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Sample records for airway ciliated cells

  1. ATP7B detoxifies silver in ciliated airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ibricevic, Aida; Brody, Steven L.; Youngs, Wiley J.; Cannon, Carolyn L.

    2010-03-15

    Silver is a centuries-old antibiotic agent currently used to treat infected burns. The sensitivity of a wide range of drug-resistant microorganisms to silver killing suggests that it may be useful for treating refractory lung infections. Toward this goal, we previously developed a methylated caffeine silver acetate compound, SCC1, that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against clinical strains of bacteria in vitro and when nebulized to lungs in mouse infection models. Preclinical testing of high concentrations of SCC1 in primary culture mouse tracheal epithelial cells (mTEC) showed selective ciliated cell death. Ciliated cell death was induced by both silver- and copper-containing compounds but not by the methylated caffeine portion of SCC1. We hypothesized that copper transporting P-type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, play a role in silver detoxification in the airway. In mTEC, ATP7A was expressed in non-ciliated cells, whereas ATP7B was expressed only in ciliated cells. The exposure of mTEC to SCC1 induced the trafficking of ATP7B, but not ATP7A, suggesting the presence of a cell-specific silver uptake and detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, the expression of the copper uptake protein CTR1 was also restricted to ciliated cells. A role of ATP7B in silver detoxification was further substantiated when treatment of SCC1 significantly increased cell death in ATP7B shRNA-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, mTEC from ATP7B{sup -/-} mice showed enhanced loss of ciliated cells compared to wild type. These studies are the first to demonstrate a cell type-specific expression of the Ag{sup +}/Cu{sup +} transporters ATP7A, ATP7B, and CTR1 in airway epithelial cells and a role for ATP7B in detoxification of these metals in the lung.

  2. Directed Induction of Functional Multi-ciliated Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Spheroids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Satoshi; Gotoh, Shimpei; Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Korogi, Yohei; Nagasaki, Tadao; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Ito, Isao; Tsukita, Sachiko; Mishima, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multi-ciliated airway cells (MCACs) play a role in mucociliary clearance of the lung. However, the efficient induction of functional MCACs from human pluripotent stem cells has not yet been reported. Using carboxypeptidase M (CPM) as a surface marker of NKX2-1+-ventralized anterior foregut endoderm cells (VAFECs), we report a three-dimensional differentiation protocol for generating proximal airway epithelial progenitor cell spheroids from CPM+ VAFECs. These spheroids could be induced to generate MCACs and other airway lineage cells without alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, the directed induction of MCACs and of pulmonary neuroendocrine lineage cells was promoted by adding DAPT, a Notch pathway inhibitor. The induced MCACs demonstrated motile cilia with a “9 + 2” microtubule arrangement and dynein arms capable of beating and generating flow for mucociliary transport. This method is expected to be useful for future studies on human airway disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:26724905

  3. Chibby functions to preserve normal ciliary morphology through the regulation of intraflagellar transport in airway ciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Siller, Saul S; Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Airway cilia provide the coordinated motive force for mucociliary transport, which prevents the accumulation of mucus, debris, pollutants, and bacteria in our respiratory tracts. As airway cilia are constantly exposed to the environment and, hence, are an integral component of the pathogenesis of several congenital and chronic pulmonary disorders, it is necessary to understand the molecular mechanisms that control ciliated cell differentiation and ciliogenesis. We have previously reported that loss of the basal body protein Chibby (Cby) results in chronic upper airway infection in mice due to a significant reduction in the number of airway cilia. In the present work, we demonstrate that Cby is required for normal ciliary structure and proper distribution of proteins involved in the bidirectional intraflagellar transport (IFT) system, which consists of 2 distinct sub-complexes, IFT-A and IFT-B, and is essential for ciliary biogenesis and maintenance. In fully differentiated ciliated cells, abnormal paddle-like cilia with dilated ciliary tips are observed in Cby-/- airways and primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs). In addition, IFT88, an IFT-B sub-complex protein, robustly accumulates within the dilated tips of both multicilia in Cby-/- MTECs and primary cilia in Cby-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Furthermore, we show that only IFT-B components, including IFT20 and IFT57, but not IFT-A and Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins, amass with IFT88 in these distended tips in Cby-/- ciliated cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that Cby plays a role in the proper distribution of IFT particles to preserve normal ciliary morphology in airway ciliated cells.

  4. The differentiated airway epithelium infected by influenza viruses maintains the barrier function despite a dramatic loss of ciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nai-Huei; Yang, Wei; Beineke, Andreas; Dijkman, Ronald; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Thiel, Volker; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Meng, Fandan; Herrler, Georg

    2016-12-22

    Virus-host interactions in the respiratory epithelium during long term influenza virus infection are not well characterized. Therefore, we developed an air-liquid interface culture system for differentiated porcine respiratory epithelial cells to study the effect of virus-induced cellular damage. In our well-differentiated cells, α2,6-linked sialic acid is predominantly expressed on the apical surface and the basal cells mainly express α2,3-linked sialic acid. During the whole infection period, release of infectious virus was maintained at a high titre for more than seven days. The infected epithelial cells were subject to apoptosis resulting in the loss of ciliated cells together with a thinner thickness. Nevertheless, the airway epithelium maintained trans-epithelial electrical resistance and retained its barrier function. The loss of ciliated cells was compensated by the cells which contained the KRT5 basal cell marker but were not yet differentiated into ciliated cells. These specialized cells showed an increase of α2,3-linked sialic acid on the apical surface. In sum, our results help to explain the localized infection of the airway epithelium by influenza viruses. The impairment of mucociliary clearance in the epithelial cells provides an explanation why prior viral infection renders the host more susceptible to secondary co-infection by another pathogen.

  5. The differentiated airway epithelium infected by influenza viruses maintains the barrier function despite a dramatic loss of ciliated cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Nai-Huei; Yang, Wei; Beineke, Andreas; Dijkman, Ronald; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Thiel, Volker; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Meng, Fandan; Herrler, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Virus-host interactions in the respiratory epithelium during long term influenza virus infection are not well characterized. Therefore, we developed an air-liquid interface culture system for differentiated porcine respiratory epithelial cells to study the effect of virus-induced cellular damage. In our well-differentiated cells, α2,6-linked sialic acid is predominantly expressed on the apical surface and the basal cells mainly express α2,3-linked sialic acid. During the whole infection period, release of infectious virus was maintained at a high titre for more than seven days. The infected epithelial cells were subject to apoptosis resulting in the loss of ciliated cells together with a thinner thickness. Nevertheless, the airway epithelium maintained trans-epithelial electrical resistance and retained its barrier function. The loss of ciliated cells was compensated by the cells which contained the KRT5 basal cell marker but were not yet differentiated into ciliated cells. These specialized cells showed an increase of α2,3-linked sialic acid on the apical surface. In sum, our results help to explain the localized infection of the airway epithelium by influenza viruses. The impairment of mucociliary clearance in the epithelial cells provides an explanation why prior viral infection renders the host more susceptible to secondary co-infection by another pathogen. PMID:28004801

  6. Myb permits multilineage airway epithelial cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jie-hong; Adair-Kirk, Tracy L.; Patel, Anand C.; Huang, Tao; Yozamp, Nicholas S.; Xu, Jian; Reddy, E. Premkumar; Byers, Derek E.; Pierce, Richard A.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brody, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelium of the pulmonary airway is specially differentiated to provide defense against environmental insults, but also subject to dysregulated differentiation that results in lung disease. The current paradigm for airway epithelial differentiation is a one-step program whereby a p63+ basal epithelial progenitor cell generates a ciliated or secretory cell lineage, but the cue for this transition and whether there are intermediate steps is poorly defined. Here we identify transcription factor Myb as a key regulator that permits early multilineage differentiation of airway epithelial cells. Myb+ cells were identified as p63− and therefore distinct from basal progenitor cells, but were still negative for markers of differentiation. Myb RNAi treatment of primary-culture airway epithelial cells and Myb gene deletion in mice resulted in a p63− population with failed maturation of Foxj1+ ciliated cells, as well as Scbg1a1+ and Muc5ac+ secretory cells. Consistent with these findings, analysis of whole genome expression of Myb-deficient cells identified Myb-dependent programs for ciliated and secretory cell differentiation. Myb+ cells were rare in human airways but were increased in regions of ciliated cells and mucous cell hyperplasia in samples from subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Together, the results show that a p63− Myb+ population of airway epithelial cells represents a distinct intermediate stage of differentiation that is required under normal conditions and may be heightened in airway disease. PMID:25103188

  7. Generation of novel AAV variants by directed evolution for improved CFTR delivery to human ciliated airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Li, Wuping; Zhang, Liqun; Johnson, Jarrod S; Zhijian, Wu; Grieger, Joshua C; Ping-Jie, Xiao; Drouin, Lauren M; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Pickles, Raymond J; Samulski, R Jude

    2009-12-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have been used to deliver CFTR to the airway epithelium of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, no significant CFTR function has been demonstrated likely due to low transduction efficiencies of the AAV vectors. To improve AAV transduction efficiency for human airway epithelium (HAE), we generated a chimeric AAV library and performed directed evolution of AAV on an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium. Two independent and novel AAV variants were identified that contained capsid components from AAV-1, AAV-6, and/or AAV-9. The transduction efficiencies of the two novel AAV variants for human ciliated airway epithelium were three times higher than that for AAV-6. The novel variants were then used to deliver CFTR to ciliated airway epithelium from CF patients. Here we show that our novel AAV variants, but not the parental, AAV provide sufficient CFTR delivery to correct the chloride ion transport defect to ~25% levels measured in non-CF cells. These results suggest that directed evolution of AAV on relevant in vitro models will enable further improvements in CFTR gene transfer efficiency and the development of an efficacious and safe gene transfer vector for CF lung disease.

  8. Generation of Novel AAV Variants by Directed Evolution for Improved CFTR Delivery to Human Ciliated Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wuping; Zhang, Liqun; Johnson, Jarrod S; Zhijian, Wu; Grieger, Joshua C; Ping-Jie, Xiao; Drouin, Lauren M; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Pickles, Raymond J; Samulski, R Jude

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors expressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene have been used to deliver CFTR to the airway epithelium of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, no significant CFTR function has been demonstrated likely due to low transduction efficiencies of the AAV vectors. To improve AAV transduction efficiency for human airway epithelium (HAE), we generated a chimeric AAV library and performed directed evolution of AAV on an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium. Two independent and novel AAV variants were identified that contained capsid components from AAV-1, AAV-6, and/or AAV-9. The transduction efficiencies of the two novel AAV variants for human ciliated airway epithelium were three times higher than that for AAV-6. The novel variants were then used to deliver CFTR to ciliated airway epithelium from CF patients. Here we show that our novel AAV variants, but not the parental, AAV provide sufficient CFTR delivery to correct the chloride ion transport defect to ~25% levels measured in non-CF cells. These results suggest that directed evolution of AAV on relevant in vitro models will enable further improvements in CFTR gene transfer efficiency and the development of an efficacious and safe gene transfer vector for CF lung disease. PMID:19603002

  9. CX3CR1 Is Expressed in Differentiated Human Ciliated Airway Cells and Co-Localizes with Respiratory Syncytial Virus on Cilia in a G Protein-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kwang-Il; Piepenhagen, Peter A.; Kishko, Michael; DiNapoli, Joshua M.; Groppo, Rachel P.; Zhang, Linong; Almond, Jeffrey; Kleanthous, Harry; Delagrave, Simon; Parrington, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the principal cause of bronchiolitis in infants and a significant healthcare problem. The RSV Glycoprotein (G) mediates attachment of the virus to the cell membrane, which facilitates interaction of the RSV Fusion (F) protein with nucleolin, thereby triggering fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. However, a host protein ligand for G has not yet been identified. Here we show that CX3CR1 is expressed in the motile cilia of differentiated human airway epithelial (HAE) cells, and that CX3CR1 co-localizes with RSV particles. Upon infection, the distribution of CX3CR1 in these cells is significantly altered. Complete or partial deletion of RSV G results in viruses binding at least 72-fold less efficiently to cells, and reduces virus replication. Moreover, an antibody targeting an epitope near the G protein’s CX3CR1-binding motif significantly inhibits binding of the virus to airway cells. Given previously published evidence of the interaction of G with CX3CR1 in human lymphocytes, these findings suggest a role for G in the interaction of RSV with ciliated lung cells. This interpretation is consistent with past studies showing a protective benefit in immunizing against G in animal models of RSV infection, and would support targeting the CX3CR1-G protein interaction for prophylaxis or therapy. CX3CR1 expression in lung epithelial cells may also have implications for other respiratory diseases such as asthma. PMID:26107373

  10. The human airway epithelial basal cell transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Neil R; Shaykhiev, Renat; Walters, Matthew S; Wang, Rui; Zwick, Rachel K; Ferris, Barbara; Witover, Bradley; Salit, Jacqueline; Crystal, Ronald G

    2011-05-04

    The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population. Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the "human airway basal cell signature" as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels. The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem/progenitor cells of the human airway epithelium.

  11. The Human Airway Epithelial Basal Cell Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Zwick, Rachel K.; Ferris, Barbara; Witover, Bradley; Salit, Jacqueline; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The human airway epithelium consists of 4 major cell types: ciliated, secretory, columnar and basal cells. During natural turnover and in response to injury, the airway basal cells function as stem/progenitor cells for the other airway cell types. The objective of this study is to better understand human airway epithelial basal cell biology by defining the gene expression signature of this cell population. Methodology/Principal Findings Bronchial brushing was used to obtain airway epithelium from healthy nonsmokers. Microarrays were used to assess the transcriptome of basal cells purified from the airway epithelium in comparison to the transcriptome of the differentiated airway epithelium. This analysis identified the “human airway basal cell signature” as 1,161 unique genes with >5-fold higher expression level in basal cells compared to differentiated epithelium. The basal cell signature was suppressed when the basal cells differentiated into a ciliated airway epithelium in vitro. The basal cell signature displayed overlap with genes expressed in basal-like cells from other human tissues and with that of murine airway basal cells. Consistent with self-modulation as well as signaling to other airway cell types, the human airway basal cell signature was characterized by genes encoding extracellular matrix components, growth factors and growth factor receptors, including genes related to the EGF and VEGF pathways. Interestingly, while the basal cell signature overlaps that of basal-like cells of other organs, the human airway basal cell signature has features not previously associated with this cell type, including a unique pattern of genes encoding extracellular matrix components, G protein-coupled receptors, neuroactive ligands and receptors, and ion channels. Conclusion/Significance The human airway epithelial basal cell signature identified in the present study provides novel insights into the molecular phenotype and biology of the stem

  12. Epithelial cell culture from human adenoids: a functional study model for ciliated and secretory cells.

    PubMed

    González, Claudia; Espinosa, Marisol; Sánchez, María Trinidad; Droguett, Karla; Ríos, Mariana; Fonseca, Ximena; Villalón, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Mucociliary transport (MCT) is a defense mechanism of the airway. To study the underlying mechanisms of MCT, we have both developed an experimental model of cultures, from human adenoid tissue of ciliated and secretory cells, and characterized the response to local chemical signals that control ciliary activity and the secretion of respiratory mucins in vitro. In ciliated cell cultures, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and intracellular Ca(2+) levels were measured in response to ATP, UTP, and adenosine. In secretory cultures, mucin synthesis and secretion were identified by using immunodetection. Mucin content was taken from conditioned medium and analyzed in the presence or absence of UTP. Enriched ciliated cell monolayers and secretory cells were obtained. Ciliated cells showed a basal CBF of 10.7 Hz that increased significantly after exposure to ATP, UTP, or adenosine. Mature secretory cells showed active secretion of granules containing different glycoproteins, including MUC5AC. Culture of ciliated and secretory cells grown from adenoid epithelium is a reproducible and feasible experimental model, in which it is possible to observe ciliary and secretory activities, with a potential use as a model to understand mucociliary transport control mechanisms.

  13. Epithelial Cell Culture from Human Adenoids: A Functional Study Model for Ciliated and Secretory Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Claudia; Espinosa, Marisol; Sánchez, María Trinidad; Droguett, Karla; Ríos, Mariana; Fonseca, Ximena; Villalón, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mucociliary transport (MCT) is a defense mechanism of the airway. To study the underlying mechanisms of MCT, we have both developed an experimental model of cultures, from human adenoid tissue of ciliated and secretory cells, and characterized the response to local chemical signals that control ciliary activity and the secretion of respiratory mucins in vitro. Materials and Methods. In ciliated cell cultures, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and intracellular Ca2+ levels were measured in response to ATP, UTP, and adenosine. In secretory cultures, mucin synthesis and secretion were identified by using immunodetection. Mucin content was taken from conditioned medium and analyzed in the presence or absence of UTP. Results. Enriched ciliated cell monolayers and secretory cells were obtained. Ciliated cells showed a basal CBF of 10.7 Hz that increased significantly after exposure to ATP, UTP, or adenosine. Mature secretory cells showed active secretion of granules containing different glycoproteins, including MUC5AC. Conclusion. Culture of ciliated and secretory cells grown from adenoid epithelium is a reproducible and feasible experimental model, in which it is possible to observe ciliary and secretory activities, with a potential use as a model to understand mucociliary transport control mechanisms. PMID:23484122

  14. Transcriptional PROFILING OF MUCOCILIARY DIFFERENTIATION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI) in the appropriate medium, primary human airway epithelial cells form a polarized, pseudostratified epithelium composed of ciliated and mucus-secreting cells. This culture system provides a useful tool for the in vitro study of...

  15. Transcriptional PROFILING OF MUCOCILIARY DIFFERENTIATION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI) in the appropriate medium, primary human airway epithelial cells form a polarized, pseudostratified epithelium composed of ciliated and mucus-secreting cells. This culture system provides a useful tool for the in vitro study of...

  16. Injury induces direct lineage segregation of functionally distinct airway basal stem/progenitor cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Law, Brandon M; Tata, Purushothama Rao; Villoria, Jorge; Saez, Borja; Mou, Hongmei; Zhao, Rui; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-01-01

    Summary Following injury, stem cells restore normal tissue architecture by producing the proper number and proportions of differentiated cells. Current models of airway epithelial regeneration propose that distinct cytokeratin 8-expressing progenitor cells, arising from p63+ basal stem cells, subsequently differentiate into secretory and ciliated cell lineages. We now show that immediately following injury, discrete subpopulations of p63+ airway basal stem/progenitor cells themselves express Notch pathway components associated with either secretory or ciliated cell fate commitment. One basal cell population displays intracellular Notch2 activation and directly generates secretory cells; the other expresses c-myb and directly yields ciliated cells. Furthermore, disrupting Notch ligand activity within the basal cell population at large disrupts the normal pattern of lineage segregation. These non-cell autonomous effects demonstrate that effective airway epithelial regeneration requires intercellular communication within the broader basal stem/progenitor cell population. These findings have broad implications for understanding epithelial regeneration and stem cell heterogeneity. PMID:25658372

  17. Epithelial ciliated beating cells essential for ex vivo ALI culture growth.

    PubMed

    Gras, Delphine; Petit, Aurélie; Charriot, Jérémy; Knabe, Lucie; Alagha, Khuder; Gamez, Anne Sophie; Garulli, Céline; Bourdin, Arnaud; Chanez, Pascal; Molinari, Nicolas; Vachier, Isabelle

    2017-05-03

    Bronchial epithelium plays a key role in orchestrating innate and adaptive immunity. The fate of ex vivo airway epithelial cultures growing at the air liquid interface (ALI) derived from human endobronchial biopsies or brushings is not easy to predict. Calibrating and differentiating these cells is a long and expensive process requiring rigorous expertise. Pinpointing factors associated with ALI culture success would help researchers gain further insight into epithelial progenitor behavior. A successful ALI culture was defined as one in which a pseudostratified epithelium has formed after 28 days in the presence of all differentiated epithelial cell types. A 4-year prospective bi-center study was conducted with adult subjects enrolled in different approved research protocols. 463 consecutive endobronchial biopsies were obtained from normal healthy volunteers, healthy smokers, asthmatic patients and smokers with COPD. All demographic variables, the different fiber optic centers and culture operators, numbers of endo-bronchial biopsies and the presence of ciliated cells were carefully recorded. Univariate and multivariate models were developed. A stepwise procedure was used to select the final logistic regression model. ALI culture success was independently associated with the presence of living ciliated cells within the initial biopsy (OR = 2.18 [1.50-3.16], p < 0.001). This finding highlights the properties of the cells derived from the epithelium dedifferentiation process. The preferential selection of samples with ciliated beating cells would probably save time and money. It is still unknown whether successful ALI culture is related to indicators of general cell viability or a purported stem cell state specifically associated with ciliated beating cells.

  18. The role of oestrogen in the control of ciliated cells of the human endometrium.

    PubMed

    More, I A; Masterton, R G

    1976-05-01

    The incidence of ciliated cells in the human endometrium was determined. Conditions associated with an excess of oestrogenic activity were characterized by an increased incidence of ciliated cells, whilst oestrogen deficiency was associated with decreased numbers. When endometrium was cultured, addition of oestradiol-17 beta caused an increase in the ciliated cell population.

  19. [Early morphogenesis of ciliated cells in human oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Kurtova, A I; Chernikov, V P; Savel'ev, S V

    2013-01-01

    Ciliated cells were found in the epithelium of the oral cavity of human embryos and fetuses starting from the seventh week of prenatal development. At the early stages of prenatal development (until the 13th week), cells with cilia cover most of the dorsal surface of the tongue and the soft palate, whereas they are found only near the gland ducts in the circumvallate and foliate lingual papillae after 17 weeks of development. The ultrastructure of the axoneme of cilia corresponds to the structure of motile cilia and is represented by nine microtubule doublets that surround the central pair of microtubule singlets. An immunohistochemical study performed on weeks 10-12 of development identified nerve endings associated with the ciliated cells. Until the 14th week of development, the cytoplasm of ciliated cells is immunopositive for NSE. The spatial distribution of ciliated cells in the tongue epithelium until the 13th week of development is not related to the morphogenesis of lingual papillae, and their role in the human oral cavity during the first trimester of pregnancy is unclear and requires further study.

  20. Alterations of ciliate phosducin phosphorylation in Blepharisma japonicum cells.

    PubMed

    Sobierajska, Katarzyna; Fabczak, Hanna; Fabczak, Stanisław

    2005-05-13

    We have previously reported that motile photophobic response in ciliate Blepharisma japonicum correlates with dephosphorylation of a cytosolic 28 kDa phosphoprotein (PP28) exhibiting properties similar to those of phosducin. Here we demonstrate in in vivo phosphorylation assay that the light-elicited dephosphorylation of the PP28 is significantly modified by cell incubation with substances known to modulate protein phosphatase and kinase activities. Immunoblot analyses showed that incubation of ciliates with okadaic acid and calyculin A, potent inhibitors of type 1 or 2A protein phosphatases, distinctly increased phosphorylation of PP28 in dark-adapted cells and markedly weakened dephosphorylation of the ciliate phosducin following cell illumination. An enhancement of PP28 phosphorylation was also observed in dark-adapted ciliates exposed to 8-Br-cAMP and 8-Br-cGMP, slowly hydrolysable cyclic nucleotide analogs and 3-isobutyryl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), a non-specific cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDEs) inhibitor. Only slight changes in light-evoked dephosphorylation levels of PP28 were observed in cells treated with the cyclic nucleotide analogs and IBMX. Incubation of ciliates with H 89 or KT 5823, highly selective inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), respectively, decreased PP28 phosphorylation levels in dark-adapted cells, whereas the extent of light-evoked dephosphorylation of the phosphoprotein was only slightly influenced. Cell treatment with higher Ca2+ concentration together with ionophore A23187 in culture medium resulted in marked increase in PP28 phosphorylation levels, while quite an opposite effect was observed in cells exposed to Ca2+ chelators, EGTA or BAPTA/AM as well as calmodulin antagonists, such as trifluoperazine (TFP), W-7 or calmidazolium. Light-dependent dephosphorylation was not considerably affected by these treatments. The experimental findings presented here suggest that an

  1. Growth restriction of an experimental live attenuated human parainfluenza virus type 2 vaccine in human ciliated airway epithelium in vitro parallels attenuation in African green monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schaap-Nutt, Anne; Scull, Margaret A.; Schmidt, Alexander C.; Murphy, Brian R.; Pickles, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) are common causes of severe pediatric respiratory viral disease. We characterized wild-type HPIV2 infection in an in vitro model of human airway epithelium (HAE) and found that the virus replicates to high titer, sheds apically, targets ciliated cells, and induces minimal cytopathology. Replication of an experimental, live attenuated HPIV2 vaccine strain, containing both temperature sensitive (ts) and non-ts attenuating mutations, was restricted >30-fold compared to rHPIV2-WT in HAE at 32°C and exhibited little productive replication at 37°C. This restriction paralleled attenuation in the upper and lower respiratory tract of African green monkeys, supporting the HAE model as an appropriate and convenient system for characterizing HPIV2 vaccine candidates. PMID:20139039

  2. Ciliated cells in vitamin A-deprived cultured hamster tracheal epithelium do divide

    SciTech Connect

    Rutten, A.A.; Beems, R.B.; Wilmer, J.W.; Feron, V.J.

    1988-09-01

    The pseudostratified tracheal epithelium, composed of a heterogeneous phenotypically varying cell population, was studied with respect to the in vitro cell proliferative activity of differentiated epithelial cells. Ciliated tracheal epithelial cells so far have been considered to be terminally differentiated, nonproliferating cells. Tracheal organ cultures obtained from vitamin A-deprived Syrian Golden hamsters were cultured in a vitamin A-deficient, serum-free, hormone-supplemented medium. In vitamin A-deprived tracheal epithelium treated with physiologically active all-trans retinol and low cigarette-smoke condensate concentrations it is possible to stimulate the cell proliferation of both basal and columnar cells. Therefore, the probability of finding proliferating columnar cells was increased compared with the in vivo and the vitamin A-deprived situation in which cell proliferative activity is relatively low. In the presence of cigarette-smoke condensate in a noncytotoxic concentration, basal, small mucous granule, ciliated, and indifferent tracheal epithelial cells incorporated (methyl-3H)-thymidine into the DNA during the S phase. The finding that ciliated cells were labeled was supported by serial sections showing the same labeled ciliated cell in two section planes separated by 2 to 3 micron, without labeled epithelial cells next to the ciliated cell. Furthermore, a ciliated tracheal epithelial cell incorporating (methyl-/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA was also seen in tracheal cultures of vitamin A-deprived hamsters treated with all-trans retinol in a physiologic concentration.

  3. Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Ghio, Andrew; Zelikoff, Judith; Lung-chi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry have revealed increases in the incidence of chronic (non-cancer) lung disorders among first responders (FR) who were at Ground Zero during the initial 72 h after the collapse. Our previous analyses of rats exposed to building-derived WTC dusts using exposure scenarios/levels that mimicked FR mouth-breathing showed that a single WTC dust exposure led to changes in expression of genes whose products could be involved in the lung ailments, but few other significant pathologies. We concluded that rather than acting as direct inducers of many of the FR health effects, it was more likely inhaled WTC dusts instead may have impacted on toxicities induced by other rescue-related co-pollutants present in Ground Zero air. To allow for such effects to occur, we hypothesized that the alkaline WTC dusts induced damage to the normal ability of the lungs to clear inhaled particles. To validate this, rats were exposed on two consecutive days (2 h/d, by intratracheal inhalation) to WTC dust (collected 12-13 September 2001) and examined over a 1-yr period thereafter for changes in the presence of ciliated cells in the airways and hyperplastic goblet cells in the lungs. WTC dust levels in the lungs were assessed in parallel to verify that any changes in levels of these cells corresponded with decreases in host ability to clear the particles themselves. Image analyses of the rat lungs revealed a significant decrease in ciliated cells and increase in hyperplastic goblet cells due to the single series of WTC dust exposures. The study also showed there was only a nominal non-significant decrease (6-11%) in WTC dust burden over a 1-yr period after the final exposure. These results provide support for our current hypothesis that exposure to WTC dusts caused changes in airway morphology/cell composition; such changes could, in turn, have led to potential alterations in the clearance/toxicities of other pollutants inhaled

  4. Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell D.; Vaughan, Joshua M.; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Ghio, Andrew; Zelikoff, Judith; Lung-chi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry have revealed increases in the incidence of chronic (non-cancer) lung disorders among first responders (FR) who were at Ground Zero during the initial 72 h after the collapse. Our previous analyses of rats exposed to building-derived WTC dusts using exposure scenarios/levels that mimicked FR mouth-breathing showed that a single WTC dust exposure led to changes in expression of genes whose products could be involved in the lung ailments, but few other significant pathologies. We concluded that rather than acting as direct inducers of many of the FR health effects, it was more likely inhaled WTC dusts instead may have impacted on toxicities induced by other rescue-related co-pollutants present in Ground Zero air. To allow for such effects to occur, we hypothesized that the alkaline WTC dusts induced damage to the normal ability of the lungs to clear inhaled particles. To validate this, rats were exposed on two consecutive days (2 h/d, by intratracheal inhalation) to WTC dust (collected 12–13 September 2001) and examined over a 1-yr period thereafter for changes in the presence of ciliated cells in the airways and hyperplastic goblet cells in the lungs. WTC dust levels in the lungs were assessed in parallel to verify that any changes in levels of these cells corresponded with decreases in host ability to clear the particles themselves. Image analyses of the rat lungs revealed a significant decrease in ciliated cells and increase in hyperplastic goblet cells due to the single series of WTC dust exposures. The study also showed there was only a nominal non-significant decrease (6–11%) in WTC dust burden over a 1-yr period after the final exposure. These results provide support for our current hypothesis that exposure to WTC dusts caused changes in airway morphology/cell composition; such changes could, in turn, have led to potential alterations in the clearance/toxicities of other pollutants inhaled

  5. EGF-Amphiregulin Interplay in Airway Stem/Progenitor Cells Links the Pathogenesis of Smoking-Induced Lesions in the Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wu-Lin; Yang, Jing; Gomi, Kazunori; Chao, IonWa; Crystal, Ronald G.; Shaykhiev, Renat

    2017-01-01

    The airway epithelium of cigarette smokers undergoes dramatic remodeling with hyperplasia of basal cells (BC) and mucus-producing cells, squamous metaplasia, altered ciliated cell differentiation and decreased junctional barrier integrity, relevant to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. In this study, we show that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand amphiregulin (AREG) is induced by smoking in human airway epithelium as a result of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-driven squamous differentiation of airway BC stem/progenitor cells. In turn, AREG induced a unique EGFR activation pattern in human airway BC, distinct from that evoked by EGF, leading to BC- and mucous hyperplasia, altered ciliated cell differentiation and impaired barrier integrity. Further, AREG promoted its own expression and suppressed expression of EGF, establishing an autonomous self-amplifying signaling loop in airway BC relevant for promotion of EGF-independent hyperplastic phenotypes. Thus, EGF-AREG interplay in airway BC stem/progenitor cells is one of the mechanisms that mediates the interconnected pathogenesis of all major smoking-induced lesions in the human airway epithelium. PMID:27709733

  6. New light sensor molecules of single-cell ciliates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Nengbing; Song, Pill-Soon

    1994-05-01

    The unicellular ciliate, Stentor coeruleus, exhibits sensitive light-avoiding behavior. The photosensor stentorin showed a (M - H)- at 591.1304, which is in accord with the formula C34H23O10. Acetylated stentorin, when FAB-desorbed as (M + H)+, shows a series of ions indicating the presence of eight hydroxyl groups. Additional confirmation is a collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) spectrum of the (M + H)+ of the octaacetate. The NMR spectrum of stentorin shows characteristic signals of isopropyl groups. Similar studies indicate that photosensor blepharismin from Blepharisma japonicum is structurally different from stentorin. Time-resolved fluorescence decays indicated that a primary event occurs within a few picoseconds. The stimulus light signal absorbed/perceived by Stentor and possibly by Blepharisma, is apparently amplified by a transient calcium influx into the cell. Preliminary studies suggest that signal transduction in both organisms utilizes G-protein(s) as an initial transducer and a cGMP-phosphodiesterase as the effector system, analogous to the visual system of higher animals.

  7. Delineating cellular interactions between ciliates and fish by co-culturing Tetrahymena thermophila with fish cells.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Marcel D O; Bols, Niels C

    2014-10-01

    Although several species of Tetrahymena are often described as histophagous and opportunistic pathogens of fish, little is known about ciliate/fish cell interactions, but one approach for studying these is in vitro with cell lines. In this study, T. thermophila, B1975 (wild type) and NP1 (temperature sensitive mutant for phagocytosis) were cultured on monolayers of 3 fish epithelial cell lines, CHSE-214, RTgill-W1, and ZEB2J, and the rabbit kidney epithelial cell line, RK-13. Generally the ciliates flourished, whereas the monolayers died, being completely consumed over several days. The destruction of monolayers required that the ciliates could make contact with the animal cells through swimming, which appeared to dislodge or loosen cells so that they could be phagocytosed. The ciliates internalized into food vacuoles ZEB2J from cell monolayers as well as from cell suspensions. Phagocytosis was essential for monolayer destruction as monolayers remained intact under conditions where phagocytosis was impeded, such as 37°C for NP1 and 4°C for B1975. Monolayers of fish cells supported the proliferation of ciliates. Thus T. thermophila can 'eat' animal cells or be histophagous in vitro, with the potential to be histophagous in vivo.

  8. Myosin Id is required for planar cell polarity in ciliated tracheal and ependymal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hegan, Peter S; Ostertag, Eric; Geurts, Aron M; Mooseker, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    In wild type (WT) tracheal epithelial cells, ciliary basal bodies are oriented such that all cilia on the cell surface beat in the same upward direction. This precise alignment of basal bodies and, as a result, the ciliary axoneme, is termed rotational planar cell polarity (PCP). Rotational PCP in the multi-ciliated epithelial cells of the trachea is perturbed in rats lacking myosin Id (Myo1d). Myo1d is localized in the F-actin and basal body rich subapical cortex of the ciliated tracheal epithelial cell. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of Myo1d knock out (KO) trachea revealed that the unidirectional bending pattern is disrupted. Instead, cilia splay out in a disordered, often radial pattern. Measurement of the alignment axis of the central pair axonemal microtubules was much more variable in the KO, another indicator that rotational PCP is perturbed. The asymmetric localization of the PCP core protein Vangl1 is lost. Both the velocity and linearity of cilia-driven movement of beads above the tracheal mucosal surface was impaired in the Myo1d KO. Multi-ciliated brain ependymal epithelial cells exhibit a second form of PCP termed translational PCP in which basal bodies and attached cilia are clustered at the anterior side of the cell. The precise asymmetric clustering of cilia is disrupted in the ependymal cells of the Myo1d KO rat. While basal body clustering is maintained, left-right positioning of the clusters is lost.

  9. Myosin Id is required for planar cell polarity in ciliated tracheal and ependymal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hegan, Peter S.; Ostertag, Eric; Geurts, Aron M.; Mooseker, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    In wild type (WT) tracheal epithelial cells, ciliary basal bodies are oriented such that all cilia on the cell surface beat in the same upward direction. This precise alignment of basal bodies and, as a result, the ciliary axoneme, is termed rotational planar cell polarity (PCP). Rotational PCP in the multi-ciliated epithelial cells of the trachea is perturbed in rats lacking myosin Id (Myo1d). Myo1d is localized in the F-actin and basal body rich subapical cortex of the ciliated tracheal epithelial cell. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of Myo1d knock out (KO) trachea revealed that the unidirectional bending pattern is disrupted. Instead, cilia splay out in a disordered, often radial pattern. Measurement of the alignment axis of the central pair axonemal microtubules was much more variable in the KO, another indicator that rotational PCP is perturbed. The asymmetric localization of the PCP core protein Vangl1 is lost. Both the velocity and linearity of cilia-driven movement of beads above the tracheal mucosal surface was impaired in the Myo1d KO. Multi-ciliated brain ependymal epithelial cells exhibit a second form of PCP termed translational PCP in which basal bodies and attached cilia are clustered at the anterior side of the cell. The precise asymmetric clustering of cilia is disrupted in the ependymal cells of the Myo1d KO rat. While basal body clustering is maintained, left-right positioning of the clusters is lost. PMID:26446290

  10. Rhinovirus Delays Cell Repolarization in a Model of Injured/Regenerating Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Andrea N.; Ganesan, Shyamala; Chattoraj, Asamanja; Chattoraj, Sangbrita S.; Comstock, Adam T.; Unger, Benjamin L.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhinovirus (RV), which causes exacerbation in patients with chronic airway diseases, readily infects injured airway epithelium and has been reported to delay wound closure. In this study, we examined the effects of RV on cell repolarization and differentiation in a model of injured/regenerating airway epithelium (polarized, undifferentiated cells). RV causes only a transient barrier disruption in a model of normal (mucociliary-differentiated) airway epithelium. However, in the injury/regeneration model, RV prolongs barrier dysfunction and alters the differentiation of cells. The prolonged barrier dysfunction caused by RV was not a result of excessive cell death but was instead associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like features, such as reduced expression of the apicolateral junction and polarity complex proteins, E-cadherin, occludin, ZO-1, claudins 1 and 4, and Crumbs3 and increased expression of vimentin, a mesenchymal cell marker. The expression of Snail, a transcriptional repressor of tight and adherence junctions, was also up-regulated in RV-infected injured/regenerating airway epithelium, and inhibition of Snail reversed RV-induced EMT-like features. In addition, compared with sham-infected cells, the RV-infected injured/regenerating airway epithelium showed more goblet cells and fewer ciliated cells. Inhibition of epithelial growth factor receptor promoted repolarization of cells by inhibiting Snail and enhancing expression of E-cadherin, occludin, and Crumbs3 proteins, reduced the number of goblet cells, and increased the number of ciliated cells. Together, these results suggest that RV not only disrupts barrier function, but also interferes with normal renewal of injured/regenerating airway epithelium by inducing EMT-like features and subsequent goblet cell hyperplasia. PMID:27119973

  11. Airway Epithelial Cell Cilia and Obstructive Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Asma; Dolovich, Myrna B.

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelium is the first line of defense against exposure of the airway and lung to various inflammatory stimuli. Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells constitutes an important part of the mucociliary transport apparatus. To be effective in transporting secretions out of the lung, the mucociliary transport apparatus must exhibit a cohesive beating of all ciliated epithelial cells that line the upper and lower respiratory tract. Cilia function can be modulated by exposures to endogenous and exogenous factors and by the viscosity of the mucus lining the epithelium. Cilia function is impaired in lung diseases such as COPD and asthma, and pharmacologic agents can modulate cilia function and mucus viscosity. Cilia beating is reduced in COPD, however, more research is needed to determine the structural-functional regulation of ciliary beating via all signaling pathways and how this might relate to the initiation or progression of obstructive lung diseases. Additionally, genotypes and how these can influence phenotypes and epithelial cell cilia function and structure should be taken into consideration in future investigations. PMID:27845721

  12. Chibby promotes ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during airway cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael C; Li, Feng-Qian; Cyge, Benjamin; Arashiro, Takeshi; Brechbuhl, Heather M; Chen, Xingwang; Siller, Saul S; Weiss, Matthew A; O'Connell, Christopher B; Love, Damon; Westlake, Christopher J; Reynolds, Susan D; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi

    2014-10-13

    Airway multiciliated epithelial cells play crucial roles in the mucosal defense system, but their differentiation process remains poorly understood. Mice lacking the basal body component Chibby (Cby) exhibit impaired mucociliary transport caused by defective ciliogenesis, resulting in chronic airway infection. In this paper, using primary cultures of mouse tracheal epithelial cells, we show that Cby facilitates basal body docking to the apical cell membrane through proper formation of ciliary vesicles at the distal appendage during the early stages of ciliogenesis. Cby is recruited to the distal appendages of centrioles via physical interaction with the distal appendage protein CEP164. Cby then associates with the membrane trafficking machinery component Rabin8, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small guanosine triphosphatase Rab8, to promote recruitment of Rab8 and efficient assembly of ciliary vesicles. Thus, our study identifies Cby as a key regulator of ciliary vesicle formation and basal body docking during the differentiation of airway ciliated cells.

  13. Airway Basal Cells. The “Smoking Gun” of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The earliest abnormality in the lung associated with smoking is hyperplasia of airway basal cells, the stem/progenitor cells of the ciliated and secretory cells that are central to pulmonary host defense. Using cell biology and ’omics technologies to assess basal cells isolated from bronchoscopic brushings of nonsmokers, smokers, and smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), compelling evidence has been provided in support of the concept that airway basal cells are central to the pathogenesis of smoking-associated lung diseases. When confronted by the chronic stress of smoking, airway basal cells become disorderly, regress to a more primitive state, behave as dictated by their inheritance, are susceptible to acquired changes in their genome, lose the capacity to regenerate the epithelium, are responsible for the major changes in the airway that characterize COPD, and, with persistent stress, can undergo malignant transformation. Together, these observations led to the conclusion that accelerated loss of lung function in susceptible individuals begins with disordered airway basal cell biology (i.e., that airway basal cells are the “smoking gun” of COPD, a potential target for the development of therapies to prevent smoking-related lung disorders). PMID:25354273

  14. Generation of a human airway epithelium derived basal cell line with multipotent differentiation capacity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As the multipotent progenitor population of the airway epithelium, human airway basal cells (BC) replenish the specialized differentiated cell populations of the mucociliated airway epithelium during physiological turnover and repair. Cultured primary BC divide a limited number of times before entering a state of replicative senescence, preventing the establishment of long-term replicating cultures of airway BC that maintain their original phenotype. Methods To generate an immortalized human airway BC cell line, primary human airway BC obtained by brushing the airway epithelium of healthy nonsmokers were infected with a retrovirus expressing human telomerase (hTERT). The resulting immortalized cell line was then characterized under non-differentiating and differentiating air-liquid interface (ALI) culture conditions using ELISA, TaqMan quantitative PCR, Western analysis, and immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical staining analysis for cell type specific markers. In addition, the ability of the cell line to respond to environmental stimuli under differentiating ALI culture was assessed. Results We successfully generated an immortalized human airway BC cell line termed BCi-NS1 via expression of hTERT. A single cell derived clone from the parental BCi-NS1 cells, BCi-NS1.1, retains characteristics of the original primary cells for over 40 passages and demonstrates a multipotent differentiation capacity into secretory (MUC5AC, MUC5B), goblet (TFF3), Clara (CC10) and ciliated (DNAI1, FOXJ1) cells on ALI culture. The cells can respond to external stimuli such as IL-13, resulting in alteration of the normal differentiation process. Conclusion Development of immortalized human airway BC that retain multipotent differentiation capacity over long-term culture should be useful in understanding the biology of BC, the response of BC to environmental stress, and as a target for assessment of pharmacologic agents. PMID:24298994

  15. Resolution of cell-mediated airways diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    "Inflammation resolution" has of late become a topical research area. Activation of resolution phase mechanisms, involving select post-transcriptional regulons, transcription factors, 'autacoids', and cell phenotypes, is now considered to resolve inflammatory diseases. Critical to this discourse on resolution is the elimination of inflammatory cells through apoptosis and phagocytosis. For major inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD we propose an alternative path to apoptosis for cell elimination. We argue that transepithelial migration of airway wall leukocytes, followed by mucociliary clearance, efficiently and non-injuriously eliminates pro-inflammatory cells from diseased airway tissues. First, it seems clear that numerous infiltrated granulocytes and lymphocytes can be speedily transmitted into the airway lumen without harming the epithelial barrier. Then there are a wide range of 'unexpected' findings demonstrating that clinical improvement of asthma and COPD is not only associated with decreasing numbers of airway wall inflammatory cells but also with increasing numbers of these cells in the airway lumen. Finally, effects of inhibition of transepithelial migration support the present hypothesis. Airway inflammatory processes have thus been much aggravated when transepithelial exit of leukocytes has been inhibited. In conclusion, the present hypothesis highlights risks involved in drug-induced inhibition of transepithelial migration of airway wall leukocytes. It helps interpretation of common airway lumen data, and suggests approaches to treat cell-mediated airway inflammation. PMID:20540713

  16. Effects of histamine on ciliary beat frequency of ciliated cells from guinea pigs nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    An, Fengwei; Xing, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Lei

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of histamine on ciliary beat frequency (CBF) through combining high-speed digital microscopy and patch-clamp technology. Ciliated cells were obtained from septum and turbinate of 90-120-day-old healthy male guinea pigs. Tight seal was formed by applying negative pressure on the glass electrode after the drawing and pushing progress. Then, we enrolled high-speed digital microscopy to measure CBF before and after treatment with histamine of different concentrations ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-1) mol/L in Hank's solution and D-Hank's solution as well as after administrating adenosine triphosphate. One-way ANOVA, Student's t test or Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical comparisons. Glass electrode fix up ciliated cell is available at tip diameter of 2-5 μm and negative pressure of 10-20 cmH2O column. The baseline CBF in Hank's solution was higher than in D-Hank's solution. Treatment with 10(-6)-l0(-3) mol/L histamine of concentrations can stimulate a rise of CBF. Nevertheless, CBF in all groups decreased to baseline CBF within 20 min. Generally, 10(-2) mol/L histamine can stimulate a rise of CBF; meanwhile, the high concentration of histamine killed 50% ciliated cell. Histamine at 10(-1) mol/L killed all ciliated cells. Ciliary beating activity decreased in Ca(2+)-free solution. Moreover, adenosine triphosphate could increase CBF effectively after the stimulation effect of histamine. We construct an effective technology integrating patch-clamp technique with CBF measurements on ciliated cells. Extracellular histamine stimulation could increase CBF effectively.

  17. Expression of IL-4/IL-13 receptors in differentiating human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Linda D.; Stern, Randi; Laxman, Bharathi; Marroquin, Bertha A.

    2010-01-01

    IL-4 and IL-13 elicit several important responses in airway epithelium including chemokine secretion and mucous secretion that may contribute to airway inflammation, cell migration, and differentiation. These cytokines have overlapping but not identical effector profiles likely due to shared subunits in their receptor complexes. These receptors are variably described in epithelial cells, and the relative expression, localization, and function of these receptors in differentiated and repairing epithelial cells are not clear. We examined IL-4/IL-13 receptor expression and localization in primary airway epithelial cells collected from normal human lungs and grown under conditions yielding both undifferentiated and differentiated cells inclusive of basal, goblet, and ciliated cell phenotypes. Gene expression of the IL-4Rα, IL-2Rγc, IL-13Rα1, and IL-13Rα2 receptor subunits increased with differentiation, but different patterns of localization and protein abundance were seen for each subunit based on both differentiation and the cell subtypes present. Increased expression of receptor subunits observed in more differentiated cells was associated with more substantial functional responses to IL-4 stimulation including increased eotaxin-3 expression and accelerated migration after injury. We demonstrate substantial differences in IL-4/IL-13 receptor subunit expression and responsiveness to IL-4 based on the extent of airway epithelial cell differentiation and suggest that these differences may have functional consequences in airway inflammation. PMID:20729386

  18. Myosin at the apical pole of ciliated epithelial cells as revealed by a monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (CC-212), obtained in a fusion experiment in which basal bodies from quail oviduct were used as immunogen, has been shown to label the apical pole of ciliated cells and to react with a 200-kD protein. This monoclonal antibody was demonstrated to be an anti- myosin from smooth muscle or from nonmuscular cells using the following criteria: On Western blots it reacted with the myosin heavy chains from gizzard and platelet extracts and from cultured cell line extracts, but did not react with striated muscle myosin heavy chains. By immunofluorescence it decorated the stress fibers of well-spread cells with a characteristic striated pattern, while it did not react with myotubes containing organized myofibrils. On native ciliated cells as well as on Triton-extracted ciliated cortices from quail oviduct, this monoclonal antibody decorated the apical pole with a stronger labeling of the periphery of the apical area. Ultrastructural localization was attempted using the immunogold technique on the same preparation. Myosin was associated with a filamentous material present between striated rootlets and the proximal extremities of the basal bodies. No labeling of the basal body itself or of axoneme was observed. PMID:3525577

  19. Ciliated sensory cells and associated neurons in the lip of Octopus joubini Robson.

    PubMed

    Emery, D G

    1975-01-01

    The lip of Octopus joubini is a fleshy fold around the beak that is subdivided distally into finger-like papillae and overlayed by an uninterrupted noncellular cuticle. The muscular core of the lip has a high proportion of nervous tissue. The simple epithelium contains numerous ciliated sensory cells, especially in the papillae. In many of these cells the cilia lie deep within the cytoplasm and usually appear to extend toward the surface. Receptors with intracellular cilia also lie below the epithelium and send dendrites bearing cilia to the surface. Large unipolar interneurons that may receive synapses from the ciliated receptors lie in the musculature near the papillae. The sensory system of the octopus lip is more advanced than that of the squid, and it is very similar to that of Sepia. The relationship of these findings to the phylogeny and ecology of cephalopods is discussed.

  20. Immunocytochemical localization of tubulin, actin, and myosin in axonemes of ciliated cells from quail oviduct.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, D; Gounon, P; Karsenti, E; Sauron, M E

    1982-05-01

    Tubulin, actin, and myosin have been localized in isolated demembranated ciliated cells from quail oviduct by immunocytochemistry in both light and electron microscopy by using purified antibodies. The peripheral doublets and the central tubules are stained by the antitubulin whereas the kinetosomes are poorly stained. Actin antibodies clearly stain the axonemes, but only on the proximal-half portion, whereas myosin antibodies stain a small area of the axonemes just above the ciliary neck region.

  1. Immunocytochemical localization of tubulin, actin, and myosin in axonemes of ciliated cells from quail oviduct.

    PubMed Central

    Sandoz, D; Gounon, P; Karsenti, E; Sauron, M E

    1982-01-01

    Tubulin, actin, and myosin have been localized in isolated demembranated ciliated cells from quail oviduct by immunocytochemistry in both light and electron microscopy by using purified antibodies. The peripheral doublets and the central tubules are stained by the antitubulin whereas the kinetosomes are poorly stained. Actin antibodies clearly stain the axonemes, but only on the proximal-half portion, whereas myosin antibodies stain a small area of the axonemes just above the ciliary neck region. Images PMID:7048302

  2. Antibody production using a ciliate generates unusual antibody glycoforms displaying enhanced cell-killing activity

    PubMed Central

    Calow, Jenny; Bockau, Ulrike; Struwe, Weston B.; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Loser, Karin; Crispin, Max

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibody glycosylation is a key parameter in the optimization of antibody therapeutics. Here, we describe the production of the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody rituximab in the unicellular ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. The resulting antibody demonstrated enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, which we attribute to unusual N-linked glycosylation. Detailed chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis revealed afucosylated, oligomannose-type glycans, which, as a whole, displayed isomeric structures that deviate from the typical human counterparts, but whose branches were equivalent to fragments of metabolic intermediates observed in human glycoproteins. From the analysis of deposited crystal structures, we predict that the ciliate glycans adopt protein-carbohydrate interactions with the Fc domain that closely mimic those of native complex-type glycans. In addition, terminal glucose structures were identified that match biosynthetic precursors of human glycosylation. Our results suggest that ciliate-based expression systems offer a route to large-scale production of monoclonal antibodies exhibiting glycosylation that imparts enhanced cell killing activity. PMID:27594301

  3. Transplantation of Airway Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells: A Future for Cell-Based Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Ahmad, Shama; White, Carl W; Reynolds, Susan D

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to cure disease through replacement of malfunctioning cells. Although the tissue stem cell (TSC) is thought to be the optimal therapeutic cell, transplantation of TSC/progenitor cell mixtures has saved lives. We previously purified the mouse tracheobronchial epithelial TSCs and reported that in vitro amplification generated numerous TSCs. However, these cultures also contained TSC-derived progenitor cells and TSC repurification by flow cytometry compromised TSC self-renewal. These limitations prompted us to determine if a TSC/progenitor cell mixture would repopulate the injured airway epithelium. We developed a cell transplantation protocol and demonstrate that transplanted mouse and human tracheobronchial epithelial TSC/progenitor cell mixtures are 20-25% of airway epithelial cells, actively contribute to epithelial repair, and persist for at least 43 days. At 2 weeks after transplantation, TSCs/progenitor cells differentiated into the three major epithelial cell types: basal, secretory, and ciliated. We conclude that cell therapy that uses adult tracheobronchial TSCs/progenitor cells is an effective therapeutic option.

  4. Basal cells as stem cells of the mouse trachea and human airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Jason R.; Onaitis, Mark W.; Rawlins, Emma L.; Lu, Yun; Clark, Cheryl P.; Xue, Yan; Randell, Scott H.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.

    2009-01-01

    The pseudostratified epithelium of the mouse trachea and human airways contains a population of basal cells expressing Trp-63 (p63) and cytokeratins 5 (Krt5) and Krt14. Using a KRT5-CreERT2 transgenic mouse line for lineage tracing, we show that basal cells generate differentiated cells during postnatal growth and in the adult during both steady state and epithelial repair. We have fractionated mouse basal cells by FACS and identified 627 genes preferentially expressed in a basal subpopulation vs. non-BCs. Analysis reveals potential mechanisms regulating basal cells and allows comparison with other epithelial stem cells. To study basal cell behaviors, we describe a simple in vitro clonal sphere-forming assay in which mouse basal cells self-renew and generate luminal cells, including differentiated ciliated cells, in the absence of stroma. The transcriptional profile identified 2 cell-surface markers, ITGA6 and NGFR, which can be used in combination to purify human lung basal cells by FACS. Like those from the mouse trachea, human airway basal cells both self-renew and generate luminal daughters in the sphere-forming assay. PMID:19625615

  5. Rapid Expansion of Human Epithelial Stem Cells Suitable for Airway Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Butler, Colin R; Hynds, Robert E; Gowers, Kate H C; Lee, Dani Do Hyang; Brown, James M; Crowley, Claire; Teixeira, Vitor H; Smith, Claire M; Urbani, Luca; Hamilton, Nicholas J; Thakrar, Ricky M; Booth, Helen L; Birchall, Martin A; De Coppi, Paolo; Giangreco, Adam; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Janes, Sam M

    2016-07-15

    Stem cell-based tracheal replacement represents an emerging therapeutic option for patients with otherwise untreatable airway diseases including long-segment congenital tracheal stenosis and upper airway tumors. Clinical experience demonstrates that restoration of mucociliary clearance in the lungs after transplantation of tissue-engineered grafts is critical, with preclinical studies showing that seeding scaffolds with autologous mucosa improves regeneration. High epithelial cell-seeding densities are required in regenerative medicine, and existing techniques are inadequate to achieve coverage of clinically suitable grafts. To define a scalable cell culture system to deliver airway epithelium to clinical grafts. Human respiratory epithelial cells derived from endobronchial biopsies were cultured using a combination of mitotically inactivated fibroblasts and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibition using Y-27632 (3T3+Y). Cells were analyzed by immunofluorescence, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry to assess airway stem cell marker expression. Karyotyping and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification were performed to assess cell safety. Differentiation capacity was tested in three-dimensional tracheospheres, organotypic cultures, air-liquid interface cultures, and an in vivo tracheal xenograft model. Ciliary function was assessed in air-liquid interface cultures. 3T3-J2 feeder cells and ROCK inhibition allowed rapid expansion of airway basal cells. These cells were capable of multipotent differentiation in vitro, generating both ciliated and goblet cell lineages. Cilia were functional with normal beat frequency and pattern. Cultured cells repopulated tracheal scaffolds in a heterotopic transplantation xenograft model. Our method generates large numbers of functional airway basal epithelial cells with the efficiency demanded by clinical transplantation, suggesting its suitability for use in tracheal reconstruction.

  6. Arrest in ciliated cell expansion on the bronchial lining of adult rats caused by chronic exposure to industrial noise.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria João R; Pereira, António S; Ferreira, Paula G; Guimarães, Laura; Freitas, Diamantino; Carvalho, António P O; Grande, Nuno R; Aguas, Artur P

    2005-03-01

    Workers chronically exposed to high-intensity/low-frequency noise at textile plants show increased frequency of respiratory infections. This phenomenon prompted the herein investigation on the cytology of the bronchial epithelium of Wistar rats submitted to textile noise. Workplace noise from a cotton-mill room of a textile factory was recorded and reproduced in a sound-insulated animal room. The Wistar rats were submitted to a weekly schedule of noise treatment that was similar to that of the textile workers (8h/day, 5 days/week). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to compare the fine morphology of the inner surface of the bronchi in noise-exposed and control rats. SEM quantitative cytology revealed that exposure to noise for 5-7 months caused inhibition in the natural expansion of the area occupied by ciliated cells on the bronchial epithelium as adult rats grow older. This difference between noise-exposed and age-matched control rats was statistically significant (P<0.05) and documents that the cytology of the rat bronchial epithelium is mildly altered by noise exposure. The decrease in the area of bronchial cilia may impair the mucociliar clearance of the respiratory airways and, thus, increase vulnerability to respiratory infection.

  7. Rapid Expansion of Human Epithelial Stem Cells Suitable for Airway Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gowers, Kate H. C.; Lee, Dani Do Hyang; Brown, James M.; Crowley, Claire; Teixeira, Vitor H.; Smith, Claire M.; Urbani, Luca; Hamilton, Nicholas J.; Thakrar, Ricky M.; Booth, Helen L.; Birchall, Martin A.; De Coppi, Paolo; Giangreco, Adam; O’Callaghan, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Stem cell–based tracheal replacement represents an emerging therapeutic option for patients with otherwise untreatable airway diseases including long-segment congenital tracheal stenosis and upper airway tumors. Clinical experience demonstrates that restoration of mucociliary clearance in the lungs after transplantation of tissue-engineered grafts is critical, with preclinical studies showing that seeding scaffolds with autologous mucosa improves regeneration. High epithelial cell–seeding densities are required in regenerative medicine, and existing techniques are inadequate to achieve coverage of clinically suitable grafts. Objectives: To define a scalable cell culture system to deliver airway epithelium to clinical grafts. Methods: Human respiratory epithelial cells derived from endobronchial biopsies were cultured using a combination of mitotically inactivated fibroblasts and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibition using Y-27632 (3T3+Y). Cells were analyzed by immunofluorescence, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry to assess airway stem cell marker expression. Karyotyping and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification were performed to assess cell safety. Differentiation capacity was tested in three-dimensional tracheospheres, organotypic cultures, air–liquid interface cultures, and an in vivo tracheal xenograft model. Ciliary function was assessed in air–liquid interface cultures. Measurements and Main Results: 3T3-J2 feeder cells and ROCK inhibition allowed rapid expansion of airway basal cells. These cells were capable of multipotent differentiation in vitro, generating both ciliated and goblet cell lineages. Cilia were functional with normal beat frequency and pattern. Cultured cells repopulated tracheal scaffolds in a heterotopic transplantation xenograft model. Conclusions: Our method generates large numbers of functional airway basal epithelial cells with the efficiency demanded by clinical

  8. Airway epithelial cells: current concepts and challenges.

    PubMed

    Crystal, Ronald G; Randell, Scott H; Engelhardt, John F; Voynow, Judith; Sunday, Mary E

    2008-09-15

    The adult human bronchial tree is covered with a continuous layer of epithelial cells that play a critical role in maintaining the conduit for air, and which are central to the defenses of the lung against inhaled environmental concomitants. The epithelial sheet functions as an interdependent unit with the other lung components. Importantly, the structure and/or function of airway epithelium is deranged in major lung disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and bronchogenic carcinoma. Investigations regarding the airway epithelium have led to many advances over the past few decades, but new developments in genetics and stem cell/progenitor cell biology have opened the door to understanding how the airway epithelium is developed and maintained, and how it responds to environmental stress. This article provides an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells, gene expression, cell-cell interactions, and less frequent cell types, and discusses the challenges for future areas of investigation regarding the airway epithelium in health and disease.

  9. Eosinophils induce airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Halwani, Rabih; Vazquez-Tello, Alejandro; Sumi, Yuki; Pureza, Mary Angeline; Bahammam, Ahmed; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan; Soussi-Gounni, Abdelillah; Mahboub, Bassam; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Hamid, Qutayba

    2013-04-01

    Asthma is characterized by eosinophilic airway inflammation and remodeling of the airway wall. Features of airway remodeling include increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. However, little is known about the interaction between inflammatory eosinophils and ASM cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of eosinophils on ASM cell proliferation. Eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of mild asthmatics and non-asthmatic subjects and co-cultured with human primary ASM cells. ASM proliferation was estimated using Ki-67 expression assay. The expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) mRNA in ASM cells was measured using quantitative real-time PCR. The role of eosinophil derived Cysteinyl Leukotrienes (CysLTs) in enhancing ASM proliferation was estimated by measuring the release of leukotrienes from eosinophils upon their direct contact with ASM cells using ELISA. This role was confirmed either by blocking eosinophil-ASM contact or co-culturing them in the presence of leukotrienes antagonist. ASM cells co-cultured with eosinophils, isolated from asthmatics, but not non-asthmatics, had a significantly higher rate of proliferation compared to controls. This increase in ASM proliferation was independent of their release of ECM proteins but dependent upon eosinophils release of CysLTs. Eosinophil-ASM cell to cell contact was required for CysLTs release. Preventing eosinophil contact with ASM cells using anti-adhesion molecules antibodies, or blocking the activity of eosinophil derived CysLTs using montelukast inhibited ASM proliferation. Our results indicated that eosinophils contribute to airway remodeling during asthma by enhancing ASM cell proliferation and hence increasing ASM mass. Direct contact of eosinophils with ASM cells triggers their release of CysLTs which enhance ASM proliferation. Eosinophils, and their binding to ASM cells, constitute a potential therapeutic target to interfere with the series of biological events leading to airway remodeling

  10. Ecotoxicity assessment using ciliate cells in millifluidic droplets

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Rico; Burkart, Corinna; Pfitzner, Daniel; Jungmann, Dirk; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-01-01

    Precise analysis of the aquatic cells and their responses to the toxic chemicals, i.e., water disinfective agents, is of crucial importance due to their role in the ecosystem. We demonstrate the application of the droplets based millifluidic tool for isolating and longtime monitoring of single Paramecium tetraurelia cells using a large number of water-in-oil emulsion droplets. Due to the automated monitoring of the fluorescence signal, the droplets containing cells are distinguished from the empty reservoirs. A viability indicator is used to follow the metabolic dynamic of the cells in every single droplet. Finally, we perform ecotoxicity tests in droplets, exposing the encapsulated paramecia cells to silver nitrate for determination of EC50 levels, and compare the output with the conventional microtiter plate assay. PMID:27051472

  11. Photomovements in Ciliated Protozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, Hans-Werner

    Ciliates are unicellular, nonphotosynthetic organisms which show a number of light-induced responses. Orientation with respect to the direction of light, phototaxis, has been demonstrated in some species of ciliates. Most of these species bear conspicuous cell organelles such as subpellicular pigment granules, a colored stigma, a watchglass organelle, or a compound crystalline organelle. Several lines of evidence suggest that these kinds of organelles are prerequisites for phototactic orientation of the cells. Photoreceptor molecules presumedly mediating the photobehavior of two species have been identified. The ecological advantage of light-induced responses in ciliated protozoa is still debated. In some cases the organisms may utilize this behavior either to approach their potential prey, to escape their predators, to escape damaging light, or to meet a mating partner. Several species of ciliates display inverse phototactic behavior at different stages of their life cycle.

  12. Highly Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells: a Model to Study Host cell-parasite Interactions in Pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Claudia; Zhang, Chengxian; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Iqbal, Junaid; Guerra, Julio; Greenberg, David P.; Decker, Michael D.; Carbonetti, Nicholas; Starner, Timothy D.; McCray, Paul B.; Mooi, Frits R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bordetella pertussis colonizes the human respiratory mucosa. Most studies on B. pertussis adherence have relied on cultured mammalian cells that lack key features present in differentiated human airway cells or on animal models that are not natural hosts of B. pertussis. The objectives of this work are to evaluate B. pertussis infection on highly differentiated human airway cells in vitro and to show the role of B. pertussis fimbriae in cell adherence. Methods Primary human airway epithelial (PHAE) cells from human bronchi and a human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cell line were grown in vitro under air-liquid interface conditions. Results PHAE and HBE cells infected with B. pertussis wild type strain revealed bacterial adherence to cell’s apical surface and bacterial induced cytoskeleton changes and cell detachment. Mutations in the major fimbrial subunits Fim2/3 or in the minor fimbrial adhesin subunit FimD affected B. pertussis adherence to predominantly HBE cells. This cell model recapitulates the morphologic features of the human airway infected by B. pertussis and confirms the role of fimbriae in B. pertussis adherence. Furthemore, HBE cells show that fimbrial subunits, and specifically FimD adhesin, are critical in B. pertussis adherence to airway cells. Conclusions The relevance of this model to study host-parasite interaction in pertussis lies in the striking physiologic and morphologic similarity between the PHAE and HBE cells and the human airway ciliated and goblet cells in vivo. These cells can proliferate in vitro, differentiate, and express the same genetic profile as human respiratory cells in vivo. PMID:26492208

  13. Barrier role of actin filaments in regulated mucin secretion from airway goblet cells.

    PubMed

    Ehre, Camille; Rossi, Andrea H; Abdullah, Lubna H; De Pestel, Kathleen; Hill, Sandra; Olsen, John C; Davis, C William

    2005-01-01

    Airway goblet cells secrete mucin onto mucosal surfaces under the regulation of an apical, phospholipase C/G(q)-coupled P2Y(2) receptor. We tested whether cortical actin filaments negatively regulate exocytosis in goblet cells by forming a barrier between secretory granules and plasma membrane docking sites as postulated for other secretory cells. Immunostaining of human lung tissues and SPOC1 cells (an epithelial, mucin-secreting cell line) revealed an apical distribution of beta- and gamma-actin in ciliated and goblet cells. In goblet cells, actin appeared as a prominent subplasmalemmal sheet lying between granules and the apical membrane, and it disappeared from SPOC1 cells activated by purinergic agonist. Disruption of actin filaments with latrunculin A stimulated SPOC1 cell mucin secretion under basal and agonist-activated conditions, whereas stabilization with jasplakinolide or overexpression of beta- or gamma-actin conjugated to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) inhibited secretion. Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate, a PKC-activated actin-plasma membrane tethering protein, was phosphorylated after agonist stimulation, suggesting a translocation to the cytosol. Scinderin (or adseverin), a Ca(2+)-activated actin filament severing and capping protein was cloned from human airway and SPOC1 cells, and synthetic peptides corresponding to its actin-binding domains inhibited mucin secretion. We conclude that actin filaments negatively regulate mucin secretion basally in airway goblet cells and are dynamically remodeled in agonist-stimulated cells to promote exocytosis.

  14. Smoking-Associated Disordering of the Airway Basal Stem/Progenitor Cell Metabotype

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Ruba S.; Walters, Matthew S.; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Chen, Qiuying; Gross, Steven S.

    2016-01-01

    The airway epithelium is a complex pseudostratified multicellular layer lining the tracheobronchial tree, functioning as the primary defense against inhaled environmental contaminants. The major cell types of the airway epithelium include basal, intermediate columnar, ciliated, and secretory. Basal cells (BCs) are the proliferating stem/progenitor population that differentiate into the other specialized cell types of the airway epithelium during normal turnover and repair. Given that cigarette smoke delivers thousands of xenobiotics and high levels of reactive molecules to the lung epithelial surface, we hypothesized that cigarette smoke broadly perturbs BC metabolism. To test this hypothesis, primary airway BCs were isolated from healthy nonsmokers (n = 11) and healthy smokers (n = 7) and assessed by global metabolic profiling by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The analysis identified 52 significant metabolites in BCs differentially expressed between smokers and nonsmokers (P < 0.05). These changes included metabolites associated with redox pathways, energy production, and inflammatory processes. Notably, BCs from smokers exhibited altered levels of the key enzyme cofactors/substrates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide, acetyl coenzyme A, and membrane phospholipid levels. Consistent with the high burden of oxidants in cigarette smoke, glutathione levels were diminished, whereas 3-nitrotyrosine levels were increased, suggesting that protection of airway epithelial cells against oxidative and nitrosative stress is significantly compromised in smoker BCs. It is likely that this altered metabotype is a reflection of, and likely contributes to, the disordered biology of airway BCs consequent to the stress cigarette smoking puts on the airway epithelium. PMID:26161876

  15. Changes in aquaporin 5 in the non-ciliated cells of mouse oviduct according to sexual maturation and oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Nah, Won Heum; Oh, Yeong Seok; Hwang, Jung Hye; Gye, M C

    2015-08-14

    Aquaporin (AQP) water channels play an important role in fluid homeostasis and the control of epithelial cell volume. To understand the oviductal fluid homeostasis, the expression of aqp5 was examined in mouse oviduct. In the oviduct of cycling females, aqp1, aqp3, aqp4, aqp5, aqp6, aqp7, aqp8, and aqp11 mRNA were detected. Of these, expression of aqp5 mRNA increased significantly from the early prepubertal period to puberty. Epithelial AQP5 immunoreactivity was markedly increased during the same period and was most notable in the infundibulum. In immature female mice (3 weeks old), gonadotropin (pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (5 IU/head) and human chorionic gonadotropin (5 IU/head), single intraperitoneal injection) significantly increased oviductal aqp5 mRNA and AQP5 immunoreactivity in oviduct epithelia. In adult mouse oviduct epithelia, AQP5 was primarily found in the apical membrane, subapical cytoplasm and basolateral membrane of secretory non-ciliated cells, whereas weak to negligible immunoreactivity was found in β-tubulin-positive ciliated cells. Taking into account the fact that non-ciliated cells are well developed with subapical secretory vesicles as well as endosomes, AQP5 may also participate in the secretion and endocytosis in addition to water movement through non-ciliated secretory cells. AQP5 immunoreactivity was also found in the isthmic muscle and lamina propria beneath the epithelia. In cycling females, oviductal aqp5 mRNA levels were the highest at oestrus and the lowest at di-oestrus. AQP5 immunoreactivity in non-ciliated cells was notable in the infundibulum, where AQP5 immunoreactivity was relatively high at oestrus but low at dioestrus and pro-oestrus, indicating synchrony between aqp5 gene activation and the ovarian cycle. Together, the findings of the present study indicate that aqp5 specific to non-ciliated cells is activated during sexual maturation, supporting fluid homeostasis in mouse oviduct.

  16. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Mast Cell-Airway Smooth Muscle Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Davinder; Doe, Camille; Woodman, Lucy; Heidi Wan, Wing-Yan; Sutcliffe, Amanda; Hollins, Fay

    2012-01-01

    Background: The mast cell localization to airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle in asthma is important in the development of disordered airway physiology. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is expressed by airway structural cells. Whether it has a role in the crosstalk between these cells is uncertain. We sought to define TSLP expression in bronchial tissue across the spectrum of asthma severity and to investigate the TSLP and TSLP receptor (TSLPR) expression and function by primary ASM and mast cells alone and in coculture. Methods: TSLP expression was assessed in bronchial tissue from 18 subjects with mild to moderate asthma, 12 with severe disease, and nine healthy control subjects. TSLP and TSLPR expression in primary mast cells and ASM was assessed by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and its function was assessed by calcium imaging. The role of TSLP in mast cell and ASM proliferation, survival, differentiation, synthetic function, and contraction was examined. Results: TSLP expression was increased in the ASM bundle in mild-moderate disease. TSLP and TSLPR were expressed by mast cells and ASM and were functional. Mast cell activation by TSLP increased the production of a broad range of chemokines and cytokines, but did not affect mast cell or ASM proliferation, survival, or contraction. Conclusions: TSLP expression by the bronchial epithelium and ASM was upregulated in asthma. TSLP promoted mast cell synthetic function, but did not contribute to other functional consequences of mast cell-ASM crosstalk. PMID:22052771

  18. Leukocytic cell sources of airway tissue kallikrein

    PubMed Central

    Lauredo, Isabel T.; Forteza, Rosanna M.; Botvinnikova, Yelena; Abraham, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Lung tissue kallikrein (TK) is a serine proteinase that putatively plays a role in the pathophysiology of asthma by generating kallidin and bradykinin, mediators that contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. In previous studies we observed biphasic increases in TK activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid following airway allergen challenge in allergic sheep. Although glandular TK is likely a major source of the initial increase in TK, the sources of the late increases in TK that are associated with the development of airway hyperresponsiveness may be dependent on activated resident and recruited inflammatory cells including alveolar macrophages (AMs) and neutrophils (PMNs). These cells increase concomitantly with the late increases in TK activity. To test this hypothesis, we obtained AMs from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and PMNs and monocytes (precursors of AMs) from sheep blood and determined whether these cells contained TK and whether these same cells could release TK upon activation. Using confocal microscopy, immunocytochemical techniques, and enzyme activity assays, we found that all three cell types contained and secreted TK. All three cell types demonstrated basal release of TK, which could be increased after stimulation with zymosan. In addition, PMNs also released TK in the presence of phorbol ester, suggesting multiple secretory pathways in these cells. Further-more, we showed that human monocytes also contain and secrete TK. We conclude that in the airways, monocytes, PMNs, and AMs may contribute to increased TK activity. Knowing the sources of TK in the airways could be important in understanding the mechanisms of inflammation that contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma and may help in the development of new therapies to control the disease. PMID:14660481

  19. In Vivo Imaging of Tracheal Epithelial Cells in Mice during Airway Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Ki; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Wain, John; Zhao, Rui; Jung, Keehoon; Choi, Jinwoo; Lam, Adam; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Breton, Sylvie; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2012-01-01

    Many human lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiolitis obliterans, and cystic fibrosis, are characterized by changes in the cellular composition and architecture of the airway epithelium. Intravital fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach in mechanistic studies of diseases, but it has been difficult to apply this tool for in vivo respiratory cell biology in animals in a minimally invasive manner. Here, we describe a novel miniature side-view confocal probe capable of visualizing the epithelium in the mouse trachea in vivo at a single-cell resolution. We performed serial real-time endotracheal fluorescence microscopy in live transgenic reporter mice to view the three major cell types of the large airways, namely, basal cells, Clara cells, and ciliated cells. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we monitored the regeneration of Clara cells over 18 days after a sulfur dioxide injury. Our results show that in vivo tracheal microscopy offers a new approach in the study of altered, regenerating, or metaplastic airways in animal models of lung diseases. PMID:22984086

  20. In vivo imaging of tracheal epithelial cells in mice during airway regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Ki; Vinarsky, Vladimir; Wain, John; Zhao, Rui; Jung, Keehoon; Choi, Jinwoo; Lam, Adam; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Breton, Sylvie; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2012-12-01

    Many human lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiolitis obliterans, and cystic fibrosis, are characterized by changes in the cellular composition and architecture of the airway epithelium. Intravital fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach in mechanistic studies of diseases, but it has been difficult to apply this tool for in vivo respiratory cell biology in animals in a minimally invasive manner. Here, we describe a novel miniature side-view confocal probe capable of visualizing the epithelium in the mouse trachea in vivo at a single-cell resolution. We performed serial real-time endotracheal fluorescence microscopy in live transgenic reporter mice to view the three major cell types of the large airways, namely, basal cells, Clara cells, and ciliated cells. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we monitored the regeneration of Clara cells over 18 days after a sulfur dioxide injury. Our results show that in vivo tracheal microscopy offers a new approach in the study of altered, regenerating, or metaplastic airways in animal models of lung diseases.

  1. Quercetin Blocks Airway Epithelial Cell Chemokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nanua, Suparna; Zick, Suzanna M.; Andrade, Juan E.; Sajjan, Umadevi S.; Burgess, John R.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2006-01-01

    Quercetin (3,3′,4′,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, is an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and potent antioxidant. We hypothesized that quercetin blocks airway epithelial cell chemokine expression via PI 3-kinase–dependent mechanisms. Pretreatment with quercetin and the PI 3–kinase inhibitor LY294002 each reduced TNF-α–induced IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 (also called CCL2) expression in cultured human airway epithelial cells. Quercetin also inhibited TNF-α–induced PI 3-kinase activity, Akt phosphorylation, intracellular H2O2 production, NF-κB transactivation, IL-8 promoter activity, and steady-state mRNA levels, consistent with the notion that quercetin inhibits chemokine expression by attenuating NF-κB transactivation via a PI 3-kinase/Akt-dependent pathway. Quercetin also reduced TNF-α–induced chemokine secretion in the presence of the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D, while inducing phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)-2α, suggesting that quercetin attenuates chemokine expression by post-transcriptional as well as transcriptional mechanisms. Finally, we tested the effects of quercetin in cockroach antigen–sensitized and –challenged mice. These mice show MCP-1–dependent airways hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Quercetin significantly reduced lung MCP-1 and methacholine responsiveness. We conclude that quercetin blocks airway cell chemokine expression via transcriptional and post-transcriptional pathways. PMID:16794257

  2. Fungal glycan interactions with epithelial cells in allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, René M.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to fungi results in a wide range of health outcomes, from invasive disease or allergy to immune tolerance. Inhaled fungi contact airway epithelial cells as an early event, and this host:fungal interaction can shape the eventual immunological outcome. Emerging evidence points to exposure to fungal cell wall carbohydrates in the development of allergic airway disease. Herein, we describe determinants of fungal allergenicity, and review the responses of airway epithelial cells to fungal carbohydrates. A greater understanding of the recognition of and response to fungal carbohydrates by airway epithelial cells may lead to the development of targeted therapies that ameliorate allergic airway disease. PMID:23602359

  3. Airway management considerations in children with I-cell disease.

    PubMed

    Mallen, Jonathan; Highstein, Mallory; Smith, Lee; Cheng, Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    Inclusion-cell disease (mucolipidosis II/I-cell disease) is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by a constellation of physical findings which complicate airway management. There is currently a deficit of published literature describing appropriate strategies for acute management of these children's airways. This paper details emergency and anesthetic airway management concerns and potential solutions in a small series of children with I-cell disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. MicroRNA 4423 is a primate-specific regulator of airway epithelial cell differentiation and lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Catalina; Campbell, Joshua D.; Gerrein, Joseph; Tellez, Carmen S.; Garrison, Carly B.; Walser, Tonya C.; Drizik, Eduard; Si, Huiqing; Gower, Adam C.; Vick, Jessica; Anderlind, Christina; Jackson, George R.; Mankus, Courtney; Schembri, Frank; O’Hara, Carl; Gomperts, Brigitte N.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Hayden, Patrick; Belinsky, Steven A.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a significant risk factor for lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although microRNAs are regulators of many airway gene-expression changes induced by smoking, their role in modulating changes associated with lung cancer in these cells remains unknown. Here, we use next-generation sequencing of small RNAs in the airway to identify microRNA 4423 (miR-4423) as a primate-specific microRNA associated with lung cancer and expressed primarily in mucociliary epithelium. The endogenous expression of miR-4423 increases as bronchial epithelial cells undergo differentiation into mucociliary epithelium in vitro, and its overexpression during this process causes an increase in the number of ciliated cells. Furthermore, expression of miR-4423 is reduced in most lung tumors and in cytologically normal epithelium of the mainstem bronchus of smokers with lung cancer. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-4423 in a subset of lung cancer cell lines reduces their anchorage-independent growth and significantly decreases the size of the tumors formed in a mouse xenograft model. Consistent with these phenotypes, overexpression of miR-4423 induces a differentiated-like pattern of airway epithelium gene expression and reverses the expression of many genes that are altered in lung cancer. Together, our results indicate that miR-4423 is a regulator of airway epithelium differentiation and that the abrogation of its function contributes to lung carcinogenesis. PMID:24158479

  5. Connecting alveolate cell biology with trophic ecology in the marine plankton using the ciliate Favella as a model.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, Michael L; Wolfe, Gordon V; Strom, Suzanne L; Taylor, Alison R

    2014-10-01

    Planktonic alveolates (ciliates and dinoflagellates), key trophic links in marine planktonic communities, exhibit complex behaviors that are underappreciated by microbiologists and ecologists. Furthermore, the physiological mechanisms underlying these behaviors are still poorly understood except in a few freshwater model ciliates, which are significantly different in cell structure and behavior than marine planktonic species. Here, we argue for an interdisciplinary research approach to connect physiological mechanisms with population-level outcomes of behaviors. Presenting the tintinnid ciliate Favella as a model alveolate, we review its population ecology, behavior, and cellular/molecular biology in the context of sensory biology and synthesize past research and current findings to construct a conceptual model describing the sensory biology of Favella. We discuss how emerging genomic information and new technical methods for integrating research across different levels of biological organization are paving the way for rapid advance. These research approaches will yield a deeper understanding of the role that planktonic alveolates may play in biogeochemical cycles, and how they may respond to future ocean conditions.

  6. Ultrastructure of the ciliated cells of the free-swimming larva, and sessile stages, of the marine sponge Haliclona indistincta (Demospongiae: Haplosclerida).

    PubMed

    Stephens, Kelly M; Ereskovsky, Alexander; Lalor, Pierce; McCormack, Grace P

    2013-11-01

    We provide a detailed, comparative study of the ciliated cells of the marine haplosclerid sponge Haliclona indistincta, in order to make data available for future phylogenetic comparisons at the ultrastructural level. Our study focuses on the description and analysis of the larval epithelial cells, and choanocytes of the metamorphosed juvenile sponge. The ultrastructure of the two cell types is sufficiently different to prevent our ability to conclusively determine the origin of the choanocytes from the larval ciliated cells. However, ciliated, epithelial cells were observed in a migratory position within the inner cell mass of the larval stages. Some cilia were observed within the cell's cytoplasm, which is indicative of the ciliated epithelial cell undergoing transdifferentiation into a choanocyte; while traces of other ciliated epithelial cells were contained within phagosomes, suggesting they are phagocytosed. We compared our data with other species described in the literature. However, any phylogenetic inference must wait until further detailed comparisons can be made with species whose phylogenetic position has been determined by other means, such as phylogenomics, in order to more closely link genomic, and morphological information.

  7. Expression of ligands for Siglec-8 and Siglec-9 in human airways and airway cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Yu, Huifeng; Fernandes, Steve M.; Wei, Yadong; Gonzalez-Gil, Anabel; Motari, Mary G.; Vajn, Katarina; Stevens, Whitney W.; Peters, Anju T.; Bochner, Bruce S.; Kern, Robert C.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Balanced activation and inhibition of the immune system ensures pathogen clearance while avoiding hyperinflammation. Siglecs, sialic acid binding proteins found on subsets of immune cells, often inhibit inflammation: Siglec-8 on eosinophils and Siglec-9 on neutrophils engage sialoglycan ligands on airways to diminish ongoing inflammation. The identities of human siglec ligands and their expression during inflammation are largely unknown. Objective The histological distribution, expression and molecular characteristics of siglec ligands were explored in healthy and inflamed human upper airways and in a cellular model of airway inflammation. Methods Normal and chronically inflamed upper airway tissues were stained for siglec ligands. The ligands were extracted from normal and inflamed tissues and from human Calu-3 cells for quantitative analysis by siglec blotting and isolation by siglec capture. Results Siglec-8 ligands were expressed on a subpopulation of submucosal gland cells of human inferior turbinate, whereas Siglec-9 ligands were expressed more broadly (submucosal glands, epithelium, connective tissue); both were significantly upregulated in chronic rhinosinusitis patients. Human airway (Calu-3) cells expressed Siglec-9 ligands on mucin 5B under inflammatory control via the NF-κB pathway, and mucin 5B carried sialoglycan ligands of Siglec-9 on human upper airway tissue. Conclusion Inflammation results in upregulation of immune inhibitory Siglec-8 and Siglec-9 sialoglycan ligands on human airways. Siglec-9 ligands were upregulated via the NF-κB pathway resulting in their enhanced expression on mucin 5B. Siglec sialoglycan ligand expression in inflamed cells and tissues may contribute to the control of airway inflammation. PMID:25747723

  8. Control of local immunity by airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Weitnauer, M; Mijošek, V; Dalpke, A H

    2016-03-01

    The lung is ventilated by thousand liters of air per day. Inevitably, the respiratory system comes into contact with airborne microbial compounds, most of them harmless contaminants. Airway epithelial cells are known to have innate sensor functions, thus being able to detect microbial danger. To avoid chronic inflammation, the pulmonary system has developed specific means to control local immune responses. Even though airway epithelial cells can act as proinflammatory promoters, we propose that under homeostatic conditions airway epithelial cells are important modulators of immune responses in the lung. In this review, we discuss epithelial cell regulatory functions that control reactivity of professional immune cells within the microenvironment of the airways and how these mechanisms are altered in pulmonary diseases. Regulation by epithelial cells can be divided into two mechanisms: (1) mediators regulate epithelial cells' innate sensitivity in cis and (2) factors are produced that limit reactivity of immune cells in trans.

  9. Aggregates of mutant CFTR fragments in airway epithelial cells of CF lungs: new pathologic observations.

    PubMed

    Du, Kai; Karp, Philip H; Ackerley, Cameron; Zabner, Joseph; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by a mutation in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene resulting in a loss of Cl(-) channel function, disrupting ion and fluid homeostasis, leading to severe lung disease with airway obstruction due to mucus plugging and inflammation. The most common CFTR mutation, F508del, occurs in 90% of patients causing the mutant CFTR protein to misfold and trigger an endoplasmic reticulum based recycling response. Despite extensive research into the pathobiology of CF lung disease, little attention has been paid to the cellular changes accounting for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Here we report a novel finding of intracellular retention and accumulation of a cleaved fragment of F508del CFTR in concert with autophagic like phagolysosomes in the airway epithelium of patients with F508del CFTR. Aggregates consisting of poly-ubiquitinylated fragments of only the N-terminal domain of F508del CFTR but not the full-length molecule accumulate to appreciable levels. Importantly, these undegraded intracytoplasmic aggregates representing the NT-NBD1 domain of F508del CFTR were found in ciliated, in basal, and in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. Aggregates were found in both native lung tissues and ex-vivo primary cultures of bronchial epithelial cells from CF donors, but not in normal control lungs. Our findings present a new, heretofore, unrecognized innate CF gene related cell defect and a potential contributing factor to the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. Mutant CFTR intracytoplasmic aggregates could be analogous to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in other degenerative disorders and in pulmonary "conformational protein-associated" diseases. Consequently, potential alterations to the functional integrity of airway epithelium and regenerative capacity may represent a critical new element in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease.

  10. Progenitor Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas J.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple distinct epithelial domains are found throughout the airway that are distinguishable by location, structure, function, and cell-type composition. Several progenitor cell populations in the proximal airway have been identified to reside in confined microenvironmental niches including the submucosal glands (SMGs), which are embedded in the tracheal connective tissue between the surface epithelium and cartilage, and basal cells that reside within the surface airway epithelium (SAE). Current research suggests that regulatory pathways that coordinate development of the proximal airway and establishment of progenitor cell niches may overlap with pathways that control progenitor cell responses during airway regeneration following injury. SMGs have been shown to harbor epithelial progenitor cells, and this niche is dysregulated in diseases such as cystic fibrosis. However, mechanisms that regulate progenitor cell proliferation and maintenance within this glandular niche are not completely understood. Here we discuss glandular progenitor cells during development and regeneration of the proximal airway and compare properties of glandular progenitors to those of basal cell progenitors in the SAE. Further investigation into glandular progenitor cell control will provide a direction for interrogating therapeutic interventions to correct aberrant conditions affecting the SMGs in diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. PMID:24818588

  11. Allergic airway inflammation induces the migration of dendritic cells into airway sensory ganglia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A neuroimmune crosstalk between dendritic cells (DCs) and airway nerves in the lung has recently been reported. However, the presence of DCs in airway sensory ganglia under normal and allergic conditions has not been explored so far. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the localisation, distribution and proliferation of DCs in airway sensory ganglia under allergic airway inflammation. Methods Using the house dust mite (HDM) model for allergic airway inflammation BALB/c mice were exposed to HDM extract intranasally (25 μg/50 μl) for 5 consecutive days a week over 7 weeks. With the help of the immunohistochemistry, vagal jugular-nodose ganglia complex (JNC) sections were analysed regarding their expression of DC-markers (MHC II, CD11c, CD103), the neuronal marker PGP 9.5 and the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and glutamine synthetase (GS) as a marker for satellite glia cells (SGCs). To address the original source of DCs in sensory ganglia, a proliferation experiment was also carried in this study. Results Immune cells with characteristic DC-phenotype were found to be closely located to SGCs and vagal sensory neurons under physiological conditions. The percentage of DCs in relation to neurons was significantly increased by allergic airway inflammation in comparison to the controls (HDM 51.38 ± 2.38% vs. control 28.16 ± 2.86%, p < 0.001). The present study also demonstrated that DCs were shown to proliferate in jugular-nodose ganglia, however, the proliferation rate of DCs is not significantly changed in the two treated animal groups (proliferating DCs/ total DCs: HDM 0.89 ± 0.38%, vs. control 1.19 ± 0.54%, p = 0.68). Also, increased number of CGRP-positive neurons was found in JNC after allergic sensitisation and challenge (HDM 31.16 ± 5.41% vs. control 7.16 ± 1.53%, p < 0.001). Conclusion The present findings suggest that DCs may migrate from outside into the ganglia to interact with

  12. Stimulus-response coupling in mammalian ciliated cells. Demonstration of two mechanisms of control for cytosolic [Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, M; Hinds, T R; Verdugo, P

    1989-01-01

    Changes of cytosolic [Ca2+] have been proposed to couple stimulation of ciliary movement, however, quantitative measurements of fluctuations of intracellular free [Ca2+] associated with stimulation of ciliated cells have not been investigated. In primary cultures of rabbit oviductal ciliated cells, the stimulation of ciliary activity produced by micromolar concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) was associated with a transient increase of intracellular [Ca2+]. Whereas the increase of cytosolic [Ca2+] and beat frequency produced by ATP were inhibited by the Ca-channel blocker LaCl3, the rise of cytosolic [Ca2+] and frequency of ciliary beat produced by PGF2 alpha was not affected by LaCl3. These results are the first direct demonstration that fluctuations of cytosolic [Ca2+] are associated with increased ciliary beat frequency in mammalian epithelial cells. The present findings suggest two different calcium-dependent mechanisms for stimulus-coupling in ciliary epithelium: ATP acting via purinergic receptor coupled to transmembrane influx of Ca2+, and PGF2 alpha acting via receptor-mediated release of intracellular sequestered Ca. PMID:2611335

  13. Disentangling sources of variation in SSU rDNA sequences from single cell analyses of ciliates: impact of copy number variation and experimental error.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chundi; Zhang, Tengteng; Wang, Yurui; Katz, Laura A; Gao, Feng; Song, Weibo

    2017-07-26

    Small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) is widely used for phylogenetic inference, barcoding and other taxonomy-based analyses. Recent studies indicate that SSU rDNA of ciliates may have a high level of sequence variation within a single cell, which impacts the interpretation of rDNA-based surveys. However, sequence variation can come from a variety of sources including experimental errors, especially the mutations generated by DNA polymerase in PCR. In the present study, we explore the impact of four DNA polymerases on sequence variation and find that low-fidelity polymerases exaggerate the estimates of single-cell sequence variation. Therefore, using a polymerase with high fidelity is essential for surveys of sequence variation. Another source of variation results from errors during amplification of SSU rDNA within the polyploidy somatic macronuclei of ciliates. To investigate further the impact of SSU rDNA copy number variation, we use a high-fidelity polymerase to examine the intra-individual SSU rDNA polymorphism in ciliates with varying levels of macronuclear amplification: Halteria grandinella, Blepharisma americanum and Strombidium stylifer We estimate the rDNA copy numbers of these three species by single-cell quantitative PCR. The results indicate that: (i) sequence variation of SSU rDNA within a single cell is authentic in ciliates, but the level of intra-individual SSU rDNA polymorphism varies greatly among species; (ii) rDNA copy numbers vary greatly among species, even those within the same class; (iii) the average rDNA copy number of Halteria grandinella is about 567 893 (s.d. = 165 481), which is the highest record of rDNA copy number in ciliates to date; and (iv) based on our data and the records from previous studies, it is not always true in ciliates that rDNA copy numbers are positively correlated with cell or genome size. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  15. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  16. Cell-specific transcriptional profiling of ciliated sensory neurons reveals regulators of behavior and extracellular vesicle biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Kaletsky, Rachel; Silva, Malan; Williams, April; Haas, Leonard; Androwski, Rebecca; Landis, Jessica; Patrick, Cory; Rashid, Alina; Santiago-Martinez, Dianaliz; Gravato-Nobre, Maria; Hodgkin, Jonathan; Hall, David H.; Murphy, Coleen T.; Barr, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cilia and extracellular vesicles (EVs) are signaling organelles[1]. Cilia act as cellular sensory antennae, with defects resulting in human ciliopathies. Cilia both release and bind to EVs[1]. EVs are submicron-sized particles released by cells and function in both short and long range intercellular communication. In C. elegans and mammals, the Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) gene products polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 localize to both cilia and EVs, act in the same genetic pathway, and function in a sensory capacity, suggesting ancient conservation[2]. A fundamental understanding of EV biology and the relationship between the polycystins, cilia, and EVs is lacking. To define properties of a ciliated EV-releasing cell, we performed RNAseq on 27 GFP-labeled EV releasing neurons (EVNs) isolated from adult C. elegans. We identified 335 significantly overrepresented genes, of which 61 were validated by GFP reporters. The EVN transcriptional profile uncovered new pathways controlling EV biogenesis and polycystin signaling and also identified EV cargo, which included an antimicrobial peptide and ASIC channel. Tumor necrosis associated factor (TRAF) homologues trf-1 and trf-2 and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pmk-1 acted in polycystin signaling pathways controlling male mating behaviors. pmk-1 was also required for EV biogenesis, independent of the innate immunity MAPK signaling cascade. This first high-resolution transcriptome profile of a subtype of ciliated sensory neurons isolated from adult animals reveals the functional components of an EVN. PMID:26687621

  17. Airway epithelial cell wound repair mediated by alpha-dystroglycan.

    PubMed

    White, S R; Wojcik, K R; Gruenert, D; Sun, S; Dorscheid, D R

    2001-02-01

    Dystroglycans (DGs) bind laminin matrix proteins in skeletal and cardiac muscle and are expressed in other nonmuscle tissues. However, their expression in airway epithelial cells has not been demonstrated. We examined expression of DGs in the human airway epithelial cell line 1HAEo(-), and in human primary airway epithelial cells. Expression of the common gene for alpha- and beta-DG was demonstrated by reverse transcriptase/ polymerase chain reaction in 1HAEo(-) cells. Protein expression of beta-DG was demonstrated by both Western blot and flow cytometry in cultured cells. Localization of alpha-DG, using both a monoclonal antibody and the alpha-DG binding lectin wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA), was to the cell membrane and nucleus. We then examined the function of DGs in modulating wound repair over laminin matrix. Blocking alpha-DG binding to laminin in 1HAEo(-) monolayers using either glycosyaminoglycans or WGA attenuated cell migration and spreading after mechanical injury. alpha-DG was not expressed in epithelial cells at the wound edge immediately after wound creation, but localized to the cell membrane in these cells within 12 h of injury. These data demonstrate the presence of DGs in airway epithelium. alpha-DG is dynamically expressed and serves as a lectin to bind laminin during airway epithelial cell repair.

  18. Exploring the Transcriptome of Ciliated Cells Using In Silico Dissection of Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ivliev, Alexander E.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.; Peters, Dorien J. M.; Sergeeva, Marina G.

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are cell organelles that play important roles in cell motility, sensory and developmental functions and are involved in a range of human diseases, known as ciliopathies. Here, we search for novel human genes related to cilia using a strategy that exploits the previously reported tendency of cell type-specific genes to be coexpressed in the transcriptome of complex tissues. Gene coexpression networks were constructed using the noise-resistant WGCNA algorithm in 12 publicly available microarray datasets from human tissues rich in motile cilia: airways, fallopian tubes and brain. A cilia-related coexpression module was detected in 10 out of the 12 datasets. A consensus analysis of this module's gene composition recapitulated 297 known and predicted 74 novel cilia-related genes. 82% of the novel candidates were supported by tissue-specificity expression data from GEO and/or proteomic data from the Human Protein Atlas. The novel findings included a set of genes (DCDC2, DYX1C1, KIAA0319) related to a neurological disease dyslexia suggesting their potential involvement in ciliary functions. Furthermore, we searched for differences in gene composition of the ciliary module between the tissues. A multidrug-and-toxin extrusion transporter MATE2 (SLC47A2) was found as a brain-specific central gene in the ciliary module. We confirm the localization of MATE2 in cilia by immunofluorescence staining using MDCK cells as a model. While MATE2 has previously gained attention as a pharmacologically relevant transporter, its potential relation to cilia is suggested for the first time. Taken together, our large-scale analysis of gene coexpression networks identifies novel genes related to human cell cilia. PMID:22558177

  19. Airway epithelial cell expression of interleukin-6 in transgenic mice. Uncoupling of airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity.

    PubMed Central

    DiCosmo, B F; Geba, G P; Picarella, D; Elias, J A; Rankin, J A; Stripp, B R; Whitsett, J A; Flavell, R A

    1994-01-01

    We produced transgenic mice which overexpress human IL-6 in the airway epithelial cells. Transgenic mice develop a mononuclear cell infiltrate adjacent to large and mid-sized airways. Immunohistochemistry reveals these cells to be predominantly CD4+ cells, MHC class II+ cells, and B220+ cells. Transgenic mice and nontransgenic mice had similar baseline respiratory system resistance (0.47 +/- 0.06 vs 0.43 +/- 0.04 cmH2O/ml per s at 9 wk of age, P = NS and 0.45 +/- 0.07 vs 0.43 +/- 0.09 cmH2O/ml per s at 17 wk of age, P = NS). Transgenic mice, however, required a significantly higher log dose of methacholine to produce a 100% increase in respiratory system resistance as compared with non-transgenic littermates (1.34 +/- 0.24 vs 0.34 +/- 0.05 mg/ml, P < or = 0.01). We conclude that the expression of human IL-6 in the airways of transgenic mice results in a CD4+, MHC class II+, B220+ lymphocytic infiltrate surrounding large and mid-sized airways that does not alter basal respiratory resistance, but does diminish airway reactivity to methacholine. These findings demonstrate an uncoupling of IL-6-induced airway lymphocytic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness and suggest that some forms of airway inflammation may serve to restore altered airway physiology. Images PMID:7962549

  20. [Regulation of airway stem cell proliferation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Yang, S X; Wu, Q; Sun, X; Li, X; Li, K; Xu, L; Li, Y; Zhang, Q Y; Zhang, Y C; Chen, H Y

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effect of fibroblasts on regulating airway stem cell proliferation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Lung cell suspension was prepared from β-actin-GFP mice. Airway stem cells were obtained by fluorescence activated cell sorting and co-cultured with lung fibroblasts. The fibroblasts were treated with TGF-β inhibitor SB43142. The expression of growth factors FGF1/2 and the effect of FGF1/2 on stem cell proliferation were observed. The cloning efficiency of airway stem cells, when co-cultured with normal lung fibroblast cells for 8 days, was (3.5±1.1)%, while the cloning efficiency was reduced to (0.04±0.04)% when co-cultured with lung fibroblasts from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients. The difference between the 2 groups was statistically significant(P=0.002 5). TGF-β receptor inhibitor SB431542 increased lung fibroblast growth factors FGF1/2 expression.FGF1 mRNA expression was increased to the experimental group 0.005 5 from 0.000 2 in the control group.FGF2 mRNA expression of the amount raised to the experimental group 0.000 15 from 0.000 8 in the control group.FGF1/2 promoted the growth of airway stem cells. After FGF1/2 was co-cultured with normal lung fibroblast cells for 8 days, the cloning efficiency of airway stem cells was (0.3±0.1)%. During the development of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, fibroblast secreted FGF1/2 regulate airway stem cell proliferation.

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Phosphoinositide Kinome from Two Ciliates Reveals Novel Evolutionary Links for Phosphoinositide Kinases in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leondaritis, George; Siokos, John; Skaripa, Irini; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2013-01-01

    Background The complexity of phosphoinositide signaling in higher eukaryotes is partly due to expansion of specific families and types of phosphoinositide kinases (PIKs) that can generate all phosphoinositides via multiple routes. This is particularly evident in the PI3Ks and PIPKs, and it is considered an evolutionary trait associated with metazoan diversification. Yet, there are limited comprehensive studies on the PIK repertoire of free living unicellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We undertook a genome-wide analysis of putative PIK genes in two free living ciliated cells, Tetrahymena and Paramecium. The Tetrahymena thermophila and Paramecium tetraurelia genomes were probed with representative kinases from all families and types. Putative homologs were verified by EST, microarray and deep RNA sequencing database searches and further characterized for domain structure, catalytic efficiency, expression patterns and phylogenetic relationships. In total, we identified and characterized 22 genes in the Tetrahymena thermophila genome and 62 highly homologues genes in Paramecium tetraurelia suggesting a tight evolutionary conservation in the ciliate lineage. Comparison to the kinome of fungi reveals a significant expansion of PIK genes in ciliates. Conclusions/Significance Our study highlights four important aspects concerning ciliate and other unicellular PIKs. First, ciliate-specific expansion of PI4KIII-like genes. Second, presence of class I PI3Ks which, at least in Tetrahymena, are associated with a metazoan-type machinery for PIP3 signaling. Third, expansion of divergent PIPK enzymes such as the recently described type IV transmembrane PIPKs. Fourth, presence of possible type II PIPKs and presumably inactive PIKs (hence, pseudo-PIKs) not previously described. Taken together, our results provide a solid framework for future investigation of the roles of PIKs in ciliates and indicate that novel functions and novel regulatory pathways of

  2. Temporal Monitoring of Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells Using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Cornelia; Reale, Riccardo; Held, Marie; Millar, Timothy M.; Collins, Jane E.; Davies, Donna E.; Morgan, Hywel; Swindle, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    The airway epithelium is exposed to a variety of harmful agents during breathing and appropriate cellular responses are essential to maintain tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence has highlighted the contribution of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the development of many chronic respiratory diseases. Despite intense research efforts, the responses of the airway barrier to environmental agents are not fully understood, mainly due to lack of suitable in vitro models that recapitulate the complex in vivo situation accurately. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we describe a novel dynamic 3D in vitro model of the airway epithelium, incorporating fully differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells at the air-liquid interface and a basolateral microfluidic supply of nutrients simulating the interstitial flow observed in vivo. Through combination of the microfluidic culture system with an automated fraction collector the kinetics of cellular responses by the airway epithelium to environmental agents can be analysed at the early phases for the first time and with much higher sensitivity compared to common static in vitro models. Following exposure of primary differentiated epithelial cells to pollen we show that CXCL8/IL–8 release is detectable within the first 2h and peaks at 4–6h under microfluidic conditions, a response which was not observed in conventional static culture conditions. Such a microfluidic culture model is likely to have utility for high resolution temporal profiling of toxicological and pharmacological responses of the airway epithelial barrier, as well as for studies of disease mechanisms. PMID:26436734

  3. Phenotypic modification of human airway epithelial cells in air-liquid interface culture induced by exposure to the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK).

    PubMed

    Carson, Johnny L; Brighton, Luisa E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-04-01

    The nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is a potent tobacco-specific carcinogen. We used an air-liquid interface epithelial cell culture system to model changes associated with NNK exposure relative to pathologies documented in human tobacco-related illnesses. Although in vitro systems exhibit certain limitations, they often offer accentuation of subtle pathologies. While the distribution of cell types in control cultures typically favors the ciliated cell phenotype, NNK-exposed cultures transitioned to non-ciliated cell phenotypes as well as reflecting features consistent with squamous metaplasia. We conclude that NNK impacts normal growth and differentiation of human airway epithelium in a short interval of time in vitro.

  4. Apoptotic cell clearance by bronchial epithelial cells critically influences airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Juncadella, Ignacio J.; Kadl, Alexandra; Sharma, Ashish K.; Shim, Yun M.; Hochreiter-Hufford, Amelia; Borish, Larry; Ravichandran, Kodi S.

    2013-01-01

    Lung epithelial cells can influence immune responses to airway allergens1,2. Airway epithelial cells also undergo apoptosis after encountering environmental allergens3; yet, relatively little is known about how these are cleared, and their effect on airway inflammation. Here we show that airway epithelial cells efficiently engulf apoptotic epithelial cells and secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines, dependent upon intracellular signalling by the small GTPase Rac1. Inducible deletion of Rac1 expression specifically in airway epithelial cells in a mouse model resulted in defective engulfment by epithelial cells and aberrant anti-inflammatory cytokine production. Intranasal priming and challenge of these mice with house dust mite extract or ovalbumin as allergens led to exacerbated inflammation, augmented Th2 cytokines and airway hyper-responsiveness, with decreased interleukin (IL)-10 in bronchial lavages. Rac1-deficient epithelial cells produced much higher IL-33 upon allergen or apoptotic cell encounter, with increased numbers of nuocyte-like cells1,4,5. Administration of exogenous IL-10 ‘rescued’ the airway inflammation phenotype in Rac1-deficient mice, with decreased IL-33. Collectively, these genetic and functional studies suggest a new role for Rac1-dependent engulfment by airway epithelial cells and in establishing the anti-inflammatory environment, and that defects in cell clearance in the airways could contribute to inflammatory responses towards common allergens. PMID:23235830

  5. Relationship between the flagellates and the ciliates.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R E; Kugrens, P

    1992-01-01

    The flagellates and the ciliates have long been considered to be closely related because of their unicellular nature and the similarity in the structures of the axoneme of the flagella and cilia in both groups. Most protozoologists believe that the ciliates arose from a flagellate. The flagellates that are most similar in structure to the ciliates are the dinoflagellates and two genera of uncertain taxonomic position, Colponema and Katablepharis. Structurally, dinoflagellates have a number of similarities with ciliates. These include the similarity of the cortical alveoli in the ciliates to the thecal vesicles in the dinoflagellates, the possession of tubular cristae, the similarity of the parasomal sac of the ciliates to the pusule of the dinoflagellates, the possession of similar trichocysts and mucocysts, and some similarity in the feeding apparatus. Colponema spp. are probably related to the dinoflagellates and have many of the same similarities with the ciliates. Katablepharis spp. are very similar in structure to the swarmer (embryo) of the suctorian ciliates. Indeed, reduction in the number of cilia to two in the suctorian swarmer and elimination of the macronucleus would result in a cell that is very similar to the Katablepharis cell. The feeding apparatus of Katablepharis spp. and the rest of the ciliates consists of two concentric microtubular arrays associated with vesicles. Information available from nucleotide sequencing of rRNA places the dinoflagellates in an ancestral position to the ciliates. The rRNA of Colponema and Katablepharis spp. has not yet been investigated. The use of stop codons in mRNA is discussed in relation to phylogeny. Images PMID:1480107

  6. Epithelial Cell Proliferation Contributes to Airway Remodeling in Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lance; E, Xueping; Tarsi, Jaime; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor; Horiuchi, Todd K.; Cochran, Rebecca; DeMartino, Steve; Schechtman, Kenneth B.; Hussain, Iftikhar; Holtzman, Michael J.; Castro, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Despite long-term therapy with corticosteroids, patients with severe asthma develop irreversible airway obstruction. Objectives: To evaluate if there are structural and functional differences in the airway epithelium in severe asthma associated with airway remodeling. Methods: In bronchial biopsies from 21 normal subjects, 11 subjects with chronic bronchitis, 9 subjects with mild asthma, and 31 subjects with severe asthma, we evaluated epithelial cell morphology: epithelial thickness, lamina reticularis (LR) thickness, and epithelial desquamation. Levels of retinoblastoma protein (Rb), Ki67, and Bcl-2 were measured, reflecting cellular proliferation and death. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to study cellular apoptosis. Measurements and Main Results: Airway epithelial and LR thickness was greater in subjects with severe asthma compared with those with mild asthma, normal subjects, and diseased control subjects (p = 0.009 and 0.033, respectively). There was no significant difference in epithelial desquamation between groups. Active, hypophosphorylated Rb expression was decreased (p = 0.002) and Ki67 was increased (p < 0.01) in the epithelium of subjects with severe asthma as compared with normal subjects, indicating increased cellular proliferation. Bcl-2 expression was decreased (p < 0.001), indicating decreased cell death suppression. There was a greater level of apoptotic activity in the airway biopsy in subjects with severe asthma as compared with the normal subjects using the TUNEL assay (p = 0.002), suggesting increased cell death. Conclusions: In subjects with severe asthma, as compared with subjects with mild asthma, normal subjects, and diseased control subjects, we found novel evidence of increased cellular proliferation in the airway contributing to a thickened epithelium and LR. These changes may contribute to the progressive decline in lung function and airway remodeling in patients with severe

  7. Regulation of human airway smooth muscle cell migration and relevance to asthma.

    PubMed

    Salter, Brittany; Pray, Cara; Radford, Katherine; Martin, James G; Nair, Parameswaran

    2017-08-16

    Airway remodelling is an important feature of asthma pathogenesis. A key structural change inherent in airway remodelling is increased airway smooth muscle mass. There is emerging evidence to suggest that the migration of airway smooth muscle cells may contribute to cellular hyperplasia, and thus increased airway smooth muscle mass. The precise source of these cells remains unknown. Increased airway smooth muscle mass may be collectively due to airway infiltration of myofibroblasts, neighbouring airway smooth muscle cells in the bundle, or circulating hemopoietic progenitor cells. However, the relative contribution of each cell type is not well understood. In addition, although many studies have identified pro and anti-migratory agents of airway smooth muscle cells, whether these agents can impact airway remodelling in the context of human asthma, remains to be elucidated. As such, further research is required to determine the exact mechanism behind airway smooth muscle cell migration within the airways, how much this contributes to airway smooth muscle mass in asthma, and whether attenuating this migration may provide a therapeutic avenue for asthma. In this review article, we will discuss the current evidence with respect to the regulation of airway smooth muscle cell migration in asthma.

  8. Immunologically Induced Alterations of Airway Smooth Muscle Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souhrada, M.; Souhrada, J. F.

    1984-08-01

    Active and passive sensitization, both in vivo and in vitro, caused significant hyperpolarization of airway smooth muscle cell preparations isolated from guinea pigs. An increase in the contribution of the electrogenic Na+ pump to the resting membrane potential was responsible for this change. Hyperpolarization, as induced by passive sensitization, was not prevented by agents that inhibit specific mediators of anaphylaxis but was abolished when serum from sensitized animals was heated. The heat-sensitive serum factor, presumably reaginic antibodies, appears to be responsible for the membrane hyperpolarization of airway smooth muscle cells after sensitization.

  9. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae induces inflammatory response in sheep airway epithelial cells via a MyD88-dependent TLR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xue, Di; Ma, Yan; Li, Min; Li, Yanan; Luo, Haixia; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2015-01-15

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is a bacterium that specifically infects sheep and goat and causes ovine infectious pleuropneumonia. In an effort to understand the pathogen-host interaction between the M. ovipneumoniae and airway epithelial cells, we investigated the host inflammatory response using a primary air-liquid interface (ALI) epithelial culture model generated from bronchial epithelial cells of Ningxia Tan sheep (Ovis aries). The ALI culture of sheep bronchial epithelial cells showed a fully differentiated epithelium comprising distinct epithelial types, including the basal, ciliated and goblet cells. Exposure of ALI cultures to M. ovipneumoniae led to increased expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and components of the myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent TLR signaling pathway, including the MyD88, TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), IL-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), as well as subsequent pro-inflammatory cytokines in the epithelial cells. Of interest, infection with M. ovipneumoniae failed to induce the expression of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), TRAF3 and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), key components of the MyD88-independent signaling pathway. These results suggest that the MyD88-dependent TLR pathway may play a crucial role in sheep airway epithelial cells in response to M. ovipneumoniae infection, which also indicate that the ALI culture system may be a reliable model for investigating pathogen-host interactions between M. ovipneumoniae and airway epithelial cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. TLR2 Regulates Gap Junction Intercellular Communication in Airway Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Francis J.; Prince, Alice S.

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune response to inhaled bacteria, such as the opportunist Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is initiated by TLR2 displayed on the apical surface of airway epithelial cells. Activation of TLR2 is accompanied by an immediate Ca2+ flux that is both necessary and sufficient to stimulate NF-κB and MAPK proinflammatory signaling to recruit and activate polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the airway. In human airway cells gap junction channels were found to provide a regulated conduit for the movement of Ca2+ from cell to cell. In response to TLR2 stimulation, by either lipid agonists or P. aeruginosa, gap junctions functioned to transiently amplify proinflammatory signaling by communicating Ca2+ fluxes from stimulated to adjacent, non-stimulated cells thus increasing epithelial CXCL8 production. P. aeruginosa stimulation also induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Connexin 43 and association with c-Src, events linked to the closure of these channels. By 4 hours post bacterial stimulation, gap junction communication was decreased indicating an autoregulatory control of the connexins. Thus, gap junction channels comprised of Connexin 43 and other connexins in airway cells provide a mechanism to coordinate and regulate the epithelial immune response even in the absence of signals from the immune system. PMID:18354224

  11. The DNA of ciliated protozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, D M

    1994-01-01

    Ciliates contain two types of nuclei: a micronucleus and a macronucleus. The micronucleus serves as the germ line nucleus but does not express its genes. The macronucleus provides the nuclear RNA for vegetative growth. Mating cells exchange haploid micronuclei, and a new macronucleus develops from a new diploid micronucleus. The old macronucleus is destroyed. This conversion consists of amplification, elimination, fragmentation, and splicing of DNA sequences on a massive scale. Fragmentation produces subchromosomal molecules in Tetrahymena and Paramecium cells and much smaller, gene-sized molecules in hypotrichous ciliates to which telomere sequences are added. These molecules are then amplified, some to higher copy numbers than others. rDNA is differentially amplified to thousands of copies per macronucleus. Eliminated sequences include transposonlike elements and sequences called internal eliminated sequences that interrupt gene coding regions in the micronuclear genome. Some, perhaps all, of these are excised as circular molecules and destroyed. In at least some hypotrichs, segments of some micronuclear genes are scrambled in a nonfunctional order and are recorded during macronuclear development. Vegetatively growing ciliates appear to possess a mechanism for adjusting copy numbers of individual genes, which corrects gene imbalances resulting from random distribution of DNA molecules during amitosis of the macronucleus. Other distinctive features of ciliate DNA include an altered use of the conventional stop codons. Images PMID:8078435

  12. Directed differentiation of airway epithelial cells of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Dong

    2016-11-01

    The ability to generate lung and airway epithelial cells from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) would have applications in regenerative medicine, modeling of lung disease, drug screening, and studies of human lung development. In this research, hBMSCs were cultured in specialized airway epithelial cell growth media for differentiation of airway epithelial cells, including keratinocyte growth factor transferrin, bovine pituitary extract, epinephrine, triiodothyronine and retinoic acid. The surfactant protein C, a specific marker of type II pneumocytes, and its corresponding protein were demonstrated by immunofluorescence and western blotting after differentiation of airway epithelial cells, respectively. These cells were then transferred into an induced acute lung injury model. The results showed that the hBMSCs could induce differentiation in airway epithelial cells under the special conditions of the medium, the result for surfactant protein C was positive in differentiated airway epithelial cells using immunofluorescence and western blotting, and these cells were successfully colonized in the injured lung airway. In conclusion, our research shows that a population of airway epithelial cells can be specifically generated from hBMSCs and that induced cells may be allowed to participate in tissue repair.

  13. Characterization of Side Population Cells from Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Tillie-Louise; Shaheen, Furquan; Johnson, Andrew; Wadsworth, Samuel; Pechkovsky, Dmitri V.; Jacoby, David B.; Kicic, Anthony; Stick, Stephen M.; Knight, Darryl A.

    2010-01-01

    The airway epithelium is the first line of contact with the inhaled external environment and is continuously exposed to and injured by pollutants, allergens, and viruses. However, little is known about epithelial repair and in particular the identity and role of tissue resident stem/progenitor cells that may contribute to epithelial regeneration. The aims of the present study were to identify, isolate, and characterize side population (SP) cells in human tracheobronchial epithelium. Epithelial cells were obtained from seven nontransplantable healthy lungs and four asthmatic lungs by pronase digestion. SP cells were identified by verapamil-sensitive efflux of the DNA-binding dye Hoechst 33342. Using flow cytometry, CD45− SP, CD45+ SP, and non-SP cells were isolated and sorted. CD45− SP cells made up 0.12% ± 0.01% of the total epithelial cell population in normal airway but 4.1% ± 0.06% of the epithelium in asthmatic airways. All CD45− SP cells showed positive staining for epithelial-specific markers cytokeratin-5, E-cadherin, ZO-1, and p63. CD45− SP cells exhibited stable telomere length and increased colony-forming and proliferative potential, undergoing population expansion for at least 16 consecutive passages. In contrast with non-SP cells, fewer than 100 CD45− SP cells were able to generate a multilayered and differentiated epithelium in air-liquid interface culture. SP cells are present in human tracheobronchial epithelium, exhibit both short- and longterm proliferative potential, and are capable of generation of differentiated epithelium in vitro. The number of SP cells is significantly greater in asthmatic airways, providing evidence of dysregulated resident SP cells in the asthmatic epithelium. PMID:18653771

  14. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia.

    PubMed

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan; Yan, Yan; Ravi, Laxmi Iyer; Wong, Puisan; Huong, Tra Nguyen; Li, Chunwei; Tan, Boon Huan; Wang, De Yun; Sugrue, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss.

  15. NITROTYROSINE ATTENUATES RSV-INDUCED INFLAMMATION IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrotyrosine attenuates RSV-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells. Joleen Soukup, Zuowei Li, Susanne Becker and Yuh-Chin Huang. NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, North Carolina, CEMALB, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

    Nitrotyrosine (NO2Tyr) is a...

  16. NITROTYROSINE ATTENUATES RSV-INDUCED INFLAMMATION IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrotyrosine attenuates RSV-induced inflammation in airway epithelial cells. Joleen Soukup, Zuowei Li, Susanne Becker and Yuh-Chin Huang. NHEERL, ORD, USEPA, RTP, North Carolina, CEMALB, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

    Nitrotyrosine (NO2Tyr) is a...

  17. Can a fermentation gas mainly produced by rumen Isotrichidae ciliates be a potential source of biohydrogen and a fuel for a chemical fuel cell?

    PubMed

    Piela, Piotr; Michałowski, Tadeusz; Miltko, Renata; Szewczyk, Krzysztof; Sikora, Radosław; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Sikora, Anna

    2010-07-01

    Bacteria, fungi and protozoa inhabiting the rumen, the largest chamber of the ruminants' stomach, release large quantities of hydrogen during the fermentation of carbohydrates. The hydrogen is used by coexisting methanogens to produce methane in energy-yielding processes. This work shows, for the first time, a fundamental possibility of using a hydrogen-rich fermentation gas produced by selected rumen ciliates to feed a low-temperature hydrogen fuel cell. A biohydrogen fuel cell (BHFC) was constructed consisting of (i) a bioreactor, in which a hydrogen-rich gas was produced from glucose by rumen ciliates, mainly of the Isotrichidae family, deprived of intra- and extracellular bacteria, methanogens, and fungi, and (ii) a chemical fuel cell of the polymer-electrolyte type (PEFC). The fuel cell was used as a tester of the technical applicability of the fermentation gas produced by the rumen ciliates for power generation. The average estimated hydrogen yield was ca. 1.15 mol H2 per mol of fermented glucose. The BHFC performance was equal to the performance of the PEFC running on pure hydrogen. No fuel cell poisoning effects were detected. A maximum power density of 1.66 kW/m2 (PEFC geometric area) was obtained at room temperature. The maximum volumetric power density was 128 W/m3 but the coulombic efficiency was only ca. 3.8%. The configuration of the bioreactor limited the continuous operation time of this BHFC to ca. 14 hours.

  18. Epithelium-derived chemokines induce airway smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Takeda, N; Sumi, Y; Préfontaine, D; Al Abri, J; Al Heialy, N; Al-Ramli, W; Michoud, M-C; Martin, J G; Hamid, Q

    2009-07-01

    The remodelling of airway smooth muscle (ASM) associated with asthma severity may involve the migration of ASM cells towards the epithelium. However, little is known about the mechanisms of cell migration and the effect of epithelial-derived mediators on this process. The main objective of the current study is to assess the effects of epithelial-derived chemokines on ASM cell migration. Normal human ASM cells were incubated with supernatants from cells of the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B and normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. To induce chemokine production, epithelial cells were treated with TNF-alpha. Chemokine expression by epithelial cells was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, ELISA and membrane antibody array. To identify the role of individual chemokines in ASM cell migration, we performed migration assays with a modified Boyden chamber using specific neutralizing antibodies to block chemokine effects. Supernatants from BEAS-2B cells treated with TNF-alpha increased ASM cell migration; migration was increased 1.6 and 2.5-fold by supernatant from BEAS-2B cells treated with 10 and 100 ng/mL TNF-alpha, respectively. Protein levels in supernatants and mRNA expression by BEAS-2B cells of regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and IL-8 were significantly increased by 100 ng/mL TNF-alpha treatment. The incubation of supernatant with antibodies to RANTES or IL-8 significantly reduced ASM cell migration, and the combined antibodies further inhibited the cell migration. The migratory effects of supernatants and inhibiting effects of RANTES and/or IL-8 were confirmed also using NHBE cells. The results show that chemokines from airway epithelial cells cause ASM cell migration and might potentially play a role in the process of airway remodelling in asthma.

  19. Rat respiratory coronavirus infection: replication in airway and alveolar epithelial cells and the innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Funk, C. Joel; Manzer, Rizwan; Miura, Tanya A.; Groshong, Steve D.; Ito, Yoko; Travanty, Emily A.; Leete, Jennifer; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Mason, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The rat coronavirus sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV) causes respiratory infection and provides a system for investigating respiratory coronaviruses in a natural host. A viral suspension in the form of a microspray aerosol was delivered by intratracheal instillation into the distal lung of 6–8-week-old Fischer 344 rats. SDAV inoculation produced a 7 % body weight loss over a 5 day period that was followed by recovery over the next 7 days. SDAV caused focal lesions in the lung, which were most severe on day 4 post-inoculation (p.i.). Immunofluorescent staining showed that four cell types supported SDAV virus replication in the lower respiratory tract, namely Clara cells, ciliated cells in the bronchial airway and alveolar type I and type II cells in the lung parenchyma. In bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) a neutrophil influx increased the population of neutrophils to 45 % compared with 6 % of the cells in control samples on day 2 after mock inoculation. Virus infection induced an increase in surfactant protein SP-D levels in BALF of infected rats on days 4 and 8 p.i. that subsided by day 12. The concentrations of chemokines MCP-1, LIX and CINC-1 in BALF increased on day 4 p.i., but returned to control levels by day 8. Intratracheal instillation of rats with SDAV coronavirus caused an acute, self-limited infection that is a useful model for studying the early events of the innate immune response to respiratory coronavirus infections in lungs of the natural virus host. PMID:19741068

  20. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan; Yan, Yan; Ravi, Laxmi Iyer; Wong, Puisan; Huong, Tra Nguyen; Li, Chunwei; Tan, Boon Huan; Wang, De Yun; Sugrue, Richard J.

    2015-10-15

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5 dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss. - Highlights: • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nasal ciliated epithelial cells. • Virus morphogenesis occurs within filamentous projections distinct from cilia. • The RSV N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time during infection. • Trafficking of the F protein into the cilia occurred early in infection. • Presence of the F protein in cilia correlated with impaired cilia function.

  1. CD38 and airway hyper-responsiveness: studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Alonso G P; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-02-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility, and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyper-responsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g., TNF-α) that requires the activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-κB and AP-1, and is post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3' Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in Cd38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to the response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of Cd38-deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared with wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyper-responsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38-deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyper-responsiveness; a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and (or) activity are warranted.

  2. Mast cells in airway diseases and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Glenn; Bradding, Peter

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are major effector cells of inflammation and there is strong evidence that mast cells play a significant role in asthma pathophysiology. There is also a growing body of evidence that mast cells contribute to other inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This review discusses the role that mast cells play in airway diseases and highlights how mast cell microlocalisation within specific lung compartments and their cellular interactions are likely to be critical for their effector function in disease.

  3. Ciliates by the Slice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boynton, John E.; Small, Eugene B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes new methods of collecting and examining ciliates, particularly those found in the sediments of lakes, rivers, and estuaries. Discusses extraction methods in preparation for observations in the classroom. Suggests investigations of ciliate ecology as an area of increasing research interest. (JM)

  4. Ciliates by the Slice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boynton, John E.; Small, Eugene B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes new methods of collecting and examining ciliates, particularly those found in the sediments of lakes, rivers, and estuaries. Discusses extraction methods in preparation for observations in the classroom. Suggests investigations of ciliate ecology as an area of increasing research interest. (JM)

  5. Aeroallergen challenge promotes dendritic cell proliferation in the airways.

    PubMed

    Veres, Tibor Z; Voedisch, Sabrina; Spies, Emma; Valtonen, Joona; Prenzler, Frauke; Braun, Armin

    2013-02-01

    Aeroallergen provocation induces the rapid accumulation of CD11c(+)MHC class II (MHC II)(+) dendritic cells (DCs) in the lungs, which is driven by an increased recruitment of blood-derived DC precursors. Recent data show, however, that well-differentiated DCs proliferate in situ in various tissues. This may also contribute to their allergen-induced expansion; therefore, we studied DC proliferation in the airways of mice in the steady state and after local aeroallergen provocation. Confocal whole-mount microscopy was used to visualize proliferating DCs in different microanatomical compartments of the lung. We demonstrate that in the steady state, CD11c(+)MHC II(+) DCs proliferate in both the epithelial and subepithelial layers of the airway mucosa as well as in the lung parenchyma. A 1-h pulse of the nucleotide 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine was sufficient to label 5% of DCs in both layers of the airway mucosa. On the level of whole-lung tissue, 3-5% of both CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) DC populations and 0.3% of CD11c(+)MHC II(low) lung macrophages incorporated 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine. Aeroallergen provocation caused a 3-fold increase in the frequency of locally proliferating DCs in the airway mucosa. This increase in mucosal DC proliferation was later followed by an elevation in the number of DCs. The recruitment of monocyte-derived inflammatory DCs contributed to the increasing number of DCs in the lung parenchyma, but not in the airway mucosa. We conclude that local proliferation significantly contributes to airway DC homeostasis in the steady state and that it is the major mechanism underlying the expansion of the mucosal epithelial/subepithelial DC network in allergic inflammation.

  6. Infection of Differentiated Porcine Airway Epithelial Cells by Influenza Virus: Differential Susceptibility to Infection by Porcine and Avian Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Liang, Chi-Hui; Winter, Christine; Petersen, Henning; Rautenschlein, Silke; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey; Herrler, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Background Swine are important hosts for influenza A viruses playing a crucial role in the epidemiology and interspecies transmission of these viruses. Respiratory epithelial cells are the primary target cells for influenza viruses. Methodology/Principal Findings To analyze the infection of porcine airway epithelial cells by influenza viruses, we established precision-cut lung slices as a culture system for differentiated respiratory epithelial cells. Both ciliated and mucus-producing cells were found to be susceptible to infection by swine influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype) with high titers of infectious virus released into the supernatant already one day after infection. By comparison, growth of two avian influenza viruses (subtypes H9N2 and H7N7) was delayed by about 24 h. The two avian viruses differed both in the spectrum of susceptible cells and in the efficiency of replication. As the H9N2 virus grew to titers that were only tenfold lower than that of a porcine H3N2 virus this avian virus is an interesting candidate for interspecies transmission. Lectin staining indicated the presence of both α-2,3- and α-2,6-linked sialic acids on airway epithelial cells. However, their distribution did not correlate with pattern of virus infection indicating that staining by plant lectins is not a reliable indicator for the presence of cellular receptors for influenza viruses. Conclusions/Significance Differentiated respiratory epithelial cells significantly differ in their susceptibility to infection by avian influenza viruses. We expect that the newly described precision-cut lung slices from the swine lung are an interesting culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated respiratory epithelial cells by different pathogens (viral, bacterial and parasitic ones) of swine. PMID:22174804

  7. Infection of differentiated porcine airway epithelial cells by influenza virus: differential susceptibility to infection by porcine and avian viruses.

    PubMed

    Punyadarsaniya, Darsaniya; Liang, Chi-Hui; Winter, Christine; Petersen, Henning; Rautenschlein, Silke; Hennig-Pauka, Isabel; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey; Herrler, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Swine are important hosts for influenza A viruses playing a crucial role in the epidemiology and interspecies transmission of these viruses. Respiratory epithelial cells are the primary target cells for influenza viruses. To analyze the infection of porcine airway epithelial cells by influenza viruses, we established precision-cut lung slices as a culture system for differentiated respiratory epithelial cells. Both ciliated and mucus-producing cells were found to be susceptible to infection by swine influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype) with high titers of infectious virus released into the supernatant already one day after infection. By comparison, growth of two avian influenza viruses (subtypes H9N2 and H7N7) was delayed by about 24 h. The two avian viruses differed both in the spectrum of susceptible cells and in the efficiency of replication. As the H9N2 virus grew to titers that were only tenfold lower than that of a porcine H3N2 virus this avian virus is an interesting candidate for interspecies transmission. Lectin staining indicated the presence of both α-2,3- and α-2,6-linked sialic acids on airway epithelial cells. However, their distribution did not correlate with pattern of virus infection indicating that staining by plant lectins is not a reliable indicator for the presence of cellular receptors for influenza viruses. Differentiated respiratory epithelial cells significantly differ in their susceptibility to infection by avian influenza viruses. We expect that the newly described precision-cut lung slices from the swine lung are an interesting culture system to analyze the infection of differentiated respiratory epithelial cells by different pathogens (viral, bacterial and parasitic ones) of swine.

  8. Airway cells after swimming outdoors or in the sea in nonasthmatic athletes.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, Maria R; Morici, Giuseppe; Riccobono, Loredana; Profita, Mirella; Bonanno, Anna; Paternò, Alessandra; Di Giorgi, Rossana; Chimenti, Laura; Abate, Pietro; Mirabella, Franco; Maurizio Vignola, A; Bonsignore, Giovanni

    2003-07-01

    Marathon runners and elite swimmers showed increased inflammatory cells in the airways at baseline. Although airway neutrophils increase further after a marathon race, the airway response to swimming is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of swimming on airway cells. To avoid the concomitant effects of chronic exposure to chlorine, the study was conducted in seven nonasthmatic swimmers [mean age (SD): 23.3 +/- 7.7 yr, training: 32 +/- 15 km.wk-1] habitually training in an outdoor pool (OP), i.e., a low-chlorine environment. Spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide (NO), induced sputum, and peripheral blood samples were obtained at baseline, after a 5-km trial in OP, and after a 5-km race in the sea (S), i.e., hypertonic airway exposure. Airway neutrophil differential counts at baseline were higher in swimmers than in sedentary controls (N = 10), but cell counts, neutrophil elastase, and eosinophil cationic protein were unaffected by 5-km swimming. After swimming, L-selectin expression on airway cells decreased, suggesting exercise-induced cell mobilization into the airways and/or direct effects of hyperventilation on airway cells. After S, airway eosinophil differential counts increased slightly. Exhaled NO concentration was 19 +/- 6 ppb at baseline, 8 +/- 4 ppb after OP, and 21 +/- 7 ppb after S (P < 0.005 for OP vs baseline and S). In swimmers not chronically exposed to high chlorine concentrations, data obtained at baseline suggest a direct relationship between airway neutrophilia and endurance training. The low L-selectin expression by airway cells postexercise suggests hyperventilation-induced cell recruitment or modulation of cell function. Hypertonic exposure of airways during exercise may slightly increase airway eosinophils and exhaled NO. Overall, 5-km swimming exerted smaller effects on airway cells than running a marathon.

  9. Dendritic cell-nerve clusters are sites of T cell proliferation in allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Veres, Tibor Z; Shevchenko, Marina; Krasteva, Gabriela; Spies, Emma; Prenzler, Frauke; Rochlitzer, Sabine; Tschernig, Thomas; Krug, Norbert; Kummer, Wolfgang; Braun, Armin

    2009-03-01

    Interactions between T cells and dendritic cells in the airway mucosa precede secondary immune responses to inhaled antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the anatomical locations where dendritic cell-T cell interactions occur, resulting in T cells activation by dendritic cells. In a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation, we applied whole-mount immunohistology and confocal microscopy to visualize dendritic cells and T cells together with nerves, epithelium, and smooth muscle in three dimensions. Proliferating T cells were identified by the detection of the incorporation of the nucleotide analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine into the DNA. We developed a novel quantification method that enabled the accurate determination of cell-cell contacts in a semi-automated fashion. Dendritic cell-T cell interactions occurred beneath the smooth muscle layer, but not in the epithelium. Approximately 10% of the dendritic cells were contacted by nerves, and up to 4% of T cells formed clusters with these dendritic cells. T cells that were clustered with nerve-contacting dendritic cells proliferated only in the airways of mice with allergic inflammation but not in the airways of negative controls. Taken together, these results suggest that during the secondary immune response, sensory nerves influence dendritic cell-driven T cell activation in the airway mucosa.

  10. Human airway smooth muscle cells secrete amphiregulin via bradykinin/COX-2/PGE2, inducing COX-2, CXCL8, and VEGF expression in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC) contribute to asthma pathophysiology through an increased smooth muscle mass and elevated cytokine/chemokine output. Little is known about how HASMC and the airway epithelium interact to regulate chronic airway inflammation and remodeling. Amphiregulin is a member of the family of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agonists with cell growth and proinflammatory roles and increased expression in the lungs of asthma patients. Here we show that bradykinin (BK) stimulation of HASMC increases amphiregulin secretion in a mechanism dependent on BK-induced COX-2 expression, increased PGE2 output, and the stimulation of HASMC EP2 and EP4 receptors. Conditioned medium from BK treated HASMC induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 mRNA and protein accumulation in airway epithelial cells, which were blocked by anti-amphiregulin antibodies and amphiregulin siRNA, suggesting a paracrine effect of HASMC-derived amphiregulin on airway epithelial cells. Consistent with this, recombinant amphiregulin induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 in airway epithelial cells. Finally, we found that conditioned media from amphiregulin-stimulated airway epithelial cells induced amphiregulin expression in HASMC and that this was dependent on airway epithelial cell COX-2 activity. Our study provides evidence of a dynamic axis of interaction between HASMC and epithelial cells that amplifies CXCL8, VEGF, COX-2, and amphiregulin production. PMID:26047642

  11. Cell proliferation contributes to PNEC hyperplasia after acute airway injury.

    PubMed

    Stevens, T P; McBride, J T; Peake, J L; Pinkerton, K E; Stripp, B R

    1997-03-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs) are airway epithelial cells that are capable of secreting a variety of neuropeptides. PNECs are scattered throughout the bronchial tree either as individual cells or clusters of cells termed neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs). PNECs and their secretory peptides have been considered to play a role in fetal lung development. Although the normal physiological function of PNECs and neuropeptides in normal adult lungs and in repair from lung injury is not known, PNEC hyperplasia has been associated with chronic lung diseases, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and with chronic exposures, such as hypoxia, tobacco smoke, nitrosamines, and ozone. To evaluate changes in PNEC number and distribution after acute airway injury, FVB/n mice were treated with either naphthalene or vehicle. Naphthalene is an aromatic hydrocarbon that, at the dose used in this study, selectively destroys nonciliated bronchial epithelial cells (Clara cells) through cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolic activation into cytotoxic epoxides. PNECs were identified by immunohistochemical analysis of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity (CGRP-IR). Proliferating cells were marked with [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. Acute naphthalene toxicity results in PNEC hyperplasia that is detectable after 5 days of recovery. PNEC hyperplasia is characterized by increased numbers of NEBs without significant changes in the number of isolated PNECs and by increased [(3)H]thymidine labeling of CGRP-IR cells. These data show that cell proliferation contributes to PNEC hyperplasia after acute airway injury and suggest that PNECs may be capable of more rapidly increasing their number in response to injury than previously recognized.

  12. Airway structural cells regulate TLR5-mediated mucosal adjuvant activity.

    PubMed

    Van Maele, L; Fougeron, D; Janot, L; Didierlaurent, A; Cayet, D; Tabareau, J; Rumbo, M; Corvo-Chamaillard, S; Boulenouar, S; Jeffs, S; Vande Walle, L; Lamkanfi, M; Lemoine, Y; Erard, F; Hot, D; Hussell, T; Ryffel, B; Benecke, A G; Sirard, J-C

    2014-05-01

    Antigen-presenting cell (APC) activation is enhanced by vaccine adjuvants. Most vaccines are based on the assumption that adjuvant activity of Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists depends on direct, functional activation of APCs. Here, we sought to establish whether TLR stimulation in non-hematopoietic cells contributes to flagellin's mucosal adjuvant activity. Nasal administration of flagellin enhanced T-cell-mediated immunity, and systemic and secretory antibody responses to coadministered antigens in a TLR5-dependent manner. Mucosal adjuvant activity was not affected by either abrogation of TLR5 signaling in hematopoietic cells or the presence of flagellin-specific, circulating neutralizing antibodies. We found that flagellin is rapidly degraded in conducting airways, does not translocate into lung parenchyma and stimulates an early immune response, suggesting that TLR5 signaling is regionalized. The flagellin-specific early response of lung was regulated by radioresistant cells expressing TLR5 (particularly the airway epithelial cells). Flagellin stimulated the epithelial production of a small set of mediators that included the chemokine CCL20, which is known to promote APC recruitment in mucosal tissues. Our data suggest that (i) the adjuvant activity of TLR agonists in mucosal vaccination may require TLR stimulation of structural cells and (ii) harnessing the effect of adjuvants on epithelial cells can improve mucosal vaccines.

  13. Rhinovirus Disrupts the Barrier Function of Polarized Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sajjan, Umadevi; Wang, Qiong; Zhao, Ying; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Secondary bacterial infection following rhinovirus (RV) infection has been recognized in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Objectives: We sought to understand mechanisms by which RV infection facilitates secondary bacterial infection. Methods: Primary human airway epithelial cells grown at air–liquid interface and human bronchial epithelial (16HBE14o-) cells grown as polarized monolayers were infected apically with RV. Transmigration of bacteria (nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and others) was assessed by colony counting and transmission electron microscopy. Transepithelial resistance (RT) was measured by using a voltmeter. The distribution of zona occludins (ZO)-1 was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Measurements and Main Results: Epithelial cells infected with RV showed 2-log more bound bacteria than sham-infected cultures, and bacteria were recovered from the basolateral media of RV- but not sham-infected cells. Infection of polarized airway epithelial cell cultures with RV for 24 hours caused a significant decrease in RT without causing cell death or apoptosis. Ultraviolet-treated RV did not decrease RT, suggesting a requirement for viral replication. Reduced RT was associated with increased paracellular permeability, as determined by flux of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin. Neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β reversed corresponding cytokine-induced reductions in RT but not that induced by RV, indicating that the RV effect is independent of these proinflammatory cytokines. Confocal microscopy and immunoblotting revealed the loss of ZO-1 from tight junction complexes in RV-infected cells. Intranasal inoculation of mice with RV1B also caused the loss of ZO-1 from the bronchial epithelium tight junctions in vivo. Conclusions: RV facilitates binding, translocation, and persistence of bacteria by disrupting airway epithelial barrier function. PMID:18787220

  14. Airway responses towards allergens - from the airway epithelium to T cells.

    PubMed

    Papazian, D; Hansen, S; Würtzen, P A

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis is increasing, affecting up to 30% of the human population worldwide. Allergic sensitization arises from complex interactions between environmental exposures and genetic susceptibility, resulting in inflammatory T helper 2 (Th2) cell-derived immune responses towards environmental allergens. Emerging evidence now suggests that an epithelial dysfunction, coupled with inherent properties of environmental allergens, can be responsible for the inflammatory responses towards allergens. Several epithelial-derived cytokines, such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), IL-25 and IL-33, influence tissue-resident dendritic cells (DCs) as well as Th2 effector cells. Exposure to environmental allergens does not elicit Th2 inflammatory responses or any clinical symptoms in nonatopic individuals, and recent findings suggest that a nondamaged, healthy epithelium lowers the DCs' ability to induce inflammatory T-cell responses towards allergens. The purpose of this review was to summarize the current knowledge on which signals from the airway epithelium, from first contact with inhaled allergens all the way to the ensuing Th2-cell responses, influence the pathology of allergic diseases.

  15. Characterization of Nipah virus infection in a model of human airway epithelial cells cultured at an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Vergara, Leoncio A; Wen, Julie W; Long, Dan; Rockx, Barry

    2016-05-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging paramyxovirus that can cause lethal respiratory illness in humans. No vaccine/therapeutic is currently licensed for humans. Human-to-human transmission was previously reported during outbreaks and NiV could be isolated from respiratory secretions, but the proportion of cases in Malaysia exhibiting respiratory symptoms was significantly lower than that in Bangladesh. Previously, we showed that primary human basal respiratory epithelial cells are susceptible to both NiV-Malaysia (M) and -Bangladesh (B) strains causing robust pro-inflammatory responses. However, the cells of the human respiratory epithelium that NiV targets are unknown and their role in NiV transmission and NiV-related lung pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here, we characterized NiV infection of the human respiratory epithelium using a model of the human tracheal/bronchial (B-ALI) and small airway (S-ALI) epithelium cultured at an air-liquid interface. We show that NiV-M and NiV-B infect ciliated and secretory cells in B/S-ALI, and that infection of S-ALI, but not B-ALI, results in disruption of the epithelium integrity and host responses recruiting human immune cells. Interestingly, NiV-B replicated more efficiently in B-ALI than did NiV-M. These results suggest that the human tracheal/bronchial epithelium is favourable to NiV replication and shedding, while inducing a limited host response. Our data suggest that the small airways epithelium is prone to inflammation and lesions as well as constituting a point of virus entry into the pulmonary vasculature. The use of relevant models of the human respiratory tract, such as B/S-ALI, is critical for understanding NiV-related lung pathogenesis and identifying the underlying mechanisms allowing human-to-human transmission.

  16. RSV-encoded NS2 promotes epithelial cell shedding and distal airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liesman, Rachael M.; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Luongo, Cindy L.; Yang, Lijuan; Proia, Alan D.; DeVincenzo, John P.; Collins, Peter L.; Pickles, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the major cause of bronchiolitis in young children. The factors that contribute to the increased propensity of RSV-induced distal airway disease compared with other commonly encountered respiratory viruses remain unclear. Here, we identified the RSV-encoded nonstructural 2 (NS2) protein as a viral genetic determinant for initiating RSV-induced distal airway obstruction. Infection of human cartilaginous airway epithelium (HAE) and a hamster model of disease with recombinant respiratory viruses revealed that NS2 promotes shedding of infected epithelial cells, resulting in two consequences of virus infection. First, epithelial cell shedding accelerated the reduction of virus titers, presumably by clearing virus-infected cells from airway mucosa. Second, epithelial cells shedding into the narrow-diameter bronchiolar airway lumens resulted in rapid accumulation of detached, pleomorphic epithelial cells, leading to acute distal airway obstruction. Together, these data indicate that RSV infection of the airway epithelium, via the action of NS2, promotes epithelial cell shedding, which not only accelerates viral clearance but also contributes to acute obstruction of the distal airways. Our results identify RSV NS2 as a contributing factor for the enhanced propensity of RSV to cause severe airway disease in young children and suggest NS2 as a potential therapeutic target for reducing the severity of distal airway disease. PMID:24713657

  17. Airway epithelial cell response to human metapneumovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.; Liu, T.; Spetch, L.; Kolli, D.; Garofalo, R.P.; Casola, A.

    2007-11-10

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants, elderly and immunocompromised patients. In this study, we show that hMPV can infect in a similar manner epithelial cells representative of different tracts of the airways. hMPV-induced expression of chemokines IL-8 and RANTES in primary small alveolar epithelial cells (SAE) and in a human alveolar type II-like epithelial cell line (A549) was similar, suggesting that A549 cells can be used as a model to study lower airway epithelial cell responses to hMPV infection. A549 secreted a variety of CXC and CC chemokines, cytokines and type I interferons, following hMPV infection. hMPV was also a strong inducer of transcription factors belonging to nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) families, which are known to orchestrate the expression of inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediators.

  18. Primary in vitro culture of porcine tracheal epithelial cells in an air-liquid interface as a model to study airway epithelium and Aspergillus fumigatus interactions.

    PubMed

    Khoufache, Khaled; Cabaret, Odile; Farrugia, Cécile; Rivollet, Danièle; Alliot, Annie; Allaire, Eric; Cordonnier, Catherine; Bretagne, Stéphane; Botterel, Françoise

    2010-12-01

    Since the airway epithelium is the first tissue encountered by airborne fungal spores, specific models are needed to study this interaction. We developed such a model using primary porcine tracheal epithelial cells (PTEC) as a possible alternative to the use of primary human cells. PTEC were obtained from pigs and were cultivated in an air-liquid interface. Fluorescent brightener was employed to quantify the internalization of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia. Potential differences (Vt) and transepithelial resistances (Rt) after challenge with the mycotoxin, verruculogen, were studied. Primers for porcine inflammatory mediator genes IL-8, TNF-alpha, and GM-CSF were designed for a quantitative real-time PCR procedure to study cellular responses to challenges with A. fumigatus conidia. TEM showed the differentiation of ciliated cells and the PTEC ability to internalize conidia. The internalization rate was 21.9 ± 1.4% after 8 h of incubation. Verruculogen (10(-6) M) significantly increased Vt without having an effect on the Rt. Exposure of PTEC to live A. fumigatus conidia for 24 h induced a 10- to 40-fold increase in the mRNA levels of inflammatory mediator genes. PTEC behave similarly to human cells and are therefore a suitable alternative to human cells for studying interaction between airway epithelium and A. fumigatus.

  19. Interaction with epithelial cells modifies airway macrophage response to ozone.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rebecca N; Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E; Duncan, Kelly E; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-03-01

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (O3) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived signals affect Mac response to O3. Macs from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of healthy volunteers were cocultured with the human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) or alveolar (A549) epithelial cell lines. Cocultures, Mac monocultures, and epithelial cell monocultures were exposed to O3 or air, and Mac immunophenotype, phagocytosis, and cytotoxicity were assessed. Quantities of hyaluronic acid (HA) and IL-8 were compared across cultures and in BAL fluid from healthy volunteers exposed to O3 or air for in vivo confirmation. We show that Macs in coculture had increased markers of alternative activation, enhanced cytotoxicity, and reduced phagocytosis compared with Macs in monoculture that differed based on coculture with A549 or 16HBE. Production of HA by epithelial cell monocultures was not affected by O3, but quantities of HA in the in vitro coculture and BAL fluid from volunteers exposed in vivo were increased with O3 exposure, indicating that O3 exposure impairs Mac regulation of HA. Together, we show epithelial cell-Mac coculture models that have many similarities to the in vivo responses to O3, and demonstrate that epithelial cell-derived signals are important determinants of Mac immunophenotype and response to O3.

  20. Airway epithelial homeostasis and planar cell polarity signaling depend on multiciliated cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vladar, Eszter K.; Nayak, Jayakar V.; Milla, Carlos E.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Motile airway cilia that propel contaminants out of the lung are oriented in a common direction by planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, which localizes PCP protein complexes to opposite cell sides throughout the epithelium to orient cytoskeletal remodeling. In airway epithelia, PCP is determined in a 2-phase process. First, cell-cell communication via PCP complexes polarizes all cells with respect to the proximal-distal tissue axis. Second, during ciliogenesis, multiciliated cells (MCCs) undergo cytoskeletal remodeling to orient their cilia in the proximal direction. The second phase not only directs cilium polarization, but also consolidates polarization across the epithelium. Here, we demonstrate that in airway epithelia, PCP depends on MCC differentiation. PCP mutant epithelia have misaligned cilia, and also display defective barrier function and regeneration, indicating that PCP regulates multiple aspects of airway epithelial homeostasis. In humans, MCCs are often sparse in chronic inflammatory diseases, and these airways exhibit PCP dysfunction. The presence of insufficient MCCs impairs mucociliary clearance in part by disrupting PCP-driven polarization of the epithelium. Consistent with defective PCP, barrier function and regeneration are also disrupted. Pharmacological stimulation of MCC differentiation restores PCP and reverses these defects, suggesting its potential for broad therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27570836

  1. Epithelial cell-extracellular matrix interactions and stem cells in airway epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Coraux, Christelle; Roux, Jacqueline; Jolly, Thomas; Birembaut, Philippe

    2008-08-15

    In healthy subjects, the respiratory epithelium forms a continuous lining to the airways and to the environment, and plays a unique role as a barrier against external deleterious agents to protect the airways from the insults. In respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis, or asthma, the airway epithelium is frequently remodeled and injured, leading to the impairment of its defense functions. The rapid restoration of the epithelial barrier is crucial for these patients. The complete regeneration of the airway epithelium is a complex phenomenon, including not only the epithelial wound repair but also the epithelial differentiation to reconstitute a fully well differentiated and functional epithelium. The regeneration implies two partners: the epithelial stem/progenitor cells and factors able to regulate this process. Among these factors, epithelial cells-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions play a crucial role. The secretion of a provisional ECM, the cell-ECM relationships through epithelial receptors, and the remodeling of the ECM by proteases (mainly matrix metalloproteinases) contribute not only to airway epithelial repair by modulating epithelial cell migration and proliferation, but also to the differentiation of repairing cells leading to the complete restoration of the wounded epithelium. A better characterization of resident stem cells and of effectors of the regeneration process is an essential prerequisite to propose new regenerative therapeutics to patients suffering from infectious/inflammatory respiratory diseases.

  2. XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Hiroaki; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Cho, Hae-Ra; Liu, Hongmei; Lira, Alonso; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26360608

  3. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Spaziano, Giuseppe; Piegari, Elena; Matteis, Maria; Cappetta, Donato; Esposito, Grazia; Russo, Rosa; Tartaglione, Gioia; De Palma, Raffaele; Rossi, Francesco; D’Agostino, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce. Objectives To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model. Methods GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro. Results Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties. Conclusion Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide

  4. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Urbanek, Konrad; De Angelis, Antonella; Spaziano, Giuseppe; Piegari, Elena; Matteis, Maria; Cappetta, Donato; Esposito, Grazia; Russo, Rosa; Tartaglione, Gioia; De Palma, Raffaele; Rossi, Francesco; D'Agostino, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce. To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model. GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro. Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties. Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide system activation and tissue remodeling.

  5. Mast Cells Mediate Hyperoxia-Induced Airway Hyper-reactivity in Newborn Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Eric D.; Potts, Erin N.; Mason, Stanley N.; Foster, W. Michael; Auten, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Premature infants are at increased risk of developing airway hyper-reactivity following oxidative stress and inflammation. Mast cells contribute to airway hyper-reactivity partly by mediator release, so we sought to determine if blocking mast cell degranulation or recruitment prevents hyperoxia-induced airway hyper-reactivity, mast cell accumulation, and airway smooth muscle changes. Rats were exposed at birth to air or 60% O2 for 14 days, inducing significantly increased airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in the latter group, induced by nebulized methacholine challenge, measured by forced oscillometry. Daily treatment (postnatal days 1-14) with intraperitoneal cromolyn prevented hyperoxia-induced AHR, as did treatment with imatinib on postnatal days 5-14, compared with vehicle treated controls. Cromolyn prevented mast cell degranulation in the trachea but not hilar airways, and blocked mast cell accumulation in the hilar airways. Imatinib treatment completely blocked mast cell accumulation in tracheal/hilar airway tissues. Hyperoxia-induced AHR in neonatal rats is mediated, at least in part, via the mast cell. PMID:20386143

  6. Influence of airway wall compliance on epithelial cell injury and adhesion during interfacial flows

    PubMed Central

    Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Mihai, Cosmin; Hansford, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial flows during cyclic airway reopening are an important source of ventilator-induced lung injury. However, it is not known how changes in airway wall compliance influence cell injury during airway reopening. We used an in vitro model of airway reopening in a compliant microchannel to investigate how airway wall stiffness influences epithelial cell injury. Epithelial cells were grown on gel substrates with different rigidities, and cellular responses to substrate stiffness were evaluated in terms of metabolic activity, mechanics, morphology, and adhesion. Repeated microbubble propagations were used to simulate cyclic airway reopening, and cell injury and detachment were quantified via live/dead staining. Although cells cultured on softer gels exhibited a reduced elastic modulus, these cells experienced less plasma membrane rupture/necrosis. Cells on rigid gels exhibited a minor, but statistically significant, increase in the power law exponent and also exhibited a significantly larger height-to-length aspect ratio. Previous studies indicate that this change in morphology amplifies interfacial stresses and, therefore, correlates with the increased necrosis observed during airway reopening. Although cells cultured on stiff substrates exhibited more plasma membrane rupture, these cells experienced significantly less detachment and monolayer disruption during airway reopening. Western blotting and immunofluorescence indicate that this protection from detachment and monolayer disruption correlates with increased focal adhesion kinase and phosphorylated paxillin expression. Therefore, changes in cell morphology and focal adhesion structure may govern injury responses during compliant airway reopening. In addition, these results indicate that changes in airway compliance, as occurs during fibrosis or emphysema, may significantly influence cell injury during mechanical ventilation. PMID:25213636

  7. Heterogeneity of tight junction morphology in extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary airways of the rat.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, E E

    1980-10-01

    In the present study morphology of tight junctions was related to the various cell types lining extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary airways of the rat. Freeze fracture replicas were prepared from extrapulmonary airway epithelium derived from the cartilagenous and membranous sides of upper, middle, and lower thirds of the trachea. Intrapulmonary airway epithelium was obtained from airways less than 1 mm in diameter. Tight junction fibrils on the P fracture face were organized into three types of patterns. Type 1: parallel sparsely interconnected lumenal fibrils with large ablumenal fibril loops. Type 2: richly interconnected lumenal fibrils with large ablumenal fibril loops. Type 3: narrow network of interconnected fibrils. On the E fracture face complementary grooves were organized in a similar pattern. Ciliated cells on both sides and all levels of the trachea were associated with type 1 junctions. In intrapulmonary airways, however, the junctional pattern of ciliated cells changed to type 2. Brush cells at all levels of the airways were bounded by type 2 and occasionally by type 1 junctions. Secretory cell junctions displayed the following patterns: Mucous cells were bounded solely by type 3, serous cells by either types 2 or 3, and Clara cells predominantly by type 2. Cells tentatively identified as intermediate cells displayed all three junctional patterns. The number of parallel fibrils comprising tight junctions was higher in extrapulmonary as compared to intrapulmonary airways. No difference was seen in the various locations sampled in the trachea. Gap junctions were observed between secretory cells of extrapulmonary but not intrapulmonary airways. These observations are discussed in relation to current physiologic data.

  8. Tryptase does not alter transepithelial conductance or paracellular permeability in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene H; Lee, John H; Zabner, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Cell tight junction proteins create a barrier between airway epithelial cells to limit paracellular transport from the apical to basolateral surface. This barrier can impede the entry of respiratory pathogens and toxins from the airway lumen into the systemic circulation. Mast cell-mediated inflammation in the human airway can cause a disruption of this barrier. Tryptase is one of the major mediators released by mast cells and has been studied extensively in diseases such as asthma, reflux, and sinusitis. We hypothesize that tryptase may play a role in airway paracellular permeability by disrupting the cell tight junction proteins. We tested this hypothesis by applying tryptase on the apical and basolateral surface to primary human airway epithelia grown in an air-liquid interface and measured changes in the transepithelial conductance and paracellular permeability of the membrane during short (every minute) and longer (over hours) time courses. We then immunostained the cell membranes for occludins and claudins to observe for changes in the structure of the tight junctions after tryptase application. Our data show that tryptase does not alter paracellular permeability in human airway cells over minutes or hours, and that tryptase does not alter the structure of the cell junction. Tryptase alone does not alter paracellular permeability in human airway cells. Tryptase may be altering the epithelial membrane independent of the cell tight junction pathway or other mast cell mediators may play a role in permeability.

  9. Two distinct classes of mitotic cyclin homologues, Cyc1 and Cyc2, are involved in cell cycle regulation in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Adl, S M; Berger, J D

    1999-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell cycle is regulated by the sequential activation of different CDK/cyclin complexes. Two distinct classes of mitotic cyclin homologues, CYC1 and CYC2, have been identified and cloned for the first time in the ciliate Paramecium. Cyc1 is 324 amino acids long with a predicted molecular mass of 38 kDa, whereas Cyc2 is 336 amino acids long with a predicted molecular mass of 40 kDa. They display 42-51% sequence identity to other eukaryotic mitotic cyclins within the 'cyclin box' region. The conserved 'cyclin box' and 'destruction box' elements can be identified within each of the sequences. Genomic Southern blot analysis indicated that the CYC1 gene has two isoforms, with 92.3% and 85.9% identify at the amino acid level and at the nucleotide level, respectively. Both Cyc1 and Cyc2 proteins showed characteristic patterns of accumulation and destruction during the vegetative cell cycle, with Cyc1 peaking at the point of commitment to division (PCD), and Cyc2 reaching the maximal level late in the cell cycle. Immunoprecipitation experiments with antibodies specific to Cyc1 and Cyc2 indicated that Cyc1 and Cyc2 associate with distinct CDK homologues. Both immunoprecipitates exhibited histone H1 kinase activity that oscillated in the cell cycle in parallel with the respective amount of cyclins present. Histone H1 kinase activity associated with Cyc1 reached a peak at PCD while Cyc2 showed maximal activity when about 75% cells have completed cytokinesis. We propose that Cyc1 may be involved in commitment to division, in association with the CDK that binds to p13suc1, Cdk3, and that the Cyc2/Cdk2 complex may regulate cytokinesis. PCR-amplification revealed similar sequences in Tetrahymena, Sterkiella, Colpoda and Blepharisma, suggesting the conservation of the cyclin genes within ciliates. Although cell cycle regulation in ciliates differs in some respects from that of other eukaryotes, the cyclin motifs have clearly been conserved during evolution.

  10. Ultrastructure observation on the cells at different life history stages of Cryptocaryon irritans (Ciliophora: Prostomatea), a parasitic ciliate of marine fishes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Ni, Bing; Fan, Xinpeng; Warren, Alan; Yin, Fei; Gu, Fukang

    2016-09-01

    Cells of Cryptocaryon irritans at different life history stages were studied using both light and electron microscopy. The characteristics of several organelles were revealed for the first time at the ultrastructural level. It was confirmed that the cytostome of trophonts, protomonts and theronts was surrounded by cilium-palp triplets rather than ciliary triplets. The nematodesmata underlying the circumoral dikinetids were single bundles, whereas these were always paired in Prorodontids. Toxicysts were present in late-stage tomonts and theronts, but were absent in trophonts and protomonts. We posited that toxicysts might play a role in infection and invasion of host-fish tissue by theronts. The adoral brosse was unlike that of any other family of the class Prostomatea based on its location and morphology. Membranous folds were present in trophonts, protomonts and theronts. These folds were longer and more highly developed in C. irritans than in exclusively free-living prostome ciliates suggesting that they might be linked to parasitism in C. irritans. Trophonts, protomonts and theronts had multiple contractile vacuoles. The basic ultrastructure of the contractile vacuole of C. irritans was similar to that of other kinetofragminophoran ciliates. They might play different roles in different stages of the life cycle since their ultrastructure varied among trophonts, protomonts and theronts.

  11. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  12. Interactions between airway epithelial cells and dendritic cells during viral infections using an in vitro co-culture model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Historically, single cell culture models have been limited in pathological and physiological relevance. A co-culture model of dendritic cells (DCs) and differentiated human airway epithelial cells was developed to examine potential interactions between these two cell t...

  13. CGRP induction in cystic fibrosis airways alters the submucosal gland progenitor cell niche in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Weiliang; Fisher, John T.; Lynch, Thomas J.; Luo, Meihui; Evans, Turan I.A.; Neff, Traci L.; Zhou, Weihong; Zhang, Yulong; Ou, Yi; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Russo, Andrew F.; Goodheart, Michael J.; Parekh, Kalpaj R.; Liu, Xiaoming; Engelhardt, John F.

    2011-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), a lack of functional CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels causes defective secretion by submucosal glands (SMGs), leading to persistent bacterial infection that damages airways and necessitates tissue repair. SMGs are also important niches for slow-cycling progenitor cells (SCPCs) in the proximal airways, which may be involved in disease-related airway repair. Here, we report that calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP) activates CFTR-dependent SMG secretions and that this signaling pathway is hyperactivated in CF human, pig, ferret, and mouse SMGs. Since CGRP-expressing neuroendocrine cells reside in bronchiolar SCPC niches, we hypothesized that the glandular SCPC niche may be dysfunctional in CF. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR-deficient mice failed to maintain glandular SCPCs following airway injury. In wild-type mice, CGRP levels increased following airway injury and functioned as an injury-induced mitogen that stimulated SMG progenitor cell proliferation in vivo and altered the proliferative potential of airway progenitors in vitro. Components of the receptor for CGRP (RAMP1 and CLR) were expressed in a very small subset of SCPCs, suggesting that CGRP indirectly stimulates SCPC proliferation in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These findings demonstrate that CGRP-dependent pathways for CFTR activation are abnormally upregulated in CF SMGs and that this sustained mitogenic signal alters properties of the SMG progenitor cell niche in CF airways. This discovery may have important implications for injury/repair mechanisms in the CF airway. PMID:21765217

  14. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Rebecca N.; Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E.; Duncan, Kelly E.

    2015-01-01

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (O3) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell–Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell–derived signals affect Mac response to O3. Macs from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of healthy volunteers were cocultured with the human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) or alveolar (A549) epithelial cell lines. Cocultures, Mac monocultures, and epithelial cell monocultures were exposed to O3 or air, and Mac immunophenotype, phagocytosis, and cytotoxicity were assessed. Quantities of hyaluronic acid (HA) and IL-8 were compared across cultures and in BAL fluid from healthy volunteers exposed to O3 or air for in vivo confirmation. We show that Macs in coculture had increased markers of alternative activation, enhanced cytotoxicity, and reduced phagocytosis compared with Macs in monoculture that differed based on coculture with A549 or 16HBE. Production of HA by epithelial cell monocultures was not affected by O3, but quantities of HA in the in vitro coculture and BAL fluid from volunteers exposed in vivo were increased with O3 exposure, indicating that O3 exposure impairs Mac regulation of HA. Together, we show epithelial cell–Mac coculture models that have many similarities to the in vivo responses to O3, and demonstrate that epithelial cell–derived signals are important determinants of Mac immunophenotype and response to O3. PMID:25054807

  15. New Role of Adult Lung c-kit+ Cells in a Mouse Model of Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cappetta, Donato; Urbanek, Konrad; Esposito, Grazia; Matteis, Maria; Sgambato, Manuela; Tartaglione, Gioia; Rossi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airflow obstruction in asthma. Emerging evidence points to the involvement of c-kit+ cells in lung homeostasis, although their potential role in asthma is unknown. Our aim was to isolate c-kit+ cells from normal mouse lungs and to test whether these cells can interfere with hallmarks of asthma in an animal model. Adult mouse GFP-tagged c-kit+ cells, intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin-induced airway hyperresponsiveness, positively affected airway remodeling and improved airway function. In bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of cell-treated animals, a reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and in IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 release, along with an increase of IL-10, was observed. In MSC-treated mice, the macrophage polarization to M2-like subset may explain, at least in part, the increment in the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. After in vitro stimulation of c-kit+ cells with proinflammatory cytokines, the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and TGFβ were upregulated. These data, together with the increased apoptosis of inflammatory cells in vivo, indicate that c-kit+ cells downregulate immune response in asthma by influencing local environment, possibly by cell-to-cell contact combined to paracrine action. In conclusion, intratracheally administered c-kit+ cells reduce inflammation, positively modulate airway remodeling, and improve function. These data document previously unrecognized properties of c-kit+ cells, able to impede pathophysiological features of experimental airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:28090152

  16. Newborn pig trachea cell line cultured in air-liquid interface conditions allows a partial in vitro representation of the porcine upper airway tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The domestic pig is an excellent animal model to study human microbial diseases due to its similarity to humans in terms of anatomy, physiology, and genetics. We assessed the suitability of an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) culture system for newborn pig trachea (NPTr) cells as a practical tool for analyzing the immune response of respiratory epithelial cells to aggressors. This cell line offers a wide microbial susceptibility spectrum to both viruses and bacteria. The purpose of our study was to evaluate and characterize diverse aspects of cell differentiation using different culture media. After the NPTr cells reached confluence, the apical medium was removed and the cells were fed by medium from the basal side. Results We assessed the cellular layer’s capacity to polarize and differentiate in ALI conditions. Using immunofluorescence and electronic microscopy we evaluated the presence of goblet and ciliated cells, the epithelial junction organization, and the transepithelial electrical resistance. We found that the cellular layer develops a variable density of mucus producing cells and acquires a transepithelial resistance. We also identified increased development of cellular junctions over the culture period. Finally, we observed variable expression of transcripts associated to proteins such as keratin 8, mucins (MUC1, MUC2, and MUC4), occludin, and villin 1. Conclusions The culture of NPTr cells in ALI conditions allows a partial in vitro representation of porcine upper airway tissue that could be used to investigate some aspects of host/respiratory pathogen interactions. PMID:24885012

  17. Role of ROCK2 in CD4(+) cells in allergic airways responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, D I; Mathews, J A; Ninin, F M C; Wurmbrand, A P; Liao, J K; Shore, S A

    2017-02-01

    Rho kinases (ROCKs) contribute to allergic airways disease. ROCKs also play a role in lymphocyte proliferation and migration. To determine the role of ROCK2 acting within CD4(+) cells in allergic airways responses. ROCK2-haploinsufficient (ROCK2(+/-) ) and wild-type mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). ROCK2(+/-) mice then received either CD4(+) cells from ROCK2-sufficient OVA TCR transgenic (OT-II) mice or saline i.v. 48 h before challenge with aerosolized OVA. Wild-type mice received saline before challenge. Allergic airways responses were measured 48 h after the last challenge. Allergic airways responses were also assessed in mice lacking ROCK2 only in CD4(+) cells (ROCK2(CD)(4Cre) mice) vs. control (CD4-Cre and ROCK2(flox/flox) ) mice. OVA-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage lymphocytes, eosinophils, IL-13, IL-5, and eotaxin were reduced in ROCK2(+/-) vs. wild-type mice, as were airway hyperresponsiveness and mucous hypersecretion. In ROCK2(+/-) mice, adoptive transfer with CD4(+) cells from OT-II mice restored effects of OVA on lymphocytes, eosinophils, IL-13, IL-5, and mucous hypersecretion to wild-type levels, whereas eotaxin and airway hyperresponsiveness were not affected. ROCK2 inhibitors reduced IL-13-induced release of eotaxin from airway smooth muscle (ASM), similar to effects of these inhibitors on ASM contractility. Despite the ability of adoptive transfer to restore allergic airways inflammation in ROCK2-insufficient mice, allergic inflammation was not different in ROCK2(CD)(4Cre) vs. control mice. ROCK2 contributes to allergic airways responses likely via effects within ASM cells and within non-lymphocyte cells involved in lymphocyte activation and migration into the airways. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Epigenetics of Ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Chalker, Douglas L.; Meyer, Eric; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2013-01-01

    Research using ciliates revealed early examples of epigenetic phenomena and continues to provide novel findings. These protozoans maintain separate germline and somatic nuclei that carry transcriptionally silent and active genomes, respectively. Examining the differences in chromatin within distinct nuclei of Tetrahymena identified histone variants and established that transcriptional regulators act by modifying histones. Formation of somatic nuclei requires both transcriptional activation of silent chromatin and large-scale DNA elimination. This somatic genome remodeling is directed by homologous RNAs, acting with an RNA interference (RNAi)-related machinery. Furthermore, the content of the parental somatic genome provides a homologous template to guide this genome restructuring. The mechanisms regulating ciliate DNA rearrangements reveal the surprising power of homologous RNAs to remodel the genome and transmit information transgenerationally. PMID:24296171

  19. Repeated allergen exposure of sensitized Brown-Norway rats induces airway cell DNA synthesis and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Salmon, M; Walsh, D A; Koto, H; Barnes, P J; Chung, K F

    1999-09-01

    Chronic inflammation in asthmatic airways can lead to characteristic airway smooth muscle (ASM) thickening and pathological changes within the airway wall. This study assessed the effect of repeated allergen exposure on ASM and epithelial cell deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, cell recruitment and airway wall pathology. Brown-Norway rats were sensitized and then exposed to ovalbumin or saline aerosol every 3 days on six occasions. After the final exposure, rats were administered twice daily for 7 days with the DNA S-phase marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Using a triple immunohistochemical staining technique, BrdU incorporation into ASM and epithelium was quantified employing computer-assisted image analysis. There were >3-fold mean increases in BrdU incorporation into ASM from 1.3% of cells (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.0-1.6) in saline controls to 4.7% (95% CI 2.6-6.7) after allergen exposure (p<0.001), and in airway epithelium, from 1.3 (95% CI 0.6-2.0) BrdU-positive cells x mm basement membrane(-1) in saline controls to 4.9 (95% CI 3.0-6.7) after allergen exposure (p<0.001). There was increased subepithelial collagen deposition and mucus secretion along with a significant eosinophil and lymphocyte recruitment to the airways. Increased rates of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in both airway smooth muscle and epithelial cells along with changes to the airway wall pathology may precede the establishment of smooth muscle thickening and airway remodelling after repeated allergen exposure in rats. This model seems to be appropriate for studying structural changes within the airways as observed in asthma.

  20. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma.

  1. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: involvement of interleukin-2 system.

    PubMed

    Cervia, Davide; Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina; Perrotta, Cristiana; Picchietti, Simona; Alimenti, Claudio; Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell-cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the β and γ subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the α subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2Rα subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Polystyrene nanoparticles activate ion transport in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, J; Gong, X; Nahirney, D; Duszyk, M; Radomski, MW

    2011-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, nanotechnology has provided researchers with new nanometer materials, such as nanoparticles, which have the potential to provide new therapies for many lung diseases. In this study, we investigated the acute effects of polystyrene nanoparticles on epithelial ion channel function. Methods Human submucosal Calu-3 cells that express cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and baby hamster kidney cells engineered to express the wild-type CFTR gene were used to investigate the actions of negatively charged 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles on short-circuit current in Calu-3 cells by Ussing chamber and single CFTR Clchannels alone and in the presence of known CFTR channel activators by using baby hamster kidney cell patches. Results Polystyrene nanoparticles caused sustained, repeatable, and concentration-dependent increases in short-circuit current. In turn, these short-circuit current responses were found to be biphasic in nature, ie, an initial peak followed by a plateau. EC50 values for peak and plateau short-circuit current responses were 1457 and 315.5 ng/mL, respectively. Short-circuit current was inhibited by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a CFTR Cl− channel blocker. Polystyrene nanoparticles activated basolateral K+ channels and affected Cl− and HCO3 − secretion. The mechanism of short-circuit current activation by polystyrene nanoparticles was found to be largely dependent on calcium-dependent and cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphorylation of CFTR Cl− channels. Recordings from isolated inside-out patches using baby hamster kidney cells confirmed the direct activation of CFTR Cl− channels by the nanoparticles. Conclusion This is the first study to identify the activation of ion channels in airway cells after exposure to polystyrene-based nanomaterials. Thus, polystyrene nanoparticles cannot be considered as a simple neutral vehicle for drug delivery for the treatment of lung diseases, due to the fact

  3. Defining an olfactory receptor function in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Aisenberg, William H.; Huang, Jessie; Zhu, Wanqu; Rajkumar, Premraj; Cruz, Randy; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Natarajan, Niranjana; Yong, Hwan Mee; De Santiago, Breann; Oh, Jung Jin; Yoon, A-Rum; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Homann, Oliver; Sullivan, John K.; Liggett, Stephen B.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.; An, Steven S.

    2016-01-01

    Pathways that control, or can be exploited to alter, the increase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and cellular remodeling that occur in asthma are not well defined. Here we report the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as the canonical olfaction machinery (Golf and AC3) in the smooth muscle of human bronchi. In primary cultures of isolated human ASM, we identified mRNA expression for multiple ORs. Strikingly, OR51E2 was the most highly enriched OR transcript mapped to the human olfactome in lung-resident cells. In a heterologous expression system, OR51E2 trafficked readily to the cell surface and showed ligand selectivity and sensitivity to the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate and propionate. These endogenous metabolic byproducts of the gut microbiota slowed the rate of cytoskeletal remodeling, as well as the proliferation of human ASM cells. These cellular responses in vitro were found in ASM from non-asthmatics and asthmatics, and were absent in OR51E2-deleted primary human ASM. These results demonstrate a novel chemo-mechanical signaling network in the ASM and serve as a proof-of-concept that a specific receptor of the gut-lung axis can be targeted to treat airflow obstruction in asthma. PMID:27905542

  4. Defining an olfactory receptor function in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg, William H; Huang, Jessie; Zhu, Wanqu; Rajkumar, Premraj; Cruz, Randy; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Natarajan, Niranjana; Yong, Hwan Mee; De Santiago, Breann; Oh, Jung Jin; Yoon, A-Rum; Panettieri, Reynold A; Homann, Oliver; Sullivan, John K; Liggett, Stephen B; Pluznick, Jennifer L; An, Steven S

    2016-12-01

    Pathways that control, or can be exploited to alter, the increase in airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and cellular remodeling that occur in asthma are not well defined. Here we report the expression of odorant receptors (ORs) belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as the canonical olfaction machinery (Golf and AC3) in the smooth muscle of human bronchi. In primary cultures of isolated human ASM, we identified mRNA expression for multiple ORs. Strikingly, OR51E2 was the most highly enriched OR transcript mapped to the human olfactome in lung-resident cells. In a heterologous expression system, OR51E2 trafficked readily to the cell surface and showed ligand selectivity and sensitivity to the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate and propionate. These endogenous metabolic byproducts of the gut microbiota slowed the rate of cytoskeletal remodeling, as well as the proliferation of human ASM cells. These cellular responses in vitro were found in ASM from non-asthmatics and asthmatics, and were absent in OR51E2-deleted primary human ASM. These results demonstrate a novel chemo-mechanical signaling network in the ASM and serve as a proof-of-concept that a specific receptor of the gut-lung axis can be targeted to treat airflow obstruction in asthma.

  5. Klebsiella pneumoniae triggers a cytotoxic effect on airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a capsulated Gram negative bacterial pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. Despite its clinical relevance, little is known about the features of the interaction between K. pneumoniae and lung epithelial cells on a cellular level, neither about the role of capsule polysaccharide, one of its best characterised virulence factors, in this interaction. Results The interaction between Klebsiella pneumoniae and cultured airway epithelial cells was analysed. K. pneumoniae infection triggered cytotoxicity, evident by cell rounding and detachment from the substrate. This effect required the presence of live bacteria and of capsule polysaccharide, since it was observed with isolates expressing different amounts of capsule and/or different serotypes but not with non-capsulated bacteria. Cytotoxicity was analysed by lactate dehydrogenase and formazan measurements, ethidium bromide uptake and analysis of DNA integrity, obtaining consistent and complementary results. Moreover, cytotoxicity of non-capsulated strains was restored by addition of purified capsule during infection. While a non-capsulated strain was avirulent in a mouse infection model, capsulated K. pneumoniae isolates displayed different degrees of virulence. Conclusion Our observations allocate a novel role to K. pneumoniae capsule in promotion of cytotoxicity. Although this effect is likely to be associated with virulence, strains expressing different capsule levels were not equally virulent. This fact suggests the existence of other bacterial requirements for virulence, together with capsule polysaccharide. PMID:19650888

  6. PM10-stimulated airway epithelial cells activate primary human dendritic cells independent of uric acid: application of an in vitro model system exposing dendritic cells to airway epithelial cell-conditioned media.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Jeremy A; Alexis, Neil E; Pui, Mandy; Wong, SzeWing; Fung, Elkie; Hansbro, Phillip; Knight, Darryl A; Sin, Don D; Carlsten, Chris

    2014-08-01

    Airway epithelial cells represent the first line of defence against inhaled insults, including air pollution. Air pollution can activate innate immune signalling in airway epithelial cells leading to the production of soluble mediators that can influence downstream inflammatory cells. Our objective was to develop and validate a model of dendritic cell exposure to airway epithelial cell-conditioned media. After establishing the model, we explored how soluble mediators released from airway epithelial cells in response to air pollution influenced the phenotype of dendritic cells. Human airway epithelial cells were cultured under control and urban particulate matter (PM10) exposure conditions with or without pharmacological inhibitors of the uric acid pathway. Culture supernatants were collected for conditioned media experiments with peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived dendritic cells analysed by flow cytometry. Monocytes derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in interleukin-4 and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor differentiated into immature dendritic cells that phenotypically differentiated into mature dendritic cells in response to conditioned media from phorbol myristate acetate-activated THP-1 monocytes. Exposure of immature dendritic cells to conditioned media from airway epithelial cells exposed to PM10 resulted in dendritic cell maturation that was independent of uric acid. We present a conditioned media model useful for interrogating the contribution of soluble mediators produced by airway epithelial cells to dendritic cell phenotype and function. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PM10 exposure induces airway epithelial cell production of soluble mediators that induce maturation of dendritic cells independent of uric acid. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  7. TNFα Affects Ciliary Beat Response to Increased Viscosity in Human Pediatric Airway Epithelium.

    PubMed

    González, Claudia; Droguett, Karla; Rios, Mariana; Cohen, Noam A; Villalón, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    In airway epithelium, mucociliary clearance (MCC) velocity depends on the ciliary beat frequency (CBF), and it is affected by mucus viscoelastic properties. Local inflammation induces secretion of cytokines (TNFα) that can alter mucus viscosity; however airway ciliated cells have an autoregulatory mechanism to prevent the collapse of CBF in response to increase in mucus viscosity, mechanism that is associated with an increment in intracellular Ca(+2) level ([Ca(2+)]i). We studied the effect of TNFα on the autoregulatory mechanism that regulates CBF in response to increased viscosity using dextran solutions, in ciliated cells cultured from human pediatric epithelial adenoid tissue. Cultures were treated with TNFα, before and after the viscous load was changed. TNFα treatment produced a significantly larger decrease in CBF in cultures exposed to dextran. Furthermore, an increment in [Ca(2+)]i was observed, which was significantly larger after TNFα treatment. In conclusion, although TNFα has deleterious effects on ciliated cells in response to maintaining CBF after increasing viscous loading, it has a positive effect, since increasing [Ca(2+)]i may prevent the MCC collapse. These findings suggest that augmented levels of TNFα associated with an inflammatory response of the nasopharyngeal epithelium may have dual effects that contribute to maintaining the effectiveness of MCC in the upper airways.

  8. TNFα Affects Ciliary Beat Response to Increased Viscosity in Human Pediatric Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Droguett, Karla; Rios, Mariana; Cohen, Noam A.

    2016-01-01

    In airway epithelium, mucociliary clearance (MCC) velocity depends on the ciliary beat frequency (CBF), and it is affected by mucus viscoelastic properties. Local inflammation induces secretion of cytokines (TNFα) that can alter mucus viscosity; however airway ciliated cells have an autoregulatory mechanism to prevent the collapse of CBF in response to increase in mucus viscosity, mechanism that is associated with an increment in intracellular Ca+2 level ([Ca2+]i). We studied the effect of TNFα on the autoregulatory mechanism that regulates CBF in response to increased viscosity using dextran solutions, in ciliated cells cultured from human pediatric epithelial adenoid tissue. Cultures were treated with TNFα, before and after the viscous load was changed. TNFα treatment produced a significantly larger decrease in CBF in cultures exposed to dextran. Furthermore, an increment in [Ca2+]i was observed, which was significantly larger after TNFα treatment. In conclusion, although TNFα has deleterious effects on ciliated cells in response to maintaining CBF after increasing viscous loading, it has a positive effect, since increasing [Ca2+]i may prevent the MCC collapse. These findings suggest that augmented levels of TNFα associated with an inflammatory response of the nasopharyngeal epithelium may have dual effects that contribute to maintaining the effectiveness of MCC in the upper airways. PMID:28025644

  9. Contrasting roles for the receptor for advanced glycation end-products on structural cells in allergic airway inflammation vs. airway hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Akihiko; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Waseda, Koichi; Kurimoto, Etsuko; Fujii, Utako; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Gelfand, Erwin W; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kanehiro, Arihiko

    2015-10-15

    The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily. RAGE is reported to be involved in various inflammatory disorders; however, studies that address the role of RAGE in allergic airway disease are inconclusive. RAGE-sufficient (RAGE+/+) and RAGE-deficient (RAGE-/-) mice were sensitized to ovalbumin, and airway responses were monitored after ovalbumin challenge. RAGE-/- mice showed reduced eosinophilic inflammation and goblet cell metaplasia, lower T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine production from spleen and peribronchial lymph node mononuclear cells, and lower numbers of group 2 innate lymphoid cells in the lung compared with RAGE+/+ mice following sensitization and challenge. Experiments using irradiated, chimeric mice showed that the mice expressing RAGE on radio-resistant structural cells but not hematopoietic cells developed allergic airway inflammation; however, the mice expressing RAGE on hematopoietic cells but not structural cells showed reduced airway inflammation. In contrast, absence of RAGE expression on structural cells enhanced innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). In the absence of RAGE, increased interleukin (IL)-33 levels in the lung were detected, and blockade of IL-33 receptor ST2 suppressed innate AHR in RAGE-/- mice. These data identify the importance of RAGE expressed on lung structural cells in the development of allergic airway inflammation, T helper type 2 cell activation, and group 2 innate lymphoid cell accumulation in the airways. RAGE on lung structural cells also regulated innate AHR, likely through the IL-33-ST2 pathway. Thus manipulating RAGE represents a novel therapeutic target in controlling allergic airway responses. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. NOTCH1 is required for regeneration of Clara cells during repair of airway injury.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yiming; Li, Aimin; Borok, Zea; Li, Changgong; Minoo, Parviz

    2012-05-01

    The airways of the mammalian lung are lined with highly specialized epithelial cell types that are the targets of airborne toxicants and injury. Notch signaling plays an important role in the ontogeny of airway epithelial cells, but its contributions to recruitment, expansion or differentiation of resident progenitor/stem cells, and repair and re-establishment of the normal composition of airway epithelium following injury have not been addressed. In this study, the role of a specific Notch receptor, Notch1, was investigated by targeted inactivation in the embryonic lung epithelium using the epithelial-specific Gata5-Cre driver line. Notch1-deficient mice are viable without discernible defects in pulmonary epithelial cell-fate determination and differentiation. However, in an experimental model of airway injury, activity of Notch1 is found to be required for normal repair of the airway epithelium. Absence of Notch1 reduced the ability of a population of cells distinguished by expression of PGP9.5, otherwise a marker of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, which appears to serve as a reservoir for regeneration of Clara cells. Hairy/enhancer of split-5 (Hes5) and paired-box-containing gene 6 (Pax6) were found to be downstream targets of Notch1. Both Hes5 and Pax6 expressions were significantly increased in association with Clara cell regeneration in wild-type lungs. Ablation of Notch1 reduced Hes5 and Pax6 and inhibited airway epithelial repair. Thus, although dispensable in developmental ontogeny of airway epithelial cells, normal activity of Notch1 is required for repair of the airway epithelium. The signaling pathway by which Notch1 regulates the repair process includes stimulation of Hes5 and Pax6 gene expression.

  11. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huff, Ryan D; Hsu, Alan C-Y; Nichol, Kristy S; Jones, Bernadette; Knight, Darryl A; Wark, Peter A B; Hansbro, Philip M; Hirota, Jeremy A

    2017-01-01

    The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production. Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM) and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies. HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4) inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells. Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  12. Detonation Nanodiamond Toxicity in Human Airway Epithelial Cells Is Modulated by Air Oxidation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detonational nanodiamonds (DND), a nanomaterial with an increasing range of industrial and biomedical applications, have previously been shown to induce a pro-inflammatory response in cultured human airway epithelial cells (HAEC). We now show that surface modifications induced by...

  13. Detonation Nanodiamond Toxicity in Human Airway Epithelial Cells Is Modulated by Air Oxidation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detonational nanodiamonds (DND), a nanomaterial with an increasing range of industrial and biomedical applications, have previously been shown to induce a pro-inflammatory response in cultured human airway epithelial cells (HAEC). We now show that surface modifications induced by...

  14. Cell division and density of symbiotic Chlorella variabilis of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria is controlled by the host's nutritional conditions during early infection process.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    The association of ciliate Paramecium bursaria with symbiotic Chlorella sp. is a mutualistic symbiosis. However, both the alga-free paramecia and symbiotic algae can still grow independently and can be reinfected experimentally by mixing them. Effects of the host's nutritional conditions against the symbiotic algal cell division and density were examined during early reinfection. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that algal cell division starts 24 h after mixing with alga-free P. bursaria, and that the algal mother cell wall is discarded from the perialgal vacuole membrane, which encloses symbiotic alga. Labelling of the mother cell wall with Calcofluor White Stain, a cell-wall-specific fluorochrome, was used to show whether alga had divided or not. Pulse labelling of alga-free P. bursaria cells with Calcofluor White Stain-stained algae with or without food bacteria for P. bursaria revealed that the fluorescence of Calcofluor White Stain in P. bursaria with bacteria disappeared within 3 days after mixing, significantly faster than without bacteria. Similar results were obtained both under constant light and dark conditions. This report is the first describing that the cell division and density of symbiotic algae of P. bursaria are controlled by the host's nutritional conditions during early infection. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, airway innervation, and smooth muscle are altered in Cftr null mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Luk, Catherine; Kent, Geraldine; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2006-09-01

    The amine- and peptide-producing pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) are widely distributed within the airway mucosa of mammalian lung as solitary cells and innervated clusters, neuroepithelial bodies (NEB), which function as airway O2 sensors. These cells express Cftr and hence could play a role in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We performed confocal microscopy and morphometric analysis on lung sections from Cftr-/- (null), Cftr+/+, and Cftr+/- (control) mice at developmental stages E20, P5, P9, and P30 to determine the distribution, frequency, and innervation of PNEC/NEB, innervation and cell mass of airway smooth muscle, and neuromuscular junctions using synaptic vesicle protein 2, smooth muscle actin, and synaptophysin markers, respectively. The mean number of PNEC/NEB in Cftr-/- mice was significantly reduced compared with control mice at E20, whereas comparable or increased numbers were observed postnatally. NEB cells in Cftr null mice showed a significant reduction in intracorpuscular nerve endings compared with control mice, which is consistent with an intrinsic abnormality of the PNEC system. The airways of Cftr-/- mice showed reduced density (approximately 20-30%) of smooth muscle innervation, decreased mean airway smooth muscle mass (approximately 35%), and reduced density (approximately 20%) of nerve endings compared with control mice. We conclude that the airways of Cftr-/- mice exhibit heretofore unappreciated structural alterations affecting cellular and neural components of the PNEC system and airway smooth muscle and its innervation resulting in blunted O2 sensing and reduced airway tonus. Cftr could play a role in the development of the PNEC system, lung innervation, and airway smooth muscle.

  16. Restoration of Chloride Efflux by Azithromycin in Airway Epithelial Cells of Cystic Fibrosis Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Rebeyrol, Carine; Ruffin, Manon; Roque, Telma; Guillot, Loïc; Jacquot, Jacky; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) has shown promising anti-inflammatory properties in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and clinical studies have presented an improvement in the respiratory condition of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate, in human airway cells, the mechanism by which AZM has beneficial effects in CF. We demonstrated that AZM did not have any anti-inflammatory effect on CF airway cells but restored Cl− efflux. PMID:21220528

  17. Airway cell composition at rest and after an all-out test in competitive rowers.

    PubMed

    Morici, Giuseppe; Bonsignore, Maria R; Zangla, Daniele; Riccobono, Loredana; Profita, Mirella; Bonanno, Anna; Paternò, Alessandra; Di Giorgi, Rossana; Mirabella, Franco; Chimenti, Laura; Benigno, Arcangelo; Vignola, Antonio M; Bellia, Vincenzo; Amato, Giuseppe; Bonsignore, Giovanni

    2004-10-01

    This study was designed to assess: a) whether rowing affects airway cell composition, and b) the possible relationship between the degree of ventilation during exercise and airway cells. In nine young, nonasthmatic competitive rowers (mean age +/- SD: 16.2 +/- 1.0 yr), induced sputum samples were obtained at rest and shortly after an all-out rowing test over 1000 m (mean duration: 200 +/- 14 s), during which ventilatory and metabolic variables were recorded breath-by-breath (Cosmed K4b, Italy). At rest, induced sputum showed prevalence of neutrophils (60%) over macrophages (40%); after exercise, total cell and bronchial epithelial cell (BEC) counts tended to increase. In the last minute of exercise, mean VE was 158.0 +/- 41.5 L x min(-1), and VO2 x kg(-1) 62 +/- 11 mL x min(-1). Exercise VE correlated directly with postexercise total cell (Spearman rho: 0.75, P < 0.05) an dmacrophage (rho: 0.82, P < 0.05) counts. A similar trend was observed for exercise VE and changes in BEC counts from baseline to postexercise (rho: 0.64, P = 0.11). Exercise VE did not correlate with airway neutrophil counts at rest or after exercise. Expression of adhesion molecules by airway neutrophils, macrophages, and eosinophils decreased after the all-out test. Similar to endurance athletes, nonasthmatic competitive rowers showed increased neutrophils in induced sputum compared with values found in sedentary subjects. The trend toward increased BEC postexercise possibly reflected the effects of high airflows on airway epithelium. Airway macrophages postexercise were highest in rowers showing tile most intense exercise hyperpnea, suggesting early involvement of these cells during exercise. However, the low expression of adhesion molecules by all airway cell types suggests that intense short-lived exercise may be associated with a blunted response of airway cells in nonasthmatic well-trained rowers.

  18. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Regulates Airway Epithelium Differentiation by Controlling Basal Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Maouche, Kamel; Polette, Myriam; Jolly, Thomas; Medjber, Kahina; Cloëz-Tayarani, Isabelle; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Burlet, Henriette; Terryn, Christine; Coraux, Christelle; Zahm, Jean-Marie; Birembaut, Philippe; Tournier, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Airway epithelial basal cells are known to be critical for regenerating injured epithelium and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), which is highly permeable to Ca2+, is involved in lung morphogenesis. Here, we have investigated the potential role of the α7 nAChR in the regulation of airway epithelial basal cell proliferation and the differentiation of the human airway epithelium. In vivo during fetal development and in vitro during the regeneration of the human airway epithelium, α7 nAChR expression coincides with epithelium differentiation. Inactivating α7 nAChR function in vitro increases cell proliferation during the initial steps of the epithelium regeneration, leading to epithelial alterations such as basal cell hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia, remodeling observed in many bronchopulmonary diseases. The regeneration of the airway epithelium after injury in α7−/− mice is delayed and characterized by a transient hyperplasia of basal cells. Moreover, 1-year-old α7−/− mice more frequently present basal cells hyperplasia. Modulating nAChR function or expression shows that only α7 nAChR, as opposed to heteropentameric αxβy nAChRs, controls the proliferation of human airway epithelial basal cells. These findings suggest that α7 nAChR is a key regulator of the plasticity of the human airway epithelium by controlling basal cell proliferation and differentiation pathway and is involved in airway remodeling during bronchopulmonary diseases. PMID:19808646

  19. Endosymbiosis of Chlorella species to the ciliate Paramecium bursaria alters the distribution of the host's trichocysts beneath the host cell cortex.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Each symbiotic Chlorella of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria is enclosed in a perialgal vacuole membrane derived from the host digestive vacuole membrane. Alga-free paramecia and symbiotic algae can grow independently. Mixing them experimentally can cause reinfection. Earlier, we reported that the symbiotic algae appear to push the host trichocysts aside to become fixed beneath the host cell cortex during the algal reinfection process. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy with a monoclonal antibody against the trichocysts demonstrates that the trichocysts change their locality to form algal attachment sites and decrease their density beneath the host cell cortex through algal reinfection. Transmission electron microscopy to detect acid phosphatase activity showed that some trichocysts near the host cell cortex are digested by the host lysosomal fusion during algal reinfection. Removal of algae from the host cell using cycloheximide recovers the trichocyst's arrangement and number near the host cell cortex. These results indicate that symbiotic algae compete for their attachment sites with preexisting trichocysts and that the algae have the ability to ensure algal attachment sites beneath the host cell cortex.

  20. The Autocrine Mitogenic Loop of the Ciliate Euplotes raikovi: The Pheromone Membrane-bound Forms Are the Cell Binding Sites and Potential Signaling Receptors of Soluble Pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Ortenzi, Claudio; Alimenti, Claudio; Vallesi, Adriana; Di Pretoro, Barbara; Terza, Antonietta La; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2000-01-01

    Homologous proteins, denoted pheromones, promote cell mitotic proliferation and mating pair formation in the ciliate Euplotes raikovi, according to whether they bind to cells in an autocrine- or paracrine-like manner. The primary transcripts of the genes encoding these proteins undergo alternate splicing, which generates at least two distinct mRNAs. One is specific for the soluble pheromone, the other for a pheromone isoform that remains anchored to the cell surface as a type II protein, whose extracellular C-terminal region is structurally equivalent to the secreted form. The 15-kDa membrane-bound isoform of pheromone Er-1, denoted Er-1mem and synthesized by the same E. raikovi cells that secrete Er-1, has been purified from cell membranes by affinity chromatography prepared with matrix-bound Er-1, and its extracellular and cytoplasmic regions have been expressed as recombinant proteins. Using the purified material and these recombinant proteins, it has been shown that Er-1mem has the property of binding pheromones competitively through its extracellular pheromone-like domain and associating reversibly and specifically with a guanine nucleotide-binding protein through its intracellular domain. It has been concluded that the membrane-bound pheromone isoforms of E. raikovi represent the cell effective pheromone binding sites and are functionally equipped for transducing the signal generated by this binding. PMID:10749941

  1. Functional diversity of aquatic ciliates.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Thomas

    2017-04-13

    This paper first reviews the concept of functional diversity in general terms and then applies it to free-living aquatic ciliates. Ciliates are extremely versatile organisms and display an enormous functional diversity as key elements of pelagic food webs, acting as predators of bacteria, algae, other protists and even some metazoans. Planktonic ciliates are important food for zooplankton, and mixotrophic and functionally autotrophic species may significantly contribute to primary production in the ocean and in lakes. The co-occurrence of many ciliate species in seemingly homogenous environments indicates a wide range of their ecological niches. Variation in space and time may foster co-occurrence and prevent violating the competitive exclusion principle among ciliates using the same resources. Considering that many ciliates may be dormant and/or rare in many habitats, ciliate species diversity must be higher than can be deduced from simple sampling techniques; molecular methods of identification clearly point to this hidden diversity. From a functional point of view, the question is how much of this diversity represents redundancy. A key challenge for future research is to link the ecophysiological performance of naturally co-occurring ciliates to their functional genes. To this end, more experimental research is needed with with functionally different species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. [In vitro Cultivation of Functioning Passaged Ciliated Epithelium for Trachea Tissue Engineering].

    PubMed

    Baranovsky, D S; Lyundup, A V; Parshin, V D

    2015-01-01

    Currently all tissue engineered trachea transplants had no ciliated epithelium until transplantation, and long-term temporary lack of mucociliary clearance leads to patients' condition decline and reduced life quality in postoperative period. So, the need for a better cultivation method and studying ciliated epithelium growth characteristics in cell culture increased rapidly. The aim of our study was to investigate cultivation offunctionally complete passaged ciliated epitheliumfor trachea tissue engineering. Human ciliated epithelium isolated from intraoperative bioptate was used for culturing in the special complex medium with morphological and functional characteristics evaluation. Ciliated epithelial cell-groups were obtained by culturing in the special complex medium. Generated cell-groups had ciliary activity and showed well-coordinated movement with functional characteristics similar to native epithelial tissue. The basic parameters of cell-activity were studied. Thus our study provides a new insight for the problem of ciliated epithelium in vitro culturing as well as developing the optimal laboratory method.

  3. Innate immune response of human pluripotent stem cell-derived airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Brendan A S; Kushwah, Rahul; Mechael, Rami; Shapovalova, Zoya; Alev, Cantas; Bhatia, Mickie

    2015-07-01

    The acquisition of innate immune response is requisite to having bona fide differentiation of airway epithelium. Procedures developed to differentiate lung airway from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have demonstrated anecdotal evidence for innate immune response, but an in-depth exploration of response levels is lacking. Herein, using an established method of airway epithelial generation from hPSCs, we show that hPSC-derived epithelial cells are able to up-regulate expression of TNFα, IL8 and IL1β in response to challenge with bacterial endotoxin LPS, but lack response from genes associated with innate immune response in other cell types. Further, stimulation of cells with TNF-α resulted in auto-induction of TNFα transcript, as well as cytokine responses of IL8 and IL1β. The demonstration of innate immune induction in hPSC-derived airway epithelia gives further strength to the functionality of in vitro protocols aimed at generating differentiated airway cells that can potentially be used in a translational setting. Finally, we propose that innate immune challenge of airway epithelium from human pluripotent stem cell sources be used as a robust validation of functional in vitro differentiation.

  4. Protocadherin-1 Localization and Cell-Adhesion Function in Airway Epithelial Cells in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Faura Tellez, Grissel; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Brouwer, Uilke; Nijboer-Brinksma, Susan; Vandepoele, Karl; Noordhoek, Jacobien A.; Heijink, Irene; de Vries, Maaike; Smithers, Natalie P.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Timens, Wim; Wiffen, Laura; van Roy, Frans; Holloway, John W.; Lackie, Peter M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The asthma gene PCDH1 encodes Protocadherin-1, a putative adhesion molecule of unknown function expressed in the airway epithelium. Here, we characterize the localization, differential expression, homotypic adhesion specificity and function of PCDH1 in airway epithelial cells in asthma. Methods We performed confocal fluorescence microscopy to determine subcellular localization of PCDH1 in 16HBE cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) grown at air-liquid interface. Next, to compare PCDH1 expression and localization in asthma and controls we performed qRT-PCR and fluorescence microscopy in PBECs and immunohistochemistry on airway wall biopsies. We examined homotypic adhesion specificity of HEK293T clones overexpressing fluorescently tagged-PCDH1 isoforms. Finally, to evaluate the role for PCDH1 in epithelial barrier formation and repair, we performed siRNA knockdown-studies and measured epithelial resistance. Results PCDH1 localized to the cell membrane at cell-cell contact sites, baso-lateral to adherens junctions, with increasing expression during epithelial differentiation. No differences in gene expression or localization of PCDH1 isoforms expressing the extracellular domain were observed in either PBECs or airway wall biopsies between asthma patients and controls. Overexpression of PCDH1 mediated homotypic interaction, whereas downregulation of PCDH1 reduced epithelial barrier formation, and impaired repair after wounding. Conclusions In conclusion, PCDH1 is localized to the cell membrane of bronchial epithelial cells baso-lateral to the adherens junction. Expression of PCDH1 is not reduced nor delocalized in asthma even though PCDH1 contributes to homotypic adhesion, epithelial barrier formation and repair. PMID:27701444

  5. Pluripotent allospecific CD8+ effector T cells traffic to lung in murine obliterative airway disease.

    PubMed

    West, Erin E; Lavoie, Tera L; Orens, Jonathan B; Chen, Edward S; Ye, Shui Q; Finkelman, Fred D; Garcia, Joe G N; McDyer, John F

    2006-01-01

    Long-term success in lung transplantation is limited by obliterative bronchiolitis, whereas T cell effector mechanisms in this process remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse heterotopic allogeneic airway transplant model, we studied T cell effector responses during obliterative airways disease (OAD). Allospecific CD8+ IFN-gamma+ T cells were detected in airway allografts, with significant coexpression of TNF-alpha and granzyme B. Therefore, using IFN-gamma as a surrogate marker, we assessed the distribution and kinetics of extragraft allo-specific T cells during OAD. Robust allospecific IFN-gamma was produced by draining the lymph nodes, spleen, and lung mononuclear cells from allograft, but not isograft recipients by Day 14, and significantly decreased by Day 28. Although the majority of allospecific T cells were CD8+, allospecific CD4+ T cells were also detected in these compartments, with each employing distinct allorecognition pathways. An influx of pluripotent CD8+ effector cells with a memory phenotype were detected in the lung during OAD similar to those seen in the allografts and secondary lymphoid tissue. Antibody depletion of CD8+ T cells markedly reduced airway lumen obliteration and fibrosis at Day 28. Together, these data demonstrate that allospecific CD8+ effector T cells play an important role in OAD and traffic to the lung after heterotopic airway transplant, suggesting that the lung is an important immunologic site, and perhaps a reservoir, for effector cells during the rejection process.

  6. Kalanchoe pinnata inhibits mast cell activation and prevents allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, E A; Reuter, S; Martin, H; Dehzad, N; Muzitano, M F; Costa, S S; Rossi-Bergmann, B; Buhl, R; Stassen, M; Taube, C

    2012-01-15

    Aqueous extract of Kalanchoe pinnata (Kp) have been found effective in models to reduce acute anaphylactic reactions. In the present study, we investigate the effect of Kp and the flavonoid quercetin (QE) and quercitrin (QI) on mast cell activation in vitro and in a model of allergic airway disease in vivo. Treatment with Kp and QE in vitro inhibited degranulation and cytokine production of bone marrow-derived mast cells following IgE/FcɛRI crosslinking, whereas treatment with QI had no effect. Similarly, in vivo treatment with Kp and QE decreased development of airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia and production of IL-5, IL-13 and TNF. In contrast, treatment with QI had no effect on these parameters. These findings demonstrate that treatment with Kp or QE is effective in treatment of allergic airway disease, providing new insights to the immunomodulatory functions of this plant.

  7. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: Involvement of interleukin-2 system

    SciTech Connect

    Cervia, Davide; Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina; Perrotta, Cristiana; Picchietti, Simona; Alimenti, Claudio; Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell–cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the β and γ subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the α subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2Rα subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth. -- Highlights: ► Euplotes pheromone Er-1 increases the growth of human Jurkat T-cells. ► Er-1 increases the T-cell production of specific cytokines. ► Er-1 activates interleukin-2 receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. ► The immuno-enhancing effect of Er-1 on Jurkat cells translates to an inhibition of human glioma cell growth.

  8. Curcumin and anthocyanin inhibit pepsin-mediated cell damage and carcinogenic changes in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Tina L; Pearson, Amy C S; Wells, Clive W; Stoner, Gary D; Johnston, Nikki

    2013-10-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is associated with inflammatory and neoplastic airway diseases. Gastric pepsin internalized by airway epithelial cells during reflux contributes to oxidative stress, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Several plant extracts and compounds inhibit digestive enzymes and inflammatory or neoplastic changes to the esophagus in models of gastroesophageal reflux. This study examined the potential of chemoprotective phytochemicals to inhibit peptic activity and mitigate pepsin-mediated damage of airway epithelial cells. Cultured human laryngeal and hypopharyngeal epithelial cells were pretreated with curcumin (10 micromol/L), ecabet sodium (125 microg/mL), and anthocyanin-enriched black-raspberry extract (100 microg/mL) 30 minutes before treatment with pepsin (0.1 mg/mL; 1 hour; pH 7). Controls were treated with media pH 7 or pepsin pH 7 without phytochemicals. Cell damage and proliferative changes were assessed by electron microscopy, cell count, thymidine analog incorporation, and real-time polymerase chain reaction array. Pepsin inhibition was determined by in vitro kinetic assay. Micromolar concentrations of curcumin, ecabet sodium, and black-raspberry extract inhibited peptic activity and pepsin-induced mitochondrial damage and hyperproliferation. Curcumin abrogated pepsin-mediated depression of tumor suppressor gene expression and altered the subcellular localization of pepsin following endocytosis. Several phytochemicals inhibit the pepsin-mediated cell damage underlying inflammatory or neoplastic manifestations of LPR. Dietary supplementation or adjunctive therapy with phytochemicals may represent novel preventive or therapeutic strategies for LPR-attributed disease.

  9. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Resident Protein AGR3. Required for Regulation of Ciliary Beat Frequency in the Airway.

    PubMed

    Bonser, Luke R; Schroeder, Bradley W; Ostrin, Lisa A; Baumlin, Nathalie; Olson, Jean L; Salathe, Matthias; Erle, David J

    2015-10-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family members regulate protein folding and calcium homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The PDI family member anterior gradient (AGR) 3 is expressed in the airway, but the localization, regulation, and function of AGR3 are poorly understood. Here we report that AGR3, unlike its closest homolog AGR2, is restricted to ciliated cells in the airway epithelium and is not induced by ER stress. Mice lacking AGR3 are viable and develop ciliated cells with normal-appearing cilia. However, ciliary beat frequency was lower in airways from AGR3-deficient mice compared with control mice (20% lower in the absence of stimulation and 35% lower after ATP stimulation). AGR3 deficiency had no detectable effects on ciliary beat frequency (CBF) when airways were perfused with a calcium-free solution, suggesting that AGR3 is required for calcium-mediated regulation of ciliary function. Decreased CBF was associated with impaired mucociliary clearance in AGR3-deficient airways. We conclude that AGR3 is a specialized member of the PDI family that plays an unexpected role in the regulation of CBF and mucociliary clearance in the airway.

  10. Equine Airway Mast Cells are Sensitive to Cell Death Induced by Lysosomotropic Agents.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, S; Riihimäki, M; Pejler, G; Waern, I

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells are known for their detrimental effects in various inflammatory conditions. Regimens that induce selective mast cell apoptosis may therefore be of therapeutic significance. Earlier studies have demonstrated that murine- and human-cultured mast cells are highly sensitive to apoptosis induced by the lysosomotropic agent LeuLeuOMe (LLME). However, the efficacy of lysosomotropic agents for inducing apoptosis of in vivo-derived airway mast cells and the impact on mast cells in other species have not been assessed. Here we addressed whether lysosomotropic agents can induce cell death of equine in vivo-derived mast cells. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from horses were incubated with LLME at 15-100 μm for up to 48 h. The overall cell viability was unaffected by 15 μm LLME up to 48 h, whereas a relatively modest drop in total cell counts (~30%) was seen at the highest LLME dose used. In contrast to the relatively low effect on total cell counts, LLME efficiently and dose dependently reduced the number of mast cells in BAL fluids, with an almost complete depletion (96%) of mast cells after 24 h of incubation with 100 μm LLME. A significant but less dramatic reduction (up to ~45%) of lymphocytes was also seen, whereas macrophages and neutrophils were essentially resistant. The appearance of apoptotic bodies suggested a mechanism involving apoptosis rather than necrosis. These findings suggest that equine airway mast cells are highly sensitive to lysosomotropic agents. Possibly, lysosomotropic agents could be of therapeutic value to treat disorders involving harmful accumulation of mast cells in the airways.

  11. Grepafloxacin inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced interleukin-8 expression in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Matsumoto, K; Gon, Y; Maruoka, S; Hayashi, S; Asai, Y; Machino, T; Horie, T

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effect of grepafloxacin (GPFX), a new fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent, on interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-stimulated human airway epithelial cells (AEC). GPFX inhibited IL-8 protein production as well as mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner (2.5 - 25 micro g/ml), but the inhibition of IL-8 expression by corresponding concentrations of GPFX to serum and airway lining fluids was not complete. We discuss the modulatory effect of GPFX on IL-8 production in the context of its efficacy on controlling chronic airway inflammatory diseases.

  12. T cell chemotaxis and chemokine release after Staphylococcus aureus interaction with polarized airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Escotte, Sandie; Al Alam, Denise; Le Naour, Richard; Puchelle, Edith; Guenounou, Moncef; Gangloff, Sophie C

    2006-03-01

    In response to bacterial infection, airway epithelium releases inflammatory mediators including cytokines and chemokines that lead to immune cell efflux and could stimulate the adaptive T cell immune response. The aim of our study was to analyze, in a double chamber culture, the chemokine changes in response to Staphylococcus aureus and their consequences for T cells. Our data show that S. aureus stimulates basolateral and apical release of IL-8 and eotaxin by airway epithelial cells. We also observed increased chemokine receptor expression on CD8+ and CD4+ T cells and enhanced chemotaxis of CD4+ T cells toward apical supernatant. Our data strongly suggest that S. aureus interaction with airway epithelium contributes to specific migration of T cells to inflamed sites.

  13. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood.

  14. Influenza virus budding from the tips of cellular microvilli in differentiated human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, Larissa; Heck, Sonja; Matrosovich, Tatyana; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Becker, Stephan; Matrosovich, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    The epithelium of conducting airways represents the main target for influenza virus in mammals. However, the peculiarities of virus interactions with differentiated airway epithelial cells remain largely unknown. Here, influenza virus budding was studied in differentiated cultures of human tracheobronchial epithelial cells using transmission electron microscopy. Budding of spherical and filamentous virions was observed on the apical surfaces of cells with no association with cilia and secretory granules. Quantitative analysis of the distribution of viral buds on the cell surface indicated that the tips of the microvilli represented a prominent site of influenza virus budding in the human airway epithelium. As the microvilli of differentiated cells are involved in many fundamental cell functions, these data will prompt further studies on the biological significance of microvilli-associated budding for virus replication, transmission and pathogenicity.

  15. IL-22 Is Produced by Innate Lymphoid Cells and Limits Inflammation in Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gyülveszi, Gabor; Dehzad, Nina; Kreymborg, Katharina; Schneeweiss, Kristin; Michel, Erich; Reuter, Sebastian; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Arnold-Schild, Danielle; Schild, Hansjörg; Buhl, Roland; Becher, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22 is an effector cytokine, which acts primarily on epithelial cells in the skin, gut, liver and lung. Both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties have been reported for IL-22 depending on the tissue and disease model. In a murine model of allergic airway inflammation, we found that IL-22 is predominantly produced by innate lymphoid cells in the inflamed lungs, rather than TH cells. To determine the impact of IL-22 on airway inflammation, we used allergen-sensitized IL-22-deficient mice and found that they suffer from significantly higher airway hyperreactivity upon airway challenge. IL-22-deficiency led to increased eosinophil infiltration lymphocyte invasion and production of CCL17 (TARC), IL-5 and IL-13 in the lung. Mice treated with IL-22 before antigen challenge displayed reduced expression of CCL17 and IL-13 and significant amelioration of airway constriction and inflammation. We conclude that innate IL-22 limits airway inflammation, tissue damage and clinical decline in allergic lung disease. PMID:21789181

  16. Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Children With Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Field, Joshua J.; Stocks, Janet; Kirkham, Fenella J.; Rosen, Carol L.; Dietzen, Dennis J.; Semon, Trisha; Kirkby, Jane; Bates, Pamela; Seicean, Sinziana; DeBaun, Michael R.; Redline, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Background: The high prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) among children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) remains unexplained. Methods: To determine the relationship between AHR, features of asthma, and clinical characteristics of SCA, we conducted a multicenter, prospective cohort study of children with SCA. Dose response slope (DRS) was calculated to describe methacholine responsiveness, because 30% of participants did not achieve a 20% decrease in FEV1 after inhalation of the highest methacholine concentration, 25 mg/mL. Multiple linear regression analysis was done to identify independent predictors of DRS. Results: Methacholine challenge was performed in 99 children with SCA aged 5.6 to 19.9 years (median, 12.8 years). Fifty-four (55%) children had a provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% decrease in FEV1 < 4 mg/mL. In a multivariate analysis, independent associations were found between increased methacholine responsiveness and age (P < .001), IgE (P = .009), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels (P = .005). There was no association between methacholine responsiveness and a parent report of a doctor diagnosis of asthma (P = .986). Other characteristics of asthma were not associated with methacholine responsiveness, including positive skin tests to aeroallergens, exhaled nitric oxide, peripheral blood eosinophil count, and pulmonary function measures indicating airflow obstruction. Conclusions: In children with SCA, AHR to methacholine is prevalent. Younger age, serum IgE concentration, and LDH level, a marker of hemolysis, are associated with AHR. With the exception of serum IgE, no signs or symptoms of an allergic diathesis are associated with AHR. Although the relationship between methacholine responsiveness and LDH suggests that factors related to SCA may contribute to AHR, these results will need to be validated in future studies. PMID:20724735

  17. Bystander suppression of allergic airway inflammation by lung resident memory CD8+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsland, Benjamin J.; Harris, Nicola L.; Camberis, Mali; Kopf, Manfred; Hook, Sarah M.; Le Gros, Graham

    2004-04-01

    CD8+ memory T cells have recently been recognized as playing a key role in natural immunity against unrelated viral infections, a phenomenon referred to as "heterologous antiviral immunity." We now provide data that the cellular immunological interactions that underlie such heterologous immunity can play an equally important role in regulating T helper 2 immune responses and protecting mucosal surfaces from allergen-induced inflammation. Our data show that CD8+ T cells, either retained in the lung after infection with influenza virus, or adoptively transferred via the intranasal route can suppress allergic airway inflammation. The suppression is mediated by IFN-, which acts to reduce the activation level, T helper 2 cytokine production, airways hyperresponsiveness, and migration of allergen-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung, whereas the systemic and draining lymph node responses remain unchanged. Of note, adoptive transfer of previously activated transgenic CD8+ T cells conferred protection against allergic airway inflammation, even in the absence of specific-antigen. Airway resident CD8+ T cells produced IFN- when directly exposed to conditioned media from activated dendritic cells or the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18. Taken together these data indicate that effector/memory CD8+ T cells present in the airways produce IFN- after inflammatory stimuli, independent of specific-antigen, and as a consequence play a key role in modifying the degree and frequency of allergic responses in the lung.

  18. Immunostimulatory DNA mediates inhibition of eosinophilic inflammation and airway hyperreactivity independent of natural killer cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Broide, D H; Stachnick, G; Castaneda, D; Nayar, J; Miller, M; Cho, J; Rodriquez, M; Roman, M; Raz, E

    2001-11-01

    Immunostimulatory DNA sequences (ISS) inhibit eosinophilic inflammation and airway hyperreactivity in mouse models of asthma. In vitro ISS activate natural killer (NK) cells to secrete IFN-gamma, and this cytokine is hypothesized to contribute to the antiallergic effect of ISS in vivo. We investigated whether ISS activation of NK cells is important in mediating the reduction in airway hyperreactivity and the antieosinophilic effect of ISS in vivo. We assessed whether ISS modulated the development of eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway hyperreactivity to methacholine in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and OVA allergen-challenged mice pretreated with an antibody to deplete NK cells. Mice sensitized and challenged with OVA had significant bronchoalveolar lavage and lung eosinophilia, as well as airway hyperresponsiveness. ISS induced significant inhibition of bronchoalveolar lavage and lung eosinophilia, as well as airway hyperresponsiveness, in OVA-sensitized mice pretreated before OVA challenge with an NK cell-depleting antibody (NK(-) mice), as well as in mice pretreated with a control non-NK cell-depleting antibody (NK(+) mice). The NK cell-depleting antibody inhibited ISS-induced IFN-gamma production by spleen cells. These studies demonstrate that depletion of NK cells has no significant effect on ISS-mediated inhibition of airway eosinophilia and airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo, suggesting that non-NK cells and cytokines other than IFN-gamma derived from NK cells mediate the majority of the ISS-inhibitory effect on eosinophilic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo.

  19. Lung development and repair: Contribution of the ciliated lineage

    PubMed Central

    Rawlins, Emma L.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Randell, Scott H.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.

    2007-01-01

    The identity of the endogenous epithelial cells in the adult lung that are responsible for normal turnover and repair after injury is still controversial. In part, this is due to a paucity of highly specific genetic lineage tools to follow efficiently the fate of the major epithelial cell populations: the basal, secretory, ciliated, neuroendocrine, and alveolar cells. As part of a program to address this problem we have used a 1-kb FOXJ1 promoter to drive CreER in the ciliated cells of the embryonic and adult lung. Analysis of FOXJ1-GFP transgenic lungs shows that labeled cells appear in a proximal-distal pattern during embryogenesis and that the promoter drives expression in all ciliated cells. Using FOXJ1CreER adult mice, we have followed the fate of ciliated cells after epithelial injury by naphthalene or sulfur dioxide. From quantitative analysis and confocal microscopy we conclude that ciliated cells transiently change their morphology in response to lung injury but do not proliferate or transdifferentiate as part of the repair process. PMID:17194755

  20. Lung development and repair: contribution of the ciliated lineage.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, Emma L; Ostrowski, Lawrence E; Randell, Scott H; Hogan, Brigid L M

    2007-01-09

    The identity of the endogenous epithelial cells in the adult lung that are responsible for normal turnover and repair after injury is still controversial. In part, this is due to a paucity of highly specific genetic lineage tools to follow efficiently the fate of the major epithelial cell populations: the basal, secretory, ciliated, neuroendocrine, and alveolar cells. As part of a program to address this problem we have used a 1-kb FOXJ1 promoter to drive CreER in the ciliated cells of the embryonic and adult lung. Analysis of FOXJ1-GFP transgenic lungs shows that labeled cells appear in a proximal-distal pattern during embryogenesis and that the promoter drives expression in all ciliated cells. Using FOXJ1CreER adult mice, we have followed the fate of ciliated cells after epithelial injury by naphthalene or sulfur dioxide. From quantitative analysis and confocal microscopy we conclude that ciliated cells transiently change their morphology in response to lung injury but do not proliferate or transdifferentiate as part of the repair process.

  1. Spatiotemporally separated antigen uptake by alveolar dendritic cells and airway presentation to T cells in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Emily E.; Looney, Mark R.; Bose, Oishee; Sen, Debasish; Sheppard, Dean; Locksley, Richard; Huang, Xiaozhu

    2012-01-01

    Asthma pathogenesis is focused around conducting airways. The reasons for this focus have been unclear because it has not been possible to track the sites and timing of antigen uptake or subsequent antigen presentation to effector T cells. In this study, we use two-photon microscopy of the lung parenchyma and note accumulation of CD11b+ dendritic cells (DCs) around the airway after allergen challenge but very limited access of these airway-adjacent DCs to the contents of the airspace. In contrast, we observed prevalent transepithelial uptake of particulate antigens by alveolar DCs. These distinct sites are temporally linked, as early antigen uptake in alveoli gives rise to DC and antigen retention in the airway-adjacent region. Antigen-specific T cells also accumulate in the airway-adjacent region after allergen challenge and are activated by the accumulated DCs. Thus, we propose that later airway hyperreactivity results from selective retention of allergen-presenting DCs and antigen-specific T cells in airway-adjacent interaction zones, not from variation in the abilities of individual DCs to survey the lung. PMID:22585735

  2. Airway Epithelial Cell Integrity Protects from Cytotoxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Signals.

    PubMed

    Losa, Davide; Köhler, Thilo; Bacchetta, Marc; Saab, Joanna Bou; Frieden, Maud; van Delden, Christian; Chanson, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Cell-to-cell communication via gap junctions regulates airway epithelial cell homeostasis and maintains the epithelium host defense. Quorum-sensing molecules produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinate the expression of virulence factors by this respiratory pathogen. These bacterial signals may also incidentally modulate mammalian airway epithelial cell responses to the pathogen, a process called interkingdom signaling. We investigated the interactions between the P. aeruginosa N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C12) quorum-sensing molecule and human airway epithelial cell gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). C12 degradation and its effects on cells were monitored in various airway epithelial cell models grown under nonpolarized and polarized conditions. Its concentration was further monitored in daily tracheal aspirates of colonized intubated patients. C12 rapidly altered epithelial integrity and decreased GJIC in nonpolarized airway epithelial cells, whereas other quorum-sensing molecules had no effect. The effects of C12 were dependent on [Ca(2+)]i and could be prevented by inhibitors of Src tyrosine family and Rho-associated protein kinases. In contrast, polarized airway cells grown on Transwell filters were protected from C12 except when undergoing repair after wounding. In vivo during colonization of intubated patients, C12 did not accumulate, but it paralleled bacterial densities. In vitro C12 degradation, a reaction catalyzed by intracellular paraoxonase 2 (PON2), was impaired in nonpolarized cells, whereas PON2 expression was increased during epithelial polarization. The cytotoxicity of C12 on nonpolarized epithelial cells, combined with its impaired degradation allowing its accumulation, provides an additional pathogenic mechanism for P. aeruginosa infections.

  3. RhoA orchestrates glycolysis for TH2 cell differentiation and allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Qi; Kalim, Khalid W; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Shuangmin; Hinge, Ashwini; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; Zheng, Yi; Guo, Fukun

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is known to be important for T-cell activation. However, its involvement in effector T-cell differentiation has just begun to gain attention. Importantly, how metabolic pathways are integrated with T-cell activation and effector cell differentiation and function remains largely unknown. We sought to test our hypothesis that RhoA GTPase orchestrates glycolysis for TH2 cell differentiation and TH2-mediated allergic airway inflammation. Conditional RhoA-deficient mice were generated by crossing RhoA(flox/flox) mice with CD2-Cre transgenic mice. Effects of RhoA on TH2 differentiation were evaluated based on in vitro TH2-polarized culture conditions and in vivo in ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation. Cytokine levels were measured by using intracellular staining and ELISA. T-cell metabolism was measured by using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer and flow cytometry. Disruption of RhoA inhibited T-cell activation and TH2 differentiation in vitro and prevented the development of allergic airway inflammation in vivo, with no effect on TH1 cells. RhoA deficiency in activated T cells led to multiple defects in metabolic pathways, such as glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. Importantly, RhoA couples glycolysis to TH2 cell differentiation and allergic airway inflammation through regulating IL-4 receptor mRNA expression and TH2-specific signaling events. Finally, inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase, an immediate downstream effector of RhoA, blocked TH2 differentiation and allergic airway inflammation. RhoA is a key component of the signaling cascades leading to TH2 differentiation and allergic airway inflammation at least in part through control of T-cell metabolism and the Rho-associated protein kinase pathway. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Insights into Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells in Human Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Karta, Maya R; Broide, David H; Doherty, Taylor A

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries have led to the identification of a novel group of immune cells, the innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). The members of this group are divided into three subpopulations: ILC1s, ILC2s, and ILC3s. ILC2s produce Th2 cytokines, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, upon activation by epithelial cell-derived cytokines, lipid mediators (cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2), and TNF family member TL1A and promote structural and immune cell responses in the airways after antigen exposure. In addition, ILC2 function is also influenced by inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS)/ICOS-ligand (ICOS-L) interactions via direct contact between immune cells. The most common airway antigens are allergens and viruses which are highly linked to the induction of airway diseases with underlying type 2 inflammation including asthma and allergic rhinitis. Based on recent findings linking ILC2s and airway Th2 responses, there is intensive investigation into the role of ILC2s in human disease with the hope of a better understanding of the pathophysiology and the discovery of novel potential therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the recent advances made in elucidating ILC2 involvement in human Th2 airway disease.

  5. Successful establishment of primary small airway cell cultures in human lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The study of small airway diseases such as post-transplant bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) is hampered by the difficulty in assessing peripheral airway function either physiologically or directly. Our aims were to develop robust methods for sampling small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) and to establish submerged SAEC cultures for downstream experimentation. Methods SAEC were obtained at 62 post-transplant bronchoscopies in 26 patients using radiologically guided bronchial brushings. Submerged cell cultures were established and SAEC lineage was confirmed using expression of clara cell secretory protein (CCSP). Results The cell yield for SAEC (0.956 ± 0.063 × 106) was lower than for large airway cells (1.306 ± 0.077 × 106) but did not significantly impact on the culture establishment rate (79.0 ± 5.2% vs. 83.8 ± 4.7% p = 0.49). The presence of BOS significantly compromised culture success (independent of cell yield) for SAEC (odds ratio (95%CI) 0.067 (0.01-0.40)) but not LAEC (0.3 (0.05-1.9)). Established cultures were successfully passaged and expanded. Conclusion Primary SAEC can be successfully obtained from human lung transplant recipients and maintained in culture for downstream experimentation. This technique will facilitate the development of primary in vitro models for BOS and other diseases with a small airway component such as asthma, cystic fibrosis and COPD. PMID:19857270

  6. A critical role for dendritic cells in the evolution of IL-1β-mediated murine airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Sen, Debasish; Goodsell, Amanda; Ma, Royce; Moermans, Catherine; McKnelly, Kate J.; Baron, Jody L.; Krummel, Matthew F.; Nishimura, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation and fibrosis, known as airway remodeling, are defining features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and are refractory to current treatments. How and if chronic inflammation contributes to airway fibrosis remains controversial. Here, we use a model of COPD airway disease utilizing adenoviral (Ad) delivery of IL-1β to determine that adaptive T-cell immunity is required for airway remodeling since mice deficient in α/β T-cells (tcra −/−) are protected. Dendritic cells (DCs) accumulate around COPD airways and are critical to prime adaptive immunity, but have not been shown to directly influence airway remodeling. We show that DC depletion or deficiency in the crucial DC chemokine receptor, ccr6, both protect from Ad-IL-1β-induced airway adaptive T-cell immune responses, and fibrosis in mice. These results provide evidence that chronic airway inflammation, mediated by accumulation of α/β T-cells and driven by DCs, is critical to airway fibrosis. PMID:25786688

  7. A critical role for dendritic cells in the evolution of IL-1β-mediated murine airway disease.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Sen, Debasish; Goodsell, Amanda; Ma, Royce; Moermans, Catherine; McKnelly, Kate J; Baron, Jody L; Krummel, Matthew F; Nishimura, Stephen L

    2015-04-15

    Chronic airway inflammation and fibrosis, known as airway remodeling, are defining features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and are refractory to current treatments. How and whether chronic inflammation contributes to airway fibrosis remain controversial. In this study, we use a model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease airway disease utilizing adenoviral delivery of IL-1β to determine that adaptive T cell immunity is required for airway remodeling because mice deficient in α/β T cells (tcra(-/-)) are protected. Dendritic cells (DCs) accumulate around chronic obstructive pulmonary disease airways and are critical to prime adaptive immunity, but they have not been shown to directly influence airway remodeling. We show that DC depletion or deficiency in the crucial DC chemokine receptor ccr6 both protect from adenoviral IL-1β-induced airway adaptive T cell immune responses and fibrosis in mice. These results provide evidence that chronic airway inflammation, mediated by accumulation of α/β T cells and driven by DCs, is critical to airway fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Inducible nitric oxide synthase expression is reduced in cystic fibrosis murine and human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, T J; Drumm, M L

    1998-01-01

    It has been reported that exhaled nitric oxide levels are reduced in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. We have examined the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the airways by immunostaining and found that iNOS is constitutively expressed in the airway epithelia of non-CF mouse and human tissues but essentially absent in the epithelium of CF airways. We explored potential consequences of lost iNOS expression and found that iNOS inhibition significantly increases mouse nasal trans-epithelial potential difference, and hindered the ability of excised mouse lungs to prevent growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The absence of continuous nitric oxide production in epithelial cells of CF airways may play a role in two CF-associated characteristics: hyperabsorption of sodium and susceptibility to bacterial infections. PMID:9739054

  9. Effects of second hand smoke on airway secretion and mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanyan; Di, Y. Peter

    2012-01-01

    The airway acts as the first defense against inhaled pathogens and particulate matter from the environment. One major way for the airway to clear inhaled foreign objects is through mucociliary clearance (MCC), an important component of the respiratory innate immune defense against lung disease. MCC is characterized by the upward movement of mucus by ciliary motion that requires a balance between the volume and composition of the mucus, adequate periciliary liquid (PCL) volume, and normal ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Airway surface fluid (ASL) is a thin layer liquid that consists of the highly viscous mucus upper “gel” layer, and the watery lubricating lower “sol” layer. Mucus production, secretion and clearance are considered to play a critical role in maintenance of airway health because it maintains hydration in the airway and traps particulates, bacteria, and viruses. Different types of epithelial cells, including secretory cells, and ciliated cells, contribute to the MCC function. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains chemicals and particulates that significantly affect airway secretion. Active and passive CS-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with hyperplasia of goblet cells and submucosal glands (SMGs), thus increasing the secretory capacity of the airways that impairs MCC. PMID:22973232

  10. IL13 activates autophagy to regulate secretion in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, John D; Alevy, Yael; Malvin, Nicole P; Patel, Khushbu K; Gunsten, Sean P; Holtzman, Michael J; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Brody, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine modulation of autophagy is increasingly recognized in disease pathogenesis, and current concepts suggest that type 1 cytokines activate autophagy, whereas type 2 cytokines are inhibitory. However, this paradigm derives primarily from studies of immune cells and is poorly characterized in tissue cells, including sentinel epithelial cells that regulate the immune response. In particular, the type 2 cytokine IL13 (interleukin 13) drives the formation of airway goblet cells that secrete excess mucus as a characteristic feature of airway disease, but whether this process is influenced by autophagy was undefined. Here we use a mouse model of airway disease in which IL33 (interleukin 33) stimulation leads to IL13-dependent formation of airway goblet cells as tracked by levels of mucin MUC5AC (mucin 5AC, oligomeric mucus/gel forming), and we show that these cells manifest a block in mucus secretion in autophagy gene Atg16l1-deficient mice compared to wild-type control mice. Similarly, primary-culture human tracheal epithelial cells treated with IL13 to stimulate mucus formation also exhibit a block in MUC5AC secretion in cells depleted of autophagy gene ATG5 (autophagy-related 5) or ATG14 (autophagy-related 14) compared to nondepleted control cells. Our findings indicate that autophagy is essential for airway mucus secretion in a type 2, IL13-dependent immune disease process and thereby provide a novel therapeutic strategy for attenuating airway obstruction in hypersecretory inflammatory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis lung disease. Taken together, these observations suggest that the regulation of autophagy by Th2 cytokines is cell-context dependent.

  11. NDRG1 is important to maintain the integrity of airway epithelial barrier through claudin-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Gon, Yasuhiro; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Kozu, Yutaka; Kazumichi, Kuroda; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Takeshita, Ikuko; Oshima, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Shu

    2017-02-13

    Impairment of epithelial barrier integrity caused by environmental triggers is associated with the pathogenesis of airway inflammation. Using human airway epithelial cells, we attempted to identify molecule(s) that promote airway epithelial barrier integrity. Microarray analyses were conducted using the Affimetrix human whole genome gene chip, and we identified the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) gene, which was induced during the development of the epithelial cell barrier. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed strong NDRG1 expression in ciliated epithelial cells in nasal tissues sampled from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and the low expression of NDRG1 was observed in goblet cells or damaged epithelial cells. NDRG1 gene knockdown with its specific siRNA decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance and increased the dextran permeability. Immunocytochemistry revealed that NDRG1 knockdown disrupted tight junctions of airway epithelial cells. Next, we analyzed the effects of NDRG1 knockdown on the expression of tight and adhesion junction molecules. NDRG1 knockdown significantly decreased only claudin-9 expression, but did not decrease other claudin family molecules, such as E-cadherin, and ZO-1, -2, or -3. Knockdown of claudin-9 markedly impaired the barrier function in airway epithelial cells. These results suggest that NDRG1 is important for the barrier integrity in airway epithelial cells.

  12. Triptolide inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation in rat airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing Smad signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ming; Lv, Zhiqiang; Huang, Linjie; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Xiaoling; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Ruiyun; Jiang, Shanping

    2015-02-15

    Background: We have reported that triptolide can inhibit airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma via TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and the possible mechanism. Methods: Rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized, then pretreated with different concentration of triptolide before stimulated by TGF-β1. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of triptolide on cell cycle and apoptosis. Signal proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7) were detected by western blotting analysis. Results: Triptolide significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced ASMC proliferation (P<0.05). The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by triptolide dose dependently. No pro-apoptotic effects were detected under the concentration of triptolide we used. Western blotting analysis showed TGF-β1 induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation was inhibited by triptolide pretreatment, and the level of Smad7 was increased by triptolide pretreatment. Conclusions: Triptolide may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway. - Highlights: • In this study, rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized. • Triptolide inhibited TGF-β1-induced airway smooth muscle cells proliferation. • Triptolide inhibited ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway.

  13. The beta-agonist isoproterenol attenuates EGF-stimulated wound closure in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Bradley J; Jones, Stacie M; Pate, Crystal; Shank, Brian; Sessions, Laura; Pittman, Laura M; Cornett, Lawrence E; Kurten, Richard C

    2006-03-01

    Asthma is a disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction. An additional hallmark of chronic asthma is altered wound healing that leads to airway remodeling. Although beta-agonists are effective in treating the bronchospasm associated with asthma, their effects on airway wound healing, which are related to airway remodeling, are unknown. It has been demonstrated that beta-agonists can alter the signaling of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors, which are important in timely wound healing. Therefore, we hypothesized that the beta-agonist isoproterenol would affect wound healing. Using an in vitro scrape wound assay, we demonstrated that isoproterenol attenuates EGF-stimulated wound healing in 16HBE airway epithelial cell cultures. Through experiments with forskolin and cells overexpressing beta2-adrenergic receptor-yellow fluorescent protein, we show that attenuation is due to the accumulation of cAMP and the involvement of at least one additional pathway. Furthermore, attenuation is not due to a direct effect on the EGF receptor or to an alteration of the ERK/MAPK signaling cascade. Based on these results, we propose that isoproterenol may exert its effects through other MAPK signaling pathways (JNK and/or p38) or through parallel mechanisms. These results also demonstrate a problem of potential therapeutic relevance in which a commonly prescribed medication may alter wound healing and contribute to the remodeling of asthmatic airways.

  14. Mast cell mediators in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-H.; Lai, Y.-L. . E-mail: tiger@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrated previously that mast cells play an important role in citric acid (CA)-induced airway constriction. In this study, we further investigated the underlying mediator(s) for this type of airway constriction. At first, to examine effects caused by blocking agents, 67 young Hartley guinea pigs were divided into 7 groups: saline + CA; methysergide (serotonin receptor antagonist) + CA; MK-886 (leukotriene synthesis inhibitor) + CA; mepyramine (histamine H{sub 1} receptor antagonist) + CA; indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) + CA; cromolyn sodium (mast cell stabilizer) + CA; and compound 48/80 (mast cell degranulating agent) + CA. Then, we tested whether leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) or histamine enhances CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. We measured dynamic respiratory compliance (Crs) and forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s (FEV{sub 0.1}) during either baseline or recovery period. In addition, we detected histamine level, an index of pulmonary mast cell degranulation, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. Citric acid aerosol inhalation caused decreases in Crs and FEV{sub 0.1}, indicating airway constriction in the control group. This airway constriction was significantly attenuated by MK-886, mepyramine, cromolyn sodium, and compound 48/80, but not by either methysergide or indomethacin. Both LTC{sub 4} and histamine infusion significantly increased the magnitude of CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. Citric acid inhalation caused significant increase in histamine level in the BAL sample, which was significantly suppressed by compound 48/80. These results suggest that leukotrienes and histamine originating from mast cells play an important role in CA inhalation-induced noncholinergic airway constriction.

  15. Creation and characterization of an airway epithelial cell line for stable expression of CFTR variants

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Laura B.; Vecchio-Pagan, Briana; Sharma, Neeraj; Han, Sangwoo T.; Franca, Arianna; Wohler, Elizabeth S.; Batista, Denise A.S.; Goff, Loyal A.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Analysis of the functional consequences and treatment response of rare CFTR variants is challenging due to the limited availability of primary airways cells. Methods A Flp recombination target (FRT) site for stable expression of CFTR was incorporated into an immortalized CF bronchial epithelial cell line (CFBE41o−). CFTR cDNA was integrated into the FRT site. Expression was evaluated by western blotting and confocal microscopy and function measured by short circuit current. RNA sequencing was used to compare the transcriptional profile of the resulting CF8Flp cell line to primary cells and tissues. Results Functional CFTR was expressed from integrated cDNA at the FRT site of the CF8Flp cell line at levels comparable to that seen in native airway cells. CF8Flp cells expressing WT-CFTR have a stable transcriptome comparable to that of primary cultured airway epithelial cells, including genes that play key roles in CFTR pathways. Conclusion CF8Flp cells provide a viable substitute for primary CF airway cells for the analysis of CFTR variants in a native context. PMID:26694805

  16. Post-transcriptional regulation of interleukin-10 in peripheral B cells of airway allergy patients

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiang-Qian; Yang, Shao-Bo; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Xie, Rui-Di; Yang, Li-Tao; Ke, Yu-Xing; Zhao, Hong-Xia; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Da-Bo; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The dysfunction of peripheral immune tolerance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Recent reports indicate that micro RNA (miR)-98 is associated with the process of aberrant immune responses. This study aims to test a hypothesis that miR-98 is associated with the pathogenesis of airway allergy via interfering with the development of regulatory B cells (Breg). In this study, patients with airway allergy were recruited into this study. The frequency of Bregs was assessed by flow cytometry. The levels of miR-98 in peripheral B cells were determined by RT-qPCR. A cell-culture model of B cells was developed to test the role of miR-98 in the repressing of interleukin (IL)-10 in B cells. The results showed that the levels of IL-10 in peripheral B cells were significantly lower in patients with airway allergy as compared with healthy subjects. High levels of miR-98 (one of the miR-98 members) were detected in peripheral B cells of patients with airway allergy, which was mimicked by stimulating B cells with IL-4. Histone acetyltransferase p300 was involved in the IL-4-induced miR-98 expression. miR-98 mediated the IL-4-inhibited IL-10 expression in B cells. In conclusion, miR-98 affects the expression of IL-10 in B cells and may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:28078048

  17. What we can learn from a tadpole about ciliopathies and airway diseases: Using systems biology in Xenopus to study cilia and mucociliary epithelia.

    PubMed

    Walentek, Peter; Quigley, Ian K

    2017-01-01

    Over the past years, the Xenopus embryo has emerged as an incredibly useful model organism for studying the formation and function of cilia and ciliated epithelia in vivo. This has led to a variety of findings elucidating the molecular mechanisms of ciliated cell specification, basal body biogenesis, cilia assembly, and ciliary motility. These findings also revealed the deep functional conservation of signaling, transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein networks employed in the formation and function of vertebrate ciliated cells. Therefore, Xenopus research can contribute crucial insights not only into developmental and cell biology, but also into the molecular mechanisms underlying cilia related diseases (ciliopathies) as well as diseases affecting the ciliated epithelium of the respiratory tract in humans (e.g., chronic lung diseases). Additionally, systems biology approaches including transcriptomics, genomics, and proteomics have been rapidly adapted for use in Xenopus, and broaden the applications for current and future translational biomedical research. This review aims to present the advantages of using Xenopus for cilia research, highlight some of the evolutionarily conserved key concepts and mechanisms of ciliated cell biology that were elucidated using the Xenopus model, and describe the potential for Xenopus research to address unresolved questions regarding the molecular mechanisms of ciliopathies and airway diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Innate lymphoid cells contribute to allergic airway disease exacerbation by obesity.

    PubMed

    Everaere, Laetitia; Ait-Yahia, Saliha; Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Vorng, Han; Quemener, Sandrine; LeVu, Pauline; Fleury, Sebastien; Bouchaert, Emmanuel; Fan, Ying; Duez, Catherine; de Nadai, Patricia; Staels, Bart; Dombrowicz, David; Tsicopoulos, Anne

    2016-11-01

    Epidemiologic and clinical observations identify obesity as an important risk factor for asthma exacerbation, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) have been implicated, respectively, in asthma and adipose tissue homeostasis and in obesity-associated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We sought to determine the potential involvement of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in allergic airway disease exacerbation caused by high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Obesity was induced by means of HFD feeding, and allergic airway inflammation was subsequently induced by means of intranasal administration of house dust mite (HDM) extract. AHR, lung and visceral adipose tissue inflammation, humoral response, cytokines, and innate and adaptive lymphoid populations were analyzed in the presence or absence of ILCs. HFD feeding exacerbated allergic airway disease features, including humoral response, airway and tissue eosinophilia, AHR, and TH2 and TH17 pulmonary profiles. Notably, nonsensitized obese mice already exhibited increased lung ILC counts and tissue eosinophil infiltration compared with values in lean mice in the absence of AHR. The numbers of total and cytokine-expressing lung ILC2s and ILC3s further increased in HDM-challenged obese mice compared with those in HDM-challenged lean mice, and this was accompanied by high IL-33 and IL-1β levels and decreased ILC markers in visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, depletion of ILCs with an anti-CD90 antibody, followed by T-cell reconstitution, led to a profound decrease in allergic airway inflammatory features in obese mice, including TH2 and TH17 infiltration. These results indicate that HFD-induced obesity might exacerbate allergic airway inflammation through mechanisms involving ILC2s and ILC3s. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that KATP channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K(+) channels triggers K(+) efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca(2+)entry through closing voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. Intracellular Ca(2+) is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K(+) efflux decreases Ca(2+) influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a KATP channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective KATP channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt antagonize the proliferating and migrating effects of PDGF-BB on

  20. Interactive effect of cigarette smoke extract and world trade center dust particles on airway cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Alice; Prophete, Colette; Chen, Lung-chi; Emala, Charles W; Cohen, Mitchell D

    2011-01-01

    Rescue workers and residents exposed to the environment surrounding the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, have suffered a disproportionate incidence of chronic lung disease attributed to the inhalation of airborne dust. To date, the pathophysiology of this lung disease is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to examine whether airborne dust contaminants recovered from the surrounding area 24-48 h after the collapse of the WTC demonstrate direct cytotoxicity to two airway cell types that were most directly exposed to inhaled dust, airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. It was also of interest to determine whether the presence of these dusts could modulate the effects of cigarette smoke on these cell types in that some of the individuals who responded to the collapse site were also smokers. Human cultured airway epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells were exposed to 10% cigarette smoke extract (CSE), WTC dust particles (10-53 μm; 0.01-0.5 μg/μl), or a combination of the two for 2-24 h. Cell viability was measured by determining mitochondrial integrity (MTT assays) and apoptosis (poly-ADP-ribose polymerase [PARP] immunoblotting). Conditioned cell culture media recovered from the CSE- and/or WTC dust-exposed BEAS-2B cells were then applied to cultured human airway smooth muscle cells that were subsequently assayed for mitochondrial integrity and their ability to synthesize cyclic AMP (a regulator of airway smooth muscle constriction). BEAS-2B cells underwent necrotic cell death following exposure to WTC dust or CSE for 2-24 h without evidence of apoptosis. Smooth muscle cells demonstrated cellular toxicity and enhanced cyclic AMP synthesis following exposure to conditioned media from WTC- or CSE-exposed epithelial cells. These acute toxicity assays of WTC dust and CSE offer insights into lung cell toxicity that may contribute to the pathophysiology of chronic lung disease in workers and residents exposed to WTC dust. These studies

  1. Curcumin regulates airway epithelial cell cytokine responses to the pollutant cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Rennolds, Jessica; Malireddy, Smitha; Hassan, Fatemat; Tridandapani, Susheela; Parinandi, Narasimham; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium induces secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by two distinct pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium increases NAPDH oxidase activity leading to Erk activation and IL-8 secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin prevents cadmium-induced secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 by airway cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin could be use to suppress lung inflammation due to cadmium inhalation. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal present in the environment and its inhalation can lead to pulmonary disease such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These lung diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial cells to cadmium promotes a polarized apical secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, two pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokines known to play an important role in pulmonary inflammation. We also determined that two distinct pathways controlled secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines by human airway epithelial cells as cadmium-induced IL-6 secretion occurs via an NF-{kappa}B dependent pathway, whereas IL-8 secretion involves the Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Interestingly, the natural antioxidant curcumin could prevent both cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, curcumin could be used to prevent airway inflammation due to cadmium inhalation.

  2. Impact and management of airway obstruction in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx.

    PubMed

    Chu, Pen-Yuan; Lee, Tsung-Lun; Chang, Shyue-Yih

    2011-01-01

    We compared postoperative complications and oncologic results after laryngectomy of patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), with and without airway obstruction. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 544 patients with laryngeal SCC between 1990 and 2000. Of 175 advanced cases receiving total laryngectomy, 32 initially presented with upper airway obstruction. Postoperative complications after laryngectomy did not differ significantly between patients with and without airway obstruction (36% vs 28%; p = .353). Although patients with airway obstruction had more T4 (81% vs 42%; p < .001) and stage IV disease (82% vs 48%; p = .0004), tumor recurrence rates did not increase (21% vs 29%; p = .374). Five-year overall (52% vs 60%; p = .251), disease-specific (73% vs 70%; p = .982), and relapse-free (72% vs 68%; p = .982) survival did not differ significantly between groups. After appropriate management of airway obstruction, the postoperative complications and oncologic results were similar to those without airway obstruction.  © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2011.

  3. TGF-β-dependent dendritic cell chemokinesis in murine models of airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Sen, Debasish; Ma, Royce; Murray, Lynne A.; Tsui, Ping; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Baron, Jody L.; Krummel, Matthew F.; Nishimura, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Small airway chronic inflammation is a major pathologic feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is refractory to current treatments. Dendritic cells (DCs) accumulate around small airways in COPD. DCs are critical mediators of antigen surveillance and antigen presentation and amplify adaptive immune responses. How DCs accumulate around airways remains largely unknown. We use 2-photon DC imaging of living murine lung sections to directly visualize the dynamic movement of living DCs around airways in response to either soluble mediators (IL-1β) or environmental stimuli (cigarette smoke or TLR3 ligands) implicated in COPD pathogenesis. We find that DCs accumulate around murine airways primarily by increasing velocity (chemokinesis) rather than directional migration (chemotaxis) in response to all three stimuli. DC accumulation maximally occurs in a specific zone located 26-50 μm from small airways, which overlaps with zones of maximal DC velocity. Our data suggest that increased accumulation of DCs around airways results from increased numbers of highly chemokinetic DCs entering the lung from the circulation with balanced rates of immigration and emigration. Increases in DC accumulation and chemokinesis are partially dependent on ccr6, a crucial DC chemokine receptor, and fibroblast expression of the integrin αvβ8, a critical activator of TGF-β αvβ8-mediated TGF-β activation is known to enhance IL-1β-dependent fibroblast expression of the only known endogenous ccr6 chemokine ligand, ccl20. Taken together, these data suggest a mechanism by which αvβ8, ccl20 and ccr6 interact to lead to DC accumulation around airways in response to COPD-relevant stimuli. PMID:26109638

  4. TGF-β-Dependent Dendritic Cell Chemokinesis in Murine Models of Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Sen, Debasish; Ma, Royce; Murray, Lynne A; Tsui, Ping; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D; Baron, Jody L; Krummel, Matthew F; Nishimura, Stephen L

    2015-08-01

    Small airway chronic inflammation is a major pathologic feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is refractory to current treatments. Dendritic cells (DCs) accumulate around small airways in COPD. DCs are critical mediators of Ag surveillance and Ag presentation and amplify adaptive immune responses. How DCs accumulate around airways remains largely unknown. We use 2-photon DC imaging of living murine lung sections to directly visualize the dynamic movement of living DCs around airways in response to either soluble mediators (IL-1β) or environmental stimuli (cigarette smoke or TLR3 ligands) implicated in COPD pathogenesis. We find that DCs accumulate around murine airways primarily by increasing velocity (chemokinesis) rather than directional migration (chemotaxis) in response to all three stimuli. DC accumulation maximally occurs in a specific zone located 26-50 μm from small airways, which overlaps with zones of maximal DC velocity. Our data suggest that increased accumulation of DCs around airways results from increased numbers of highly chemokinetic DCs entering the lung from the circulation with balanced rates of immigration and emigration. Increases in DC accumulation and chemokinesis are partially dependent on ccr6, a crucial DC chemokine receptor, and fibroblast expression of the integrin αvβ8, a critical activator of TGF-β. αvβ8-Mediated TGF-β activation is known to enhance IL-1β-dependent fibroblast expression of the only known endogenous ccr6 chemokine ligand, ccl20. Taken together, these data suggest a mechanism by which αvβ8, ccl20, and ccr6 interact to lead to DC accumulation around airways in response to COPD-relevant stimuli. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Single-Cell Analysis of Mast Cell Degranulation Induced by Airway Smooth Muscle-Secreted Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Benjamin M.; Meyer, Audrey F.; Gruba, Sarah M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by narrowed airways, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, mucus hyper-secretion, and airway remodeling. Mast cell (MC) infiltration into airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a defining feature of asthma, and ASM regulates the inflammatory response by secreting chemokines, including CXCL10 and CCL5. Single cell analysis offers a unique approach to study specific cellular signaling interactions within large and complex signaling networks such as the inflammatory microenvironment in asthma. Methods Carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry was used to study the effects of ASM–secreted chemokines on mouse peritoneal MC degranulation. Results MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 was monitored at the single cell level. Relative to IgE-mediated degranulation, CXCL10- and CCL5-stimulated MCs released a decreased amount of serotonin per granule with fewer release events per cell. Decreased serotonin released per granule was correlated with increased spike half-width and rise-time values. Conclusions MCs are directly activated with ASM-associated chemokines. CXCL10 and CCL5 induce less robust MC degranulation compared to IgE- and A23187-stimulation. The kinetics of MC degranulation are signaling pathway-dependent, suggesting a biophysical mechanism of regulated degranulation that incorporates control over granule trafficking, transport, and docking machinery. General Significance The biophysical mechanisms, including variations in number of exocytotic release events, serotonin released per granule, and the membrane kinetics of exocytosis that underlie MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 were characterized at the single cell level. These findings clarify the function of ASM-derived chemokines as instigators of MC degranulation relative to classical mechanisms of MC stimulation. PMID:25986989

  6. Multiple dosing of simvastatin inhibits airway mucus production of epithelial cells: implications in the treatment of chronic obstructive airway pathologies.

    PubMed

    Marin, Laura; Traini, Daniela; Bebawy, Mary; Colombo, Paolo; Buttini, Francesca; Haghi, Mehra; Ong, Hui Xin; Young, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by mucus hyper-production. This pathology, together with other inflammatory contributions, leads to airway obstruction and breathing complications. Newer therapeutic approaches are of increased interest, including the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. Retrospective studies have shown that statins are effective in reducing patient mortality and blood cytokines levels. These findings suggest statins may also provide a new therapeutic approach in COPD treatment. The aim of the present work was to study the transport of simvastatin (SV) across Calu-3 epithelial cells and to investigate its pharmacological action with respect to reduction in mucus production. Calu-3 cells were grown under liquid covered culture (LCC) conditions for transport studies in order to demonstrate the ability of SV to transport across the monolayer. For mucus detection, cells were grown under air interface culture (AIC) conditions. Samples collected for microscope analysis were stained with alcian blue; images of the stained cell surface were acquired and the mucus was quantified as the RGBB ratio. SV was transported through the cell monolayer and 'retained' inside the Calu-3 cells. Colour analysis of stained Calu-3 monolayers microscope-images showed that chronic administration of SV for 14 days caused a significant inhibition in mucus production. These findings suggest that local delivery of SV directly to the lungs may provide a promising treatment and potential disease management approach of COPD, with significant effects on mucus reduction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, Erik P; Hyun, Sang Won; Feng, Chiguang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Anguo; Guang, Wei; Nguyen, Chinh; Sun, Wenji; Luzina, Irina G; Webb, Tonya J; Atamas, Sergei P; Passaniti, Antonino; Twaddell, William S; Puché, Adam C; Wang, Lai-Xi; Cross, Alan S; Goldblum, Simeon E

    2014-05-01

    Sialic acids on glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in many biological processes. In the airways, sialylated glycoproteins and glycolipids are strategically positioned on the plasma membranes of epithelia to regulate receptor-ligand, cell-cell, and host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. We now demonstrate, for the first time, sialidase activity for ganglioside substrates in human airway epithelia. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, NEU3 has a substrate preference for gangliosides and is expressed at mRNA and protein levels at comparable abundance in epithelia derived from human trachea, bronchi, small airways, and alveoli. In small airway and alveolar epithelia, NEU3 protein was immunolocalized to the plasma membrane, cytosolic, and nuclear subcellular fractions. Small interfering RNA-induced silencing of NEU3 expression diminished sialidase activity for a ganglioside substrate by >70%. NEU3 immunostaining of intact human lung tissue could be localized to the superficial epithelia, including the ciliated brush border, as well as to nuclei. However, NEU3 was reduced in subepithelial tissues. These results indicate that human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase.

  8. Role of nicotinic receptors and acetylcholine in mucous cell metaplasia, hyperplasia and airway mucus formation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gundavarapu, Sravanthi; Wilder, Julie A.; Mishra, Neerad C.; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; Langley, Raymond J.; Singh, Shashi P.; Saeed, Ali Imran; Jaramillo, Richard J.; Gott, Katherine M.; Peña-Philippides, Juan Carlos; Harrod, Kevin S.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Buch, Shilpa; Sopori, Mohan L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Airway mucus hypersecretion is a key pathophysiological feature in number of lung diseases. Cigarette smoke/nicotine and allergens are strong stimulators of airway mucus; however, the mechanism of mucus modulation is unclear. Objectives Characterize the pathway by which cigarette smoke/nicotine regulates airway mucus and identify agents that decrease airway mucus. Methods IL-13 and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) are implicated in airway mucus. We examined the role of IL-13 and GABAARs in nicotine-induced mucus formation in normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and A549 cells, and secondhand cigarette smoke and/or ovalbumin-induced mucus formation in vivo. Results Nicotine promotes mucus formation in NHBE cells; however, the nicotine-induced mucus formation is independent of IL-13 but sensitive to the GABAAR antagonist picrotoxin (PIC). Airway epithelial cells express α7/α9/α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and specific inhibition or knockdown of α7- but not α9/α10-nAChRs abrogates mucus formation in response to nicotine and IL-13. Moreover, addition of acetylcholine or inhibition of its degradation increases mucus in NHBE cells. Nicotinic but not muscarinic receptor antagonists block allergen or nicotine/cigarette smoke-induced airway mucus formation in NHBE cells and/or in mouse airways. Conclusions Nicotine-induced airway mucus formation is independent of IL-13 and α7-nAChRs are critical in airway mucous cell metaplasia/hyperplasia and mucus production in response to various pro-mucoid agents, including IL-13. In the absence of nicotine, acetylcholine may be the biological ligand for α7-nAChRs to trigger airway mucus formation. α7-nAChRs are downstream of IL-13 but upstream of GABAARα2 in the MUC5AC pathway. Acetylcholine and α-7-nAChRs may serve as therapeutic targets to control airway mucus. PMID:22578901

  9. Hedgehog signalling within airway epithelial progenitors and in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Watkins, D Neil; Berman, David M; Burkholder, Scott G; Wang, Baolin; Beachy, Philip A; Baylin, Stephen B

    2003-03-20

    Embryonic signalling pathways regulate progenitor cell fates in mammalian epithelial development and cancer. Prompted by the requirement for sonic hedgehog (Shh) signalling in lung development, we investigated a role for this pathway in regeneration and carcinogenesis of airway epithelium. Here we demonstrate extensive activation of the hedgehog (Hh) pathway within the airway epithelium during repair of acute airway injury. This mode of Hh signalling is characterized by the elaboration and reception of the Shh signal within the epithelial compartment, and immediately precedes neuroendocrine differentiation. We reveal a similar pattern of Hh signalling in airway development during normal differentiation of pulmonary neuroendocrine precursor cells, and in a subset of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), a highly aggressive and frequently lethal human tumour with primitive neuroendocrine features. These tumours maintain their malignant phenotype in vitro and in vivo through ligand-dependent Hh pathway activation. We propose that some types of SCLC might recapitulate a critical, Hh-regulated event in airway epithelial differentiation. This requirement for Hh pathway activation identifies a common lethal malignancy that may respond to pharmacological blockade of the Hh signalling pathway.

  10. Detection of a novel stem cell probably involved in normal turnover of the lung airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Martínez, Marta; Rodríguez-Flores, Laura E; de-la-Garza-González, Carlos; Ancer-Rodríguez, Jesús; Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto

    2015-11-01

    Regeneration of the lung airway epithelium after injury has been extensively studied. In contrast, analysis of its turnover in healthy adulthood has received little attention. In the classical view, this epithelium is maintained in the steady-state by the infrequent proliferation of basal or Clara cells. The intermediate filament protein nestin was initially identified as a marker for neural stem cells, but its expression has also been detected in other stem cells. Lungs from CD1 mice at the age of 2, 6, 12, 18 or 24 months were fixed in neutral-buffered formalin and paraffin-embedded. Nestin expression was examined by an immunohistochemical peroxidase-based method. Nestin-positive cells were detected in perivascular areas and in connective tissue that were in close proximity of the airway epithelium. Also, nestin-positive cells were found among the cells lining the airway epithelium. These findings suggest that nestin-positive stem cells circulate in the bloodstream, transmigrate through blood vessels and localize in the lung airway epithelium to participate in its turnover. We previously reported the existence of similar cells able to differentiate into lung chondrocytes. Thus, the stem cell reported here might be a bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMDMSC) able to generate several types of lung tissues. In conclusion, our findings indicate that there exist a BMDMSC in healthy adulthood that participates in the turnover of the lung airway epithelium. These findings may improve our knowledge about the lung stem cell biology and also provide novel approaches to therapy for devastating pulmonary diseases.

  11. Wound repair and anti-oxidative capacity is regulated by ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi; Liu, Hui-jun; Xiang, Yang; Tan, Yu-rong; Zhu, Xiao-lin; Qin, Xiao-qun

    2010-08-01

    Integrin beta 4 (ITGB4) is a structural adhesion molecule which engages in maintaining the integrity of airway epithelial cells. Its specific cytomembrane structural feature strongly indicates that ITGB4 may engage in many signaling pathways and physiologic processes. However, in addition to adhesion, the specific biologic significance of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells is almost unknown. In this article, we investigated the expression and functional properties of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14O-cells) and primary rat tracheal epithelial cells (RTE cells) were used to determine ITGB4 expression under ozone tress or mechanical damage, respectively. An ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged asthma model was used to investigate ITGB4 expression after antigen exposure in vivo. In addition, an ITGB4 overexpression vector and ITGB4 silence virus vector were constructed and transfected into RTE cells. Then, wound repair ability and anti-oxidation capacity was evaluated. Our results demonstrated that, on the edge of mechanically wounded cell areas, ITGB4 expression was increased after mechanical injury. After ozone stress, upregulation expression of ITGB4 was also detected. In the OVA-challenged asthma model, ITGB4 expression was decreased on airway epithelial cells accompanying with structural disruption and damage of anti-oxidation capacity. Besides, our study revealed that upregulation of ITGB4 promotes wound repair ability and anti-oxidative ability, while such abilities were blocked when ITGB4 was silenced. Taken together, these results showed that ITGB4 was a new interesting molecule involved in the regulation of wound repair and anti-oxidation processes for airway epithelial cells.

  12. Cholesterol depletion in cell membranes of human airway epithelial cells suppresses MUC5AC gene expression.

    PubMed

    Song, Kee Jae; Kim, Na Hyun; Lee, Gi Bong; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kwon, Jin Ho; Kim, Kyung-Su

    2013-05-01

    If cholesterol in the cell membrane is depleted by treating cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), the activities of transmembrane receptors are altered in a cell-specific and/or receptor-specific manner. The proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β is potent inducers of MUC5AC mRNA and protein synthesis in human airway epithelial cells. Cells activated by IL-1β showed increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol depletion on the expression of MUC5AC in human airway epithelial cells and whether these alterations to MUC5AC expression were related to MAPK activity. After NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with 1% MβCD before adding IL-1β for 24 hours, MUC5AC mRNA expression was determined by reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real time-PCR. Cholesterol depletion by MβCD was measured by modified microenzymatic fluorescence assay and filipin staining. The phosphorylation of IL-1 receptor, ERK and p38 MAPK, was analyzed by western blot. Cholesterol in the cell membrane was significantly depleted by treatment with MβCD on cells. IL-1β-induced MUC5AC mRNA expression was decreased by MβCD and this decrease occurred IL-1-receptor- specifically. Moreover, we have shown that MβCD suppressed the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in cells activated with IL-1β. This result suggests that MβCD-mediated suppression of IL-1β-induced MUC5AC mRNA operated via the ERK- and p38 MAPK-dependent pathway. Cholesterol depletion in NCI-H292 cell membrane may be considered an anti-hypersecretory method since it effectively inhibits mucus secretion of respiratory epithelial cells.

  13. THE EFFECTS OF COMBINATORIAL EXPOSURE OF PRO-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES ON AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RELEASE OF CHEMOTACTIC MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 15 million individuals nationally. Within the inflamed asthmatic airway there exist complex interactions between many cells and the cytokines they release, in particular mast cells, eosinophils, T-lymphocy...

  14. THE EFFECTS OF COMBINATORIAL EXPOSURE OF PRO-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES ON AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RELEASE OF CHEMOTACTIC MEDIATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways affecting nearly 15 million individuals nationally. Within the inflamed asthmatic airway there exist complex interactions between many cells and the cytokines they release, in particular mast cells, eosinophils, T-lymphocy...

  15. Pro-inflammatory role of natural killer cells in the development of allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C B; Guernsey, L A; Zammit, D; Brammer, C; Wu, C A; Thrall, R S; Aguila, H L

    2014-04-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells have been implicated in the development of allergic airway inflammation. However, the in vivo role of NK cells has not been firmly established due to the lack of animal models with selective deficiencies in NK cells. To determine the specific contribution of NK cells in a murine model of allergic airway disease (AAD). The role of NK cells in AAD was studied using NK-deficient (NKD) mice, perforin(-/-) mice, and mice depleted of Ly49A/D/G(+) NK cell subsets in an ovalbumin-induced model of allergic airway disease (OVA-AAD). Induction of OVA-AAD in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice resulted in the expansion of airway NK cells and the development of pronounced airway eosinophilia. In the absence of NK cells or specific subsets of NK cells, either in NKD mice, or after the depletion of Ly49A/D/G(+) NK cells, the development of OVA-AAD was significantly impaired as seen by decreased airway inflammation and eosinophilia, decreased secretion of the Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 and diminished OVA-specific antibody production. Furthermore, while OVA-exposure induced a dramatic expansion of dendritic cells (DCs) in WT mice, their induction was significantly attenuated in NKD mice. Development of OVA-AAD in perforin(-/-) mice suggested that the proinflammatory role of NK cells is not dependent on perforin-mediated cytotoxicity. Lastly, induction of allergic disease by OVA-specific CD4 T cells from WT but not NK-depleted or NKD mice in RAG(-/-) recipients, demonstrates that NK cells are essential for T cell priming. Our data demonstrate that conventional NK cells play an important and distinct role in the development of AAD. The presence of activated NK cells has been noted in patients with asthma. Understanding the mechanisms by which NK cells regulate allergic disease is therefore an important component of treatment approaches. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Store-operated Ca2+ channels in airway epithelial cell function and implications for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Krishna; Parekh, Anant B.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial cells of the lung are at the interface of a host and its environment and are therefore directly exposed to the inhaled air-borne particles. Rather than serving as a simple physical barrier, airway epithelia detect allergens and other irritants and then help organize the subsequent immune response through release of a plethora of secreted signals. Many of these signals are generated in response to opening of store-operated Ca2+ channels in the plasma membrane. In this review, we describe the properties of airway store-operated channels and their role in regulating airway epithelial cell function. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377718

  17. S-Nitrosoglutathione induces functional DeltaF508-CFTR in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Charlotte; Gaston, Benjamin; Roomans, Godfried M

    2002-09-27

    S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is an endogenous bronchodilator levels of which are reduced in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. GSNO has recently been shown to increase maturation of CFTR in CF cell lines at physiological concentrations. The ability of S-nitrosoglutathione to direct the DeltaF508-CFTR to the plasma membrane and restore the function of the cAMP-dependent chloride transport in cultured human airway epithelial cells has been studied. Immunocytochemistry showed a time- and dose-dependent increase of apically located CFTR after GSNO treatment. Chloride transport studies with the fluorescent dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide (MQAE) showed that GSNO was able to induce a fourfold increase of cAMP-dependent chloride transport. Our data and the fact that endogenous GSNO levels are lower in the airways of CF patients make GSNO an interesting candidate for pharmacological treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  18. Differential susceptibility of inbred mouse strains to chlorine-induced airway fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine is a reactive gas that is considered a chemical threat agent. Humans who develop acute lung injury from chlorine inhalation typically recover normal lung function; however, a subset can experience chronic airway disease. To examine pathological changes following chlorine-induced lung injury, mice were exposed to a single high dose of chlorine, and repair of the lung was analyzed at multiple times after exposure. In FVB/NJ mice, chlorine inhalation caused pronounced fibrosis of larger airways that developed by day 7 after exposure and was associated with airway hyperreactivity. In contrast, A/J mice had little or no airway fibrosis and had normal lung function at day 7. Unexposed FVB/NJ mice had less keratin 5 staining (basal cell marker) than A/J mice in large intrapulmonary airways where epithelial repair was poor and fibrosis developed after chlorine exposure. FVB/NJ mice had large areas devoid of epithelium on day 1 after exposure leading to fibroproliferative lesions on days 4 and 7. A/J mice had airways covered by squamous keratin 5-stained cells on day 1 that transitioned to a highly proliferative reparative epithelium by day 4 followed by the reappearance of ciliated and Clara cells by day 7. The data suggest that lack of basal cells in the large intrapulmonary airways and failure to effect epithelial repair at these sites are factors contributing to the development of airway fibrosis in FVB/NJ mice. The observed differences in susceptibility to chlorine-induced airway disease provide a model in which mechanisms and treatment of airway fibrosis can be investigated. PMID:23171502

  19. Staphylococcus aureus Infection Reduces Nutrition Uptake and Nucleotide Biosynthesis in a Human Airway Epithelial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Gierok, Philipp; Harms, Manuela; Methling, Karen; Hochgräfe, Falko; Lalk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Gram positive opportunistic human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus induces a variety of diseases including pneumonia. S. aureus is the second most isolated pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients and accounts for a large proportion of nosocomial pneumonia. Inside the lung, the human airway epithelium is the first line in defence with regard to microbial recognition and clearance as well as regulation of the immune response. The metabolic host response is, however, yet unknown. To address the question of whether the infection alters the metabolome and metabolic activity of airway epithelial cells, we used a metabolomics approach. The nutrition uptake by the human airway epithelial cell line A549 was monitored over time by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR) and the intracellular metabolic fingerprints were investigated by gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (GC-MS) and (HPLC-MS). To test the metabolic activity of the host cells, glutamine analogues and labelled precursors were applied after the infection. We found that A549 cells restrict uptake of essential nutrients from the medium after S. aureus infection. Moreover, the infection led to a shutdown of the purine and pyrimidine synthesis in the A549 host cell, whereas other metabolic routes such as the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway remained active. In summary, our data show that the infection with S. aureus negatively affects growth, alters the metabolic composition and specifically impacts the de novo nucleotide biosynthesis in this human airway epithelial cell model. PMID:27834866

  20. Analysis of Notch Signaling-Dependent Gene Expression in Developing Airways Reveals Diversity of Clara Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Arjun; Vasconcelos, Michelle; Zhao, Rui; Gower, Adam C.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Cardoso, Wellington V.

    2014-01-01

    Clara cells (CCs) are a morphologically and operationally heterogeneous population of Secretoglobin Scgb1a1-expressing secretory cells that are crucial for airway homeostasis and post-injury repair. Analysis of the extent and origin of CC diversity are limited by knowledge of genes expressed in these cells and their precursors. To identify novel putative markers of CCs and explore the origins of CC diversity, we characterized global changes in gene expression in embryonic lungs in which CCs do not form due to conditional disruption of Notch signaling (RbpjkCNULL). Microarray profiling, Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR), and RNA in situ hybridization (ISH) identified eleven genes downregulated in the E18.5 airways of Rbpjkcnull compared to controls, nearly half not previously known to mark CCs. ISH revealed that several genes had overlapping but distinct domains of expression of in the normal developing lung (E18.5). Notably, Reg3g, Chad, Gabrp and Lrrc26 were enriched in proximal airways, Hp in the distal airways and Upk3a in clusters of cells surrounding Neuroepithelial Bodies (NEBs). Seven of the eleven genes, including Reg3g, Hp, and Upk3a, were expressed in the adult lung in CCs in a pattern similar to that observed in the developing airways. qRT-PCR-based analysis of gene expression of CCs isolated from different airway regions of B1-EGFP reporter mice corroborated the spatial enrichment in gene expression observed by ISH. Our study identifies candidate markers for CC-precursors and CCs and supports the idea that the diversification of the CC phenotype occurs already during embryonic development. PMID:24586412

  1. Distal airway epithelial progenitor cells are radiosensitive to High-LET radiation

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Alicia M.; Konda, Bindu; Kirsch, David G.; Stripp, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation occurs in a variety of situations, including charged particle radiotherapy, radiological accidents, and space travel. However, the extent of normal tissue injury in the lungs following high-LET radiation exposure is unknown. Here we show that exposure to high-LET radiation led to a prolonged loss of in vitro colony forming ability by airway epithelial progenitor cells. Furthermore, exposure to high-LET radiation induced clonal expansion of a subset of progenitor cells in the distal airway epithelium. Clonal expansion following high-LET radiation exposure was correlated with elevated progenitor cell apoptosis, persistent γ-H2AX foci, and defects in mitotic progression of distal airway progenitors. We discovered that the effects of high-LET radiation exposure on progenitor cells occur in a p53-dependent manner. These data show that high-LET radiation depletes the distal airway progenitor pool by inducing cell death and loss of progenitor function, leading to clonal expansion. Importantly, high-LET radiation induces greater long-term damage to normal lung tissue than the relative equivalent dose of low-LET γ-rays, which has implications in therapeutic development and risk assessment. PMID:27659946

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Elshaw, Shona R; Henderson, Neil; Knox, Alan J; Watson, Susan A; Buttle, David J; Johnson, Simon R

    2004-01-01

    Airway remodelling is a feature of chronic asthma comprising smooth muscle hypertrophy and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) breakdown ECM, are involved in tissue remodelling and have been implicated in airway remodelling. Although mesenchymal cells are an important source of MMPs, little data are available on airway smooth muscle (ASM) derived MMPs. We therefore investigated MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) production and activity in human ASM cells.MMPs and TIMPs were examined using quantitative real-time RT–PCR, Western blotting, zymography and a quench fluorescence (QF) assay of total MMP activity.The most abundant MMPs were pro-MMP-2, pro- MMP-3, active MMP-3 and MT1-MMP. TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression was low in cell lysates but high in conditioned medium. High TIMP secretion was confirmed by the ability of ASM-conditioned medium to inhibit recombinant MMP-2 in a QF assay. Thrombin increased MMP activity by activation of pro-MMP-2 independent of the conventional smooth muscle thrombin receptors PAR 1 and 4.In conclusion, ASM cells express pro-MMP-2, pro and active MMP-3, MMP-9 and MT1-MMP. Unstimulated cells secrete excess TIMP 1 and 2, preventing proteolytic activity. MMP-2 can be activated by thrombin which may contribute to airway remodelling. PMID:15265805

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells Exposed to the Respiratory Toxicant Diacetyl.

    PubMed

    Foster, Matthew W; Gwinn, William M; Kelly, Francine L; Brass, David M; Valente, Ashlee M; Moseley, M Arthur; Thompson, J Will; Morgan, Daniel L; Palmer, Scott M

    2017-02-03

    Occupational exposures to the diketone flavoring agent, diacetyl, have been associated with bronchiolitis obliterans, a rare condition of airway fibrosis. Model studies in rodents have suggested that the airway epithelium is a major site of diacetyl toxicity, but the effects of diacetyl exposure upon the human airway epithelium are poorly characterized. Here we performed quantitative LC-MS/MS-based proteomics to study the effects of repeated diacetyl vapor exposures on 3D organotypic cultures of human primary tracheobronchial epithelial cells. Using a label-free approach, we quantified approximately 3400 proteins and 5700 phosphopeptides in cell lysates across four independent donors. Altered expression of proteins and phosphopeptides were suggestive of loss of cilia and increased squamous differentiation in diacetyl-exposed cells. These phenomena were confirmed by immunofluorescence staining of culture cross sections. Hyperphosphorylation and cross-linking of basal cell keratins were also observed in diacetyl-treated cells, and we used parallel reaction monitoring to confidently localize and quantify previously uncharacterized sites of phosphorylation in keratin 6. Collectively, these data identify numerous molecular changes in the epithelium that may be important to the pathogenesis of flavoring-induced bronchiolitis obliterans. More generally, this study highlights the utility of quantitative proteomics for the study of in vitro models of airway injury and disease.

  4. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-09-24

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  5. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs. PMID:21943186

  6. EVIDENCE FOR A CRYPTOMONAD SYMBIONT IN THE CILIATE, CYCLOTRICHIUM MEUNIERI(1).

    PubMed

    Barber, R T; White, A W; Siegelman, H W

    1969-03-01

    Extracts of the marine ciliate Cyclotrichium meunieri contained chlorophylls a and c, carotenoids, and a phycoerythrin with a single absorbance maximum at 542 nm. This assemblage of pigments suggests that the numerous photosynthetic symbionts present in each ciliate cell belong to the Cryptophyceae.

  7. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  8. Airway cooling and mucosal injury during cold weather exercise.

    PubMed

    Davis, M S; Lockard, A J; Marlin, D J; Freed, A N

    2002-09-01

    In human subjects that exercise strenuously in cold weather, there is evidence that hyperventilation with cold air leads to peripheral airway cooling, desiccation and mucosal injury. Our hypothesis was that hyperventilation with cold air can result in penetration of unconditioned air (air that is not completely warmed and humidified) into the peripheral airways of exercising horses, resulting in peripheral airway mucosal injury. To test this hypothesis, a thermister-tipped catheter was inserted through the midcervical trachea and advanced into a sublobar bronchus in three horses that cantered on a treadmill at 6.6 m/s while breathing cold (5 degrees C) air. The mean (+/- s.e.) intra-airway temperature during cantering was 33.3 +/- 0.4 degrees C, a value comparable to the bronchial lumen temperatures measured in man during maximal exercise while breathing subfreezing dry air. In a second experiment, 6 fit Thoroughbred racehorses with satisfactory performance were used to determine whether strenuous exercise in cold conditions can produce airway injury. Horses were assigned to Exercise (E) or Control (C) groups in a random crossover design. Samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the E treatment were recovered within 30 min of galloping exercise in 4 degrees C, 100% relative humidity (E), while in C BALF samples were obtained when the horses had not performed any exercise for at least 48 h prior. Ciliated epithelial cells in BALF were higher in E than in the C treatment. Similar results have been found in human athletes and laboratory animal models of cold weather exercise. These results support the hypothesis that, similar to man, horses that exercise in cold weather experience peripheral airway mucosal injury due to the penetration of unconditioned air. Furthermore, these results suggest that airway cooling and desiccation may be a factor in airway inflammation commonly found in equine athletes.

  9. Differentiated transplant derived airway epithelial cell cytokine secretion is not regulated by cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While lung transplantation is an increasingly utilized therapy for advanced lung diseases, chronic rejection in the form of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS) continues to result in significant allograft dysfunction and patient mortality. Despite correlation of clinical events with eventual development of BOS, the causative pathophysiology remains unknown. Airway epithelial cells within the region of inflammation and fibrosis associated with BOS may have a participatory role. Methods Transplant derived airway epithelial cells differentiated in air liquid interface culture were treated with IL-1β and/or cyclosporine, after which secretion of cytokines and growth factor and gene expression for markers of epithelial to mesenchymal transition were analyzed. Results Secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, but not TGF-β1, was increased by IL-1β stimulation. In contrast to previous studies using epithelial cells grown in submersion culture, treatment of differentiated cells in ALI culture with cyclosporine did not elicit cytokine or growth factor secretion, and did not alter IL-6, IL-8, or TNF-α production in response to IL-1β treatment. Neither IL-1β nor cyclosporine elicited expression of markers of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition E-cadherin, EDN-fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin. Conclusion Transplant derived differentiated airway epithelial cell IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α secretion is not regulated by cyclosporine in vitro; these cells thus may participate in local inflammatory responses in the setting of immunosuppression. Further, treatment with IL-1β did not elicit gene expression of markers of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. These data present a model of differentiated airway epithelial cells that may be useful in understanding epithelial participation in airway inflammation and allograft rejection in lung transplantation. PMID:21477368

  10. Klotho expression is reduced in COPD airway epithelial cells: effects on inflammation and oxidant injury.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Jingying; Li, Lingling; Yu, Like; Wiegman, Coen H; Barnes, Peter J; Adcock, Ian M; Huang, Mao; Yao, Xin

    2015-12-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is associated with sustained inflammation, excessive injury, and accelerated lung aging. Human Klotho (KL) is an anti-aging protein that protects cells against inflammation and damage. In the present study, we quantified KL expression in the lungs of COPD patients and in an ozone-induced mouse model of COPD, and investigated the mechanisms that control KL expression and function in the airways. KL distribution and levels in human and mouse airways were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The effect of CSE (cigarette smoke extract) on KL expression was detected in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, the effect of KL on CSE-mediated inflammation and hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular injury/apoptosis was determined using siRNAs. KL expression was decreased in the lungs of smokers and further reduced in patients with COPD. Similarly, 6 weeks of exposure to ozone decreased KL levels in airway epithelial cells. CSE and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α) decreased KL expression and release from airway epithelial cells, which was associated with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Moreover, KL depletion increased cell sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and oxidative stress-induced cell damage. These effects involved the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) pathways. Reduced KL expression in COPD airway epithelial cells was associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms associated with the accelerated lung aging in COPD development.

  11. Klotho expression is reduced in COPD airway epithelial cells: effects on inflammation and oxidant injury

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Jingying; Li, Lingling; Yu, Like; Wiegman, Coen H.; Barnes, Peter J.; Adcock, Ian M.; Huang, Mao

    2015-01-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is associated with sustained inflammation, excessive injury, and accelerated lung aging. Human Klotho (KL) is an anti-aging protein that protects cells against inflammation and damage. In the present study, we quantified KL expression in the lungs of COPD patients and in an ozone-induced mouse model of COPD, and investigated the mechanisms that control KL expression and function in the airways. KL distribution and levels in human and mouse airways were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The effect of CSE (cigarette smoke extract) on KL expression was detected in human bronchial epithelial cells. Moreover, the effect of KL on CSE-mediated inflammation and hydrogen peroxide-induced cellular injury/apoptosis was determined using siRNAs. KL expression was decreased in the lungs of smokers and further reduced in patients with COPD. Similarly, 6 weeks of exposure to ozone decreased KL levels in airway epithelial cells. CSE and TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α) decreased KL expression and release from airway epithelial cells, which was associated with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Moreover, KL depletion increased cell sensitivity to cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and oxidative stress-induced cell damage. These effects involved the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2) pathways. Reduced KL expression in COPD airway epithelial cells was associated with increased oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms associated with the accelerated lung aging in COPD development. PMID:26201096

  12. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions. PMID:27886077

  13. Magnetofection Enhances Lentiviral-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Cells through Extracellular and Cellular Barriers.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Stefano; Orlando, Clara; Carbone, Annalucia; Di Gioia, Sante; Conese, Massimo

    2016-11-23

    Gene transfer to airway epithelial cells is hampered by extracellular (mainly mucus) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers. Magnetofection has been used to increase retention time of lentiviral vectors (LV) on the cellular surface. In this study, magnetofection was investigated in airway epithelial cell models mimicking extracellular and cellular barriers. Bronchiolar epithelial cells (H441 line) were evaluated for LV-mediated transduction after polarization onto filters and dexamethasone (dex) treatment, which induced hemicyst formation, with or without magnetofection. Sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients was overlaid onto cells, and LV-mediated transduction was evaluated in the absence or presence of magnetofection. Magnetofection of unpolarized H441 cells increased the transduction with 50 MOI (multiplicity of infection, i.e., transducing units/cell) up to the transduction obtained with 500 MOI in the absence of magnetofection. Magnetofection well-enhanced LV-mediated transduction in mucus-layered cells by 20.3-fold. LV-mediated transduction efficiency decreased in dex-induced hemicysts in a time-dependent fashion. In dome-forming cells, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization at the cell borders was increased by dex treatment. Under these experimental conditions, magnetofection significantly increased LV transduction by 5.3-fold. In conclusion, these results show that magnetofection can enhance LV-mediated gene transfer into airway epithelial cells in the presence of extracellular (sputum) and cellular (tight junctions) barriers, representing CF-like conditions.

  14. TLR-2 IS INVOLVED IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONE TO AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary cultures of normal human airway epithelial cells (NHBE) respond to ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) by increased production of the cytokine IL-8, and the induction of a number of oxidant stress response genes. Components of ambient air PM responsible for stim...

  15. SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES
    Y.M. Kim, A.G. Lenz, R. Silbajoris, I. Jaspers and J.M. Samet. Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, ...

  16. SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES
    Y.M. Kim, A.G. Lenz, R. Silbajoris, I. Jaspers and J.M. Samet. Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, ...

  17. CULTURE CONDITIONS AFFECT HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO DIESEL PARTICLE EXPOSURE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a ubiquitous ambient air contaminant that may contribute to the health effects of particulate matter inhalation. In vitro studies have shown that DEP exposure induces pro-inflammatory proteins in human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) with varying...

  18. TLR-2 IS INVOLVED IN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONE TO AIR POLLUTION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary cultures of normal human airway epithelial cells (NHBE) respond to ambient air pollution particulate matter (PM) by increased production of the cytokine IL-8, and the induction of a number of oxidant stress response genes. Components of ambient air PM responsible for stim...

  19. CULTURE CONDITIONS AFFECT HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELL RESPONSE TO DIESEL PARTICLE EXPOSURE IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a ubiquitous ambient air contaminant that may contribute to the health effects of particulate matter inhalation. In vitro studies have shown that DEP exposure induces pro-inflammatory proteins in human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) with varying...

  20. Beta-adrenergic agonists inhibit corticosteroid-induced apoptosis of airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tse, Roberta; Marroquin, Bertha A; Dorscheid, Delbert R; White, Steven R

    2003-08-01

    Airway epithelial damage is a feature of persistent asthma. Treatment with inhaled and oral corticosteroids may suppress inflammation and gain clinical control despite continued epithelial damage. We have previously demonstrated that corticosteroids elicit apoptosis of airway epithelial cells in culture. beta-Adrenergic receptor agonists are commonly used in asthma therapy and can inhibit corticosteroid-induced apoptosis of eosinophils. We tested the hypothesis that beta-adrenergic agonists would inhibit corticosteroid-induced airway epithelial cell apoptosis in cultured primary airway epithelial cells and in the cell line 1HAEo-. Albuterol treatment inhibited dexamethasone-induced apoptosis completely but did not inhibit apoptosis induced by Fas receptor activation. The protective effect of albuterol was duplicated by two different analogs of protein kinase A. The protective effect was not associated with increased translocation of the glucocorticoid receptor to the nucleus nor with changes in glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcriptional activation or repression. We demonstrate that beta-adrenergic agonists can inhibit corticosteroid-induced apoptosis but not apoptosis induced by Fas activation. These data suggest that one potential deleterious effect of corticosteroid therapy in asthma can be prevented by concomitant beta-adrenergic agonist treatment.

  1. SEASONAL EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) ON HUMAN PRIMARY AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SEASONAL EFFECTS OF ULTRAFINE, FINE, AND COARSE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) ON HUMAN PRIMARY AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Exposure of humans to PM results in increased mortality and morbidity. Recent toxicology studies have shown a number of pathophysiological pulmonary and car...

  2. THE EFFECT OF SIZE FRACTIONED PARTICULATE MATTER ON HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE EFFECT OF SIZE FRACTIONATED PARTICULATE MATTER ON HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS IN VITRO. LA Dailey1, C Sioutas2, JM Soukup1, S Becker1, RB Devlin1. 1National Health & Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, USEPA, RTP, NC,USA; 2USC, Civil & Environmental Engineering, LA, ...

  3. Continuous mucociliary transport by primary human airway epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Patrick R.; Yin, Wei-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC) is an important innate defense mechanism that continuously removes inhaled pathogens and particulates from the airways. Normal MCC is essential for maintaining a healthy respiratory system, and impaired MCC is a feature of many airway diseases, including both genetic (cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia) and acquired (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis) disorders. Research into the fundamental processes controlling MCC, therefore, has direct clinical application, but has been limited in part due to the difficulty of studying this complex multicomponent system in vitro. In this study, we have characterized a novel method that allows human airway epithelial cells to differentiate into a mucociliary epithelium that transports mucus in a continuous circular track. The mucociliary transport device allows the measurement and manipulation of all features of mucociliary transport in a controlled in vitro system. In this initial study, the effect of ciliary beat frequency and mucus concentration on the speed of mucociliary transport was investigated. PMID:25979076

  4. α-Galactosylceramide-induced airway eosinophilia is mediated through the activation of NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ya-Hui; Wang, Tzu-Chun; Jen, Hsiao-Yu; Yu, Alice L; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2011-04-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells bridge innate and adaptive immune responses, resulting in the expansion of Ag-specific B and T cell responses. α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), the most studied glycolipid that activates iNKT cells, has been proposed to be an effective adjuvant against infections and tumors. We found that the activation of iNKT cells by intranasal injection of α-GalCer induced airway eosinophilia in naive mice. Eosinophils, which mediate tissue damage and dysfunction by secreting mediators, play important roles in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how eosinophils are recruited to the lung by α-GalCer. Our results demonstrated that α-GalCer-induced eosinophil inflammation was mediated through iNKT cells. These cells secreted IL-5 to recruit eosinophils directly to the lung and/or secreted IL-4 and IL-13 to recruit eosinophils indirectly by inducing lung epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblast to secrete the eosinophil chemoattractant eotaxin. In addition, in the OVA-alum murine model of allergic asthma, α-GalCer administration in OVA-immunized mice also increased airway eosinophilia after challenge. Given our findings, intranasal administration of α-GalCer induced airway eosinophilic inflammation in both naive and allergic mice. Hence, it remains to be determined whether the activation of iNKT cells would be applicable in therapeutics for human diseases.

  5. Airway basal cells of healthy smokers express an embryonic stem cell signature relevant to lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Wang, Rui; Zwick, Rachel K; Hackett, Neil R; Leung, Roland; Moore, Malcolm A S; Sima, Camelia S; Chao, Ion Wa; Downey, Robert J; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Salit, Jacqueline; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-09-01

    Activation of the human embryonic stem cell (hESC) signature genes has been observed in various epithelial cancers. In this study, we found that the hESC signature is selectively induced in the airway basal stem/progenitor cell population of healthy smokers (BC-S), with a pattern similar to that activated in all major types of human lung cancer. We further identified a subset of 6 BC-S hESC genes, whose coherent overexpression in lung adenocarcinoma (AdCa) was associated with reduced lung function, poorer differentiation grade, more advanced tumor stage, remarkably shorter survival, and higher frequency of TP53 mutations. BC-S shared with hESC and a considerable subset of lung carcinomas a common TP53 inactivation molecular pattern which strongly correlated with the BC-S hESC gene expression. These data provide transcriptome-based evidence that smoking-induced reprogramming of airway BC toward the hESC-like phenotype might represent a common early molecular event in the development of aggressive lung carcinomas in humans.

  6. Phylogeny of Intestinal Ciliates, Including Charonina ventriculi, and Comparison of Microscopy and 18S rRNA Gene Pyrosequencing for Rumen Ciliate Community Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Devente, Savannah R.; Kirk, Michelle R.; Seedorf, Henning; Dehority, Burk A.

    2015-01-01

    The development of high-throughput methods, such as the construction of 18S rRNA gene clone or pyrosequencing libraries, has allowed evaluation of ciliate community composition in hundreds of samples from the rumen and other intestinal habitats. However, several genera of mammalian intestinal ciliates have been described based only on morphological features and, to date, have not been identified using molecular methods. Here, we isolated single cells of one of the smallest but widely distributed intestinal ciliates, Charonina ventriculi, and sequenced its 18S rRNA gene. We verified the sequence in a full-cycle rRNA approach using fluorescence in situ hybridization and thereby assigned an 18S rRNA gene sequence to this species previously known only by its morphology. Based on its full-length 18S rRNA gene sequence, Charonina ventriculi was positioned within the phylogeny of intestinal ciliates in the subclass Trichostomatia. The taxonomic framework derived from this phylogeny was used for taxonomic assignment of trichostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequence data stemming from high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing of rumen-derived DNA samples. The 18S rRNA gene-based ciliate community structure was compared to that obtained from microscopic counts using the same samples. Both methods allowed identification of dominant members of the ciliate communities and classification of the rumen ciliate community into one of the types first described by Eadie in 1962. Notably, each method is associated with advantages and disadvantages. Microscopy is a highly accurate method for evaluation of total numbers or relative abundances of different ciliate genera in a sample, while 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing represents a valuable alternative for comparison of ciliate community structure in a large number of samples from different animals or treatment groups. PMID:25616800

  7. Phylogeny of intestinal ciliates, including Charonina ventriculi, and comparison of microscopy and 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing for rumen ciliate community structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Devente, Savannah R; Kirk, Michelle R; Seedorf, Henning; Dehority, Burk A; Janssen, Peter H

    2015-04-01

    The development of high-throughput methods, such as the construction of 18S rRNA gene clone or pyrosequencing libraries, has allowed evaluation of ciliate community composition in hundreds of samples from the rumen and other intestinal habitats. However, several genera of mammalian intestinal ciliates have been described based only on morphological features and, to date, have not been identified using molecular methods. Here, we isolated single cells of one of the smallest but widely distributed intestinal ciliates, Charonina ventriculi, and sequenced its 18S rRNA gene. We verified the sequence in a full-cycle rRNA approach using fluorescence in situ hybridization and thereby assigned an 18S rRNA gene sequence to this species previously known only by its morphology. Based on its full-length 18S rRNA gene sequence, Charonina ventriculi was positioned within the phylogeny of intestinal ciliates in the subclass Trichostomatia. The taxonomic framework derived from this phylogeny was used for taxonomic assignment of trichostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequence data stemming from high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing of rumen-derived DNA samples. The 18S rRNA gene-based ciliate community structure was compared to that obtained from microscopic counts using the same samples. Both methods allowed identification of dominant members of the ciliate communities and classification of the rumen ciliate community into one of the types first described by Eadie in 1962. Notably, each method is associated with advantages and disadvantages. Microscopy is a highly accurate method for evaluation of total numbers or relative abundances of different ciliate genera in a sample, while 18S rRNA gene pyrosequencing represents a valuable alternative for comparison of ciliate community structure in a large number of samples from different animals or treatment groups. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Intratracheal therapy with autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells reduces airway inflammation in horses with recurrent airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Barussi, Fernanda C M; Bastos, Fernanda Z; Leite, Lidiane M B; Fragoso, Felipe Y I; Senegaglia, Alexandra C; Brofman, Paulo R S; Nishiyama, Anita; Pimpão, Cláudia T; Michelotto, Pedro V

    2016-10-01

    This research evaluated the effects of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMCs) on the inflammatory process in the equine recurrent airway obstruction (RAO). Eight horses in RAO clinical score were divided into cell therapy group (Gcel) treated with a single intratracheal dose of BMMCs, and dexamethasone group (Gdex) treated with 21days of oral dexamethasone. The horses were clinically revaluated on days 7 and 21, together with cytological evaluation of the BALF, and detection of inflammatory markers (interleukins [IL]-10, -4, and -17, and interferon γ and α). There were decreases in respiratory effort and clinical score on days 7 and 21(p<0.05) for both groups. The percentage of neutrophils decreased and macrophages increased on days 7 and 21 (p<0.005) in both groups. IL-10 levels increased in the Gcel group on day 21 compared to days 0 and 7 (p<0.05), but this was not observed in the Gdex group. The quantification of IL-4, IL-17, IFN-γ, and IFN-α did not change between evaluations in both groups. These preliminary results suggest that BMMCs may ameliorate the inflammatory response of RAO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antimitogenic effect of bitter taste receptor agonists on airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Panebra, Alfredo; Pera, Tonio; Tiegs, Brian C; Hershfeld, Alena; Kenyon, Lawrence C; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2016-02-15

    Airway remodeling is a hallmark feature of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical studies and animal models have demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and ASM thickness is correlated with severity of the disease. Current medications control inflammation and reverse airway obstruction effectively but have limited effect on remodeling. Recently we identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2R) on ASM cells, and activation with known TAS2R agonists resulted in ASM relaxation and bronchodilation. These studies suggest that TAS2R can be used as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. To further establish their effectiveness, in this study we aimed to determine the effects of TAS2R agonists on ASM growth and promitogenic signaling. Pretreatment of healthy and asthmatic human ASM cells with TAS2R agonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of ASM proliferation. The antimitogenic effect of TAS2R ligands was not dependent on activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or high/intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels. Immunoblot analyses revealed that TAS2R agonists inhibit growth factor-activated protein kinase B phosphorylation without affecting the availability of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, suggesting TAS2R agonists block signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists involved inhibition of induced transcription factors (activator protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, E2 factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells) and inhibition of expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes, suggesting a direct inhibition of cell cycle progression. Collectively, these findings establish the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and signaling pathways that can be targeted to reduce or prevent airway remodeling as well as

  10. Antimitogenic effect of bitter taste receptor agonists on airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Panebra, Alfredo; Pera, Tonio; Tiegs, Brian C.; Hershfeld, Alena; Kenyon, Lawrence C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a hallmark feature of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical studies and animal models have demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and ASM thickness is correlated with severity of the disease. Current medications control inflammation and reverse airway obstruction effectively but have limited effect on remodeling. Recently we identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2R) on ASM cells, and activation with known TAS2R agonists resulted in ASM relaxation and bronchodilation. These studies suggest that TAS2R can be used as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. To further establish their effectiveness, in this study we aimed to determine the effects of TAS2R agonists on ASM growth and promitogenic signaling. Pretreatment of healthy and asthmatic human ASM cells with TAS2R agonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of ASM proliferation. The antimitogenic effect of TAS2R ligands was not dependent on activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or high/intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K+ channels. Immunoblot analyses revealed that TAS2R agonists inhibit growth factor-activated protein kinase B phosphorylation without affecting the availability of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, suggesting TAS2R agonists block signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists involved inhibition of induced transcription factors (activator protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, E2 factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells) and inhibition of expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes, suggesting a direct inhibition of cell cycle progression. Collectively, these findings establish the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and signaling pathways that can be targeted to reduce or prevent airway remodeling as well as

  11. Pycnogenol Ameliorates Asthmatic Airway Inflammation and Inhibits the Function of Goblet Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoe; Han, Bo; Chen, Xing; Wu, Qiaoling; Wang, Lijun; Li, Gang

    2016-11-01

    Pycnogenol(®) (PYC) is utilized in the treatment of various diseases ranging from chronic inflammation to circulatory diseases, but its efficacy and functional mechanism in pediatric asthma continue to remain obscure. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and molecular mechanism of PYC on regulation of asthmatic airway inflammation. We found that PYC with tail intravenous injection of 50 mg/kg or intragastric administration of 100 mg/kg all reduced ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway injury. Pharmacokinetics of PYC was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography assay, indicating that PYC was quickly absorbed into the blood after intragastric administration, and PYC metabolism was later improved gradually with increase of time after PYC administration. PYC has a higher bioavailability of 71.96%, and it was more easily absorbed by the body. PYC inhibited the number of total inflammatory cells and levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-9, and IL-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of OVA-induced mice. PYC inhibited IL-13 secretion from the Th2 cells, thereby causing a reduction in expression of the signaling molecules in JAK/STAT6 pathway in airway epithelial cells. STAT6 silence suppressed IL-13-increased acetylcholine level. STAT6 overexpression promoted expression of goblet cell metaplasia-associated molecules (FOXA3, SPDEF, and Muc5ac). PYC suppressed OVA-induced expression of FOXA3, SPDEF, and Muc5ac in lung. Our findings indicate that PYC has a higher bioavailability and it prevents emergence of OVA-induced airway injury and airway inflammation in mice by inhibiting IL-13/JAK/STAT6 pathway and blocking release of acetylcholine to reduce goblet cell metaplasia.

  12. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D; Pabelick, Christine M; Prakash, Y S; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C

    2015-12-01

    Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0-20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases.

  13. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D.; Pabelick, Christine M.; Prakash, Y.S.; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Methods Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0–20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. Results CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Conclusion Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases. PMID:26331770

  14. Arsenic upregulates MMP-9 and inhibits wound repair in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Colin E; Liguori, Andrew E; Zong, Yue; Lantz, R Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L; Boitano, Scott

    2008-08-01

    As part of the innate immune defense, the polarized conducting lung epithelium acts as a barrier to keep particulates carried in respiration from underlying tissue. Arsenic is a metalloid toxicant that can affect the lung via inhalation or ingestion. We have recently shown that chronic exposure of mice or humans to arsenic (10-50 ppb) in drinking water alters bronchiolar lavage or sputum proteins consistent with reduced epithelial cell migration and wound repair in the airway. In this report, we used an in vitro model to examine effects of acute exposure of arsenic (15-290 ppb) on conducting airway lung epithelium. We found that arsenic at concentrations as low as 30 ppb inhibits reformation of the epithelial monolayer following scrape wounds of monolayer cultures. In an effort to understand functional contributions to epithelial wound repair altered by arsenic, we showed that acute arsenic exposure increases activity and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, an important protease in lung function. Furthermore, inhibition of MMP-9 in arsenic-treated cells improved wound repair. We propose that arsenic in the airway can alter the airway epithelial barrier by restricting proper wound repair in part through the upregulation of MMP-9 by lung epithelial cells.

  15. Ca2+ signaling in airway epithelial cells facilitates leukocyte recruitment and transepithelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Jarin; Prince, Alice

    2009-01-01

    In airway cells, TLR2 stimulation by bacterial products activates Ca2+ fluxes that signal leukocyte recruitment to the lung and facilitates transepithelial migration into the airway lumen. TLR2 is apically displayed on airway cells, where it senses bacterial stimuli. Biochemical and genetic approaches demonstrate that TLR2 ligands stimulate release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores by activating TLR2 phosphorylation by c-Src and recruiting PI3K and PLCγ to affect Ca2+ release through IP3Rs. This Ca2+ release plays a pivotal role in signaling TLR2-dependent NF-κB activation and chemokine expression to recruit PMNs to the lung. In addition, TLR2-initiated Ca2+ release activates Ca2+-dependent proteases, calpains, which cleave the transmembrane proteins occludin and E-cadherin to promote PMN transmigration. This review highlights recent findings that demonstrate a central role for Ca2+ signaling in airway epithelial cells to induce proinflammatory gene transcription and to initiate junctional changes that accommodate transmigration of recruited PMNs. PMID:19605699

  16. ω-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids accelerate airway repair by activating FFA4 in club cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung-Pil; Park, Soo-Jin; Kang, Saeromi; Koh, Jung-Min; Sato, Koichi; Chung, Hae-Young; Okajima, Fumikazu; Im, Dong-Soon

    2017-06-01

    A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) named free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4, also known as GPR120) was found to act as a GPCR for ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Its expression has been reported in lung epithelial club cells. We investigated whether supplementation of the ω-3 fatty acids benefits lung health. Omacor (7.75 mg/kg), clinically prescribed preparation of ω-3 fatty acids, and FFA4-knockout mice were utilized in a naphthalene-induced mouse model of acute airway injury (1 injection of 30 mg/kg ip). Naphthalene injection induced complete destruction of bronchiolar epithelial cells within a day. Appearance of bronchiolar epithelial cells was observed after 21 days in control mice. It was found, however, that supplementation of Omacor accelerated the recovery. The appearance of bronchiolar epithelial cells was observed between 7 and 14 days after naphthalene injury in Omacor-treated mice. In isolated club cells, ω-3 fatty acids were found to stimulate cell proliferation and migration but to inhibit cell differentiation. With the use of pharmacological tools and FFA4-knockout mice, FFA4 was found to be responsible for ω-3 fatty acids-induced proliferation in vitro in club cells. Furthermore, accelerated recovery from naphthalene-induced airway injury in Omacor-treated mice was not observed in FFA4-knockout mice in vivo. Present findings indicate that ω-3 fatty acids-induced proliferation of bronchiole epithelial cells through FFA4 is responsible for Omacor-induced accelerated recovery from airway injury. Therefore, intermittent administration of Omacor needs to be tested for acute airway injury because ω-3 fatty acids stimulate proliferation but inhibit differentiation of club cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. SERCA2 Regulates Non-CF and CF Airway Epithelial Cell Response to Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shama; Nichols, David P.; Strand, Matthew; Rancourt, Raymond C.; Randell, Scott H.; White, Carl W.; Ahmad, Aftab

    2011-01-01

    Calcium mobilization can regulate a wide range of essential functions of respiratory epithelium, including ion transport, ciliary beat frequency, and secretion of mucus, all of which are modified in cystic fibrosis (CF). SERCA2, an important controller of calcium signaling, is deficient in CF epithelium. We conducted this study to determine whether SERCA2 deficiency can modulate airway epithelial responses to environmental oxidants such as ozone. This could contribute to the pathogenesis of pulmonary exacerbations, which are important and frequent clinical events in CF. To address this, we used air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures of non-CF and CF cell lines, as well as differentiated cultures of cells derived from non-CF and CF patients. We found that ozone exposure caused enhanced membrane damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic cell death in CF airway epithelial cell lines relative to non-CF. Ozone exposure caused increased proinflammatory cytokine production in CF airway epithelial cell lines. Elevated proinflammatory cytokine production also was observed in shRNA-mediated SERCA2 knockdown cells. Overexpression of SERCA2 reversed ozone-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Ozone-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was NF-κB- dependent. In a stable NF-κB reporter cell line, SERCA2 inhibition and knockdown both upregulated cytomix-induced NF-κB activity, indicating importance of SERCA2 in modulating NF-κB activity. In this system, increased NF-κB activity was also accompanied by increased IL-8 production. Ozone also induced NF-κB activity and IL-8 release, an effect that was greater in SERCA2-silenced NF-κB-reporter cells. SERCA2 overexpression reversed cytomix-induced increased IL-8 release and total nuclear p65 in CFTR-deficient (16HBE-AS) cells. These studies suggest that SERCA2 is an important regulator of the proinflammatory response of airway epithelial cells and could be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:22096575

  18. Near Equilibrium Calculus of Stem Cells in Application to the Airway Epithelium Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zheng; Plikus, Maksim V.; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic maintenance of tissues is orchestrated by well tuned networks of cellular signaling. Such networks regulate, in a stochastic manner, fates of all cells within the respective lineages. Processes such as symmetric and asymmetric divisions, differentiation, de-differentiation, and death have to be controlled in a dynamic fashion, such that the cell population is maintained at a stable equilibrium, has a sufficiently low level of stochastic variation, and is capable of responding efficiently to external damage. Cellular lineages in real tissues may consist of a number of different cell types, connected by hierarchical relationships, albeit not necessarily linear, and engaged in a number of different processes. Here we develop a general mathematical methodology for near equilibrium studies of arbitrarily complex hierarchical cell populations, under regulation by a control network. This methodology allows us to (1) determine stability properties of the network, (2) calculate the stochastic variance, and (3) predict how different control mechanisms affect stability and robustness of the system. We demonstrate the versatility of this tool by using the example of the airway epithelium lineage. Recent research shows that airway epithelium stem cells divide mostly asymmetrically, while the so-called secretory cells divide predominantly symmetrically. It further provides quantitative data on the recovery dynamics of the airway epithelium, which can include secretory cell de-differentiation. Using our new methodology, we demonstrate that while a number of regulatory networks can be compatible with the observed recovery behavior, the observed division patterns of cells are the most optimal from the viewpoint of homeostatic lineage stability and minimizing the variation of the cell population size. This not only explains the observed yet poorly understood features of airway tissue architecture, but also helps to deduce the information on the still largely hypothetical

  19. Adhesion of Streptococcus pneumoniae to human airway epithelial cells exposed to urban particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Naseem; Ezzati, Majid; Hall, Lucinda; Dickson, Iain; Kirwan, Michael; Png, Ken M Y; Mudway, Ian S; Grigg, Jonathan

    2011-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies report an association between pneumonia and urban particulate matter (PM) less than 10 microns (μm) in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10)). Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. To date, the mechanism whereby urban PM enhances vulnerability to S pneumoniae infection is unclear. Adhesion of S pneumoniae to host cells is a prerequisite for infection. Host-expressed proteins, including the receptor for platelet-activating factor (PAFR), are co-opted by S pneumoniae to adhere to lower airway epithelial cells. To define whether inhalable urban PM enhances the adhesion of S pneumoniae to airway epithelial cells. A549 cells were cultured with PM(10) from Leicester (United Kingdom [UK]) and PM(10) and PM less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)) from Accra (Ghana), then infected with S pneumoniae strain D39. Pneumococcal adhesion to human primary bronchial epithelial cells was also assessed. Bacterial adhesion was determined by quantitative culture and confocal microscopy. The role of oxidative stress was assessed by N-acetyl cysteine, and the role of PAFR was assessed by mRNA transcript level, receptor expression, and receptor blocking. PM(10) (UK) increased S pneumoniae adhesion to both A549 airway epithelial cells and human primary bronchial epithelial cells. PM(10) (Ghana) and PM(2.5) (Ghana) also increased adhesion. Culture of A549 cells by PM(10) (UK) increased PAFR mRNA transcript level and PAFR expression. PM(10) (UK)-stimulated adhesion to A549 cells was attenuated by a PAFR blocker and N-acetyl cysteine. Urban PM increases adhesion of S pneumoniae to human airway epithelial cells. PM-stimulated adhesion is mediated by oxidative stress and PAFR. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Near Equilibrium Calculus of Stem Cells in Application to the Airway Epithelium Lineage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Plikus, Maksim V; Komarova, Natalia L

    2016-07-01

    Homeostatic maintenance of tissues is orchestrated by well tuned networks of cellular signaling. Such networks regulate, in a stochastic manner, fates of all cells within the respective lineages. Processes such as symmetric and asymmetric divisions, differentiation, de-differentiation, and death have to be controlled in a dynamic fashion, such that the cell population is maintained at a stable equilibrium, has a sufficiently low level of stochastic variation, and is capable of responding efficiently to external damage. Cellular lineages in real tissues may consist of a number of different cell types, connected by hierarchical relationships, albeit not necessarily linear, and engaged in a number of different processes. Here we develop a general mathematical methodology for near equilibrium studies of arbitrarily complex hierarchical cell populations, under regulation by a control network. This methodology allows us to (1) determine stability properties of the network, (2) calculate the stochastic variance, and (3) predict how different control mechanisms affect stability and robustness of the system. We demonstrate the versatility of this tool by using the example of the airway epithelium lineage. Recent research shows that airway epithelium stem cells divide mostly asymmetrically, while the so-called secretory cells divide predominantly symmetrically. It further provides quantitative data on the recovery dynamics of the airway epithelium, which can include secretory cell de-differentiation. Using our new methodology, we demonstrate that while a number of regulatory networks can be compatible with the observed recovery behavior, the observed division patterns of cells are the most optimal from the viewpoint of homeostatic lineage stability and minimizing the variation of the cell population size. This not only explains the observed yet poorly understood features of airway tissue architecture, but also helps to deduce the information on the still largely hypothetical

  1. Cigarette smoke induces genetic instability in airway epithelial cells by suppressing FANCD2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hays, L E; Zodrow, D M; Yates, J E; Deffebach, M E; Jacoby, D B; Olson, S B; Pankow, J F; Bagby, G C

    2008-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are commonly found in bronchogenic carcinoma cells, but the molecular causes of chromosomal instability (CIN) and their relationship to cigarette smoke has not been defined. Because the Fanconi anaemia (FA)/BRCA pathway is essential for maintenance of chromosomal stability, we tested the hypothesis that cigarette smoke suppresses that activity of this pathway. Here, we show that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) inhibited translation of FANCD2 mRNA (but not FANCC or FANCG) in normal airway epithelial cells and that this suppression of FANCD2 expression was sufficient to induce both genetic instability and programmed cell death in the exposed cell population. Cigarette smoke condensate also suppressed FANCD2 function and induced CIN in bronchogenic carcinoma cells, but these cells were resistant to CSC-induced apoptosis relative to normal airway epithelial cells. We, therefore, suggest that CSC exerts pressure on airway epithelial cells that results in selection and emergence of genetically unstable somatic mutant clones that may have lost the capacity to effectively execute an apoptotic programme. Carcinogen-mediated suppression of FANCD2 gene expression provides a plausible molecular mechanism for CIN in bronchogenic carcinogenesis. PMID:18475298

  2. Sialo-oligosaccharide receptors for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and related oligosaccharides of poly-N-acetyllactosamine series are polarized at the cilia and apical-microvillar domains of the ciliated cells in human bronchial epithelium.

    PubMed

    Loveless, R W; Feizi, T

    1989-04-01

    The occurrence and distribution of the sialo-oligosaccharide receptors (sialosyl-I and sialosyl-i) for Mycoplasma pneumoniae as well as other related oligosaccharide structures of poly-N-acetyllactosamine type, and their short-chain analogs based on galactose linked beta 1-4 or beta 1-3 to N-acetylglucosamine (Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc or Gal beta 1-3GlcNAc, respectively) were investigated in the human bronchial epithelium by histochemistry by using sequence-specific monoclonal antibodies and lectins. Among the mature epithelial cells, only ciliated cells were found to express the long-chain antigens, whereas mucus-secreting cells contained the short-chain antigens associated with mucus globules. The long-chain oligosaccharides were found to be highly polarized at the luminal aspects of the ciliated cells where the branched structures (I and sialosyl-I antigens) were detected both at the apical-microvillar border and on the cilia, but the linear structures (i, sialosyl-i, and VIM-2 antigens) were detected exclusively at the apical-microvillar border. These observations provide the first in situ visualization of the receptor structures for M. pneumoniae at the primary site of infection. The lack of sialo-oligosaccharide receptors in secretory cells and the mucus they produce provides a biochemical basis for evasion by this microorganism of the secreted mucus barrier.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Airway Infection Recruits and Modulates Neutrophilic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Öz, Hasan H.; Zhou, Benyuan; Voss, Pina; Carevic, Melanie; Schroth, Carolin; Frey, Nina; Rieber, Nikolaus; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes infections mainly in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Despite innate and adaptive immune responses upon infection, P. aeruginosa is capable of efficiently escaping host defenses, but the underlying immune mechanisms remain poorly understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells that are functionally characterized by their potential to suppress T- and natural killer (NK)-cell responses. Here we demonstrate, using an airway in vivo infection model, that P. aeruginosa recruits and activates neutrophilic MDSCs, which functionally suppress T-cell responses. We further show that the CF gene defect (CF transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR) modulates the functionality, but not the recruitment or generation of neutrophilic MDSCs. Collectively, we define a mechanism by which P. aeruginosa airway infection undermines host immunity by modulating neutrophilic MDSCs in vivo. PMID:27965936

  4. Effects of the cationic protein poly-L-arginine on airway epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shahana, Shahida; Kampf, Caroline; Roomans, Godfried M

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic asthma is associated with an increased number of eosinophils in the airway wall. Eosinophils secrete cationic proteins, particularly major basic protein (MBP). AIM: To investigate the effect of synthetic cationic polypeptides such as poly-L-arginine, which can mimic the effect of MBP, on airway epithelial cells. METHODS: Cultured airway epithelial cells were exposed to poly-L-arginine, and effects were determined by light and electron microscopy. RESULTS: Poly-L-arginine induced apoptosis and necrosis. Transmission electron microscopy showed mitochondrial damage and changes in the nucleus. The tight junctions were damaged, as evidenced by penetration of lanthanum. Scanning electron microscopy showed a damaged cell membrane with many pores. Microanalysis showed a significant decrease in the cellular content of magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium and chlorine, and an increase in calcium. Plakoglobin immunoreactivity in the cell membrane was decreased, indicating a decrease in the number of desmosomes CONCLUSIONS: The results point to poly-L-arginine induced membrane damage, resulting in increased permeability, loss of cell-cell contacts and generalized cell damage. PMID:12137242

  5. Nitric oxide induces airway smooth muscle cell relaxation by decreasing the frequency of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F.; Bai, Yan

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) induces airway smooth muscle cell (SMC) relaxation, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Consequently, we investigated the effects of NO on airway SMC contraction, Ca2+ signaling, and Ca2+ sensitivity in mouse lung slices with phase-contrast and confocal microscopy. Airways that were contracted in response to the agonist 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transiently relaxed in response to the NO donor, NOC-5. This NO-induced relaxation was enhanced by zaprinast or vardenafil, two selective inhibitors of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase-5, but blocked by ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, and by Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Simultaneous measurements of airway caliber and SMC [Ca2+]i revealed that airway contraction induced by 5-HT correlated with the occurrence of Ca2+ oscillations in the airway SMCs. Airway relaxation induced by NOC-5 was accompanied by a decrease in the frequency of these Ca2+ oscillations. The cGMP analogues and selective PKG activators 8Br-cGMP and 8pCPT-cGMP also induced airway relaxation and decreased the frequency of the Ca2+ oscillations. NOC-5 inhibited the increase of [Ca2+]i and contraction induced by the photolytic release of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in airway SMCs. The effect of NO on the Ca2+ sensitivity of the airway SMCs was examined in lung slices permeabilized to Ca2+ by treatment with caffeine and ryanodine. Neither NOC-5 nor 8pCPT-cGMP induced relaxation in agonist-contracted Ca2+-permeabilized airways. Consequently, we conclude that NO, acting via the cGMP–PKG pathway, induced airway SMC relaxation by predominately inhibiting the release of Ca2+ via the IP3 receptor to decrease the frequency of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations. PMID:20176853

  6. Comparative effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on human airway epithelial cells and macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio; Costa, Anna Luisa; Blosi, Magda; Di Cristo, Luisana; Zanello, Pier Paolo; Bianchi, Massimiliano G.; Visigalli, Rossana; Bergamaschi, Enrico

    2012-09-01

    Among nanomaterials of industrial relevance, metal-based nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used, but their effects on airway cells are relatively poorly characterized. To compare the effects of metal NPs on cells representative of the lung-blood barrier, Calu-3 epithelial cells and Raw264.7 macrophages were incubated with three industrially relevant preparations of TiO2 NPs (size range 4-33 nm), two preparations of CeO2 NPs (9-36 nm) and CuO NPs (25 nm). While Raw264.7 were grown on standard plasticware, Calu-3 cells were seeded on permeable filters, where they form a high-resistance monolayer, providing an in vitro model of the airway barrier. Metal NPs, obtained from industrial sources, were characterized under the conditions adopted for the biological tests. Cytotoxicity was assessed with resazurin method in both epithelial and macrophage cells, while epithelial barrier permeability was monitored measuring the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER). In macrophages, titania and ceria had no significant effect on viability in the whole range of nominal doses tested (15-240 μg/cm2 of monolayer), while CuO NPs produced a marked viability loss. Moreover, only CuO NPs, but not the other NPs, lowered TEER of Calu-3 monolayers, pointing to the impairment of the epithelial barrier. TEER decreased by 30 % at the dose of 10 μg/cm2 of CuO NPs, compared to untreated control, and was abolished at doses ≥80 μg/cm2, in strict correlation with changes in cell viability. These results indicate that (1) CuO NPs increase airway epithelium permeability even at relatively low doses and are significantly toxic for macrophages and airway epithelial cells, likely through the release of Cu ions in the medium; (2) TiO2 and CeO2 NPs do not affect TEER and exhibit little acute toxicity for airway epithelial cells and macrophages; and (3) TEER measurement can provide a simple method to assess the impairment of in vitro airway epithelial barrier model by manufactured nanomaterials.

  7. The Ciliate Colpoda: "Instant" Protozoan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Anne Muller; Giese, Arthur C.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of Colpoda, a ciliated protozoan which is able to survive in a dry, encysted state for long periods of time. Outlines the procedures for culturing the organism and producing cyst preparations, and recommends its use in the high school biology laboratory. (JR)

  8. The Ciliate Colpoda: "Instant" Protozoan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Anne Muller; Giese, Arthur C.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of Colpoda, a ciliated protozoan which is able to survive in a dry, encysted state for long periods of time. Outlines the procedures for culturing the organism and producing cyst preparations, and recommends its use in the high school biology laboratory. (JR)

  9. Dysregulation of type 2 innate lymphoid cells and TH2 cells impairs pollutant-induced allergic airway responses.

    PubMed

    De Grove, Katrien C; Provoost, Sharen; Hendriks, Rudi W; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Seys, Leen J M; Kumar, Smitha; Maes, Tania; Brusselle, Guy G; Joos, Guy F

    2017-01-01

    Although the prominent role of TH2 cells in type 2 immune responses is well established, the newly identified type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) can also contribute to orchestration of allergic responses. Several experimental and epidemiologic studies have provided evidence that allergen-induced airway responses can be further enhanced on exposure to environmental pollutants, such as diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). However, the components and pathways responsible remain incompletely known. We sought to investigate the relative contribution of ILC2 and adaptive TH2 cell responses in a murine model of DEP-enhanced allergic airway inflammation. Wild-type, Gata-3(+/nlslacZ) (Gata-3-haploinsufficient), RAR-related orphan receptor α (RORα)(fl/fl)IL7R(Cre) (ILC2-deficient), and recombination-activating gene (Rag) 2(-/-) mice were challenged with saline, DEPs, or house dust mite (HDM) or DEP+HDM. Airway hyperresponsiveness, as well as inflammation, and intracellular cytokine expression in ILC2s and TH2 cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were assessed. Concomitant DEP+HDM exposure significantly enhanced allergic airway inflammation, as characterized by increased airway eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia, accumulation of ILC2s and TH2 cells, type 2 cytokine production, and airway hyperresponsiveness compared with sole DEPs or HDM. Reduced Gata-3 expression decreased the number of functional ILC2s and TH2 cells in DEP+HDM-exposed mice, resulting in an impaired DEP-enhanced allergic airway inflammation. Interestingly, although the DEP-enhanced allergic inflammation was marginally reduced in ILC2-deficient mice that received combined DEP+HDM, it was abolished in DEP+HDM-exposed Rag2(-/-) mice. These data indicate that dysregulation of ILC2s and TH2 cells attenuates DEP-enhanced allergic airway inflammation. In addition, a crucial role for the adaptive immune system was shown on concomitant DEP+HDM exposure. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of

  10. Arsenic Alters ATP-Dependent Ca2+ Signaling in Human Airway Epithelial Cell Wound Response

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Lantz, R. Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Boitano, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca2+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., < 4μM as Na-arsenite) on wound-induced Ca2+ signaling pathways in human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-). We found that arsenic reduces purinergic Ca2+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner and results in a reshaping of the Ca2+ signaling response to localized wounds. We next examined arsenic effects on two purinergic receptor types: the metabotropic P2Y and ionotropic P2X receptors. Arsenic inhibited both P2Y- and P2X-mediated Ca2+ signaling responses to ATP. Both inhaled and ingested arsenic can rapidly reach the airway epithelium where purinergic signaling is essential in innate immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  11. Matrine suppresses airway inflammation by downregulating SOCS3 expression via inhibition of NF-κB signaling in airway epithelial cells and asthmatic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Daqing; Wang, Jing; Yang, Niandi; Ma, Haixin

    2016-08-12

    Matrine has been demonstrated to attenuate allergic airway inflammation. Elevated suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) was correlated with the severity of asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of matrine on SOCS3 expression in airway inflammation. In this study, we found that matrine significantly inhibited OVA-induced AHR, inflammatory cell infiltration, goblet cell differentiation, and mucous production in a dose-dependent manner in mice. Matrine also abrogated the level of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, but enhanced interferon (IFN)-γ expression, both in BALF and in lung homogenates. Furthermore, matrine impeded TNF-α-induced the expression of IL-6 and adhesion molecules in airway epithelial cells (BEAS-2B and MLE-12). Additionally, we found that matrine inhibited SOCS3 expression, both in asthmatic mice and TNF-α-stimulated epithelial cells via suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway by using pcDNA3.1-SOCS3 plasmid, SOCS3 siRNA, or nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) inhibitor PDTC. Conclusions: Matrine suppresses airway inflammation by downregulating SOCS3 expression via inhibition of NF-κB signaling in airway epithelial cells and asthmatic mice. - Highlights: • Matrine attenuates asthmatic symptoms and regulates Th1/Th2 balance in vivo. • Matrine suppresses inflammation responses in vitro. • Matrine decreases SOCS3 expression both in vivo and in vitro. • Matrine inhibits SOCS3 expression by suppressing NF-κB signaling.

  12. Coordinated release of nucleotides and mucin from human airway epithelial Calu-3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kreda, Silvia M; Okada, Seiko F; van Heusden, Catharina A; O'Neal, Wanda; Gabriel, Sherif; Abdullah, Lubna; Davis, C William; Boucher, Richard C; Lazarowski, Eduardo R

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of the mucociliary clearance (MCC) process that removes noxious materials from airway surfaces depends on the balance between mucin secretion, airway surface liquid (ASL) volume, and ciliary beating. Effective mucin dispersion into ASL requires salt and water secretion onto the mucosal surface, but how mucin secretion rate is coordinated with ion and, ultimately, water transport rates is poorly understood. Several components of MCC, including electrolyte and water transport, are regulated by nucleotides in the ASL interacting with purinergic receptors. Using polarized monolayers of airway epithelial Calu-3 cells, we investigated whether mucin secretion was accompanied by nucleotide release. Electron microscopic analyses of Calu-3 cells identified subapical granules that resembled goblet cell mucin granules. Real-time confocal microscopic analyses revealed that subapical granules, labelled with FM 1-43 or quinacrine, were competent for Ca2+-regulated exocytosis. Granules containing MUC5AC were apically secreted via Ca2+-regulated exocytosis as demonstrated by combined immunolocalization and slot blot analyses. In addition, Calu-3 cells exhibited Ca2+-regulated apical release of ATP and UDP-glucose, a substrate of glycosylation reactions within the secretory pathway. Neither mucin secretion nor ATP release from Calu-3 cells were affected by activation or inhibition of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. In SPOC1 cells, an airway goblet cell model, purinergic P2Y2 receptor-stimulated increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration resulted in secretion of both mucins and nucleotides. Our data suggest that nucleotide release is a mechanism by which mucin-secreting goblet cells produce paracrine signals for mucin hydration within the ASL. PMID:17656429

  13. Coordinated release of nucleotides and mucin from human airway epithelial Calu-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Kreda, Silvia M; Okada, Seiko F; van Heusden, Catharina A; O'Neal, Wanda; Gabriel, Sherif; Abdullah, Lubna; Davis, C William; Boucher, Richard C; Lazarowski, Eduardo R

    2007-10-01

    The efficiency of the mucociliary clearance (MCC) process that removes noxious materials from airway surfaces depends on the balance between mucin secretion, airway surface liquid (ASL) volume, and ciliary beating. Effective mucin dispersion into ASL requires salt and water secretion onto the mucosal surface, but how mucin secretion rate is coordinated with ion and, ultimately, water transport rates is poorly understood. Several components of MCC, including electrolyte and water transport, are regulated by nucleotides in the ASL interacting with purinergic receptors. Using polarized monolayers of airway epithelial Calu-3 cells, we investigated whether mucin secretion was accompanied by nucleotide release. Electron microscopic analyses of Calu-3 cells identified subapical granules that resembled goblet cell mucin granules. Real-time confocal microscopic analyses revealed that subapical granules, labelled with FM 1-43 or quinacrine, were competent for Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis. Granules containing MUC5AC were apically secreted via Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis as demonstrated by combined immunolocalization and slot blot analyses. In addition, Calu-3 cells exhibited Ca(2+)-regulated apical release of ATP and UDP-glucose, a substrate of glycosylation reactions within the secretory pathway. Neither mucin secretion nor ATP release from Calu-3 cells were affected by activation or inhibition of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. In SPOC1 cells, an airway goblet cell model, purinergic P2Y(2) receptor-stimulated increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration resulted in secretion of both mucins and nucleotides. Our data suggest that nucleotide release is a mechanism by which mucin-secreting goblet cells produce paracrine signals for mucin hydration within the ASL.

  14. Bitter taste receptor agonists alter mitochondrial function and induce autophagy in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shi; Sharma, Pawan; Shah, Sushrut D; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2017-07-01

    Airway remodeling, including increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, is a hallmark feature of asthma and COPD. We previously identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) on human ASM cells and demonstrated that known TAS2R agonists could promote ASM relaxation and bronchodilation and inhibit mitogen-induced ASM growth. In this study, we explored cellular mechanisms mediating the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists on human ASM cells. Pretreatment of ASM cells with TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine resulted in inhibition of cell survival, which was largely reversed by bafilomycin A1, an autophagy inhibitor. Transmission electron microscope studies demonstrated the presence of double-membrane autophagosomes and deformed mitochondria. In ASM cells, TAS2R agonists decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased mitochondrial ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation. Inhibiting dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1) reversed TAS2R agonist-induced mitochondrial membrane potential change and attenuated mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Furthermore, the expression of mitochondrial protein BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) and mitochondrial localization of DLP1 were significantly upregulated by TAS2R agonists. More importantly, inhibiting Bnip3 mitochondrial localization by dominant-negative Bnip3 significantly attenuated cell death induced by TAS2R agonist. Collectively the TAS2R agonists chloroquine and quinine modulate mitochondrial structure and function, resulting in ASM cell death. Furthermore, Bnip3 plays a central role in TAS2R agonist-induced ASM functional changes via a mitochondrial pathway. These findings further establish the cellular mechanisms of antimitogenic effects of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and pathways that can be targeted to mitigate airway remodeling as well as bronchoconstriction in obstructive airway diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological

  15. Lung airway-surveilling CXCR3(hi) memory CD8(+) T cells are critical for protection against influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Slütter, Bram; Pewe, Lecia L; Kaech, Susan M; Harty, John T

    2013-11-14

    Inducing memory CD8(+) T cells specific for conserved antigens from influenza A virus (IAV) is a potential strategy for broadly protective vaccines. Here we show that memory CD8(+) T cells in the airways played an important role in early control of IAV. Expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 was critical for memory CD8(+) T cells to populate the airways during the steady state and vaccination approaches were designed to favor the establishment of memory CD8(+) T cells in the airways. Specifically, we found that interleukin-12 (IL-12) signaling shortly after immunization limited CXCR3 expression on memory CD8(+) T cells. Neutralization of IL-12 or adjuvants that did not induce high amounts of IL-12 enhanced CXCR3 expression, sustained airway localization of memory CD8(+) T cells, and resulted in superior protection against IAV.

  16. The effect of ozone on inflammatory cell infiltration and airway hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Schultheis, A.J.H.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory cells may contribute to the development of exaggerated bronchoconstrictor responses since a persistent link has been noted between pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. In these studies guinea pigs were exposed to 2.0 ppm ozone for 4 hours, then immediately sacrificed or allowed to breathe filtered air for up to 14 days. Following ozone exposure there was an immediate massive neutrophil infiltration into the lung. Neutrophils in lung digest dropped to control values within 3-12 hours post-ozone but remained elevated in BAL fluid for 3 days. There was probable eosinophil degranulation within the first 24 hours post-ozone. Guinea pigs were hyperresponsive to vigal stimulation through 3 days post-ozone. Although they were also hyperresponsive to ACh, responses to MCh were unchanged. Neuronal M[sub 2] receptors were dysfunctional through 3 days post-ozone. There was resolution of inflammation, airway responsiveness, and neuronal M[sub 2] receptor function by 14 days post-exposure. This investigation has (1) confirmed an immediate lung inflammation following acute ozone exposure; (2) established that cells in BAL give a distorted reflection of inflammatory events in lung digest; (3) demonstrated that ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness is at least partially due to efferent cholinergic mechanisms without functional changes of muscarinic receptors on airway smooth muscle; (4) shown that ACh may not be an appropriate agent to test ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness; and (5) demonstrated that inhibitory neuronal M[sub 2] receptors are dysfunctional following ozone exposure. There was close linkage between these events, suggesting that they may be causally related. This investigation proposes a specific mechanism, dysfunction of neuronal M[sub 2] receptors, by which inflammatory cells could cause airway hyperresponsiveness following acute ozone exposure.

  17. Matrix stiffness-modulated proliferation and secretory function of the airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shkumatov, Artem; Thompson, Michael; Choi, Kyoung M; Sicard, Delphine; Baek, Kwanghyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Prakash, Y S; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-06-01

    Multiple pulmonary conditions are characterized by an abnormal misbalance between various tissue components, for example, an increase in the fibrous connective tissue and loss/increase in extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). Such tissue remodeling may adversely impact physiological function of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) responsible for contraction of airways and release of a variety of bioactive molecules. However, few efforts have been made to understand the potentially significant impact of tissue remodeling on ASMCs. Therefore, this study reports how ASMCs respond to a change in mechanical stiffness of a matrix, to which ASMCs adhere because mechanical stiffness of the remodeled airways is often different from the physiological stiffness. Accordingly, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, we found that the elastic modulus of the mouse bronchus has an arithmetic mean of 23.1 ± 14 kPa (SD) (median 18.6 kPa). By culturing ASMCs on collagen-conjugated polyacrylamide hydrogels with controlled elastic moduli, we found that gels designed to be softer than average airway tissue significantly increased cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Conversely, gels stiffer than average airways stimulated cell proliferation, while reducing VEGF secretion and agonist-induced calcium responses of ASMCs. These dependencies of cellular activities on elastic modulus of the gel were correlated with changes in the expression of integrin-β1 and integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that changes in matrix mechanics alter cell proliferation, calcium signaling, and proangiogenic functions in ASMCs. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Programmed cell death ligand 2 regulates TH9 differentiation and induction of chronic airway hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Kerzerho, Jerome; Maazi, Hadi; Speak, Anneliese O.; Szely, Natacha; Lombardi, Vincent; Khoo, Bryant; Geryak, Stacey; Lam, Jonathan; Soroosh, Pejman; Van Snick, Jacques; Akbari, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma is defined as a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways; however, the underlying physiologic and immunologic processes are not fully understood. Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether TH9 cells develop in vivo in a model of chronic airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and what factors control this development. Method We have developed a novel chronic allergen exposure model using the clinically relevant antigen Aspergillus fumigatus to determine the time kinetics of TH9 development in vivo. Results TH9 cells were detectable in the lungs after chronic allergen exposure. The number of TH9 cells directly correlated with the severity of AHR, and anti–IL-9 treatment decreased airway inflammation. Moreover, we have identified programmed cell death ligand (PD-L) 2 as a negative regulator of TH9 cell differentiation. Lack of PD-L2 was associated with significantly increased TGF-β and IL-1α levels in the lungs, enhanced pulmonary TH9 differentiation, and higher morbidity in the sensitized mice. Conclusion Our findings suggest that PD-L2 plays a pivotal role in the regulation of TH9 cell development in chronic AHR, providing novel strategies for modulating adaptive immunity during chronic allergic responses. PMID:23174661

  19. "Epithelial Cell TRPV1-Mediated Airway Sensitivity as a Mechanism for Respiratory Symptoms Associated with Gulf War Illness?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    TITLE: “Epithelial Cell TRPV1 -Mediated Airway Sensitivity as a Mechanism for Respiratory Symptoms Associated with Gulf War Illness” PRINCIPAL...66,),&$7,212) E7(/(3+21(180%(5 ,QFOXGHDUHDFRGH 01-06-2010 Annual Report 1 JUN 2009 - 31 MAY 2010 Epithelial Cell TRPV1 -Mediated Airway...express functional TRPV1 . More recently we found that these cells also express another important irritant receptor, namely TRPA1. Activation of

  20. Arsenic Compromises Conducting Airway Epithelial Barrier Properties in Primary Mouse and Immortalized Human Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Liguori, Andrew E.; Olsen, Colin E.; Lantz, R. Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Boitano, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a lung toxicant that can lead to respiratory illness through inhalation and ingestion, although the most common exposure is through contaminated drinking water. Lung effects reported from arsenic exposure include lung cancer and obstructive lung disease, as well as reductions in lung function and immune response. As part of their role in innate immune function, airway epithelial cells provide a barrier that protects underlying tissue from inhaled particulates, pathogens, and toxicants frequently found in inspired air. We evaluated the effects of a five-day exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic {<4μM [~300 μg/L (ppb)] as NaAsO2} on airway epithelial barrier function and structure. In a primary mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cell model we found that both micromolar (3.9 μM) and submicromolar (0.8 μM) arsenic concentrations reduced transepithelial resistance, a measure of barrier function. Immunofluorescent staining of arsenic-treated MTE cells showed altered patterns of localization of the transmembrane tight junction proteins claudin (Cl) Cl-1, Cl-4, Cl-7 and occludin at cell-cell contacts when compared with untreated controls. To better quantify arsenic-induced changes in tight junction transmembrane proteins we conducted arsenic exposure experiments with an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-). We found that arsenic exposure significantly increased the protein expression of Cl-4 and occludin as well as the mRNA levels of Cl-4 and Cl-7 in these cells. Additionally, arsenic exposure resulted in altered phosphorylation of occludin. In summary, exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can alter both the function and structure of airway epithelial barrier constituents. These changes likely contribute to the observed arsenic-induced loss in basic innate immune defense and increased infection in the airway. PMID:24349408

  1. Arsenic compromises conducting airway epithelial barrier properties in primary mouse and immortalized human cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Cara L; Liguori, Andrew E; Olsen, Colin E; Lantz, R Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L; Boitano, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a lung toxicant that can lead to respiratory illness through inhalation and ingestion, although the most common exposure is through contaminated drinking water. Lung effects reported from arsenic exposure include lung cancer and obstructive lung disease, as well as reductions in lung function and immune response. As part of their role in innate immune function, airway epithelial cells provide a barrier that protects underlying tissue from inhaled particulates, pathogens, and toxicants frequently found in inspired air. We evaluated the effects of a five-day exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic {<4μM [~300 μg/L (ppb)] as NaAsO2} on airway epithelial barrier function and structure. In a primary mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cell model we found that both micromolar (3.9 μM) and submicromolar (0.8 μM) arsenic concentrations reduced transepithelial resistance, a measure of barrier function. Immunofluorescent staining of arsenic-treated MTE cells showed altered patterns of localization of the transmembrane tight junction proteins claudin (Cl) Cl-1, Cl-4, Cl-7 and occludin at cell-cell contacts when compared with untreated controls. To better quantify arsenic-induced changes in tight junction transmembrane proteins we conducted arsenic exposure experiments with an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-). We found that arsenic exposure significantly increased the protein expression of Cl-4 and occludin as well as the mRNA levels of Cl-4 and Cl-7 in these cells. Additionally, arsenic exposure resulted in altered phosphorylation of occludin. In summary, exposure to environmentally relevant levels of arsenic can alter both the function and structure of airway epithelial barrier constituents. These changes likely contribute to the observed arsenic-induced loss in basic innate immune defense and increased infection in the airway.

  2. Effects of micropatterned curvature on the motility and mechanical properties of airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jimin; Chen, Cheng; Jiang, Xuemei; Xu, Rong; Tambe, Dhananjay; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Lina; Lan, Bo; Cai, Kaiyong; Deng, Linhong

    2011-12-02

    Geometric features such as size and shape of the microenvironment are known to alter cell behaviors such as growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration. Little is known, however, about the effect of curvature on cell behaviors despite that many cells reside in curved space of tubular organs such as the bronchial airways. To address this question, we fabricated micropatterned strips that mimic airway walls with varying curvature. Then, we cultured airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) on these strips and investigated the cells' motility and mechanical properties using time-lapse imaging microscopy and optical magnetic twisting cytometry (OMTC). We found that both motility and mechanical properties of the ASMCs were influenced by the curvature. In particular, when the curvature increased from 0 to 1/150 μm(-1), the velocity of cell migration first decreased (0-1/750 μm(-1)), and then increased (1/750-1/150 μm(-1)). In contrast, the cell stiffness increased and then decreased. Thus, at the intermediate curvature (1/750 μm(-1)) the ASMCs were the least motile, but most stiff. The contractility instead decreased consistently as the curvature increased. The level of F-actin, and vinculin expression within the ASMCs appeared to correlate with the contractility and motility, respectively, in relation to the curvature. These results may provide valuable insights to understanding the heterogeneity of airway constrictions in asthma as well as the developing and functioning of other tubular organs and tissue engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intestinal ciliate composition found in the feces of racing horses from Izmir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gürelli, Gözde; Göçmen, Bayram

    2012-08-01

    Species composition and distribution of intestinal ciliates were investigated in the feces from 15 racing horses living near Izmir, Turkey. Thirty-seven species belonging to 21 genera were identified. Although no new species were observed, this is the first report on intestinal ciliates in racing horses living in Turkey. The mean number of ciliates was 26.4 ± 13.9 × 10(4) cells ml(-1) of feces and the mean number of ciliate species per host was 18.8 ± 7.1. No ciliates were observed in one horse. Bundleia and Polymorphella were found to be the two dominant genera, occurring in high proportions. In contrast, Didesmis and Prorodonopsis were only observed at a low frequency. Bundleia nana, Blepharoconus hemiciliatus, Paraisotrichopsis composita, Prorodonopsis coli and Spirodinium equi were newly recorded from Turkey.

  4. Abundance, variability, and potential grazing impact of planktonic ciliates in the open subaratic Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Suzanne L.; Postel, James R.; Booth, Beatrice C.

    The abundance and variability of planktonic ciliates in the open subarctic Pacific were determined during four month-long cruises in 1987 and 1988. The ciliate community, numerically dominated by relatively small aloricate choreotrichs, was comparable in abundance to communities in a range of oceanic and neritic environments, including waters with much higher average chlorophyll concentrations. Integrated (0-80m) ciliate biomass was typically 100-200mgC m -2, although 3- to 4-fold higher levels were observed on two occasions in spring. Ciliate community biomass, in general, was dominated by large (>20 μm width) individuals, although in August 1988 the biomass of smaller cells was as great or greater. The estimated grazing impact of the ciliate community averaged 20% of the primary production. On one instance in May 1988, however, a large biomass of ciliates led to an estimated grazing impact equivalent to 55% of phytoplankton production. While ciliates may be major phytoplankton grazers during sporadic ciliate “blooms”, dino- and other heterotrophic flagellates, which make up the bulk of microheterotroph biomass, must normally be of equal or greater importance as herbivores in this ocean region.

  5. Basolateral Cl channels in primary airway epithelial cultures.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Widdicombe, Jonathan H

    2007-06-01

    Salt and water absorption and secretion across the airway epithelium are important for maintaining the thin film of liquid lining the surface of the airway epithelium. Movement of Cl across the apical membrane involves the CFTR Cl channel; however, conductive pathways for Cl movement across the basolateral membrane have been little studied. Here, we determined the regulation and single-channel properties of the Cl conductance (G(Cl)) in airway surface epithelia using epithelial cultures from human or bovine trachea and freshly isolated ciliated cells from the human nasal epithelium. In Ussing chamber studies, a swelling-activated basolateral G(Cl) was found, which was further stimulated by forskolin and blocked by N-phenylanthranilic acid (DPC) = sucrose > flufenamic acid = niflumic acid = glibenclamide > CdCl(2) = 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB) = DIDS = ZnCl(2) > tamoxifen > 4,4'-dinitro-2,2'-stilbene-disulfonate disodium salt (DNDS). In whole cell patch-clamp experiments, three types of G(Cl) were identified: 1) a voltage-activated, DIDS- (but not Cd-) blockable and osmosensitive G(Cl); 2) an inwardly rectifying, hyperpolarization-activated and Cd-sensitive G(Cl); and 3) a forskolin-activated, linear G(Cl), which was insensitive to Cd and DIDS. In cell-attached patch-clamp recordings, the basolateral pole of isolated ciliated cells expressed three types of Cl channels: 1) an outwardly rectifying, swelling-activated Cl channel; 2) a strongly inwardly rectifying Cl channel; and 3) a forskolin-activated, low-conductance channel. We propose that, depending on the driving force for Cl across the apical membrane, basolateral Cl channels confine Cl(-) secretion or support transcellular Cl(-) absorption.

  6. The Role of Bitter and Sweet Taste Receptors in Upper Airway Immunity.

    PubMed

    Workman, Alan D; Palmer, James N; Adappa, Nithin D; Cohen, Noam A

    2015-12-01

    Over the past several years, taste receptors have emerged as key players in the regulation of innate immune defenses in the mammalian respiratory tract. Several cell types in the airway, including ciliated epithelial cells, solitary chemosensory cells, and bronchial smooth muscle cells, all display chemoresponsive properties that utilize taste receptors. A variety of bitter products secreted by microbes are detected with resultant downstream inflammation, increased mucous clearance, antimicrobial peptide secretion, and direct bacterial killing. Genetic variation of bitter taste receptors also appears to play a role in the susceptibility to infection in respiratory disease states, including that of chronic rhinosinusitis. Ongoing taste receptor research may yield new therapeutics that harness innate immune defenses in the respiratory tract and may offer alternatives to antibiotic treatment. The present review discusses taste receptor-protective responses and analyzes the role these receptors play in mediating airway immune function.

  7. The Role of Bitter and Sweet Taste Receptors in Upper Airway Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Alan D.; Palmer, James N.; Adappa, Nithin D.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, taste receptors have emerged as key players in the regulation of innate immune defenses in the mammalian respiratory tract. Several cell types in the airway, including ciliated epithelial cells, solitary chemosensory cells, and bronchial smooth muscle cells, all display chemoresponsive properties that utilize taste receptors. A variety of bitter products secreted by microbes are detected with resultant downstream inflammation, increased mucous clearance, antimicrobial peptide secretion, and direct bacterial killing. Genetic variation of bitter taste receptors also appears to play a role in the susceptibility to infection in respiratory disease states, including that of chronic rhinosinusitis. Ongoing taste receptor research may yield new therapeutics that harness innate immune defenses in the respiratory tract and may offer alternatives to antibiotic treatment. The present review discusses taste receptor-protective responses and analyzes the role these receptors play in mediating airway immune function. PMID:26492878

  8. Gene Transfer by Guanidinium-Cholesterol Cationic Lipids into Airway Epithelial Cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Peuchmaur, Michel; Leclerc, Tony; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Lehn, Pierre

    1997-03-01

    Synthetic vectors represent an attractive alternative approach to viral vectors for gene transfer, in particular into airway epithelial cells for lung-directed gene therapy for cystic fibrosis. Having recently found that guanidinium-cholesterol cationic lipids are efficient reagents for gene transfer into mammalian cell lines in vitro, we have investigated their use for gene delivery into primary airway epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained indicate that the lipid bis (guanidinium)-tren-cholesterol (BGTC) can be used to transfer a reporter gene into primary human airway epithelial cells in culture. Furthermore, liposomes composed of BGTC and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) are efficient for gene delivery to the mouse airway epithelium in vivo. Transfected cells were detected both in the surface epithelium and in submucosal glands. In addition, the transfection efficiency of BGTC/DOPE liposomes in vivo was quantitatively assessed by using the luciferase reporter gene system.

  9. Intelectin is required for IL-13-induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and -3 expression in lung epithelial cells and promotes allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Naibing; Kang, Guannan; Jin, Chang'E; Xu, Yongjian; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Erle, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, mucus overproduction, airway hyperreactivity, and peribronchial fibrosis. Intelectin has been shown to be increased in airway epithelium of asthmatics. However, the role of intelectin in the pathogenesis of asthma is unknown. Airway epithelial cells can secrete chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and -3 that play crucial roles in asthmatic airway inflammation. We hypothesized that intelectin plays a role in allergic airway inflammation by regulating chemokine expression. In a mouse allergic asthma model, we found that mRNA expression of intelectin-2 as well as MCP-1 and -3 in mouse lung was increased very early (within 2 h) after allergen challenge. Expression of intelectin protein was localized to mucous cells in airway epithelium. Treatment of MLE12 mouse lung epithelial cells with interleukin IL-13, a critical mediator of allergic airway disease, induced expression of intelectin-1 and -2 as well as MCP-1 and -3. When IL-13-induced intelectin-1 and -2 expression was inhibited by RNA interference, IL-13-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and MCP-1 and -3 production by MLE12 cells was inhibited. Furthermore, inhibition of intelectin expression by airway transfection with shRNA targeting intelectin-1 and -2 attenuated allergen-induced airway inflammation. We conclude that intelectin, a molecule expressed by airway epithelial cells and upregulated in asthma, is required for IL-13-induced MCP-1 and -3 production in mouse lung epithelial cells and contributes to allergic airway inflammation. PMID:19965981

  10. Intelectin is required for IL-13-induced monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and -3 expression in lung epithelial cells and promotes allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Naibing; Kang, Guannan; Jin, Chang'E; Xu, Yongjian; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Erle, David J; Zhen, Guohua

    2010-03-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, mucus overproduction, airway hyperreactivity, and peribronchial fibrosis. Intelectin has been shown to be increased in airway epithelium of asthmatics. However, the role of intelectin in the pathogenesis of asthma is unknown. Airway epithelial cells can secrete chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and -3 that play crucial roles in asthmatic airway inflammation. We hypothesized that intelectin plays a role in allergic airway inflammation by regulating chemokine expression. In a mouse allergic asthma model, we found that mRNA expression of intelectin-2 as well as MCP-1 and -3 in mouse lung was increased very early (within 2 h) after allergen challenge. Expression of intelectin protein was localized to mucous cells in airway epithelium. Treatment of MLE12 mouse lung epithelial cells with interleukin IL-13, a critical mediator of allergic airway disease, induced expression of intelectin-1 and -2 as well as MCP-1 and -3. When IL-13-induced intelectin-1 and -2 expression was inhibited by RNA interference, IL-13-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and MCP-1 and -3 production by MLE12 cells was inhibited. Furthermore, inhibition of intelectin expression by airway transfection with shRNA targeting intelectin-1 and -2 attenuated allergen-induced airway inflammation. We conclude that intelectin, a molecule expressed by airway epithelial cells and upregulated in asthma, is required for IL-13-induced MCP-1 and -3 production in mouse lung epithelial cells and contributes to allergic airway inflammation.

  11. Bat Airway Epithelial Cells: A Novel Tool for the Study of Zoonotic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Eckerle, Isabella; Ehlen, Lukas; Kallies, René; Wollny, Robert; Corman, Victor M.; Cottontail, Veronika M.; Tschapka, Marco; Oppong, Samuel; Drosten, Christian; Müller, Marcel A.

    2014-01-01

    Bats have been increasingly recognized as reservoir of important zoonotic viruses. However, until now many attempts to isolate bat-borne viruses in cell culture have been unsuccessful. Further, experimental studies on reservoir host species have been limited by the difficulty of rearing these species. The epithelium of the respiratory tract plays a central role during airborne transmission, as it is the first tissue encountered by viral particles. Although several cell lines from bats were established recently, no well-characterized, selectively cultured airway epithelial cells were available so far. Here, primary cells and immortalized cell lines from bats of the two important suborders Yangochiroptera and Yinpterochiroptera, Carollia perspicillata (Seba's short-tailed bat) and Eidolon helvum (Straw-colored fruit bat), were successfully cultured under standardized conditions from both fresh and frozen organ specimens by cell outgrowth of organ explants and by the use of serum-free primary cell culture medium. Cells were immortalized to generate permanent cell lines. Cells were characterized for their epithelial properties such as expression of cytokeratin and tight junctions proteins and permissiveness for viral infection with Rift-Valley fever virus and vesicular stomatitis virus Indiana. These cells can serve as suitable models for the study of bat-borne viruses and complement cell culture models for virus infection in human airway epithelial cells. PMID:24454736

  12. Airway Memory CD4+ T Cells Mediate Protective Immunity against Emerging Respiratory Coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jincun; Zhao, Jingxian; Mangalam, Ashutosh K.; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fett, Craig; Meyerholz, David K.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Baric, Ralph S.; David, Chella S.; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Two zoonotic coronaviruses (CoV), SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV have crossed species to cause severe human respiratory disease. Here, we showed that induction of airway memory CD4+ T cells specific for a conserved epitope shared by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV is a potential strategy for developing pan-coronavirus vaccines. Airway memory CD4+ T cells differed phenotypically and functionally from lung-derived cells and were crucial for protection against both CoVs in mice. Protection was interferon-γ-dependent and required early induction of robust innate and virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses. The conserved epitope was also recognized in SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV-infected human leukocyte antigen DR2 and DR3 transgenic mice, indicating potential relevance in human populations. Additionally, this epitope was cross-protective between human and bat CoVs, the progenitors for many human CoVs. Vaccine strategies that induce airway memory CD4+ T cells targeting conserved epitopes may have broad applicability in the context of new CoV and other respiratory virus outbreaks. PMID:27287409

  13. Airway Memory CD4(+) T Cells Mediate Protective Immunity against Emerging Respiratory Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jincun; Zhao, Jingxian; Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fett, Craig; Meyerholz, David K; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Baric, Ralph S; David, Chella S; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-06-21

    Two zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs)-SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV-have crossed species to cause severe human respiratory disease. Here, we showed that induction of airway memory CD4(+) T cells specific for a conserved epitope shared by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV is a potential strategy for developing pan-coronavirus vaccines. Airway memory CD4(+) T cells differed phenotypically and functionally from lung-derived cells and were crucial for protection against both CoVs in mice. Protection was dependent on interferon-γ and required early induction of robust innate and virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The conserved epitope was also recognized in SARS-CoV- and MERS-CoV-infected human leukocyte antigen DR2 and DR3 transgenic mice, indicating potential relevance in human populations. Additionally, this epitope was cross-protective between human and bat CoVs, the progenitors for many human CoVs. Vaccine strategies that induce airway memory CD4(+) T cells targeting conserved epitopes might have broad applicability in the context of new CoVs and other respiratory virus outbreaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A.; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3+ iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3+ Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  15. Staphylococcus aureus Inhibits IL-8 Responses Induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Chekabab, Samuel M; Silverman, Richard J; Lafayette, Shantelle L; Luo, Yishan; Rousseau, Simon; Nguyen, Dao

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and Staphylococcus aureus (SA) are major respiratory pathogens and can concurrently colonize the airways of patients with chronic obstructive diseases, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Airway epithelial cell signalling is critical to the activation of innate immune responses. In the setting of polymicrobial colonization or infection of the respiratory tract, how epithelial cells integrate different bacterial stimuli remains unknown. Our study examined the inflammatory responses to PA and SA co-stimulations. Immortalised airway epithelial cells (Beas-2B) exposed to bacteria-free filtrates from PA (PAF) induced a robust production of the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8 while bacteria-free filtrates from SA (SAF) had a minimal effect. Surprisingly, co-stimulation with PAF+SAF demonstrated that SAF strongly inhibited the PAF-driven IL-8 production, showing that SAF has potent anti-inflammatory effects. Similarly SAF decreased IL-8 production induced by the TLR1/TLR2 ligand Pam3CysSK4 but not the TLR4 ligand LPS nor TLR5 ligand flagellin in Beas-2B cells. Moreover, SAF greatly dampened TLR1/TLR2-mediated activation of the NF-κB pathway, but not the p38 MAPK pathway. We observed this SAF-dependent anti-inflammatory activity in several SA clinical strains, as well as in the CF epithelial cell line CFBE41o-. These findings show a novel direct anti-inflammatory effect of SA on airway epithelial cells, highlighting its potential to modulate inflammatory responses in the setting of polymicrobial infections.

  16. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 cause barrier dysfunction in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Saatian, Bahman; Rezaee, Fariba; Desando, Samantha; Emo, Jason; Chapman, Tim; Knowlden, Sara; Georas, Steve N.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that airway epithelial barrier function is compromised in asthma, a disease characterized by Th2-skewed immune response against inhaled allergens, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Th2-type cytokines on airway epithelial barrier function. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells monolayers were grown on collagen coated Transwell inserts. The basolateral or apical surfaces of airway epithelia were exposed to human interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, IL-25, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) alone or in combination at various concentrations and time points. We analyzed epithelial apical junctional complex (AJC) function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability to FITC-conjugated dextran over time. We analyzed AJC structure using immunofluorescence with antibodies directed against key junctional components including occludin, ZO-1, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Transepithelial resistance was significantly decreased after both basolateral and apical exposure to IL-4. Permeability to 3 kDa dextran was also increased in IL-4-exposed cells. Similar results were obtained with IL-13, but none of the innate type 2 cytokines examined (TSLP, IL-25 or IL-33) significantly affected barrier function. IL-4 and IL-13-induced barrier dysfunction was accompanied by reduced expression of membrane AJC components but not by induction of claudin- 2. Enhanced permeability caused by IL-4 was not affected by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3 kinase signaling, but was attenuated by a broad spectrum inhibitor of janus associated kinases. Our study indicates that IL-4 and IL-13 have disruptive effect on airway epithelial barrier function. Th2-cytokine induced epithelial barrier dysfunction may contribute to airway inflammation in allergic asthma. PMID:24665390

  17. Interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 cause barrier dysfunction in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saatian, Bahman; Rezaee, Fariba; Desando, Samantha; Emo, Jason; Chapman, Tim; Knowlden, Sara; Georas, Steve N

    2013-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that airway epithelial barrier function is compromised in asthma, a disease characterized by Th2-skewed immune response against inhaled allergens, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Th2-type cytokines on airway epithelial barrier function. 16HBE14o- human bronchial epithelial cells monolayers were grown on collagen coated Transwell inserts. The basolateral or apical surfaces of airway epithelia were exposed to human interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, IL-25, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) alone or in combination at various concentrations and time points. We analyzed epithelial apical junctional complex (AJC) function by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability to FITC-conjugated dextran over time. We analyzed AJC structure using immunofluorescence with antibodies directed against key junctional components including occludin, ZO-1, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Transepithelial resistance was significantly decreased after both basolateral and apical exposure to IL-4. Permeability to 3 kDa dextran was also increased in IL-4-exposed cells. Similar results were obtained with IL-13, but none of the innate type 2 cytokines examined (TSLP, IL-25 or IL-33) significantly affected barrier function. IL-4 and IL-13-induced barrier dysfunction was accompanied by reduced expression of membrane AJC components but not by induction of claudin- 2. Enhanced permeability caused by IL-4 was not affected by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3 kinase signaling, but was attenuated by a broad spectrum inhibitor of janus associated kinases. Our study indicates that IL-4 and IL-13 have disruptive effect on airway epithelial barrier function. Th2-cytokine induced epithelial barrier dysfunction may contribute to airway inflammation in allergic asthma.

  18. DUOX1 mediates persistent epithelial EGFR activation, mucous cell metaplasia, and airway remodeling during allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Habibovic, Aida; Hristova, Milena; Heppner, David E.; Danyal, Karamatullah; Ather, Jennifer L.; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M.W.; Irvin, Charles G.; Poynter, Matthew E.; Lundblad, Lennart K.; Dixon, Anne E.; Geiszt, Miklos

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation with mucous metaplasia and airway remodeling are hallmarks of allergic asthma, and these outcomes have been associated with enhanced expression and activation of EGFR signaling. Here, we demonstrate enhanced expression of EGFR ligands such as amphiregulin as well as constitutive EGFR activation in cultured nasal epithelial cells from asthmatic subjects compared with nonasthmatic controls and in lung tissues of mice during house dust mite–induced (HDM-induced) allergic inflammation. EGFR activation was associated with cysteine oxidation within EGFR and the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src, and both amphiregulin production and oxidative EGFR activation were diminished by pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of the epithelial NADPH oxidase dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1). DUOX1 deficiency also attenuated several EGFR-dependent features of HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation, including neutrophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production (IL-33, IL-13), mucous metaplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and central airway resistance. Moreover, targeted inhibition of airway DUOX1 in mice with previously established HDM-induced allergic inflammation, by intratracheal administration of DUOX1-targeted siRNA or pharmacological NADPH oxidase inhibitors, reversed most of these outcomes. Our findings indicate an important function for DUOX1 in allergic inflammation related to persistent EGFR activation and suggest that DUOX1 targeting may represent an attractive strategy in asthma management. PMID:27812543

  19. DUOX1 mediates persistent epithelial EGFR activation, mucous cell metaplasia, and airway remodeling during allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Habibovic, Aida; Hristova, Milena; Heppner, David E; Danyal, Karamatullah; Ather, Jennifer L; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M W; Irvin, Charles G; Poynter, Matthew E; Lundblad, Lennart K; Dixon, Anne E; Geiszt, Miklos; van der Vliet, Albert

    2016-11-03

    Chronic inflammation with mucous metaplasia and airway remodeling are hallmarks of allergic asthma, and these outcomes have been associated with enhanced expression and activation of EGFR signaling. Here, we demonstrate enhanced expression of EGFR ligands such as amphiregulin as well as constitutive EGFR activation in cultured nasal epithelial cells from asthmatic subjects compared with nonasthmatic controls and in lung tissues of mice during house dust mite-induced (HDM-induced) allergic inflammation. EGFR activation was associated with cysteine oxidation within EGFR and the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Src, and both amphiregulin production and oxidative EGFR activation were diminished by pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of the epithelial NADPH oxidase dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1). DUOX1 deficiency also attenuated several EGFR-dependent features of HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation, including neutrophilic inflammation, type 2 cytokine production (IL-33, IL-13), mucous metaplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and central airway resistance. Moreover, targeted inhibition of airway DUOX1 in mice with previously established HDM-induced allergic inflammation, by intratracheal administration of DUOX1-targeted siRNA or pharmacological NADPH oxidase inhibitors, reversed most of these outcomes. Our findings indicate an important function for DUOX1 in allergic inflammation related to persistent EGFR activation and suggest that DUOX1 targeting may represent an attractive strategy in asthma management.

  20. Local blockade of epithelial PDL-1 in the airways enhances T cell function and viral clearance during influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    McNally, Beth; Ye, Fang; Willette, Meredith; Flaño, Emilio

    2013-12-01

    In order to maintain the gas exchange function of the lung following influenza virus infection, a delicate orchestration of positive and negative regulatory pathways must be maintained to attain viral eradication while minimizing local inflammation. The programmed death receptor 1 ligand/programmed death receptor 1 (PDL-1/PD-1) pathway plays an important immunoregulatory role, particularly in the context of T cell function. Here, we have shown that influenza virus infection of primary airway epithelial cells strongly enhances PDL-1 expression and does so in an alpha interferon receptor (IFNAR) signaling-dependent manner. PD-1 is expressed primarily on effector T cells in the lung, compared to effector memory and central memory cells, and shortly after influenza virus infection, an increased number of PD-1(+) T cells are recruited to the airways. Using in vitro cocultures of airway epithelial cells and T cells and in vivo models of influenza virus infection, we have demonstrated that blockade of airway epithelial PDL-1 improves CD8 T cell function, defined by increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and granzyme B and expression of CD107ab. Furthermore, PDL-1 blockade in the airways served to accelerate influenza virus clearance and enhance infection recovery. Our findings suggest that local manipulation of the PDL-1/PD-1 axis in the airways may represent a therapeutic alternative during acute influenza virus infection.

  1. Strain reorganizes focal adhesions and cytoskeleton in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, P G; Garcia, R; Kogerman, L

    1997-04-10

    Abnormal mechanical stress on pulmonary structures is associated with increased airway resistance and impaired gas exchange as a result of increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) deposition. Using an in vitro system with cultured ASM cells, we have demonstrated that cyclic deformational strain increases ASM cellular myosin and myosin light chain kinase. To determine if these contractile protein increases were accompanied by ultrastructural changes in cells indicating phenotypic modulation, cells subjected to strain were compared to cells grown under static conditions by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and fluorescent staining. The strained ASM cells oriented perpendicular to the strain direction were more elongated and contained more actin stress fibers than identical cells grown under physically static conditions. The stress fiber bundles were thicker and reorganized parallel to the long axis of the cell. Marked increases in the numbers and lengths of focal adhesions between the cell membrane and the substratum were found by both TEM and immunostaining for talin. Mechanical strain thus increases organization of cytoskeletal elements in cultured ASM cells. Similar effects in vivo may serve to promote the expression of the contractile phenotype of cultured ASM cells independent of other in vivo factors and alter cell contractility. Increased organization of cytoskeletal elements might also increase the efficiency of signal transduction from the extracellular matrix into the cell interior.

  2. Cigarette smoke impairs airway epithelial barrier function and cell-cell contact recovery.

    PubMed

    Heijink, I H; Brandenburg, S M; Postma, D S; van Oosterhout, A J M

    2012-02-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), induces aberrant airway epithelial structure and function. The underlying mechanisms are unresolved so far. We studied effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on epithelial barrier function and wound regeneration in human bronchial epithelial 16HBE cells and primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) from COPD patients, nonsmokers and healthy smokers. We demonstrate that CSE rapidly and transiently impairs 16HBE barrier function, largely due to disruption of cell-cell contacts. CSE induced a similar, but stronger and more sustained, defect in PBECs. Application of the specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor AG1478 showed that EGFR activation contributes to the CSE-induced defects in both 16HBE cells and PBECs. Furthermore, our data indicate that the endogenous protease calpain mediates these defects through tight junction protein degradation. CSE also delayed the reconstitution of 16HBE intercellular contacts during wound healing and attenuated PBEC barrier function upon wound regeneration. These findings were comparable between PBECs from smokers, healthy smokers and COPD patients. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that CSE reduces epithelial integrity, probably by EGFR and calpain-dependent disruption of intercellular contacts. This may increase susceptibility to environmental insults, e.g. inhaled pathogens. Thus, EGFR may be a promising target for therapeutic strategies to improve mucosal barrier function in cigarette smoking-related disease.

  3. The effects of exogenous lipid on THP-1 cells: an in vitro model of airway aspiration?

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Yvette A.; Williamson, James D.; Hart, Simon P.; Morice, Alyn H.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases of the airways are associated with gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) and aspiration events. The observation of lipid-laden macrophages (LLMs) within the airway may indicate aspiration secondary to GOR. The proposed mechanism, that lipid droplets from undigested or partially digested food are aspirated leading to accumulation in scavenging macrophages, led us to hypothesise that an activated population of LLMs could interact with other immune cells to induce bronchial inflammation. To test this, we generated an in vitro model using differentiated THP-1 cells, which were treated with a high-fat liquid feed. Here, we show that THP-1 cells can take up lipid from the high-fat feed independent of actin polymerisation or CD36-dependent phagocytosis. These cells did not exhibit M1 or M2 polarisation. Gene array analysis confirmed over 8000 genes were upregulated by at least twofold following high fat exposure, and IL-8 was the most upregulated gene. Pathway analysis revealed upregulation of genes known to be involved in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) pathophysiology. We suggest that aspiration and macrophage phagocytosis may be important mechanisms in the aetiology of diseases such as COPD and cystic fibrosis that are characterised by high levels of IL-8 within the airways. PMID:28344981

  4. Cigarette smoke extract reduces VEGF in primary human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thaikoottathil, J V; Martin, R J; Zdunek, J; Weinberger, A; Rino, J G; Chu, H W

    2009-04-01

    Reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been reported in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lungs of severe emphysema patients. Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are exposed to various environmental insults like cigarette smoke and bacterial infections, but their direct effect on VEGF production in well-differentiated primary human AEC remains unclear. The current authors determined the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) alone and in combination with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) on VEGF production in well-differentiated primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) and small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) in air-liquid interface cultures. Secretion and expression of VEGF were determined by ELISA and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Cell growth, apoptosis, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and protein kinase (PK)C signalling pathways were evaluated to further dissect VEGF regulation under CSE treatment. CSE significantly reduced VEGF secretion in NHBE and SAEC. In SAEC, Mp alone significantly increased the VEGF, while the presence of CSE attenuated Mp-induced VEGF production. While ERK inhibitor reduced VEGF secretion only in NHBE, a PKC inhibitor significantly decreased VEGF secretion in both NHBE and SAEC. In conclusion, direct cigarette smoke extract exposure significantly reduced vascular endothelial growth factor production in well-differentiated primary human airway epithelial cells, in part through modifying extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and protein kinase C signalling pathways.

  5. Cigarette Smoke Modulates Repair and Innate Immunity following Injury to Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Nadia M.; van der Vlugt, Luciën E. P. M.; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; Taube, Christian; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and contributes to COPD development and progression by causing epithelial injury and inflammation. Whereas it is known that cigarette smoke (CS) may affect the innate immune function of airway epithelial cells and epithelial repair, this has so far not been explored in an integrated design using mucociliary differentiated airway epithelial cells. In this study, we examined the effect of whole CS exposure on wound repair and the innate immune activity of mucociliary differentiated primary bronchial epithelial cells, upon injury induced by disruption of epithelial barrier integrity or by mechanical wounding. Upon mechanical injury CS caused a delayed recovery in the epithelial barrier integrity and wound closure. Furthermore CS enhanced innate immune responses, as demonstrated by increased expression of the antimicrobial protein RNase 7. These differential effects on epithelial repair and innate immunity were both mediated by CS-induced oxidative stress. Overall, our findings demonstrate modulation of wound repair and innate immune responses of injured airway epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD development and progression. PMID:27829065

  6. Effects of hexamethylene diisocyanate exposure on human airway epithelial cells: in vitro cellular and molecular studies.

    PubMed Central

    Wisnewski, Adam V; Liu, Qing; Miller, Jing-Jing; Magoski, Nadine; Redlich, Carrie A

    2002-01-01

    In this study we developed an in vitro exposure model to investigate the effects of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) on human airway epithelial cells at the cellular and molecular level. We used immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) to visualize the binding and uptake of HDI by airway epithelial cell lines (A549 and NCI-NCI-H292) and microarray technology to identify HDI sensitive genes. By IFA, we observed that subcytotoxic concentrations of HDI form microscopic micelles that appear to be taken up by cells over a 3-hr period postexposure. Microarray analysis (4.6K genes) of parallel cultures identified four genes (thioredoxin reductase, dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, TG interacting factor, and stanniocalcin) whose mRNA levels were up-regulated after HDI exposure. Northern analysis was used to confirm that HDI increased message levels of these four genes and to further explore the dose dependence and kinetics of the response. The finding that HDI exposure increases thioredoxin reductase expression supports previous studies suggesting that HDI alters thiol-redox homeostasis, an important sensor of cellular stress. Another of the HDI-increased genes, a dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, encodes a protein previously shown to be specifically susceptible to HDI conjugation, and known to detoxify other hydrocarbons. Together, the data describe a novel approach for investigating the effects of HDI binding and uptake by human airway epithelial cells and begin to identify genes that may be involved in the acute response to exposure. PMID:12204825

  7. In Vitro Modeling of RSV Infection and Cytopathogenesis in Well-Differentiated Human Primary Airway Epithelial Cells (WD-PAECs).

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Lindsay; Villenave, Remi; Guo-Parke, Hong; Douglas, Isobel; Shields, Michael D; Power, Ultan F

    2016-01-01

    The choice of model used to study human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is extremely important. RSV is a human pathogen that is exquisitely adapted to infection of human hosts. Rodent models, such as mice and cotton rats, are semi-permissive to RSV infection and do not faithfully reproduce hallmarks of RSV disease in humans. Furthermore, immortalized airway-derived cell lines, such as HEp-2, BEAS-2B, and A549 cells, are poorly representative of the complexity of the respiratory epithelium. The development of a well-differentiated primary pediatric airway epithelial cell models (WD-PAECs) allows us to simulate several hallmarks of RSV infection of infant airways. They therefore represent important additions to RSV pathogenesis modeling in human-relevant tissues. The following protocols describe how to culture and differentiate both bronchial and nasal primary pediatric airway epithelial cells and how to use these cultures to study RSV cytopathogenesis.

  8. Chronic exposure of rats to cotton-mill-room noise changes the cell composition of the tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maria João R; Pereira, António S; Guimarães, Laura; Freitas, Diamantino; Carvalho, António P O; Grande, Nuno R; Aguas, Artur P

    2002-12-01

    The work environment of cotton mill rooms of modern textile plants is characterized by noise pollution. We have taped and reproduced this noisy environment to study its effects on experimentally exposed rats. Because we have previously documented that chronic noise causes alterations in the respiratory epithelium, we have focused our investigation on the morphology of the tracheal lining. Wistar rats were exposed to the textile-type noise from 1 up to 7 months, with an average 40 hours weekly exposure of the animals. The rats were sacrificed monthly and the tracheas were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to quantify the areas of the airway lining that were covered by ciliated, serous or other cells of the epithelium. We found that noise exposure of the rats caused a significant loss of tracheal ciliated cells; an increased density of serous cells on the epithelium balanced this change. This modification of the rat trachea was already established after 1 month of noise treatment of the animals; it did not change significantly throughout the 7-month course of the herein investigation. Loss of ciliated cells was more intense in areas of the tracheal epithelium located between the regions of cartilage rings. We conclude that the ciliated cell is an elective target for damage caused on the respiratory epithelium by the workplace noise occurring in cotton mill rooms. This modification of the respiratory epithelium is likely to impair clearance of the airways since this function depends on the activity of ciliated cells.

  9. Effects of cigarette smoke and asbestos on airway, vascular and mesothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, H.; Wright, J.; Churg, A.

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine whether exposure to both cigarette smoke and asbestos leads to enhanced cell proliferation, and whether pleura cell proliferation reflects the presence of fibres at or near the pleura, rats were exposed to air (control), daily cigarette smoke, a single intratracheal instillation of amosite asbestos, or a combination of smoke and asbestos. Dividing cells were labelled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, 7 or 14 days. Both cigarette smoke and asbestos produced increases in the labelling index of small airway wall, epithelial cells and pulmonary artery cells. In the small airways there was a brief marked positive synergistic interaction between these two agents, but synergism was not seen in the vessels. Cigarette smoke did not increase the labelling of mesothelial or submesothelial cells, whereas asbestos caused a persisting increase in mesothelial cell labelling. There was no correlation between the number of BrdU labelled mesothelial or submesothelial cells and the number of fibres touching the pleura, or located within 180 microns of the pleura. We conclude that the combination of cigarette smoke and asbestos exposure produces a complex set of interactions and has the potential to markedly increase cell proliferation in the parenchyma, an effect that may be important in both fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis. In contrast to the diminishing effects over time of a single dose of asbestos on cell proliferation in the small airways and vessels, the same dose of asbestos leads to sustained mesothelial cell proliferation. However, the latter process does not correlate with local accumulation of asbestos fibres. Images Figure 1 PMID:8652361

  10. ExoU-induced procoagulant activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected airway cells.

    PubMed

    Plotkowski, M C; Feliciano, L F P; Machado, G B S; Cunha, L G; Freitas, C; Saliba, A M; de Assis, M C

    2008-12-01

    The present study addressed the question whether ExoU, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin with phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, may induce airway epithelial cells to overexpress tissue factor (TF) and exhibit a procoagulant phenotype. Cells from the human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B line were infected with an ExoU-producing P. aeruginosa strain, pre-treated or not with the cytosolic PLA2 inhibitor methylarachidonyl fluorophosphate (MAFP), or with two ExoU-deficient mutants. Control noninfected and infected cells were assessed for the expression of: 1) TF mRNA by RT-PCR; 2) cell-associated TF by enzyme immunoassay and flow cytometry; 3) procoagulant activity by a colorimetric assay; and 4) microparticle-associated TF by flow cytometry. An enzyme immunoassay was also used to assess cell-associated TF in lung extracts from mice infected intratracheally with ExoU-producing and -deficient bacteria. Cells infected with the wild-type bacteria had higher levels of TF mRNA, cell-associated TF expression, procoagulant activity and released microparticle-associated TF than cells infected with the mutants. Bacterial treatment with MAFP significantly reduced the expression of TF by infected cells. Lung samples from mice infected with the wild-type bacteria exhibited higher levels of cell-associated TF and procoagulant activity. The present results demonstrate that ExoU may contribute to the pathogenesis of lung injury by inducing a tissue factor-dependent procoagulant activity in airway epithelial cells.

  11. Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jae Hun; Bi, Dapeng; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Qazvini, Nader Taheri; Tantisira, Kelan; Park, Chan Young; McGill, Maureen; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Gweon, Bomi; Notbohm, Jacob; Steward, Robert, Jr.; Burger, Stephanie; Randell, Scott H.; Kho, Alvin T.; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Hardin, Corey; Shore, Stephanie A.; Israel, Elliot; Weitz, David A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Weiss, Scott T.; Manning, M. Lisa; Butler, James P.; Drazen, Jeffrey M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-10-01

    From coffee beans flowing in a chute to cells remodelling in a living tissue, a wide variety of close-packed collective systems--both inert and living--have the potential to jam. The collective can sometimes flow like a fluid or jam and rigidify like a solid. The unjammed-to-jammed transition remains poorly understood, however, and structural properties characterizing these phases remain unknown. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells, we show that the jamming transition in asthma is linked to cell shape, thus establishing in that system a structural criterion for cell jamming. Surprisingly, the collapse of critical scaling predicts a counter-intuitive relationship between jamming, cell shape and cell-cell adhesive stresses that is borne out by direct experimental observations. Cell shape thus provides a rigorous structural signature for classification and investigation of bronchial epithelial layer jamming in asthma, and potentially in any process in disease or development in which epithelial dynamics play a prominent role.

  12. A Cryptic Marine Ciliate Feeds on Progametes of Noctiluca scintillans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuwen; Chan, Kit Yu Karen; Shen, Zhuo; Cheung, Shunyan; Landry, Michael R; Liu, Hongbin

    2017-02-01

    The dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans (Noctiluca) has the ability to reproduce sexually, which may help to increase or restore its population size during periods of blooms or environmental stress. Here, we documented for the first time a marine ciliate Strombidium sp. that feeds on Noctiluca's progametes undergoing stages 5 to 9 of nuclear division. This ciliate frequently swam on or around gametogenic and some vegetative Noctiluca cells. The ciliates associated with gametogenic cells had significantly lower swimming speed and changed direction more frequently than those associated with vegetative cells, which overall increased their time spent around the food patches (progametes). This trophic interaction constitutes an upside-down predator-prey link, in which ciliates within the typical size range of Noctiluca prey, become the predators. Based on the phylogenetic tree (maximum-likelihood), there are 14 environmental clones similar to Strombidium sp. found in other coastal waters, where Noctiluca presence or blooms have been reported. This novel predator-prey relationship could therefore be common in other Noctiluca habitats. Additional studies are needed to assess the magnitude of its impacts on Noctiluca population dynamics and plankton bloom succession.

  13. Mast cells can amplify airway reactivity and features of chronic inflammation in an asthma model in mice.

    PubMed

    Williams, C M; Galli, S J

    2000-08-07

    The importance of mast cells in the development of the allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity and inflammation associated with asthma remains controversial. We found that genetically mast cell-deficient WBB6F(1)-W/W(v) mice that were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) without adjuvant, then challenged repetitively with antigen intranasally, exhibited much weaker responses in terms of bronchial hyperreactivity to aerosolized methacholine, lung tissue eosinophil infiltration, and numbers of proliferating cells within the airway epithelium than did identically treated WBB6F(1)-+/+ normal mice. However, W/W(v) mice that had undergone selective reconstitution of tissue mast cells with in vitro-derived mast cells of congenic +/+ mouse origin exhibited airway responses that were very similar to those of the +/+ mice. By contrast, W/W(v) mice that were sensitized with OVA emulsified in alum and challenged with aerosolized OVA exhibited levels of airway hyperreactivity and lung tissue eosinophil infiltration that were similar to those of the corresponding +/+ mice. Nevertheless, these W/W(v) mice exhibited significantly fewer proliferating cells within the airway epithelium than did identically treated +/+ mice. These results show that, depending on the "asthma model" investigated, mast cells can either have a critical role in, or not be essential for, multiple features of allergic airway responses in mice.

  14. Parasitic Nematode-Induced CD4+Foxp3+T Cells Can Ameliorate Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Mi-Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Park, Sang Kyun; Jang, Min Seong; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Background The recruitment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T (Treg) cells is one of the most important mechanisms by which parasites down-regulate the immune system. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the effects of Treg cells from Trichinella spiralis-infected mice and uninfected mice on experimental allergic airway inflammation in order to understand the functions of parasite-induced Treg cells. After four weeks of T. spiralis infection, we isolated Foxp3-GFP-expressing cells from transgenic mice using a cell sorter. We injected CD4+Foxp3+ cells from T. spiralis-infected [Inf(+)Foxp3+] or uninfected [Inf(-)Foxp3+] mice into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice before the induction of inflammation or during inflammation. Inflammation was induced by ovalbumin (OVA)-alum sensitization and OVA challenge. The concentrations of the Th2-related cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and the levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 in the serum were lower in mice that received intravenous application of Inf(+)Foxp3+ cells [IV(inf):+(+) group] than in control mice. Some features of allergic airway inflammation were ameliorated by the intravenous application of Inf(-)Foxp3+ cells [IV(inf):+(-) group], but the effects were less distinct than those observed in the IV(inf):+(+) group. We found that Inf(+)Foxp3+ cells migrated to inflammation sites in the lung and expressed higher levels of Treg-cell homing receptors (CCR5 and CCR9) and activation markers (Klrg1, Capg, GARP, Gzmb, OX40) than did Inf(-)Foxp3+ cells. Conclusion/Significance T. spiralis infection promotes the proliferation and functional activation of Treg cells. Parasite-induced Treg cells migrate to the inflammation site and suppress immune responses more effectively than non-parasite-induced Treg cells. The adoptive transfer of Inf(+)Foxp3+ cells is an effective method for the treatment and prevention of allergic airway diseases in mice and is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment

  15. Chitin-Induced Airway Epithelial Cell Innate Immune Responses Are Inhibited by Carvacrol/Thymol

    PubMed Central

    Erle, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is produced in large amounts by fungi, insects, and other organisms and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Airway epithelial cells are in direct contact with environmental particles and serve as the first line of defense against inhaled allergens and pathogens. The potential contributions of airway epithelial cells to chitin-induced asthma remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that chitin directly stimulates airway epithelial cells to release cytokines that promote type 2 immune responses and to induce expression of molecules which are important in innate immune responses. We found that chitin exposure rapidly induced the expression of three key type 2-promoting cytokines, IL-25, IL-33 and TSLP, in BEAS-2B transformed human bronchial epithelial cells and in A549 and H292 lung carcinoma cells. Chitin also induced the expression of the key pattern recognition receptors TLR2 and TLR4. Chitin induced the expression of miR-155, miR-146a and miR-21, each of which is known to up-regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Also the expression of SOCS1 and SHIP1 which are known targets of miR-155 was repressed by chitin treatment. The monoterpene phenol carvacrol (Car) and its isomer thymol (Thy) are found in herbal essential oils and have been shown to inhibit allergic inflammation in asthma models. We found that Car/Thy inhibited the effects of chitin on type 2-promoting cytokine release and on the expression of TLRs, SOCS1, SHIP1, and miRNAs. Car/Thy could also efficiently reduce the protein levels of TLR4, inhibit the increase in TLR2 protein levels in chitin plus Car/Thy-treated cells and increase the protein levels of SHIP1 and SOCS1, which are negative regulators of TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. We conclude that direct effects of chitin on airway epithelial cells are likely to contribute to allergic airway diseases like asthma, and that Car/Thy directly inhibits epithelial cell pro-inflammatory responses to chitin. PMID

  16. Carbocisteine inhibits oxidant-induced apoptosis in cultured human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Motoki; Nakayama, Katsutoshi; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2009-09-01

    Increased oxidant levels have been associated with exacerbations of COPD, and L-carbocisteine, a mucolytic agent, reduces the frequency of exacerbations. The mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of L-carbocisteine on oxidant-induced COPD exacerbations were examined in an in vitro study of human airway epithelial cells. In order to examine the antioxidant effects of L-carbocisteine, human tracheal epithelial cells were treated with L-carbocisteine and exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Cell apoptosis was assessed using a cell death detection ELISA, and the pathways leading to cell apoptosis were examined by measurement of caspase-3 and caspase-9 by western blot analysis with fluorescent detection. The proportion of apoptotic cells in human tracheal epithelium was increased in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, following exposure to H(2)O(2). Treatment with L-carbocisteine reduced the proportion of apoptotic cells. In contrast, H(2)O(2) did not increase the concentration of LDH in supernatants of epithelial cells. Exposure to H(2)O(2) activated caspase-3 and caspase-9, and L-carbocisteine inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced activation of these caspases. L-carbocisteine activated Akt phosphorylation, which modulates caspase activation, and the inhibitors of Akt, LY294002 and wortmannin, significantly reversed the inhibitory effects of L-carbocisteine on H(2)O(2)-induced cell apoptosis. These findings suggest that in human airway epithelium, L-carbocisteine may inhibit cell damage induced by H(2)O(2) through the activation of Akt phosphorylation. L-carbocisteine may have antioxidant effects, as well as mucolytic activity, in inflamed airways.

  17. Complement-Mediated Death of Ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis Caused by Human Blood Serum.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P A; Faktor, M I; Karpova, N S; Cheremnykh, E G; Brusov, O S

    2016-04-01

    Toxicity of human blood serum for ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis is determined by the complement system. When ciliate are dying after being exposed to blood serum, cell membrane permeability for low-molecular-weight compounds significantly increases, probably due to pore formation. Serine protease inhibitors or exposure to physical factors inducing complement inactivation (e.g., heating up to 56°C) completely prevented ciliate death under the effect of human serum. Activation of serum complement upon interaction with Tetrahymena cells occurred by the classical or lectin pathway, while the contribution of the alternative activation pathway was negligible.

  18. Ozone-Induced Type 2 Immunity in Nasal Airways. Development and Lymphoid Cell Dependence in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chee Bing; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Brooks, Phillip T; Brandenberger, Christina; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Nault, Rance; Zacharewski, Timothy R; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation exposures to ozone commonly encountered in photochemical smog cause airway injury and inflammation. Elevated ambient ozone concentrations have been epidemiologically associated with nasal airway activation of neutrophils and eosinophils. In the present study, we elucidated the temporal onset and lymphoid cell dependency of eosinophilic rhinitis and associated epithelial changes in mice repeatedly exposed to ozone. Lymphoid cell-sufficient C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0 or 0.5 parts per million (ppm) ozone for 1, 2, 4, or 9 consecutive weekdays (4 h/d). Lymphoid cell-deficient, Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice were similarly exposed for 9 weekdays. Nasal tissues were taken at 2 or 24 hours after exposure for morphometric and gene expression analyses. C57BL/6 mice exposed to ozone for 1 day had acute neutrophilic rhinitis, with airway epithelial necrosis and overexpression of mucosal Ccl2 (MCP-1), Ccl11 (eotaxin), Cxcl1 (KC), Cxcl2 (MIP-2), Hmox1, Il1b, Il5, Il6, Il13, and Tnf mRNA. In contrast, 9-day ozone exposure elicited type 2 immune responses in C57BL/6 mice, with mucosal mRNA overexpression of Arg1, Ccl8 (MCP-2), Ccl11, Chil4 (Ym2), Clca1 (Gob5), Il5, Il10, and Il13; increased density of mucosal eosinophils; and nasal epithelial remodeling (e.g., hyperplasia/hypertrophy, mucous cell metaplasia, hyalinosis, and increased YM1/YM2 proteins). Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice exposed to ozone for 9 days, however, had no nasal pathology or overexpression of transcripts related to type 2 immunity. These results provide a plausible paradigm for the activation of eosinophilic inflammation and type 2 immunity found in the nasal airways of nonatopic individuals subjected to episodic exposures to high ambient ozone.

  19. Organic electrochemical transistor array for recording transepithelial ion transport of human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chunlei; Xie, Changyan; Lin, Peng; Yan, Feng; Huang, Pingbo; Hsing, I-Ming

    2013-12-03

    An organic electrochemical transistor array is integrated with human airway epithelial cells. This integration provides a novel method to couple transepithelial ion transport with electrical current. Activation and inhibition of transepithelial ion transport are readily detected with excellent time resolution. The organic electrochemical transistor array serves as a promising platform for physiological studies and drug testing. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Peripheral killer cells do not differentiate between asthma patients with or without fixed airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Tubby, Carolyn; Negm, Ola H; Harrison, Timothy; Tighe, Patrick J; Todd, Ian; Fairclough, Lucy C

    2017-06-01

    The three main types of killer cells - CD8(+) T cells, NK cells and NKT cells - have been linked to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, their role in a small subset of asthma patients displaying fixed airway obstruction (FAO), similar to that seen in COPD, has not been explored. The objective of the present study was to investigate killer cell numbers, phenotype and function in peripheral blood from asthma patients with FAO, asthma patients without FAO, and healthy individuals. Peripheral CD8(+) T cells (CD8(+)CD3(+)CD56(-)), NK cells (CD56(+)CD3(-)) and NKT-like cells (CD56(+)CD3(+)) of 14 asthma patients with FAO (post-bronchodilator FEV/FVC <0.7, despite clinician-optimised treatment), 7 asthma patients without FAO (post-bronchodilator FEV/FVC ≥ 0.7), and 9 healthy individuals were studied. No significant differences were seen between the number, receptor expression, MAPK signalling molecule expression, cytotoxic mediator expression, and functional cytotoxicity of peripheral killer cells from asthma patients with FAO, asthma patients without FAO and healthy individuals. Peripheral killer cell numbers or functions do not differentiate between asthma patients with or without fixed airway obstruction.

  1. The effect of N-acetylcysteine on chloride efflux from airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Varelogianni, Georgia; Oliynyk, Igor; Roomans, Godfried M; Johannesson, Marie

    2010-01-27

    Defective chloride transport in epithelial cells increases mucus viscosity and leads to recurrent infections with high oxidative stress in patients with CF (cystic fibrosis). NAC (N-acetylcysteine) is a well known mucolytic and antioxidant drug, and an indirect precursor of glutathione. Since GSNO (S-nitrosoglutathione) previously has been shown to be able to promote Cl- efflux from CF airway epithelial cells, it was investigated whether NAC also could stimulate Cl- efflux from CF and non-CF epithelial cells and through which mechanisms. CFBE (CF bronchial epithelial cells) and normal bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE) were treated with 1 mM, 5 mM, 10 mM or 15 mM NAC for 4 h at 37 degrees C. The effect of NAC on Cl- transport was measured by Cl- efflux measurements and by X-ray microanalysis. Cl- efflux from CFBE cells was stimulated by NAC in a dose-dependent manner, with 10 mM NAC causing a significant increase in Cl- efflux with nearly 80% in CFBE cells. The intracellular Cl- concentration in CFBE cells was significantly decreased up to 60% after 4 h treatment with 10 mM NAC. Moreover immunocytochemistry and Western blot experiments revealed expression of CFTR channel on CFBE cells after treatment with 10 mM NAC. The stimulation of Cl- efflux by NAC in CF airway epithelial cells may improve hydration of the mucus and thereby be beneficial for CF patients.

  2. Baicalin inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Li, Jian-Qiang; Bo, Jian-Ping; Wang, Bei; Tian, Xin-Rui; Liu, Tan-Zhen; Liu, Zhuo-La

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation and migration play important roles in airway remodeling in asthma. In vitro platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) induced ASM cell proliferation and migration. Baicalin is one of flavonoid extracts from Scutellaria baicalensis, which has an anti-asthma effect. However, little is known about its role in PDGF-induced proliferation and migration in rat ASM (RASM) cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of baicalin on PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation and migration. We also identified the signaling pathway by which baicalin influences RASM cell proliferation and migration. In the current study, we demonstrated that baicalin suppressed PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation, arrested PDGF-induced cell-cycle progression. It also suppressed PDGF-induced RASM cell migration. Furthermore, baicalin suppressed PDGF-induced expression of phosphorylated p38, ERK1/2 and JNK in RASM cells. In summary, our study is the first to show that baicalin pretreatment can significantly inhibit PDGF-induced RASM cell proliferation and migration by suppressing the MAPK signaling pathway, and baicalin may be a useful chemotherapeutic agent for asthma.

  3. A comparative in-silico analysis of autophagy proteins in ciliates

    PubMed Central

    Küçükoğlu, Nurçin; Arslanyolu, Muhittin

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy serves as a turnover mechanism for the recycling of redundant and/or damaged macromolecules present in eukaryotic cells to re-use them under starvation conditions via a double-membrane structure known as autophagosome. A set of eukaryotic genes called autophagy-related genes (ATGs) orchestrate this highly elaborative process. The existence of these genes and the role they play in different eukaryotes are well-characterized. However, little is known of their role in some eukaryotes such as ciliates. Here, we report the computational analyses of ATG genes in five ciliate genomes to understand their diversity. Our results show that Oxytricha trifallax is the sole ciliate which has a conserved Atg12 conjugation system (Atg5-Atg12-Atg16). Interestingly, Oxytricha Atg16 protein includes WD repeats in addition to its N-terminal Atg16 domain as is the case in multicellular organisms. Additionally, phylogenetic analyses revealed that E2-like conjugating protein Atg10 is only present in Tetrahymena thermophila. We fail to find critical autophagy components Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8 in the parasitic ciliate Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. Contrary to previous reports, we also find that ciliate genomes do not encode typical Atg1 since all the candidate sequences lack an Atg1-specific C-terminal domain which is essential for Atg1 complex formation. Consistent with the absence of Atg1, ciliates also lack other members of the Atg1 complex. However, the presence of Atg6 in all ciliates examined here may rise the possibility that autophagosome formation could be operated through Atg6 in ciliates, since Atg6 has been shown as an alternative autophagy inducer. In conclusion, our results highlight that Atg proteins are partially conserved in ciliates. This may provide a better understanding for the autophagic destruction of the parental macronucleus, a developmental process also known as programmed nuclear death in ciliates. PMID:28123910

  4. Characterization and expression of the gene encoding En-MAPK1, an intestinal cell kinase (ICK)-like kinase activated by the autocrine pheromone-signaling loop in the Polar Ciliate, Euplotes nobilii.

    PubMed

    Candelori, Annalisa; Luporini, Pierangelo; Alimenti, Claudio; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-04-03

    In the protozoan ciliate Euplotes, a transduction pathway resulting in a mitogenic cell growth response is activated by autocrine receptor binding of cell type-specific, water-borne signaling protein pheromones. In Euplotes raikovi, a marine species of temperate waters, this transduction pathway was previously shown to involve the phosphorylation of a nuclear protein kinase structurally similar to the intestinal-cell and male germ cell-associated kinases described in mammals. In E. nobilii, which is phylogenetically closely related to E. raikovi but inhabits Antarctic and Arctic waters, we have now characterized a gene encoding a structurally homologous kinase. The expression of this gene requires +1 translational frameshifting and a process of intron splicing for the production of the active protein, designated En-MAPK1, which contains amino acid substitutions of potential significance for cold-adaptation.

  5. Mast Cells Can Amplify Airway Reactivity and Features of Chronic Inflammation in an Asthma Model in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cara M.M.; Galli, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    The importance of mast cells in the development of the allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity and inflammation associated with asthma remains controversial. We found that genetically mast cell–deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice that were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) without adjuvant, then challenged repetitively with antigen intranasally, exhibited much weaker responses in terms of bronchial hyperreactivity to aerosolized methacholine, lung tissue eosinophil infiltration, and numbers of proliferating cells within the airway epithelium than did identically treated WBB6F1-+/+ normal mice. However, W/Wv mice that had undergone selective reconstitution of tissue mast cells with in vitro–derived mast cells of congenic +/+ mouse origin exhibited airway responses that were very similar to those of the +/+ mice. By contrast, W/Wv mice that were sensitized with OVA emulsified in alum and challenged with aerosolized OVA exhibited levels of airway hyperreactivity and lung tissue eosinophil infiltration that were similar to those of the corresponding +/+ mice. Nevertheless, these W/Wv mice exhibited significantly fewer proliferating cells within the airway epithelium than did identically treated +/+ mice. These results show that, depending on the “asthma model” investigated, mast cells can either have a critical role in, or not be essential for, multiple features of allergic airway responses in mice. PMID:10934234

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells alleviate oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the airways.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Zhang, Yuelin; Wiegman, Coen H; Adcock, Ian M; Lian, Qizhou; Mak, Judith C W; Bhavsar, Pankaj K; Chung, Kian Fan

    2017-09-11

    Oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction may contribute to inflammation and remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) protect against lung damage in animal models of COPD. It is unknown whether these effects occur through attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction in airway cells. To examine the effect of induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs (iPSC-MSCs) on oxidative stress-induce mitochondrial dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) in vitro and in mouse lungs in vivo. ASMCs were co-cultured with iPSC-MSCs in the presence of cigarette smoke medium (CSM), and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and apoptosis were measured. Conditioned media from iPSC-MSCs and trans-well co-cultures were used to detect any paracrine effects. The effect of systemic injection of iPSC-MSCs on airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness in ozone-exposed mice was also investigated. Co-culture of iPSC-MSCs with ASMCs attenuated CSM-induced mitochondrial ROS, apoptosis and ΔΨm loss in ASMCs. iPSC-MSC-conditioned media or trans-well co-cultures with iPSC-MSCs reduced CSM-induced mitochondrial ROS but not ΔΨm or apoptosis in ASMCs. Mitochondrial transfer from iPSC-MSCs to ASMCs was observed after direct co-culture and was enhanced by CSM. iPSC-MSCs attenuated ozone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, airway hyper-responsiveness and inflammation in mouse lungs. iPSC-MSCs offered protection against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in human ASMCs and in mouse lungs, whilst reducing airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness. These effects are, at least partly, dependent on cell-cell contact that allows for mitochondrial transfer, and paracrine regulation. Therefore, iPSC-MSCs show promise as a therapy for oxidative stress-dependent lung diseases such as COPD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. AMPK agonists ameliorate sodium and fluid transport and inflammation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Myerburg, Michael M; King, J Darwin; Oyster, Nicholas M; Fitch, Adam C; Magill, Amy; Baty, Catherine J; Watkins, Simon C; Kolls, Jay K; Pilewski, Joseph M; Hallows, Kenneth R

    2010-06-01

    The metabolic sensor AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) inhibits both the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel and epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC), and may inhibit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in epithelia. Here we have tested in primary polarized CF and non-CF human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells the effects of AMPK activators, metformin and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-riboside (AICAR), on various parameters that contribute to CF lung disease: ENaC-dependent short-circuit currents (I(sc)), airway surface liquid (ASL) height, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. AMPK activation after overnight treatment with either metformin (2-5 mM) or AICAR (1 mM) substantially inhibited ENaC-dependent I(sc) in both CF and non-CF airway cultures. Live-cell confocal images acquired 60 minutes after apical addition of Texas Red-dextran-containing fluid revealed significantly greater ASL heights after AICAR and metformin treatment relative to controls, suggesting that AMPK-dependent ENaC inhibition slows apical fluid reabsorption. Both metformin and AICAR decreased secretion of various proinflammatory cytokines, both with and without prior LPS stimulation. Finally, prolonged exposure to more physiologically relevant concentrations of metformin (0.03-1 mM) inhibited ENaC currents and decreased proinflammatory cytokine levels in CF HBE cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that novel therapies to activate AMPK in the CF airway may be beneficial by blunting excessive sodium and ASL absorption and by reducing excessive airway inflammation, which are major contributors to CF lung disease.

  8. AMPK Agonists Ameliorate Sodium and Fluid Transport and Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Myerburg, Michael M.; King, J Darwin; Oyster, Nicholas M.; Fitch, Adam C.; Magill, Amy; Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C.; Kolls, Jay K.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Hallows, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic sensor AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) inhibits both the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel and epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC), and may inhibit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in epithelia. Here we have tested in primary polarized CF and non-CF human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells the effects of AMPK activators, metformin and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-riboside (AICAR), on various parameters that contribute to CF lung disease: ENaC-dependent short-circuit currents (Isc), airway surface liquid (ASL) height, and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. AMPK activation after overnight treatment with either metformin (2–5 mM) or AICAR (1 mM) substantially inhibited ENaC-dependent Isc in both CF and non-CF airway cultures. Live-cell confocal images acquired 60 minutes after apical addition of Texas Red–dextran-containing fluid revealed significantly greater ASL heights after AICAR and metformin treatment relative to controls, suggesting that AMPK-dependent ENaC inhibition slows apical fluid reabsorption. Both metformin and AICAR decreased secretion of various proinflammatory cytokines, both with and without prior LPS stimulation. Finally, prolonged exposure to more physiologically relevant concentrations of metformin (0.03–1 mM) inhibited ENaC currents and decreased proinflammatory cytokine levels in CF HBE cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that novel therapies to activate AMPK in the CF airway may be beneficial by blunting excessive sodium and ASL absorption and by reducing excessive airway inflammation, which are major contributors to CF lung disease. PMID:19617399

  9. Fluticasone impact on airway dendritic cells in smokers: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Myeloid Dendritic cells are key drivers of inflammation in smoke-related lung diseases, whereas plasmacytoid DCs play a crucial role in the defense against infections. Effects of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) on airway DCs in smokers are unknown. Methods In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 45 active cigarette smokers inhaled placebo, fluticasone or fluticasone plus salmeterol twice daily for 4 weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid DCs were analyzed using four-color flow cytometry before and after the inhalation period. In addition, fluticasone effects were tested on T-cell proliferation in co-cultures with blood myeloid DCs from smokers. Results Inhalation of fluticasone plus salmeterol, but not fluticasone alone or placebo, reduced endobronchial concentrations of myeloid DCs (median decrease: 24%), macrophages (median decrease: 26%) and neutrophils (median decrease: 76%). In contrast, fluticasone reduced plasmacytoid DC concentrations independently of salmeterol. There were no changes in the expression of function-associated surface molecules on myeloid DC (such as CD1a, Langerin, BDCA-1, CD83 or CCR5) in all groups after treatment. Fluticasone (either alone or in combination with salmeterol) suppressed T-cell proliferation in co-cultures with blood myeloid DCs from smokers. Conclusions Resistance to ICS monotherapy in smokers might in part be due to lacking effects on airway myeloid DCs, whereas the increased risk for infections during ICS therapy could be attributable to a reduction in plasmacytoid DCs. Combination therapy of fluticasone with salmeterol is associated with a reduction in airway myeloid DCs, but also airway macrophages and neutrophils. Trial registration Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT00908362) and the European Clinical Trial Database, EudraCT (identifier: 2009-009459-40). PMID:24168756

  10. Fluticasone impact on airway dendritic cells in smokers: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lommatzsch, Marek; Kraeft, Ulrike; Troebs, Laura; Garbe, Katharina; Bier, Andrea; Stoll, Paul; Klammt, Sebastian; Kuepper, Michael; Bratke, Kai; Virchow, Johann Christian

    2013-10-29

    Myeloid Dendritic cells are key drivers of inflammation in smoke-related lung diseases, whereas plasmacytoid DCs play a crucial role in the defense against infections. Effects of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) on airway DCs in smokers are unknown. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 45 active cigarette smokers inhaled placebo, fluticasone or fluticasone plus salmeterol twice daily for 4 weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid DCs were analyzed using four-color flow cytometry before and after the inhalation period. In addition, fluticasone effects were tested on T-cell proliferation in co-cultures with blood myeloid DCs from smokers. Inhalation of fluticasone plus salmeterol, but not fluticasone alone or placebo, reduced endobronchial concentrations of myeloid DCs (median decrease: 24%), macrophages (median decrease: 26%) and neutrophils (median decrease: 76%). In contrast, fluticasone reduced plasmacytoid DC concentrations independently of salmeterol. There were no changes in the expression of function-associated surface molecules on myeloid DC (such as CD1a, Langerin, BDCA-1, CD83 or CCR5) in all groups after treatment. Fluticasone (either alone or in combination with salmeterol) suppressed T-cell proliferation in co-cultures with blood myeloid DCs from smokers. Resistance to ICS monotherapy in smokers might in part be due to lacking effects on airway myeloid DCs, whereas the increased risk for infections during ICS therapy could be attributable to a reduction in plasmacytoid DCs. Combination therapy of fluticasone with salmeterol is associated with a reduction in airway myeloid DCs, but also airway macrophages and neutrophils. Registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT00908362) and the European Clinical Trial Database, EudraCT (identifier: 2009-009459-40).

  11. Role of non-coding RNAs in maintaining primary airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell maintains its own proliferative rate and contributes to the inflammatory response in the airways, effects that are inhibited by corticosteroids, used in the treatment of airways diseases. Objective We determined the differential expression of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNA species (lncRNAs) in primary ASM cells following treatment with a corticosteroid, dexamethasone, and fetal calf serum (FCS). Methods mRNA, miRNA and lncRNA expression was measured by microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. Results A small number of miRNAs (including miR-150, −371-5p, −718, −940, −1181, −1207-5p, −1915, and −3663-3p) were decreased following exposure to dexamethasone and FCS. The mRNA targets of these miRNAs were increased in expression. The changes in mRNA expression were associated with regulation of ASM actin cytoskeleton. We also observed changes in expression of lncRNAs, including natural antisense, pseudogenes, intronic lncRNAs, and intergenic lncRNAs following dexamethasone and FCS. We confirmed the change in expression of three of these, LINC00882, LINC00883, PVT1, and its transcriptional activator, c-MYC. We propose that four of these lincRNAs (RP11-46A10.4, LINC00883, BCYRN1, and LINC00882) act as miRNA ‘sponges’ for 4 miRNAs (miR-150, −371-5p, −940, −1207-5p). Conclusion This in-vitro model of primary ASM cell phenotype was associated with the regulation of several ncRNAs. Their identification allows for in-vitro functional experimentation to establish causality with the primary ASM phenotype, and in airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PMID:24886442

  12. Inhibitory effects of carbocisteine on type A seasonal influenza virus infection in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Mutsuo; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Shinya, Kyoko; Hatachi, Yukimasa; Sasaki, Takahiko; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Yoshida, Motoki; Asada, Masanori; Fujino, Naoya; Suzuki, Takaya; Deng, Xue; Kubo, Hiroshi; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2010-08-01

    Type A human seasonal influenza (FluA) virus infection causes exacerbations of bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). l-carbocisteine, a mucolytic agent, reduces the frequency of common colds and exacerbations in COPD. However, the inhibitory effects of l-carbocisteine on FluA virus infection are uncertain. We studied the effects of l-carbocisteine on FluA virus infection in airway epithelial cells. Human tracheal epithelial cells were pretreated with l-carbocisteine and infected with FluA virus (H(3)N(2)). Viral titers in supernatant fluids, RNA of FluA virus in the cells, and concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines in supernatant fluids, including IL-6, increased with time after infection. l-carbocisteine reduced viral titers in supernatant fluids, RNA of FluA virus in the cells, the susceptibility to FluA virus infection, and concentrations of cytokines induced by virus infection. The epithelial cells expressed sialic acid with an alpha2,6-linkage (SAalpha2,6Gal), a receptor for human influenza virus on the cells, and l-carbocisteine reduced the expression of SAalpha2,6Gal. l-carbocisteine reduced the number of acidic endosomes from which FluA viral RNA enters into the cytoplasm and reduced the fluorescence intensity from acidic endosomes. Furthermore, l-carbocisteine reduced NF-kappaB proteins including p50 and p65 in the nuclear extracts of the cells. These findings suggest that l-carbocisteine may inhibit FluA virus infection, partly through the reduced expression of the receptor for human influenza virus in the human airway epithelial cells via the inhibition of NF-kappaB and through increasing pH in endosomes. l-carbocisteine may reduce airway inflammation in influenza virus infection.

  13. Following damage, the majority of bone marrow-derived airway cells express an epithelial marker

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Heather; Keir, Pamela A; Edwards, Carol J; Webb, Sheila; Dorin, Julia R

    2006-01-01

    Background Adult-derived bone marrow stem cells are capable of reconstituting the haematopoietic system. However there is ongoing debate in the literature as to whether bone marrow derived cells have the ability to populate other tissues and express tissue specific markers. The airway has been an organ of major interest and was one of the first where this was demonstrated. We have previously demonstrated that the mouse airway can be repopulated by side population bone marrow transplanted cells. Here we investigate the frequency and phenotypic nature of these bone marrow derived cells. Methods Female mice were engrafted with male whole bone marrow or side population (SP) cells and subjected to detergent-induced damage after 3 months. Donor cells were identified by Y chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridisation and their phenotype was assessed by immunohistochemistry on the same sections. Slides were visualised by a combination of widefield and deconvolved microscopy and whole cells were analysed on cytospin preparations. Results The frequencies of engraftment of male cells in the airway of mice that show this (9/10), range from 1.0 – 1.6% with whole marrow and 0.6 – 1.5% with SP cells. Undamaged controls have only between 0.1 and 0.2% male cells in the trachea. By widefield microscopy analysis we find 60.2% (53/88) of male donor derived cells express cytokeratins as a marker of epithelial cells. These results were reinforced using deconvolved microscopy and scored by two independent investigators. In addition cytospin analysis of cells dissociated from the damaged trachea of engrafted mice also reveals donor derived Y chromosome positive cells that are immunopositive for cytokeratin. Using cytokeratin and the universal haematopoietic marker CD45 immunohistochemistry, we find the donor derived cells fall into four phenotypic classes. We do not detect cytokeratin positive cells in whole bone marrow using cytokeratin immunostaining and we do not detect any

  14. Effects of cigarette smoke extract on human airway smooth muscle cells in COPD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Ge, Qi; Tjin, Gavin; Alkhouri, Hatem; Deng, Linghong; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Adcock, Ian; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje; Burgess, Janette K; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G G

    2014-09-01

    We hypothesised that the response to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells from smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) would be intrinsically different from smokers without COPD, producing greater pro-inflammatory mediators and factors relating to airway remodelling. ASM cells were obtained from smokers with or without COPD, and then stimulated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or transforming growth factor-β1. The production of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by ELISA, and the deposition of collagens by extracellular matrix ELISA. The effects of CSE on cell attachment and wound healing were measured by toluidine blue attachment and cell tracker green wound healing assays. CSE increased the release of CXCL8 and CXCL1 from human ASM cells, and cells from smokers with COPD produced more CSE-induced CXCL1. The production of MMP-1, -3 and -10, and the deposition of collagen VIII alpha 1 (COL8A1) were increased by CSE, especially in the COPD group which had higher production of MMP-1 and deposition of COL8A1. CSE decreased ASM cell attachment and wound healing in the COPD group only. ASM cells from smokers with COPD were more sensitive to CSE stimulation, which may explain, in part, why some smokers develop COPD.

  15. Apigenin inhibits TGF-β1-induced proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Hua; Lu, Bin; Wu, Hong-Ke; Zhang, Hao; Yao, Fei-Fei

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the proliferation and migration of ASM cells (ASMCs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in asthma. Previous studies reported that apigenin can inhibit airway remodeling in a mouse asthma model. However, its effects on the proliferation and migration of ASMCs in asthma remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of our present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on ASMC proliferation and migration, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. We found that apigenin inhibited transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced ASMC proliferation. The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by apigenin. It also suppressed TGF-β1-induced ASMCs migration. Furthermore, apigenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced Smad 2 and Smad 3 phosphorylation in ASMCs. Taken together, these results suggested that apigenin inhibited the proliferation and migration of TGF-β1-stimulated ASMCs by inhibiting Smad signaling pathway. These data might provide useful information for treating asthma and show that apigenin has potential for attenuating airway remodeling.

  16. Apigenin inhibits TGF-β1-induced proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Hua; Lu, Bin; Wu, Hong-Ke; Zhang, Hao; Yao, Fei-Fei

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the proliferation and migration of ASM cells (ASMCs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in asthma. Previous studies reported that apigenin can inhibit airway remodeling in a mouse asthma model. However, its effects on the proliferation and migration of ASMCs in asthma remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of our present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on ASMC proliferation and migration, and explore the possible molecular mechanism. We found that apigenin inhibited transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced ASMC proliferation. The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by apigenin. It also suppressed TGF-β1-induced ASMCs migration. Furthermore, apigenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced Smad 2 and Smad 3 phosphorylation in ASMCs. Taken together, these results suggested that apigenin inhibited the proliferation and migration of TGF-β1-stimulated ASMCs by inhibiting Smad signaling pathway. These data might provide useful information for treating asthma and show that apigenin has potential for attenuating airway remodeling. PMID:26722444

  17. Nitrite Modulates Bacterial Antibiotic Susceptibility and Biofilm Formation in Association with Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zemke, Anna C; Shiva, Sruti; Burn, Jane L.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogenic bacteria in cystic fibrosis and other forms of bronchiectasis. Growth in antibiotic resistant biofilms contributes to the virulence of this organism. Sodium nitrite has antimicrobial properties and has been tolerated as a nebulized compound at high concentrations in human subjects with pulmonary hypertension; however, its effects have not been evaluated on biotic biofilms or in combination with other clinically useful antibiotics. We grew P. aeruginosa on the apical surface of primary human airway epithelial cells to test the efficacy of sodium nitrite against biotic biofilms. Nitrite alone prevented 99% of biofilm growth. We then identified significant cooperative interactions between nitrite and polymyxins. For P. aeruginosa growing on primary CF airway cells, combining nitrite and colistimethate resulted in an additional log of bacterial inhibition compared to treating with either agent alone. Nitrite and colistimethate additively inhibited oxygen consumption by P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly, while the antimicrobial effects of nitrite in planktonic, aerated cultures are nitric oxide (NO) dependent, antimicrobial effects in other growth conditions are not. The inhibitory effect of nitrite on bacterial oxygen consumption and biofilm growth did not require NO as an intermediate as chemically scavenging NO did not block growth inhibition. These data suggest an NO-radical independent nitrosative or oxidative inhibition of respiration. The combination of nebulized sodium nitrite and colistimethate may provide a novel therapy for chronic P. aeruginosa airway infections, because sodium nitrite, unlike other antibiotic respiratory chain ‘poisons’, can be safely nebulized at high concentration in humans. PMID:25229185

  18. The innate immune function of airway epithelial cells in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Pieter S.; McCray, Paul B.; Bals, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The airway epithelium is now considered central to the orchestration of pulmonary inflammatory and immune responses, and is also key to tissue remodelling. It acts as a first barrier in the defence against a wide range of inhaled challenges, and is critically involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses to these challenges. Recent progress in our understanding of the developmental regulation of this tissue, the differentiation pathways, recognition of pathogens and antimicrobial responses is now exploited to help understand how epithelial cell function and dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory lung diseases. In the review, advances in our knowledge of the biology of airway epithelium, as well as its role and (dys)function in asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis, are discussed. PMID:25700381

  19. Differentiated swine airway epithelial cell cultures for the investigation of influenza A virus infection and replication

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Allen C.; Karasin, Alexander I.; Olsen, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Bateman et al. (2013) Differentiated swine airway epithelial cell cultures for the investigation of influenza A virus infection and replication. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(2) 139–150. Background  Differentiated human airway epithelial cell cultures have been utilized to investigate cystic fibrosis, wound healing, and characteristics of viral infections. These cultures, grown at an air–liquid interface (ALI) in media with defined hormones and growth factors, recapitulate many aspects of the in vivo respiratory tract and allow for experimental studies at the cellular level. Objectives  To optimize growth conditions for differentiated swine airway epithelial cultures and to use these cultures to examine influenza virus infection and replication. Methods  Primary swine respiratory epithelial cells were grown at an air–liquid interface with varying amounts of retinoic acid and epidermal growth factor. Cells grown with optimized concentrations of these factors for 4 weeks differentiated into multilayer epithelial cell cultures resembling the lining of the swine respiratory tract. Influenza virus infection and replication were examined in these cultures. Results/Conclusions  Retinoic acid promoted ciliogenesis, whereas epidermal growth factor controlled the thickness of the pseudoepithelium. The optimal concentrations for differentiated swine cell cultures were 1·5 ng/ml epidermal growth factor and 100 nm retinoic acid. Influenza A viruses infected and productively replicated in these cultures in the absence of exogenous trypsin, suggesting that the cultures express a protease capable of activating influenza virus hemagglutinin. Differences in virus infection and replication characteristics found previously in pigs in vivo were recapitulated in the swine cultures. This system could be a useful tool for a range of applications, including investigating influenza virus species specificity, defining cell tropism

  20. Wnt Signaling Regulates Airway Epithelial Stem Cells in Adult Murine Submucosal Glands.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Thomas J; Anderson, Preston J; Xie, Weiliang; Crooke, Adrianne K; Liu, Xiaoming; Tyler, Scott R; Luo, Meihui; Kusner, David M; Zhang, Yulong; Neff, Traci; Burnette, Daniel C; Walters, Katherine S; Goodheart, Michael J; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-06-24

    Wnt signaling is required for lineage commitment of glandular stem cells (SCs) during tracheal submucosal gland (SMG) morphogenesis from the surface airway epithelium (SAE). Whether similar Wnt-dependent processes coordinate SC expansion in adult SMGs following airway injury remains unknown. We found that two Wnt-reporters in mice (BAT-gal and TCF/Lef:H2B-GFP) are coexpressed in actively cycling SCs of primordial glandular placodes and in a small subset of adult SMG progenitor cells that enter the cell cycle 24 hours following airway injury. At homeostasis, these Wnt reporters showed nonoverlapping cellular patterns of expression in the SAE and SMGs. Following tracheal injury, proliferation was accompanied by dynamic changes in Wnt-reporter activity and the analysis of 56 Wnt-related signaling genes revealed unique temporal changes in expression within proximal (gland-containing) and distal (gland-free) portions of the trachea. Wnt stimulation in vivo and in vitro promoted epithelial proliferation in both SMGs and the SAE. Interestingly, slowly cycling nucleotide label-retaining cells (LRCs) of SMGs were spatially positioned near clusters of BAT-gal positive serous tubules. Isolation and culture of tet-inducible H2B-GFP LRCs demonstrated that SMG LRCs were more proliferative than SAE LRCs and culture expanded SMG-derived progenitor cells outcompeted SAE-derived progenitors in regeneration of tracheal xenograft epithelium using a clonal analysis competition assay. SMG-derived progenitors were also multipotent for cell types in the SAE and formed gland-like structures in xenografts. These studies demonstrate the importance of Wnt signals in modulating SC phenotypes within tracheal niches and provide new insight into phenotypic differences of SMG and SAE SCs. Stem Cells 2016.

  1. NK cells contribute to persistent airway inflammation and AHR during the later stage of RSV infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Xiaoru; Xie, Jun; Zhao, Keting; Li, Wei; Tang, Wei; Chen, Sisi; Zang, Na; Ren, Luo; Deng, Yu; Xie, Xiaohong; Wang, Lijia; Fu, Zhou; Liu, Enmei

    2016-10-01

    RSV can lead to persistent airway inflammation and AHR and is intimately associated with childhood recurrent wheezing and asthma, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. There are high numbers of NK cells in the lung, which not only play important roles in the acute stage of RSV infection, but also are pivotal in regulating the pathogenesis of asthma. Therefore, in this study, we assumed that NK cells might contribute to persistent airway disease during the later stage of RSV infection. Mice were killed at serial time points after RSV infection to collect samples. Leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted, lung histopathology was examined, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured by whole-body plethysmography. Cytokines were detected by ELISA, and NK cells were determined by flow cytometry. Rabbit anti-mouse asialo-GM-1 antibodies and resveratrol were used to deplete or suppress NK cells. Inflammatory cells in BALF, lung tissue damage and AHR were persistent for 60 days post-RSV infection. Type 2 cytokines and NK cells were significantly increased during the later stage of infection. When NK cells were decreased by the antibodies or resveratrol, type 2 cytokines, the persistent airway inflammation and AHR were all markedly reduced. NK cells can contribute to the RSV-associated persistent airway inflammation and AHR at least partially by promoting type 2 cytokines. Therefore, therapeutic targeting of NK cells may provide a novel approach to alleviating the recurrent wheezing subsequent to RSV infection.

  2. Mature cystic fibrosis airway neutrophils suppress T cell function: evidence for a role of arginase 1 but not programmed death-ligand 1.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Sarah A; Laval, Julie; Forrest, Osric A; Preininger, Marcela; Brown, Milton R; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg; Tangpricha, Vin; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, and although T cells with appropriate Ag specificity are present in draining lymph nodes, they are conspicuously absent from the lumen. To account for this absence, we hypothesized that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), recruited massively into the CF airway lumen and actively exocytosing primary granules, also suppress T cell function therein. Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), which exerts T cell suppression at a late step, was expressed bimodally on CF airway PMNs, delineating PD-L1(hi) and PD-L1(lo) subsets, whereas healthy control (HC) airway PMNs were uniformly PD-L1(hi). Blood PMNs incubated in CF airway fluid lost PD-L1 over time; in coculture, Ab blockade of PD-L1 failed to inhibit the suppression of T cell proliferation by CF airway PMNs. In contrast with PD-L1, arginase 1 (Arg1), which exerts T cell suppression at an early step, was uniformly high on CF and HC airway PMNs. However, arginase activity was high in CF airway fluid and minimal in HC airway fluid, consistent with the fact that Arg1 activation requires primary granule exocytosis, which occurs in CF, but not HC, airway PMNs. In addition, Arg1 expression on CF airway PMNs correlated negatively with lung function and positively with arginase activity in CF airway fluid. Finally, combined treatment with arginase inhibitor and arginine rescued the suppression of T cell proliferation by CF airway fluid. Thus, Arg1 and PD-L1 are dynamically modulated upon PMN migration into human airways, and, Arg1, but not PD-L1, contributes to early PMN-driven T cell suppression in CF, likely hampering resolution of infection and inflammation.

  3. MATURE CYSTIC FIBROSIS AIRWAY NEUTROPHILS SUPPRESS T-CELL FUNCTION: EVIDENCE FOR A ROLE OF ARGINASE 1, BUT NOT PROGRAMMED DEATH-LIGAND 1

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Sarah A.; Laval, Julie; Forrest, Osric A.; Preininger, Marcela; Brown, Milton R.; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg; Tangpricha, Vin; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria colonize cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, and while T cells with appropriate antigen specificity are present in draining lymph nodes, they are conspicuously absent from the lumen. To account for this absence, we hypothesized that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), recruited massively into the CF airway lumen and actively exocytosing primary granules, also suppress T-cell function therein. Programmed Death-Ligand 1 (PD-L1), which exerts T-cell suppression at a late step, was expressed bimodally on CF airway PMNs, delineating PD-L1hi and PD-L1lo subsets, while healthy control (HC) airway PMNs were uniformly PD-L1hi. Blood PMNs incubated in CF airway fluid lost PD-L1 over time, and in coculture, antibody blockade of PD-L1 failed to inhibit the suppression of T-cell proliferation by CF airway PMNs. In contrast with PD-L1, arginase 1 (Arg1), which exerts T-cell suppression at an early step, was uniformly high on CF and HC airway PMNs. However, arginase activity was high in CF airway fluid and minimal in HC airway fluid, consistent with the fact that Arg1 activation requires primary granule exocytosis, which occurs in CF, but not HC, airway PMNs. In addition, Arg1 expression on CF airway PMNs correlated negatively with lung function and positively with arginase activity in CF airway fluid. Finally, combined treatment with arginase inhibitor and arginine rescued the suppression of T-cell proliferation by CF airway fluid. Thus, Arg1 and PD-L1 are dynamically modulated upon PMN migration into human airways, and, Arg1, but not PD-L1, contributes to early PMN-driven T-cell suppression in CF, likely hampering resolution of infection and inflammation. PMID:25926674

  4. Electronic cigarette liquid increases inflammation and virus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qun; Jiang, Di; Minor, Maisha; Chu, Hong Wei

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) is rapidly increasing in the United States, especially among young people since e-cigarettes have been perceived as a safer alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. However, the scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes on the lung is extremely limited. The major goal of our current study is to determine if e-cigarette use alters human young subject airway epithelial functions such as inflammatory response and innate immune defense against respiratory viral (i.e., human rhinovirus, HRV) infection. We examined the effects of e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid) on pro-inflammatory cytokine (e.g., IL-6) production, HRV infection and host defense molecules (e.g., short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1, SPLUNC1) in primary human airway epithelial cells from young healthy non-smokers. Additionally, we examined the role of SPLUNC1 in lung defense against HRV infection using a SPLUNC1 knockout mouse model. We found that nicotine-free e-liquid promoted IL-6 production and HRV infection. Addition of nicotine into e-liquid further amplified the effects of nicotine-free e-liquid. Moreover, SPLUNC1 deficiency in mice significantly increased lung HRV loads. E-liquid inhibited SPLUNC1 expression in primary human airway epithelial cells. These findings strongly suggest the deleterious health effects of e-cigarettes in the airways of young people. Our data will guide future studies to evaluate the impact of e-cigarettes on lung health in human populations, and help inform the public about potential health risks of e-cigarettes.

  5. Secretion of IL-13 by airway epithelial cells enhances epithelial repair via HB-EGF.

    PubMed

    Allahverdian, Sima; Harada, Norihiro; Singhera, Gurpreet K; Knight, Darryl A; Dorscheid, Delbert R

    2008-02-01

    Inappropriate repair after injury to the epithelium generates persistent activation, which may contribute to airway remodeling. In the present study we hypothesized that IL-13 is a normal mediator of airway epithelial repair. Mechanical injury of confluent airway epithelial cell (AEC) monolayers induced expression and release of IL-13 in a time-dependent manner coordinate with repair. Neutralizing of IL-13 secreted from injured epithelial cells by shIL-13Ralpha2.FC significantly reduced epithelial repair. Moreover, exogenous IL-13 enhanced epithelial repair and induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation. We examined secretion of two EGFR ligands, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF), after mechanical injury. Our data showed a sequential release of the EGF and HB-EGF by AEC after injury. Interestingly, we found that IL-13 induces HB-EGF, but not EGF, synthesis and release from AEC. IL-13-induced EGFR phosphorylation and the IL-13-reparative effect on AEC are mediated via HB-EGF. Finally, we demonstrated that inhibition of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity by tyrphostin AG1478 increases IL-13 release after injury, suggesting negative feedback between EGFR and IL-13 during repair. Our data, for the first time, showed that IL-13 plays an important role in epithelial repair, and that its effect is mediated through the autocrine release of HB-EGF and activation of EGFR. Dysregulation of EGFR phosphorylation may contribute to a persistent repair phenotype and chronically increased IL-13 release, and in turn result in airway remodeling.

  6. Functional invariant NKT cells in pig lungs regulate the airway hyperreactivity: a potential animal model.

    PubMed

    Renukaradhya, Gourapura J; Manickam, Cordelia; Khatri, Mahesh; Rauf, Abdul; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Dwivedi, Varun

    2011-04-01

    Important roles played by invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in asthma pathogenesis have been demonstrated. We identified functional iNKT cells and CD1d molecules in pig lungs. Pig iNKT cells cultured in the presence of α-GalCer proliferated and secreted Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Like in other animal models, direct activation of pig lung iNKT cells using α-GalCer resulted in acute airway hyperreactivity (AHR). Clinically, acute AHR-induced pigs had increased respiratory rate, enhanced mucus secretion in the airways, fever, etc. In addition, we observed petechial hemorrhages, infiltration of CD4(+) cells, and increased Th2 cytokines in AHR-induced pig lungs. Ex vivo proliferated iNKT cells of asthma induced pigs in the presence of C-glycoside analogs of α-GalCer had predominant Th2 phenotype and secreted more of Th2 cytokine, IL-4. Thus, baby pigs may serve as a useful animal model to study iNKT cell-mediated AHR caused by various environmental and microbial CD1d-specific glycolipid antigens.

  7. Novel flow cytometry approach to identify bronchial epithelial cells from healthy human airways

    PubMed Central

    Maestre-Batlle, Danay; Pena, Olga M.; Hirota, Jeremy A.; Gunawan, Evelyn; Rider, Christopher F.; Sutherland, Darren; Alexis, Neil E.; Carlsten, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Sampling various compartments within the lower airways to examine human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) is essential for understanding numerous lung diseases. Conventional methods to identify HBEC in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and wash (BW) have throughput limitations in terms of efficiency and ensuring adequate cell numbers for quantification. Flow cytometry can provide high-throughput quantification of cell number and function in BAL and BW samples, while requiring low cell numbers. To date, a flow cytometric method to identify HBEC recovered from lower human airway samples is unavailable. In this study we present a flow cytometric method identifying HBEC as CD45 negative, EpCAM/pan-cytokeratin (pan-CK) double-positive population after excluding debris, doublets and dead cells from the analysis. For validation, the HBEC panel was applied to primary HBEC resulting in 98.6% of live cells. In healthy volunteers, HBEC recovered from BAL (2.3% of live cells), BW (32.5%) and bronchial brushing samples (88.9%) correlated significantly (p = 0.0001) with the manual microscopy counts with an overall Pearson correlation of 0.96 across the three sample types. We therefore have developed, validated, and applied a flow cytometric method that will be useful to interrogate the role of the respiratory epithelium in multiple lung diseases. PMID:28165060

  8. Identification of a Human Airway Epithelial Cell Subpopulation with Altered Biophysical, Molecular, and Metastatic Properties.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Paul C; Tran, Linh M; Bendris, Nawal; O'Byrne, Sean; Tse, Henry T; Sharma, Shivani; Hoech, Jonathan W; Park, Stacy J; Liclican, Elvira L; Jing, Zhe; Li, Rui; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Paul, Manash K; Fontebasso, Yari; Larsen, Jill E; Hakimi, Shaina; Seki, Atsuko; Fishbein, Michael C; Gimzewski, James K; Carlo, Dino Di; Minna, John D; Walser, Tonya C; Dubinett, Steven M

    2017-09-01

    Lung cancers are documented to have remarkable intratumoral genetic heterogeneity. However, little is known about the heterogeneity of biophysical properties, such as cell motility, and its relationship to early disease pathogenesis and micrometastatic dissemination. In this study, we identified and selected a subpopulation of highly migratory premalignant airway epithelial cells that were observed to migrate through microscale constrictions at up to 100-fold the rate of the unselected immortalized epithelial cell lines. This enhanced migratory capacity was found to be Rac1-dependent and heritable, as evidenced by maintenance of the phenotype through multiple cell divisions continuing more than 8 weeks after selection. The morphology of this lung epithelial subpopulation was characterized by increased cell protrusion intensity. In a murine model of micrometastatic seeding and pulmonary colonization, the motility-selected premalignant cells exhibit both enhanced survival in short-term assays and enhanced outgrowth of premalignant lesions in longer-term assays, thus overcoming important aspects of "metastatic inefficiency." Overall, our findings indicate that among immortalized premalignant airway epithelial cell lines, subpopulations with heritable motility-related biophysical properties exist, and these may explain micrometastatic seeding occurring early in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. Understanding, targeting, and preventing these critical biophysical traits and their underlying molecular mechanisms may provide a new approach to prevent metastatic behavior. Cancer Prev Res; 10(9); 514-24. ©2017 AACRSee related editorial by Hynds and Janes, p. 491. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. ICAM-1-independent adhesion of neutrophils to phorbol ester-stimulated human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Celi, A; Cianchetti, S; Petruzzelli, S; Carnevali, S; Baliva, F; Giuntini, C

    1999-09-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is the only inducible adhesion receptor for neutrophils identified in bronchial epithelial cells. We stimulated human airway epithelial cells with various agonists to evaluate whether ICAM-1-independent adhesion mechanisms could be elicited. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation of cells of the alveolar cell line A549 caused a rapid, significant increase in neutrophil adhesion from 11 +/- 3 to 49 +/- 7% (SE). A significant increase from 17 +/- 4 to 39 +/- 6% was also observed for neutrophil adhesion to PMA-stimulated human bronchial epithelial cells in primary culture. Although ICAM-1 expression was upregulated by PMA at late time points, it was not affected at 10 min when neutrophil adhesion was already clearly enhanced. Antibodies to ICAM-1 had no effect on neutrophil adhesion. In contrast, antibodies to the leukocyte integrin beta-chain CD18 totally inhibited the adhesion of neutrophils to PMA-stimulated epithelial cells. These results demonstrate that PMA stimulation of human airway epithelial cells causes an increase in neutrophil adhesion that is not dependent on ICAM-1 upregulation.

  10. Do cell junction protein mutations cause an airway phenotype in mice or humans?

    PubMed

    Chang, Eugene H; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Zabner, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Cell junction proteins connect epithelial cells to each other and to the basement membrane. Genetic mutations of these proteins can cause alterations in some epithelia leading to varied phenotypes such as deafness, renal disease, skin disorders, and cancer. This review examines if genetic mutations in these proteins affect the function of lung airway epithelia. We review cell junction proteins with examples of disease mutation phenotypes in humans and in mouse knockout models. We also review which of these genes are expressed in airway epithelium by microarray expression profiling and immunocytochemistry. Last, we present a comprehensive literature review to find the lung phenotype when cell junction and adhesion genes are mutated or subject to targeted deletion. We found that in murine models, targeted deletion of cell junction and adhesion genes rarely result in a lung phenotype. Moreover, mutations in these genes in humans have no obvious lung phenotype. Our research suggests that simply because a cell junction or adhesion protein is expressed in an organ does not imply that it will exhibit a drastic phenotype when mutated. One explanation is that because a functioning lung is critical to survival, redundancy in the system is expected. Therefore mutations in a single gene might be compensated by a related function of a similar gene product. Further studies in human and animal models will help us understand the overlap in the function of cell junction gene products. Finally, it is possible that the human lung phenotype is subtle and has not yet been described.

  11. Using Optical Tweezers to Study Cell Mechanics during Airway Reopening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin, Huseyin; Wang, Jing; Ghadiali, Samir; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2006-03-01

    Patients suffering from the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) must be mechanically ventilated in order to survive. However, these ventilation protocols may generate injurious hydrodynamic stresses especially during low tidal volume (VT) ventilation when the flow of micron-sized air bubbles displace the surrounding liquid. In-vitro studies in our lab revealed that microbubble flows can severally damage lung epithelial cells (EC). The degree of injury was elevated for sub-confluent monolayers in small channel heights. Under these conditions, the micromechanics of individual EC may influence the degree of cellular injury. To investigate the role of cell mechanics, we used an oscillating Optical Tweezers (OT) technique to measure the intrinsic mechanical properties of EC before and after the flow of microbubbles. Knowledge of how the EC's micromechanical properties influence cell viability may lead to the development of novel treatment therapies that enhance the EC's ability to withstand injurious hydrodynamic stresses during ventilation treatment.

  12. The effect of humic acid on uptake/adsorption of copper by a marine bacterium and two marine ciliates.

    PubMed

    Lores, E M; Snyder, R A; Pennock, J R

    1999-01-01

    The effect of humic acid (HA) on Cu uptake by a bacterium and two bacterivorus ciliates was investigated. The presence of HA resulted in a statistically significant (p<0.001) decrease in Cu associated with bacteria that were exposed to 67 microg Cu L(-1). Complexation of Cu appears to lower the availability of Cu with respect to bacterial cell surface binding and uptake. For ciliates, 10 mg HA L(-1) significantly reduced uptake of Cu by Uronema, but did not reduce uptake of Cu by Pleuronema. Uronema exposed to 67 microg Cu L(-1) accumulated 54% less Cu when 10 mg HA L(-1) was present (0.50 pg ciliate(-1) vs 0.23 pg ciliate(-1)). Uronema feeding on V. natriegens, took up less than half as much Cu as unfed Uronema when exposed to Cu without HA (0.41 pg Cu fed ciliate(-1) vs 0.86 pg Cu unfed ciliate(-1), but only 40% less when exposed to Cu and HA (0.31 pg Cu fed ciliate(-1) vs 0.51 pg Cu unfed ciliate(-1)). The lower % reduction attributable to fed ciliates in the presence of HA suggests that some of the Cu associated with HA is available through trophic processes.

  13. GTP-Binding Proteins Inhibit cAMP Activation of Chloride Channels in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiebert, Erik M.; Kizer, Neil; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    1992-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterized, in part, by defective regulation of Cl^- secretion by airway epithelial cells. In CF, cAMP does not activate Cl^- channels in the apical membrane of airway epithelial cells. We report here whole-cell patch-clamp studies demonstrating that pertussis toxin, which uncouples heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) from their receptors, and guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate, which prevents G proteins from interacting with their effectors, increase Cl^- currents and restore cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells isolated from CF patients. In contrast, the G protein activators guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate and AlF^-_4 reduce Cl^- currents and inhibit cAMP from activating Cl^- currents in normal airway epithelial cells. In CF cells treated with pertussis toxin or guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate and in normal cells, cAMP activates a Cl^- conductance that has properties similar to CF transmembrane-conductance regulator Cl^- channels. We conclude that heterotrimeric G proteins inhibit cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells and that modulation of the inhibitory G protein signaling pathway may have the therapeutic potential for improving cAMP-activated Cl^- secretion in CF.

  14. Patient-Derived Airway Secretion Dissociation Technique To Isolate and Concentrate Immune Cells Using Closed-Loop Inertial Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyunryul; Choi, Kyungyong; Qu, Yanyan; Kwon, Taehong; Lee, Janet S; Han, Jongyoon

    2017-05-16

    Assessment of airway secretion cells, both for research and clinical purposes, is a highly desired goal in patients with acute and chronic pulmonary diseases. However, lack of proper cell isolation and enrichment techniques hinder downstream evaluation and characterization of cells found in airway secretions. Here, we demonstrate a novel enrichment method to capture immune-related cells from clinical airway secretions using closed-loop separation of spiral inertial microfluidics (C-sep). By recirculating the output focusing stream back to the input reservoir and running continuously with a high flow processing rate, one can achieve optimal concentration, recovery and purity of airway immune cells from a large volume of diluent, which was not readily possible in the single-pass operation. Our method reproducibly recovers 94.0% of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), with up to 10(5) PMNs in clear diluted buffer from 50 μL of airway secretions obtained from mechanically ventilated patients. We show that C-sep isolated PMNs show higher neutrophil elastase (NE) release following activation by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) than cells isolated by conventional mucolytic method. By capturing cells without chemically disrupting their potential function, our method is expected to expand the possibility of clinical in vitro cell based biological assays for various pulmonary diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis.

  15. Cell-to-Cell Contact and Nectin-4 Govern Spread of Measles Virus from Primary Human Myeloid Cells to Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Li, Ni; Mark, Anna C.; Mateo, Mathieu; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles is a highly contagious, acute viral illness. Immune cells within the airways are likely first targets of infection, and these cells traffic measles virus (MeV) to lymph nodes for amplification and subsequent systemic dissemination. Infected immune cells are thought to return MeV to the airways; however, the mechanisms responsible for virus transfer to pulmonary epithelial cells are poorly understood. To investigate this process, we collected blood from human donors and generated primary myeloid cells, specifically, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and dendritic cells (DCs). MDMs and DCs were infected with MeV and then applied to primary cultures of well-differentiated airway epithelial cells from human donors (HAE). Consistent with previous results obtained with free virus, infected MDMs or DCs were incapable of transferring MeV to HAE when applied to the apical surface. Likewise, infected MDMs or DCs applied to the basolateral surface of HAE grown on small-pore (0.4-μm) support membranes did not transfer virus. In contrast, infected MDMs and DCs applied to the basolateral surface of HAE grown on large-pore (3.0-μm) membranes successfully transferred MeV. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that MDMs and DCs are capable of penetrating large-pore membranes but not small-pore membranes. Further, by using a nectin-4 blocking antibody or recombinant MeV unable to enter cells through nectin-4, we demonstrated formally that transfer from immune cells to HAE occurs in a nectin-4-dependent manner. Thus, both infected MDMs and DCs rely on cell-to-cell contacts and nectin-4 to efficiently deliver MeV to the basolateral surface of HAE. IMPORTANCE Measles virus spreads rapidly and efficiently in human airway epithelial cells. This rapid spread is based on cell-to-cell contact rather than on particle release and reentry. Here we posit that MeV transfer from infected immune cells to epithelial cells also occurs by cell-to-cell contact rather than through cell

  16. Intrinsic pro-angiogenic status of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaeghe, Catherine; Tabruyn, Sebastien P.; Oury, Cecile; Bours, Vincent . E-mail: vbours@ulg.ac.be; Griffioen, Arjan W.

    2007-05-11

    Cystic fibrosis is a common genetic disorder characterized by a severe lung inflammation and fibrosis leading to the patient's death. Enhanced angiogenesis in cystic fibrosis (CF) tissue has been suggested, probably caused by the process of inflammation, as similarly described in asthma and chronic bronchitis. The present study demonstrates an intrinsic pro-angiogenic status of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells. Microarray experiments showed that CF airway epithelial cells expressed several angiogenic factors such as VEGF-A, VEGF-C, bFGF, and PLGF at higher levels than control cells. These data were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and, at the protein level, by ELISA. Conditioned media of these cystic fibrosis cells were able to induce proliferation, migration and sprouting of cultured primary endothelial cells. This report describes for the first time that cystic fibrosis epithelial cells have an intrinsic angiogenic activity. Since excess of angiogenesis is correlated with more severe pulmonary disease, our results could lead to the development of new therapeutic applications.

  17. Dysfunction of mitochondria Ca2+ uptake in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Antigny, Fabrice; Girardin, Nathalie; Raveau, Dorothée; Frieden, Maud; Becq, Frédéric; Vandebrouck, Clarisse

    2009-07-01

    In the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common mutation F508del promotes the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention of misfolded CF proteins. Furthermore, in homozygous F508del-CFTR airway epithelial cells, the histamine Ca(2+) mobilization is abnormally increased. Because the uptake of Ca(2+) by mitochondria during Ca(2+) influx or Ca(2+) release from ER stores may be crucial for maintaining a normal Ca(2+) homeostasis, we compared the mitochondria morphology and distribution by transmission electron microscopy technique and the mitochondria membrane potential variation (DeltaPsi(mit)) using a fluorescent probe (TMRE) on human CF (CF-KM4) and non-CF (MM39) tracheal serous gland cell lines. Confocal imaging of Rhod-2-AM-loaded or of the mitochondrial targeted cameleon 4mtD3cpv-transfected human CF and non-CF cells, were used to examine the ability of mitochondria to sequester intracellular Ca(2+). The present study reveals that (i) the mitochondria network is fragmented in F508del-CFTR cells, (ii) the DeltaPsi(mit) of CF mitochondria is depolarized compared non-CF mitochondria, and (iii) the CF mitochondria Ca(2+) uptake is reduced compared non-CF cells. We propose that these defects in airway epithelial F508del-CFTR cells are the consequence of mitochondrial membrane depolarization leading to a deficient mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake.

  18. Effects of ATP release on mucin5AC secretion in airway epithelial cells by mechanical stretching.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Liu, Chunyi; Zhou, Xiangdong; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2014-01-01

    This study is to determine the effects of ATP and Ca(2+) on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) overexpression in airway epithelial cells in mechanical ventilation. Oxygen was injected into the closed box used in this study to increase the pressure. Gravity-driven draining flow led to formation of a thin liquid film on the upper portion of cell monolayer, exposing cells to the tension forces at the air-liquid interface. The levels of MUC5AC protein and ATP in culture medium were detected by ELISA and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Ca(2+) and MUC5AC mRNA in culture cells were detected by flow cytometry and RT-PCR, respectively. Mechanical stretching increased the expression of MUC5AC in cells and the concentration of MUC5AC and ATP in supernatant. BAPTA-AM and EGTA partially reduced the increases in the concentrations of MUC5AC and ATP in supernatant with mechanical ventilation. BAPTA-AM completely inhibited ATP in supernatant with normal breathing conditions. Our results showed that mechanical ventilation increases the secretion of MUC5AC in airway epithelial cells. This is possibly related to Ca(2+)-dependent ATP release and intracellular and external Ca(2+). © 2014 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  19. Increased numbers of activated group 2 innate lymphoid cells in the airways of patients with severe asthma and persistent airway eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven G; Chen, Ruchong; Kjarsgaard, Melanie; Huang, Chynna; Oliveria, John-Paul; O'Byrne, Paul M; Gauvreau, Gail M; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Lemiere, Catherine; Martin, James; Nair, Parameswaran; Sehmi, Roma

    2016-01-01

    In patients with severe eosinophilic asthma, local maturation rather than systemic recruitment of mature cells might contribute to persistent airway eosinophilia. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are a major source of type 2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) and can facilitate eosinophilic inflammatory responses in mouse models of asthma in the absence of CD4+ lymphocytes. This study investigated the potential role of ILC2s in driving chronic airway eosinophilia in patients with severe asthma, despite regular high-dose oral corticosteroid therapy. In a cross-sectional study we enumerated blood and sputum ILC2s (lin(-)CD45(+)127(+)ST2(+)) and levels of intracellular IL-5 and IL-13 in patients with severe asthma (n = 25), patients with steroid-naive mild atopic asthma (n = 19), and nonatopic control subjects (n = 5). Results were compared with numbers of CD4+ lymphocytes, eosinophil lineage-committed progenitors (eosinophilopoietic progenitor cells [EoPs]), and mature eosinophils. Significantly greater numbers of total and type 2 cytokine-producing ILC2s were detected in blood and sputum of patients with severe asthma compared to mild asthmatics. In contrast, intracellular cytokine expression by CD4 cells and EoPs within the airways did not differ between the asthmatic groups. In patients with severe asthma, although sputum CD4+ cells were more abundant than ILC2s and EoPs, proportionally, ILC2s were the predominant source of type 2 cytokines. In addition, there were significantly greater numbers of sputum IL-5(+)IL-13(+) ILC2s in patients with severe asthma whose airway eosinophilia was greater than 3%, despite normal blood eosinophil numbers (<300/μL). Our findings suggest that ILC2s can promote the persistence of airway eosinophilia in patients with severe asthma through uncontrolled localized production of the type 2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13, despite high-dose oral corticosteroid therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  20. The transcription factor Etv5 controls TH17 cell development and allergic airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duy; Sehra, Sarita; Sun, Xin; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The differentiation of TH17 cells, which promote pulmonary inflammation, requires the cooperation of a network of transcription factors. Objectives We sought to define the role of Etv5, an Ets-family transcription factor, in TH17 cell development and function. Methods TH17 development was examined in primary mouse T cells wherein Etv5 expression was altered by retroviral transduction, small interfering RNA targeting a specific gene, and mice with a conditional deletion of Etv5 in T cells. The direct function of Etv5 on the Il17 locus was tested with chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays. The house dust mite–induced allergic inflammation model was used to test the requirement for Etv5-dependent TH17 functions in vivo. Results We identify Etv5 as a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3–induced positive regulator of TH17 development. Etv5 controls TH17 differentiation by directly promoting 0a and Il17f expression. Etv5 recruits histone-modifying enzymes to the Il17a–Il17f locus, resulting in increased active histone marks and decreased repressive histone marks. In a model of allergic airway inflammation, mice with Etv5-deficient T cells have reduced airway inflammation and IL-17A/F production in the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with wild-type mice, without changes in TH2 cytokine production. Conclusions These data define signal transducer and activator of transcription 3–dependent feed-forward control of TH17 cytokine production and a novel role for Etv5 in promoting T cell–dependent airway inflammation. PMID:24486067

  1. Innate Lymphoid Cells Mediate Pulmonary Eosinophilic Inflammation, Airway Mucous Cell Metaplasia, and Type 2 Immunity in Mice Exposed to Ozone.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Buglak, Nicholas; Li, Ning; White, Kaylin; Van Dyken, Steven J; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of ambient ozone in photochemical smog is associated with eosinophilic airway inflammation and nonatopic asthma in children. In the present study, we determined the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced nonatopic asthma by using lymphoid cell-sufficient C57BL/6 mice, ILC-sufficient Rag2(-/-) mice (devoid of T and B cells), and ILC-deficient Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice (depleted of all lymphoid cells including ILCs). Mice were exposed to 0 or 0.8 parts per million ozone for 1 day or 9 consecutive weekdays (4 hr/day). A single exposure to ozone caused neutrophilic inflammation, airway epithelial injury, and reparative DNA synthesis in all strains of mice, irrespective of the presence or absence of ILCs. In contrast, 9-day exposures induced eosinophilic inflammation and mucous cell metaplasia only in the lungs of ILC-sufficient mice. Repeated ozone exposures also elicited increased messenger RNA expression of transcripts associated with type 2 immunity and airway mucus production in ILC-sufficient mice. ILC-deficient mice repeatedly exposed to ozone had no pulmonary pathology or increased gene expression related to type 2 immunity. These results suggest a new paradigm for the biologic mechanisms underlying the development of a phenotype of childhood nonatopic asthma that has been linked to ambient ozone exposures.

  2. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca2+ elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca2+ elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca2+ entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  3. Airway distensibility with lung inflation after allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barisione, Giovanni; Pompilio, Pasquale P; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Brusasco, Claudia; Cioè, Alex; Dellacà, Raffaele L; Lamparelli, Teresa; Garlaschi, Alessandro; Pellegrino, Riccardo; Brusasco, Vito

    2012-10-15

    The ability to reverse induced-bronchoconstriction by deep-inhalation increases after allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT), despite a decreased total lung capacity (TLC). We hypothesized that this effect may be due to an increased airway distensibility with lung inflation, likely related to an increment in lung stiffness. We studied 28 subjects, 2 weeks before and 2 months after HSCT. Within-breath respiratory system conductance (G(rs)) at 5, 11 and 19 Hz was measured by forced oscillation technique (FOT) at functional residual capacity (FRC) and TLC. Changes in conductance at 5Hz (G(rs5)) were related to changes in lung volume (ΔG(rs5)/ΔV(L)) to estimate airway distensibility. G(rs) at FRC showed a slight but significant increase at all forcing frequencies by approximately 12-16%. TLC decreased after HSCT whereas the ΔG(rs5)/ΔV(L) ratio became higher after than before HSCT and was positively correlated (R2=0.87) with lung tissue density determined by quantitative CT scanning. We conclude that airway caliber and distensibility with lung inflation are increased after HSCT. This effect seems to be related to an increase in lung stiffness and must be taken into account when interpreting lung function changes after HSCT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Elevated amount of Toll-like receptor 4 mRNA in bronchial epithelial cells is associated with airway inflammation in horses with recurrent airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Annerose; Derksen, Frederik J; Venta, Patrick J; Ewart, Susan; Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, Vilma; Robinson, N Edward

    2007-04-01

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) is characterized by neutrophilic airway inflammation and obstruction, and stabling of susceptible horses triggers acute disease exacerbations. Stable dust is rich in endotoxin, which is recognized by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. In human bronchial epithelium, TLR4 stimulation leads to elevation of interleukin (IL)-8 mRNA expression. The zinc finger protein A20 negatively regulates this pathway. We hypothesized that TLR4 and IL-8 mRNA and neutrophil numbers are elevated and that A20 mRNA is not increased in RAOs during stabling compared with controls and with RAOs on pasture. We measured the maximal change in pleural pressure (DeltaPpl(max)), determined inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), and quantified TLR4, IL-8, and A20 mRNA in bronchial epithelium by quantitative RT-PCR. We studied six horse pairs, each pair consisting of one RAO and one control horse. Each pair was studied when the RAO-affected horse had airway obstruction induced by stabling and after 7, 14, and 28 days on pasture. Stabling increased BAL neutrophils, DeltaPpl(max), and TLR4 (4.14-fold change) significantly in RAOs compared with controls and with RAOs on pasture. TLR4 correlated with IL-8 (R2 = 0.75). Whereas stabling increased IL-8 in all horses, A20 was unaffected. IL-8 was positively correlated with BAL neutrophils (R2 = 0.43) and negatively with A20 (R2 = 0.44) only in RAO-affected horses. Elevated TLR4 expression and lack of A20 upregulation in bronchial epithelial cells from RAO-affected horses may contribute to elevated IL-8 production, leading to exaggerated neutrophilic airway inflammation in response to inhalation of stable dust.

  5. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection induced allergic airway sensitization is controlled by regulatory T-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crother, Timothy R; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Peterson, Ellena; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate), but not a high dose (severe) CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2-/-, and TLR4-/- mice were infected intranasally (i.n.) with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA) and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2-/- mice, but not in TLR4-/- mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2-/- mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4-/- mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs.

  6. Ozone-induced airway epithelial cell death, the neurokinin-1 receptor pathway, and the postnatal developing lung

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Oslund, Karen L.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Miller, Lisa A.; Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    Children are uniquely susceptible to ozone because airway and lung growth continue for an extensive period after birth. Early-life exposure of the rhesus monkey to repeated ozone cycles results in region-specific disrupted airway/lung growth, but the mediators and mechanisms are poorly understood. Substance P (SP), neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R); and nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) are signaling pathway components involved in ozone-induced cell death. We hypothesize that acute ozone (AO) exposure during postnatal airway development disrupts SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway expression and that these changes correlate with increased ozone-induced cell death. Our objectives were to 1) spatially define the normal development of the SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway in conducting airways; 2) compare how postnatal age modulates responses to AO exposure; and 3) determine how concomitant, episodic ozone exposure modifies age-specific acute responses. Male infant rhesus monkeys were assigned at age 1 mo to two age groups, 2 or 6 mo, and then to one of three exposure subgroups: filtered air (FA), FA+AO (AO: 8 h/day × 2 days), or episodic biweekly ozone exposure cycles (EAO: 8 h/day × 5 days/14-day cycle+AO). O3 = 0.5 ppm. We found that 1) ozone increases SP/NK-1R/Nur77 pathway expression in conducting airways, 2) an ozone exposure cycle (5 days/cycle) delivered early at age 2 mo resulted in an airway that was hypersensitive to AO exposure at the end of 2 mo, and 3) continued episodic exposure (11 cycles) resulted in an airway that was hyposensitive to AO exposure at 6 mo. These observations collectively associate with greater overall inflammation and epithelial cell death, particularly in early postnatal (2 mo), distal airways. PMID:25063800

  7. Epigenetic dysregulation of interleukin 8 (CXCL8) hypersecretion in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Poghosyan, Anna Patel, Jamie K.; Clifford, Rachel L.; Knox, Alan J.

    2016-08-05

    Airway epithelial cells in cystic fibrosis (CF) overexpress Interleukin 8 (CXCL8) through poorly defined mechanisms. CXCL8 transcription is dependent on coordinated binding of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP)β, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and activator protein (AP)-1 to the promoter. Here we show abnormal epigenetic regulation is responsible for CXCL8 overexpression in CF cells. Under basal conditions CF cells had increased bromodomain (Brd)3 and Brd4 recruitment and enhanced NF-κB and C/EBPβ binding to the CXCL8 promoter compared to non-CF cells due to trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and DNA hypomethylation at CpG6. IL-1β increased NF-κB, C/EBPβ and Brd4 binding. Furthermore, inhibitors of bromodomain and extra-terminal domain family (BET) proteins reduced CXCL8 production in CF cells suggesting a therapeutic target for the BET pathway. -- Highlights: •A regulatory mechanism of CXCL8 transcriptional control in CF airways is proposed. •There was an increased binding of NF-κB and C/EBPβ transcription factors. •There was enhanced recruitment of BET proteins to the CXCL8 promoter. •Epigenetic modifications are responsible for the aberrant CXCL8 transcription.

  8. Syntaxin 1A is expressed in airway epithelial cells, where it modulates CFTR Cl– currents

    PubMed Central

    Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Di, Anke; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Boyaka, Prosper N.; McGhee, Jerry R.; Zhou, Weihong; Akagawa, Kimio; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Thome, Ulrich; Engelhardt, John F.; Nelson, Deborah J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2000-01-01

    The CFTR Cl– channel controls salt and water transport across epithelial tissues. Previously, we showed that CFTR-mediated Cl– currents in the Xenopus oocyte expression system are inhibited by syntaxin 1A, a component of the membrane trafficking machinery. This negative modulation of CFTR function can be reversed by soluble syntaxin 1A peptides and by the syntaxin 1A binding protein, Munc-18. In the present study, we determined whether syntaxin 1A is expressed in native epithelial tissues that normally express CFTR and whether it modulates CFTR currents in these tissues. Using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, we observed syntaxin 1A in native gut and airway epithelial tissues and showed that epithelial cells from these tissues express syntaxin 1A at >10-fold molar excess over CFTR. Syntaxin 1A is seen near the apical cell surfaces of human bronchial airway epithelium. Reagents that disrupt the CFTR-syntaxin 1A interaction, including soluble syntaxin 1A cytosolic domain and recombinant Munc-18, augmented cAMP-dependent CFTR Cl– currents by more than 2- to 4-fold in mouse tracheal epithelial cells and cells derived from human nasal polyps, but these reagents did not affect CaMK II–activated Cl– currents in these cells. PMID:10675364

  9. Multipotent versus differentiated cell fate selection in the developing Drosophila airways

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ryo; Hosono, Chie; Samakovlis, Christos; Saigo, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Developmental potentials of cells are tightly controlled at multiple levels. The embryonic Drosophila airway tree is roughly subdivided into two types of cells with distinct developmental potentials: a proximally located group of multipotent adult precursor cells (P-fate) and a distally located population of more differentiated cells (D-fate). We show that the GATA-family transcription factor (TF) Grain promotes the P-fate and the POU-homeobox TF Ventral veinless (Vvl/Drifter/U-turned) stimulates the D-fate. Hedgehog and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling cooperate with Vvl to drive the D-fate at the expense of the P-fate while negative regulators of either of these signaling pathways ensure P-fate specification. Local concentrations of Decapentaplegic/BMP, Wingless/Wnt, and Hedgehog signals differentially regulate the expression of D-factors and P-factors to transform an equipotent primordial field into a concentric pattern of radially different morphogenetic potentials, which gradually gives rise to the distal-proximal organization of distinct cell types in the mature airway. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09646.001 PMID:26633813

  10. Alcohol increases the permeability of airway epithelial tight junctions in Beas-2B and NHBE cells.

    PubMed

    Simet, Samantha M; Wyatt, Todd A; DeVasure, Jane; Yanov, Daniel; Allen-Gipson, Diane; Sisson, Joseph H

    2012-03-01

    Tight junctions form a continuous belt-like structure between cells and act to regulate paracellular signaling. Protein kinase C (PKC) has been shown to regulate tight junction assembly and disassembly and is activated by alcohol. Previous research has shown that alcohol increases the permeability of tight junctions in lung alveolar cells. However, little is known about alcohol's effect on tight junctions in epithelium of the conducting airways. We hypothesized that long-term alcohol exposure reduces zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-1 localization at the cell membrane and increases permeability through a PKC-dependent mechanism. To test this hypothesis, we exposed normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, cells from a human bronchial epithelial transformed cell line (Beas-2B), and Beas-2B expressing a PKCα dominant negative (DN) to alcohol (20, 50, and 100 mM) for up to 48 hours. Immunofluorescence was used to assess changes in ZO-1, claudin-1, claudin-5, and claudin-7 localization. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was used to measure the permeability of tight junctions between monolayers of NHBE, Beas-2B, and DN cells. Alcohol increased tight junction permeability in a concentration-dependent manner and decreased ZO-1, claudin-1, claudin-5, and claudin-7 localization at the cell membrane. To determine a possible signaling mechanism, we measured the activity of PKC isoforms (alpha, delta, epsilon, and zeta). PKCα activity significantly increased in Beas-2B cells from 1 to 6 hours of 100 mM alcohol exposure, while PKCζ activity significantly decreased at 1 hour and increased at 3 hours. Inhibiting PKCα with Gö-6976 prevented the alcohol-induced protein changes in both ZO-1 and claudin-1 at the cell membrane. PKCα DN Beas-2B cells were resistant to alcohol-induced protein alterations. These results suggest that alcohol disrupts ZO-1, claudin-1, claudin-5, and claudin-7 through the activation of PKCα, leading to an alcohol-induced "leakiness

  11. Bioaerosols from a Food Waste Composting Plant Affect Human Airway Epithelial Cell Remodeling Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Wei; Lee, Chung-Ru; Hung, Hsueh-Fen; Teng, Kuo-Sheng; Huang, Hsin; Chuang, Chun-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The composting procedure in food waste plants generates airborne bioaerosols that have the potential to damage human airway epithelial cells. Persistent inflammation and repair responses induce airway remodeling and damage to the respiratory system. This study elucidated the expression changes of airway remodeling genes in human lung mucoepidermoid NCI-H292 cells exposed to bioaerosols from a composting plant. Different types of microorganisms were detectable in the composting plant, using the agar culture method. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the level of Aspergillus fumigatus and the profile of remodeling genes. The real-time PCR results indicated that the amount of A. fumigatus in the composting hall was less than 102 conidia. The endotoxins in the field bioaerosols were determined using a limulus amebocyte lysate test. The endotoxin levels depended on the type of particulate matter (PM), with coarse particles (2.5–10 μm) having higher endotoxin levels than did fine particles (0.5–2.5 μm). After exposure to the conditioned medium of field bioaerosol samples, NCI-H292 cells showed increased pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-6 release and activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21WAF1/CIP1) gene expression, but not of matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9. Airborne endotoxin levels were higher inside the composting hall than they were in other areas, and they were associated with PM. This suggested that airborne bioaerosols in the composting plant contained endotoxins and microorganisms besides A. fumigatus that cause the inflammatory cytokine secretion and augment the expression of remodeling genes in NCI-H292 cells. It is thus necessary to monitor potentially hazardous materials from bioaerosols in food composting plants, which could affect the health of workers. PMID:24368426

  12. Local ciliate communities associated with aquatic macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Yeates, Anna M; Esteban, Genoveva F

    2014-03-01

    This study, based within the catchment area of the River Frome, an important chalk stream in the south of England, compared ciliated protozoan communities associated with three species of aquatic macrophyte common to lotic habitats: Ranunculus penicillatus subsp. pseudofluitans, Nasturtium officinale and Sparganium emersum. A total of 77 ciliate species were counted. No species-specific ciliate assemblage was found to be typical of any one plant species. Ciliate abundance between plant species was determined to be significantly different. The ciliate communities from each plant species were unique in that the number of species increased with ciliate abundance. The community associated with R. penicillatus subsp. pseudofluitans showed the highest consistency and species richness whereas S. emersum ciliate communities were unstable. Most notably, N. officinale was associated with low ciliate abundances and an apparent reduction in biofilm formation, discussed herein in relation to the plant's production of the microbial toxin phenethyl isothiocyanate. We propose that the results reflect differences in the quantity and quality of biofilm present on the plants, which could be determined by the different plant morphologies, patterns of plant decay and herbivore defense systems, all of which suppress or promote the various conditions for biofilm growth.

  13. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, P; Park, C Y; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Tsuda, A; Sager, T M; Molina, R M; Donaghey, T C; Alencar, A M; Kasahara, D I; Ericsson, T; Millet, E J; Swenson, J; Tschumperlin, D J; Butler, J P; Brain, J D; Fredberg, J J; Gehr, P; Zhou, E H

    2010-06-06

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40-100 nm and less than 44 microm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 microm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 microM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases.

  14. Prostaglandin E2 induces expression of MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-07-05

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a prostanoid with diverse actions in health and disease. In chronic respiratory diseases driven by inflammation, PGE2 has both positive and negative effects. An enhanced understanding of the receptor-mediated cellular signalling pathways induced by PGE2 may help us separate the beneficial properties from unwanted actions of this important prostaglandin. PGE2 is known to exert anti-inflammatory and bronchoprotective actions in human airways. To date however, whether PGE2 increases production of the anti-inflammatory protein MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) was unknown. We address this herein and use primary cultures of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells to show that PGE2 increases MKP-1 mRNA and protein upregulation in a concentration-dependent manner. We explore the signalling pathways responsible and show that PGE2-induces CREB phosphorylation, not p38 MAPK activation, in ASM cells. Moreover, we utilize selective antagonists of EP2 (PF-04418948) and EP4 receptors (GW 627368X) to begin to identify EP-mediated functional outcomes in ASM cells in vitro. Taken together with earlier studies, our data suggest that PGE2 increases production of the anti-inflammatory protein MKP-1 via cAMP/CREB-mediated cellular signalling in ASM cells and demonstrates that EP2 may, in part, be involved.

  15. Burkholderia cenocepacia ET12 Strain Activates TNFR1 Signaling in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Umadevi Sajjan, S.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Forstner, Janet F.; LiPuma, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an important pulmonary pathogen in individuals with cystic fibrosis. Infection is often associated with severe pulmonary inflammation and some patients develop a fatal necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis (‘cepacia syndrome’). The mechanisms by which this species causes severe pulmonary inflammation are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that B. cenocepacia BC7, a potentially virulent representative of the epidemic ET12 lineage binds to tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1) and activates TNFR1-related signaling pathway similar to TNF-α, a natural ligand for TNFR1. This interaction participates in stimulating a robust IL-8 production from CF airway epithelial cells. In contrast, BC45, a relatively less virulent ET12 representative, and ATCC 25416, an environmental B. cepacia strain do not bind to TNFR1 and stimulate only minimal IL-8 production from CF cells. Further, TNFR1 expression is increased in CF airway epithelial cells compared to non-CF cells. We also show that B. cenocepacia ET12 strain colocaizes with TNFR1 in vitro and in the lungs of CF patient who died due to infection with B. cenocepacia, ET12 strain. Together, these results suggest that interaction of B. cenocepacia, ET12 strain with TNFR1 may contribute to robust inflammatory responses elicited by this organism. PMID:17697131

  16. Pivotal role of c-Fos in nitric oxide synthase 2 expression in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chambellan, Arnaud; Leahy, Rachel; Xu, Weiling; Cruickshank, Paul J.; Janocha, Allison; Szabo, Katalin; Cannady, Steven B.; Comhair, Suzy A.A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) in airway epithelial cells plays a key role in the innate host response to a wide variety of microbial agents and also participates in the generation of pathologic airway inflammation. Among the important signalling cascades that direct NOS2 gene expression are nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and interferon-γ (IFNγ)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1). Previous studies suggest activator protein-1 (AP-1), in particular c-Fos component of AP-1, influences NOS2 expression. We investigated the effect of c-Fos modulation using RNA interference siRNA on NOS2 gene expression. A549 cells stably transfected with a plasmid overexpressing a c-Fos siRNA construct (FOSi) resulted in a decrease of NOS2 protein inducibility by IFN γ. In contrast, classical IFN γ inducible signal transduction pathways interferon regulated factor-1 (IRF-1) and pSTAT-1 were activated at a similar magnitude in FOSi and control cells. DNA–protein binding assays showed that c-Fos binding was present in wild type cells, but reduced in FOSi clones. FOSi clones had activation of NFκB detectable by DNA–protein binding assays, which may have contributed to a decrease of NOS2 expression. Overall, these studies indicate that c-Fos is a requisite and specific component for inducible NOS2 expression. PMID:19135542

  17. Cell-contact dependent inhibition of monocytes by airway epithelial cells and reversion by infection with Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Oumouna, Mustapha; Weitnauer, Michael; Mijošek, Vedrana; Schmidt, Lotte M; Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Dalpke, Alexander H

    2015-11-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are the first line of defense against airborne infectious microbes and play an important role in regulating the local immune response. However, the interplay of epithelial cells and professional immune cells during both homeostasis and infection has only been partially studied. The present study was performed to determine how bronchial epithelial cells affect the activation of monocytes. Under healthy conditions, AECs were shown to inhibit reactivity of monocytes. We hypothesized that upon infection, monocytes might be released from inhibition by AECs. We report that direct contact of monocytes with unstimulated BEAS2B epithelial cells results in inhibition of TNF secretion by activated monocytes. In addition to the known soluble modulators, we show that cell contacts between epithelial cells and monocytes or macrophages also contribute to homeostatic inhibitory actions. We find AECs to express the inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and blockade of PD-L1 results in increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from monocytes. Contrary to the inhibitory activities during homeostasis, epithelial cells infected with Respiratory Syncitial Virus (RSV) induce a significant release of inhibition. However, release of inhibition was not due to modulation of PD-L1 expression in AECs. We conclude that airway epithelial cells control the reactivity of monocytes through direct and indirect interactions; however tonic inhibition can be reverted upon stimulation of AECs with RSV and thereof derived molecular patterns. The study confirms the important role of airway epithelial cells for local immune reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Sustained calcium entry through P2X nucleotide receptor channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zsembery, Akos; Boyce, Amanda T; Liang, Lihua; Peti-Peterdi, János; Bell, P Darwin; Schwiebert, Erik M

    2003-04-11

    Purinergic receptor stimulation has potential therapeutic effects for cystic fibrosis (CF). Thus, we explored roles for P2Y and P2X receptors in stably increasing [Ca(2+)](i) in human CF (IB3-1) and non-CF (16HBE14o(-)) airway epithelial cells. Cytosolic Ca(2+) was measured by fluorospectrometry using the fluorescent dye Fura-2/AM. Expression of P2X receptor (P2XR) subtypes was assessed by immunoblotting and biotinylation. In IB3-1 cells, ATP and other P2Y agonists caused only a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i) derived from intracellular stores in a Na(+)-rich environment. In contrast, ATP induced an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) that had transient and sustained components in a Na(+)-free medium; the sustained plateau was potentiated by zinc or increasing extracellular pH. Benzoyl-benzoyl-ATP, a P2XR-selective agonist, increased [Ca(2+)](i) only in Na(+)-free medium, suggesting competition between Na(+) and Ca(2+) through P2XRs. Biochemical evidence showed that the P2X(4) receptor is the major subtype shared by these airway epithelial cells. A role for store-operated Ca(2+) channels, voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, or Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in the ATP-induced sustained Ca(2+) signal was ruled out. In conclusion, these data show that epithelial P2X(4) receptors serve as ATP-gated calcium entry channels that induce a sustained increase in [Ca(2+)](i). In airway epithelia, a P2XR-mediated Ca(2+) signal may have therapeutic benefit for CF.

  19. B cells play key roles in th2-type airway immune responses in mice exposed to natural airborne allergens.

    PubMed

    Drake, Li Yin; Iijima, Koji; Hara, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M; Kita, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    Humans are frequently exposed to various airborne allergens. In addition to producing antibodies, B cells participate in immune responses via various mechanisms. The roles of B cells in allergic airway inflammation and asthma have been controversial. We examined the functional importance of B cells in a mouse model of asthma, in which mice were exposed repeatedly to common airborne allergens. Naïve wild-type BALB/c mice or B cell-deficient JH-/- mice were exposed intranasally to a cocktail of allergen extracts, including Alternaria, Aspergillus, and house dust mite, every other day for two weeks. Ovalbumin was included in the cocktail to monitor the T cell immune response. Airway inflammation, lung pathology, and airway reactivity were analyzed. The airway exposure of naïve wild type mice to airborne allergens induced robust eosinophilic airway inflammation, increased the levels of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the lung, and increased the reactivity to inhaled methacholine. These pathological changes and immune responses were attenuated in B cell-deficient JH-/- mice. The allergen-induced expansion of CD4+ T cells was impaired in the lungs and draining lymph nodes of JH-/- mice. Furthermore, lymphocytes from JH-/- mice failed to produce Th2 cytokines in response to ovalbumin re-stimulation in vitro. Our results suggest that B cells are required for the optimal development of Th2-type immune responses and airway inflammation when exposed to common airborne allergens. The therapeutic targeting of B cells may be beneficial to treat asthma in certain patients.

  20. Inhibition of the interactions between eosinophil cationic protein and airway epithelial cells by traditional Chinese herbs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is cytotoxic to bacteria, viruses, parasites and mammalian cells. Cells are damaged via processes of pore formation, permeability alteration and membrane leaking. Some clinical studies indicate that ECP gathers in the bronchial tract of asthma sufferers, damages bronchial and airway epithelial cells, and leads to in breathing tract inflammation; therefore, prevention of the cytotoxicity caused by ECP may serve as an approach to treat airway inflammation. To achieve the purpose, reduction of the ECP-cell interactions is rational. In this work, the Chinese herbal combinative network was generated to predict and identify the functional herbs from the pools of prescriptions. It was useful to select the node herbs and to demonstrate the relative binding ability between ECP and Beas-2B cells with or withour herb treatments. Results Eighty three Chinese herbs and prescriptions were tested and five effective herbs and six prescription candidates were selected. On the basis of effective single-herbal drugs and prescriptions, a combinative network was generated. We found that a single herb, Gan-cao, served as a node connecting five prescriptions. In addition, Sheng-di-huang, Dang-guei and Mu-tong also appeared in five, four and three kinds of prescriptions, respectively. The extracts of these three herbs indeed effectively inhibited the interactions between ECP and Beas-2B cells. According to the Chinese herbal combinative network, eight of the effective herbal extracts showed inhibitory effects for ECP internalizing into Beas-2B cells. The major components of Gang-cao and Sheng-di-huang, glycyrrhizic acid and verbascose, respectively, reduced the binding affinity between ECP and cells effectively. Conclusions Since these Chinese herbs reduced the binding affinity between ECP and cells and inhibited subsequent ECP entrance into cells, they were potential for mitigating the airway inflammation symptoms. Additionally, we

  1. Modulation of regulatory T cells by intranasal allergen immunotherapy in an experimental rat model of airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Moitra, Saibal; Datta, Ankur; Mondal, Somnath; Hazra, Iman; Faruk, Sk Md Omar; Das, Prasanta K; Basu, Anjan K; Tripathi, Santanu K; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2017-06-01

    Allergic airway diseases such as asthma and allergic rhinitis are increasing in prevalence worldwide. The theory of an altered Th1/Th2 balance in allergic diathesis has recently been termed a "procrustean paradigm" as it failed to explain many preclinical findings. Regulatory T cells (Treg) have now been shown to be critical in T-cell homeostasis and in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to allergens. Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT) has been shown to induce regulatory T cells in allergic patients. Among various types of SIT, intranasal immunotherapy had not been studied in detail for the treatment of allergic airway diseases. So, there was a need to study the contribution of regulatory T cells and their mechanistic pathways following intranasal immunotherapy in-vivo. It had been previously shown that intranasal allergen immunotherapy using Alstonia scholaris pollen extract abrogates allergic airway inflammation with decline in IgE and Th2 cytokine levels. The present study for the first time offers a multi-targeted approach towards attenuation of airway allergy by the generation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+T cells and other subsets of Treg cells like Tr1 cells, Th3 cells, CTLA4+Treg cells, and also modulation of various Treg cell surface molecules like GITR, OX40, CD39 and CD73 by intranasal immunotherapy in the same animal model. This animal experiment will thus help to chart out newer molecular targets for treating allergic asthma or rhinitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Monocyte/macrophage-derived microparticles up-regulate inflammatory mediator synthesis by human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Chiara; Chimenti, Daniele; Conti, Ilaria; Neri, Tommaso; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Celi, Alessandro

    2006-08-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MP) are membrane fragments shed by virtually all eukaryotic cells upon activation or during apoptosis that play a significant role in physiologically relevant processes, including coagulation and inflammation. We investigated whether MP derived from monocytes/macrophages have the potential to modulate human airway epithelial cell activation. Monocytes/macrophages were isolated from the buffy coats of blood donors by Ficoll gradient centrifugation, followed by overnight culture of the mononuclear cell fraction. Adherent cells were washed and incubated with the calcium ionophore, A23187, or with histamine. The MP-containing supernatant was incubated with cells of the human bronchial epithelial line BEAS-2B and of the human alveolar line A549. IL-8, MCP-1, and ICAM-1 production was assessed by ELISA and by RT-PCR. In some experiments, monocytes/macrophages were stained with the fluorescent lipid intercalating dye PKH67, and the supernatant was analyzed by FACS. Stimulation of monocytes/macrophages with A23187 caused the release of particles that retain their fluorescent lipid intercalating label, indicating that they are derived from cell membranes. Incubation with A549 and BEAS-2B cells up-regulate IL-8 synthesis. Ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation of the material abolished the effect, indicating that particulate matter, rather than soluble molecules, is responsible for it. Up-regulation of MCP-1 and ICAM-1 was also demonstrated in A549 cells. Similar results were obtained with histamine. Our data show that human monocytes/macrophages release MP that have the potential to sustain the innate immunity of the airway epithelium, as well as to contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases of the lungs through up-regulation of proinflammatory mediators.

  3. The Extracellular Microenvironment Explains Variations in Passive Drug Transport across Different Airway Epithelial Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyoung Ah; Talattof, Arjang; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Stringer, Kathleen A.; Yu, Jing-yu; Lim, Dong Hyun; Rosania, Gus R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We sought to identify key variables in cellular architecture and physiology that might explain observed differences in the passive transport properties of small molecule drugs across different airway epithelial cell types. Methods Propranolol (PR) was selected as a weakly basic, model compound to compare the transport properties of primary (NHBE) vs. tumor-derived (Calu-3) cells. Differentiated on Transwell™ inserts, the architecture of pure vs. mixed cell co-cultures was studied with confocal microscopy followed by quantitative morphometric analysis. Cellular pharmacokinetic modeling was used to identify parameters that differentially affect PR uptake and transport across these two cell types. Results Pure Calu-3 and NHBE cells possessed different structural and functional properties. Nevertheless, mixed Calu-3 and NHBE cell co-cultures differentiated as stable cell monolayers. After measuring the total mass of PR, the fractional areas covered by Calu-3 and NHBE cells allowed deconvoluting the transport properties of each cell type. Based on the apparent thickness of the unstirred, cell surface aqueous layer, local differences in extracellular microenvironment explained the measured variations in passive PR uptake and permeation between Calu-3 and NHBE cells. Conclusion Mixed cell co-cultures can be used to compare the local effects of the extracellular microenvironment on drug uptake and transport across two epithelial cell types. PMID:23708857

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor signalling regulates granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production by airway epithelial cells and established allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Acciani, T H; Suzuki, T; Trapnell, B C; Le Cras, T D

    2016-02-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are increasingly recognized as a major signalling centre in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. A previous study demonstrated that epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in AEC regulated key features of allergic airway disease. However, it is unclear what mediators are regulated by EGFR signalling in AEC, although the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is EGFR dependent in keratinocytes. To determine whether EGFR signalling regulates GM-CSF production by human AEC downstream of the clinically relevant mediators house dust mite (HDM) and interleukin (IL)-17A and in a mouse model of established allergic asthma. EGFR inhibitors were used to determine whether EGFR signalling regulates GM-CSF production by cultured human AEC in response to HDM and IL-17A. The roles of EGFR ligands, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) converting enzyme (TACE) were also assessed. To determine whether EGFR regulates GM-CSF as well as key asthma characteristics in vivo, mice were chronically exposed to HDM to establish allergic airway disease and then treated with the EGFR inhibitor Erlotinib. EGFR inhibition reduced HDM and IL-17A induced GM-CSF production in a dose-dependent manner in cultured human AEC. GM-CSF production also required amphiregulin, p38 MAPK signalling and protease/TACE activity. In mice with established allergic airway disease, EGFR inhibition reduced levels of GM-CSF and TNF-α, as well as airway hyperreactivity, cellular inflammation, smooth muscle thickening and goblet cell metaplasia without changes in IgE and Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines. Results link HDM, IL-17A, amphiregulin, EGFR and GM-CSF in a mechanistic pathway in AEC and demonstrate that EGFR regulates GM-CSF production and the severity of established disease in a clinically relevant asthma model. These results identify the EGFR→GM-CSF axis as a

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling regulates granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor production by airway epithelial cells and established allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Acciani, Thomas H.; Suzuki, Takuji; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Cras, Timothy D. Le

    2015-01-01

    Background Airway epithelial cells (AEC) are increasingly recognized as a major signaling center in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. A previous study demonstrated that epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in AEC regulated key features of allergic airway disease. However, it is unclear what mediators are regulated by EGFR signaling in AEC, although the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is EGFR-dependent in keratinocytes. Objectives To determine if EGFR signaling regulates GM-CSF production by human AEC downstream of the clinically relevant mediators house dust mite (HDM) and interleukin (IL)-17A and in a mouse model of established allergic asthma. Methods EGFR inhibitors were used to determine whether EGFR signaling regulates GM-CSF production by cultured human AEC in response to HDM and IL-17A. The roles of EGFR ligands, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) converting enzyme (TACE) were also assessed. To determine if EGFR regulates GM-CSF as well as key asthma characteristics in vivo, mice were chronically exposed to HDM to establish allergic airway disease and then treated with the EGFR inhibitor Erlotinib. Results EGFR inhibition reduced HDM and IL-17A induced GM-CSF production in a dose-dependent manner in cultured human AEC. GM-CSF production also required amphiregulin, p38 MAPK signaling, and protease/TACE activity. In mice with established allergic airway disease, EGFR inhibition reduced levels of GM-CSF and TNFα, as well as airway hyperreactivity, cellular inflammation, smooth muscle thickening, and goblet cell metaplasia without changes in IgE and Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results link HDM, IL-17A, amphiregulin, EGFR and GM-CSF in a mechanistic pathway in AEC, and demonstrate that EGFR regulates GM-CSF production and the severity of established disease in a clinically relevant asthma

  6. [Regeneration of airway epithelium].

    PubMed

    Adam, D; Perotin, J-M; Lebargy, F; Birembaut, P; Deslée, G; Coraux, C

    2014-04-01

    Epithelial regeneration is a complex process. It can lead to the remodeling of the airway epithelium as in asthma, COPD or cystic fibrosis. The development of in vivo and in vitro models has allowed the analysis of remodeling mechanisms and showed the role of components of extracellular matrix, proteases, cytokines and growth factors. Airway epithelial progenitors and stems cells have been studied in these models. However, their identification remains difficult. Identification and characterization of airway epithelial progenitor/stem-cells, and a better knowledge of the regeneration process may allow the development of new therapeutic strategies for airway epithelial reconstitution. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of Allergen Source-Derived Proteases in Sensitization via Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Protease activity is a characteristic common to many allergens. Allergen source-derived proteases interact with lung epithelial cells, which are now thought to play vital roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Allergen source-derived proteases act on airway epithelial cells to induce disruption of the tight junctions between epithelial cells, activation of protease-activated receptor-2, and the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin. These facilitate allergen delivery across epithelial layers and enhance allergenicity or directly activate the immune system through a nonallergic mechanism. Furthermore, they cleave regulatory cell surface molecules involved in allergic reactions. Thus, allergen source-derived proteases are a potentially critical factor in the development of allergic sensitization and appear to be strongly associated with heightened allergenicity. PMID:22523502

  8. Interactions of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia with Airway Epithelial Cells: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Carys A.; Culibrk, Luka; Moore, Margo M.; Tebbutt, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an environmental filamentous fungus that also acts as an opportunistic pathogen able to cause a variety of symptoms, from an allergic response to a life-threatening disseminated fungal infection. The infectious agents are inhaled conidia whose first point of contact is most likely to be an airway epithelial cell (AEC). The interaction between epithelial cells and conidia is multifaceted and complex, and has implications for later steps in pathogenesis. Increasing evidence has demonstrated a key role for the airway epithelium in the response to respiratory pathogens, particularly at early stages of infection; therefore, elucidating the early stages of interaction of conidia with AECs is essential to understand the establishment of infection in cohorts of at-risk patients. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the early interactions between A. fumigatus and AECs, including bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. We describe mechanisms of adhesion, internalization of conidia by AECs, the immune response of AECs, as well as the role of fungal virulence factors, and patterns of fungal gene expression characteristic of early infection. A clear understanding of the mechanisms involved in the early establishment of infection by A. fumigatus could point to novel targets for therapy and prophylaxis. PMID:27092126

  9. Activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria in the human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Influenza is an acute infection of the respiratory tract, which affects each year millions of people. Influenza virus infection is initiated by the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) through receptor binding and fusion of viral and endosomal membranes. HA is synthesized as a precursor protein and requires cleavage by host cell proteases to gain its fusion capacity. Although cleavage of HA is crucial for virus infectivity, little was known about relevant proteases in the human airways for a long time. Recent progress in the identification and characterization of HA-activating host cell proteases has been considerable however and supports the idea of targeting HA cleavage as a novel approach for influenza treatment. Interestingly, certain bacteria have been demonstrated to support HA activation either by secreting proteases that cleave HA or due to activation of cellular proteases and thereby may contribute to virus spread and enhanced pathogenicity. In this review, we give an overview on activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria with the main focus on recent progress on HA cleavage by proteases HAT and TMPRSS2 in the human airway epithelium. In addition, we outline investigations of HA-activating proteases as potential drug targets for influenza treatment.

  10. Diversity of Human and Macaque Airway Immune Cells at Baseline and during Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Silver, Richard F; Myers, Amy J; Jarvela, Jessica; Flynn, JoAnne; Rutledge, Tara; Bonfield, Tracey; Lin, Philana Ling

    2016-12-01

    Immune cells of the distal airways serve as "first responders" of host immunity to the airborne pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Mtb infection of cynomolgus macaques recapitulates the range of human outcomes from clinically silent latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) to active tuberculosis of various degrees of severity. To further advance the application of this model to human studies, we compared profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells of humans and cynomolgus macaques before and after Mtb infection. A simple gating strategy effectively defined BAL T-cell and phagocyte populations in both species. BAL from Mtb-naive humans and macaques showed similar differential cell counts. BAL T cells of macaques were composed of fewer CD4(+)cells but more CD8(+) and CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive cells than were BAL T cells of humans. The most common mononuclear phagocyte population in BAL of both species displayed coexpression of HLA-DR, CD206, CD11b, and CD11c; however, multiple phagocyte subsets displaying only some of these markers were observed as well. Macaques with LTBI displayed a marked BAL lymphocytosis that was not observed in humans with LTBI. In macaques, the prevalence of specific mononuclear phagocyte subsets in baseline BAL correlated with ultimate outcomes of Mtb infection (i.e., LTBI versus active disease). Overall, these findings demonstrate the comparability of studies of pulmonary immunity to Mtb in humans and macaques. They also indicate a previously undescribed complexity of airway mononuclear phagocyte populations that suggests further lines of investigation relevant to understanding the mechanisms of both protection from and susceptibility to the development of active tuberculosis within the lung.

  11. Cultured Human Airway Epithelial Cells (Calu-3): A Model of Human Respiratory Function, Structure, and Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Chidekel, Aaron; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the application of the human airway Calu-3 cell line as a respiratory model for studying the effects of gas concentrations, exposure time, biophysical stress, and biological agents on human airway epithelial cells. Calu-3 cells are grown to confluence at an air-liquid interface on permeable supports. To model human respiratory conditions and treatment modalities, monolayers are placed in an environmental chamber, and exposed to specific levels of oxygen or other therapeutic modalities such as positive pressure and medications to assess the effect of interventions on inflammatory mediators, immunologic proteins, and antibacterial outcomes. Monolayer integrity and permeability and cell histology and viability also measure cellular response to therapeutic interventions. Calu-3 cells exposed to graded oxygen concentrations demonstrate cell dysfunction and inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Modeling positive airway pressure reveals that pressure may exert a greater injurious effect and cytokine response than oxygen. In experiments with pharmacological agents, Lucinactant is protective of Calu-3 cells compared with Beractant and control, and perfluorocarbons also protect against hyperoxia-induced airway epithelial cell injury. The Calu-3 cell preparation is a sensitive and efficient preclinical model to study human respiratory processes and diseases related to oxygen- and ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:20948883

  12. Cyclic peptide *CRRETAWAC* attenuates fibronectin-induced cytokine secretion of human airway smooth muscle cells by inhibiting FAK and p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mengdi; Ji, Jiani; Cao, Wenhao; Zhang, Huojun; Meng, Dan; Xie, Bangruan; Xu, Shuyun

    2017-10-01

    α5β1 integrin is highly expressed in airway smooth muscle cells and mediate the adhesion of airway smooth muscle cells to fibronectin to regulate airway remodelling in asthma. This study aimed to investigate the effects of synthetic cyclic peptide *CRRETAWAC* on fibronectin-induced cytokine secretion of airway smooth muscle cells and the underlying mechanism. Human airway smooth muscle cells were isolated and treated with fibronectin, IL-13, *CRRETAWAC* peptide, α5β1 integrin-blocking antibody, FAK inhibitor or p38 MAPK inhibitor. The transcription and secretion of eotaxin-1 and RANTES were detected by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. The phosphorylation of FAK and MAPKs including p38, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 was detected by Western blot analysis. The transcription and secretion of eotaxin-1 and RANTES increased in airway smooth muscle cells cultured in fibronectin-coated plates. However, α5β1 integrin-blocking antibody, *CRRETAWAC* peptide, FAK inhibitor or p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced mRNA levels and the secretion of eotaxin-1 and RANTES in airway smooth muscle cells cultured in fibronectin-coated plates. In addition, the phosphorylation of FAK and p38 MAPK was significantly increased in airway smooth muscle cells cultured in fibronectin-coated plates compared to the cells cultured in uncoated plates and was significantly reduced in airway smooth muscle cells treated with *CRRETAWAC* peptide. Fibronectin induces cytokine synthesis and secretion of airway smooth muscle cells. Peptide *CRRETAWAC* antagonizes fibronectin-induced cytokine synthesis and secretion of airway smooth muscle cells via the inhibition of FAK and p38 MAPK, and is a potential agent for the therapy of asthma. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  13. Hyaluronic acid influence on platelet-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B.; Bengtsson, Torbjoern; Grenegard, Magnus; Lindstroem, Eva G.

    2012-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and is expressed throughout the body including the lung and mostly in areas surrounding proliferating and migrating cells. Furthermore, platelets have been implicated as important players in the airway remodelling process, e.g. due to their ability to induce airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HA, the HA-binding surface receptor CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Proliferation of ASMC was measured using the MTS-assay, and we found that the CD44 blocking antibody and the HA synthase inhibitor 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) significantly inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. The interaction between ASMC and platelets was studied by fluorescent staining of F-actin. In addition, the ability of ASMC to synthesise HA was investigated by fluorescent staining using biotinylated HA-binding protein and a streptavidin conjugate. We observed that ASMC produced HA and that a CD44 blocking antibody and 4-MU significantly inhibited platelet binding to the area surrounding the ASMC. Furthermore, the FAK-inhibitor PF 573228 inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Co-culture of ASMC and platelets also resulted in increased phosphorylation of FAK as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, 4-MU significantly inhibited the increased FAK-phosphorylation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ECM has the ability to influence platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Specifically, we propose that HA produced by ASMC is recognised by platelet CD44. The platelet/HA interaction is followed by FAK activation and increased proliferation of co-cultured ASMC. We also suggest that the mitogenic effect of platelets represents a potential important and novel mechanism that may contribute to airway remodelling.

  14. Ultrastructure of extrusomes in hypotrichous ciliate Pseudourostyla nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yao; Wang, Zhengjun; Zhang, Jun; Gu, Fukang

    2011-01-01

    The ultrastructure of extrusomes of the hypotrichous ciliate Pseudourostyla nova was observed in scanning and transmission electron microscopy and enzyme-cytochemistry. The results show that the distribution, morphological characteristics, morphogenesis process, and extrusive process of the extrusomes in P. nova are different from the trichocysts in Paramecium, suggesting that the extrusomes of P. nova can respond to environmental stimuli, play an important role in the defense of this species, and cannot be regarded as "trichocysts". The results also suggest that the extrusomes might be originated from the Golgi apparatus and mature in the cytoplasm; after the extrusion of mature extrusomes, the residual substance might be reabsorbed and reused by the ciliate cell via food vacuoles, and take part in material recycling of the cell.

  15. Kaempferol Inhibits Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Mucus Hypersecretion in Airway Epithelial Cells And Ovalbumin-Sensitized Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hye; Gong, Ju-Hyun; Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Min-Kyung; Kim, Yun-Ho; Kang, Young-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is an important pathological feature of chronic airway diseases, such as asthma and pulmonary diseases. MUC5AC is a major component of the mucus matrix forming family of mucins in the airways. The initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mediated stress responses contributes to the pathogenesis of airway diseases. The present study investigated that ER stress was responsible for airway mucus production and this effect was blocked by the flavonoid kaempferol. Oral administration of ≥10 mg/kg kaempferol suppressed mucus secretion and goblet cell hyperplasia observed in the bronchial airway and lung of BALB/c mice sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA). TGF-β and tunicamycin promoted MUC5AC induction after 72 h in human bronchial airway epithelial BEAS-2B cells, which was dampened by 20 μM kaempferol. Kaempferol inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress of airway epithelial cells through disturbing the activation of the ER transmembrane sensor ATF6 and IRE1α. Additionally, this compound demoted the induction of ER chaperones such as GRP78 and HSP70 and the splicing of XBP-1 mRNA by tunicamycin. The in vivo study further revealed that kaempferol attenuated the induction of XBP-1 and IRE1α in epithelial tissues of OVA-challenged mice. TGF-β and tunicamycin induced TRAF2 with JNK activation and such induction was deterred by kaempferol. The inhibition of JNK activation encumbered the XBP-1 mRNA splicing and MUC5AC induction by tunicamycin and TGF-β. These results demonstrate that kaempferol alleviated asthmatic mucus hypersecretion through blocking bronchial epithelial ER stress via the inhibition of IRE1α-TRAF2-JNK activation. Therefore, kaempferol may be a potential therapeutic agent targeting mucus hypersecretion-associated pulmonary diseases.

  16. Induction of the inflammatory regulator A20 by gibberellic acid in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reihill, J A; Malcomson, B; Bertelsen, A; Cheung, S; Czerwiec, A; Barsden, R; Elborn, J S; Dürkop, H; Hirsch, B; Ennis, M; Kelly, C; Schock, B C

    2016-02-01

    NF-κB-driven inflammation is negatively regulated by the zinc finger protein A20. Gibberellic acid (GA3 ) is a plant-derived diterpenoid with documented anti-inflammatory activity, which is reported to induce A20-like zinc finger proteins in plants. Here, we sought to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of GA3 in airway epithelial cells and determine if the anti-inflammatory action relates to A20 induction. Primary nasal epithelial cells and a human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14o-) were used. Cells were pre-incubated with GA3 , stimulated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS; IL-6 and IL-8 release, A20, NF-κB and IκBα expression were then evaluated. To determine if any observed anti-inflammatory effect occurred via an A20-dependent mechanism, A20 was silenced using siRNA. Cells pre-incubated with GA3 had significantly increased levels of A20 mRNA (4 h) and protein (24 h), resulting in a significant reduction in IL-6 and IL-8 release. This effect was mediated via reduced IκBα degradation and reduced NF-κB (p65) expression. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory action of GA3 was abolished in A20-silenced cells. We showed that A20 induction by GA3 attenuates inflammation in airway epithelial cells, at least in part through its effect on NF-κB and IκBα. GA3 or gibberellin-derived derivatives could potentially be developed into anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases associated with A20 dysfunction. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Stimulus-dependent dissociation between XB130 and Tks5 scaffold proteins promotes airway epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Serisha; Derouet, Mathieu; Bai, Xiao Hui; Xu, Feng; Kapus, Andras; Yang, Burton B.; Liu, Mingyao

    2016-01-01

    Repair of airway epithelium after injury requires migration of neighboring epithelial cells to injured areas. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating airway epithelial cell migration is not well defined. We have previously shown that XB130, a scaffold protein, is required for airway epithelial repair and regeneration in vivo, and interaction between XB130 and another scaffold protein, Tks5, regulates cell proliferation and survival in human bronchial epithelial cells. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of XB130 and Tks5 interaction in airway epithelial cell migration. Interestingly, we found that XB130 only promotes lateral cell migration, whereas, Tks5 promotes cell migration/invasion via proteolysis of extracellular matrix. Upon stimulation with EGF, PKC activator phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate or a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand, XB130 and Tks5 translocated to the cell membrane in a stimulus-dependent manner. The translocation and distribution of XB130 is similar to lamellipodial marker, WAVE2; whereas Tks5 is similar to podosome marker, N-WASP. Over-expression of XB130 or Tks5 alone enhances cell migration, whereas co-expression of both XB130 and Tks5 inhibits cell migration processes and signaling. Furthermore, XB130 interacts with Rac1 whereas Tks5 interacts with Cdc42 to promote Rho GTPase activity. Our results suggest that dissociation between XB130 and Tks5 may facilitate lateral cell migration via XB130/Rac1, and vertical cell migration via Tks5/Cdc42. These molecular mechanisms will help our understanding of airway epithelial repair and regeneration. PMID:27835612

  18. The Anti-inflammatory Effect of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin in Rhinovirus-infected Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Di; Berman, Reena; Wu, Qun; Stevenson, Connor; Chu, Hong Wei

    2017-01-01

    Objective Excessive airway inflammation is seen in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients experiencing acute exacerbations, which are often associated with human rhinovirus (HRV) infection. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) has anti-inflammatory function in endothelial cells and monocytes, but its anti-inflammatory effect has not been investigated in COPD airway epithelial cells. We determined A1AT’s anti-inflammatory function in COPD airway epithelial cells and the underlying mechanisms such as the role of caspase-1. Methods Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from COPD and normal subjects were cultured at air-liquid interface and treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin (BSA, control) two hours prior to whole cigarette smoke (WCS) or air exposure, followed by HRV-16 infection. After 24 hours of viral infection, cell supernatants were collected for measuring IL-8, and cells were examined for caspase-1. The in vivo anti-inflammatory function of A1AT was determined by infecting mice intranasally with HRV-1B followed by aerosolized A1AT or BSA. Results A1AT significantly reduced WCS and HRV-16-induced IL-8 production in normal and COPD airway epithelial cells. COPD cells are less sensitive to A1AT’s anti-inflammatory effect than normal cells. A1AT exerted the anti-inflammatory function in part via reducing caspase-1 in normal cells, but not in COPD cells. In mice, A1AT significantly reduced HRV-1B induced lung neutrophilic inflammation. Conclusions A1AT exerts an anti-inflammatory effect in cigarette smoke-exposed and HRV-infected human airway epithelial cells, which may be related to its inhibitory effect on caspase-1 activity. PMID:28191362

  19. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  20. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  1. Argon Preconditioning Protects Airway Epithelial Cells against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Christina; Qi, Hong; Soto-Gonzalez, Lourdes; Doerr, Katharina; Ullrich, Roman; Tretter, Eva Verena; Markstaller, Klaus; Klein, Klaus Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the predominant pathogenic mechanism of ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. The noble gas argon has been shown to alleviate oxidative stress-related myocardial and cerebral injury. The risk of lung IR injury is increased in some major surgeries, reducing clinical outcome. However, no study has examined the lung-protective efficacy of argon preconditioning. The present study investigated the protective effects of argon preconditioning on airway epithelial cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to induce oxidative stress. A549 airway epithelial cells were treated with a cytotoxic concentration of H2O2 after exposure to standard air or 30 or 50% argon/21% oxygen/5% carbon dioxide/rest nitrogen for 30, 45 or 180 min. Cells were stained with annexin V/propidium iodide, and apoptosis was evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Protective signalling pathways activated by argon exposure were identified by Western blot analysis for phosphorylated candidate molecules of the mitogen-activated protein kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) pathways. Preconditioning with 50% argon for 30, 45 and 180 min and 30% argon for 180 min caused significant protection of A549 cells against H2O2-induced apoptosis, with increases in cellular viability of 5-47% (p < 0.0001). A small adverse effect was also observed, which presented as a 12-15% increase in cellular necrosis in argon-treated groups. Argon exposure resulted in early activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, peaking 10- 30 min after the start of preconditioning, and delayed activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway, peaking after 60-90 min. Argon preconditioning protects airway epithelial cells from H2O2-induced apoptotic cell death. Argon activates the JNK, p38, and ERK1/2 pathways, but not the Akt pathway. The cytoprotective properties of argon suggest possible prophylactic applications in surgery-related IR injury of the lungs. © 2016 S. Karger AG

  2. Oxidative Stress Regulates CFTR Gene Expression in Human Airway Epithelial Cells through a Distal Antioxidant Response Element

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaolin; Leir, Shih-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) expression in human airway epithelial cells involves the recruitment of distal cis-regulatory elements, which are associated with airway-selective DNase hypersensitive sites at −44 kb and −35 kb from the gene. The −35-kb site encompasses an enhancer that is regulated by the immune mediators interferon regulatory factor 1 and 2 and by nuclear factor Y. Here we investigate the −44-kb element, which also has enhancer activity in vitro in airway epithelial cells but is inactive in intestinal epithelial cells. This site contains an antioxidant response element (ARE) that plays a critical role in its function in airway cell lines and primary human bronchial epithelial cells. The natural antioxidant sulforaphane (SFN) induces nuclear translocation of nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that regulates genes with AREs in their promoters, many of which are involved in response to injury. Under normal conditions, the −44-kb ARE is occupied by the repressor BTB and CNC homology 1, basic leucine zipper transcription factor (Bach1), and v-Maf avian musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog K (MafK) heterodimers. After 2 hours of SFN treatment, Nrf2 displaces these repressive factors and activates CFTR expression. Site-directed mutagenesis shows that both the ARE and an adjacent NF-κB binding site are required for activation of the –44-kb element in airway epithelial cells. Moreover, this element is functionally linked to the −35-kb enhancer in modulating CFTR expression in response to environmental stresses in the airway. PMID:25259561

  3. Prenatal tracheal reconstruction with a hybrid amniotic mesenchymal stem cells-engineered construct derived from decellularized airway.

    PubMed

    Gray, Fabienne L; Turner, Christopher G; Ahmed, Azra; Calvert, Catherine E; Zurakowski, David; Fauza, Dario O

    2012-06-01

    This study was aimed at examining an airway construct engineered from autologous amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (aMSCs) and a xenologous decellularized airway scaffold as a means for tracheal repair. Fetal lambs (N = 13) with a tracheal defect were divided into 2 groups. One group (acellular, n = 6) was repaired with a decellularized leporine tracheal segment. The other group (engineered, n = 7) received an identical graft seeded with expanded/labeled autologous aMSCs. Newborns were euthanized for multiple analyses. Eleven lambs survived to term, 10 of which could breathe at birth. Engineered grafts showed a significant increase in diameter in vivo (P = .04) unlike acellular grafts (P = .62), although variable stenosis was present in all implants. Engineered constructs exhibited full epithelialization, compared with none of the acellular grafts (P = .002). Engineered grafts had a significantly greater degree of increase in elastin levels after implantation than acellular implants (P = .04). No such differences were noted in collagen and glycosaminoglycan contents. Donor cells were detected in engineered grafts, which displayed a pseudostratified columnar epithelium. Constructs engineered from aMSCs and decellularized airway undergo enhanced remodeling and epithelialization in vivo when compared with equivalent acellular implants. Amniotic mesenchymal stem cell-engineered airways may become an alternative for perinatal airway repair. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Stochastic homeostasis in human airway epithelium is achieved by neutral competition of basal cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H; Nadarajan, Parthiban; Graham, Trevor A; Pipinikas, Christodoulos P; Brown, James M; Falzon, Mary; Nye, Emma; Poulsom, Richard; Lawrence, David; Wright, Nicholas A; McDonald, Stuart; Giangreco, Adam; Simons, Benjamin D; Janes, Sam M

    2013-01-01

    Lineage tracing approaches have provided new insights into the cellular mechanisms that support tissue homeostasis in mice. However, the relevance of these discoveries to human epithelial homeostasis and its alterations in disease is unknown. By developing a novel quantitative approach for the analysis of somatic mitochondrial mutations that are accumulated over time, we demonstrate that the human upper airway epithelium is maintained by an equipotent basal progenitor cell population, in which the chance loss of cells due to lineage commitment is perfectly compensated by the duplication of neighbours, leading to “neutral drift” of the clone population. Further, we show that this process is accelerated in the airways of smokers, leading to intensified clonal consolidation and providing a background for tumorigenesis. This study provides a benchmark to show how somatic mutations provide quantitative information on homeostatic growth in human tissues, and a platform to explore factors leading to dysregulation and disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00966.001 PMID:24151545

  5. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities includ