS Retrieved Temperature Isotherms over Southern Europe viewed from the west, September 8, 2002. The isotherms in this map made from AIRS data show regions of the same temperature in the atmosphere.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. AIRS FPA applied to the MIRIADS: powerful infrared systems applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John T.; McCarley, Paul L.; Baxter, Christopher R.; Massie, Mark A.

    2001-10-01

    Raytheon's Infrared Operations (RIO) has invented and developed a new type of focal plane array with 'Image Processing on-the-chip' named the Adaptive IR Sensor (AIRS). The AIRS FPA is based upon the human retina in that it performs signal processing near the photoreceptors. The AIRS FPA has been reduced to practice and adaptively removes detector and optic temperature drift and 1/f induced fixed pattern noise. This 3rd-generation multi-mode IRFPA, also called a Smart FPA, is a 256 X 256-array format capable of operation in four modes: (1) Direct Injection (DI), (2) Adaptive Non-uniformity Correction (NUC), (3) Motion/Edge Detection, and (4) Subframe Averaging. Nova Research has developed a Modular IR Application Development System (MIRIADS) which is a compact single board camera system that is highly integrated with the dewar assembly. The MIRIADS system coupled with the AIRS Smart FPA results in a very high performance wide field of view IR Sensor and processing system with integrated in one of the smallest packages to date.

  14. Requirements for an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) for Improved Regional Weather Prediction and Monitoring of Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; Susskind, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral infrared atmospheric sounders (e.g., the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Met Op) provide highly accurate temperature and water vapor profiles in the lower to upper troposphere. These systems are vital operational components of our National Weather Prediction system and the AIRS has demonstrated over 6 hrs of forecast improvement on the 5 day operational forecast. Despite the success in the mid troposphere to lower stratosphere, a reduction in sensitivity and accuracy has been seen in these systems in the boundary layer over land. In this paper we demonstrate the potential improvement associated with higher spatial resolution (1 km vs currently 13.5 km) on the accuracy of boundary layer products with an added consequence of higher yield of cloud free scenes. This latter feature is related to the number of samples that can be assimilated and has also shown to have a significant impact on improving forecast accuracy. We also present a set of frequencies and resolutions that will improve vertical resolution of temperature and water vapor and trace gas species throughout the atmosphere. Development of an Advanced Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Sounder (ALS) with these improvements will improve weather forecast at the regional scale and of tropical storms and hurricanes. Improvements are also expected in the accuracy of the water vapor and cloud properties products, enhancing process studies and providing a better match to the resolution of future climate models. The improvements of technology required for the ALS are consistent with the current state of technology as demonstrated in NASA Instrument Incubator Program and NOAA's Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES) formulation phase development programs.

  15. Spectrally resolved infrared radiances from AIRS observation and GCM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2007-12-01

    Global multi-year spectrally resolved infrared radiances observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sound (AIRS) satellite instrument and simulated from the General Circulation Models (GCMs) of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab (GFDL) are processed to obtain long-term global and regional means as well as the associated spatial and temporal variability. The accumulated radiance data comprise a host of phenomena that are still largely unrecognized but reveal important physical processes. For instance, the correlation between the radiances and the Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) discloses the roles of water vapor in both upper (via its v2 band) and lower (via the continuum in the window region) troposphere, and that of clouds regarding the so called "super greenhouse effect" in Tropics. A comparison between observed and simulated radiances demonstrates that radiance affords a stricter and more insightful metric than the broadband flux. A seemingly good agreement of OLR flux may arise from cancellation of errors of opposite signs in different spectral regions; radiance biases are indicative of physical causes because the radiances at each frequency are sensitive to factor(s) at different levels. Model validation at the radiance level thus provides a complementary and integrative perspective to that obtained using meteorological variables. It is demonstrated that the radiance discrepancies between the GFDL model and the observation are consistent with the model biases in temperature, water vapor and clouds.

  16. The Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brendt. Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Elmer, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Tropopause folds are identified by warm, dry, high-potential vorticity, ozone-rich air and are one explanation for damaging non-convective wind events. Could improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated tropopause folding improve non-convective wind forecasts and high wind warnings? The goal of this study is to assess the impact of assimilating Hyperspectral Infrared (IR) profiles on forecasting stratospheric air, tropopause folds, and associated non-convective winds: (1) AIRS: Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (2) IASI: Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (3) CrIMSS: Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite

  17. First Data from Mars Climate Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Mars Climate Sounder, an instrument on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter designed to monitor daily changes in the global atmosphere of Mars, made its first observations of Mars on March 24, 2006.

    These tests were conducted to demonstrate that the instrument could, if needed, support the mission's aerobraking maneuvers (dips into the atmosphere to change the shape of the orbit) by providing hemisphere-scale coverage of atmospheric activity. The instrument scanned nine arrays of detectors four times across the entire disc of the planet, including the north pole, from an altitude of about 45,000 kilometers (28,000 miles). This is about 150 times farther away than the spacecraft will be during its main science phase. At this great range, the planet appears only 40 pixels wide, as suggested by the pixilation of the images. However, this is sufficient to identify regional dust storms in the lower atmosphere. Regional dust storms could perturb atmospheric densities at the higher altitudes (about 100 kilometers or 60 miles) where the orbiter will conduct more than 500 aerobraking passes during the next six months. Such storms are rare in the current season on Mars, early northern spring, and no large storms are present as the orbiter prepares for the start of aerobraking.

    Each of the Mars Climate Sounder's arrays looks in a different wavelength band, and three of the resulting images are shown here. The view on the left is from data collected in a broad spectral band (wavelengths of 0.3 microns to 3 microns) for reflected sunlight. The view in the center is from data collected in the 12-micron thermal-infrared band. This band was chosen to sense infrared radiation from the surface when the atmosphere is clear and from dust clouds when it is not. The view on the right is from data collected at 15 microns, a longer-wavelength band still in the thermal-infrared part of the spectrum. At this wavelength, carbon dioxide, the main ingredient in Mars

  18. Full Spatial Resolution Infrared Sounding Application in the Preconvection Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, G.; Lin, T.

    2013-12-01

    Advanced infrared (IR) sounders such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) provide atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles with high vertical resolution and high accuracy in preconvection environments. The derived atmospheric stability indices such as convective available potential energy (CAPE) and lifted index (LI) from advanced IR soundings can provide critical information 1 ; 6 h before the development of severe convective storms. Three convective storms are selected for the evaluation of applying AIRS full spatial resolution soundings and the derived products on providing warning information in the preconvection environments. In the first case, the AIRS full spatial resolution soundings revealed local extremely high atmospheric instability 3 h ahead of the convection on the leading edge of a frontal system, while the second case demonstrates that the extremely high atmospheric instability is associated with the local development of severe thunderstorm in the following hours. The third case is a local severe storm that occurred on 7-8 August 2010 in Zhou Qu, China, which caused more than 1400 deaths and left another 300 or more people missing. The AIRS full spatial resolution LI product shows the atmospheric instability 3.5 h before the storm genesis. The CAPE and LI from AIRS full spatial resolution and operational AIRS/AMSU soundings along with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Sounder derived product image (DPI) products were analyzed and compared. Case studies show that full spatial resolution AIRS retrievals provide more useful warning information in the preconvection environments for determining favorable locations for convective initiation (CI) than do the coarser spatial resolution operational soundings and lower spectral resolution GOES Sounder retrievals. The retrieved soundings are also tested in a regional data assimilation WRF 3D-var system to evaluate the

  19. Laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beranek, R. G.; Bilbro, J. W.; Fitzjarrald, D. E.; Jones, W. D.; Keller, V. W.

    1989-01-01

    The principle of operation of a space based Doppler lidar wind measuring system is discussed along with laser wavelength selection considerations. Differences in accommodating the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) polar platform and the Manned Space Station are presented. The impact of the LAWS instrument support subsystems are specifically discussed.

  20. Regional Data Assimilation of AIRS Profiles and Radiances at the SPoRT Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Brad; Chou, Shih-hung; Jedlovec, Gary

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Short Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center's mission to improve short-term weather prediction at the regional and local scale. It includes information on the cold bias in Weather Research and Forcasting (WRF), troposphere recordings from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and vertical resolution of analysis grid.

  1. Causality arguments behind closed-form description of air dispersion in the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheltikov, A. M.

    2017-04-01

    We show that a closed-form Sellmeier-equation description of the refractive index of atmospheric air can be extended to the mid- and long-wavelength infrared spectral ranges, where the optical response of air is dominated by molecular rovibrational modes. When written in the form of a Sellmeier-type equation, the formula of air refractivity is shown to be instrumental for the analysis of group-velocity dispersion of atmospheric air, helping identify the regions of broadband anomalous dispersion, where long-distance transmission and soliton pulse compression of high-power mid- and long-wavelength infrared field waveforms are possible.

  2. Using CLARREO for spectral calibration of NOAA operational satellite sensors: Lessons learned from studies with AIRS and IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Cao, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) Mission will provide the spectrally resolved thermal IR and reflected solar measurements with high absolute accuracy. These SI traceable measurements will provide the basis for absolute calibration for a wide range of visible and infrared (IR) Earth observing sensors. In particular, CLARREO can potentially reduce the spectral uncertainties of NOAA’s operational satellite sensors. This study explores the potential of using CLARREO measurements for on-orbit spectral calibration for future NOAA operational sensors on both polar-orbiting and geostationary platforms. Lessons learned from the on-orbit spectral calibration of current systems will be reviewed based on our studies using Atmospheric Infrared Sounders (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) as quasi on-orbit standards in assessing Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), GOES Imagers and Sounders, and High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS). The on-going effort of spectral cross-check between AIRS and IASI with simultaneous nadir observations (SNOs) will be discussed. This method will also be used to verify the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) using CLARREO measurements. Similar work is planned to verify GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) using CLARREO based on studies between IASI/AIRS and GOES Imager as proxy.

  3. MODTRAN5 analysis of clear-sky, co-located space- and ground-based infrared atmospheric measurements: AERI, AIRS, CERES, MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Paul E.; Anderson, Gail P.; Shen, Sylvia S.; Chetwynd, James; Roman, Miguel, III; Schaaf, Crystal; Turner, David D.; Rutan, David A.; Berk, Alexander; Miller, David P.; Kroutil, Robert

    2009-05-01

    A set of 26 clear-sky, co-located, infrared data from NASA's space-based, downward looking Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)1 and its Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES)2 have been paired with the DOE's Southern Great Plains (SGP)3 ground-based, upward looking Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI)4. These data sets have then been simulated using the MODTRAN®55 (MOD5) radiative transfer code with standard auxiliary 'truth' data as input. Of particular interest is the impact, if any, of the large Ground Sampling Distance (GSD) of AIRS and CERES (minimum radii of approximately 13 and 26 km, respectively) vs. the soda-straw up-looking mode of AERI. The smaller Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)6 GSD (<1 km) provides estimated distributions of land-type and albedo within the larger footprints. The SGP's coincident vertical profile sondes and Aeronet7 retrievals, along with other satellite data [Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)8] constrain the surface type, column ozone and aerosol optical depth that existed during the measurement events. Initial MOD5 calculations, using these ancillary data as input, have replicated the AERI and AIRS measurements to within an average difference of ~1% over their entire spectral range. Using MODIS visible albedo9 retrievals to extend the albedo into the long wave (LW) only slightly improved the statistical comparison between the CERES and MOD5 broadband LW radiances agreement, from 3% to ~1.5%, while increasing the variance. While these results are not sufficient for specific instrument inversion algorithms, they suggest some confidence in the generic use of MODTRAN®5 to help integrate and spectrally extend assorted data sets for sensitivity studies of Climate Change, where the estimated required sensitivity is <1%.

  4. A cold air outbreak over the Norwegian Sea observed with the Tiros-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claud, Chantal; Katsaros, Kristina B.; Petty, Grant W.; Chedin, Alain; Scott, Noelle A.

    1992-01-01

    Until recently, the scarcity of meteorological observations over polar areas has limited studies of high latitude weather systems, but now data from polar orbiting satellites offer a new opportunity to observe and describe these systems. TOVS data were used successfully for delineating synoptic and subsynoptic systems since they provide the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere: SSM/I observations have proved valuable for analyzing storms through water vapor and rain determinations. These positive results prompted us to analyze simultaneous TOVS and SSM/I observations obtained during a cold air outbreak over the Norwegian Sea. After a description of the instruments and the retrieval schemes, the mutually supporting information from these two independent instruments is discussed. Implications for the monitoring of polar lows are presented.

  5. A cold air outbreak over the Norwegian Sea observed with the Tiros-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claud, Chantal; Katsaros, Kristina B.; Petty, Grant W.; Chedin, Alain; Scott, Noelle A.

    1992-01-01

    Until recently, the scarcity of meteorological observations over polar areas has limited studies of high-latitude weather systems, but now data from polar orbiting satellites offer a new opportunity to observe and describe these systems. TOVS data have been used successfully for delineating synoptic and subsynoptic systems, since they provide the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere; SSM/I observations have proved valuable for analyzing storms through water vapor and rain determinations. These positive results prompted simultaneous analysis of TOVS and SSM/I observations obtained during a cold air outbreak over the Norwegian Sea. After a description of the instruments and the retrieval schemes, the mutually supporting information from these two independent instruments is discussed. Implications for the monitoring of polar lows are presented.

  6. Moisture correspondence between lower and upper troposphere over oceans using AIRS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Hengchun; Fetzer, E. J.; Granger, S.; Lee, S. -Y.; Olsen, E. T.; Lambridgtsen, B. H.; Chen, L.

    2006-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) mounted on Aqua space craft measures vertical profiles of air temperature and humidity using both microwaves and infrared irradiance. The AIRS' level III data that provide gridded values of 1(sup o) latitude by 1(sup o) longitude for the highest temporal resolution of twice per day became available recently (Granger et al. 2005). This level III data were derived from the level II Version 4.0 AIRS retrieval algorithm. This study uses this level III AIRS moisture profile data to reveal geographical correspondences of atmospheric moisture content between the lower and upper troposphere.

  7. Assimilation of the Microwave Limb Sounder Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargan, K.; Read, W.; Livesey, N.; Wagner, P.; Nguyen. H.; Pawson, S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the assimilation of limb-sounder data can significantly improve the representation of ozone in NASA's GEOS Data Assimilation Systems (GEOS-DAS), particularly in the stratosphere. The studies conducted so far utilized retrieved data from the MIPAS, POAM, ILAS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) instruments. Direct assimilation of the radiance data can be seen as the natural next step to those studies. The motivation behind working with radiances is twofold. First, retrieval algorithms use a priori data which are either climatological or are obtained from previous analyses. This introduces additional uncertainty and, in some cases, may lead to "self-contamination"- when the a priori is taken from the same assimilation system in which subsequently ingests the retrieved observations. Second, radiances can be available in near real time thus providing an opportunity for operational assimilation, which could help improve the use of infrared radiance instruments from operational satellite instruments. In this presentation we summarize our ongoing work on an implementation of the assimilation of EOS MLS radiances into the GEOS-5 DAS. This work focuses on assimilation of band 7 brightness temperatures which are sensitive to ozone. Our implementation uses the MLS Callable Forward Model developed by the MLS team at NASA JPL as the observation operator. We will describe our approach and recent results which are not yet final. In particular, we will demonstrate that this approach has a potential to improve the vertical structure of ozone in the lower tropical stratosphere as compared with the retrieved MLS product. We will discuss the computational efficiency of this implementation.

  8. Detecting Climate Signatures with High Spectral Resolution Infrared Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deslover, D. H.; Tobin, D.; Knuteson, R. O.; Revercomb, H. E.

    2013-12-01

    Upwelling atmospheric infrared radiances can be accurately monitored from high spectral resolution satellite observations. The high spectral resolution nature of these measurements affords the ability to track various climate relevant parameters such as window channels sensitive to surface temperature and clouds, channels with higher sensitivity to trace gases including CO2, CH4, SO2, HNO3, as well as channels sensitive only to upper tropospheric or lower stratospheric temperature. NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) provides a data record that extends from its 2002 launch to the present. The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) onboard Metop- (A launched in 2006, B in 2012), as well as the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) launched in 2011, complement this data record. Future infrared sounders with similar capabilities will augment these measurements into the distant future. We have created a global data set from the aforementioned satellite observations. Our analysis yields a channel dependent approach that can be further constrained in terms of diurnal, seasonal and geographic limits, with measurement accuracies of better than a few tenths of degree Kelvin. In this study, we have applied this concept to obtain a better understanding of long-term stratospheric temperature trends. We will present a survey of temperature trends for spectral channels that were chosen to be sensitive to stratospheric emission. Results will be shown for tropical, mid-latitude and polar stratospheric observations.

  9. Operational testing and applications of the AIRS FPA with infrared fisheye optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Christopher R.; Massie, Mark A.; Bartolac, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Nova's development of the "Modular Infrared Imaging Applications Development System" (MIRIADS) produced a longwave infrared (LWIR) camera system that operated the "Adaptive Infrared Sensor" (AIRS) focal plane device produced by the Raytheon Infrared Operations (RIO) organization. A novel system architecture permitted the integration of an infrared fisheye lens system produced by Optics 1, Inc., which permitted a complete hemispherical field of view to be imaged onto the AIRS FPA. This paper will describe applications for this system as an extremely wide field-of-view IR sensor (early warning detection, fire detection, etc.), and will present test imagery collected with the system. This technology advancement has been the result of the coordinated effort of a variety of companies and government agencies. This presentation will highlight significant contributions of individuals and will indicate the effectiveness of the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program in helping to advance this nation's technology base.

  10. Characteristics of monsoon inversions over the Arabian Sea observed by satellite sounder and reanalysis data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Sanjeev; Narayanan, M. S.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2016-04-01

    Monsoon inversion (MI) over the Arabian Sea (AS) is one of the important characteristics associated with the monsoon activity over Indian region during summer monsoon season. In the present study, we have used 5 years (2009-2013) of temperature and water vapour measurement data obtained from satellite sounder instrument, an Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) onboard MetOp satellite, in addition to ERA-Interim data, to study their characteristics. The lower atmospheric data over the AS have been examined first to identify the areas where MIs are predominant and occur with higher strength. Based on this information, a detailed study has been made to investigate their characteristics separately in the eastern AS (EAS) and western AS (WAS) to examine their contrasting features. The initiation and dissipation times of MIs, their percentage occurrence, strength, etc., has been examined using the huge database. The relation with monsoon activity (rainfall) over Indian region during normal and poor monsoon years is also studied. WAS ΔT values are ˜ 2 K less than those over the EAS, ΔT being the temperature difference between 950 and 850 hPa. A much larger contrast between the WAS and EAS in ΔT is noticed in ERA-Interim data set vis-à-vis those observed by satellites. The possibility of detecting MI from another parameter, refractivity N, obtained directly from another satellite constellation of GPS Radio Occultation (RO) (COSMIC), has also been examined. MI detected from IASI and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard the NOAA satellite have been compared to see how far the two data sets can be combined to study the MI characteristics. We suggest MI could also be included as one of the semipermanent features of southwest monsoon along with the presently accepted six parameters.

  11. An Emerging ESDR: Multi-Platform Hyperspectral Infrared Radiances fromEOS-AIRS, S-NPP/JPSS CrIS, and METOP IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strow, L. L.; Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Motteler, H.; Hepplewhite, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Space-based measurements of high-spectral resolution infrared (IR) radiances of the earth began in Sept. 2002 with the NASA EOS-AQUA AIRS instrument. The CrIS instrument on NASA's Suomi-NPP platform supplements this record in the 1:30 polar orbit, starting in 2012, and may continue for 15 years under the NOAA/NASA JPSS Program. The first of three IASI hyperspectral sounders on EUMETSAT's METOP platforms (9:30 orbit) started operation in July 2007, followed by the 2nd IASI on METOP-2 in early 2013. Development of a follow-on instrument (IASI-NG) for post METOP-3 is well underway. These instruments are sensitive to the atmospheric temperature and humidity profile, surface temperature and emissivity, and minor gases (CO2, O3, CO, CH4, N2O, CFCs, HNO3, etc.) They also have high sensitivity to clouds, especially long-wave cloud radiative forcing. The National Research Council has recommended the development of a hyperspectral IR radiance climate data set as a climate benchmark. We present here evidence that supports the use of the existing hyperspectral sounders for generation of these ESDRs and eventually CDRs. The large spatial and temporal overlap between these sensors has provided a rich data-set for inter-calibration studies that are used to characterize the accuracy of a combined ESDR radiance product. We will discuss the stability of each instrument, and inter-calibration differences (with error estimates). In addition, we have developed robust, non-statistical approaches for converting the AIRS spectral radiances into equivalent CrIS radiances, a key step in development of a long-term consistent radiance record. Finally, several examples of robust decadal changes in the earth's atmosphere using AIRS will be discussed and compared to ERA and MERRA re-analysis products (temperature, water vapor, cloud forcing). Finally, we will review the challenges involved in creating an ESDR from 3 different instruments and institutions/countries.

  12. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zhang, X.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    A case study and monthly statistical analysis using sounder data assimilation to improve the Alaska regional weather forecast model are presented. Weather forecast in Alaska faces challenges as well as opportunities. Alaska has a large land with multiple types of topography and coastal area. Weather forecast models must be finely tuned in order to accurately predict weather in Alaska. Being in the high-latitudes provides Alaska greater coverage of polar orbiting satellites for integration into forecasting models than the lower 48. Forecasting marine low stratus clouds is critical to the Alaska aviation and oil industry and is the current focus of the case study. NASA AIRS/CrIS sounder profiles data are used to do data assimilation for the Alaska regional weather forecast model to improve Arctic marine stratus clouds forecast. Choosing physical options for the WRF model is discussed. Preprocess of AIRS/CrIS sounder data for data assimilation is described. Local observation data, satellite data, and global data assimilation data are used to verify and/or evaluate the forecast results by the MET tools Model Evaluation Tools (MET).

  13. Next Generation Grating Spectrometer Sounders for LEO and GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    AIRS and MODIS are widely used for weather, climate, composition, carbon cycle, cross-calibration, and applications. The community asking for new capability in the 2020 timeframe, capabilities desired: (1) Hyperspectral UV to LWIR, High Spatial ?1km IFOV (2) Maximize Synergies of Solar Reflected and IR. Synergies with OCO-2. We expect more users and applications of next gen LEO IR Sounder than GEO. These include: weather, climate, GHG monitoring, aviation, disaster response. There is a new direction for imagers and sounders: (1) Separate Vis/NIR/SWIR from MWIR/LWIR instruments reduces technology risk and complexity. (2) Expect Costs to be lower than CrIS & VIIRS Some additional ideas to reduce costs include: (1) minimum set of requirements (2) mini-grating spectrometers. supports constellation for higher revisit (3) new technology to reduce instrument size (large format fpa's) (4) hosted payloads

  14. High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS), phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) was successfully built, tested, and flight proven on the NASA U-2/ER-2 high altitude aircraft. The HIS demonstration has shown that, by using the technology of Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTS), it is possible to measure the spectrum of upwelling infrared radiance needed for temperature and humidity sounding with high spectral resolution and high radiometric precision. By resolving individual carbon dioxide lines, the retrieved temperature profiles have vertical resolutions of 1 to 2 km and RMS errors less than 1 C, about 2 to 4 times better than possible with current sounders. Implementing this capability on satellite sounders will greatly enhance the dynamical information content of temperature measurements from space. The aircraft model HIS is now a resource which should be used to support field experiments in mesoscale meteorology, to monitor trace gas concentrations and to better understand their effects on climate, to monitor the surface radiation budget and the radiative effects of clouds, and to collect data for research into retrieval techniques, especially under partially cloudy conditions.

  15. The 2003 edition of geisa: a spectroscopic database system for the second generation vertical sounders radiance simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Lmd Team

    The GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) computer accessible database system, in its former 1997 and 2001 versions, has been updated in 2003 (GEISA-03). It is developed by the ARA (Atmospheric Radiation Analysis) group at LMD (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, France) since 1974. This early effort implemented the so-called `` line-by-line and layer-by-layer '' approach for forward radiative transfer modelling action. The GEISA 2003 system comprises three databases with their associated management softwares: a database of spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located in a spectral range from the microwave to the limit of the visible. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the Giant Planets. a database of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. a database of refractive indices of basic atmospheric aerosol components. Illustrations will be given of GEISA-03, data archiving method, contents, management softwares and Web access facilities at: http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr The performance of instruments like AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder; http://www-airs.jpl.nasa.gov) in the USA, and IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer; http://smsc.cnes.fr/IASI/index.htm) in Europe, which have a better vertical resolution and accuracy, compared to the presently existing satellite infrared vertical sounders, is directly related to the quality of the spectroscopic parameters of the optically active gases, since these are essential input in the forward models used to simulate recorded radiance spectra. For these upcoming atmospheric sounders, the so-called GEISA/IASI sub-database system has been elaborated

  16. GEOSTAR - a microwave sounder for GOES-R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Wilson, William; Tanner, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has for many years operated two weather satellite systems, the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite system (POES), using low-earth orbiting (LEO) satellites, and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES), using geostationary earth orbiting (GEO) satellites. Similar systems are also operated by other nations. The POES satellites have been equipped with both infrared (IR) and microwave (MW) atmospheric sounders, which together make it possible to determine the vertical distribution of temperature and humidity in the troposphere even under cloudy conditions.

  17. Infrared Spectral Radiance Intercomparisons With Satellite and Aircraft Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement system validation is critical for advanced satellite sounders to reach their full potential of improving observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for enabling enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Experimental field campaigns, focusing on satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft, are an essential part of the validation task. Airborne FTS systems can enable an independent, SI-traceable measurement system validation by directly measuring the same level-1 parameters spatially and temporally coincident with the satellite sensor of interest. Continuation of aircraft under-flights for multiple satellites during multiple field campaigns enables long-term monitoring of system performance and inter-satellite cross-validation. The NASA / NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a significant contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This presentation gives an overview of benefits achieved using airborne sensors such as NAST-I utilizing examples from recent field campaigns. The methodology implemented is not only beneficial to new sensors such as the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) flying aboard the Suomi NPP and future JPSS satellites but also of significant benefit to sensors of longer flight heritage such as the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the AQUA and METOP-A platforms, respectively, to ensure data quality continuity important for climate and other applications. Infrared spectral radiance inter-comparisons are discussed with a particular focus on usage of NAST-I data for enabling inter-platform cross-validation.

  18. Average Tropical Relative Humidity from AIRS, Dec-Feb 2002-2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The average tropospheric relative humidity from AIRS for the four December-February periods during 2002 through 2005.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. History of Space-Based Infrared Astronomy and the Air Force Infrared Celestial Backgrounds Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-18

    this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data...Infrared Surveys ........................................................................................ 253 9.5. The Search for Near-Earth...www.dtic.mil/dtic/ search /tr/index.html) or the National Technical Information Service (NTIS – http://ntis.gov); I provide the unique nine character

  20. Current Sounding Capability From Satellite Meteorological Observation With Ultraspectral Infrared Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.

    2008-01-01

    Ultraspectral resolution infrared spectral radiance obtained from near nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud property information. The intent of the measurement of tropospheric thermodynamic state and trace abundances is the initialization of climate models and the monitoring of air quality. The NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I), designed to support the development of future satellite temperature and moisture sounders, aboard high altitude aircraft has been collecting data throughout many field campaigns. An advanced retrieval algorithm developed with NAST-I is now applied to satellite data collected with the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the Aqua satellite launched on 4 May 2002 and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the MetOp satellite launched on October 19, 2006. These instruments possess an ultra-spectral resolution, for example, both IASI and NAST-I have 0.25 cm-1 and a spectral coverage from 645 to 2760 cm-1. The retrieval algorithm with a fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. The physical inversion scheme has been developed, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiance observed with ultraspectral infrared sounders, to simultaneously retrieve surface, atmospheric thermodynamic, and cloud microphysical parameters. A fast radiative transfer model, which applies to the clouded atmosphere, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. A one-dimensional (1-d) variational multi-variable inversion solution is used to improve an iterative background state defined by an eigenvector-regression-retrieval. The solution is iterated in order to account for non-linearity in the 1-d variational solution. It is shown that relatively accurate temperature and moisture retrievals can be achieved below optically thin clouds. For optically thick clouds, accurate temperature and moisture profiles down to

  1. Improving the Air Force Infrared Stellar Calibration Network with High Spectral Resolution Data from the Infrared Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, K. E.; Engelke, C. W.; Price, S. D.

    2004-12-01

    We present preliminary results of a project to improve the spectral resolution of the Air Force Infrared Stellar Calibration Network by incorporating data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). This network and its deriviatives were created by Cohen and colleagues to support infrared calibration for government and civilian ground- and space-based observatories, such as the Infrared Telescope Facility, Gemini, and the Maui Optical Site. The reduced 2.4 to 45 μ m spectra from the ISO Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) are up to 100 times higher spectral resolution than the current network data. Appropriately substituting these spectra for the standard stars will improve the accuracy of the calibration network, particularly in spectral regions where the atmosphere limits ground-based data, and permit more accurate calibration of very narrow spectral bandpasses. The initial effort has photometrically calibrated the SWS spectra for the 9 stellar or secondary standards with composites. The model atmosphere spectrum for α Cen has been replaced by SWS data; the model spectra for α CMa and α Lyr have been retained in order to preserve the common calibration pedigree with the original Cohen et al. network (although see Price et al. 2004, AJ, 128, 889). Where available, high quality photometry from the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) are used, supplemented by photometry from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experment (DIRBE) and the photometry used by Cohen et al. used to create the original composite. The next steps are to 1) replace the 10-15 tertiary standard stars with template spectra with measured spectra for the cases in which the SWS observations have sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratios (this will double the number of secondary standards); 2) develop a set of high spectral resolution infrared templates based on the SWS observations for each MK spectral class of the secondary standards with which to upgrade the entire network; 3) create new templates for

  2. RF Charging of Topside Sounder Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.

    1998-11-01

    Evidence concerning RF-induced charging of topside sounder spacecraft is reviewed. The most direct evidence from the orbital sounders ISIS II and Cosmos 1809 is observations of sounder-accelerated ions at energies up to a several tens of electron-volts. These ions are interpreted as the flux to the spacecraft body to discharge the negative electrical potential induced on the body by the action of sounder near fields on ambient electrons. The situation on ISIS II was modeled for frequencies well below the electron plasma and gyrofrequencies, fp and fc , respectively. During the RF pulse, the body was found to go to a negative potential about equal to the peak amplitude of the voltage waveform applied to the sounder dipole. Other observations from the sounders at frequencies around fp and fc, including "floating" resonant signals on ionograms and impedance measurements, attest to RF sheaths and hence to charging. The OEDIPUS-C spacecraft potential measurement has provided proof of RF charging through the whole range of electron characteristic frequencies.

  3. Terminal air-to-ground missile guidance by infrared seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Stephane; Mazar, Bruno; Horaud, Radu

    1997-06-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method for terminal air-to- ground missile guidance based on IR seeker. The aim is to hit a building which has been previously selected in a 3D model of the scene. The proposed algorithm is divided in two steps: acquisition and tracking steps. Acquisition consists in estimating the location of the target in the first image and to reestimate the missile position. The second step is the tracking of the target along the sequence of images by predicting the target location in each image from the previous one. A supervisor module is in charge of verifying the correctness of the tracking, by doing some reacquisitions in background and ensure the coherence between reacquisitions in background and ensure the coherence between reacquisitions and tracking. All computations are real-time compatible.

  4. Modelling an infrared Man Portable Air Defence System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchenall, Richard P.; Richardson, Mark A.; Brian, Butters; Roy, Walmsley

    2010-09-01

    The global proliferation of shoulder launched IR Man Portable Air Defence Systems (ManPADS) has resulted in the existence of a serious threat to both civilian and military aircraft from terrorist attack. Some of the older generations of ManPADS can be defeated with modern countermeasures but even the most sophisticated protection still has vulnerabilities to the latest family of ManPADS. This paper describes the work undertaken by the authors to model a second generation ManPAD, based on the Russian SA-14, and assess the vulnerabilities of aircraft both with and without flare countermeasures from these systems. The conclusions are the results of over 11,000 simulated firings against targets of varying aspects, velocities and altitudes.

  5. Multiorder etalon sounder (MOES) development and test for balloon experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.; Wnag, Jinxue; Wu, Jian

    1993-01-01

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI), with its high throughput and high spectral resolution has been used in the remote-sensing measurements of the earth's atmospheric composition, winds, and temperatures. The most recent satellite instruments include the Fabry-Perot interferometer flown on the Dynamics Explorer-2 (DE-2), the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI), and the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) flown on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). These instruments measure the Doppler line profiles of the emission and absorption of certain atmospheric species (such as atomic oxygen) in the visible and infrared spectral region. The successful space flight of DE-FPI, HRDI, and CLAES on UARS demonstrated the extremely high spectral resolution and ruggedness of the etalon system for the remote sensing of earth and planetary atmospheres. Recently, an innovative FPI focal plane detection technique called the Circle-to-Line Interferometer Optical (CLIO) system was invented at the Space Physics Research Laboratory. The CLIO simplifies the FPI focal plane detection process by converting the circular rings or fringes into a linear pattern similar to that produced by a conventional spectrometer, while retaining the throughput advantage of the etalon interferometer. The combination of FPI and CLIO allows the development of more sensitive Fabry-Perot interferometers in the infrared for the remote sensing of the lower atmospheres of Earth and possibly other planets. The Multiorder Etalon Sounder (MOES), a combination of the rugged etalon and the CLIO, compares very favorably to other space-borne optical instruments in terms of performance versus complexity. The new instrument is expected to be rugged, compact, and very suitable for an operational temperature and moisture sounder. With this technique, the contamination of radiance measurements by emissions of other gases is also minimized. At the Space Physics Research Laboratory (SPRL), the MOES

  6. AIRS Retrieval Validation During the EAQUATE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Barnet, Christopher D.; DiGirolamo, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Newman, Stuart M.

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric and surface thermodynamic parameters retrieved with advanced hyperspectral remote sensors of Earth observing satellites are critical for weather prediction and scientific research. The retrieval algorithms and retrieved parameters from satellite sounders must be validated to demonstrate the capability and accuracy of both observation and data processing systems. The European AQUA Thermodynamic Experiment (EAQUATE) was conducted mainly for validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the AQUA satellite, but also for assessment of validation systems of both ground-based and aircraft-based instruments which will be used for other satellite systems such as the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the European MetOp satellite, the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) from the NPOESS Preparatory Project and the following NPOESS series of satellites. Detailed inter-comparisons were conducted and presented using different retrieval methodologies: measurements from airborne ultraspectral Fourier transform spectrometers, aircraft in-situ instruments, dedicated dropsondes and radiosondes, and ground based Raman Lidar, as well as from the European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF) modeled thermal structures. The results of this study not only illustrate the quality of the measurements and retrieval products but also demonstrate the capability of these validation systems which are put in place to validate current and future hyperspectral sounding instruments and their scientific products.

  7. AIRS radiometric calibration validation for climate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Pagano, Thomas S.; Elliott, Denis; Gaiser, Steve; Gregorich, Dave; Broberg, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Climate research using data from satellite based radiometers makes extreme demands on the traceability and stability of the radiometric calibration. The selection of a cooled grating array spectrometer for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, AIRS, is key, but does not ensured that AIRS data will be of climate quality. Additional design features, plus additional pre-launch testing, and extensive on-orbit calibration subsystem monitoring beyond what would suffice for application of the data to weather forecasting were required to ensure the radiometric data quality required for climate research. Validation that climate data quality are being generated makes use of the sea surface skin temperatures (SST and (obs-calc).

  8. The validation of AIRS retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Olsen, Edward T.; Chen, Luke L.; Hagan, Denise E.; Fishbein, Evan; McMillin, Larry; Zhou, Jiang; McMillan, Wallace W.

    2003-01-01

    The initial validation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (SIRS) experiment retrievals were completed in August 2003 as part of public release of version 3.0 data. The associated analyses are reported at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/atmodyn/airs/, where data may be accessed. Here we describe some of those analyses, with an emphasis on cloud cleared radiances, atmospheric temperature profiles, sea surface temperature, total water vapor and atmospheric water vapor profiles. The results are applicable over ocean in the latitude band +/-40 degrees.

  9. NASA GES DISC DAAC Data Holdings for AIRS/Aqua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S.; Phelps, C. S.; Sharma, A. K.; Qin, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a high-resolution infrared sounder on the Earth Observing System polar-orbiting platform, EOS Aqua, which was successfully launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS is closely coupled with two microwave instruments, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A) and the Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). The data products from AIRS/AMSU-A/HSB are archived and distributed at the Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) located at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). AIRS has 2,378 channels measuring in the infrared range 3.74-15.4 μm and four channels measuring in the visible/near-infrared range 0.4-1.1 μm. AMSU-A is a temperature sounder that primarily provides atmospheric information in the presence of clouds, which is used to correct the AIRS infrared measurements for the effects of the clouds. Likewise, HSB provides information on snow/ice cover, precipitation, and the coarse distribution of moisture in the troposphere. Combined with simultaneous measurements from AIRS, the calibrated brightness temperature from AMSU-A and HSB is used to initialize the atmospheric moisture profile required for the retrieval of the final AIRS geophysical products. The data product suite includes level 1B combined, geolocated and calibrated radiances and will include level 2 final retrievals of surface skin temperature, surface albedo, integrated precipitable water, radiative fluxes, various cloud properties and trace gases (ozone, methane, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide). Furthermore, AIRS/AMSU-A/HSB will obtain atmospheric temperature profiles with an accuracy of 1K for every 1 km layer in the troposphere (1K for every 4 km layer in stratosphere) and humidity profiles with an accuracy 20% in 2 km layers from the surface up through the troposphere. Global coverage is obtained twice daily (day and night) on a 1:30 p.m. sun-synchronous orbit from a 705-km altitude. For processing convenience, the data

  10. AIRS Sea Surface Temperature and Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been providing necessary measurements for long term atmospheric and surface processes aboard NASA' s Aqua polar orbiter since May 2002. Here, we use time series of AIRS sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies to show the time evolution of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in the Gulf of Alaska (lon:-144.5, lat:54.5) from 2003 to 2014. PDO is connected to the first mode of North Pacific SST variability and is tele-connected to ENSO in the tropics. Further analysis of AIRS data can provide clarification of Pacific climate variability.

  11. Cris-atms Retrievals Using an AIRS Science Team Version 6-like Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Kouvaris, Louis C.; Iredell, Lena

    2014-01-01

    CrIS is the infrared high spectral resolution atmospheric sounder launched on Suomi-NPP in 2011. CrISATMS comprise the IRMW Sounding Suite on Suomi-NPP. CrIS is functionally equivalent to AIRS, the high spectral resolution IR sounder launched on EOS Aqua in 2002 and ATMS is functionally equivalent to AMSU on EOS Aqua. CrIS is an interferometer and AIRS is a grating spectrometer. Spectral coverage, spectral resolution, and channel noise of CrIS is similar to AIRS. CrIS spectral sampling is roughly twice as coarse as AIRSAIRS has 2378 channels between 650 cm-1 and 2665 cm-1. CrIS has 1305 channels between 650 cm-1 and 2550 cm-1. Spatial resolution of CrIS is comparable to AIRS.

  12. Near-infrared conical emission from 800 nm filament in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipilo, D. E.; Pushkarev, D. V.; Panov, N. A.; Uryupina, D. S.; Andreeva, V. A.; Volkov, R. V.; Balakin, A. V.; Shkurinov, A. P.; Babushkin, I.; Morgner, U.; Kosareva, O. G.; Savel’ev, A. B.

    2017-03-01

    We used a single shot imaging technique to register frequency-angular distribution at different positions along the filament of 55 fs 800 nm pulse focused with the numerical aperture of about 1/600 into air. We have revealed that the phenomena accompanying filamentation develop successively in the propagation direction. The conical emission in the visible comes first. Later in the propagation the conical emission in the infrared appears and develops down to 900 nm at least. Multiple robust light bullets become the secondary sources of the conical waves on the infrared side of the spectrum. The overall scenario of the nonlinear phenomena successive appearance in air is for the first time unified in one experiment in atmospheric gases and simulated with the carrier wave resolved in agreement with the experiment.

  13. Topside sounders as mobile ionospheric heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    2006-01-01

    There is evidence that satellite-borne RF sounders can act as mobile ionospheric heaters in addition to performing topside sounding. The main objective of topside sounding is to use sounder-generated electromagnetic (em) waves to obtain ionospheric topside vertical electron-density (N(sub e) profiles. These profiles are obtained from mathematical inversions of the frequency vs. delay-time ionospheric reflection traces. In addition to these em reflection traces, a number of narrowband intense signals are observed starting at zero delay times after the transmitted pulses. Some of these signals, termed plasma resonances, appear at characteristic frequencies of the ambient medium such as at the electron cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), the harmonics nf(sub ce), the electron plasma frequency f(sub pe) and the upper-hybrid frequency f(sub uh), where (f(sub uh))(exp 2) = (f(sub ce))(exp 2) + (f(sub pe))(exp 2) . These signals have been attributed to the oblique echoes of sounder-generated electrostatic (es) waves. These resonances provide accurate in situ f(sub pe) and f(sub ce) values which, in turn, lead to accurate N(sub e) and [B] values where B is the ambient magnetic field. Resonances are also observed between the nf(sub ce) harmonics both above and below f(sub uh). The former, known as the Qn plasma resonances, are mainly attributed to the matching of the wave group velocity of sounder-generated (Bernstein-mode) es waves to the satellite velocity. The frequency spectrum of these waves in the magnetosphere can be used to detect non-Maxwellian electron velocity-distributions. In addition, these resonances also exhibit components that appear to be the result of plasma emissions stimulated by the sounder pulses. The plasma resonances observed between the nf(sub ce) harmonics and below f(sub uh), known as the Dn plasma resonances, are entirely attributed to such sounder-stimulated plasma emissions. There are other sounder-stimulated plasma phenomena that also fall into

  14. AIRS Data Mining Service at the Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) DISC DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, G. A.; Qin, J.; Pham, L.; Lynnes, C.; Eng, E.; Li, J.

    2004-05-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a high-resolution infrared (IR) sounder with 2378 spectral channels flying on the EOS Aqua platform with two operational microwave sounders, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). Measurements from the three instruments are analyzed jointly to filter out the effects of clouds from the IR data in order to derive clear-column air-temperature profiles and surface temperatures with high vertical resolution and accuracy. Together, these three instruments constitute an advanced operational sounding data system that have contributed to improve global modeling efforts and numerical weather prediction; enhance studies of the global energy and water cycles, the effects of greenhouse gases, and atmosphere-surface interactions; and facilitate monitoring of climate variations and trends. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center/Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DISC DAAC) provides long-term archive and distribution services for AIRS/AMSU/HSB data products as well science support to assist users in understanding, accessing and using the AIRS data products. However, the high data volume generated by the AIRS/AMSU/HSB instruments and the complexity of its data format (Hierarchical Data Format, HDF) are barriers to AIRS data use. Although many researchers are interested in only a fraction of the data they receive or request, they are forced to run their algorithms on a much larger data set to extract the information of interest. In order to address this problem, the GES DAAC is expanding its data mining system to accept AIRS user's algorithms by providing online tools for spectral channels and value added product sub-settings, as well as spatial, temporal and user defined profile sub-settings. This presentation will show details of the AIRS components of the GES DAAC data mining system including technical description, input data and returning products

  15. Drying and decontamination of raw pistachios with sequential infrared drying, tempering and hot air drying.

    PubMed

    Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Brandl, Maria T; Wang, Bini; McHugh, Tara H; Zhang, Ruihong; Pan, Zhongli

    2017-04-04

    Pistachio nuts have been associated with outbreaks of foodborne disease and the industry has been impacted by numerous product recalls due to contamination with Salmonella enterica. The current hot air drying of pistachios has low energy efficiency and drying rates, and also does not guarantee the microbial safety of products. In the study described herein, dehulled and water-sorted pistachios with a moisture content (MC) of 38.14% (wet basis) were dried in a sequential infrared and hot air (SIRHA) drier to <9% MC. The decontamination efficacy was assessed by inoculating pistachios with Enterococcus faecium, a surrogate of Salmonella enterica used for quality control in the almond industry. Drying with IR alone saved 105min (34.4%) of drying time compared with hot air drying. SIRHA drying of pistachios for 2h with infrared (IR) heat followed by tempering at a product temperature of 70°C for 2h and then by hot air drying shortened the drying time by 40min (9.1%) compared with drying by hot air only. This SIRHA method also reduced the E. faecium cell population by 6.1-logCFU/g kernel and 5.41-logCFU/g shell of pistachios. The free fatty acid contents of SIRHA dried pistachios were on par with that of hot air dried samples. Despite significant differences in peroxide values (PV) of pistachio kernels dried with the SIRHA method compared with hot air drying at 70°C, the PV were within the permissible limit of 5Meq/kg for edible oils. Our findings demonstrate the efficacy of SIRHA drying in achieving simultaneous drying and decontamination of pistachios.

  16. GeoSTAR - A Microwave Sounder for Geostationary Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Wilson, William; Tanner, Alan; Gaier, Todd; Ruf, Chris; Piepmeier, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    GeoSTAR represents a new approach to microwave atmospheric sounding that is now under development. It has capabilities similar to sensors currently operating on low earth orbiting weather satellites but is intended for deployment in geostationary orbit - where it will complement future infrared sounders and enable all-weather temperature and humidity soundings and rain mapping. The required spatial resolution of 50 km or better dictates an aperture of 4 meters or more at a sounding frequency of 50 GHz, which is difficult to achieve with a real aperture system - this is the reason why it has until now not been possible to put a microwave sounder on a geostationary platform. GeoSTAR is instead based on a synthetic aperture imaging approach. Among the advantages of such a system are that there are no moving parts, and the size of the aperture is easily expandable to meet future needs. A ground based prototype of GeoSTAR is currently under development in an effort led by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  17. Upper tropospheric cloud systems determined from IR Sounders and their influence on the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubenrauch, Claudia; Protopapadaki, Sofia; Feofilov, Artem; Velasco, Carola Barrientos

    2017-02-01

    Covering about 30% of the Earth, upper tropospheric clouds play a key role in the climate system by modulating the Earth's energy budget and heat transport. Infrared Sounders reliably identify cirrus down to an IR optical depth of 0.1. Recently LMD has built global cloud climate data records from AIRS and IASI observations, covering the periods from 2003-2015 and 2008-2015, respectively. Upper tropospheric clouds often form mesoscale systems. Their organization and properties are being studied by (1) distinguishing cloud regimes within 2° × 2° regions and (2) applying a spatial composite technique on adjacent cloud pressures, which estimates the horizontal extent of the mesoscale cloud systems. Convective core, cirrus anvil and thin cirrus of these systems are then distinguished by their emissivity. Compared to other studies of tropical mesoscale convective systems our data include also the thinner anvil parts, which make out about 30% of the area of tropical mesoscale convective systems. Once the horizontal and vertical structure of these upper tropospheric cloud systems is known, we can estimate their radiative effects in terms of top of atmosphere and surface radiative fluxes and by computing their heating rates.

  18. The temperature fields measurement of air in the car cabin by infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pešek, M.

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with the temperature fields measurement of air using the Jenoptic Variocam infrared camera inside the car Škoda Octavia Combi II. The temperature fields with the use of auxiliary material with a high emissivity value were visualized. The measurements through the viewing window with a high transmissivity value were performed. The viewing windows on the side car door were placed. In the rear car area, the temperature fields of air on the spacious sheet of auxiliary material were visualized which is a suitable method for 2D airstreams. In the front car area, the temperature fields in the air were measured with the use of the measuring net which is suitable for 3D airstreams measuring.

  19. Static Hot Air and Infrared Rays Roasting are Efficient Methods for Aflatoxin Decontamination on Hazelnuts

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Ilenia; Dal Bello, Barbara; Zeppa, Giuseppe; Spadaro, Davide; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxins are a group of secondary metabolites produced by members of Aspergillus Section Flavi that are dangerous to humans and animals. Nuts can be potentially contaminated with aflatoxins, often over the legal threshold. Food processes, including roasting, may have different effects on mycotoxins, and high temperatures have proven to be very effective in the reduction of mycotoxins. In this work, two different roasting methods—traditional static hot air roasting and infra-red rays roasting—were applied and compared for the detoxification of hazelnuts from Italy and Turkey. At the temperature of 140 °C for 40 min of exposure, detoxification was effective for both roasting techniques. Residual aflatoxins after infra-red rays treatments were lower compared to static hot air roasting. On Italian hazelnuts, residual aflatoxins were lower than 5%, while for Turkish hazelnuts they were lower than 15% after 40 min of exposure to an infra-red rays roaster. After roasting, the perisperm was detached from the nuts and analyzed for aflatoxin contents. Residual aflatoxins in the perisperm ranged from 80% up to 100%. After roasting, the lipid profile and the nutritional quality of hazelnuts were not affected. Fatty acid methyl esters analyses showed a similar composition for Italian and Turkish hazelnuts. PMID:28230792

  20. Static Hot Air and Infrared Rays Roasting are Efficient Methods for Aflatoxin Decontamination on Hazelnuts.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Ilenia; Dal Bello, Barbara; Zeppa, Giuseppe; Spadaro, Davide; Gullino, Maria Lodovica

    2017-02-21

    Aflatoxins are a group of secondary metabolites produced by members of Aspergillus Section Flavi that are dangerous to humans and animals. Nuts can be potentially contaminated with aflatoxins, often over the legal threshold. Food processes, including roasting, may have different effects on mycotoxins, and high temperatures have proven to be very effective in the reduction of mycotoxins. In this work, two different roasting methods-traditional static hot air roasting and infra-red rays roasting-were applied and compared for the detoxification of hazelnuts from Italy and Turkey. At the temperature of 140 °C for 40 min of exposure, detoxification was effective for both roasting techniques. Residual aflatoxins after infra-red rays treatments were lower compared to static hot air roasting. On Italian hazelnuts, residual aflatoxins were lower than 5%, while for Turkish hazelnuts they were lower than 15% after 40 min of exposure to an infra-red rays roaster. After roasting, the perisperm was detached from the nuts and analyzed for aflatoxin contents. Residual aflatoxins in the perisperm ranged from 80% up to 100%. After roasting, the lipid profile and the nutritional quality of hazelnuts were not affected. Fatty acid methyl esters analyses showed a similar composition for Italian and Turkish hazelnuts.

  1. Mechanical Description of the Mars Climate Sounder Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) Instrument of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft. The instrument scans the Martian atmosphere almost continuously to systematically acquire weather and climate observations over time. Its primary components are an optical bench that houses dual telescopes with a total of nine channels for visible and infrared sensing, and a two axis gimbal that provides pointing capabilities. Both rotating joints consist of an integrated actuator with a hybrid planetary/harmonic transmission and a twist cap section that enables the electrical wiring to pass through the rotating joint. Micro stepping is used to reduce spacecraft disturbance torques to acceptable levels while driving the stepper motors. To ensure survivability over its four year life span, suitable mechanical components, lubrication, and an active temperature control system were incorporated. Some life test results and lessons learned are provided to serve as design guidelines for actuator parts and flex cables.

  2. Cloudy Sounding and Cloud-Top Height Retrieval From AIRS Alone Single Field-of-View Radiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisz, Elisabeth; Li, Jun; Li, Jinlong; Zhou, Daniel K.; Huang, Hung-Lung; Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Yang, Ping

    2007-01-01

    High-spectral resolution measurements from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard the EOS (Earth Observing System) Aqua satellite provide unique information about atmospheric state, surface and cloud properties. This paper presents an AIRS alone single field-of-view (SFOV) retrieval algorithm to simultaneously retrieve temperature, humidity and ozone profiles under all weather conditions, as well as cloud top pressure (CTP) and cloud optical thickness (COT) under cloudy skies. For optically thick cloud conditions the above-cloud soundings are derived, whereas for clear skies and optically thin cloud conditions the profiles are retrieved from 0.005 hPa down to the earth's surface. Initial validation has been conducted by using the operational MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) product, ECMWF (European Center of Medium range Weather Forecasts) analysis fields and radiosonde observations (RAOBs). These inter-comparisons clearly demonstrate the potential of this algorithm to process data from 38 high-spectral infrared (IR) sounder instruments.

  3. Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer (AASIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Design information for the Advanced Atmospheric Sounder and Imaging Radiometer is reported, which was developed to determine the configuration of a sensor for IR and visible imaging. The areas of technology reported include: systems design, optics, mechanics, electronics, detectors, radiative cooler, and radiometric calibration.

  4. New application of the operational sounder HIRS in determining a climatology of sulphuric acid aerosol from the Pinatubo eruption

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, A.J.; Foot, J.S.

    1994-12-20

    The authors present satellite remote sounding measurements of sulphuric acid aerosols resulting from the Mt Pinatubo eruption. They show latitude distributions, column densities, and mass loadings as a function of time after the eruption. Measurements are interpreted from two different infrared channels in the sounder.

  5. Applications Using AIRS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S. E.; Pagano, T. S.; Fetzer, E. J.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Olsen, E. T.; Teixeira, J.; Licata, S. J.; Hall, J. R.; Thompson, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has been returning daily global observations of Earth's atmospheric constituents and properties since 2002. With a 12-year data record and daily, global observations in near real-time, AIRS data can play a role in applications that fall under many of the NASA Applied Sciences focus areas. For vector-borne disease, research is underway using AIRS near surface retrievals to assess outbreak risk, mosquito incubation periods and epidemic potential for dengue fever, malaria, and West Nile virus. For drought applications, AIRS temperature and humidity data are being used in the development of new drought indicators and improvement in the understanding of drought development. For volcanic hazards, new algorithms using AIRS data are in development to improve the reporting of sulfur dioxide concentration, the burden and height of volcanic ash and dust, all of which pose a safety threat to aircraft. In addition, anomaly maps of many of AIRS standard products are being produced to help highlight "hot spots" and illustrate trends. To distribute it's applications imagery, AIRS is leveraging existing NASA data frameworks and organizations to facilitate archiving, distribution and participation in the BEDI. This poster will communicate the status of the applications effort for the AIRS Project and provide examples of new maps designed to best communicate the AIRS data.

  6. Evaluation of Vertically Resolved Water Winds from AIRS using Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Dobkowski, Edwin C.; Gregorich, David T.

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge of wind velocity as a function of altitude is key to weather forecast improvements. The ability of hyperspectral sounders in principle to measure vertically resolved water winds, which has long been recognized, has been tested with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data. AIRS retrievals of total column water above 300 mb have been correlated with the radiosonde upper-tropospheric wind velocity and moisture data. The excellent correlation is illustrated with results obtained from hurricane Katrina and from the western United States. AIRS is a hyperspectral infrared sounder in low Earth orbit. It was launched in May 2002. We illustrate the use of AIRS data for the measurement of upper tropospheric water by using the 2387/cm CO2 R-branch channel and the 1551/cm water vapor channel. The 2387/cm channel measures the temperature at 300 mb totally independent of water vapor. The weighting function of the 1551/cm channel peaks at 300 mb only under moist conditions; the peak shifts downward (higher temperature) for less water and upward (lower temperature) for more water. The difference between the brightness temperatures bt2387 and bt1551 cancels the local several degree weather related variability of the temperature and measures the component due to the water vapor at 300 mb.

  7. Optical Alignment and Diffraction Analysis for AIRES: An Airborne Infrared Echelle Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The optical design is presented for a long-slit grating spectrometer known as AIRES (Airborne InfraRed Echelle Spectrometer). The instrument employs two gratings in series: a small order sorter and a large steeply blazed echelle. The optical path includes four pupil and four field stops, including two narrow slits. A detailed diffraction analysis is performed using GLAD by Applied Optics Research to evaluate critical trade-offs between optical throughput, spectral resolution, and system weight and volume. The effects of slit width, slit length, oversizing the second slit relative to the first, on- vs off-axis throughput, and clipping at the pupil stops and other optical elements are discussed.

  8. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2003-09-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability.

  9. Flight tests of a clear-air turbulence alerting system. [infrared radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurkowski, R. L.; Kuhn, P. M.; Stearns, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of clear-air turbulence (CAT) ahead of an aircraft in real-time by an infrared (IR) radiometer is discussed. It is noted that the alter time and reliability depend on the band-pass of the IR filter used and on the altitude of the aircraft. Results of flights tests indicate that a bandpass of 20 to 40 microns appears optimal for altering the aircraft crew to CAT at times before encounter of 2 to 9 min. Alert time increases with altitude, as the atmospheric absorption determining the horizontal weighting is reduced.

  10. Evidence of Convective Redistribution of Carbon Monoxide in Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne; Schoeberl, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vertical convective transport is a key element of the tropospheric circulation. Convection lofts air from the boundary layer into the free troposphere, allowing surface emissions to travel much further, and altering the rate of chemical processes such as ozone production. This study uses satellite observations to focus on the convective transport of CO from the boundary layer to the mid and upper troposphere. Our hypothesis is that strong convection associated with high rain rate regions leads to a correlation between mid level and upper level CO amounts. We first test this hypothesis using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model. We find the correlation is robust and increases as the precipitation rate (the strength of convection) increases. We next examine three years of CO profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments aboard EOS Aura. Rain rates are taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B-42 multi-satellite product. Again we find a correlation between mid-level and upper tropospheric CO, which increases with rain rate. Our result shows the critical importance of tropical convection in coupling vertical levels of the troposphere in the transport of trace gases. The effect is seen most clearly in strong convective regions such as the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone.

  11. Lessons Learned from Previous Space-Borne Sounders as a Guide to Future Sounder Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Farrell,William M.; Fung, Shing F.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.; Pfaff, Rovert E.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Adrian, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    Space-borne radio sounding is considered to be the gold standard for electron-density (N(sub e)) measurements compared to other techniques even under low-density conditions, such as N(sub e) < 1/cu cm, when other techniques are known to experience difficulties. These reliable measurements are not restricted to in-situ N(sub e) determinations since a spaceborne sounder can provide vertical N(sub e) profiles (N(sub e)(h)) from the spacecraft altitude to the altitude of maximum N(sub e). Near-conjunction studies involving the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) satellites in the topside ionosphere and Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) near the altitude of the F-region peak density have verified that, even at the greatest distance from the sounder, the ISIS-derived N(sub e)(h) profiles agree with the DE-2 Langmuir-probe measurements to within about 30% over a density range of more than two decades. Space-borne sounders can also provide N(sub e) profiles along the magnetic-field B, by inverting echoes that are ducted along field-aligned irregularities (FAI), and can provide information about the terrain beneath the satellite by examining surface reflections in the frequency range above the ionospheric penetration frequency. Many nations have launched rocket and satellite radio sounders in geospace over more than 4 decades and there have been sounders on space-probes and in orbit around other planets. Here we will summarize some of the lessons learned from these accomplishments by analyzing data from radio sounders on the Alouette and ISIS satellites and the OEDIPUS and other rockets in the terrestrial ionosphere, the IMAGE satellite in the terrestrial magnetosphere, the Ulysses space probe in Jupiter's 10 plasma torus and the MARSIS satellite in orbit around Mars. The emphasis will be on information deduced concerning (1) fundamental plasma processes and gradients in N, and B in the vicinity of the sounders from sounder-stimulated plasma resonances and

  12. Infrared pulse characterization using four-wave mixing inside a few cycle pulse filament in air

    SciTech Connect

    Marceau, Claude Thomas, Steven; Kassimi, Yacine; Gingras, Guillaume; Witzel, Bernd

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a four-wave mixing (FWM) technique to measure near- and mid-infrared (IR) laser pulse shapes in time domain. Few cycle 800 nm laser pulses were synchronized with the IR pulse and focused colinearly to generate a plasma filament in air. Second harmonic radiation around 400 nm was generated through FWM, with a yield proportional to the IR pulse intensity. Excellent signal to noise ratio was observed from 2.1 μm to 18 μm. With proper phase stabilization of the IR beam, this technique is a promising step toward direct electric field sensing of near-IR pulses in air.

  13. AIRS Maps from Space Processing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Charles K.; Licata, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    This software package processes Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Level 2 swath standard product geophysical parameters, and generates global, colorized, annotated maps. It automatically generates daily and multi-day averaged colorized and annotated maps of various AIRS Level 2 swath geophysical parameters. It also generates AIRS input data sets for Eyes on Earth, Puffer-sphere, and Magic Planet. This program is tailored to AIRS Level 2 data products. It re-projects data into 1/4-degree grids that can be combined and averaged for any number of days. The software scales and colorizes global grids utilizing AIRS-specific color tables, and annotates images with title and color bar. This software can be tailored for use with other swath data products for the purposes of visualization.

  14. A Moderate-resolution Geosynchronous Microwave Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, James

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of microwave radiometers for remote sensing of atmospheric temperature and humidity began in early 1970s, when NASA's Nimbus series experimental satellites tested a number of microwave payloads which are the precursors of today's operational microwave temperature and humidity sounders such as the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A and AMSU-B), now flying on several Lower Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites, notably the National Oceanic and Atmospheric (NOAA)-series weather satellites. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) will be the next generation microwave sounder, now being developed by NASA for the future U.S. National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites System (NPOESS), slated for operation late this decade. The unique feature of a microwave sensor is its cloud-penetrating capability. And the visible and IR sensors are usually greatly degraded by cloud covers. But under the cloud cover is where the weather can be most "active," and atmospheric measurements are most urgently needed. This unique capability has been well proven by AMSU-A, and AMSU-B on LEO satellites. The same capability is also true for a microwave sounder on a GEO satellite. The key advantage of a sensor on a GEO-platform is its "high temporal resolution." A sensor on a GEO-platform can almost "continuous" monitor a given scene on Earth. On the other hand, the major drawback the GEO-platform is its poor spatial resolution. This is probably the main reason why a geosynchronous microwave sounder has yet to be realized. Take the ATMS as an example. It has a 20 cm diameter antenna (temperature channels), producing a 2.2 degree beam, resulting in a footprint of 32 km (from the NPOESS 833 km orbit). From a GEO-orbit the same 32 km footprint would need an antenna 43 times larger, or 860 cm diameter. We will discuss the needs and advantages of such a GEO-microwave sounder with a straw-man design, and show the expected performance characteristics, such as

  15. Instrumentation for Infrared Astronomy in the Collections of the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVorkin, David H.

    2017-01-01

    The National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution is responsible for preserving the material heritage of modern astronomical history. We place emphasis on American accomplishments, on both airborne and spaceborne instrumentation, and on ground based instrumentation that stimulated and supported spaceborne efforts. At present the astronomical collection includes over 600 objects, of which approximately 40 relate to the history of infrared astronomy. This poster will provide a simple listing of our holdings in infrared and far-infrared astronomy, and will highlight particularly significant early objects, like Cashman and Ektron cells, Leighton and Neugebauer's Caltech 2.2 micron survey telescope, Low's Lear Jet Bolometer, Harwit's first Aerobee IR payload and Fazio's balloon-borne observatory. Elements from more recent missions will also be included, such as instruments from KAO, an IRAS focal plane instrument, FIRAS from COBE, the payload from Boomerang and Woody and Richards' balloonsonde payload. The poster author will invite AAS members to comment on these holdings, provide short stories of their experiences building and using them, and suggest candidates for possible collection.

  16. Satellite Sounder Data Assimilation for Improving Alaska Region Weather Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Stevens, E.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Heinrichs, T.; Broderson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Data assimilation has been demonstrated very useful in improving both global and regional numerical weather prediction. Alaska has very coarser surface observation sites. On the other hand, it gets much more satellite overpass than lower 48 states. How to utilize satellite data to improve numerical prediction is one of hot topics among weather forecast community in Alaska. The Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at University of Alaska is conducting study on satellite data assimilation for WRF model. AIRS/CRIS sounder profile data are used to assimilate the initial condition for the customized regional WRF model (GINA-WRF model). Normalized standard deviation, RMSE, and correlation statistic analysis methods are applied to analyze one case of 48 hours forecasts and one month of 24-hour forecasts in order to evaluate the improvement of regional numerical model from Data assimilation. The final goal of the research is to provide improved real-time short-time forecast for Alaska regions.

  17. VAS demonstration: (VISSR Atmospheric Sounder) description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, H. E.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    The VAS Demonstration (VISSR Atmospheric Sounder) is a project designed to evaluate the VAS instrument as a remote sensor of the Earth's atmosphere and surface. This report describes the instrument and ground processing system, the instrument performance, the valiation as a temperature and moisture profiler compared with ground truth and other satellites, and assesses its performance as a valuable meteorological tool. The report also addresses the availability of data for scientific research.

  18. Rocket/Nimbus Sounder Comparison (RNSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The experimental results for radiance and temperature differences in the Wallops Island comparisons indicate that the differences between satellite and rocket systems are of the same order of magnitude as the differences among the various satellite and rocket sounders. The Arcasondes produced usable data to about 50 km, while the Datasondes require design modification. The SIRS and IRIS soundings provided usable data to 30 mb; extension of these soundings was also investigated.

  19. Radiation from sounder-accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.

    2006-01-01

    Quasi-electrostatic Z-mode waves observed in the two-point OEDIPUS-C (OC) transmission experiment have been interpreted as incoherent radiation by sounder-accelerated electrons (SAE). A consistent interpretation of slow Z-mode waves created by SAE, based on wave and particle observations, has been built around the theory of incoherent radiation. The question therefore arises as to whether some transmitter-induced waves observed by monostatic sounder receivers in the same frequency domain, from the greater of the electron plasma and gyro frequencies to the upper-hybrid-resonance frequency, can also be explained as caused by SAE. Two candidate signal types routinely observed in the ISIS-II sounder receiver have been examined: (a) a diffuse resonance ’spike’ lasting a few milliseconds and (b) highly elongated pulses distributed smoothly throughout the entire frequency range observed when the ambient ionospheric plasma exhibits density irregularities. An examination of Z-mode wave phase and group velocities, combined with consideration of wave and spacecraft kinematics, indicate that the hypothesis of plane slow Z waves does not suffice. The particle detector located on the same payload as the OC transmitter measures SAE pulses lasting milliseconds. Consideration of the role of the transmitter payload body appears to be necessary to account for the retention around the payload of SAE at various pitch angles and energies up to about 100 eV.

  20. AIRS/AMSU-A/HSB Data On-demand Subsetting and Visualization Services at NASA GES DISC DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Cho, S.; Sun, D.; Qin, J.; Sharma, A. K.

    2002-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a high-resolution infrared sounder closely coupled with AMSU-A (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) and HSB (Humidity Sounder for Brazil) on EOS Aqua spacecraft launched on May 4, 2002. The data products from AIRS/AMSU-A/HSB will be archived and distributed at the Goddard Distributed Active Archive Center (GDAAC) located in the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DAAC). The ADDST is developing tools to read, visualize, analyze and reformat AIRS/AMSU-A/HSB data. The web-based AIRS on-the-fly/on-demand subsetter will be available to perform channel/variable subsetting and restructuring for Level1B (Calibrated Radiances) and Level2 (Atmospheric Retrievals) data products. One can narrow down criteria to subset data files with desired channels and variables and then download the subsetted file. AIRS QuickLook allows users to view AIRS/HSB/AMSU Level-1B data online for a specific channel prior to ordering or downloading data. Global map is also provided along with image to show geographic coverage of the granule and flight direction of the spacecraft. The Atmospheric Dynamics Data Support Team (ADDST) at the GES DISC/DAAC is providing various services to assist users in understanding, accessing, and using AIRS data product. Information on AIRS data and data analysis tools can be found at AIRS data support informational web site (http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/atmodyn/airs/ ) that provides access to various technical online documents, such as, readmes, user's guides, instrument guides, images from AIRS/AMSU-A/HSB data, product search and ordering interfaces, HDF-EOS format information, format conversion software, online data analysis tools, other AIRS related web links and more. Other data support services provided by the ADDST are assist with data mining, helpdesk for user questions on data and information, data ordering, and educational resources.

  1. Air-stable few-layer black phosphorus phototransistor for near-infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Junhong; Park, Kichul; Kim, Jin Tae; Choi, Won Kook; Song, Yong-Won

    2017-02-01

    We have demonstrated a few-layer black phosphorus (BP) phototransistor of stable operation in ambient air environment and at near-infrared light (λ = 1550 nm). The air-stable electronic and optoelectronic properties of the few-layer BP phototransistor have been achieved by a proper Al2O3 passivation. The optical identification method and qualitative and quantitative electrical characterizations of the few-layer BP phototransistor in dark state confirmed that the device performance was robust in ambient air, to further chemical treatments, and storage of more than six months. In addition, the low-frequency noise characterizations had revealed that the noise spectral density related to the sensitivity of phototransistor was reduced. Owing to the suppression of interaction between few-layer BP and adsorbates arising from the Al2O3 passivation, a fast rise time of the few-layer BP phototransistor, less than 100 μs, had been observed, demonstrating the intrinsic photoresponse properties of few-layer BP. The low dark current of ˜4 nA at the operation bias and the reasonable responsivity of ˜6 mA W-1 were obtained under the condition lacking adsorbates interactions. Internally, the dark current and responsivity level was tunable by changing the operation bias. Our results are close to the intrinsic properties of the few-layer BP phototransistor, implying that it can be a building block of functioned few-layer BP photodetectors.

  2. The Stratospheric Wind Ingrared Limb Sounder: Investigation of atmospheric dynamics and transport from Eos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccleese, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Stratospheric Wind Infrared Limb Sounder (SWIRLS) is one of the instruments in the atmospheric sounder package to be flown by NASA on the Earth Observing System (EOS) B platform in the late 1990's. SWIRLS is designed to measure the horizontal vector wind field, atmospheric temperature, and the abundances and distributions of ozone and nitrous oxide in the middle atmosphere. These measurements will constitute a dynamical climatology of the stratosphere covering time scales ranging from diurnal to interannual. In addition, the SWIRLS investigation will quantify the physical mechanisms responsible for the structure and variations of stratospheric circulation and temperature fields, including the transport of species, particularly ozone, heat and momentum. Existing data sets lack the combination of accuracy, global and temporal coverage, spatial resoultion and simultaneity required to distinguish unambiguosly between the roles of dynamical and chemical processes in determining the current distribution of ozone and its evolution in the future. The measurement objectives, measurement approach, and instrumentation of SWIRLS is described.

  3. Development of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) for NPOESS C1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brann, C.; Kunkee, D.

    2008-12-01

    The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System's Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is planned for flight on the first NPOESS mission (C1) in 2013. The C1 ATMS will be the second instrument of the ATMS series and will provide along with the companion Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles for NPOESS. The first flight of the ATMS is scheduled in 2010 on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) satellite, which is an early instrument risk reduction component of the NPOESS mission. This poster will focus on the development of the ATMS for C1 including aspects of the sensor calibration, antenna beam and RF characteristics and scanning. New design aspects of the C1 ATMS, required primarily by parts obsolescence, will also be addressed in this poster.

  4. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) Architecture and Design Accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, Lawrence; Racette, Paul; Blackwell, William; Galbraith, Christopher; Thompson, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term "hyperspectral microwave" is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth s atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4-9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the scan head computer

  5. Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) architecture and design accommodations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilliard, L.; Racette, P.; Blackwell, W.; Galbraith, C.; Thompson, E.

    The Hyperspectral Microwave Atmospheric Sounder (HyMAS) is being developed at Lincoln Laboratories and accommodated by the Goddard Space Flight Center for a flight opportunity on a NASA research aircraft. The term “ hyperspectral microwave” is used to indicate an all-weather sounding that performs equivalent to hyperspectral infrared sounders in clear air with vertical resolution of approximately 1 km. Deploying the HyMAS equipped scanhead with the existing Conical Scanning Microwave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) shortens the path to a flight demonstration. Hyperspectral microwave is achieved through the use of independent RF antennas that sample the volume of the Earth's atmosphere through various levels of frequencies, thereby producing a set of dense, spaced vertical weighting functions. The simulations proposed for HyMAS 118/183-GHz system should yield surface precipitation rate and water path retrievals for small hail, soft hail, or snow pellets, snow, rainwater, etc. with accuracies comparable to those of the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder. Further improvements in retrieval methodology (for example, polarization exploitation) are expected. The CoSMIR instrument is a packaging concept re-used on HyMAS to ease the integration features of the scanhead. The HyMAS scanhead will include an ultra-compact Intermediate Frequency Processor (IFP) module that is mounted inside the door to improve thermal management. The IFP is fabricated with materials made of Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology integrated with detectors, amplifiers, A/D conversion and data aggregation. The IFP will put out 52 channels of 16 bit data comprised of 4 - 9 channel data streams for temperature profiles and 2-8 channel streams for water vapor. With the limited volume of the existing CoSMIR scanhead and new HyMAS front end components, the HyMAS team at Goddard began preliminary layout work inside the new drum. Importing and re-using models of the shell, the s- an head

  6. Exploiting hyperspectral sounders for volcanic ash remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Western, Luke; Watson, Matthew; Francis, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Assumptions are made when retrieving properties of volcanic ash clouds using passive infrared satellite remote sensing. Assumptions in the retrieval method lead to larger uncertainties in the retrieved volcanic ash cloud properties. It is a general desire to reduce these uncertainties by removing some of the assumptions that must be made. Hyperspectral sounders provide the spectral capabilities to explore many of the physical parameters that describe volcanic ash clouds - the question is, which parameters is it possible to retrieve? We show that using the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) it is possible to retrieve the mass column loading and cloud top pressure of a volcanic ash cloud, together with the effective radius and spread of the ash particle size distribution, as well as the cloud top pressure of any underlying water cloud using an optimal estimation technique. We discuss the capabilities and shortcomings of the method. The consideration of an underlying water cloud is of importance for improving retrievals, and we place a particular focus on how well the particle size distribution can be described. More specifically, we investigate the viability of using either a lognormal or a gamma distribution to describe the distribution of ash particles, and we show that it is possible to retrieve information about the spread of a lognormal distribution of particles, whereas it is not for a gamma distribution. Some preliminary conclusions on the size distribution of volcanic ash are presented.

  7. Middle Atmosphere Sounder and Thermal Emission Radiometer - Master

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.; Scott, D. K.; Esplin, R. W.; Bailey, S. M.; Randall, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Sounder and Thermal Emission Radiometer (MASTER) instrument is an advanced infrared limb-scanning instrument designed to measure the thermal structure, chemical composition, and energy balance from the stratosphere to the lower thermosphere. MASTER builds on NASA's long and successful heritage of infrared limb scanners including the LIMS, HIRDLS, and SABER instruments. MASTER has exceptional radiometric sensitivity with a more efficient, compact, and lightweight design. An updated focal plane enables critical new science in the areas of the carbon budget closure, geomagnetically-driven ozone destruction, and auroral energy deposition, while virtually eliminating out of band contributions via dual filtering. MASTER will continue the SABER-TIMED and EOS-Aura records of temperature, lower stratospheric water vapor, ozone, methane, and thermospheric cooling by nitric oxide and carbon dioxide. MASTER's size and mass are specifically designed to allow flexibility in the choice of small satellite buses and low cost launch vehicles. The expanded focal plane enables a choice of channels applicable to science objectives in NASA's Earth Science and Heliophysics enterprises. Due to the long and successful heritage the MASTER instrument is at an exceptionally high technology readiness level. No new technologies are required to build the MASTER flight instrument.

  8. A Climatology of Tropospheric CO over the Central and Southeastern United States and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean Derived from Space, Air, and Ground-based Infrared Interferometer Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillian, W. Wallace; Strow, L. Larrabee; Revercomb, H.; Knuteson, R.; Thompson, A.

    2003-01-01

    This final report summarizes all research activities and publications undertaken as part of NASA Atmospheric Chemistry and Modeling Analysis Program (ACMAP) Grant NAG-1-2022, 'A Climatology of Tropospheric CO over the Central and Southeastern United States and the Southwestern Pacific Ocean Derived from Space, Air, and Ground-based Infrared Interferometer Spectra'. Major project accomplishments include: (1) analysis of more than 300,000 AERI spectra from the ARM SGP site yielding a 5-year (1998-2002) timeseries of CO retrievals from the Lamont, OK AERI; (2) development of a prototype CO profile retrieval algorithm for AERI spectra; (3) validation and publication of the first CO retrievals from the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (SHIS); and (4) development of a prototype AERI tropospheric O3 retrieval algorithm. Compilation and publication of the 5-year Lamont, OK timeseries is underway including a new collaboration with scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Public access to this data will be provided upon article submission. A comprehensive CO analysis of the archive of HIS spectra of remains as the only originally proposed activity with little progress. The greatest challenge faced in this project was motivating the University of Wisconsin Co-Investigators to deliver their archived HIS and AERIOO data along with the requisite temperature and water vapor profiles in a timely manner. Part of the supplied HIS dataset from ASHOE may be analyzed as part of a Master s Thesis under a separate project. Our success with the SAFARI 2000 SHIS CO analysis demonstrates the utility of such aircraft remote sensing data given the proper support from the instrument investigators. In addition to the PI and Co-I s, personnel involved in this CO climatology project include one Post Doctoral Fellow, one Research Scientist, two graduate students, and two undergraduate students. A total of fifteen presentations regarding research related to this

  9. [Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in a neurocritical patient with an air embolisism and pneumocephalus].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Díaz-Regañón, I; Benatar-Haserfaty, J; Perez, J C

    2015-02-01

    The pneumocephalus is commonly encountered after neurosurgical procedures. The collections are usually small with benign behavior, and they respond to a conservative therapy. However, there is a high percentage of cases that may behave like a space-occupying lesion. A high index of suspicion is necessary to make the diagnosis and prompt treatment of these cases. Monitoring Near infra-red spectrometry (NIRS) monitoring could help to complete the diagnosis and treatment in these cases. A venous air embolism is a common complication in neurosurgical procedures that are performed in a sitting position, where this monitoring has also been shown to be useful. In the case presented, NIRS monitoring, along with clinical and analytical data, was used for the diagnosis of the two complications.

  10. Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Shepherd, Seth D.

    2004-08-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  11. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.; Deyo, Charles R.; Longbottom, Jeff A.; White, Jason C.

    2005-05-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares, and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  12. Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  13. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2001-08-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) lab currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, LASERs, flares, and lamp-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include real missile seeker hardware mounted in a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. The simulations of aircraft signatures and IR countermeasures are accomplished by using eight xenon arc lamps, located in 9' X 3' cylindrical housings, in the presentation foreground. A mirror system keeps the high intensity IR sources in the missile field of view. Range closure is simulated in the background by zooming in on the scene and in the foreground by separating and controlling the irises of the arc lamp sources for proper spatial and intensity characteristics. All relative motion and range closure is controlled by missile flyout software and aircraft flight-profile software models.

  14. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Grauvogel, Nathanael L.; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.

    2006-05-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares, and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combine the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  15. [Investigation on remote measurement of air pollution by a method of infrared passive scanning imaging].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Xu, Liang; Gao, Min-Guang; Feng, Ming-Chun; Jin, Ling; Tong, Jing-Jing; Li, Sheng

    2012-07-01

    Passive remote sensing by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry allows detection of air pollution. However, for the localization of a leak and a complete assessment of the situation in the case of the release of a hazardous cloud, information about the position and the distribution of a cloud is essential. Therefore, an imaging passive remote sensing system comprising an interferometer, a data acquisition and processing software, scan system, a video system, and a personal computer has been developed. The remote sensing of SF6 was done. The column densities of all directions in which a target compound has been identified may be retrieved by a nonlinear least squares fitting algorithm and algorithm of radiation transfer, and a false color image is displayed. The results were visualized by a video image, overlaid by false color concentration distribution image. The system has a high selectivity, and allows visualization and quantification of pollutant clouds.

  16. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R. ); Schmalz, H. Thermal Surveys, Inc., Rockford, IL )

    1992-01-01

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated.

  17. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R.; Schmalz, H. |

    1992-11-01

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated.

  18. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R.; Schmalz, H.

    1994-03-01

    Active, safe real-time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods has been developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a nontoxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principal advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principal limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations.

  19. Impact assessment of additional predictors to the retrieval of atmospheric profiles from infrared radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Deming; Dong, Chaohua; Huo, Ruili; Cai, Ronghui

    2008-12-01

    Impacts of additional predictors on inverting atmospheric infrared radiance for temperature and humidity profiles are investigated using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) real measurements and empirical orthogonal function expansion method (EOF). These predictors are microwave channels, latitude, topography, surface altitude, surface temperature, and surface air pressure. The results suggest that microwave channels can remarkably help the improvement of the accuracy of retrieved profiles at lower troposphere (below 800hPa) and have little effect on that above 800hPa. With dataset classified by latitude, better retrievals are obtained. The root mean square errors (RMSE) of retrieved temperature at complicated terrain are significantly greater than that at plat area. For humidity retrievals it was found that RMSE exhibit weak sensitivity to topography. By combined use of infrared measurements and additional predictors, great improvements have achieved in the retrieval of atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles at lower troposphere.

  20. Asian dust height and infrared optical depth retrievals over land from hyperspectral longwave infrared radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhigang; Li, Jun; Han, Hyo-Jin; Huang, Allen; Sohn, B. J.; Zhang, Peng

    2012-10-01

    The dust top height and infrared optical depth over land are retrieved from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) longwave infrared measurements by using a one-dimensional-variation retrieval algorithm for different Asian dust storms. By combining particle size measurements from a 10-year ground observation data set from the Dunhuang Skynet station located to the east of the Taklimakan Desert in China and the Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds data set of optical properties, the mineral dust scattering and absorption coefficients are obtained and then used to compute brightness temperatures with RTTOV 9.3. The retrieved dust thermal infrared optical depths are compared with the Ozone Monitoring Instrument and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products. The retrieved dust top heights are compared against the extinction backscatter profiles obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization lidar. Infrared optical depths from AIRS correlate favorably with visible optical depths from MODIS, and dust top heights agree reasonably with lidar observations for the single-layered dust storms over the Taklimakan Desert.

  1. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  2. Processing AIRS Scientific Data Through Level 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, Stephanie; Oliphant, Robert; Manning, Evan

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder (AIRS) Science Processing System (SPS) is a collection of computer programs, known as product generation executives (PGEs). The AIRS SPS PGEs are used for processing measurements received from the AIRS suite of infrared and microwave instruments orbiting the Earth onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft. Early stages of the AIRS SPS development were described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article: Initial Processing of Infrared Spectral Data (NPO-35243), Vol. 28, No. 11 (November 2004), page 39. In summary: Starting from Level 0 (representing raw AIRS data), the AIRS SPS PGEs and the data products they produce are identified by alphanumeric labels (1A, 1B, 2, and 3) representing successive stages or levels of processing. The previous NASA Tech Briefs article described processing through Level 2, the output of which comprises geo-located atmospheric data products such as temperature and humidity profiles among others. The AIRS Level 3 PGE samples selected information from the Level 2 standard products to produce a single global gridded product. One Level 3 product is generated for each day s collection of Level 2 data. In addition, daily Level 3 products are aggregated into two multiday products: an eight-day (half the orbital repeat cycle) product and monthly (calendar month) product.

  3. Sensitivity Studies for a Space-based CO2 Laser Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Kawa, S. R.; Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.

    2007-12-01

    NASA is developing a space-based CO2 Laser Sounder at Goddard Space Flight Center that is aimed at providing global CO2 measurement in the troposphere with an ultimate measurement precision goal of less than 1%. The laser technique uses a CO2 absorption band in the near infrared and has a number of laser wavelengths across one strong absorption line centered at 1572 nm. The focus of the laser measurement is lower atmosphere CO2. The lasers are pulsed and the surface return signal can be well separated from that returned by the atmosphere using time gating in the receiver. Atmospheric scattering effects on the returned signals can be greatly reduced by this method. In this paper, we report our line-by-line radiative transfer calculation results for the selection of laser frequencies used in this active technique, including the optimal selection of absorption line and laser frequencies at which the sensitivity to atmospheric temperatures is minimal and response to lower atmospheric CO2 is maximal. Other effects on this measurement, e.g., water vapor as the most variable atmospheric composition, will be also analyzed. In addition, the simultaneous measurement of surface pressure is fundamentally required in order to appropriately estimate the change of CO2 absorption corresponding to pressure fluctuation, to compute the CO2 mixing ratio relative to dry air, and to separate actual CO2 surface flux from variations in atmospheric density. The measurement technique for surface pressure will be similar to that for CO2 but uses the O2 A-band near 768 nm. Radiative transfer calculations for the surface pressure measurement will be also reported. Other information (e.g., temperature and water vapor estimates) required to go from differential absorption measurements to final CO2 concentration retrievals will be assessed and discussed.

  4. Upper tropospheric cloud systems derived from IR sounders: properties of cirrus anvils in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protopapadaki, Sofia E.; Stubenrauch, Claudia J.; Feofilov, Artem G.

    2017-03-01

    Representing about 30 % of the Earth's total cloud cover, upper tropospheric clouds play a crucial role in the climate system by modulating the Earth's energy budget and heat transport. When originating from convection, they often form organized systems. The high spectral resolution of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) allows reliable cirrus identification, both from day and nighttime observations. Tropical upper tropospheric cloud systems have been analyzed by using a spatial composite technique on the retrieved cloud pressure of AIRS data. Cloud emissivity is used to distinguish convective core, cirrus and thin cirrus anvil within these systems. A comparison with simultaneous precipitation data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) shows that, for tropical upper tropospheric clouds, a cloud emissivity close to 1 is strongly linked to a high rain rate, leading to a proxy to identify convective cores. Combining AIRS cloud data with this cloud system approach, using physical variables, provides a new opportunity to relate the properties of the anvils, including also the thinner cirrus, to the convective cores. It also distinguishes convective cloud systems from isolated cirrus systems. Deep convective cloud systems, covering 15 % of the tropics, are further distinguished into single-core and multi-core systems. Though AIRS samples the tropics only twice per day, the evolution of longer-living convective systems can be still statistically captured, and we were able to select relatively mature single-core convective systems by using the fraction of convective core area within the cloud systems as a proxy for maturity. For these systems, we have demonstrated that the physical properties of the anvils are related to convective depth, indicated by the minimum retrieved cloud temperature within the convective core. Our analyses show that the size of the systems does in general increase with convective depth, though for

  5. Exhaled air analysis using wideband wave number tuning range infrared laser photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenev, Yury V.; Borisov, Alexey V.; Kuzmin, Dmitry A.; Penkova, Olga V.; Kostyukova, Nadezhda Y.; Karapuzikov, Alexey A.

    2017-01-01

    The infrared laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) and the pattern-recognition-based approach for noninvasive express diagnostics of pulmonary diseases on the basis of absorption spectra analysis of the patient's exhaled air are presented. The study involved lung cancer patients (N=9), patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (N=12), and a control group of healthy, nonsmoking volunteers (N=11). The analysis of the measured absorption spectra was based at first on reduction of the dimension of the feature space using principal component analysis; thereafter, the dichotomous classification was carried out using the support vector machine. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method (GC-MS) was used as the reference. The estimated mean value of the sensitivity of exhaled air sample analysis by the LPAS in dichotomous classification was not less than 90% and specificity was not less than 69%; the analogous results of analysis by GC-MS were 68% and 60%, respectively. Also, the approach to differential diagnostics based on the set of SVM classifiers usage is presented.

  6. The Atmospheric Transmission Generation System for Satellite Infrared Sounders.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    THE PENTAGON WASHINGTON. DC 20361 GREAT LAKES WASHINGTON, DC 20350 DET. CHANUTE /STOP 62 COMMANDER CHANUTE AFB, IL 61868 CHIEF OF NAVAL RESEARCH... CHANUTE AFB, IL 61868 ACQUISITIONS SECTION COMMANDING OFFICER IRDB-D8?3 FLENUMOCEANCEN AFGWC/DAPL LIBRARY & INFO. SERV. DIV. MONTEREY, CA 93940 OFFUTT AFB

  7. High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder/mod 2 (HIRS/2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    The HIRS/2 is provided for the TIROS-N series of operational meteorological satellites. The instrument features 20 spectral channels, including visible (.7 micron), shortwave (3.7 to 4.6 micron), and longwave (6.7 to 15 micron). Radiance data aids determination of vertical temperature profiles, water vapor, and ozone distribution. System performance and test results are described.

  8. Atmospheric Water Vapour Differential Absorption Measurements with an Infrared Sounder.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    such as amonia . As the differential absorption was only of the order of 2 dB for the above measurements (at 450 m range), the measurements were repeated...frequent(ref.7), and most seriously affect surface based radio frequency sensors and communications systems. Further development and refinement of the

  9. View to the south with the Two Sounder Antennas on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the south with the Two Sounder Antennas on the left - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  10. Inter-Comparison of GOES-8 Imager and Sounder Skin Temperature Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Stephanie L.; Suggs, Ronnie J.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Skin temperature (ST) retrievals derived from geostationary satellite observations have both high temporal and spatial resolutions and are therefore useful for applications such as assimilation into mesoscale forecast models, nowcasting, and diagnostic studies. Our retrieval method uses a Physical Split Window technique requiring at least two channels within the longwave infrared window. On current GOES satellites, including GOES-11, there are two Imager channels within the required spectral interval. However, beginning with the GOES-M satellite the 12-um channel will be removed, leaving only one longwave channel. The Sounder instrument will continue to have three channels within the longwave window, and therefore ST retrievals will be derived from Sounder measurements. This research compares retrievals from the two instruments and evaluates the effects of the spatial resolution and sensor calibration differences on the retrievals. Both Imager and Sounder retrievals are compared to ground-truth data to evaluate the overall accuracy of the technique. An analysis of GOES-8 and GOES-11 intercomparisons is also presented.

  11. Radar sounder performances for ESA JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berquin, Y. P.; Kofman, W. W.; Heggy, E.; Hérique, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Jupiter Icy moons Explorer (JUICE) is the first Large-class mission chosen as part of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. The mission will study Jovian icy moons Ganymede and Europa as potential habitats for life, addressing two key themes of Cosmic Vision namely the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life, and the Solar System interactions. The radar sounder instrument on this mission will have great potential to address specific science questions such as the presence of subsurface liquid water and ice shell geophysical structures. One major constraint for radar sounding is the roughness of the planetary surface. The work presented will focus on the characterization of Ganymede's surface topography to better understand its surface properties from a radar point of view. These results should help to put constraints on the design of JUICE's radar sounder. We use topographic data derived from the Voyager and Galileo missions images to try to characterize the surface structure and to quantify its geometry (in terms of slopes and RMS heights mainly). This study will help us evaluating the radar budget in a statistical approach. In addition, deterministic simulations of surface radar echoes conducted on synthetic surfaces -extrapolated from Digital Elevation Models- will be presented to better assess radar sounding performances.

  12. Topside sounder observations of equatorial bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, P. L.; Benson, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    Large scale regions of depleted equatorial ionospheric plasma, called equatorial bubbles, are investigated using topside sounder data. The sounder's unique remote measuring capability enables the magnetic field-aligned nature of the bubbles to be investigated. A search of all available Alouette 2 and ISIS 1 ionograms during nighttime perigee passes near the magnetic equator has revealed a variety of echo signatures associated with bubbles. In addition to a sudden drop in electron density, these signatures usually include in situ spread F and ducted traces. The ducted traces have been used to determine the electron density distribution and to infer changes in ion composition along the magnetic field line within the duct associated with the bubble. In some cases it can be determined that the bubble is asymmetric with respect to the magnetic equator. Even though such features require 3 dimensional models for their explanation, the great field-aligned extent of the bubbles (relative to their cross section) suggests that current theories, which ignore variations along the magnetic field, are still applicable.

  13. Microwave Limb Sounder/El Nino Watch - December, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows differences in atmospheric water vapor relative to a normal (average) year in the Earth's upper troposphere about 10 kilometers (6 miles) above the surface. The measurements were taken by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument aboard NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). These data, collected in late December 1997, show higher than normal levels of water vapor (red) over the central and eastern Pacific which indicates the presence of an El Nino condition. At the same time, the western Pacific (blue) is much drier than normal. The unusually moist air above the central and eastern Pacific is a consequence of the much warmer-than-normal ocean waters which occur during El Nino. Warmer water evaporates at a higher rate and the resulting warm moist air rises and forms tall cloud towers. In the tropics, the warm water and the resulting tall cloud towers typically produce large amounts of rain. These data show significant increases in the amount of atmospheric moisture off the coast of Peru and Ecuador since measurements were made in November 1997. The maximum water temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific, as measured by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is still higher than normal and these high ocean temperatures are likely responsible for an increase in evaporation and the subsequent rise in humidity.

  14. AIRS Ozone Burden During Antarctic Winter: Time Series from 8/1/2005 to 9/30/2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of AIRS Ozone Burden During Antarctic Winter

    AIRS provides a daily global 3-dimensional view of Earth's ozone layer. Since AIRS observes in the thermal infrared spectral range, it also allows scientists to view from space the Antarctic ozone hole for the first time continuously during polar winter. This image sequence captures the intensification of the annual ozone hole in the Antarctic Polar Vortex.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Performance of greenhouse gas profiling by infrared-laser and microwave occultation in cloudy air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proschek, V.; Kirchengast, G.; Emde, C.; Schweitzer, S.

    2012-12-01

    ACCURATE is a proposed future satellite mission enabling simultaneous measurements of greenhouse gases (GHGs), wind and thermodynamic variables from Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The measurement principle is a combination of LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO) and microwave occultation (LMO), the LMIO method, where the LIO signals are very sensitive to clouds. The GHG retrieval will therefore be strongly influenced by clouds in parts of the troposphere. The IR-laser signals, at wavelengths within 2--2.5μ m, are chosen to measure six GHGs (H2O, CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, CO; incl.~key isotopes 13CO2, C18OO, HDO). The LMO signals enable to co-measure the thermodynamic variables. In this presentation we introduce the algorithm to retrieve GHG profiles under cloudy-air conditions by using quasi-realistic forward simulations, including also influence of Rayleigh scattering, scintillations and aerosols. Data from CALIPSO--Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations--with highest vertical resolution of about 60 m and horizontal resolution of about 330 m were used for simulation of clouds. The IR-laser signals consist for each GHG of a GHG-sensitive and a close-by reference signal. The key process, ``differencing'' of these two signals, removes the atmospheric ``broadband'' effects, resulting in a pure GHG transmission profile. Very thin ice clouds, like sub-visible cirrus, are fairly transparent to the IR-laser signals, thicker and liquid water clouds block the signals. The reference signal is used to produce a cloud layering profile from zero to blocking clouds and is smoothed in a preprocess to suppress scintillations. Sufficiently small gaps, of width <2 km in the cloud layering profile, are found to enable a decent retrieval of entire GHG profiles over the UTLS under broken cloudiness and are therefore bridged by interpolation. Otherwise in case of essentially continuous cloudiness the profiles are found to terminate at cloud top level. The accuracy of

  16. Determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air employing diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Santosh Kumar; Deb, Manas Kanti; Verma, Devsharan

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents the development of a simple and precise analytical method for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air. In this method nitrogen dioxide is determined in the form of nitrite. The determination of nitrogen dioxide needs no reagents except for a solution of sodium hydroxide mixed with sodium arsenite (NaOH-Na 2As 2O 3) which is used as an absorbing reagent for trapping the nitrogen dioxide from the atmosphere in the form of nitrite, i.e., a prior analysis step. The determination of submicrogram levels of nitrogen dioxide is based on the selection of a strong and sharp quantitative analytical peak at 1380 cm - 1 using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRS-FTIR). The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification of the method are found to be 0.008 μg g - 1 NO 2- and 0.05 μg g - 1 NO 2-, respectively. The precision in terms of standard deviation and relative standard deviation value at a level of 2 μg NO 2- / 0.1 g KBr for n = 10 is found to be 0.036 μg NO 2- and 1.8%, respectively. The relative standard deviation ( n = 10) for the determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air was observed to be in the range 2.6-3.8%. The method proposed is time-saving and eliminates the slow and cumbersome steps of pH maintenance of the reaction mixture and color formation of the EPA recommended spectrophotometric and other methods for quantitative determination of nitrogen dioxide.

  17. Measurements of stratospheric NO2 by the improved stratospheric and mesospheric sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reburn, W. J.; Remedios, J. J.; Ballard, J.; Lawrence, B. N.; Taylor, F. W.

    1993-06-01

    Limb sounding measurements of infra-red emission at 6.2 μm from the Earth's atmosphere have been made by the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS). This provides a pressure modulated gas-correlation signal and a wideband signal from which NO2 and aerosol extinction at 6.2 μm are jointly retrieved between 100 mb and 0.3 mb. The retrieval scheme is discussed with reference to NO2 and a qualitative comparison made with LIMS data. The ISAMS Northern hemisphere NO2 data for January 9th 1992 are then examined and the importance of dynamical factors highlighted.

  18. A comparison of measured radiances from AIRS and HIRS across different cloud types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, M. M.; Kahn, B. H.; Staten, P.

    2015-12-01

    The observation of Earth's atmosphere with passive remote sensing instruments is ongoing for decades and resulting in a long-term global dataset. Two prominent examples are operational satellite platforms from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) or research platforms like NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). The observed spectral ranges of these observations are often similar among the different platforms, but have large differences when it comes to resolution, accuracy and quality control. Our approach is to combine different kinds of instruments at the pixel-scale to improve the characterization of infrared radiances. We focus on data from the High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) and compare the observations to radiances from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua. The high spectral resolution of AIRS is used to characterize and possibly recalibrate the observed radiances from HIRS. Our approach is unique in that we use additional information from other passive instruments on the same platforms including the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We will present comparisons of radiances from HIRS and AIRS within different types of clouds that are determined from the imagers. In this way, we can analyze and select the most homogeneous conditions for radiance comparisons and a possible re-calibration of HIRS. We hope to achieve a cloud-type-dependent calibration and quality control for HIRS, which can be extrapolated into the past via inter-calibration of the different HIRS instruments beyond the time of AIRS.

  19. The roles of vibration analysis and infrared thermography in monitoring air-handling equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurzbach, Richard N.

    2003-04-01

    Industrial and commercial building equipment maintenance has not historically been targeted for implementation of PdM programs. The focus instead has been on manufacturing, aerospace and energy industries where production interruption has significant cost implications. As cost-effectiveness becomes more pervasive in corporate culture, even office space and labor activities housed in large facilities are being scrutinized for cost-cutting measures. When the maintenance costs for these facilities are reviewed, PdM can be considered for improving the reliability of the building temperature regulation, and reduction of maintenance repair costs. An optimized program to direct maintenance resources toward a cost effective and pro-active management of the facility can result in reduced operating budgets, and greater occupant satisfaction. A large majority of the significant rotating machinery in a large building environment are belt-driven air handling units. These machines are often poorly designed or utilized within the facility. As a result, the maintenance staff typically find themselves scrambling to replace belts and bearings, going from one failure to another. Instead of the reactive-mode maintenance, some progressive and critical institutions are adopting predictive and proactive technologies of infrared thermography and vibration analysis. Together, these technologies can be used to identify design and installation problems, that when corrected, significantly reduce maintenance and increase reliability. For critical building use, such as laboratories, research facilities, and other high value non-industrial settings, the cost-benefits of more reliable machinery can contribute significantly to the operational success.

  20. Physical Retrieval of Surface Emissivity Spectrum from Hyperspectral Infrared Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Weisz, Elisabeth; Zhou, Daniel K.

    2007-01-01

    Retrieval of temperature, moisture profiles and surface skin temperature from hyperspectral infrared (IR) radiances requires spectral information about the surface emissivity. Using constant or inaccurate surface emissivities typically results in large retrieval errors, particularly over semi-arid or arid areas where the variation in emissivity spectrum is large both spectrally and spatially. In this study, a physically based algorithm has been developed to retrieve a hyperspectral IR emissivity spectrum simultaneously with the temperature and moisture profiles, as well as the surface skin temperature. To make the solution stable and efficient, the hyperspectral emissivity spectrum is represented by eigenvectors, derived from the laboratory measured hyperspectral emissivity database, in the retrieval process. Experience with AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder) radiances shows that a simultaneous retrieval of the emissivity spectrum and the sounding improves the surface skin temperature as well as temperature and moisture profiles, particularly in the near surface layer.

  1. Eight Year Climatologies from Observational (AIRS) and Model (MERRA) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearty, Thomas; Savtchenko, Andrey; Won, Young-In; Theobalk, Mike; Vollmer, Bruce; Manning, Evan; Smith, Peter; Ostrenga, Dana; Leptoukh, Greg

    2010-01-01

    We examine climatologies derived from eight years of temperature, water vapor, cloud, and trace gas observations made by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument flying on the Aqua satellite and compare them to similar climatologies constructed with data from a global assimilation model, the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). We use the AIRS climatologies to examine anomalies and trends in the AIRS data record. Since sampling can be an issue for infrared satellites in low earth orbit, we also use the MERRA data to examine the AIRS sampling biases. By sampling the MERRA data at the AIRS space-time locations both with and without the AIRS quality control we estimate the sampling bias of the AIRS climatology and the atmospheric conditions where AIRS has a lower sampling rate. While the AIRS temperature and water vapor sampling biases are small at low latitudes, they can be more than a few degrees in temperature or 10 percent in water vapor at higher latitudes. The largest sampling biases are over desert. The AIRS and MERRA data are available from the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). The AIRS climatologies we used are available for analysis with the GIOVANNI data exploration tool. (see, http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov).

  2. Chip-scale Mid-Infrared chemical sensors using air-clad pedestal silicon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao Tai; Singh, Vivek; Hu, Juejun; Richardson, Kathleen; Musgraves, J David; Luzinov, Igor; Hensley, Joel; Kimerling, Lionel C; Agarwal, Anu

    2013-06-07

    Towards a future lab-on-a-chip spectrometer, we demonstrate a compact chip-scale air-clad silicon pedestal waveguide as a Mid-Infrared (Mid-IR) sensor capable of in situ monitoring of organic solvents. The sensor is a planar crystalline silicon waveguide, which is highly transparent, between λ = 1.3 and 6.5 μm, so that its operational spectral range covers most characteristic chemical absorption bands due to bonds such as C-H, N-H, O-H, C-C, N-O, C=O, and C≡N, as opposed to conventional UV, Vis, Near-IR sensors, which use weaker overtones of these fundamental bands. To extend light transmission beyond λ = 3.7 μm, a spectral region where a typical silicon dioxide under-clad is absorbing, we fabricate a unique air-clad silicon pedestal waveguide. The sensing mechanism of our Mid-IR waveguide sensor is based on evanescent wave absorption by functional groups of the surrounding chemical molecules, which selectively absorb specific wavelengths in the mid-IR, depending on the nature of their chemical bonds. From a measurement of the waveguide mode intensities, we demonstrate in situ identification of chemical compositions and concentrations of organic solvents. For instance, we show that when testing at λ = 3.55 μm, the Mid-IR sensor can distinguish hexane from the rest of the tested analytes (methanol, toluene, carbon tetrachloride, ethanol and acetone), since hexane has a strong absorption from the aliphatic C-H stretch at λ = 3.55 μm. Analogously, applying the same technique at λ = 3.3 μm, the Mid-IR sensor is able to determine the concentration of toluene dissolved in carbon tetrachloride, because toluene has a strong absorption at λ = 3.3 μm from the aromatic C-H stretch. With our demonstration of an air-clad silicon pedestal waveguide sensor, we move closer towards the ultimate goal of an ultra-compact portable spectrometer-on-a-chip.

  3. Error Consistency Analysis Scheme for Infrared Ultraspectral Sounding Retrieval Error Budget Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.; Strow, Larry, L.

    2013-01-01

    Great effort has been devoted towards validating geophysical parameters retrieved from ultraspectral infrared radiances obtained from satellite remote sensors. An error consistency analysis scheme (ECAS), utilizing fast radiative transfer model (RTM) forward and inverse calculations, has been developed to estimate the error budget in terms of mean difference and standard deviation of error in both spectral radiance and retrieval domains. The retrieval error is assessed through ECAS without relying on other independent measurements such as radiosonde data. ECAS establishes a link between the accuracies of radiances and retrieved geophysical parameters. ECAS can be applied to measurements from any ultraspectral instrument and any retrieval scheme with its associated RTM. In this manuscript, ECAS is described and demonstrated with measurements from the MetOp-A satellite Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). This scheme can be used together with other validation methodologies to give a more definitive characterization of the error and/or uncertainty of geophysical parameters retrieved from ultraspectral radiances observed from current and future satellite remote sensors such as IASI, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS).

  4. Sulfur Dioxide Plume from Mt. Etna Eruption 2002 as Detected with AIRS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Mt. Etna, a volcano on the island of Sicily, erupted on October 26, 2002. Preliminary analysis of data taken by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on October 28 shows the instrument can provide an excellent means to study the evolution and structure of the sulfur dioxide plume emitted from volcanoes. These data also demonstrate that AIRS can be used to obtain the total mass of sulfur dioxide injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic event, information that may help us to better understand these dangerous natural occurrences in the future.

    The image clearly shows the sulfur dioxide plume. This image was created by comparing data taken at two different frequencies, or channels, and creating one image that highlights the differences between these two channels. Both channels are sensitive to water vapor, but one of the channels is also sensitive to sulfur dioxide. By subtracting out the common water vapor signal in both channels, the sulfur dioxide feature remains and shows up as an enhancement in the difference image.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Advanced Meteorological Temperature Sounder (AMTS) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The results of a system definition study (theoretical) for an Advanced Meteorological Temperature Sounder (AMTS) is described. From the data the atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles can be determined over the entire earth's surface with a spatial resolution of 45 km. x 45 km; amounts and type of cloud cover as well as surface temperatures of the earth are also determined. The major purpose of the study was to determine the feasibility of cooling twenty-eight detectors to the 80-90 Kelvin region by means of a radiative cooler. Other related considerations were achieving high signal-to-noise ratios, maximizing optical throughput through the grating spectrometer, and reducing preamplifier noise. A detailed optical design of an f/5 Ebert-Fastie spectrometer was carried out to verify that image quality is adequate; field lenses near the spectrometer focal plane were designed to image the grating onto the smallest size detectors for each channel.

  6. RAWS: The spaceborne radar wind sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of the Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is discussed. The goals of the RAWS is to estimate the following three qualities: the echo power, to determine rain rate and surface wind velocity; the mean Doppler frequency, to determine the wind velocity in hydrometers; and the spread of the Doppler frequency, to determine the turbulent spread of the wind velocity. Researchers made significant progress during the first year. The feasibility of the concept seems certain. Studies indicate that a reasonably sized system can measure in the presence of ice clouds and dense water clouds. No sensitivity problems exist in rainy environments. More research is needed on the application of the radar to the measurement of rain rates and winds at the sea surface.

  7. RAWS: The spaceborne radar wind sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1991-09-01

    The concept of the Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS) is discussed. The goals of the RAWS is to estimate the following three qualities: the echo power, to determine rain rate and surface wind velocity; the mean Doppler frequency, to determine the wind velocity in hydrometers; and the spread of the Doppler frequency, to determine the turbulent spread of the wind velocity. Researchers made significant progress during the first year. The feasibility of the concept seems certain. Studies indicate that a reasonably sized system can measure in the presence of ice clouds and dense water clouds. No sensitivity problems exist in rainy environments. More research is needed on the application of the radar to the measurement of rain rates and winds at the sea surface.

  8. EOS Laser Atmosphere Wind Sounder (LAWS) investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In this final report, the set of tasks that evolved from the Laser Atmosphere Wind Sounder (LAWS) Science Team are reviewed, the major accomplishments are summarized, and a complete set of resulting references provided. The tasks included preparation of a plan for the LAWS Algorithm Development and Evolution Laboratory (LADEL); participation in the preparation of a joint CNES/NASA proposal to build a space-based DWL; involvement in the Global Backscatter Experiments (GLOBE); evaluation of several DWL concepts including 'Quick-LAWS', SPNDL and several direct detection technologies; and an extensive series of system trade studies and Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE's). In this report, some of the key accomplishments are briefly summarized with reference to interim reports, special reports, conference/workshop presentations, and publications.

  9. Global carbon monoxide products from combined AIRS, TES and MLS measurements on A-train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J. X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attié, J.-L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2013-06-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite datasets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background model-based field is replaced by a satellite dataset, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these datasets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS/TES and AIRS/MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only retrievals, and improved coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  10. Global carbon monoxide products from combined AIRS, TES and MLS measurements on A-train satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, J. X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attié, J.-L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background model-based field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  11. Global Carbon Monoxide Products from Combined AIRS, TES and MLS Measurements on A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Juying X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attie, J. L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background modelbased field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  12. Evaluation of the Impact of AIRS Radiance and Profile Data Assimilation in Partly Cloudy Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Jedlovec, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Retrieved profiles from AIRS contain much of the information that is contained in the radiances and may be able to reveal reasons for this reduced impact. Assimilating AIRS retrieved profiles in an identical analysis configuration to the radiances, tracking the quantity and quality of the assimilated data in each technique, and examining analysis increments and forecast impact from each data type can yield clues as to the reasons for the reduced impact. By doing this with regional scale models individual synoptic features (and the impact of AIRS on these features) can be more easily tracked. This project examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing operational techniques used for AIRS radiances and research techniques used for AIRS retrieved profiles. Parallel versions of a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) are run to examine the impact AIRS radiances and retrieved profiles. Statistical evaluation of a long-term series of forecast runs will be compared along with preliminary results of in-depth investigations for select case comparing the analysis increments in partly cloudy regions and short-term forecast impacts.

  13. A Submillimeter Sounder for Measuring Martian Winds and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamppari, L. K.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.

    2016-10-01

    We review the scientific need for global vertically resolved observations of martian atmospheric winds, and show that a submillimeter limb sounder can provide such measurements, along with measurements of water vapor and other trace gases.

  14. Measurements of stratospheric volcanic aerosol optical depth from NOAA TIROS Observational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierangelo, CléMence; ChéDin, Alain; Chazette, Patrick

    2004-02-01

    We show that the infrared optical depth of stratospheric volcanic aerosols produced by the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991 may be retrieved from the observations of the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS-2) on board the polar meteorological satellites of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Evolution of the concentration in time and in space, in particular the migration of the aerosols from the tropics to the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, is found to be consistent with our knowledge of the consequences of this eruption. The method relies on the analysis of the differences between the satellite observations and simulations from an aerosol-free radiative transfer model using collocated radiosonde data as the prime input. Thus aerosol optical depths are retrieved directly without making assumptions about the aerosol size distribution or absorption coefficient. The aerosol optical depths reached a maximum in August 1991 in the tropical zone (0.055 at 8.3 μm, 0.03 at 4.0 μm, and 0.02 at 11.1 μm). The peak occurred in November 1991 in the southern midlatitudes and in March/April 1992 in the northern midlatitudes. A reanalysis of the almost 25 year archive of NOAA TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) observations holds considerable promise for improved knowledge of the atmosphere loading in volcanic aerosols.

  15. AIRS Storm Front Approaching California (animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for the AIRS Storm Front Approaching California Animation

    NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument is able to peel back cloud cover to reveal 3-D structure of a storm's water vapor content, information that can be used to improve weather forecast models.

    In this animation the initial visible cloud image series shows a front moving toward the West Coast of the United States as a low pressure area moves into the Pacific Northwest. The 'Pineapple Express,' a stream of moisture that originates in the tropics South of Hawaii and usually crosses Mexico to enter New Mexico and Texas, has shifted Westward and is also visible moving into Baja California. The area preceding the front appears to be relatively clear in the visible images.

    As the view shifts from the visible to the infrared wavelengths which highlight water vapor, we see both cloud areas contain heavy burdens of moisture. The area which appears clear in the visible images is seen to contain water vapor near the coastline as well. The viewpoint then rotates so that we can see the vertical cross section of the fronts. The variability of the vertical extent of water vapor and the amount is now clearly visible. The storm moving in from the Gulf of Alaska is more heavily laden with water vapor than that moving in from the Southwest. The moisture is concentrated in the lower atmosphere. The colors indicate the amount of water vapor present. Blue areas denote low water vapor content; green areas are medium water vapor content; red areas signify high water vapor content. The vertical grid for the final frame ranges from 250 millibar pressure at the top to 1000 millibar pressure at the bottom. The top is about 10 km (6.2 miles) above the surface of the Earth.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in

  16. Inter-Comparison of NPP/CrIS with AIRS and IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Weng, F.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the newly-launched Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) and future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is a Fourier transform spectrometer that provides soundings of the atmosphere with 1305 spectral channels, over 3 wavelength ranges: LWIR (9.14 - 15.38 μm); MWIR (5.71 - 8.26 μm); and SWIR (3.92 - 4.64 μm). An accurate spectral and radiometric calibration as well as geolocation is fundamental for CrIS radiance Sensor Data Records (SDRs). In this study, through inter- and intra-satellite calibration efforts, we focus on assessment of NPP/CrIS post-launch radiometric and spectral calibration. The purpose of this study is to use inter-calibration technologies to quantify the CrIS calibration bias and uncertainties. We will compare CrIS hyperspectral radiance measurements with the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Metop-A and -B to examine spectral and radiometric consistence and difference among three hyperspectral IR sounders. The newly-launched CrIS on Suomi NPP, combined with AIRS and IASI, provide the first-ever inter-calibration opportunity because three hyperspectral IR sounders can observe the Earth and Atmosphere at the same spectral regions from different satellites. We will directly compare CrIS with AIRS and IASI at orbital crossing points of satellites occurring at high latitudes, the so-called simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNO). The CrIS, AIRS, and IASI spectra will be processed at common grids and then the spectral differences will be computed. In addition, an accurate collocation algorithm has been developed to collocate high spatial resolution measurements from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) within each CrIS Field of View (FOV). The collocated VIIRS radiances will be used to characterize the homogeneity of CrIS FOVs to further reduce comparison uncertainties

  17. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): A New Operational Sensor Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Lyu, Cheng-H Joseph; Leslie, R. Vince; Baker, Neal; Mo, Tsan; Sun, Ninghai; Bi, Li; Anderson, Mike; Landrum, Mike; DeAmici, Giovanni; Gu, Degui; Foo, Alex; Ibrahim, Wael; Robinson, Kris; Chidester, Lynn; Shiue, James

    2012-01-01

    ATMS is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. ATMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first ATMS was launched October 28, 2011 on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite. Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models; and ATMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet NWP sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface

  18. The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS): First Year On-Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) is a new satellite microwave sounding sensor designed to provide operational weather agencies with atmospheric temperature and moisture profile information for global weather forecasting and climate applications. A TMS will continue the microwave sounding capabilities first provided by its predecessors, the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU). The first flight unit was launched a year ago in October, 2011 aboard the Suomi-National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, part of the new Joint Polar-Orbiting Satellite System (JPSS). Microwave soundings by themselves are the highest-impact input data used by Numerical Weather Prediction models; and A TMS, when combined with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), forms the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). The microwave soundings help meet sounding requirements under cloudy sky conditions and provide key profile information near the surface. ATMS was designed & built by Aerojet Corporation in Azusa, California, (now Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems). It has 22 channels spanning 23-183 GHz, closely following the channel set of the MSU, AMSU-AI/2, AMSU-B, Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), and Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB). It continues their cross-track scanning geometry, but for the first time, provides Nyquist sample spacing. All this is accomplished with approximately V. the volume, Y, the mass, and Y, the power of the three AMSUs. A description will be given of its performance from its first year of operation as determined by post-launch calibration activities. These activities include radiometric calibration using the on-board warm targets and cold space views, and geolocation determination. Example imagery and zooms of specific weather events will be shown. The second ATMS flight model is currently under construction and planned for launch on the "Jl" satellite of the JPSS program in

  19. Submillimeter Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlecht, Erich T.; Allen, Mark A.; Gill, John J.; Choonsup, Lee; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Maestrini, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder (SPACES), a high-sensitivity laboratory breadboard for a spectrometer targeted at orbital planetary atmospheric analysis. The frequency range is 520 to 590 GHz, with a target noise temperature sensitivity of 2,500 K for detecting water, sulfur compounds, carbon compounds, and other atmospheric constituents. SPACES is a prototype for a powerful tool for the exploration of the chemistry and dynamics of any planetary atmosphere. It is fundamentally a single-pixel receiver for spectral signals emitted by the relevant constituents, intended to be fed by a fixed or movable telescope/antenna. Its front-end sensor translates the received signal down to the 100-MHz range where it can be digitized and the data transferred to a spectrum analyzer for processing, spectrum generation, and accumulation. The individual microwave and submillimeter wave components (mixers, LO high-powered amplifiers, and multipliers) of SPACES were developed in cooperation with other programs, although with this type of instrument in mind. Compared to previous planetary and Earth science instruments, its broad bandwidth (approx. =.13%) and rapid tunability (approx. =.10 ms) are new developments only made possible recently by the advancement in submillimeter circuit design and processing at JPL.

  20. Planetary protection for Europa radar sounder antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Kim M.; Moussessian, Alina; Newlin, Laura E.; Willis, Paul B.; Chen, Fei; Harcke, Leif J.; Chapin, Elaine; Jun, Insoo; Gim, Yonggyu; McEachen, Michael; Allen, Scotty; Kirchner, Donald; Blankenship, Donald

    2016-05-01

    The potential for habitability puts stringent requirements on planetary protection for a mission to Europa. A long-wavelength radar sounder with a large antenna is one of the proposed instruments for a future Europa mission. The size and construction of radar sounding antennas make the usual methods of meeting planetary protection requirements challenging. This paper discusses a viable planetary protection scheme for an antenna optimized for Europa radar sounding. The preferred methodology for this antenna is exposure to 100 kGy (10 Mrad) in water of gamma radiation using a Cobalt-60 source for both bulk and surface sterilization and exposure to vapor hydrogen peroxide for surface treatment for possible recontamination due to subsequent handling. For the boom-supported antenna design, selected tests were performed to confirm the suitability of these treatment methods. A portion of a coilable boom residual from an earlier mission was irradiated and its deployment repeatability confirmed with no degradation. Elasticity was measured of several fiberglass samples using a four-point bending test to confirm that there was no degradation due to radiation exposure. Vapor hydrogen peroxide treatment was applied to the silver-coated braid used as the antenna radiating element as it was the material most likely to be susceptible to oxidative attack under the treatment conditions. There was no discernable effect. These tests confirm that the radar sounding antenna for a Europa mission should be able tolerate the proposed sterilization methods.

  1. Generation of sub-two-cycle mid-infrared pulses by four-wave mixing through filamentation in air.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Takao; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2007-11-15

    Generation of sub-two-cycle, microjoule pulses in the mid-infrared region is demonstrated. Fundamental and second-harmonic pulses of 25 fs Ti:sapphire amplifier output were focused into the air to produce extremely broadband mid-infrared pulses by four-wave difference-frequency generation through the filamentation. The full width at half-maximum of the spectral bandwidth reaches one octave (2.5-5.5 microm), which is sufficiently broad for sub-single-cycle pulse generation. The pulse width was estimated to be 13 fs, without any compressors, by cross-correlation frequency resolved optical gating. The output energy of more than a few microjoule is sufficient for spectroscopy.

  2. Transition of AIRS Products to the National Weather Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) is a proven community leader for transitioning satellite products to operational end users and is working hard to bring data from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) to forecasters. SPoRT products using AIRS data are currently or will soon be evaluated at WFOs and National Centers (1) T and q profiles: HWT, Alaska WFOs, HRD/OPC, HMT (2) Ozone profiles: HPC/OPC (3) Carbon Monoxide: Southern and Western Region WFOs SPoRT is actively evaluating differences between V5 and V6 profiles for selected cases and will continue to provide feedback to the AIRS team as V6 development efforts conclude.

  3. Octave-spanning mid-infrared pulses by plasma generation in air pumped with an Yb:KGW source

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinqing; Parobek, Alexander; Ganim, Ziad

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond mid-infrared (IR) supercontinuum generation in gas media provides a broadband source suited for time-domain spectroscopies and microscopies. This technology has largely utilized <100 fs Ti:sapphire pump lasers. In this Letter, we describe the first plasma generation mid-IR source based on a 1030 nm, 171 fs Yb:KGW laser system; when its first three harmonics are focused in air, a conical mode supercontinuum is generated that spans <1000 to 2700 cm−1 with a 190 pJ pulse energy and 0.5% RMS stability. PMID:27805634

  4. Octave-spanning mid-infrared pulses by plasma generation in air pumped with an Yb:KGW source.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinqing; Parobek, Alexander; Ganim, Ziad

    2016-11-01

    Femtosecond mid-infrared (IR) supercontinuum generation in gas media provides a broadband source suited for time-domain spectroscopies and microscopies. This technology has largely utilized <100  fs Ti:sapphire pump lasers. In this Letter, we describe the first plasma generation mid-IR source based on a 1030 nm, 171 fs Yb:KGW laser system; when its first three harmonics are focused in air, a conical mode supercontinuum is generated that spans <1000 to 2700  cm-1 with a 190 pJ pulse energy and 0.5% RMS stability.

  5. AIRS Map of Carbon Monoxide Draped on Globe: Time Series from 8/1/2005 to 9/30/2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of AIRS Map of Carbon Monoxide Draped on Globe

    Forest fires and agricultural burning create large amounts of carbon monoxide. AIRS provides daily global maps of carbon monoxide from space, allowing scientists to follow the global transport of this gas day-to-day. In this image sequence, carbon monoxide pollution from agricultural burning blooms repeatedly over the Amazonian basin. The gas is then transported across the Atlantic Ocean. Carbon monoxide pollution from fires in sub-Saharan Africa is also apparent.

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Experiment, with its visible, infrared, and microwave detectors, provides a three-dimensional look at Earth's weather. Working in tandem, the three instruments can make simultaneous observations all the way down to the Earth's surface, even in the presence of heavy clouds. With more than 2,000 channels sensing different regions of the atmosphere, the system creates a global, 3-D map of atmospheric temperature and humidity and provides information on clouds, greenhouse gases, and many other atmospheric phenomena. The AIRS Infrared Sounder Experiment flies onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., under contract to NASA. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. The potential of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect organic emissions under the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L. ); Kroutil, R.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 regulates the emission of 198 air toxics. Currently, there is no existing technology by which a regulatory agency can independently determine if a facility is in compliance. We have successfully tested the ability of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect chemical plumes released in the field. Additional laboratory releases demonstrated that FTIR spectroscopy can detect target analytes in mixtures containing components which have overlapping absorbances. The FTIR spectrometer was able to identify and quantify each component released with an average quantitative error of less than 20% using partial least squares (PLS) analysis and 40% using classical least squares analysis (CLS) when calibration files containing pure components and mixtures were used. Calibration files containing only pure analytes resulted in CLS outperforming PLS analyses.

  7. The potential of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect organic emissions under the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L.; Kroutil, R.T.

    1992-07-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 regulates the emission of 198 air toxics. Currently, there is no existing technology by which a regulatory agency can independently determine if a facility is in compliance. We have successfully tested the ability of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect chemical plumes released in the field. Additional laboratory releases demonstrated that FTIR spectroscopy can detect target analytes in mixtures containing components which have overlapping absorbances. The FTIR spectrometer was able to identify and quantify each component released with an average quantitative error of less than 20% using partial least squares (PLS) analysis and 40% using classical least squares analysis (CLS) when calibration files containing pure components and mixtures were used. Calibration files containing only pure analytes resulted in CLS outperforming PLS analyses.

  8. Determination of atmospheric temperature, water vapor, and heating rates from mid- and far- infrared hyperspectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D.; Liou, K.; Yung, Y.; Johnson, D.; Mlynczak, M.

    2007-12-01

    Comprehensive satellite-borne far-infrared (15-100 μm) hyperspectral measurements of the earth have not been implemented since the short-lived Infrared Interferometer Sounder-D (IRIS-D) instrument on the Nimbus-4 satellite ceased operation in 1971 due primarily to instrumentation limitations and mission cost considerations. Recently, the development of the Far Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument [Mlynczak et al, 2006], a balloon-borne FTS which records spectra from 5 to 200 μm, provides a test-bed for the development of space-based far-infrared measurements for climate change monitoring. A comparison of the retrieval capabilities of a notional space-based instrument of comparable performance to FIRST and the currently-operational mid-infrared instrument AIRS is presented. Temperature and water vapor retrievals are compared (in an orbital simulation framework) along with the relative ability of the retrievals from these two instruments to constrain the heating rate profile. Also, the skill with which the AIRS measurements can be used to extrapolate the cloud radiative effect into the far-infrared is explored. Finally, FIRST test flight spectra are presented in the framework of other A-Train measurements such as MODIS and CALIPSO, followed by a discussion of climate applications.

  9. AIRS Data Service at NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services (GES DISC) and Its Application to Climate Change Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Won, Young-In; Vollimer, Bruce; Theobald, Mike; Hua, Xin-Min

    2008-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument suite is designed to observe and characterize the entire atmospheric column from the surface to the top of the atmosphere in terms of surface emissivity and temperature, atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles, cloud amount and height, and the spectral outgoing infrared radiation on a global scale. The AIRS Data Support Team at the GES DISC provides data support to assist others in understanding, retrieving and extracting information from the AIRS/AMSU/HSB data products. Because a number of years has passed since its operation started, the amount of data has reached a certain level of maturity where we can address the climate change study utilizing AIRS data, In this presentation we will list various service we provide and to demonstrate how to utilize/apply the existing service to long-term and short-term variability study.

  10. Performance assessment of future thermal infrared geostationary instruments to monitor air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellitto, P.; Dauphin, P.; Dufour, G.; Eremenko, M.; Cuesta, J.; Coman, A.; Forêt, G.; Beekmann, M.; Gaubert, B.; Flaud, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Air quality (AQ) has a recognized onerous impact on human health and the environment, and then on society. It is more and more clear that constantly and efficiently monitoring AQ from space is a valuable step forward towards a more thorough comprehension of pollution processes that can have a relevant impact on the biosphere. In recent years, important progresses in this field have been made, e.g., reliable observations of several pollutants have been obtained, proving the feasibility of monitoring atmospheric composition from space. In this sense, low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal infrared (TIR) space-borne instruments are widely regarded as a useful tool to observe targeted AQ parameters like tropospheric ozone concentrations [1]. However, limitations remain with the current observation systems in particular to observe ozone in the lowermost troposphere (LmT) with a spatial and temporal resolution relevant for monitoring pollution processes at the regional scale. Indeed, LEO instruments are not well adapted to monitor small scale and short term phenomena, owing to their unsatisfactory revisit time. From this point of view, a more satisfactory concept might be based on geostationary (GEO) platforms. Current and planned GEO missions are mainly tailored on meteorological parameters retrieval and do not have sufficient spectral resolutions and signal to noise ratios (SNR) to infer information on trace gases in the LmT. New satellite missions are currently proposed that can partly overcome these limitations. Here we present a group of simulation exercises and sensitivity analyses to set-up future TIR GEO missions adapted to monitor and forecast AQ over Europe, and to evaluate their technical requirements. At this aim, we have developed a general simulator to produce pseudo-observations for different platform/instrument configurations. The core of this simulator is the KOPRA radiative transfer model, including the KOPRAfit inversion module [2]. Note that to assess the

  11. Tropospheric water vapor retrieval from a nadir THz/FIR sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Mendrok, Jana; Dupuy, Eric; Kasai, Yasuko

    2008-12-01

    This work presents clear-sky simulations to study water vapor (H2O) retrieval from a nadir sounder operating in the TeraHertz (THz) and Far-Infrared (FIR) spectral domains (100-500 cm-1). The THz/FIR retrieval is compared with retrieval from the mid-InfraRed (IR) 7μm H2O band (1200-2000 cm-1). The THz/FIR observations are more sensitive in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the IR measurements. On the other hand, the IR sounder has better performance in the lower troposphere. The retrieval error due to uncertainties on the temperature profile are of the same order of magnitude in the THz/FIR and IR bands. No significant retrieval errors from contaminating species have been found. The calculations for several atmospheric scenarios show that retrieval performances are not only dependent on the H2O abundance but also on the temperature gradient. Hence, sensitivity in the UT/LS layer, with a low temperature gradient, is poor. The combination of FIR and IR merges the advantages of both bands, and allows to slightly decorrelate temperature and H2O VMR.

  12. Advanced sounder validation studies from recent NAST-I airborne field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of satellite measurement systems continues to improve their research and operational impact and is essential for advancing global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface. Measurement system and data product validation is required to fully exploit these data for enabling their intended enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Airborne field campaigns can play a vital role in such validation and contribute to assessing and improving satellite sensor measurements and associated data products. The NASA LaRC National Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) was part of the aircraft payload for the two field experiments conducted to address Suomi NPP (SNPP) validation since the satellite's launch in late 2011: 1) mid-latitude flights based out of Palmdale, CA during May 2013 (SNPP-1), and 2) flights over Greenland during March 2015 while based out of Keflavik, Iceland (SNPP-2). This presentation focuses on radiance analysis from the SNPP airborne field campaigns with a particular emphasis on NAST-I inter-comparisons with the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) for challenging cold scene conditions as observed during SNPP-2.

  13. Lossless compression of 3D hyperspectral sounder data using the wavelet and Burrows-Wheeler transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Bormin

    2004-10-01

    Hyperspectral sounder data is used for retrieval of useful geophysical parameters which promise better weather prediction. It features two characteristics. First it is huge in size with 2D spatial coverage and high spectral resolution in the infrared region. Second it allows low tolerance of noise and error in retrieving the geophysical parameters where a mathematically ill-posed problem is involved. Therefore compression is better to be lossless or near lossless for data transfer and archive. Meanwhile medical data from X-ray computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques also possesses similar characteristics. It provides motivation to apply lossless compression schemes for medical data to the hyperspectral sounder data. In this paper, we explore the use of a wavelet-based lossless data compression scheme for the 3D hyperspectral data which uses in sequence a forward difference scheme, an integer wavelet transform, a Burrows-Wheeler transform and an arithmetic coder. Compared to previous work, our approach is shown to outperform the CALIC and 3D EZW schemes.

  14. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  15. View to the eastnortheast of the Sounder Antenna OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the east-northeast of the Sounder Antenna - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  16. View to the northeast of the Sounder Antenna OvertheHorizon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View to the northeast of the Sounder Antenna - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Five Sounder Antennas, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  17. Impact of AIRS radiance in the NCUM 4D-VAR assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Desamsetti; Indira Rani, S.; Mallick, Swapan; George, John P.; Sharma, Priti

    2016-04-01

    The hyperspectral radiances from Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), on board NASA-AQUA satellite, have been processed through the Observation Processing System (OPS) and assimilated in the Variational Assimilation (VAR) System of NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM). Numerical experiments are conducted in order to study the impact of the AIRS radiance in the NCUM analysis and forecast system. NCMRWF receives AIRS radiance from EUMETCAST through MOSDAC. AIRS is a grating spectrometer having 2378 channels covering the thermal infrared spectrum between 3 and 15 μm. Out of 2378 channels, 324 channels are selected for assimilation according to the peaking of weighting function and meteorological importance. According to the surface type and day-night conditions, some of the channels are not assimilated in the VAR. Observation Simulation Experiments (OSEs) are conducted for a period of 15 days to see the impact of AIRS radiances in NCUM. Statistical parameters like bias and RMSE are calculated to see the real impact of AIRS radiances in the assimilation system. Assimilation of AIRS in the NCUM system reduced the bias and RMSE in the radiances from instruments onboard other satellites. The impact of AIRS is clearly seen in the hyperspectral radiances like IASI and CrIS and also in infrared (HIRS) and microwave (AMSU, ATMS, etc.) sensors.

  18. Remote Sensing of Arctic Environmental Conditions and Critical Infrastructure using Infra-Red (IR) Cameras and Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, M. C.; Webley, P.; Saiet, E., II

    2014-12-01

    Remote Sensing of Arctic Environmental Conditions and Critical Infrastructure using Infra-Red (IR) Cameras and Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) Numerous scientific and logistical applications exist in Alaska and other arctic regions requiring analysis of expansive, remote areas in the near infrared (NIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) bands. These include characterization of wild land fire plumes and volcanic ejecta, detailed mapping of lava flows, and inspection of lengthy segments of critical infrastructure, such as the Alaska pipeline and railroad system. Obtaining timely, repeatable, calibrated measurements of these extensive features and infrastructure networks requires localized, taskable assets such as UAVs. The Alaska Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration (ACUASI) provides practical solutions to these problem sets by pairing various IR sensors with a combination of fixed-wing and multi-rotor air vehicles. Fixed-wing assets, such as the Insitu ScanEagle, offer long reach and extended duration capabilities to quickly access remote locations and provide enduring surveillance of the target of interest. Rotary-wing assets, such as the Aeryon Scout or the ACUASI-built Ptarmigan hexcopter, provide a precision capability for detailed horizontal mapping or vertical stratification of atmospheric phenomena. When included with other ground capabilities, we will show how they can assist in decision support and hazard assessment as well as giving those in emergency management a new ability to increase knowledge of the event at hand while reducing the risk to all involved. Here, in this presentation, we illustrate how UAV's can provide the ideal tool to map and analyze the hazardous events and critical infrastructure under extreme environmental conditions.

  19. Detection of Air and Water-Filled Subsurface Defects in GFRP Composite Bridge Decks Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabe, Udaya B.; Roy, M.; Klinkhachorn, P.; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    2006-03-01

    Any discontinuity within a structural component influences the transmission of thermal energy through its thickness, which leads to differences in surface temperatures just above the defective and defect-free areas. The variation in the surface temperatures are recorded using a digital infrared camera and the thermal images (thermograms) are analyzed to locate the presence of subsurface defects such as debonds and delaminations within the structure. While past studies focused on detection of air-filled subsurface defects (debonds and delaminations) in fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite bridge decks using infrared thermography, this paper includes the detection of fully and partially water-filled defects as well. Simulated water-filled defects were embedded within the flange-to-flange junction of adjacent GFRP bridge deck modules to create delaminations. The deck specimens were then tested before and after the application of a 3/8″ (9.5 mm) thick polymer concrete wearing surface. It was found that water-filled delaminations as small as 2″ × 2″ × 1/16″ (51 mm × 51 mm × 1.6 mm) could be detected in case of specimens without wearing surface, but this was not possible after application of the wearing surface. The heating source considered included heater and solar radiation. Use of cooling sources such as cold water and liquid carbon dioxide were also explored. These results helped establish the limits of detection for fully and partially water-filled delaminations using Infrared Thermograpy. Additional studies included the detection of debond between 2″ (51mm) thick asphalt overlay and the underlying composite deck and it was found that air-filled debonds as small as 4″ × 4″ × 1/16″ (102 mm × 102 mm × 1.6 mm) could be detected using heater as well as solar radiation as heat sources.

  20. Microwave Limb Sounder/El Nino Watch - February thru December, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This series of six images shows the movement of atmospheric water vapor over the Pacific Ocean during the formation of the 1997 El Nino condition. Higher than normal ocean water temperatures increase the rate of evaporation and the resulting warm moist air rises into the atmosphere altering global weather patterns. Data obtained by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), from late February 1997 to late December 1997, show the movement from the western Pacific to the eastern Pacific of high levels of water vapor (red) at 10 kilometers (6 miles) above the surface. Areas of unusually drier air (blue) appear over Indonesia. December 1997 data also show a rapid increase of water vapor off the coast of South America, the result of very high water temperatures in that region.

  1. The Effect of the Saharan Air Layer on the Formation of Hurricane Isabel (2003) Simulated with AIRS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, iguang; Braun, Scott A.; Qu, John J.

    2006-01-01

    The crucial physics of how the atmosphere really accomplishes the tropical cyclogenesis process is still poorly understood. The presence of the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), an elevated mixed layer of warm and dry air that extends from Africa to the tropical Atlantic and contains a substantial amount of mineral dust, adds more complexity to the tropical cyclogenesis process in the Atlantic basin. The impact of the SAL on tropical cyclogenesis is still uncertain. Karyampudi and Carlson (1988) conclude that a strong SAL can potentially aid tropical cyclone development while Dunion and Velden (2004) argue that the SAL generally inhibits tropical cyclogenesis and intensification. Advancing our understanding of the physical mechanisms of tropical cyclogenesis and the associated roles of the SAL strongly depends on the improvement in the observations over the data-sparse ocean areas. After the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), and the microwave Humidity Sounder of Brazil (HSB) were launched with the NASA Aqua satellite in 2002, new data products retrieved from the AIRS suite became available for studying the effect of the warm, dry air mass associated with the SAL (referred to as the thermodynamic effect). The vertical profiles of the AIRS retrieved temperature and humidity provide an unprecedented opportunity to examine the thermodynamic effect of the SAL. The observational data can be analyzed and assimilated into numerical models, in which the model thermodynamic state is allowed to relax to the observed state from AIRS data. The objective of this study is to numerically demonstrate that the thermodynamic effect of the SAL on the formation of Hurricane Isabel (2003) can be largely simulated through nudging of the AIRS data.

  2. Gravity Wave Variances and Propagation Derived from AIRS Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-01-01

    As the first gravity wave (GW) climatology study using nadir-viewing infrared sounders, 50 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance channels are selected to estimate GW variances at pressure levels between 2-100 hPa. The GW variance for each scan in the cross-track direction is derived from radiance perturbations in the scan, independently of adjacent scans along the orbit. Since the scanning swaths are perpendicular to the satellite orbits, which are inclined meridionally at most latitudes, the zonal component of GW propagation can be inferred by differencing the variances derived between the westmost and the eastmost viewing angles. Consistent with previous GW studies using various satellite instruments, monthly mean AIRS variance shows large enhancements over meridionally oriented mountain ranges as well as some islands at winter hemisphere high latitudes. Enhanced wave activities are also found above tropical deep convective regions. GWs prefer to propagate westward above mountain ranges, and eastward above deep convection. AIRS 90 field-of-views (FOVs), ranging from +48 deg. to -48 deg. off nadir, can detect large-amplitude GWs with a phase velocity propagating preferentially at steep angles (e.g., those from orographic and convective sources). The annual cycle dominates the GW variances and the preferred propagation directions for all latitudes. Indication of a weak two-year variation in the tropics is found, which is presumably related to the Quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). AIRS geometry makes its out-tracks capable of detecting GWs with vertical wavelengths substantially shorter than the thickness of instrument weighting functions. The novel discovery of AIRS capability of observing shallow inertia GWs will expand the potential of satellite GW remote sensing and provide further constraints on the GW drag parameterization schemes in the general circulation models (GCMs).

  3. Infrared remote sensing of cometary parent volatiles from the ground, air, and space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Disanti, Michael A.; Hoban, Susan; Reuter, Dennis C.

    1991-01-01

    A balanced view of the present generation of infrared instruments for cometary compositional studies is presented. Ground-based instruments are compared with airborne and spaceborne capabilities. An attempt to give examples of the unique science achievable with each is made, and particular emphasis is on the unique aspects of a dedicated Cometary Composition Telescope in earth orbit for investigating the chemical and structural heterogeneity of the cometary nucleus.

  4. Real-time monitoring of ozone in air using substrate-integrated hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensors

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira Petruci, João Flávio; Fortes, Paula Regina; Kokoric, Vjekoslav; Wilk, Andreas; Raimundo, Ivo Milton; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidant that is globally used as disinfection agent for many purposes including indoor building air cleaning, during food preparation procedures, and for control and killing of bacteria such as E. coli and S. aureus. However, it has been shown that effective ozone concentrations for controlling e.g., microbial growth need to be higher than 5 ppm, thereby exceeding the recommended U.S. EPA threshold more than 10 times. Consequently, real-time monitoring of such ozone concentration levels is essential. Here, we describe the first online gas sensing system combining a compact Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a new generation of gas cells, a so-called substrate-integrated hollow waveguide (iHWG). The sensor was calibrated using an UV lamp for the controlled generation of ozone in synthetic air. A calibration function was established in the concentration range of 0.3–5.4 mmol m−3 enabling a calculated limit of detection (LOD) at 0.14 mmol m−3 (3.5 ppm) of ozone. Given the adaptability of the developed IR sensing device toward a series of relevant air pollutants, and considering the potential for miniaturization e.g., in combination with tunable quantum cascade lasers in lieu of the FTIR spectrometer, a wide range of sensing and monitoring applications of beyond ozone analysis are anticipated. PMID:24213678

  5. Real-time monitoring of ozone in air using substrate-integrated hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira Petruci, João Flávio; Fortes, Paula Regina; Kokoric, Vjekoslav; Wilk, Andreas; Raimundo, Ivo Milton; Cardoso, Arnaldo Alves; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Ozone is a strong oxidant that is globally used as disinfection agent for many purposes including indoor building air cleaning, during food preparation procedures, and for control and killing of bacteria such as E. coli and S. aureus. However, it has been shown that effective ozone concentrations for controlling e.g., microbial growth need to be higher than 5 ppm, thereby exceeding the recommended U.S. EPA threshold more than 10 times. Consequently, real-time monitoring of such ozone concentration levels is essential. Here, we describe the first online gas sensing system combining a compact Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a new generation of gas cells, a so-called substrate-integrated hollow waveguide (iHWG). The sensor was calibrated using an UV lamp for the controlled generation of ozone in synthetic air. A calibration function was established in the concentration range of 0.3-5.4 mmol m-3 enabling a calculated limit of detection (LOD) at 0.14 mmol m-3 (3.5 ppm) of ozone. Given the adaptability of the developed IR sensing device toward a series of relevant air pollutants, and considering the potential for miniaturization e.g., in combination with tunable quantum cascade lasers in lieu of the FTIR spectrometer, a wide range of sensing and monitoring applications of beyond ozone analysis are anticipated.

  6. Accuracy of Geophysical Parameters Derived from AIRS/AMSU as a Function of Fractional Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Barnet, Chris; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena; Keita, Fricky; Kouvaris, Lou; Molnar, Gyula; Chahine, Moustafa

    2006-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4,2002, together with AMSU A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. The primary products of AIRS/AMSU are twice daily global fields of atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, ozone profiles, sea/land surface skin temperature, and cloud related parameters including OLR. The sounding goals of AIRS are to produce 1 km tropospheric layer mean temperatures with an rms error of lK, and layer precipitable water with an rms error of 20 percent, in cases with up to 80 percent effective cloud cover. The basic theory used to analyze Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit/Humidity Sounder Brazil (AIRS/AMSU/HSB) data in the presence of clouds, called the at-launch algorithm, was described previously. Pre-launch simulation studies using this algorithm indicated that these results should be achievable. Some modifications have been made to the at-launch retrieval algorithm as described in this paper. Sample fields of parameters retrieved from AIRS/AMSU/HSB data are presented and validated as a function of retrieved fractional cloud cover. As in simulation, the degradation of retrieval accuracy with increasing cloud cover is small and the RMS accuracy of lower tropospheric temperature retrieved with 80 percent cloud cover is about 0.5 K poorer than for clear cases. HSB failed in February 2003, and consequently HSB channel radiances are not used in the results shown in this paper. The AIRS/AMSU retrieval algorithm described in this paper, called Version 4, become operational at the Goddard DAAC (Distributed Active Archive Center) in April 2003 and is being used to analyze near-real time AIRS/AMSU data. Historical AIRS/AMSU data, going backwards from March 2005 through September 2002, is also being analyzed by the DAAC using the Version 4 algorithm.

  7. Analysis of high altitude clouds in the martian atmosphere based on Mars Climate Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Määttänen, A.; Fouchet, T.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    High altitude clouds have been observed in the Martian atmosphere. However, their properties still remain to be characterized. Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is an instrument that measures radiances in the thermal infrared, both in limb and nadir views. It allows us to retrieve vertical profiles of radiance, temperature and aerosols. Using the MCS data and radiative transfer model coupled with an automated inversion routine, we can investigate the chemical composition of the high altitude clouds. We will present the first results on the properties of the clouds. CO2 ice is the best candidate to be the main component of some high altitude clouds due to the most similar spectral variation compared to water ice or dust, in agreement with previous studies. Using cloud composition of contaminated CO2 ice (dust core surrounded by CO2 ice) might improve the fitting result, but further study is needed.

  8. Applications of infrared technology; Proceedings of the Meeting, London, England, June 9, 10, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. L.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in thermal imaging and other infrared systems relating to military, industrial, medical, and scientific applications are reviewed. Papers are presented on a new thermal imager using a linear pyroelectric detector array; multichannel near infrared spectroradiometer; technological constraints on the use of thermal imagery for remote sensing; and infrared optical system of the improved stratospheric and mesospheric sounder. Other topics discussed include infrared thermography development for composite material evaluation; infrared process linescanner, and optical infrared starting radiometer.

  9. Film handling procedures for Apollo 17 lunar sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    Film handling procedures for the Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder are itemized, including purchase of flight film, establishment of processing standards, transportation of flight films, flight film certification, application of pre- and post-sensitometry, film loading and downloading, film processing, titling, and duplication.

  10. Results of the international ionospheric Doppler sounder network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, Jan; Chum, Jaroslav

    2016-07-01

    This paper summarizes main recent results reached by the Czech-lead international network of ionospheric Doppler sounders. The network consists of Doppler sounders in the western half of Czechia (5 measuring paths, 3 frequencies with central receivers in Prague), northern Taiwan (3 transmitters, two separated receivers, 1 frequency), and three similar systems (3 measuring paths with 1 receiver and 1 frequency) in Tucuman (north-western Argentina), Hermanus (the southernmost South Africa) and Luisville (northern South Africa). Three main areas of research have been (1) statistical properties of gravity waves, (2) ionospheric effects of earthquakes, and (3) low latitude/equatorial phenomena. Some results: (1) the theoretically expected dominance of gravity wave propagation against wind has been confirmed; (2) impact of the Tohoku 2001 M9.0 earthquake was registered in the ionosphere over the Czech Republic as long-period infrasound on the distance of about 9000 km from epicenter; analysis of ionospheric infrasound excited by the Nepal 2015 M7.8 earthquake observed by the Czech and Taiwan Doppler sounders showed that the intensity of ionospheric signal is significantly height dependent and that the Doppler shift depends not only on the advection (up and down motion) of the reflecting layer but also on the compression/rarefaction of the electron gas; (3) spread F structures observed by Doppler sounders in Tucuman and Taiwan (both under the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly) provide results consistent with S4 scintillation data and with previous optical, GPS and satellite measurements.

  11. PREMIER - Instrument Development of the Millimetre-Wave Limb Sounder MWLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, D.; Kerridge, B. J.; Siddans, R.; Reburn, W. J.; Matheson, D. N.; Oldfield, M.; Cox, G. M.; Rea, S.; Murtagh, D.; Urban, J.

    2009-04-01

    The PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetre-wave Emitted Radiation) mission is one of 6 candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer Core Mission (due for launch ~ 2016), for which Phase 0 Assessment Studies have recently been undertaken. The mission proposes to make detailed measurements in the mid/upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in order to quantify processes controlling atmospheric global composition in this height range of particular importance to climate. PREMIER would consist of an infrared limb-imaging spectrometer which would observe 3D fields of trace gases, alongside a millimetre-wave limb sounder which would enable observations in the presence of most cirrus clouds, and also provide complementary trace gases. In this presentation we report on instrument development of the millimetre-wave limb sounder MWLS during Phase 0 of the PREMIER mission proposal. The PREMIER MWLS is a Swedish lead instrument (aka STEAM-R) co-developed by the Swedish Space Cooperation SSC and Chalmers University of Technology. Retrieval simulations have been performed at RAL to asses the radiometric performance of the MWLS. Based on that information, the observing system has been defined as a progressively spaced feed horn array. Physical optics simulations have been performed at Astrium UK to define the antenna pattern at the main reflector, as well as the quasi-optical layout of the antenna arrays and beam-shaping components. Hardware development has been pushed forward at RAL at several fronts to provide novel components for the instrument, most notably a sub-harmonic image rejection mixer (SHIRM).

  12. Continuous multichannel monitoring of cave air carbon dioxide using a pumped non-dispersive infrared analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattey, D.

    2012-04-01

    The concentration of CO2 in cave air is one of the main controls on the rate of degassing of dripwater and on the kinetics of calcite precipitation forming speleothem deposits. Measurements of cave air CO2reveal great complexity in the spatial distribution among interconnected cave chambers and temporal changes on synoptic to seasonal time scales. The rock of Gibraltar hosts a large number of caves distributed over a 300 meter range in altitude and monthly sampling and analysis of air and water combined with continuous logging of temperature, humidity and drip discharge rates since 2004 reveals the importance of density-driven seasonal ventilation which drives large-scale advection of CO2-rich air though the cave systems. Since 2008 we have deployed automatic CO2 monitoring systems that regularly sample cave air from up to 8 locations distributed laterally and vertically in St Michaels Cave located near the top of the rock at 275m asl and Ragged Staff Cave located in the heart of the rock near sea level. The logging system is controlled by a Campbell Scientific CR1000 programmable datalogger which controls an 8 port manifold connected to sampling lines leading to different parts of the cave over a distance of up to 250 meters. The manifold is pumped at a rate of 5l per minute drawing air through 6mm or 8mm id polythene tubing via a 1m Nafion loop to reduce humidity to local ambient conditions. The outlet of the primary pump leads to an open split which is sampled by a second low flow pump which delivers air at 100ml/minute to a Licor 820 CO2 analyser. The software selects the port to be sampled, flushes the line for 2 minutes and CO2 analysed as a set of 5 measurements averaged over 10 second intervals. The system then switches to the next port and when complete shuts down to conserve power after using 20 watts over a 30 minute period of analysis. In the absence of local mains power (eg from the show cave lighting system) two 12v car batteries will power the system

  13. Drying and decontamination of pistachios with sequential infrared drying, tempering and hot air drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pistachio industry is in need of improved drying technology as the current hot air drying has low energy efficiency and drying rate and high labor cost and also does not produce safe products against microbial contamination. In the current study, dehulled and water- sorted pistachios with a mois...

  14. Air core Bragg fibers for delivery of near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Michal; Frank, Milan; Kubeček, Václav; Matějec, Vlastimil; Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej

    2014-12-01

    Optical fibers designed for high power laser radiation delivery represent important tools in medicine, solar systems, or industry. For such purposes several different types of glass optical fibers such as silica, sapphire, or chalcogenide ones as well as hollow-glass fibers, photonic crystal fibers and Bragg fibers have been investigated. Air-core Bragg fibers or photonic crystal fibers offer us the possibility of light transmission in a low dispersive material - air having a high damage threshold and small non-linear coefficient. However, preforms for drawing Bragg fibers can be fabricated by MCVD method similarly as preforms of standard silica fibers. In this paper we present fundamental characteristics of laboratory-designed and fabricated Bragg fibers with air cores intended for delivery of laser radiation at a wavelength range from 0.9 to 1.5 μm. Bragg fibers with different air core diameters of 5, 45 and 73 mm were prepared. The fiber core was surrounded by three pairs of circular Bragg layers. Each pair was composed of one layer with a high and one layer with a low refractive index with a contrast up to 0.03. Several laser sources emitting at 0.975, 1.06, and 1.55 μm were used as radiation sources. Attenuation coefficients, overall transmissions, bending losses, and spatial profiles of output beams from fibers were determined at these wavelengths. The lowest attenuation coefficient of 70 dB/km was determined for the 45 μm and 73 mm air-core fiber when radiation from a laser was launched into the fibers by using optical lenses. However, multimodal transmission has been observed in such condition. It has also been found that bending losses of such fibers are negligible for bending diameters higher than 15 mm.

  15. Particle size and compositional retrievals of the Chaiten volcanic ash from spaceborne, high spectral resolution infrared AIRS and IASI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, F.; Gangale, G.; Clarisse, L.

    2008-12-01

    The eruption of Chaiten volcano in early May 2008 produced copious amounts of ash and little SO2 gas. The ash clouds could be detected very well by several satellite instruments, but was unusual in that true- colour daytime MODIS satellite imagery showed the ash to be quite light in colour and difficult to distinguish from ordinary meteorological clouds. High spectral resolution infrared spectrometer and interferometer measurements from AIRS and IASI were analysed to investigate the spectral signature of the Chaiten ash clouds and compare these with ash clouds from other volcanoes, which generally appear much darker in visible imagery. It was found that the Chaiten ash had a distinctive spectral signature between 800 to 1200 wavenumbers and that this correlated very well with the signature expected from rhyolitic ash. A radiative transfer code and an ash microphysical model were used to retrieve the mean particle size of fine ash in the Chaiten clouds and best fits were found for rhyolitic particles with small (less than 2 micron) radii. These results suggest that infrared spectra may be used to retrieve both compositional and particle size information in ash clouds. Based on the spectral signatures found for these ash clouds, a new ash detection algorithm was designed and found to have improved sensitivity to thin (low opacity) ash clouds and low sensitivity to surface effects. The new algorithm offers the possibility of tracking ash clouds for longer periods of time and over greater distances. Results from both the AIRS and IASI measurements are presented for the May ash clouds from Chaitén volcano and compared with the signatures of ash clouds from andesitic volcanic clouds and quartz dominated windblown dust.

  16. The added value of a visible channel to a geostationary thermal infrared instrument to monitor ozone for air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hache, E.; Attié, J.-L.; Tourneur, C.; Ricaud, P.; Coret, L.; Lahoz, W. A.; El Amraoui, L.; Josse, B.; Hamer, P.; Warner, J.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Höpfner, M.; Spurr, R.; Natraj, V.; Kulawik, S.; Eldering, A.; Orphal, J.

    2014-02-01

    Ozone is a tropospheric pollutant and plays a key role in determining the air quality that affects human wellbeing. In this study, we compare the capability of two hypothetical grating spectrometers onboard a geostationary (GEO) satellite to sense ozone in the lowermost troposphere (surface and the 0-1 km column). We consider one week during the Northern Hemisphere summer simulated by a chemical transport model, and use the two GEO instrument configurations to measure ozone concentration (1) in the thermal infrared (GEO TIR) and (2) in the thermal infrared and the visible (GEO TIR+VIS). These configurations are compared against each other, and also against an ozone reference state and a priori ozone information. In a first approximation, we assume clear sky conditions neglecting the influence of aerosols and clouds. A number of statistical tests are used to assess the performance of the two GEO configurations. We consider land and sea pixels and whether differences between the two in the performance are significant. Results show that the GEO TIR+VIS configuration provides a better representation of the ozone field both for surface ozone and the 0-1 km ozone column during the daytime especially over land.

  17. The added value of a visible channel to a geostationary thermal infrared instrument to monitor ozone for air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hache, E.; Attié, J.-L.; Tourneur, C.; Ricaud, P.; Coret, L.; Lahoz, W. A.; El Amraoui, L.; Josse, B.; Hamer, P.; Warner, J.; Liu, X.; Chance, K.; Höpfner, M.; Spurr, R.; Natraj, V.; Kulawik, S.; Eldering, A.; Orphal, J.

    2014-07-01

    Ozone is a tropospheric pollutant and plays a key role in determining the air quality that affects human wellbeing. In this study, we compare the capability of two hypothetical grating spectrometers onboard a geostationary (GEO) satellite to sense ozone in the lowermost troposphere (surface and the 0-1 km column). We consider 1 week during the Northern Hemisphere summer simulated by a chemical transport model, and use the two GEO instrument configurations to measure ozone concentration (1) in the thermal infrared (GEO TIR) and (2) in the thermal infrared and the visible (GEO TIR+VIS). These configurations are compared against each other, and also against an ozone reference state and a priori ozone information. In a first approximation, we assume clear sky conditions neglecting the influence of aerosols and clouds. A number of statistical tests are used to assess the performance of the two GEO configurations. We consider land and sea pixels and whether differences between the two in the performance are significant. Results show that the GEO TIR+VIS configuration provides a better representation of the ozone field both for surface ozone and the 0-1 km ozone column during the daytime especially over land.

  18. Quality control of AIRS total column ozone data within tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yin; Zou, Xiaolei

    2016-06-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) provides infrared radiance observations twice daily, which can be used to retrieve total column ozone with high spatial resolution. However, it was found that almost all of the ozone data within typhoons and hurricanes were flagged to be of bad quality by the AIRS original quality control (QC) scheme. This determination was based on the ratio of total precipitable water (TPW) error divided by TPW value, where TPW was an AIRS retrieval product. It was found that the difficulty in finding total column ozone data that could pass AIRS QC was related to the low TPWemployed in the AIRS QC algorithm. In this paper, a new two-step QC scheme for AIRS total column ozone is developed. A new ratio is defined which replaces the AIRS TPW with the zonal mean TPW retrieved from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit. The first QC step is to remove outliers when the new ratio exceeds 33%. Linear regression models between total column ozone and mean potential vorticity are subsequently developed with daily updates, which are required for future applications of the proposed total ozone QC algorithm to vortex initialization and assimilation of AIRS data. In the second QC step, observations that significantly deviate from the models are further removed using a biweighting algorithm. Numerical results for two typhoon cases and two hurricane cases show that a large amount of good quality AIRS total ozone data is kept within Tropical Cyclones after implementing the proposed QC algorithm.

  19. Microwave Limb Sounder Measurements Depicting the Relationship Between Nitrous Oxide Levels and

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder measures nitrous oxide, which is unaffected by stratospheric chemical processes. By studying changes in its levels, scientists can better understand how air is moving around and how ozone is affected by that air motion, allowing them to differentiate those changes from the ones caused by chemical ozone destruction. In these cross-sections of nitrous oxide (top) and ozone (bottom) data from Aura, changes in the levels of these two chemicals at various temperatures and latitudes are depicted over time. The white contour shows the approximate location of the polar vortex boundary.

    The left panel data were collected on January 23, 2005, near the beginning of chemical ozone destruction this winter. Virtually all chemical loss occurred before March 10 (center panel). Ozone destruction extended throughout the polar vortex from about 15-20 kilometers (9-13 miles), but occurred only in the outer part of the vortex from 20-25 kilometers (13-16 miles). The differences between the two days are depicted in the right panel. The largest observed difference is about a 1.2 parts per million by volume decrease in ozone. Plots of nitrous oxide show a decrease in the region in the outer part of the vortex where most ozone loss occurs, indicating that air from above (where nitrous oxide is lower) has moved into this region. This downward motion brings higher ozone into the region where chemical loss is occurring, thus partially masking the effects of chemical loss. Calculations using Microwave Limb Sounder data to separate dynamical and chemical effects indicate maximum chemical ozone loss of approximately 2 parts per million by volume (approximately 60 percent) in the outer part of the vortex near 18-21 kilometers (11-13 miles), and approximately 1.5 parts per million by volume when averaged throughout the whole vortex region.

  20. In-situ measurements of volatile toxic organics in indoor air using long-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martina; Seiber, James N.; Biermann, Heinz W.

    1993-03-01

    A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer interfaced to a 2.5 m base path, open multi- pass cell was used to monitor indoor air in post-fumigation dwellings. The residual chemicals studied were the fumigant, methyl bromide and its odor additive, chloropicrin (Cl3CNO2). Indoor measurements with a time resolution of 15 minutes were performed for two houses of different age. Our results indicate that the newer dwelling, which contained insulation materials, appeared to retain substantial amounts of the fumigant. The highest concentration measured for methyl bromide was 24 ppm, close to five times the allowed TLV (Threshold Limit Value) of 5 ppm. For chloropicrin, we also observed a surprising level of close to 0.4 ppm, four times the TLV of 0.1 ppm. It was noted that the concentrations were very susceptible to any air movement such as that due to door opening. Analyses utilizing the conventional adsorption-desorption/GC technique were performed simultaneously by the Worker Health and Safety Branch of the California EPA. Although the vast difference in time resolution of the two methods precludes direct comparison of the data, averaging our measurements over the same integration time indicated that the FTIR methods gives significantly higher values than those obtained by the conventional method, especially when the pollutant concentrations are low.

  1. The DST group ionospheric sounder replacement for JORN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, T. J.; Quinn, A. D.; Pederick, L. H.

    2016-06-01

    The Jindalee Over-the-horizon Radar Network (JORN) is an integral part of Australia's national defense capability. JORN uses a real-time ionospheric model as part of its operations. The primary source of data for this model is a set of 13 vertical-incidence sounders (VIS) scattered around the Australian coast and inland locations. These sounders are a mix of Lowell digisonde portable sounder (DPS)-1 and DPS-4. Both of these sounders, the DPS-1 in particular, are near the end of their maintainable life. A replacement for these aging sounders was required as part of the ongoing sustainment program for JORN. Over the last few years the High-Frequency Radar Branch (HFRB) of the Defence Science and Technology (DST) Group, Australian Department of Defence, has been developing its own sounders based on its successful radar hardware technology. The DST Group VIS solution known as PRIME (Portable Remote Ionospheric Monitoring Equipment) is a 100% duty cycle, continuous wave system that receives the returned ionospheric signal while it is still transmitting and operates the receiver in the near field of the transmitter. Of considerable importance to a successful VIS is the autoscaling software, which takes the ionogram data and produces an ionogram trace (group delay as a function of frequency), and from that produces a set of ionospheric parameters that represent the (bottomside) overhead electron density profile. HFRB has developed its own robust autoscaling software. The performance of DST Group's PRIME under a multitude of challenging ionospheric conditions has been studied. In December 2014, PRIME was trialed at a JORN VIS site collocated with the existing Lowell Digisonde DPS-1. This side-by-side testing determined that PRIME was fit for purpose. A summary of the results of this comparison and example PRIME output will be discussed. Note that this paper compares PRIME with the 25 year old Lowell Digisonde DPS-1, which is planned to be replaced. Our future plans include

  2. A Comparison of the Red Green Blue (RGB) Air Mass Imagery and Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles and NOAA G-IV Dropsondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Folmer, Michael; Dunion, Jason

    2014-01-01

    RGB air mass imagery is derived from multiple channels or paired channel differences. The combination of channels and channel differences means the resulting imagery does not represent a quantity or physical parameter such as brightness temperature in conventional single channel imagery. Without a specific quantity to reference, forecasters are often confused as to what RGB products represent. Hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles and NOAA G-IV dropsondes provide insight about the vertical structure of the air mass represented on the RGB air mass imagery and are a first step to validating the imagery.

  3. Comparison of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor from AIRS and Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Vomel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Upper tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has the potential of addressing several important climate questions. The specified AIRS system measurement uncertainty for water vapor is 20 percent absolute averaged over 2 km layers. Cryogenic frostpoint hygrometers (CFH) are balloon-borne water vapor sensors responsive from the surface into the lower stratosphere. Several dozen coincident, collocated CFH profiles have been obtained for AlRS validation. The combination of CFH sensitivity and sample size offers a statistically compelling picture of AIRS UTWV measurement capability. We present a comparison between CFH observations and AlRS retrievals. We focus on the altitude range from the middle troposphere up to heights at the limits of AlRS sensitivity to water vapor, believed to be around 100-1 50 hPa.

  4. First results of the AIRS Version 6 cloud top microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, B. H.; Irion, F. W.; Manning, E.; Nasiri, S. L.; Jin, H.; Schreier, M. M.; Yue, Q.; Fetzer, E.; Liou, K.

    2012-12-01

    The new cloud products from the upcoming Version 6 release of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) algorithm is described and initial results are presented. The three new cloud retrieval products include cloud thermodynamic phase, cirrus cloud optical thickness, and cirrus cloud effective diameter. The retrieval methodology of the cirrus cloud parameters is based on an optimal estimation approach that uses observed radiances and cloud clearing-derived atmospheric profiles that define the atmospheric state, surface temperature and emissivity, and cloud top temperature. We will compare the new AIRS retrievals to similar retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and possibly other A-train instruments, and also will demonstrate that the new suite of AIRS cloud products offer useful and tangible constraints for climate model development.

  5. Evaluating the Impact of AIRS Observations on Regional Forecasts at the SPoRT Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center collaborates with operational partners of different sizes and operational goals to improve forecasts using targeted projects and data sets. Modeling and DA activities focus on demonstrating utility of NASA data sets and capabilities within operational systems. SPoRT has successfully assimilated the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance and profile data. A collaborative project is underway with the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) to use AIRS profiles to better understand the impact of AIRS radiances assimilated within Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) in hopes of engaging the operational DA community in a reassessment of assimilation methodologies to more effectively assimilate hyperspectral radiances.

  6. Multi-instrument gravity-wave measurements over Tierra del Fuego and the Drake Passage - Part 1: Potential energies and vertical wavelengths from AIRS, COSMIC, HIRDLS, MLS-Aura, SAAMER, SABER and radiosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Corwin J.; Hindley, Neil P.; Moss, Andrew C.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.

    2016-03-01

    Gravity waves in the terrestrial atmosphere are a vital geophysical process, acting to transport energy and momentum on a wide range of scales and to couple the various atmospheric layers. Despite the importance of these waves, the many studies to date have often exhibited very dissimilar results, and it remains unclear whether these differences are primarily instrumental or methodological. Here, we address this problem by comparing observations made by a diverse range of the most widely used gravity-wave-resolving instruments in a common geographic region around the southern Andes and Drake Passage, an area known to exhibit strong wave activity. Specifically, we use data from three limb-sounding radiometers (Microwave Limb Sounder, MLS-Aura; HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder, HIRDLS; Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry, SABER), the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS-RO constellation, a ground-based meteor radar, the Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS) infrared nadir sounder and radiosondes to examine the gravity wave potential energy (GWPE) and vertical wavelengths (λz) of individual gravity-wave packets from the lower troposphere to the edge of the lower thermosphere ( ˜ 100 km). Our results show important similarities and differences. Limb sounder measurements show high intercorrelation, typically > 0.80 between any instrument pair. Meteor radar observations agree in form with the limb sounders, despite vast technical differences. AIRS and radiosonde observations tend to be uncorrelated or anticorrelated with the other data sets, suggesting very different behaviour of the wave field in the different spectral regimes accessed by each instrument. Evidence of wave dissipation is seen, and varies strongly with season. Observed GWPE for individual wave packets exhibits a log-normal distribution, with short-timescale intermittency dominating over a well-repeated monthly-median seasonal

  7. The topside sounder database - Data screening and systematic biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhulst, Tobias; Stankov, Stanimir M.

    2013-06-01

    The ionospheric topside sounder measurement database developed at the US National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) is a valuable source of information when investigating the composition and complex dynamics of the upper ionosphere. The database is increasingly used by many scientists around the world for both research and development of empirical models. However, there is always a danger of indiscriminately using the data without properly assessing the data quality and applicability for a given purpose. This paper is concerned with the issue of data screening and pre-processing of the Alouette/ISIS topside sounder database. An overview of the original database availability and formatting is given and the use of solar and geomagnetic indices is discussed. Data screening procedures, concerning detection and handling of erroneous profiles, are also presented. Special attention is drawn to the systematic biases observed in the database and the possibilities for their removal.

  8. Evaluation of cloudy data as stable references for climate research using AIRS and IRIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Jiang, Yibo; Elliott, Denis A.

    2011-10-01

    We explore the use cloudy data, including Deep Convective Clouds (DCC) in the tropical oceans for the evaluation of the absolute calibration accuracy and stability of infrared radiometers. For the evaluation of cloudy data we use random nadir samples. We illustrate the method with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data and data from the Infrared Interferometric Spectrometer (IRIS) in the tropical oceans. AIRS is on the EOS Aqua satellite, which was launched in May 2002 and is expected to continue to produce high quality data until 2015. Two copies of IRIS flew on Nimbus satellites between April 1970 and January 1971. Based on inconsistencies between AIRS and IRIS data, the absolute accuracy of the IRIS data is about 1K, including a significant day/night bias. Part of the observed radiometric bias may have been introduced by quality control, which senses a temperature and spatial uniformity dependent degradation of instrument performance. The observed biases are larger than the 0.5K accuracy claimed in the literature. This absolute calibration uncertainty has to be taken into account in the analysis of changes in the more than 30 year time span between IRIS and AIRS, before they can be attributed to changes in the clouds or the climate. The method described in this paper can be applied retrospectively to any infrared radiometer like HIRS, AVHRR and GOES. It has the capability to exposes instrument artifacts, which are not apparent from the routine quality control of the data.

  9. AIRS Data Subsetting Service at the Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) DISC/DAAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicente, Gilberto A.; Qin, Jianchun; Li, Jason; Gerasimov, Irina; Savtchenko, Andrey

    2004-01-01

    The AIRS mission, as a combination of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB), brings climate research and weather prediction into 21st century. From NASA' Aqua spacecraft, the AIRS/AMSU/HSB instruments measure humidity, temperature, cloud properties and the amounts of greenhouse gases. The AIRS also reveals land and sea- surface temperatures. Measurements from these three instruments are analyzed . jointly to filter out the effects of clouds from the IR data in order to derive clear-column air-temperature profiles and surface temperatures with high vertical resolution and accuracy. Together, they constitute an advanced operational sounding data system that have contributed to improve global modeling efforts and numerical weather prediction; enhance studies of the global energy and water cycles, the effects of greenhouse gases, and atmosphere-surface interactions; and facilitate monitoring of climate variations and trends. The high data volume generated by the AIRS/AMSU/HSB instruments and the complexity of its data format (Hierarchical Data Format, HDF) are barriers to AIRS data use. Although many researchers are interested in only a fraction of the data they receive or request, they are forced to run their algorithms on a much larger data set to extract the information of interest. In order to better server its users, the GES DISC/DAAC, provider of long-term archives and distribution services as well science support for the AIRS/AMSU/HSB data products, has developed various tools for performing channels, variables, parameter, spatial and derived products subsetting, resampling and reformatting operations. This presentation mainly describes the web-enabled subsetting services currently available at the GES DISC/DAAC that provide subsetting functions for all the Level 1B and Level 2 data products from the AIRS/AMSU/HSB instruments.

  10. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) preliminary program plans; (2) contract end item (CEI) specification; and (3) the instrument interface description document. Under the preliminary program plans section, plans dealing with the following subject areas are discussed: spares, performance assurance, configuration management, software implementation, contamination, calibration management, and verification.

  11. Influence of geophysical factors on oblique-sounder ionospheric characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Baranets, A.N.; Blagoveshchenskaya, N.F.; Borisova, T.D.; Bubnov, V.A.

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the influence of geophysical factors, including magnetoionospheric disturbances, on decameter wave propagation over extended paths using oblique sounding (OS) data, and also to compare experimental and calculated OS ionograms for various conditions of radio waver propagation (season, time of day). Variations of oblique-sounder ionospheric characteristics along a 9000 km long subauroral path for various geophysical conditions are considered. A comparison is made of experimental and calculated ionograms of oblique sounding.

  12. The Mars Climate Sounder on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleese, D.; Taylor, F.; Schofield, J.; Calcutt, S.

    2003-04-01

    There remains a need for an intensive effort to obtain a climatology of the martian atmosphere. This objective was to have been accomplished with the Mars Observer and with the Mars Climatology Orbiter, both of which failed at Mars. In 2005, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will carry the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) to aquire the necessary measurements of the vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, water vapor, dust and condensates. This paper describes the climate objectives and measurement approach of MCS.

  13. High resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS), volume 1, book 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The following topics are presented with respect to the high resolution microwave spectrometer sounder (HIMSS) that is to be used as an instrument for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): (1) an instrument overview; (2) an instrument description; (3) the instrument's conceptual design; (4) technical risks and offsets; (5) instrument reliability; (6) commands and telemetry; (7) mass and power budgets; (8) integration and test program; (9) program implementation; and (10) phase CD schedule.

  14. The Apollo 17 Lunar Sounder. [lunar orbit coherent radar experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Jordan, R.; Adams, G. F.; Jackson, P.; Peeples, W. J.; Porcello, L. J.; Ryu, J.; Eggleton, R. E.; Schaber, G.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo Lunar Sounder Experiment, a coherent radar operated from lunar orbit during the Apollo 17 mission, has scientific objectives of mapping lunar subsurface structure, surface profiling, surface imaging, and galactic noise measurement. Representative results from each of the four disciplines are presented. Subsurface reflections have been interpreted in both optically and digitally processed data. Images and profiles yield detailed selenomorphological information. The preliminary galactic noise results are consistent with earlier measurements by other workers.

  15. Sonic depth sounder for laboratory and field use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, E.V.; Simons, Daryl B.; Posakony, G.J.

    1961-01-01

    The laboratory investigation of roughness in alluvial channels has led to the development of a special electronic device capable of mapping the streambed configuration under dynamic conditions. This electronic device employs an ultrasonic pulse-echo principle, similar to that of a fathometer, that utilizes microsecond techniques to give high accuracy in shallow depths. This instrument is known as the sonic depth sounder and was designed to cover a depth range of 0 to 4 feet with an accuracy of ? 0.5 percent. The sonic depth sounder is capable of operation at frequencies of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 kilocycles. The ultrasonic beam generated at the transducer is designed to give a minimum-diameter interrogating signal over the extended depth range. The information obtained from a sonic depth sounder is recorded on a strip-chart recorder. This permanent record allows an analysis to be made of the streambed configuration under different dynamic conditions. The model 1024 sonic depth sounder was designed principally as a research instrument to meet laboratory needs. As such, it is somewhat limited in its application as a field instrument on large streams and rivers. The principles employed in this instrument, however, have many potentials for field applications such as the indirect measurement of bed load when the bed roughness is ripples and (or) dunes, depth measurement, determination of bed configuration, and determination of depth of scour around bridge piers and abutments. For field application a modification of the present system into a battery-operated lightweight instrument designed to operate at a depth range of 0 to 30 feet is possible and desirable.

  16. High Lapse Rates in AIRS Retrieved Temperatures in Cold Air Outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Kahn, Brian; Olsen, Edward T.; Fishbein, Evan

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) experiment, on NASA's Aqua spacecraft, uses a combination of infrared and microwave observations to retrieve cloud and surface properties, plus temperature and water vapor profiles comparable to radiosondes throughout the troposphere, for cloud cover up to 70%. The high spectral resolution of AIRS provides sensitivity to important information about the near-surface atmosphere and underlying surface. A preliminary analysis of AIRS temperature retrievals taken during January 2003 reveals extensive areas of superadiabatic lapse rates in the lowest kilometer of the atmosphere. These areas are found predominantly east of North America over the Gulf Stream, and, off East Asia over the Kuroshio Current. Accompanying the high lapse rates are low air temperatures, large sea-air temperature differences, and low relative humidities. Imagery from a Visible / Near Infrared instrument on the AIRS experiment shows accompanying clouds. These lines of evidence all point to shallow convection in the bottom layer of a cold air mass overlying warm water, with overturning driven by heat flow from ocean to atmosphere. An examination of operational radiosondes at six coastal stations in Japan shows AIRS to be oversensitive to lower tropospheric lapse rates due to systematically warm near-surface air temperatures. The bias in near-surface air temperature is seen to be independent of sea surface temperature, however. AIRS is therefore sensitive to air-sea temperature difference, but with a warm atmospheric bias. A regression fit to radiosondes is used to correct AIRS near-surface retrieved temperatures, and thereby obtain an estimate of the true atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast in five subtropical regions across the north Pacific. Moving eastward, we show a systematic shift in this air-sea temperature differences toward more isothermal conditions. These results, while preliminary, have implications for our understanding of heat flow from ocean to

  17. A laser sounder for U.S. Navy helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael M.; Mesick, Hillary C.; Byrnes, H. Jerry; Curran, Thomas P.; Contarino, V. Michael

    1987-01-01

    The design and operating principles of the laser sounder developed for use in airborne coastal-zone bathymetric surveys with a U.S. Navy P-3 aircraft are described and illustrated with diagrams. The sounder components are listed and characterized, including the Nd:YAG transmitter (operating at 532 nm for bottom ranging and 1.064 microns for surface ranging), the scanning transceiver, the 10 x 6-inch-aperture controlled-FOV receiver/digitizer, the constant-fraction discriminator, the time-to-digital converter, the navigation and data-recording subsystems, and the parallel distributed processing computer (comprising a data collection and control system and a real-time processing system). Consideration is also given to the phase-I and phase-II data-reduction software being developed to process the approximately 228 million soundings to be obtained annually. The sounder can be used day or night to sound clear ocean water up to 20 m deep.

  18. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Radiances from hyperspectral sounders such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are routinely assimilated both globally and regionally in operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system. However, only thinned, cloud-free radiances from a 281-channel subset are used, so the overall percentage of these observations that are assimilated is somewhere on the order of 5%. Cloud checks are performed within GSI to determine which channels peak above cloud top; inaccuracies may lead to less assimilated radiances or introduction of biases from cloud-contaminated radiances.Relatively large footprint from AIRS may not optimally represent small-scale cloud features that might be better resolved by higher-resolution imagers like the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Objective of this project is to "swap" the MODIS-derived cloud top pressure (CTP) for that designated by the AIRS-only quality control within GSI to test the hypothesis that better representation of cloud features will result in higher assimilated radiance yields and improved forecasts.

  19. Sensitivity of Short-Term Weather Forecasts to Assimilated AIRS Data: Implications for NPOESS Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; McCarty, Will; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is acting as a heritage and risk reduction instrument for the Cross-track lnfrared Sounder (CrIS) to be flown aboard the NPP and NPOESS satellites. The hyperspectral nature of AIRS and CrIS provides high-quality soundings that, along with their asynoptic observation time over North America, make them attractive sources to fill the spatial and temporal data voids in upper air temperature and moisture measurements for use in data assimilation and numerical weather prediction. Observations from AlRS can be assimilated either as direct radiances or retrieved thermodynamic profiles, and the Short-Term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has used both data types to improve short-term (0-48h), regional forecasts. The purpose of this paper is to share SPORT'S experiences using AlRS radiances and retrieved profiles in regional data assimilation activities by showing that proper handling of issues-including cloud contamination and land emissivity characterization-are necessary to produce optimal analyses and forecasts.

  20. The Use of Red Green Blue Air Mass Imagery to Investigate the Role of Stratospheric Air in a Non-convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedlovec, G. J.; Molthan, A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

  1. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2002-07-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator IR Countermeasures test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, LASERs, flares and lamp-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include real missile seeker hardware mounted in a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. The simulations of aircraft signatures and IR countermeasures are accomplished by using up to eight xenon arc lamps, located in 9 inch X 3 inch cylindrical housings, in the presentation foreground. A mirror system keeps the high intensity IR sources in the missile field of view. Range closure is simulated in the background by zooming in on the scene and int eh foreground by separating and controlling the irises of the arc lamp sources for property spatial and intensity characteristics. Al relative motion and range closure is controlled by missile flyout software and aircraft flight-profile software models.

  2. AIRS First Light Data: Northern Europe, July 20, 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3

    These images, taken over northern Europe on July 20, 2002, depict a few of the different views of Earth and its atmosphere that are produced by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder experiment system operating on NASA's Aqua spacecraft.

    The image in Figure 1 is from an infrared channel from the AIRS instrument that measures the surface temperature in clear areas and cloud top temperatures in cloudy areas. The image reveals very warm conditions in France and a storm off the east coast of the United Kingdom.

    The image in Figure 2 represents a microwave channel from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit instrument that sees through most clouds and observes surface conditions everywhere.

    The image in Figure 3 is a microwave channel from the Humidity Sounder for Brazil instrument that is very sensitive to humidity and does not see the surface at all, but instead reveals the structure of moisture streams in the troposphere.

    The infrared and microwave data from the AIRS experiment are integrated to retrieve a single set of temperature, moisture, and cloud values. These three channels represent only a small portion of the 2,400-channel multispectral experiment, whose primary objectives are to improve the accuracy of weather forecasts and to study climate change.

    The AIRS experiment system also takes pictures of the Earth at four visible and near-infrared wavelengths that can be combined into a color picture. This image shows a swirling low-pressure system over England, clear skies over much of France, and frontal systems in the North Atlantic. Because AIRS is sensitive to different wavelengths than your eye, the colors shown are different from what you would see. For example, plants appear very red to AIRS. There are also subtle color differences in the clouds that relate to their altitude and thickness (compare the white

  3. A Module for Assimilating Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles into the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation System for Unique Forecasting Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Blankenship, Clay

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral infrared sounder radiance data are assimilated into operational modeling systems however the process is computationally expensive and only approximately 1% of available data are assimilated due to data thinning as well as the fact that radiances are restricted to cloud-free fields of view. In contrast, the number of hyperspectral infrared profiles assimilated is much higher since the retrieved profiles can be assimilated in some partly cloudy scenes due to profile coupling other data, such as microwave or neural networks, as first guesses to the retrieval process. As the operational data assimilation community attempts to assimilate cloud-affected radiances, it is possible that the use of retrieved profiles might offer an alternative methodology that is less complex and more computationally efficient to solve this problem. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has assimilated hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles into Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) simulations using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) System. Early research at SPoRT demonstrated improved initial conditions when assimilating Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) thermodynamic profiles into WRF (using WRF-Var and assigning more appropriate error weighting to the profiles) to improve regional analysis and heavy precipitation forecasts. Successful early work has led to more recent research utilizing WRF and GSI for applications including the assimilation of AIRS profiles to improve WRF forecasts of atmospheric rivers and assimilation of AIRS, Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) profiles to improve model representation of tropopause folds and associated non-convective wind events. Although more hyperspectral infrared retrieved profiles can be assimilated into model forecasts, one disadvantage is the retrieved profiles have traditionally been assigned the

  4. Millimeter Wave Moisture Sounder Feasibility Study: The Effect of Cloud and Precipitation on Moisture Retrievals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-08

    D-A162 231 MILLIMETER WAVE MOISTURE SOUNDER FEASIBILITY STUDY- THE i/1 EFFECT OF CLOUD A (U) ATMOSPHERIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INC CAMBRIDGE MA...34 ,,; - -., ,..-.,- -, ,.. . : .,,- ,.. ,- - - , . .. .-. ,=, .-,o.. .- .-,o ,-N . ,.-,."...,- ,,, .. .,..; .. ,., .:°B,.. ’ AFGL-TR-85-0040 MILLIMETER WAVE MOISTURE SOUNDER FEASIBILITY STUDY: THE EFFECT OF...REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Millimeter Wave Moisture Sounder Feasibility Final Report Study: The Effect of Cloud and Precipitation 8 Aug 1984-7 Feb 1985 on

  5. EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED GAS ANALYZER FOR MEASUREMENTS OF AIR TOXICS IN POLLUTION PREVENTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A portable Fourier transform infrared gas analyzer with a photoacoustic detector performed reliably during pollution prevention research at two industrial facilities. It exhibited good agreement (within approximately 6%) with other analytical instruments (dispersive infrared and ...

  6. Radiometric comparison of Mars Climate Sounder and Thermal Emission spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandfield, Joshua L.; Wolff, Michael J.; Smith, Michael D.; Schofield, John T.; McCleese, Daniel J.

    2013-07-01

    Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) nadir oriented thermal infrared and solar channel measurements are compared with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) measurements across multiple Mars years. Thermal infrared measurements were compared by convolving the TES data using the MCS spectral band passes. The MCS solar channel measurements were calibrated using Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars observations to provide the proper gain factor (3.09 × 10-3 W sr-1 m-2 μm-1). The comparisons of the datasets show that day and night surface and atmospheric temperatures are within 3 K over the course of 5 martian years, after accounting for the local time differences. Any potential interannual variations in global average temperature are masked by calibration and modeling uncertainties. Previous work attributed apparent interannual global surface and atmospheric temperature variations to major dust storm activity; however, this variation has since been attributed to a calibration error in the TES dataset that has been corrected. MCS derived Lambert albedos are slightly higher than TES measurements acquired over the same season and locations. Most of this difference can be attributed to the spectral response functions of MCS and TES. Consistent with previous work, global albedo is highly variable (˜6%) and this variability must be taken into account when determining long term global trends. Vertical aerosol distributions were also derived from the calibrated MCS visible channel limb measurements, demonstrating the utility of the MCS visible channel data for monitoring of aerosols.

  7. Indium phosphide all air-gap Fabry-Pérot filters for near-infrared spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, A.; Butt, M. A.; Fomchenkov, S. A.; Khonina, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    Food quality can be characterized by noninvasive techniques such as spectroscopy in the Near Infrared wavelength range. For example, 930 -1450 nm wavelength range can be used to detect diseases and differentiate between meat samples. Miniaturization of such NIR spectrometers is useful for quick and mobile characterization of food samples. Spectrometers can be miniaturized, without compromising the spectral resolution, using Fabry-Pérot (FP) filters consisting of two highly reflecting mirrors with a central cavity in between. The most commonly used mirrors in the design of FP filters are Distributed Bragg Reflections (DBRs) consisting of alternating high and low refractive index material pairs, due to their high reflectivity compared to metal mirrors. However, DBRs have high reflectivity for a selected range of wavelengths known as the stopband of the DBR. This range is usually much smaller than the sensitivity range of the spectrometer detector. Therefore, a bandpass filter is usually required to restrict wavelengths outside the stopband of the FP DBRs. Such bandpass filters are difficult to design and implement. Alternatively, high index contrast materials must be can be used to broaden the stopband width of the FP DBRs. In this work, Indium phosphide all air-gap filters are proposed in conjunction with InGaAs based detectors. The designed filter has a wide stopband covering the entire InGaAs detector sensitivity range. The filter can be tuned in the 950-1450 nm with single mode operation. The designed filter can hence be used for noninvasive meat quality control.

  8. Countermeasure effectiveness against a man-portable air-defense system containing a two-color spinscan infrared seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, James; Richardson, Mark; Butters, Brian; Walmsley, Roy

    2011-12-01

    Man-portable air-defense (MANPAD) systems have developed sophisticated counter-countermeasures (CCM) to try and defeat any expendable countermeasure that is deployed by an aircraft. One of these is a seeker that is able to detect in two different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum. Termed two-color, the seeker can compare the emissions from the target and a countermeasure in different wavebands and reject the countermeasure. In this paper we describe the modeling process of a two-color infrared seeker using COUNTERSIM, a missile engagement and countermeasure software simulation tool. First, the simulations model a MANPAD with a two-color CCM which is fired against a fast jet model and a transport aircraft model releasing reactive countermeasures. This is then compared to when the aircraft releases countermeasures throughout an engagement up to the hit point to investigate the optimum flare firing time. The results show that the release time of expendable decoys as a countermeasure against a MANPAD with a two-color CCM is critical.

  9. Modelling a man-portable air-defence (MANPAD) system with a conical scan two-colour infrared (IR) seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, James; Richardson, Mark; Butters, Brian; Walmsley, Roy

    2011-11-01

    The use of flares of flares against 1st and 2nd generation man-portable air-defence (MANPAD) systems proved to be very effective. This naturally led to the development of counter-countermeasures (CCM) that could be incorporated into the MANPADs infrared (IR) seeker. One possible CCM is two-colour where the seeker detects in two separate IR bands. It is designed to exploit the different spectral characteristics of the target and flare. In this paper we describe the modelling process of a two-colour conical scan (conscan) IR seeker using CounterSim, a missile engagement and countermeasure simulation software tool developed by Chemring Countermeasures Ltd. It starts by explaining the signal processing needed to be able to reject the flare and track the target. The MANPAD model is then used in an engagement with a fast jet model and a transport aircraft model. Flares are first deployed reactively then released throughout an engagement to investigate the effect of flare release time and the viability of pre-emptive countermeasures.

  10. Comparison of Gravity Wave Temperature Variances from Ray-Based Spectral Parameterization of Convective Gravity Wave Drag with AIRS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Hyun-Joo; Chun, Hye-Yeong; Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.

    2012-01-01

    The realism of ray-based spectral parameterization of convective gravity wave drag, which considers the updated moving speed of the convective source and multiple wave propagation directions, is tested against the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard the Aqua satellite. Offline parameterization calculations are performed using the global reanalysis data for January and July 2005, and gravity wave temperature variances (GWTVs) are calculated at z = 2.5 hPa (unfiltered GWTV). AIRS-filtered GWTV, which is directly compared with AIRS, is calculated by applying the AIRS visibility function to the unfiltered GWTV. A comparison between the parameterization calculations and AIRS observations shows that the spatial distribution of the AIRS-filtered GWTV agrees well with that of the AIRS GWTV. However, the magnitude of the AIRS-filtered GWTV is smaller than that of the AIRS GWTV. When an additional cloud top gravity wave momentum flux spectrum with longer horizontal wavelength components that were obtained from the mesoscale simulations is included in the parameterization, both the magnitude and spatial distribution of the AIRS-filtered GWTVs from the parameterization are in good agreement with those of the AIRS GWTVs. The AIRS GWTV can be reproduced reasonably well by the parameterization not only with multiple wave propagation directions but also with two wave propagation directions of 45 degrees (northeast-southwest) and 135 degrees (northwest-southeast), which are optimally chosen for computational efficiency.

  11. Intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations with AIRS and IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Alexander, M. Joan; Clerbaux, Cathy; Grimsdell, Alison W.; Meyer, Catrin I.; Rößler, Thomas; Tournier, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    Gravity waves are an important driver for the atmospheric circulation and have substantial impact on weather and climate. Satellite instruments offer excellent opportunities to study gravity waves on a global scale. This study focuses on observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aqua satellite and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) onboard the European MetOp satellites. The main aim of this study is an intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations of both instruments. In particular, we analyzed AIRS and IASI 4.3 μm brightness temperature measurements, which directly relate to stratospheric temperature. Three case studies showed that AIRS and IASI provide a clear and consistent picture of the temporal development of individual gravity wave events. Statistical comparisons based on a five-year period of measurements (2008 - 2012) showed similar spatial and temporal patterns of gravity wave activity. However, the statistical comparisons also revealed systematic differences of variances between AIRS and IASI that we attribute to the different spatial measurement characteristics of both instruments. We also found differences between day- and nighttime data that are partly due to the local time variations of the gravity wave sources. While AIRS has been used successfully in many previous gravity wave studies, IASI data are applied here for the first time for that purpose. Our study shows that gravity wave observations from different hyperspectral infrared sounders such as AIRS and IASI can be directly related to each other, if instrument-specific characteristics such as different noise levels and spatial resolution and sampling are carefully considered. The ability to combine observations from different satellites provides an opportunity to create a long-term record, which is an exciting prospect for future climatological studies of stratospheric gravity wave

  12. Subminiature infrared detector translation stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a precision subminiature three-axis translation stage used in the GOES Sounder to provide positional adjustment of 12 cooled infrared detectors. Four separate translation stages and detectors are packaged into a detector mechanism which has an overall size of 0.850 x 1.230 x 0.600 inches. Each translation stage is capable of + or - 0.015 inch motion in the X and Y axes and +0.050/-0.025 inch motion in the Z axis with a sensitivity of 0.0002 inches. The function of the detector translation stage allows real time detector signal peaking during Sounder alignment. The translation stage operates in a cryogenic environment under a 10 to the -6th torr vacuum.

  13. Aura Microwave Limb Sounder Animation Illustrating the Interaction Between Temperatures and

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This animation created from data from the Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on NASA's Aura spacecraft depicts the complex interaction of chemicals involved in the destruction of ozone during the 2005 Arctic winter. Red is high, blue/purple is low for all chemicals, and data are taken at an altitude of about 19 kilometers (12 miles). As temperatures dip, nitric acid levels drop, indicating the presence of polar stratospheric clouds, which destroy ozone. Levels of hydrogen chloride (the primary 'safe' form of chlorine) are shown dropping, while levels of chlorine monoxide (the primary 'dangerous' form of chlorine that destroys ozone) rise, and ozone is destroyed (ozone levels generally go down after about January 20).

    The animation also illustrates how air motions change ozone levels. Prior to about January 20, ozone levels increase as ozone is transported down from higher altitudes. After that, ozone decreases gradually, and appears to move around on the surface as horizontal air motions change the shape of the polar vortex and move air into and out of it. Since the highest ozone is mostly around the edge of the vortex, this can increase the ozone inside it.

  14. Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Daniel; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Aylward, Alan D.; Aruliah, Anasuya; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Saunders, Christopher; Friend, Jonathan; Bird, Rachel; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Parkes, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The Mesosphere - Lower Thermosphere region (MLT) is often quoted as being the least well known region of the atmosphere, meaning that measurements of this altitude range are sparser than for the neighbouring layers. The reason for this apparent lack of observations can be traced back to a combination of two facts - A) the MLT is ill suited for in-situ sampling on a global scale because the residual air drag is prohibitive for suborbital vehicles (rockets are traditionally used to sample the MLT region, but they only provide snapshot measurements both geographically, as well as temporally), and B) Some of the most important trace gases in the MLT have spectral emission lines in the THz range, a frequency band which has only just become accessible to conventional remote sensing technologies (i.e. passive heterodyne detection) thanks to ongoing technology development, but which still poses massive - often prohibitive - demands on the complexity, weight and power consumption of satellite borne remote sensing detectors. To mitigate the substantial power requirements of a Local Oscillator (LO) able to pump a heterodyne receiver at THZ frequencies, we are suggesting the use of Quantum Cascade Laser diodes (QCL). Combining a QCL LO with a sub-harmonic Schottky mixer in an integrated receiver system would allow us to build a THz passive heterodyne detector for atmospheric remote sensing that is both very compact and power efficient, and could therefore be built and launched much more cheaply than competitive systems. Many of the technologies required for such an instrument already exist at technology readiness levels (TRL) of 3-5. A consortium of RAL Space, University College London (UCL), University of Leeds, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) and STAR-Dundee have been awarded a grant through the ESA In Orbit Demonstration Programme (IOD) to start developing an integrated, sub-harmonic heterodyne receiver with a QCL LO up to a TRL that would allow IOD hopefully in the

  15. The microwave limb sounder for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Peckham, G. E.; Suttie, R. A.; Curtis, P. D.; Maddison, B. J.; Harwood, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder was designed to map the concentrations of trace gases from the stratosphere to the lower thermosphere, to improve understanding of the photochemical reactions which take place in this part of the atmosphere. The instrument will measure the intensity of thermal radiation from molecules in the atmosphere at frequencies corresponding to rotational absorption bands of chlorine monoxide, ozone, and water vapor. Molecular concentration profiles will be determined over a height range of 15 to 80 km (20 to 45 km for C10). The 57 deg inclination orbit proposed for the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite will allow global coverage.

  16. Retrieval of the Nitrous Oxide Profiles using the AIRS Data in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Ma, P.; Tao, J.; Li, X.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Li, S.; Xiong, X.

    2014-12-01

    As an important greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting substance, the 100-year global warming potential of Nitrous Oxide (N2O) is almost 300 times higher than that of carbon dioxide. However, there are still large uncertainties about the quantitative N2O emission and its feedback to climate change due to the coarse ground-based network. This approach attempts to retrieve the N2O profiles from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) data. First, the sensitivity of atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles and surface parameters between two spectral absorption bands were simulated by using the radiative transfer model. Second, the eigenvector regression algorithm is used to construct a priori state. Third, an optimal estimate method was developed based on the band selection of N2O. Finally, we compared our retrieved AIRS profiles with HIPPO data, and analyzed the seasonal and annual N2O distribution in China from 2004 to 2013.

  17. Organization of T-shaped facial amphiphiles at the air/water interface studied by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Christian; Chen, Bin; Tschierske, Carsten; Kressler, Jörg; Blume, Alfred

    2012-10-11

    We studied the behavior of monolayers at the air/water interface of T-shaped facial amphiphiles which show liquid-crystalline mesophases in the bulk. The compounds are composed of a rigid p-terphenyl core (TP) with two terminal hydrophobic ether linked alkyl chains of equal length and one facial hydrophilic tri(ethylene oxide) chain with a carboxylic acid end group. Due to their amphiphilic nature they form stable Langmuir films at the air/water interface. Depending on the alkyl chain length they show markedly different compression isotherms. We used infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) to study the changes in molecular organization of the TP films upon compression. We could retrieve information on layer thickness, alkyl chain crystallization, and the orientation of the TP cores within the films. Films of TPs with long (16 carbon atoms: TP 16/3) and short (10 carbon atoms: TP 10/3) alkyl chains were compared. Compression of TP 16/3 leads to crystallization of the terminal alkyl chains, whereas the alkyl chains of TP 10/3 stay fluid over the complete compression range. TP 10/3 shows an extended plateau in the compression isotherm which is due to a layering transition. The mechanism of this layering transition is discussed. Special attention was paid to the question of whether a so-called roll-over collapse occurs during compression. From the beginning to the end of the plateau, the layer thickness is increased from 15 to 38 Å and the orientation of the TP cores changes from parallel to the water surface to isotropic. We conclude that the plateau in the compression isotherm reflects the transition of a TP monolayer to a TP multilayer. The monolayer consists of a sublayer of well-organized TP cores underneath a sublayer of fluid alkyl chains whereas the multilayer consists of a well oriented bottom layer and a disordered top layer. Our findings do not support the model of a roll-over collapse. This study demonstrates how the IRRA band intensity of OH

  18. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of Quality-controlled AIRS Temperature Retrievals under Partially Cloudy Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, O.; Susskind, J.; Rosenberg, R.; Brin, E.; Riishojgaard, L.; Liu, E.; Terry, J.; Jusem, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on board the Aqua satellite has been long recognized as an important contributor towards the improvement of weather forecasts. At this time only a small fraction of the total data produced by AIRS is being used by operational weather systems. In fact, in addition to effects of thinning and quality control, the only AIRS data assimilated are radiance observations of channels unaffected by clouds. Observations in mid-lower tropospheric sounding AIRS channels are assimilated primarily under completely clear-sky conditions, thus imposing a very severe limitation on the horizontal distribution of the AIRS-derived information. In this work it is shown that the ability to derive accurate temperature profiles from AIRS observations in partially cloud-contaminated areas can be utilized to further improve the impact of AIRS observations in a global model and forecasting system. The analyses produced by assimilating AIRS temperature profiles obtained under partial cloud cover result in a substantially colder representation of the northern hemisphere lower midtroposphere at higher latitudes. This temperature difference has a strong impact, through hydrostatic adjustment, in the midtropospheric geopotential heights, which causes a different representation of the polar vortex especially over northeastern Siberia and Alaska. The AIRS-induced anomaly propagates through the model's dynamics producing improved 5-day forecasts.

  19. Improving forecast skill by assimilation of quality-controlled AIRS temperature retrievals under partially cloudy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, O.; Susskind, J.; Rosenberg, R.; Brin, E.; Liu, E.; Riishojgaard, L. P.; Terry, J.; Jusem, J. C.

    2008-04-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on board the Aqua satellite is now recognized as an important contributor towards the improvement of weather forecasts. At this time only a small fraction of the total data produced by AIRS is being used by operational weather systems. In fact, in addition to effects of thinning and quality control, the only AIRS data assimilated are radiance observations of channels unaffected by clouds. Observations in mid-lower tropospheric sounding AIRS channels are assimilated primarily under completely clear-sky conditions, thus imposing a very severe limitation on the horizontal distribution of the AIRS-derived information. In this work it is shown that the ability to derive accurate temperature profiles from AIRS observations in partially cloud-contaminated areas can be utilized to further improve the impact of AIRS observations in a global model and forecasting system. The analyses produced by assimilating AIRS temperature profiles obtained under partial cloud cover result in a substantially colder representation of the northern hemisphere lower midtroposphere at higher latitudes. This temperature difference has a strong impact, through hydrostatic adjustment, in the midtropospheric geopotential heights, which causes a different representation of the polar vortex especially over northeastern Siberia and Alaska. The AIRS-induced anomaly propagates through the model's dynamics producing improved 5-day forecasts.

  20. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Folmer, M. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), 32-km North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) interpolated to a 12-km grid, and 13-km Rapid Refresh analyses.

  1. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

  2. The Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Elmer, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

  3. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Elmer, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

  4. The Behm Acoustic Sounder for Airplanes with Reference to Its Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Ernest

    1930-01-01

    Relative altimetry is of great importance for increasing the safety in aerial transportation, because it makes possible safe flying at night, by poor visibility, and when landing. Among the instruments of this type is the Behm sounder, which operates on an acoustic principle. Acoustic altimetry in general and the Behn sounder, in particular, are covered in this report.

  5. Evaluating CMIP5 models using AIRS tropospheric air temperature and specific humidity climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Baijun; Fetzer, Eric J.; Kahn, Brian H.; Teixeira, Joao; Manning, Evan; Hearty, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents the climatological mean features of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) monthly mean tropospheric air temperature (ta, K) and specific humidity (hus, kg/kg) products as part of the Obs4MIPs project and compares them to those from NASA's Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) for validation and 16 models from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) for CMIP5 model evaluation. MERRA is warmer than AIRS in the free troposphere but colder in the boundary layer with differences typically less than 1 K. MERRA is also drier (~10%) than AIRS in the tropical boundary layer but wetter (~30%) in the tropical free troposphere and the extratropical troposphere. In particular, the large MERRA-AIRS specific humidity differences are mainly located in the deep convective cloudy regions indicating that the low sampling of AIRS in the cloudy regions may be the main reason for these differences. In comparison to AIRS and MERRA, the sixteen CMIP5 models can generally reproduce the climatological features of tropospheric air temperature and specific humidity well, but several noticeable biases exist. The models have a tropospheric cold bias (around 2 K), especially in the extratropical upper troposphere, and a double-ITCZ problem in the troposphere from 1000 hPa to 300 hPa, especially in the tropical Pacific. The upper-tropospheric cold bias exists in the most (13 of 16) models, and the double-ITCZ bias is found in all 16 CMIP5 models. Both biases are independent of the reference dataset used (AIRS or MERRA).

  6. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Previously, it has been shown that cloud top designation associated with quality control procedures within the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system used operationally by a number of Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) partners may not provide the best representation of cloud top pressure (CTP). Because this designated CTP determines which channels are cloud-free and, thus, available for assimilation, ensuring the most accurate representation of this value is imperative to obtaining the greatest impact from satellite radiances. This paper examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing analysis increments and numerical forecasts generated using operational techniques with a research technique that swaps CTP from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the value of CTP calculated from the radiances within GSI.

  7. LAWS (Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder) earth observing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Wind profiles can be measured from space using current technology. These wind profiles are essential for answering many of the interdisciplinary scientific questions to be addressed by EOS, the Earth Observing System. This report provides guidance for the development of a spaceborne wind sounder, the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), discussing the current state of the technology and reviewing the scientific rationale for the instrument. Whether obtained globally from the EOS polar platform or in the tropics and subtropics from the Space Station, wind profiles from space will provide essential information for advancing the skill of numerical weather prediction, furthering knowledge of large-scale atmospheric circulation and climate dynamics, and improving understanding of the global biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles. The LAWS Instrument Panel recommends that it be given high priority for new instrument development because of the pressing scientific need and the availability of the necessary technology. LAWS is to measure wind profiles with an accuracy of a few meters per second and to sample at intervals of 100 km horizontally for layers km thick.

  8. Ambient formic acid in southern California air: A comparison of two methods, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and alkaline trap-liquid chromatography with UV detection

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. ); Tuazon, E.C. ); Fujita, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Formic acid is an ubiquitous component of urban smog. Sources of formic acid in urban air include direct emissions from vehicles and in situ reaction of ozone with olefins. Ambient levels of formic acid in southern California air were first measured some 15 years ago by Hanst et al. using long-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All subsequent studies of formic acid in the Los Angeles area have involved the use of two methods, either FTIR or collection on alkaline traps followed by gas chromatography, ion chromatography, or liquid chromatography analysis with UV detection, ATLC-UV. The Carbon Species Methods Comparison Study (CSMCS), a multilaboratory air quality study carried out in August 1986 at a southern California smog receptor site, provided an opportunity for direct field comparison of the FTIR and alkaline trap methods. The results of the comparison are presented in this brief report.

  9. Infrared limb emission measurements of aerosol in the troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griessbach, Sabine; Hoffmann, Lars; Spang, Reinhold; von Hobe, Marc; Müller, Rolf; Riese, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Altitude-resolved aerosol detection in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) is a challenging task for remote sensing instruments. Infrared limb emission measurements provide vertically resolved global measurements at day- and nighttime in the UTLS. For high-spectral-resolution infrared limb instruments we present here a new method to detect aerosol and separate between ice and non-ice particles. The method is based on an improved aerosol-cloud index that identifies infrared limb emission spectra affected by non-ice aerosol or ice clouds. For the discrimination between non-ice aerosol and ice clouds we employed brightness temperature difference correlations. The discrimination thresholds for this method were derived from radiative transfer simulations (including scattering) and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS)/Envisat measurements obtained in 2011. We demonstrate the value of this approach for observations of volcanic ash and sulfate aerosol originating from the Grímsvötn (Iceland, 64° N), Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Chile, 40° S), and Nabro (Eritrea, 13° N) eruptions in May and June 2011 by comparing the MIPAS volcanic aerosol detections with Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) volcanic ash and SO2 measurements.

  10. Nimbus-7 Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) experiment data user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, F. W.; Rodgers, C. D.; Nutter, S. T.; Oslik, N.

    1989-01-01

    The Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) aboard Nimbus-7 observes infrared radiation from the atmospheric limb. Global upper atmosphere temperature profiles and vertical concentrations of H2O, NO, N2O, CH4 and CO2 are derived from these measurements. The status of all channels was carefully monitored. Temperature and composition were retrieved from the measurements by linearizing the direct equation about an a priori profile and using an optimum statistical estimator to find the most likely solution. The derived temperature and composition profiles are archived on two tape products whose file structure and record formats are described in detail. The gridded retrieved temperature tape (GRID-T) contains daily day and night average temperatures at 62 pressure levels in a 2.5 degree latitude by 10 degree longitude grid extending from 67.5 degrees N to 50 degrees S. The zonal mean methane and nitrous oxide composition tape (ZMT-G) contains zonal mean day and night average CH4 and N2O mixing ratios at 31 pressure levels for 2.5 degrees latitude zones extending from 67.5 degrees N to 50 degrees S.

  11. The AIRS Applications Pipeline, from Identification to Visualization to Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S. E.; Pagano, T. S.; Fetzer, E. J.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Teixeira, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua spacecraft has been returning daily global observations of Earth's atmospheric constituents and properties since 2002. AIRS provides observations of temperature and water vapor along the atmospheric column and is sensitive to many atmospheric constituents in the mid-troposphere, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and ozone. With a 12-year data record and daily, global observations in near real-time, we are finding that AIRS data can play a role in applications that fall under most of the NASA Applied Sciences focus areas. Currently in development are temperature inversion maps that can potentially correlate to respiratory health problems, dengue fever and West Nile virus outbreak prediction maps, maps that can be used to make assessments of air quality, and maps of volcanic ash burden. This poster will communicate the Project's approach and efforts to date of its applications pipeline, which includes identifying applications, utilizing science expertise, hiring outside experts to assist with development and dissemination, visualization along application themes, and leveraging existing NASA data frameworks and organizations to facilitate archiving and distribution. In addition, a new web-based browse tool being developed by the AIRS Project for easy access to application product imagery will also be described.

  12. Spectral Cloud-Filtering of AIRS Data: Non-Polar Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gregorich, David; Barron, Diana

    2004-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating array spectrometer which covers the thermal infrared spectral range between 640 and 1700/cm. In order to retain the maximum radiometric accuracy of the AIRS data, the effects of cloud contamination have to be minimized. We discuss cloud filtering which uses the high spectral resolution of AIRS to identify about 100,000 of 500,000 non-polar ocean spectra per day as relatively "cloud-free". Based on the comparison of surface channels with the NCEP provided global real time sst (rtg.sst), AIRS surface sensitive channels have a cold bias ranging from O.5K during the day to 0.8K during the night. Day and night spatial coherence tests show that the cold bias is due to cloud contamination. During the day the cloud contamination is due to a 2-3% broken cloud cover at the 1-2 km altitude, characteristic of low stratus clouds. The cloud-contamination effects surface sensitive channels only. Cloud contamination can be reduced to 0.2K by combining the spectral filter with a spatial coherence threshold, but the yield drops to 16,000 spectra per day. AIRS was launched in May 2002 on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite. Since September 2002 it has returned 4 million spectra of the globe each day.

  13. Geo-STAR: A Geostationary Microwave Sounder for the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrigtsen, Bjorn H.; Brown, S. T.; Dinardo, S. J.; Gaier, T. C.; Kangaslahti, P. P.; Tanner, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    The Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) is a new Earth remote sensing instrument concept that has been under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. First conceived in 1998 as a NASA New Millennium Program mission and subsequently developed in 2003-2006 as a proof-of-concept prototype under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program, it is intended to fill a serious gap in our Earth remote sensing capabilities - namely the lack of a microwave atmospheric sounder in geostationary orbit. The importance of such observations have been recognized by the National Academy of Sciences National Research Council, which recently released its report on a 'Decadal Survey' of NASA Earth Science activities1. One of the recommended missions for the next decade is a geostationary microwave sounder. GeoSTAR is well positioned to meet the requirements of such a mission, and because of the substantial investment NASA has already made in GeoSTAR technology development, this concept is fast approaching the necessary maturity for implementation in the next decade. NOAA is also keenly interested in GeoSTAR as a potential payload on its next series of geostationary weather satellites, the GOES-R series. GeoSTAR, with its ability to map out the three-dimensional structure of temperature, water vapor, clouds, precipitation and convective parameters on a continual basis, will significantly enhance our ability to observe hurricanes and other severe storms. In addition, with performance matching that of current and next generation of low-earth-orbiting microwave sounders, GeoSTAR will also provide observations important to the study of the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric processes and climate variability and trends. In particular, with GeoSTAR it will be possible to fully resolve the diurnal cycle. We discuss the GeoSTAR concept and basic design, the performance of the prototype, and a number of science applications that will be possible with GeoSTAR. The work reported

  14. Accurate, practical simulation of satellite infrared radiometer spectral data

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study's purpose is to determine whether a relatively simple random band model formulation of atmospheric radiation transfer in the infrared region can provide valid simulations of narrow interval satellite-borne infrared sounder system data. Detailed ozonesondes provide the pertinent atmospheric information and sets of calibrated satellite measurements provide the validation. High resolution line-by-line model calculations are included to complete the evaluation.

  15. AIRS Impact on the Analysis and Forecast Track of Tropical Cyclone Nargis in a Global Data Assimilation and Forecasting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, O.; Lau, W.K.; Susskind, J.; Brin, E.; Liu, E.; Riishojgaard, L. P.; Rosenburg, R.; Fuentes, M.

    2009-01-01

    Tropical cyclones in the northern Indian Ocean pose serious challenges to operational weather forecasting systems, partly due to their shorter lifespan and more erratic track, compared to those in the Atlantic and the Pacific. Moreover, the automated analyses of cyclones over the northern Indian Ocean, produced by operational global data assimilation systems (DASs), are generally of inferior quality than in other basins. In this work it is shown that the assimilation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature retrievals under partial cloudy conditions can significantly impact the representation of the cyclone Nargis (which caused devastating loss of life in Myanmar in May 2008) in a global DAS. Forecasts produced from these improved analyses by a global model produce substantially smaller track errors. The impact of the assimilation of clear-sky radiances on the same DAS and forecasting system is positive, but smaller than the one obtained by ingestion of AIRS retrievals, possibly due to poorer coverage.

  16. Validation of nitrogen dioxide measurements from the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reburn, W. J.; Remedios, J. J.; Morris, P. E.; Rodgers, C. D.; Taylor, F. W.; Kerridge, B. J.; Knight, R. J.; Ballard, J.; Kumer, J. B.; Massie, S. T.

    1996-04-01

    Measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are assessed. Channel 5 of the instrument was dedicated to observations of nitrogen dioxide and employed pressure-modulation and wideband radiometry to make measurements at 6.2 μm. This dual technique allows simultaneous determination of nitrogen dioxide mixing ratio and the aerosol extinction coefficient at this wavelength and therefore provides nitrogen dioxide data even in the presence of heavy aerosol loading. Approximately 180 days of data, in the period from September 1991 to July 1992, were obtained with, typically, over 2600 profiles per day for each retrieved species, covering an altitude range of 100-0.01 mbar. In this paper the version 10 data are assessed and a full error analysis is described. Comparisons with the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) on UARS and the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) on Nimbus 7 are also presented. It is concluded that the morphology of the retrieved ISAMS fields is robust and consistent with concurrent as well as previous infrared satellite measurements. Random errors are estimated to be of the order of 10% for nighttime and 15% for daytime NO2 near the maxima of the distributions, and systematic errors are estimated to be of a similar size. However, there remains an unresolved systematic difference of about a factor of 2 between ISAMS and CLAES. Both random and systematic errors are likely to be reduced in future versions of the processing.

  17. Probing Volcanic Eruption Clouds With the Airs Spectrometer on Aqua: A New Tool for Quantifying Sulfur Dioxide and Ash Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Y.; Strow, L. L.; Carn, S.; Machado, S. D.; Hannon, S.

    2003-12-01

    Since its launch on EOS/Aqua in May 2002, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has successfully detected SO2 and ash clouds emitted during a number of volcanic eruptions. Detection of SO2 is achieved using the strong infrared absorption band of the gas centered around 7.3 μ m. For upper tropospheric volcanic clouds, preliminary AIRS SO2 retrievals performed using a version of the AIRS radiative transfer algorithm that includes variable SO2 indicate good agreement with SO2 amounts detected by the ultraviolet Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) where coincident data are available. However, the higher spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of AIRS provides much improved coverage of volcanic emissions at lower altitudes, such as the October 2002 eruption of Mt.Etna (Italy). AIRS retrievals of SO2 and ash optical depths and effective particle radii in volcanic clouds from several eruptions will be presented, including Etna, Ruang (Indonesia, September 2002), Reventador (Ecuador, November 2002), Anatahan (Mariana Islands, May 2003) and Soufriere Hills (Montserrat, July 2003). These examples demonstrate the potential of AIRS data to improve measurements of volcanic SO2 and ash loading following eruptions, and to refine our understanding of volcanic cloud composition,structure and evolution.

  18. Stratospheric CH3CN from the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Waters, Joe W.; Khosravi, Rashid; Brasseur, Guy P.; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Read, William G.

    CH3CN in the stratosphere has been measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), providing the first global CH3CN dataset. The MLS observations are in broad agreement with past high and midlatitude observations of CH3CN, although concentrations are a little larger than previously observed. In the tropics, where CH3CN has not up to now been measured, a persistent ‘peak’ in the profiles is seen around 22 hPa, which may be evidence of a tropical stratospheric CH3CN source. Comparisons are made with the NCAR SOCRATES model, including runs having an artificial tropical stratospheric CH3CN source.

  19. Design of a flexible and low-power ionospheric sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Alex

    Characterizing the structure of the ionosphere has practical applications for telecommunications and scientific applications for studies of the near-Earth space environment. Among several methods for measuring parameters of the ionosphere is ionospheric sounding, a radar technique that determines the electron content of the ionosphere as a function of height. Various research, military, and commercial institutions operate hundreds of ground-based ionosondes throughout the globe, and new ionosondes continue to be deployed in increasingly remote and distant locations. This thesis presents the design of an ionospheric sounder that reduces the power, size, and cost compared to existing systems. Key improvements include the use of an open-source software-defined radio platform and channel-aware dynamic sounding scheduling.

  20. Oblique-incidence sounder measurements with absolute propagation delay timing

    SciTech Connect

    Daehler, M.

    1990-05-03

    Timing from the Global Position Satellite (GPS) system has been applied to HF oblique incidence sounder measurements to produce ionograms whose propagation delay time scale is absolutely calibrated. Such a calibration is useful for interpreting ionograms in terms of the electron density true-height profile for the ionosphere responsible for the propagation. Use of the time variations in the shape of the electron density profile, in conjunction with an HF propagation model, is expected to provide better near-term (1-24 hour) HF propagation forecasts than are available from current updating systems, which use only the MUF. Such a capability may provide the basis for HF frequency management techniques which are more efficient than current methods. Absolute timing and other techniques applicable to automatic extraction of the electron-density profile from an ionogram will be discussed.

  1. Slow Z-mode radiation from sounder-accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.

    2004-12-01

    Quasi-electrostatic Z-mode waves created by the transmitting part of the OEDIPUS-C payload were measured on the receiving part at 1200 m distance. Solutions of the complete electromagnetic dispersion relation for a hot magnetoplasma reveal, however, that there is no solution that provides direct ray paths along the transmitter-receiver separation direction with the observed signal group delays. An interpretive model is therefore proposed in which sounder-accelerated electrons (SAE) radiate incoherently as they spiral along the magnetic field direction in the general direction of the receiving subpayload. Test-particle theory combined with the hot-plasma dispersion solution is used to predict the total electric field for previously reported SAE flux levels. It is found that voltage levels measured on the receiving dipoles have about the same order of magnitude as the predicted ones.

  2. Surface Temperature variability from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Dang, V. T.; Aumann, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    To address the existence and possible causes of the climate hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014for the day and night conditions. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We compare the satellite data with the new surface data produced by Karl et al. (2015) who denies the reality of the climate hiatus. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The day-night difference is an indicator of the anthropogenic trend. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Nadir Sounding of Carbon Gases using SCIAMACHY Near Infrared Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimeno García, Sebastián; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Günter; Slijkhuis, Sander; Hess, Michael; Aberle, Bernd

    The Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm (BIRRA) and Column EstimatoR Vertical InfraRed Sounding Atmosphere (CERVISA) codes have been designed to retrieve vertical column den-sities (VCDs) of atmospheric gases in the near and thermal infrared (NIR,TIR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum by means of non-linear least squares fitting of radiances. As part of the operational SCIAMACHY level 1-2 processor, BIRRA is currently used for the specific retrieval of carbon monoxide (CO) VCDs exploiting the fitting window 4282-4301 cm-1 within the SCIAMACHY channel 8. Using appropriate fitting windows in channel 6, BIRRA also allows to gain information on greenhouse gases such as methane and carbon dioxide. Unfortunately, the increasing number of dead and bad pixels -specially in the NIR channels -reduces the available spectral information and consequently makes the VCDs retrieval more and more challenging. The proper choice of the pixel mask, fitting window, auxiliary fit parameters, as well as the filtering of the Level 2 data is crucial for obtaining a high quality atmospheric product. For validation of BIRRA the closely related CERVISA code is used to retrieve CO and CH4 from nadir infrared sounding data of AIRS, IASI, or TES. BIRRA and CERVISA share a large portion of modules, e.g., for line-by-line absorption and the nonlinear least squares solver; the essential difference is the part of the forward model devoted to radiative transfer through the atmosphere, i.e., Beer's law for the NIR versus Schwarzschild's equation for the TIR. CERVISA retrieval results are compared both to the operational products of the TIR sounder and to the SCIAMACHY-BIRRA product. In this work, we present recent results of carbon monoxide and methane retrievals.

  4. Use of INSAT-3D sounder and imager radiances in the 4D-VAR data assimilation system and its implications in the analyses and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira Rani, S.; Taylor, Ruth; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-05-01

    INSAT-3D, the first Indian geostationary satellite with sounding capability, provides valuable information over India and the surrounding oceanic regions which are pivotal to Numerical Weather Prediction. In collaboration with UK Met Office, NCMRWF developed the assimilation capability of INSAT-3D Clear Sky Brightness Temperature (CSBT), both from the sounder and imager, in the 4D-Var assimilation system being used at NCMRWF. Out of the 18 sounder channels, radiances from 9 channels are selected for assimilation depending on relevance of the information in each channel. The first three high peaking channels, the CO2 absorption channels and the three water vapor channels (channel no. 10, 11, and 12) are assimilated both over land and Ocean, whereas the window channels (channel no. 6, 7, and 8) are assimilated only over the Ocean. Measured satellite radiances are compared with that from short range forecasts to monitor the data quality. This is based on the assumption that the observed satellite radiances are free from calibration errors and the short range forecast provided by NWP model is free from systematic errors. Innovations (Observation - Forecast) before and after the bias correction are indicative of how well the bias correction works. Since the biases vary with air-masses, time, scan angle and also due to instrument degradation, an accurate bias correction algorithm for the assimilation of INSAT-3D sounder radiance is important. This paper discusses the bias correction methods and other quality controls used for the selected INSAT-3D sounder channels and the impact of bias corrected radiance in the data assimilation system particularly over India and surrounding oceanic regions.

  5. Lidar measurements of the column CO2 mixing ratio made by NASA Goddard's CO2 Sounder during the NASA ASCENDS 2014 Airborne campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing measurements of CO2 from space can help improve our understanding of the carbon cycle and help constrain the global carbon budget. However, such measurements need to be sufficiently accurate to detect small (1 ppm) changes in the CO2 mixing ratio (XCO2) against a large background (~ 400 ppm). Satellite measurements of XCO2 using passive spectrometers, such as those from the Japanese GOSAT (Greenhouse gas Observing Satellite) and the NASA OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2) are limited to daytime sunlit portions of the Earth and are susceptible to biases from clouds and aerosols. For this reason, NASA commissioned the formulation study of ASCENDS a space-based lidar mission. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's CO2 Sounder lidar is one candidate approach for the ASCENDS mission. The NASA GSFC CO2 Sounder measures the CO2 mixing ratio using a pulsed multi-wavelength integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) approach. The CO2 Sounder has flown in the 2011, 2013 and 2014 ASCENDS airborne campaigns over the continental US, and has produced measurements in close agreement with in situ measurements of the CO2 column. In 2014, the CO2 Sounder upgraded its laser with a precision step-locked diode laser source to improve the lidar wavelength position accuracy. It also improved its optical receiver with a low-noise, high efficiency, HgCdTe avalanche photo diode detector. The combination of these two technologies enabled lidar XCO2 measurements with unprecedented accuracy. In this presentation, we show analysis from the ASCENDS 2014 field campaign, exploring: (1) Horizontal XCO2 gradients measured by the lidar, (2) Comparisons of lidar XCO2 measurements against the Parameterized Chemistry Transport Model (PCTM), and (3) Lidar column water vapor measurements using a HDO absorption line that occurs next to the CO2 absorption line. This can reduce the uncertainty in the dry air column used in XCO2 retrievals.

  6. Apperception of Clouds in AIRS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Hung-Lung; Smith, William L.

    2005-01-01

    Our capacity to simulate the radiative characteristics of the Earth system has advanced greatly over the past decade. However, new space based measurements show that idealized simulations might not adequately represent the complexity of nature. For example, AIRS simulated multi-layer cloud clearing research provides an excellent groundwork for early Atmospheric Infra-Red Sounder (AIRS) operational cloud clearing and atmospheric profile retrieval. However, it doesn't reflect the complicated reality of clouds over land and coastal areas. Thus far, operational AIRS/AMSU (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit) cloud clearing is not only of low yield but also of unsatisfying quality. This is not an argument for avoiding this challenging task, rather a powerful argument for exploring other synergistic approaches, and for adapting these strategies toward improving both indirect and direct use of cloudy infrared sounding data. Ample evidence is shown in this paper that the indirect use of cloudy sounding data by way of cloud clearing is sub-optimal for data assimilation. Improvements are needed in quality control, retrieval yield, and overall cloud clearing retrieval performance. For example, cloud clearing over land, especially over the desert surface, has led to much degraded retrieval quality and often a very low yield of quality controlled cloud cleared radiances. If these indirect cloud cleared radiances are instead to be directly assimilated into NWP models, great caution must be used. Our limited and preliminary cloud clearing results from AIRS/AMSU (with the use of MODIS data) and an AIRS/MODIS synergistic approach have, however, shown that higher spatial resolution multispectral imagery data can provide much needed quality control of the AIRS/AMSU cloud clearing retrieval. When AIRS and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are used synergistically, a higher spatial resolution over difficult terrain (especially desert areas) can be achieved and with a

  7. Assessing the Potential of the AIRS Retrieved Surface Temperature for 6-Hour Average Temperature Forecast in River Forecast Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, F.; Theobald, M.; Vollmer, B.; Savtchenko, A. K.; Hearty, T. J.; Esfandiari, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    Producing timely and accurate water forecast and information is the mission of National Weather Service River Forecast Centers (NWS RFCs) of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The river forecast system in RFCs requires average surface temperature in the fixed 6-hour period 000-0600, 0600-1200, 1200-1800, and 1200-0000 UTC. The current logic of RFC temperature forecast relies on ingest of point values of daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperature. Meanwhile, the mean temperature for the 6-hour period is estimated from a weighted average of daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperature. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the first high spectral resolution infrared sounder on board the Aqua satellite which was launched in May 2002 and follows a Sun-synchronous polar orbit. It is aimed to produce high resolution atmospheric profile and surface atmospheric parameters. As Aqua crosses the equator at about 1330 and 0130 local time, the AIRS retrieved surface temperature may represent daytime maximum and nighttime minimum value. Comparing to point observation from surface weather stations which are often sparse over the less-populated area and are unevenly distributed, satellite may obtain better area averaged observation. This test study assesses the potential of using AIRS retrieved surface temperature to forecast 6-hour average temperature for NWS RFCs. The California Nevada RFC is selected due to the poor coverage of surface observation in the mountainous region and spring snow melting. The study focuses on the March to May spring season when water from snowpack melting often plays important role in flood. AIRS retrieved temperature and surface weather station data set will be used to derive statistical weighting coefficient for 6-hour average temperature forecast. The resulting forecast biases and errors will be the main indicators of the potential usage. All study results will be presented in the meeting.

  8. Chemical, mechanical and sensory monitoring of hot air- and infrared-roasted hazelnuts (Corylus avellana L.) during nine months of storage.

    PubMed

    Belviso, Simona; Dal Bello, Barbara; Giacosa, Simone; Bertolino, Marta; Ghirardello, Daniela; Giordano, Manuela; Rolle, Luca; Gerbi, Vincenzo; Zeppa, Giuseppe

    2017-02-15

    Roasted hazelnuts can be consumed as whole nuts, or as an ingredient in the confectionary and bakery industries and are highly appreciated for their typical taste, aroma and crunchy texture. In this work, two hazelnut types (TGT, Ordu) from two harvests were roasted using two different systems (hot air, infrared) at different time/temperature combinations, and the evolution of oxidative stability, the total phenolic content (TPC), the antioxidant capacity, the mechanical and acoustic properties and the sensory perception were determined during storage. The results showed that the oxidative stability was increased by roasting hazelnuts at 120°C for 40min with hot air system. Similar overall trends were not found for the TPC, the antioxidant capacity and the mechanical-acoustic properties. However, for the maintenance of high antioxidant activity, a storage time of 6months at 4°C is recommended. The two roasting systems gave hazelnuts with significant sensory differences only at high roasting temperature.

  9. Using Open and Interoperable Ways to Publish and Access LANCE AIRS Near-Real Time Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Lynnes, C.; Vollmer, B.; Savtchenko, A. K.; Yang, W.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Near-Real Time (NRT) data from the Land Atmosphere Near real time Capability for EOS (LANCE) provide the information on the global and regional atmospheric state with very low latency. An open and interoperable platform is useful to facilitate access to and integration of LANCE AIRS NRT data. This paper discusses the use of open-source software components to build Web services for publishing and accessing AIRS NRT data in the context of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). The AIRS NRT data have also been made available through an OPeNDAP server. OPeNDAP allows several open-source netCDF-based tools such as Integrated Data Viewer, Ferret and Panoply to directly display the Level 2 data over the network. To enable users to locate swath data files in the OPeNDAP server that lie within a certain geographical area, graphical "granule maps" are being added to show the outline of each file on a map of the Earth. The metadata of AIRS NRT data and services is then explored to implement information advertisement and discovery in catalogue systems. Datacasting, an RSS-based technology for accessing Earth Science data and information to facilitate the subscriptions to AIRS NRT data availability, filtering, downloading and viewing data, is also discussed. To provide an easy entry point to AIRS NRT data and services, a Web portal designed for customized data downloading and visualization is introduced.

  10. Dynamical and chemical contributions to variability in microwave limb sounder Arctic stratoshperic column ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G.; Froidevaux, L.; Sabutis, J. L.; Santee, M. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Waters, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of column ozone above 100 hPa (Col100) derived from Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) data in February/March 1992-1998 show that about half of the interannual variability in Col100 in the Arctic polar vortex in late winter results from interannual variability in chemical loss. A majority of the remainder results from interannual variability in day-to-day dynamical motions including adiabatic warming/cooling and poleward advection of underlying upper tropospheric subtropical air on short timescales, rather than from variations in descent rates and large-scale transport over the winters. The morphology of Col100 from MLS remains very similar to that in the dynamical models even in the years with most chemical ozone loss. The amount and character of day-to-day variability in dynamical models closely follows that in MLS Col100. Although the morphology of and day-to-day variability in Arctic column ozone are controlled by dynamical processes, chemical ozone loss was a major factor in producing both the low values of and the large interannual variability in Arctic column ozone observed during the 1990s.

  11. Microwave Limb Sounder/El Nino Watch - Water Vapor Measurement, October, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows atmospheric water vapor in Earth's upper troposphere, about 10 kilometers (6 miles) above the surface, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument flying aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. These data collected in early October 1997 indicate the presence of El Nino by showing a shift of humidity from west to east (blue and red areas) along the equatorial Pacific Ocean. El Nino is the term used when the warmest equatorial Pacific Ocean water is displaced toward the east. The areas of high atmospheric moisture correspond to areas of very warm ocean water. Warmer water evaporates at a higher rate and the resulting warm moist air then rises, forming tall cloud towers. In the tropics, the warm water and the resulting tall cloud towers typically produce large amounts of rain. The MLS instrument, developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, measures humidity at the top of these clouds, which are very moist. This rain is now occurring in the eastern Pacific Ocean and has left Indonesia (deep blue region) unusually dry, resulting in the current drought in that region. This image also shows moisture moving north into Mexico, an effect of several hurricanes spawned by the warm waters of El Nino.

  12. Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder Estimates of Ozone Loss, 2004/2005 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    These data maps from Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder depict levels of hydrogen chloride (top), chlorine monoxide (center), and ozone (bottom) at an altitude of approximately 19 kilometers (490,000 feet) on selected days during the 2004-05 Arctic winter. White contours demark the boundary of the winter polar vortex.

    The maps from December 23, 2004, illustrate vortex conditions shortly before significant chemical ozone destruction began. By January 23, 2005, chlorine is substantially converted from the 'safe' form of hydrogen chloride, which is depleted throughout the vortex, to the 'unsafe' form of chlorine monoxide, which is enhanced in the portions of the region that receive sunlight at that time of year. Ozone increased over the month as a result of dynamical effects, and chemical ozone destruction is just beginning at this time. A brief period of intense cold a few days later promotes further chlorine activation and consequent changes in hydrogen chloride and chlorine monoxide levels on January 27, 2005. Peak chlorine monoxide enhancement occurs in early February.

    By February 24, 2005, chlorine deactivation is well underway, with chlorine monoxide abundances dropping and hydrogen chloride abundances rising. Almost all chlorine monoxide has been quenched by March 10, 2005. The fact that hydrogen chloride has not fully rebounded to December abundances suggests that some of that chemical was recovered into another chlorine reservoir species.

    Ozone maps for January 27, 2005, through March 10, 2005, show indications of mixing of air from outside the polar vortex into it. Such occurrences throughout this winter, especially in late February and early March, complicate analyses, and detailed calculations are required to rigorously disentangle chemical and dynamical effects and accurately diagnose chemical ozone destruction.

    Based on various analyses of Microwave Limb Sounder data, we estimate that maximum local ozone loss of approximately 2 parts

  13. Entropically mediated polyolefin blend segregation at buried sapphire and air interfaces investigated by infrared-visible sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kweskin, S J; Komvopoulos, K; Somorjai, G A

    2005-12-15

    The segregation behavior of binary polymer blends at hydrophilic solid sapphire and air interfaces was investigated by infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. SFG spectra were collected from a bulk miscible blend consisting of identical molecular weight (approximately 54,000) and similar surface free energy (29-35 dyn/cm) components of atactic polypropylene (aPP) and aspecific poly(ethylene-co-propylene) rubber (aEPR). Characteristic CH resonances of the blend were contrasted with those of the individual components at both buried (sapphire/polymer) and free (air/polymer) interfaces. Preferential segregation of the aPP component was observed after annealing at both air/polymer and sapphire/polymer interfaces. SFG spectra revealed ordering of the polymer backbone segments with the methylene (CH2) groups perpendicular to the surface at the sapphire interface and the methyl (CH3) groups upright at the air interface. The SFG results indicate that the surface composition can be determined from the peak intensities that are characteristic of each component and that conformational entropy played a likely role in surface segregation. aPP occupied a smaller free volume at the surface because of a statistically smaller segment length (aPP is more flexible and has a shorter length). In addition, the high density of the ordered CH3 side branches enhanced the surface activity by allowing the long-chain backbone segments of aPP to order at the surface.

  14. Conditions for the use of infrared camera diagnostics in energy auditing of the objects exposed to open air space at isothermal sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruczek, Tadeusz

    2015-03-01

    Convective and radiation heat transfer take place between various objects placed in open air space and their surroundings. These phenomena bring about heat losses from pipelines, building walls, roofs and other objects. One of the main tasks in energy auditing is the reduction of excessive heat losses. In the case of a low sky temperature, the radiation heat exchange is very intensive and the temperature of the top part of the horizontal pipelines or walls is lower than the temperature of their bottom parts. Quite often this temperature is also lower than the temperature of the surrounding atmospheric air. In the case of overhead heat pipelines placed in open air space, it is the ground and sky that constitute the surroundings. The aforementioned elements of surroundings usually have different values of temperature. Thus, these circumstances bring about difficulties during infrared inspections because only one ambient temperature which represents radiation of all surrounding elements must be known during the thermovision measurements. This work is aimed at the development of a method for determination of an equivalent ambient temperature representing the thermal radiation of the surrounding elements of the object under consideration placed in open air space, which could be applied at a fairly uniform temperature of the sky during the thermovision measurements as well as for the calculation of radiative heat losses.

  15. Collaborative Testing of Methods to Measure Air Pollutants, II. The Non-Dispersive Infrared Method for Carbon Monoxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Herbert C.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The Methods Standardization Branch of the Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center, has undertaken a program to standardize methods used in measuring air pollutants covered by the national primary and secondary air quality standards. This paper presents the results of a collective test of the method specified for…

  16. Global mapping of minor atmospheric constituents with AIRS on EOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Haskins, R. D.

    1990-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a grating-array spectrometer on EOS. It covers the region from 650 to 3000/cm with spectral resolution of 1200. The prime objective of AIRS is the global retrieval of temperature and water vapor profiles and of surface temperatures. The wide spectral coverage of AIRS permits the measurement of a number of additional atmospheric and surface parameters. Of particular interest is the potential to produce daily global maps of the spatial distribution of the more abundant of the minor gases, e.g. ozone, CO, CH4, and N2O. This potential capability for CH4 and N2O is strongly affected by cloud residual. Using the CH4 band at 1306/cm as example, spatial averaging of AIRS data is required to measure a 10 percent change in the nominal CH4 column abundance. At 1300/cm, this requires cloud clearing at the 0.3 percent level. The mapping capability for ozone and CO in terms of rural/urban abundance patterns is not likely to be impacted with cloud-clearing residuals as high as 5 percent.

  17. Geophysical trends from 12+ years of AIRS radiance trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza-Machado, Sergio; Strow, Larrabee; Tangborn, Andrew; Hepplewhite, Chris; Motteler, Howard; Schou, Paul; Buczkowski, Steve

    2015-04-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder has daily been providing low noise, stable top-of-the atmosphere hyperspectral radiances since 2002. Here we present analysis from 12 year linear radiance trends obtained from two AIRS radiance subsets : (1) clear-sky scenes over ocean and (2) all-sky scenes along the nadir track, which are used to retrieve a geophysical trends using an optimal estimation approach. The retrieved clear sky trends compare favorably with ERA and MERRA re-analysis trends, and in-situ trends for the minor gases. Analysis of all-sky trends show they agree better with ERA than either MERRA or the AIRS Level-2 retrievals. The radiance trends provide highly accurate measurements of atmospheric variability with easily understood error characteristics, unlike typical Level 2 retrievals. These approaches should provide highly accurate measurements of a variety of climate trends (temperature and humidity profiles, land surface temperature, cloud radiative forcing) as the AIRS (or AIRS + JPSS/CrIS + IASI) instrument time-series extends to 15+ years.

  18. Long-term assessment of Aqua MODIS radiance observation using comparisons with AIRS and IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veglio, Paolo; Tobin, David C.; Dutcher, Steve; Quinn, Greg; Moeller, Christopher C.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a detailed comparison between Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements over the period 2003-2013 and also between MODIS and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) for the years 2007-2014. For this study AIRS and IASI high spectral resolution data are degraded to MODIS broadband spectral resolution and MODIS fields of view are averaged within the AIRS and IASI footprints. Using spatially uniform scenes, the brightness temperature differences (ΔBT) between MODIS and AIRS are analyzed as a function of scene temperature, scan angle, and solar zenith angle. In general, the measurements of the two sensors are in good agreement (ΔBT less than ±0.2 K) with little or no dependence on the scene temperature. A small dependence is found for the scan angle, where ΔBT varies off nadir up to about ±0.4 K; dependence on the solar zenith angle is also observed, with ΔBT varying up to ±0.5 K. Finally, the variation of ΔBT over time is stable with BT trending less than 0.02 K/yr, with exception of ΔBT for MODIS bands 33 and 35 in the 2011-2013 timeframe. This behavior, which is also identified in MODIS/IASI comparisons, correlates to adjustments in that timeframe of the MODIS nonlinear calibration coefficients.

  19. Intercomparison of three microwave/infrared high resolution line-by-line radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, F.; Garcia, S. Gimeno; Milz, M.; Kottayil, A.; Höpfner, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G.

    2013-05-01

    An intercomparison of three line-by-line (lbl) codes developed independently for atmospheric sounding - ARTS, GARLIC, and KOPRA - has been performed for a thermal infrared nadir sounding application assuming a HIRS-like (High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder) setup. Radiances for the HIRS infrared channels and a set of 42 atmospheric profiles from the "Garand dataset" have been computed. Results of this intercomparison and a discussion of reasons of the observed differences are presented.

  20. Recent microwave sounder observations from aircraft during the HS3 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrigtsen, B.; Brown, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) is a microwave sounder similar to but more capable and accurate than current satellite microwave sounders. Since 2010 it has operated on NASA's Global Hawk UAVs and has been participating in the multiyear Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) hurricane campaign. We present recent results from HS3, including analysis of the thermodynamic and precipitation structure in and around tropical storm systems sampled during HS3. Copyright 2014 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  1. Directional gravity wave momentum fluxes in the stratosphere derived from high-resolution AIRS temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, M.; Hoffmann, L.; Preusse, P.

    2017-01-01

    In order to reduce uncertainties in modeling the stratospheric circulation, global observations of gravity wave momentum flux (GWMF) vectors are required for comparison with distributions of resolved and parametrized GWMF in global models. For the first time, we derive GWMF vectors globally from data of a nadir-viewing satellite instrument: we apply a 3-D method to an Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature data set that was optimized for gravity wave (GW) analysis. For January 2009, the resulting distributions of GW amplitudes and of net GWMF highlight the importance of GWs in the polar vortex and the summertime subtropics. Net GWMF is preferentially directed opposite to the background wind, and, interestingly, it is dominated by large-amplitude GWs of relatively long horizontal wavelength. For convective GW sources, these large horizontal scales are in contradiction with traditional thoughts. However, the observational filter effect needs to be kept in mind when interpreting the results.

  2. Water vapour mixing ratio profiles over Hornsund, Arctic. Intercomparison of lidar and AIRS results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Magdalena; Karasiński, Grzegorz

    2014-04-01

    Since October 2009, a ground-based Raman lidar system has been deployed to perform a regular, night-time, vertical sounding of a water vapour content in the lower and middle troposphere above Polish Polar Station at Hornsund (77.00°N, 15.55°E, 10 m a.s.l.) in the Arctic. The water vapour mixing ratio profiles were obtained for the atmosphere up to 6 km altitude, based on analysis of inelastic Raman backscattering signals from nitrogen molecules (at 387 nm) and water vapour particles (at 407 nm), calibrated with the data from a local Vaisala's automatic meteorological station. The results obtained for winter seasons in the years 2009-2012 are in a good general agreement with the results obtained from the atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) on the Aqua satellite.

  3. Limits of Precipitation Detection from Microwave Radiometers and Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munchak, S. J.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Johnson, B. T.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will unify and draw from numerous microwave conical scanning imaging radiometers and cross-track sounders, many of which already in operation, to provide near real-time precipitation estimates worldwide at 3-hour intervals. Some of these instruments were designed for primary purposes unrelated to precipitation remote sensing. Therefore it is worthwhile to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each set of channels with respect to precipitation detection to fully understand their role in the GPM constellation. The GPM radiometer algorithm will use an observationally-based Bayesian retrieval with common databases of precipitation profiles for all sensors. Since these databases are still under development and will not be truly complete until the GPM core satellite has completed at least one year of dual-frequency radar observations, a screening method based upon retrieval of non-precipitation parameters related to the surface and atmospheric state is used in this study. A cost function representing the departure of modeled radiances from their observed values plus the departure of surface and atmospheric parameters from the TELSEM emissivity atlas and MERRA reanalysis is used as an indicator of precipitation. Using this method, two datasets are used to evaluate precipitation detection: One year of matched AMSR-E and AMSU-B/MHS overpasses with CloudSat used as validation globally; and SSMIS overpasses over the United States using the National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ) as validation. The Heidke Skill Score (HSS) is used as a metric to evaluate detection skill over different surfaces, seasons, and across different sensors. Non-frozen oceans give the highest HSS for all sensors, followed by bare land and coasts, then snow-covered land and sea ice. Negligible skill is present over ice sheets. Sounders tend to have higher skill than imagers over complex surfaces (coast, snow, and sea ice), whereas imagers have higher skill

  4. View-angle-dependent AIRS Cloudiness and Radiance Variance: Analysis and Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.

    2013-01-01

    Upper tropospheric clouds play an important role in the global energy budget and hydrological cycle. Significant view-angle asymmetry has been observed in upper-level tropical clouds derived from eight years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) 15 um radiances. Here, we find that the asymmetry also exists in the extra-tropics. It is larger during day than that during night, more prominent near elevated terrain, and closely associated with deep convection and wind shear. The cloud radiance variance, a proxy for cloud inhomogeneity, has consistent characteristics of the asymmetry to those in the AIRS cloudiness. The leading causes of the view-dependent cloudiness asymmetry are the local time difference and small-scale organized cloud structures. The local time difference (1-1.5 hr) of upper-level (UL) clouds between two AIRS outermost views can create parts of the observed asymmetry. On the other hand, small-scale tilted and banded structures of the UL clouds can induce about half of the observed view-angle dependent differences in the AIRS cloud radiances and their variances. This estimate is inferred from analogous study using Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) radiances observed during the period of time when there were simultaneous measurements at two different view-angles from NOAA-18 and -19 satellites. The existence of tilted cloud structures and asymmetric 15 um and 6.7 um cloud radiances implies that cloud statistics would be view-angle dependent, and should be taken into account in radiative transfer calculations, measurement uncertainty evaluations and cloud climatology investigations. In addition, the momentum forcing in the upper troposphere from tilted clouds is also likely asymmetric, which can affect atmospheric circulation anisotropically.

  5. Real-time Data Processing and Visualization for the Airborne Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. K.; Revercomb, H. E.; Hoese, D.; Garcia, R. K.; Smith, W. L.; Weisz, E.; Tobin, D. C.; Best, F. A.; Knuteson, R. O.; Sullivan, D. V.; Barnes, C. M.; Van Gilst, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) is a five-year NASA mission targeted to enhance the understanding of the formation and evolution of hurricanes in the Atlantic basin. Measurements were made from two NASA Global Hawk Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) during the 2012 through 2014 hurricane seasons, with flights conducted from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. The Global Hawk aircraft are capable of high altitude flights with durations of up to 30 hours, which allow extensive observations over distant storms, not typically possible with manned aircraft. The two NASA Global Hawks were equipped with instrument suites to study the storm environment, and inner core structure and processes, respectively. The Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (S-HIS), designed and built by the University of Wisconsin (UW) Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC), measures emitted thermal radiation at high spectral resolution between 3.3 and 18 microns. The radiance measurements are used to obtain temperature and water vapor profiles of the Earth's atmosphere. The S-HIS spatial resolution is 2 km at nadir, across a 40 km ground swath from a nominal altitude of 20 kilometers. Since 1998, the S-HIS has participated in 33 field campaigns and has proven to be extremely dependable, effective, and highly accurate. It has flown on the NASA ER-2, DC-8, Proteus, WB-57, and Global Hawk airborne platforms. The UW S-HIS infrared sounder instrument is equipped with a real-time ground data processing system capable of delivering atmospheric profiles, radiance data, and engineering status to mission support scientists - all within less than one minute from the time of observation. This ground data processing system was assembled by a small team using existing software and proven practical techniques similar to a satellite ground system architecture. This summary outlines the design overview for the system and illustrates the data path, content, and outcomes.

  6. Data Assimilation of AIRS Water Vapor Profiles: Impact on Precipitation Forecasts for Atmospheric River Cases Affecting the Western of the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary; Wick, Gary; Neiman, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric rivers are transient, narrow regions in the atmosphere responsible for the transport of large amounts of water vapor. These phenomena can have a large impact on precipitation. In particular, they can be responsible for intense rain events on the western coast of North America during the winter season. This paper focuses on attempts to improve forecasts of heavy precipitation events in the Western US due to atmospheric rivers. Profiles of water vapor derived from from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations are combined with GFS forecasts by a three-dimensional variational data assimilation in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) forecasts initialized from the combined field are compared to forecasts initialized from the GFS forecast only for 3 test cases in the winter of 2011. Results will be presented showing the impact of the AIRS profile data on water vapor and temperature fields, and on the resultant precipitation forecasts.

  7. Validation of AIRS V6 Surface Temperature over Greenland with GCN and NOAA Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Hearty, Thomas; Cullather, Richard; Nowicki, Sophie; Susskind, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This work compares the temporal and spatial characteristics of the AIRSAMSU (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A) Version 6 and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Collection 5 derived surface temperatures over Greenland. To estimate uncertainties in space-based surface temperature measurements, we re-projected the MODIS Ice Surface Temperature (IST) to 0.5 by 0.5 degree spatial resolution. We also re-gridded AIRS Skin Temperature (Ts) into the same grid but classified with different cloud conditions and surface types. These co-located data sets make intercomparison between the two instruments relatively straightforward. Using this approach, the spatial comparison between the monthly mean AIRS Ts and MODIS IST is in good agreement with RMS 2K for May 2012. This approach also allows the detection of any long-term calibration drift and the careful examination of calibration consistency in the MODIS and AIRS temperature data record. The temporal correlations between temperature data are also compared with those from in-situ measurements from GC-Net (GCN) and NOAA stations. The coherent time series of surface temperature evident in the correlation between AIRS Ts and GCN temperatures suggest that at monthly time scales both observations capture the same climate signal over Greenland. It is also suggested that AIRS surface air temperature (Ta) can be used to estimate the boundary layer inversion.

  8. Stratospheric gravity wave observations of AIRS and HIRDLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Catrin I.; Hoffmann, Lars; Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Thai

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides stratospheric temperature observations for a variety of scientific analyses. However, the horizontal resolution of the operational temperature retrievals is generally not sufficient for studies of gravity waves. The AIRS high-resolution retrieval discussed here provides stratospheric temperature profiles for each individual satellite footprint and therefore has nine times better horizontal sampling than the operational data. The retrieval configuration is optimized so that the results provide a trade-off between spatial resolution and retrieval noise that is considered optimal for gravity wave analysis. To validate the AIRS data we performed an intercomparison with stratospheric temperature measurements of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). Selected case studies of gravity wave events are analyzed. AIRS and HIRDLS utilize rather different measurement geometries (nadir and limb) and have different sensitivities to gravity wave horizontal and vertical wavelengths, as indicated by their observational filters. Nevertheless, the wave structures found in the stratosphere in AIRS and HIRDLS data are often in remarkably good agreement. The three-dimensional temperature fields from AIRS allow us to derive the horizontal orientation of the phase fronts, which is a limiting factor for gravity wave analyses based on limb measurements today. In addition, a statistical comparison focuses on temperature variances due to stratospheric gravity wave activity at 20-60 km altitude. The analysis covers monthly zonal averages and time series for the HIRDLS measurement time period (January 2005-March 2008). We found good agreement in the seasonal and latitudinal patterns of gravity wave activity. Time series of gravity wave variances show a strong annual cycle at high latitudes with maxima during wintertime and minima during summertime. Largest variability is found at 60°S during austral

  9. Operational use of the AIRS Total Column Ozone Retrievals along with the RGB Airmass Product as Part of the GOES-R Proving Ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folmer, M.; Zavodsky, Bradley; Molthan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Red, Green, Blue (RGB) Air Mass product has been demonstrated in the GOES ]R Proving Ground as a possible decision aid. Forecasters have been trained on the usefulness of identifying stratospheric intrusions and potential vorticity (PV) anomalies that can lead to explosive cyclogenesis, genesis of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), or the transition of tropical cyclones to extratropical cyclones. It has also been demonstrated to distinguish different air mass types from warm, low ozone air masses to cool, high ozone air masses and the various interactions with the PV anomalies. To assist the forecasters in understanding the stratospheric contribution to high impact weather systems, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Total Column Ozone Retrievals have been made available as an operational tool. These AIRS retrievals provide additional information on the amount of ozone that is associated with the red coloring seen in the RGB Air Mass product. This paper discusses how the AIRS retrievals can be used to quantify the red coloring in RGB Air Mass product. These retrievals can be used to diagnose the depth of the stratospheric intrusions associated with different types of weather systems and provide the forecasters decision aid tools that can improve the quality of forecast products.

  10. Development and Application of Hyperspectral Infrared Ozone Retrieval Products for Operational Meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Cyclogenesis is a key forecast challenge at operational forecasting centers such as WPC and OPC, so these centers have a particular interest in unique products that can identify key storm features. In some cases, explosively developing extratropical cyclones can produce hurricane force, non-convective winds along the East Coast and north Atlantic as well as the Pacific Ocean, with the potential to cause significant damage to life and property. Therefore, anticipating cyclogenesis for these types of storms is crucial for furthering the NOAA goal of a "Weather Ready Nation". Over the last few years, multispectral imagery (i.e. RGB) products have gained popularity among forecasters. The GOES-R satellite champion at WPC/OPC has regularly evaluated the Air Mass RGB products from GOES Sounder, MODIS, and SEVIRI to aid in forecasting cyclogenesis as part of ongoing collaborations with SPoRT within the framework of the GOES-R Proving Ground. WPC/OPC has used these products to identify regions of stratospheric air associated with tropopause folds that can lead to cyclogenesis and hurricane force winds. RGB products combine multiple channels or channel differences into multi-color imagery in which different colors represent a particular cloud or air mass type. Initial interaction and feedback from forecasters evaluating the legacy Air Mass RGBs revealed some uncertainty regarding what physical processes the qualitative RGB products represent and color interpretation. To enhance forecaster confidence and interpretation of the Air Mass RGB, NASA SPoRT has transitioned a total column ozone product from AIRS retrievals to the WPC/OPC. The use of legacy AIRS demonstrates future JPSS capabilities possible with CrIS or OMPS. Since stratospheric air can be identified by anomalous potential vorticity and warm, dry, ozone-rich air, hyperspectral infrared sounder ozone products can be used in conjunction with the Air Mass RGB for identifying the role of stratospheric air in explosive

  11. Mars Climate Sounder observations in support of the Mars Science Laboratory Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, D. M.; Vasavada, A. R.; Kleinboehl, A.; Schofield, J. T.; Mischna, M. A.; McCleese, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) is a 9-channel mid- and far infrared limb and on-planet viewing radiometer. Its limb radiance profile measurements are inverted to retrieve temperature, dust and ice extinction profiles. MCS is on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft, in a sun-synchronous polar orbit. As the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) approached Mars and prepared to land on August 6th, MCS provided daily observations of the martian weather close to Gale crater, MSL's landing site. These were compared to the previous years of MCS observations that had already been used to validate the thermal structure and aerosol distributions in the mesoscale models that are used in MSL entry, descent, and landing (EDL) Monte Carlo simulations. The comparisons allowed the MSL team to optimize the lander's systems for the predicted weather during EDL. In addition, the MRO orbit provides MCS with global coverage of the martian atmosphere on a daily basis. Here we give an overview on the martian weather conditions prior to MSL landing. The weather was dominated by the activity along the southern seasonal polar cap edge supported/driven by a number baroclinic features associated with the southern winter polar vortex. Throughout the two months preceding EDL, the MCS observations were compared to the three previous Mars years where MCS observed the atmosphere at the mid-northern summer season (Ls 150) when EDL occurred. While several of the years are quite similar with a cold, cloudy aphelion season there is significant interannual variability. In addition, during this period, the atmosphere undergoes a number of seasonal transitions as the solsticial circulation realigns to the equinoctial circulation.

  12. Temperature and dust profiles in Martian dust storm conditions retrieved from Mars Climate Sounder measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.; McCleese, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) is a mid- and far-infrared thermal emission radiometer on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. It measures radiances in limb and nadir/on-planet geometry from which vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, water vapor, dust and condensates can be retrieved in an altitude range from 0 to 80 km and with a vertical resolution of ~5 km. Due to the limb geometry used as the MCS primary observation mode, retrievals in conditions with high aerosol loading are challenging. We have developed several modifications to the MCS retrieval algorithm that will facilitate profile retrievals in high-dust conditions. Key modifications include a retrieval option that uses a surface pressure climatology if a pressure retrieval is not possible in high dust conditions, an extension of aerosol retrievals to higher altitudes, and a correction to the surface temperature climatology. In conditions of a global dust storm, surface temperatures tend to be lower compared to standard conditions. Taking this into account using an adaptive value based on atmospheric opacity leads to improved fits to the radiances measured by MCS and improves the retrieval success rate. We present first results of these improved retrievals during the global dust storm in 2007. Based on the limb opacities observed during the storm, retrievals are typically possible above ~30 km altitude. Temperatures around 240 K are observed in the middle atmosphere at mid- and high southern latitudes after the onset of the storm. Dust appears to be nearly homogeneously mixed at lower altitudes. Significant dust opacities are detected at least up to 70 km altitude. During much of the storm, in particular at higher altitudes, the retrieved dust profiles closely resemble a Conrath-profile.

  13. The WHISPER Relaxation Sounder and the CLUSTER Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotignon, J. G.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Rauch, J. L.; Vallières, X.; Rochel, A.; Kougblénou, S.; Lointier, G.; Facskó, G.; Canu, P.; Darrouzet, F.; Masson, A.

    The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) instrument is part of the Wave Experiment Consortium (WEC) of the CLUSTER mission. With the help of the long double sphere antennae of the Electric Field and Wave (EFW) instrument and the Digital Wave Processor (DWP), it delivers active (sounding) and natural (transmitter off) electric field spectra, respectively from 4 to 82 kHz, and from 2 to 80 kHz. These frequency ranges have been chosen to include the electron plasma frequency, which is closely related to the total electron density, in most of the regions encountered by the CLUSTER spacecraft. Presented here is an overview of the WHISPER data products available in the CLUSTER Active Archive (CAA). The instrument and its performance are first recalled. The way the WHISPER products are obtained is then described, with particular attention being paid to the density determination. Both sounding and natural measurements are commonly used in this process, which depends on the ambient plasma regime. This is illustrated using drawings similar to the Bryant plots commonly used in the CLUSTER master science plan. These give a clear overview of typical density values and the parts of the orbits where they are obtained. More information on the applied software or on the quality/reliability of the density determination can also be highlighted.

  14. Scanning Mechanism of the FY-3 Microwave Humidity Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Manfred; Jing, Li; Hehr, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Astrium GmbH Germany, developed the scanning equipment for the instrument package of the MicroWave Humidity Sounder (MWHS) flying on the FY-3 meteorological satellite (FY means Feng Yun, Wind and Cloud) in a sun-synchronized orbit of 850-km altitude and at an inclination of 98.8 . The scanning mechanism rotates at variable velocity comprising several acceleration / deceleration phases during each revolution. The Scanning Mechanism contains two output shafts, each rotating a parabolic offset Antenna Reflector. The mechanism is operated in closed loop by means of redundant control electronics. MWHS is a sounding radiometer for measurement of global atmospheric water vapour profiles. An Engineering Qualification Model was developed and qualified and a first Flight Model was launched early 2008. The system is now working for more than two years successful in orbit. A second Flight Model of the Antenna Scanning Mechanism and of its associated control electronics was built and delivered to the customer for application on the follow-on spacecraft that will be launched by the end of 2010.

  15. The Mars Climate Sounder In-Flight Positioning Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Kass, David

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) instrument s in-flight positioning errors and presents background material about it. A short overview of the instrument s science objectives and data acquisition techniques is provided. The brief mechanical description familiarizes the reader with the MCS instrument. Several key items of the flight qualification program, which had a rigorous joint drive test program but some limitations in overall system testing, are discussed. Implications this might have had for the flight anomaly, which began after several months of flawless space operation, are mentioned. The detection, interpretation, and instrument response to the errors is discussed. The anomaly prompted engineering reviews, renewed ground, and some in-flight testing. A summary of these events, including a timeline, is included. Several items of concern were uncovered during the anomaly investigation, the root cause, however, was never found. The instrument is now used with two operational constraints that work around the anomaly. It continues science gathering at an only slightly diminished pace that will yield approximately 90% of the originally intended science.

  16. Application of VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) data in weather analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    A technique which analyzes irregularly spaced satellite data is described. An experiment with rawinsonde and VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) radiance measurements collected on March 6-7, 1982 is conducted to reveal the applicability of the technique. The rawinsonde data are analyzed on a 16 x 12 grid using the two pass analysis scheme of Barnes (1973). A scheme similar to the Barnes (1973) procedure is employed to produce gridded analysis of VAS data over a 200 x 15000 km region in central part of the U.S. The use of a correction pass on the initial gridded field is described; the technique is extremely effective on uniformly spaced observations. The incorporation of the limited fine mesh model to the scheme to analyze data in sparse and cloudy regions is examined. A comparison of rawinsonde data with VAS data is provided. The technique proves effective for studying cloudy and sparse areas with VAS data and produces a four-dimensional data set with significant mesoscale structure.

  17. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.; Chavez, M. C.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Frerking, M. A.; Gram, M. B.; Harris, W. M.; Holden, J. R.; Jarnot, R. F.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is the first satellite experiment using limb sounding techniques at microwave frequencies. Primary measurement objectives are stratospheric ClO, O3, H2O, temperature, and pressure. Measurements are of thermal emission: all are performed simultaneously and continuously and are not degraded by ice clouds or volcanic aerosols. The instrument has a 1.6-m mechanically scanning antenna system and contains heterodyne radiometers in spectral bands centred near 63, 183, and 205 GHz. The radiometers operate at ambient temperature and use Schottky-diode mixers with local oscillators derived from phase-locked Gunn oscillators. Frequency tripling by varactor multipliers generates the 183- and 205-GHz local oscillators, and quasi-optical techniques inject these into the mixers. Six 15-channel filter banks spectrally resolve stratospheric thermal emission lines and produce an output spectrum every 2 s. Thermal stability is sufficient for 'total power' measurements which do not require fast chopping. Radiometric calibration, consisting of measurements of cold space and an internal target, is performed every 65-s limb scan. Instrument in-orbit performance has been excellent, and all objectives are being met.

  18. Wavelet-based coding of ultraspectral sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Vilchez, Fernando; Serra-Sagrista, Joan; Auli-Llinas, Francesc

    2005-08-01

    In this paper we provide a study concerning the suitability of well-known image coding techniques originally devised for lossy compression of still natural images when applied to lossless compression of ultraspectral sounder data. We present here the experimental results of six wavelet-based widespread coding techniques, namely EZW, IC, SPIHT, JPEG2000, SPECK and CCSDS-IDC. Since the considered techniques are 2-dimensional (2D) in nature but the ultraspectral data are 3D, a pre-processing stage is applied to convert the two spatial dimensions into a single spatial dimension. All the wavelet-based techniques are competitive when compared either to the benchmark prediction-based methods for lossless compression, CALIC and JPEG-LS, or to two common compression utilities, GZIP and BZIP2. EZW, SPIHT, SPECK and CCSDS-IDC provide a very similar performance, while IC and JPEG2000 improve the compression factor when compared to the other wavelet-based methods. Nevertheless, they are not competitive when compared to a fast precomputed vector quantizer. The benefits of applying a pre-processing stage, the Bias Adjusted Reordering, prior to the coding process in order to further exploit the spectral and/or spatial correlation when 2D techniques are employed, are also presented.

  19. Assessment of intercalibration methods for satellite microwave humidity sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Viju O.; Allan, Richard P.; Bell, William; Buehler, Stefan A.; Kottayil, Ajil

    2013-05-01

    Three methods for intercalibrating humidity sounding channels are compared to assess their merits and demerits. The methods use the following: (1) natural targets (Antarctica and tropical oceans), (2) zonal average brightness temperatures, and (3) simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs). Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B instruments onboard the polar-orbiting NOAA 15 and NOAA 16 satellites are used as examples. Antarctica is shown to be useful for identifying some of the instrument problems but less promising for intercalibrating humidity sounders due to the large diurnal variations there. Owing to smaller diurnal cycles over tropical oceans, these are found to be a good target for estimating intersatellite biases. Estimated biases are more resistant to diurnal differences when data from ascending and descending passes are combined. Biases estimated from zonal-averaged brightness temperatures show large seasonal and latitude dependence which could have resulted from diurnal cycle aliasing and scene-radiance dependence of the biases. This method may not be the best for channels with significant surface contributions. We have also tested the impact of clouds on the estimated biases and found that it is not significant, at least for tropical ocean estimates. Biases estimated from SNOs are the least influenced by diurnal cycle aliasing and cloud impacts. However, SNOs cover only relatively small part of the dynamic range of observed brightness temperatures.

  20. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ClO Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Lungu, T. A.; Perun, V. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Burke, J. R.; Hardy, J. C.; Nakamura, L. L.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Thurstans, R. P.; Thurstans, R. P.; Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; deZafra, R. L.; Shindell, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Validation of stratospheric ClO measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is described. Credibility of the measurements is established by (1) the consistency of the measured ClO spectral emission line with the retrieved ClO profiles and (2) comparisons of ClO from MLS with that from correlative measurements by balloon-based, ground-based, and aircraft-based instruments. Values of "noise" (random), "scaling" (multiplicative), and "bias" (additive) uncertainties are determined for the Version 3 data, in the first version public release of the known artifacts in these data are identified. Comparisons with correlative measurements indicate agreement to within the combined uncertainties expected for MLS and the other measurements being compared. It is concluded that MLS Version 3 ClO data, with proper consideration of the uncertainties and "quality" parameters produced with these data, can be used for scientific analyses at retrieval surfaces between 46 and 1 hPa (approximately 20-50 km in height). Future work is planned to correct known problems in the data and improve their quality.

  1. AIRS First Light Data: Typhoon Ramasun, July 3, 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2Figure 3

    Four images of Tropical Cyclone Ramasun were obtained July 3, 2002 by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder experiment system onboard NASA's Aqua spacecraft. The AIRS experiment, with its wide spectral coverage in four diverse bands, provides the ability to obtain complete 3-D observations of severe weather, from the surface, through clouds to the top of the atmosphere with unprecedented accuracy. This accuracy is the key to understanding weather patterns and improving weather predictions.

    Viewed separately, none of these images can provide accurate 3-D descriptions of the state of the atmosphere because of interference from clouds. However, the ability to make simultaneous observations at a wide range of wavelengths allows the AIRS experiment to 'see' through clouds.

    This visible light picture from the AIRS instrument provides important information about the location of the cyclone, cloud structure and distribution.

    The AIRS instrument image at 900 cm-1 (Figure 1) is from a 10 micron transparent 'window channel' that is little affected by water vapor but still cannot see through clouds. In clear areas (like the eye of the cyclone and over northwest Australia) it measures a surface temperature of about 300K (color encoded red). In cloudy areas it measures the cloud top temperature, about 200K for the cyclone, which translates to a cloud top height of about 50,000 feet.

    On the other hand, most clouds are relatively transparent in microwave, and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Instrument channel image (Figure 2) can see through all but the densest clouds. For example, Taiwan, which is covered by clouds, is clearly visible.

    The Humidity Sounder for Brazil instrument channel (Figure 3), also in the microwave, is more sensitive to both clouds and humidity. Only in clear, dry regions, such as the eye of the cyclone or the

  2. A method to derive downwelling longwave fluxes at the Arctic surface from TIROS operational vertical sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Jennifer A.

    1997-01-01

    The dominant component of the polar surface energy budget during half the year is the downwelling flux of longwave radiation (DLF), yet little is known about its spatial and temporal variability except on monthly timescales. As surface measurements will always be sparse, the most promising opportunity for diagnosing the DLF is provided by satellite data. Estimating this flux from space, however, presents challenges over all surface types and particularly in polar environments where cloud detection and cloud fraction estimation are less certain. A new method is presented to estimate DLF from measurements by the TIROS-N operational vertical sounder (TOVS). Temperature profiles, humidity estimates, and cloud cover are retrieved from TOVS radiances using the improved initialization inversion algorithm, which has been modified to produce more accurate results over snow and sea ice. This information is combined with brightness temperature differences from pairs of infrared and near-infrared TOVS channels. These differences are used to infer cloud phase and geometric thickness. Longwave fluxes are then calculated using a forward radiative transfer model. Results during winter 1988 and spring 1992 are compared with hourly radiation measurements from the Coordinated Eastern Arctic Experiment in the eastern Arctic basin and from the Lead Experiment in the Beaufort Sea. Error analyses yield a bias of approximately 3 W m-2, a standard deviation of 23 W m-2, and a correlation coefficient of about 0.75. These errors are comparable to results from similar studies over midlatitude land and ocean areas where clouds are more easily identified.

  3. Comparison of AIRS and IASI Surface Observations of DomeC in Antarctica with Surface Temperatures Reported by AWS8989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, D. A.; Aumann, H. H.

    2008-12-01

    The decrease of the ice in the Antarctic indicates that the land and the ocean along the coastline are warming up. Representative numbers for warming at the surface further inland are much more complicated due to the vast size of the continent. The Automated Weather Station AWS8989 has been reporting temperatures from Concordia Station on DomeC in Antarctica every 10 minutes since 1996. AWS8989 is located about 1 mile from the power plant at Concordia Station. We compare the surface temperatures at DomeC deduced from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) data to the surface temperature reported by Automated Weather Station AWS8989 for the year between May 1, 2007 and April 30, 2008. AIRS and IASI measure the mean skin brightness temperature in a 50-km-radius circle from DomeC, while the AWS reports the temperature of the air at 3 meters above the surface. The AIRS and IASI measurements agree within 50 mK over the entire temperature range from 190 K in the winter to 245 K in the summer, but consistently report a colder temperature than the AWS8989. The warm bias of AWS8989 is season dependent, changing from 1.5 K warm in the winter to 5.5 K warm in the summer. Comparison of AIRS data in 2005 with a temporary Italian AWS (Aumann et al. 2006) and located several miles upwind from the power station, showed no significant temperature bias throughout the year 2005. The warm readings of AWS8989 are likely due the combination of a season-independent 1.5 K warm calibration bias in the AWS8989 sensor plus thermal contamination of the AWS8989 site. This heat island effect ranges from near zero during the low-activity winter months to about 4 K during the summer months with the highest activity at Concordia Station. The fact that activities at DomeC are increasing makes surface temperature trends from AWS8989 suspect. AIRS and IASI are hyperspectral infrared sounders designed in support of weather forecasting and climate

  4. High resolution infrared radiation sounder for the Nimbus F spacecraft. [design and fabrication of protoflight unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    The activities on the HIRS program are described for the period of July through September, 1973. Completion of design activity and early fabrication effort on the protoflight unit were the major efforts. Operation of the engineering model in spacecraft integration tests was completed during July and August, after which the unit was returned for added test and evaluation.

  5. Source fingerprint monitoring of air pollutants from petrochemical industry and the determination of their annual emission flux using open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yih-Shiaw Huang; Shih-Yi Chang; Tai-Ly Tso

    1996-12-31

    Toxic air pollutants were investigated in several petrochemical industrial park in Taiwan using a movable open-path Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results show the qualitative and quantitative analysis of emission gases from plants, and also provide the emission rates of various compounds. More than twenty compounds under usual operation were found from these industrial park. The concentration variation with time could be correlated exactly with the distances from the emission source along the wind direction. This means that by changing the measuring points the source of emission could be unambiguously identified. The point, area and line source (PAL) plume dispersion model has been applied to estimate the emission rate of either a point or an area source. The local atmospheric stability was determined by releasing an SF{sub 6} tracer. The origin of errors came mainly from the uncertainty of the source configuration and the variation of the meteorological condition. Through continuous measurement using a portable open-path Fourier transform infrared (POP-FTIR) spectrometer, the maximum value of the emission rate and the annual amount of emission could be derived. The emission rate of the measured toxic gases was derived by the model technique, and the results show that the emission amount is on the order of ten to hundred tons per year.

  6. Infrared spectroscopy analysis of mixed DPPC/fibrinogen layer behavior at the air/liquid interface under a continuous compression-expansion condition.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chia-Lin; Chang, Chien-Hsiang

    2006-07-18

    The mixed layer behavior of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) with fibrinogen at continuously compressed-expanded air/liquid interfaces was analyzed in situ by infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). The reflectance-absorbance (RA) intensities and/or wavenumbers of nu(a)-CH2 and amide I bands for a mixed DPPC/fibrinogen layer at the interface were obtained directly by an infrared spectrometer with a monolayer/grazing angle accessory and a removable Langmuir trough. The nu(a)-CH2 RA intensity-area hysteresis curves of a DPPC monolayer indicate a significant loss of free DPPC molecules at the interface during the first compression stage, which is also supported by the corresponding nu(a)-CH2 wavenumber-area hysteresis curves. For a mixed DPPC/fibrinogen layer at the interface, the amide I RA intensity-area hysteresis curves suggest that the fibrinogen molecules were expelled from the interface upon compression, apparently because of the presence of insoluble DPPC molecules. The squeeze-out of fibrinogen evidently removed a pronounced amount of DPPC from the interface, as judged from the corresponding nu(a)-CH2 intensity and wavenumber data. Moreover, significant adsorption of fibrinogen was found during the subsequent interface expansion stage. With the in situ IRRAS analysis of the mixed layer behavior at the interface, the induced loss of DPPC by fibrinogen expulsion from the compressed interface and the dominant adsorption of fibrinogen to the expanded interface were clearly demonstrated.

  7. Direct measurements of HONO and NO2 by tunable infrared differential absorption spectroscopy; Results from two field campaigns sampling aircraft exhaust and ambient urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Santoni, G.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Munger, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important source of hydroxyl radicals (OH), the main oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. However, gaseous HONO has historically proven difficult to measure accurately and to date there is no standard technique. We describe a new instrument capable of high-frequency measurements of HONO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) mixing ratios by tunable infrared differential absorption spectrometry. Mid-infrared light from two continuous-wave mode quantum cascade lasers traverse a 210 m path through a multi-pass astigmatic cell at reduced pressures for the direct detection of HONO (1660 cm-1) and NO2 (1604 cm-1). We achieve an absorbance precision less than 3×10-6 Hz-1 in one second, which translates to detection limits (S/N=3) of 300 and 30 ppt for HONO and NO2, respectively, in one second. Both lasers and the detector are thermoelectrically cooled, facilitating long-term unattended measurements. We also report preliminary results from two field campaigns; the Alternative Aviation Fuels Experiment (AAFEX) and the Study of Houston Air Radical Precursors (SHARP). At AAFEX, HONO emission ratios relative to CO2 and NOy observed in commercial aircraft exhaust are larger than in most other combustion sources and likely to play a significant role in regional HOx chemistry. Preliminary analysis from the SHARP campaign shows good agreement in HONO and NO2 levels between various measurement techniques.

  8. Infrared radiance analysis from the SNPP airborne field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2014-11-01

    Experimental field campaigns, including satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft, are an essential part of the satellite measurement system validation task aimed at improving observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for enabling enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. The Suomi NPP (SNPP) airborne field campaign was conducted during the 6 - 31 May, 2013 timeframe based out of Palmdale, CA, and focused on under-flights of the SNPP satellite with the NASA ER-2 aircraft in order to perform cal/val of the satellite instruments and their corresponding data products. Aircraft flight profiles were designed to under-fly multiple satellites within a single sortie, when feasible, to address satellite sensor validation and cross-validation; specifically, in addition to under-flying SNPP, flight profiles were defined to also obtain data coincident with the NASA A-train (i.e. AQUA), MetOP-A, and MetOP-B satellites to enable intercomparisons with instruments aboard those platforms (i.e. AIRS, IASI, and CrIS). This presentation focuses on radiance analysis from the SNPP airborne field campaign with a particular emphasis on NAST-I intercomparisons with the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS).

  9. Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) phase 1. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the 12-month phase 1 work effort. The objective of phase 1 was to establish the conceptional definition of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) sensor system, including accommodations analyses to ensure compatibility with the Space Station Freedom (SSF) and the Earth Observing System (EOS) Polar Orbiting Platform (POP). Various concepts were investigated with trade studies performed to select the configuration to be carried forward to the phase 2 Preliminary Design Definition. A summary of the LAWS system and subsystem trade studies that were performed leading to the baseline design configuration is presented in the appendix. The overall objective of the LAWS Project is to define, design, and implement an operational space based facility, LAWS, for accurate measurement of Earth wind profiles. Phase 1 addressed three major areas: (1) requirements definition; (2) instrument concepts and configurations; and (3) performance analysis. For the LAWS instrument concepts and configurations, the issues which press the technological state of the art are reliable detector lifetime and laser performance and lifetime. Lag angle compensation, pointing accuracy, satellite navigation, and telescope design are significant technical issues, but they are considered to be currently state of the art. The primary issues for performance analysis concern interaction with the atmosphere in terms of backscatter and attenuation, wind variance, and cloud blockage. The phase 1 tasks were formulated to address these significant technical issues and demonstrate the technical feasibility of the LAWS concept. Primary emphasis was placed on analysis/trade and identification of candidate concepts. Promising configurations were evaluated for performance, sensitivities, risks, and budgetary costs. Lockheed's baseline LAWS configuration is presented.

  10. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder HCl Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Jiang, Y. B.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Fuller, R. A.; Marcy, T. P.; Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Jucks, K. W.; Stachnik, R. A.; Toon, G. C.; Christensen, L. E.; Webster, C. R.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Walker, K. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Harwood, R. S.; Manney, G. L.; Schwartz, M. J.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite has provided daily global HCl profiles since August 2004. We provide a characterization of the resolution, random and systematic uncertainties, and known issues for the version 2.2 MLS HCl data. The MLS sampling allows for comparisons with many (1500 to more than 3000) closely matched profiles from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). These data sets provide HCl latitudinal distributions that are, overall, very similar to those from (coincident) MLS profiles, although there are some discrepancies in the upper stratosphere between the MLS and HALOE gradients. As found in previous work, MLS and ACE HCl profiles agree very well (within approximately 5%, on average), but the MLS HCl abundances are generally larger (by 10-20%) than HALOE HCl. The bias versus HALOE is unlikely to arise mostly from MLS, as a similar systematic bias (of order 15%) is not observed between average MLS and balloon-borne measurements of HCl, obtained over Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 2004 and 2005. At the largest pressure (147 hPa) for MLS HCl, a high bias (approximately 0.2 ppbv) is apparent in analyses of low to midlatitude data versus in situ aircraft chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) HCl measurements from the Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaigns in 2004, 2005, and 2006; this bias is also observed in comparisons of MLS and aircraftHCl/O3 correlations. Good agreement between MLS and CIMS HCl is obtained at 100 to 68 hPa. The recommended pressure range for MLS HCl is from 100 to 0.15 hPa.

  11. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Temperature and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, E. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lungu, T.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Singh, U.; Gross, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) atmospheric temperature and tangent-point pressure measurements are described. Temperatures and tangent- point pressure (atmospheric pressure at the tangent height of the field of view boresight) are retrieved from a 15-channel 63-GHz radiometer measuring O2 microwave emissions from the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Version 3 data (first public release) contains scientifically useful temperatures from 22 to 0.46 hPa. Accuracy estimates are based on instrument performance, spectroscopic uncertainty and retrieval numerics, and range from 2.1 K at 22 hPa to 4.8 K at 0.46 hPa for temperature and from 200 m (equivalent log pressure) at 10 hPa to 300 m at 0.1 hPa. Temperature accuracy is limited mainly by uncertainty in instrument characterization, and tangent-point pressure accuracy is limited mainly by the accuracy of spectroscopic parameters. Precisions are around 1 K and 100 m. Comparisons are presented among temperatures from MLS, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) stratospheric analysis and lidar stations at Table Mountain, California, Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP), France, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, Maryland. MLS temperatures tend to be 1-2 K lower than NMC and lidar, but MLS is often 5 - 10 K lower than NMC in the winter at high latitudes, especially within the northern hemisphere vortex. Winter MLS and OHP (44 deg N) lidar temperatures generally agree and tend to be lower than NMC. Problems with Version 3 MLS temperatures and tangent-point pressures are identified, but the high precision of MLS radiances will allow improvements with better algorithms planned for the future.

  12. Mare volcanism: Reinterpretation based on Kaguya Lunar Radar Sounder data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshigami, Shoko; Watanabe, Shiho; Yamaguchi, Yasushi; Yamaji, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takao; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Ishiyama, Ken; Ono, Takayuki

    2014-05-01

    The Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) onboard Kaguya (SELENE) detected widespread horizontal reflectors under some nearside maria. Previous studies estimated that the depths of the subsurface reflectors were up to several hundreds of meters and suggested that the reflectors were interfaces between mare basalt units. The comparison between the reflectors detected in the LRS data and surface age maps indicating the formation age of each basalt unit allows us to discuss the lower limit volume of each basalt unit and its space and time variation. We estimated volumes of basalt units in the ages of 2.7 Ga to 3.8 Ga in the nearside maria including Mare Crisium, Mare Humorum, Mare Imbrium, Mare Nectaris, Mare Serenitatis, Mare Smythii, and Oceanus Procellarum. The lower limit volumes of the geologic units estimated in this study were on the order of 103 to 104 km3. This volume range is consistent with the total amount of erupted lava flows derived from numerical simulations of thermal erosion models of lunar sinuous rille formation and is also comparable to the average flow volumes of continental flood basalt units formed after the Paleozoic and calculated flow volumes of Archean komatiite flows on the Earth. The lower limits of average eruption rates estimated from the unit volumes were on the order of 10-5 to 10-3 km3/yr. The estimated volumes of the geologic mare units and average eruption rate showed clear positive correlations with their ages within the same mare basin, while they vary among different maria compared within the same age range.

  13. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; Margitan, J. J.; McDermid, I. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Braathen, G.; Deshler, T.; Fishman, J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz. Analyses described here focus on the MLS Version 3 data (the first set of files made publicly available). We describe results of simulations performed to assess the quality of the retrieval algorithms, in terms of both mixing ratio and radiance closure. From actual MLS observations, the 205-GHz ozone retrievals give better closure (smaller radiance residuals) than that from the 183-GHz measurements and should be considered more accurate from the calibration aspects. However, the 183-GHz data are less noise limited in the mesosphere and can provide the most useful scientific results in that region. We compare the retrieved 205-GHz ozone profiles in the middle-to lower stratosphere to ozonesonde measurements at a wide range of latitudes and seasons. Ground-based lidar data from Table Mountain, California, provide a good reference for comparisons at higher altitudes. Based on these analyses, comparisons with balloon-borne measurements and others, as well as a detailed budget of estimated uncertainties, MLS results appear to be generally of high quality, with some biases worth mentioning. Results for the lowermost stratosphere (approx. 50 to 100 bPa) are still in need of improvement. A set of estimated precision and accuracy values is derived for the MLS ozone data sets. We also comment on recent updates in the retrieval algorithms and their impact on ozone values.

  14. The UARS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Lau, G. K.; Pickett, H. M.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.; Boyles, M. A.; Burke, J. R.; Lay, R. R.; Loo, M. S.; Livesey, N. J.; Lungu, T. A.; Manney, G. L.; Nakamura, L. L.;  Perun, V. S.;  Ridenoure, B. P.;  Shippony, Z.;  Siegel, P. H.;  Thurstans, R. P.;  Harwood, R. S.;  Pumphrey, H. C.;  Filipiak, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) experiments obtain measurements of atmospheric composition, temperature, and pressure by observations of millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength thermal emission as the instrument field of view is scanned through the atmospheric limb. Features of the measurement technique include the ability to measure many atmospheric gases as well as temperature and pressure, to obtain measurements even in the presence of dense aerosol and cirrus, and to provide near-global coverage on a daily basis at all times of day and night from an orbiting platform. The composition measurements are relatively insensitive to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature. An accurate spectroscopic database is available, and the instrument calibration is also very accurate and stable. The first MLS experiment in space, launched on the (NASA) Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in September 1991, was designed primarily to measure stratospheric profiles of ClO, O3, H2O, and atmospheric pressure as a vertical reference. Global measurement of ClO, the predominant radical in chlorine destruction of ozone, was an especially important objective of UARS MLS. All objectives of UARS MLS have been accomplished and additional geophysical products beyond those for which the experiment was designed have been obtained, including measurement of upper-tropospheric water vapor, which is important for climate change studies. A follow-on MLS experiment is being developed for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) and is scheduled to be launched on the EOS CHEMISTRY platform in late 2002. EOS MLS is designed for many stratospheric measurements, including HOx radicals, which could not be measured by UARS because adequate technology was not available, and better and more extensive upper-tropospheric and lower-stratospheric measurements.

  15. Validation of AIRS/AMSU Cloud Retrievals Using MODIS Cloud Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Gyula I.; Susskind, Joel

    2005-01-01

    The AIRS/AMSU (flying on the EOS-AQUA satellite) sounding retrieval methodology allows for the retrieval of key atmospheric/surface parameters under partially cloudy conditions (Susskind et al.). In addition, cloud parameters are also derived from the AIRS/AMSU observations. Within each AIRS footprint, cloud parameters at up to 2 cloud layers are determined with differing cloud top pressures and effective (product of infrared emissivity at 11 microns and physical cloud fraction) cloud fractions. However, so far the AIRS cloud product has not been rigorously evaluated/validated. Fortunately, collocated/coincident radiances measured by MODIS/AQUA (at a much lower spectral resolution but roughly an order of-magnitude higher spatial resolution than that of AIRS) are used to determine analogous cloud products from MODIS. This allows us for a rather rare and interesting possibility: the intercomparisons and mutual validation of imager vs. sounder-based cloud products obtained from the same satellite positions. First, we present results of small-scale (granules) instantaneous intercomparisons. Next, we will evaluate differences of temporally averaged (monthly) means as well as the representation of inter-annual variability of cloud parameters as presented by the two cloud data sets. In particular, we present statistical differences in the retrieved parameters of cloud fraction and cloud top pressure. We will investigate what type of cloud systems are retrieved most consistently (if any) with both retrieval schemes, and attempt to assess reasons behind statistically significant differences.

  16. Regression analysis in modeling of air surface temperature and factors affecting its value in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim Mohammed; Jafri, Mohd. Zubir Mat; Lim, Hwee San; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2012-10-01

    This study encompasses air surface temperature (AST) modeling in the lower atmosphere. Data of four atmosphere pollutant gases (CO, O3, CH4, and H2O) dataset, retrieved from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), from 2003 to 2008 was employed to develop a model to predict AST value in the Malaysian peninsula using the multiple regression method. For the entire period, the pollutants were highly correlated (R=0.821) with predicted AST. Comparisons among five stations in 2009 showed close agreement between the predicted AST and the observed AST from AIRS, especially in the southwest monsoon (SWM) season, within 1.3 K, and for in situ data, within 1 to 2 K. The validation results of AST with AST from AIRS showed high correlation coefficient (R=0.845 to 0.918), indicating the model's efficiency and accuracy. Statistical analysis in terms of β showed that H2O (0.565 to 1.746) tended to contribute significantly to high AST values during the northeast monsoon season. Generally, these results clearly indicate the advantage of using the satellite AIRS data and a correlation analysis study to investigate the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases on AST over the Malaysian peninsula. A model was developed that is capable of retrieving the Malaysian peninsulan AST in all weather conditions, with total uncertainties ranging between 1 and 2 K.

  17. Performance of the AIRS Pulse Tube Coolers and Instrument—A First Year in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, R. G.; Rodriguez, J. I.

    2004-06-01

    Launched on NASA's Aqua platform on May 4, 2002, JPL's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument has completed a successful first year in space and captured a number of important lessons. AIRS is designed to make precision measurements of air temperature over the surface of the Earth and uses a redundant pair of TRW 55 K pulse tube cryocoolers to cool its sensitive IR focal plane. Soon after the instrument went cold, contamination of cryogenic surfaces led to increased cooler loads and the need for decontamination cycles. In addition, single event transients occurred while passing through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) necessitating corrective actions. In November 2002 the fundamental operating strategy of the AIRS instrument was changed from the original strategy of running a single cooler and having the second cooler as a non-operating backup. Instead, based on a new system-level reliability analysis, both coolers began operation simultaneously. This change resolved the contamination and SAA driven interruptions and has enabled unprecedented levels of continuous science measurements. A review of the AIRS instrument cryogenic performance over the past year is presented including its contamination buildup and interrupt history. The reliability analysis conducted to justify two-cooler operation is also reviewed.

  18. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-06-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  19. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated.

  20. Field-aligned electron density irregularities near 500 km Equator to polar cap topside sounder observations

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, R.F.

    1985-06-01

    In addition to spread F, evidence for field-aligned electron density irregularities is commonly observed on Alouette 2 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee (500 km). This evidence is provided by distinctive signal returns from sounder-generated Z mode waves. At low latitudes these waves become guided in wave ducts caused by field-aligned electron density irregularities and give rise to strong long-duration echoes. At high latitudes, extending well into the polar cap, these Z mode waves (and stimulated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency) produce a series of vertical bars on the ionogram display as the satellite traverses discrete field-aligned density structures. The radio frequency (RF) noise environment to be expected in the 400 to 500 km altitude region from low to high latitudes was examined by analyzing perigee Alouette 2 topside sounder data. All observed noise bands were scaled on nearly 200 topside sounder ionograms recorded near perigee at low, mid, and high latitude telemetry stations. The minimum and maximum frequencies of each noise band were entered into a data base or computer analysis. The signals of primary interest in the perigee study were found to be sounder-generated. 15 references.

  1. Evaluation of gas chromatography/matrix isolation infrared spectrometry for the determination of semivolatile organic compounds in air-sample extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, J.W.; Wilson, N.K.; Barbour, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    The capabilities of gas chromatography/matrix isolation-infrared (GC/MI-IR) spectrometry for determination of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in air sample extracts were evaluated. Systematic experiments, using xylene isomers as test compounds, were conducted to determine the repeatability of the steps involved in GC/MI-IR measurements and to identify parameters that affect the precision in quantitation. The repeatability of MI-IR net absorbance measurements for single and replicate depositions was determined. The MI-IR net absorbance was nonlinear at concentrations higher than 52.1 ng/microliters, probably due to an increase in the sample spot size relative to the IR beam focus or a decrease in the matrix-to-solute ratio to less than acceptable matrix isolation conditions. The method detection limit for xylene isomers was between 1 and 2 ng/microliters injected on-column for routine measurements. Extensive signal averaging was required to obtain spectra at concentrations less than 1 ng/microliters. The method was tested by determining target SVOCs in ambient air sample extracts. The MI-IR quantitative results were compared to those from the system's flame ionization detector(FID). The FID response exhibited a high bias when unknown compounds coeluted with target analytes. The ability of GC/MI-IR to quantify target compounds in the presence of interferents and to discriminate between coeluting isomers is demonstrated.

  2. In situ study by polarization modulated Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the structure and orientation of lipids and amphipathic peptides at the air-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Cornut, I; Desbat, B; Turlet, J M; Dufourcq, J

    1996-01-01

    Free amphipathic peptides and peptides bound to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) were studied directly at the air/water interface using polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PMIRRAS). Such differential reflectivity measurements proved to be a sensitive and efficient technique to investigate in situ the respective conformations and orientations of lipid and peptide molecules in pure and mixed films. Data obtained for melittin, a natural hemolytic peptide, are compared to those of L15K7, an ideally amphipathic synthetic peptide constituted by only apolar Leu and polar Lys residues. For pure peptidic films, the intensity, shape, and position of the amide I and II bands indicate that the L15K7 peptide adopts a totally alpha-helical structure, whereas the structure of melittin is mainly alpha-helical and presents some unordered domains. The L15K7 alpha-helix axis is oriented essentially parallel to the air-water interface plane; it differs for melittin. When injected into the subphase, L15K7 and melittin insert into preformed expanded DMPC monolayers and can be detected by PMIRRAS, even at low peptide content (> 50 DMPC molecules per peptide). In such conditions, peptides have the same secondary structure and orientation as in pure peptidic films. PMID:8770206

  3. Validating the AIRS Version 5 CO Retrieval with DACOM In Situ Measurements During INTEX-A and -B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Wallace W.; Evans, Keith D.; Barnet, Christopher D.; Maddy, Eric; Sachse, Glen W.; Diskin, Glenn S.

    2011-01-01

    Herein we provide a description of the atmospheric infrared sounder (AIRS) version 5 (v5) carbon monoxide (CO) retrieval algorithm and its validation with the DACOM in situ measurements during the INTEX-A and -B campaigns. All standard and support products in the AIRS v5 CO retrieval algorithm are documented. Building on prior publications, we describe the convolution of in situ measurements with the AIRS v5 CO averaging kernel and first-guess CO profile as required for proper validation. Validation is accomplished through comparison of AIRS CO retrievals with convolved in situ CO profiles acquired during the NASA Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiments (INTEX) in 2004 and 2006. From 143 profiles in the northern mid-latitudes during these two experiments, we find AIRS v5 CO retrievals are biased high by 6% 10% between 900 and 300 hPa with a root-mean-square error of 8% 12%. No significant differences were found between validation using spiral profiles coincident with AIRS overpasses and in-transit profiles under the satellite track but up to 13 h off in time. Similarly, no significant differences in validation results were found for ocean versus land, day versus night, or with respect to retrieved cloud top pressure or cloud fraction.

  4. AIRS Products Confirm and Explain Recent Negative Trends of OLR as Observed by CERES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Molnar, Gyula; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    Anomalies and trends of OLR serve as important indicators of climate change. Several satellite based instruments currently provide information related to OLR. CERES, on board the EOS Aqua and Terra satellites, contains broad band radiometers that measure total flux and short-wave flux, from which OLR is determined. AIRS is a high spectral resolution IR sounder on EOS Aqua that measures IR radiances covering most of the spectral interval 650/cm to 2670/cm. These observations enable the determination of detailed information about atmospheric temperature, moisture, and ozone profiles, as well as surface skin temperatures and cloud parameters. The AIRS OLR product is the total flux over the spectral interval 2/cm to 2750/cm computed for the surface and atmospheric state determined from AIRS observations. We compared spatial anomalies and trends of OLR, over the seven year period September 2002 through August 2009, as observed by CERES and computed using Version-5 AIRS products. These two sets of OLR anomalies and trends, obtained in very different ways, agree with each other almost perfectly in essentially every detail. This important finding shows that a very stable high spectral infra-red sounder such as AIRS corroborates the anomalies and trends of OLR obtained from CERES. More significantly, anomalies and trends of the individual geophysical parameters derived from AIRS explain the detailed causes of the anomalies and trends of CERES OLR. Both sets of results show that global mean OLR has been decreasing at a rate of 0.12 W/sq m/yr over the seven year time period under study. Both also confirm that the primary cause of this is due to changes in the tropics, in which OLR has been decreasing at a rate of 0.27 W/sq m/yr. AIRS products show that the decrease of tropical OLR is a result of increasing tropical atmospheric water vapor and cloud cover over that time period studied, which in turn is responding to a very strong La Nina; a event starting in late 2007

  5. Assimilation of AIRS radiances for short term regional forecasts using community models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Agnes Huei Ni

    With the hyperspectral sounder's capability of providing information about temperature and humidity of the atmosphere at increased vertical resolution, the assimilation of these radiances has proven to improve numerical weather prediction in global models. The current two hyperspectral infrared sounders in orbit, AIRS and IASI, each contributed to a 12% error reduction in the ECMWF global forecasts, emerging as the single space-borne sensor to contribute the largest forecast improvement in global models (Cardinali, 2009). In this study, regional assimilation of clear sky AIRS radiances was carried out using a community available data assimilation system GSI coupled with the WRF forecast model. As the systems used were not optimized, tuning was necessary prior to carrying out the assimilation. Components of the assimilation system that required tuning included the background error covariance matrix, the satellite radiance bias correction and quality control procedures for AIRS radiances. In addition, the forecast model vertical resolution had been increased with more levels included in the stratosphere. Adopting procedures used by NCEP's operational regional data assimilation, experiments with and without AIRS radiances were carried out for a period of 16 days to access the impact of including AIRS radiances. Diagnostics from the assimilation system showed that analyses had larger temperature biases for experiments ending at 06 and 18 UTC. In addition, biases were still significant after assimilation for satellite channels that were sensitive to surface properties and water vapor. Forecasts were verified with a wide range of datasets ranging from model analyses, radiosondes, observed satellite radiances and 24 hour accumulated precipitation. With assimilation of clear sky AIRS radiances, largest improvement in bias was observed when forecasts were verified with radiosondes and satellite observations. The 00 and 12 UTC forecast were typically of better quality than

  6. Trends in Surface Temperature from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Aumann, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    To address possible causes of the current hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We find a monotonic positive trend for the land temperature but not for the ocean temperature. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The results are compared with the model studies. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  7. NIMBUS-5 sounder data processing system. Part 2: Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Woolf, H. M.; Hayden, C. M.; Shen, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    The Nimbus-5 spacecraft carries infrared and microwave radiometers for sensing the temperature distribution of the atmosphere. Methods developed for obtaining temperature profiles from the combined set of infrared and microwave radiation measurements are described. Algorithms used to determine (a) vertical temperature and water vapor profiles, (b) cloud height, fractional coverage, and liquid water content, (c) surface temperature, and (d) total outgoing longwave radiation flux are described. Various meteorological results obtained from the application of the Nimbus-5 sounding data processing system during 1973 and 1974 are presented.

  8. Multi-instrument gravity-wave measurements over Tierra del Fuego and the Drake Passage - Part 1: Potential energies and vertical wavelengths from AIRS, COSMIC, HIRDLS, MLS-Aura, SAAMER, SABER and radiosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, C. J.; Hindley, N. P.; Moss, A. C.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2015-07-01

    Gravity waves in the terrestrial atmosphere are a vital geophysical process, acting to transport energy and momentum on a wide range of scales and to couple the various atmospheric layers. Despite the importance of these waves, the many studies to date have often exhibited very dissimilar results, and it remains unclear whether these differences are primarily instrumental or methodological. Here, we address this problem by comparing observations made by a diverse range of the most widely-used gravity wave resolving instruments in a common geographic region around the southern Andes and Drake Passage, an area known to exhibit strong wave activity. Specifically, we use data from three limb-sounding radiometers (MLS-Aura, HIRDLS and SABER), the COSMIC GPS-RO constellation, a ground-based meteor radar, the AIRS infrared nadir sounder and radiosondes to examine the gravity wave potential energy (GWPE) and vertical wavelengths (λz) of individual gravity wave packets from the lower troposphere to the edge of the lower thermosphere. Our results show important similarities and differences. Limb sounder measurements show high intercorrelation, typically > 0.80 between any instrument pair. Meteor-radar observations agree in form with the limb sounders, despite vast technical differences. AIRS and radiosonde observations tend to be uncorrelated or anticorrelated with the other datasets, suggesting very different behaviour of the wave field in the different spectral regimes accessed by each instrument. Except in spring, we see little dissipation of GWPE throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere. Observed GWPE for individual wave packets exhibits a log-normal distribution, with short-timescale intermittency dominating over a well-repeated monthly-median seasonal cycle. GWPE and λz exhibit strong correlations with the stratospheric winds, but not with local surface winds. Our results provide guidance for interpretation and intercomparison of such datasets in their full

  9. New and improved infrared absorption cross sections for chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Jeremy J.

    2016-06-01

    The most widely used hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) commercially since the 1930s has been chloro-difluoromethane, or HCFC-22, which has the undesirable effect of depleting stratospheric ozone. As this molecule is currently being phased out under the Montreal Protocol, monitoring its concentration profiles using infrared sounders crucially requires accurate laboratory spectroscopic data. This work describes new high-resolution infrared absorption cross sections of chlorodifluoromethane over the spectral range 730-1380 cm-1, determined from spectra recorded using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (Bruker IFS 125HR) and a 26 cm pathlength cell. Spectra of chlorodifluoromethane/dry synthetic air mixtures were recorded at resolutions between 0.01 and 0.03 cm-1 (calculated as 0.9/MOPD; MOPD denotes the maximum optical path difference) over a range of temperatures and pressures (7.5-762 Torr and 191-295 K) appropriate for atmospheric conditions. This new cross-section dataset improves upon the one currently available in the HITRAN (HIgh-resolution TRANsmission) and GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques) databases; in particular it provides coverage over a wider range of pressures and temperatures, has more accurate wavenumber scales, more consistent integrated band intensities, improved signal-to-noise, is free of channel fringing, and additionally covers the ν2 and ν7 bands.

  10. Step-Scan T-Cell Fourier Transform Infrared Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) for Monitoring Environmental Air Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lixian; Mandelis, Andreas; Melnikov, Alexander; Michaelian, Kirk; Huan, Huiting; Haisch, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Air pollutants have adverse effects on the Earth's climate system. There is an urgent need for cost-effective devices capable of recognizing and detecting various ambient pollutants. An FTIR photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) method based on a commercial FTIR spectrometer developed for air contamination monitoring will be presented. A resonant T-cell was determined to be the most appropriate resonator in view of the low-frequency requirement and space limitations in the sample compartment. Step-scan FTIR-PAS theory for regular cylinder resonator has been described as a reference for prediction of T-cell vibration principles. Both simulated amplitude and phase responses of the T-cell show good agreement with measurement data Carbon dioxide IR absorption spectra were used to demonstrate the capacity of the FTIR-PAS method to detect ambient pollutants. The theoretical detection limit for carbon dioxide was found to be 4 ppmv. A linear response to carbon dioxide concentration was found in the range from 2500 ppmv to 5000 ppmv. The results indicate that it is possible to use step-scan FTIR-PAS with a T-cell as a quantitative method for analysis of ambient contaminants.

  11. Sounder-accelerated electrons radiate slow-Z-mode waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, G.

    During the OEDIPUS-C (OC) double-payload rocket experiment, waves were transmitted from a 19-m dipole on one subpayload and received at a distance of 1200 m on a similar dipole. Bistatic propagation was obtained in the slow-Z mode of propagation, i.e., at frequencies f in max{fc, fp} < quad f quad < quad fuh, where fc is the electron gyrofrequency, fp the plasma frequency and fuh the upper-hybrid-resonance frequency. Auroral hiss is generated in the slow-Z mode. In OC, the separation vector between the transmitter and receiver lay along a direction at about 5 from the axis of the Earth's magnetic field B. The Z-mode pulses were strong and significantly dispersed. Propagation near the upper oblique resonance cone was investigated using solutions of the complete electromagnetic hot-plasma dispersion relation. No solutions were found at the operating frequencies with the observed group delays and ray directions. An explanation has been proposed involving incoherent radiation from sounder-accelerated electrons (SAE). Published observations of SAE on OC show that the OC transmitting dipole produces strong SAE at energies from 10 eV up to 10 keV when the transmitting frequency sweeps through Z-mode frequency range. The near field of the transmitting dipole pushes SAE helically downward in the general direction of the receiver. At every instant, each SAE particle creates radiation that obeys the resonance condition f - mfc = (nf/c)cosθ Vcosα , where m is a signed integer, n the Z-mode refractive index, θ the angle between the direction of propagation of the radiation and B, V the electron speed and α its pitch angle. Using the reported SAE energies, it is found that time delays like those observed can be explained with Z-mode n and θ values, for m = 0, 1 or 2. The resonance condition and dispersion relation together require θ values near the upper-oblique resonance cone. Test-particle theory combined with the hot-plasma dispersion solution is used to predict the

  12. Using an extractive Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for improving cleanroom air quality in a semiconductor manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Li, Shou-Nan; Chang, Chin-Ta; Shih, Hui-Ya; Tang, Andy; Li, Alen; Chen, Yin-Yung

    2003-01-01

    A mobile extractive Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was successfully used to locate, identify, and quantify the "odor" sources inside the cleanroom of a semiconductor manufacturing plant. It was found that ozone (O(3)) gas with a peak concentration of 120 ppm was unexpectedly releasing from a headspace of a drain for transporting used ozonized water and that silicon tetrafluoride (SiF(4)) with a peak concentration of 3 ppm was off-gassed from silicon wafers after dry-etching processing. When the sources of the odors was pinpointed by the FTIR, engineering control measures were applied. For O(3) control, a water-sealed pipeline was added to prevent the O(3) gas (emitting from the ozonized water) from entering the mixing unit. A ventilation system also was applied to the mixing unit in case of O(3) release. For SiF(4) mitigation, before the wafer-out chamber was opened, N(2) gas with a flow rate of 150 L/min was used for 100 sec to purge the wafer-out chamber, and a vacuum system was simultaneously activated to pump away the purging N(2). The effectiveness of the control measures was assured by using the FTIR. In addition, the FTIR was used to monitor the potential hazardous gas emissions during preventative maintenance of the semiconductor manufacturing equipment.

  13. Microwave Moisture Sounder Feasibility Study. Phase 2. Retrieval Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-14

    and millimeter wave sensor ( .. n and imager ) data which extends the adopted operational algorithm based on a pirel’ statistically based retrieval of...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE All other edtions are obsolete Unclassified Si. % * W | - ! 1 t- Cont of Block 19: characterize the spectral ...visible and (b) infrared GOES imager data ... ................................................. 55 3-1 Comparison of extinction coefficient (BEXT) and

  14. [Retrieval of the Optical Thickness and Cloud Top Height of Cirrus Clouds Based on AIRS IR High Spectral Resolution Data].

    PubMed

    Cao, Ya-nan; Wei, He-li; Dai, Cong-ming; Zhang, Xue-hai

    2015-05-01

    A study was carried out to retrieve optical thickness and cloud top height of cirrus clouds from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) high spectral resolution data in 1070~1135 cm-1 IR band using a Combined Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model (CART) by brightness temperature difference between model simulation and AIRS observation. The research is based on AIRS LIB high spectral infrared observation data combined with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud product data. Brightness temperature spectra based, on the retrieved cirrus optical thickness and cloud top height were simulated and compared with brightness temperature spectra of AIRS observation in the 650~1150 cm-1 band. The cirrus optical thickness and cloud top height retrieved were compared with brightness temperature of AIRS for channel 760 (900.56 cm-1, 11. 1 µm) and cirrus reflectance of MODIS cloud product. And cloud top height retrieved was compared with cloud top height from MODIS. Results show that the brightness temperature spectra simulated were basically consistent with AIRS observation under the condition of retrieval in the 650~1150 cm-1 band. It means that CART can be used to simulate AIRS brightness temperature spectra. The retrieved cirrus parameters are consistent with brightness temperature of AIRS for channel 11. 1 µm with low brightness temperature corresponding to large cirrus optical thickness and high cloud top height. And the retrieved cirrus parameters are consistent with cirrus reflectance of MODIS cloud product with high cirrus reflectance corresponding to large cirrus optical thickness and high cloud top height. Correlation coefficient of brightness temperature between retrieved cloud top height and MODIS cloud top height was relatively high. They are mostly located in the range of 8. 5~11.5 km, and their probability distribution trend is approximately identical. CART model is feasible to retrieve cirrus properties, and the retrieval is reliable.

  15. AIRS Observations of DomeC in Antarctica and Comparison with Automated Weather Stations (AWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Gregorich, Dave; Broberg, Steve

    2006-01-01

    We compare the surface temperatures at Dome Concordia (DomeC) deduced from AIRS data and two Automatic Weather Stations at Concordia Station: AWS8989 , which has been in operation since December 1996, and AWS.it, for which data are available between January and November 2005. The AWS8989 readings are on average 3 K warmer than the AWS.it readings, with a warmer bias in the Antarctic summer than in the winter season. Although AIRS measures the skin brightness temperature, while the AWS reports the temperature of the air at 3 meter above the surface, the AIRS measurements agree well with the AWS.it readings for all data and separately for the summer and winter seasons, if data taken in the presence of strong surface inversions are filtered out. This can be done by deducing the vertical temperature gradient above the surface directly from the AIRS temperature sounding channels or indirectly by noting that extreme vertical gradients near the surface are unlikely if the wind speed is more than a few meters per second. Since the AIRS measurements are very well calibrated, the agreement with AWS.it is very encouraging. The warmer readings of AWS8989 are likely due to thermal contamination of the AWS8989 site by the increasing activity at Concordia Station. Data from an AWS.it quality station could be used for the evaluation of radiometric accuracy and stability of polar orbiting sounders at low temperatures. Unfortunately, data from AWS.it was available only for a limited time. The thermal contamination of the AWS8989 data makes long-term trends deduced from AWS8989 and possibly results about the rapid Antarctic warming deduced from other research stations on Antarctica suspect. AIRS is the first hyperspectral infrared sounder designed in support of weather forecasting and climate research. It was launched in May 2002 on the EOS Aqua spacecraft into a 704 km altitude polar sun-synchronous orbit. The lifetime of AIRS, estimated before launch to be at least 5 years is

  16. Extension of radiative transfer code MOMO, matrix-operator model to the thermal infrared - Clear air validation by comparison to RTTOV and application to CALIPSO-IIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doppler, Lionel; Carbajal-Henken, Cintia; Pelon, Jacques; Ravetta, François; Fischer, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    1-D radiative transfer code Matrix-Operator Model (MOMO), has been extended from [0.2-3.65 μm] the band to the whole [0.2-100 μm] spectrum. MOMO can now be used for the computation of a full range of radiation budgets (shortwave and longwave). This extension to the longwave part of the electromagnetic radiation required to consider radiative transfer processes that are features of the thermal infrared: the spectroscopy of the water vapor self- and foreign-continuum of absorption at 12 μm and the emission of radiation by gases, aerosol, clouds and surface. MOMO's spectroscopy module, Coefficient of Gas Absorption (CGASA), has been developed for computation of gas extinction coefficients, considering continua and spectral line absorptions. The spectral dependences of gas emission/absorption coefficients and of Planck's function are treated using a k-distribution. The emission of radiation is implemented in the adding-doubling process of the matrix operator method using Schwarzschild's approach in the radiative transfer equation (a pure absorbing/emitting medium, namely without scattering). Within the layer, the Planck-function is assumed to have an exponential dependence on the optical-depth. In this paper, validation tests are presented for clear air case studies: comparisons to the analytical solution of a monochromatic Schwarzschild's case without scattering show an error of less than 0.07% for a realistic atmosphere with an optical depth and a blackbody temperature that decrease linearly with altitude. Comparisons to radiative transfer code RTTOV are presented for simulations of top of atmosphere brightness temperature for channels of the space-borne instrument MODIS. Results show an agreement varying from 0.1 K to less than 1 K depending on the channel. Finally MOMO results are compared to CALIPSO Infrared Imager Radiometer (IIR) measurements for clear air cases. A good agreement was found between computed and observed radiance: biases are smaller than 0.5 K

  17. Global consistency check of AIRS and IASI total CO2 column concentrations using WDCGG ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Anyuan; Shu, Jiong; Song, Ci; Gao, Wei

    2016-12-01

    This article describes a global consistency check of CO2 satellite retrieval products from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) using statistical analysis and data from the World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG). We use the correlation coefficient (r), relative difference (RD), root mean square errors (RMSE), and mean bias error (MBE) as evaluation indicators for this study. Statistical results show that a linear positive correlation between AIRS/IASI and WDCGG data occurs for most regions around the world. Temporal and spatial variations of these statistical quantities reflect obvious differences between satellite-derived and ground-based data based on geographic position, especially for stations near areas of intense human activities in the Northern Hemisphere. It is noteworthy that there appears to be a very weak correlation between AIRS/IASI data and ten groundbased observation stations in Europe, Asia, and North America. These results indicate that retrieval products from the two satellite-based instruments studied should be used with great caution.

  18. Global consistency check of AIRS and IASI total CO2 column concentrations using WDCGG ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Anyuan; Shu, Jiong; Song, Ci; Gao, Wei

    2017-03-01

    This article describes a global consistency check of CO2 satellite retrieval products from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) using statistical analysis and data from the World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases (WDCGG). We use the correlation coefficient (r), relative difference (RD), root mean square errors (RMSE), and mean bias error (MBE) as evaluation indicators for this study. Statistical results show that a linear positive correlation between AIRS/IASI and WDCGG data occurs for most regions around the world. Temporal and spatial variations of these statistical quantities reflect obvious differences between satellite-derived and ground-based data based on geographic position, especially for stations near areas of intense human activities in the Northern Hemisphere. It is noteworthy that there appears to be a very weak correlation between AIRS/IASI data and ten groundbased observation stations in Europe, Asia, and North America. These results indicate that retrieval products from the two satellite-based instruments studied should be used with great caution.

  19. Analysis of a vortex precipitation event over Southwest China using AIRS and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Chengcheng; Li, Guoping; Xiong, Xiaozhen

    2017-04-01

    A strong precipitation event caused by the southwest vortex (SWV), which affected Sichuan Province and Chongqing municipality in Southwest China on 10-14 July 2012, is investigated. The SWV is examined using satellite observations from AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), in situ measurements from the SWV intensive observation campaign, and MICAPS (Marine Interactive Computer-Aided Provisioning System) data. Analysis of this precipitation process revealed that: (1) heavy rain occurred during the development phase, and cloud water content increased significantly after the dissipation of the SWV; (2) the area with low outgoing longwave radiation values from AIRS correlated well with the SWV; (3) variation of the temperature of brightness blackbody (TBB) from AIRS reflected the evolution of the SWV, and the values of TBB reduced significantly during the SWV's development; and (4) strong temperature and water vapor inversions were noted during the development of the SWV. The moisture profile displayed large vertical variation during the SWV's puissant phase, with the moisture inversion occurring at low levels. The moisture content during the receding phase was significantly reduced compared with that during the developing and puissant phases. The vertical flux of vapor divergence explained the variation of the moisture profile. These results also indicate the potential for using AIRS products in studying severe weather over the Tibetan Plateau and its surroundings, where in situ measurements are sparse.

  20. Bias Correction for Assimilation of Retrieved AIRS Profiles of Temperature and Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Brad; Blackwell, William

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral radiometer aboard NASA's Aqua satellite designed to measure atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity. AIRS retrievals are assimilated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over the North Pacific for some cases involving "atmospheric rivers". These events bring a large flux of water vapor to the west coast of North America and often lead to extreme precipitation in the coastal mountain ranges. An advantage of assimilating retrievals rather than radiances is that information in partly cloudy fields of view can be used. Two different Level 2 AIRS retrieval products are compared: the Version 6 AIRS Science Team standard retrievals and a neural net retrieval from MIT. Before assimilation, a bias correction is applied to adjust each layer of retrieved temperature and humidity so the layer mean values agree with a short-term model climatology. WRF runs assimilating each of the products are compared against each other and against a control run with no assimilation. This paper will describe the bias correction technique and results from forecasts evaluated by validation against a Total Precipitable Water (TPW) product from CIRA and against Global Forecast System (GFS) analyses.

  1. Bias Correction for Assimilation of Retrieved AIRS Profiles of Temperature and Humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Blackwell, William

    2014-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral radiometer aboard NASA's Aqua satellite designed to measure atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity. AIRS retrievals are assimilated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over the North Pacific for some cases involving "atmospheric rivers". These events bring a large flux of water vapor to the west coast of North America and often lead to extreme precipitation in the coastal mountain ranges. An advantage of assimilating retrievals rather than radiances is that information in partly cloudy fields of view can be used. Two different Level 2 AIRS retrieval products are compared: the Version 6 AIRS Science Team standard retrievals and a neural net retrieval from MIT. Before assimilation, a bias correction is applied to adjust each layer of retrieved temperature and humidity so the layer mean values agree with a short-term model climatology. WRF runs assimilating each of the products are compared against each other and against a control run with no assimilation. Forecasts are against ERA reanalyses.

  2. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived Surface Skin Temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) of 2003-2014 were investigated and the three datasets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically up to 1.65 K warmer at the sea ice boundary and up to 2.04 K colder in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a~less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally-varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three datasets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high latitude regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  3. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived surface skin temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) 2003-2014 were investigated and the three data sets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. The AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically warmer up to 1.65 K at the sea ice boundary and colder down to -2.04 K in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient o