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Sample records for airway dilator muscle

  1. Upper Airway Collapsibility (Pcrit) and Pharyngeal Dilator Muscle Activity are Sleep Stage Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Carberry, Jayne C.; Jordan, Amy S.; White, David P.; Wellman, Andrew; Eckert, Danny J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: An anatomically narrow/highly collapsible upper airway is the main cause of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Upper airway muscle activity contributes to airway patency and, like apnea severity, can be sleep stage dependent. Conversely, existing data derived from a small number of participants suggest that upper airway collapsibility, measured by the passive pharyngeal critical closing pressure (Pcrit) technique, is not sleep stage dependent. This study aimed to determine the effect of sleep stage on Pcrit and upper airway muscle activity in a larger cohort than previously tested. Methods: Pcrit and/or muscle data were obtained from 72 adults aged 20–64 y with and without OSA.Pcrit was determined via transient reductions in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during N2, slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Genioglossus and tensor palatini muscle activities were measured: (1) awake with and without CPAP, (2) during stable sleep on CPAP, and (3) in response to the CPAP reductions used to quantify Pcrit. Results: Pcrit was 4.9 ± 1.4 cmH2O higher (more collapsible) during REM versus SWS (P = 0.012), 2.3 ± 0.6 cmH2O higher during REM versus N2 (P < 0.001), and 1.6 ± 0.7 cmH2O higher in N2 versus SWS (P = 0.048). Muscle activity decreased from wakefulness to sleep and from SWS to N2 to REM sleep for genioglossus but not for tensor palatini. Pharyngeal muscle activity increased by ∼50% by breath 5 following CPAP reductions. Conclusions: Upper airway collapsibility measured via the Pcrit technique and genioglossus muscle activity vary with sleep stage. These findings should be taken into account when performing and interpreting “passive” Pcrit measurements. Citation: Carberry JC, Jordan AS, White DP, Wellman A, Eckert DJ. Upper airway collapsibility (Pcrit) and pharyngeal dilator muscle activity are sleep stage dependent. SLEEP 2016;39(3):511–521. PMID:26612386

  2. Arousal from Sleep Does Not Lead to Reduced Dilator Muscle Activity or Elevated Upper Airway Resistance on Return to Sleep in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy S.; Cori, Jennifer M.; Dawson, Andrew; Nicholas, Christian L.; O'Donoghue, Fergal J.; Catcheside, Peter G.; Eckert, Danny J.; McEvoy, R. Doug; Trinder, John

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare changes in end-tidal CO2, genioglossus muscle activity and upper airway resistance following tone-induced arousal and the return to sleep in healthy individuals with small and large ventilatory responses to arousal. Design: Observational study. Setting: Two sleep physiology laboratories. Patients or Participants: 35 men and 25 women with no medical or sleep disorders. Interventions: Auditory tones to induce 3-s to 15-s cortical arousals from sleep. Measurements and Results: During arousal from sleep, subjects with large ventilatory responses to arousal had higher ventilation (by analytical design) and tidal volume, and more marked reductions in the partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 compared to subjects with small ventilatory responses to arousal. However, following the return to sleep, ventilation, genioglossus muscle activity, and upper airway resistance did not differ between high and low ventilatory response groups (Breath 1 on return to sleep: ventilation 6.7 ± 0.4 and 5.5 ± 0.3 L/min, peak genioglossus activity 3.4% ± 1.0% and 4.8% ± 1.0% maximum, upper airway resistance 4.7 ± 0.7 and 5.5 ± 1.0 cm H2O/L/s, respectively). Furthermore, dilator muscle activity did not fall below the pre-arousal sleeping level and upper airway resistance did not rise above the pre-arousal sleeping level in either group for 10 breaths following the return to sleep. Conclusions: Regardless of the magnitude of the ventilatory response to arousal from sleep and subsequent reduction in PETCO2, healthy individuals did not develop reduced dilator muscle activity nor increased upper airway resistance, indicative of partial airway collapse, on the return to sleep. These findings challenge the commonly stated notion that arousals predispose to upper airway obstruction. Citation: Jordan AS, Cori JM, Dawson A, Nicholas CL, O'Donoghue FJ, Catcheside PG, Eckert DJ, McEvoy RD, Trinder J. Arousal from sleep does not lead to reduced dilator muscle activity or

  3. Upper airway muscles awake and asleep.

    PubMed

    Sériès, Frédéric

    2002-06-01

    Upper airway (UA) structures are involved in different respiratory and non-respiratory tasks. The coordination of agonist and antagonist UA dilators is responsible for their mechanical function and their ability to maintain UA patency throughout the respiratory cycle. The activity of these muscles is linked with central respiratory activity but also depends on UA pressure changes and is greatly influenced by sleep. UA muscles are involved in determining UA resistance and stability (i.e. closing pressure), and the effect of sleep on these variables may be accounted for by its effect on tonic and phasic skeletal muscle activities. The mechanical effects of UA dilator contraction also depend on their physiological properties (capacity to generate tension in vitro, activity of the anaerobic enzymatic pathway, histo-chemical characteristics that may differ between subjects who may or may not have sleep-related obstructive breathing disorders). These characteristics may represent an adaptive process to an increased resistive loading of these muscles. The apparent discrepancy between the occurrence of UA closure and an increased capacity to generate tension in sleep apnea patients may be due to a reduction in the effectiveness of UA muscle contraction in these patients; such an increase in tissue stiffness could be accounted for by peri-muscular tissue characteristics. Therefore, understanding of UA muscle physiological characteristics should take into account its capacity for force production and its mechanical coupling with other UA tissues. Important research goals for the future will be to integrate these issues with other physiological features of the disease, such as UA size and dimension, histological characteristics of UA tissues and the effect of sleep on muscle function. Such integration will better inform understanding of the role of pharyngeal UA muscles in the pathophysiology of the sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. PMID:12531123

  4. Motor unit regulation of mammalian pharyngeal dilator muscle activity.

    PubMed Central

    van Lunteren, E; Dick, T E

    1989-01-01

    The present study examined the cellular regulation of one of the pharyngeal dilator muscles, the geniohyoid, by assessing its motor unit (MU) behavior in anesthetized cats. During spontaneous breathing, MU that (a) were active during inspiration only (I-MU) and (b) were active during both inspiration and expiration (I/E-MU) were identified. I-MU had a later inspiratory onset time and a shorter duration of inspiratory firing than did I/E-MU (P less than 0.002 and P less than 0.0001, respectively). I-MU were usually quiescent whereas I/E-MU were usually active during the last 20% of inspiration. I/E-MU fired more rapidly (P less than 0.00001) and for relatively longer periods of time (P less than 0.00001) during inspiration than during expiration. End-expiratory airway occlusion (preventing lung expansion during inspiration) augmented the inspiratory activity of both I-MU and I/E-MU. Conversely, end-expiratory airway occlusion reduced the absolute and relative firing durations (P less than 0.002 and P less than 0.00002, respectively) and the firing frequency (P less than 0.001) of I/E-MU activity during expiration. These results indicate that (a) the complex pattern of pharyngeal dilator muscle activity is due to the integrated activity of a heterogeneous group of MU, (b) changes in the degree to which pharyngeal dilator muscles are active result from combinations of MU recruitment/decruitment and modulations of the frequency and duration of MU firing, and (c) gating of lung-volume afferent information occurs during the respiratory cycle. PMID:2760202

  5. Migration of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerthoffer, William T.

    2008-01-01

    Migration of smooth muscle cells is a process fundamental to development of hollow organs, including blood vessels and the airways. Migration is also thought to be part of the response to tissue injury. It has also been suggested to contribute to airways remodeling triggered by chronic inflammation. In both nonmuscle and smooth muscle cells numerous external signaling molecules and internal signal transduction pathways contribute to cell migration. The review includes evidence for the functional significance of airway smooth muscle migration, a summary of promigratory and antimigratory agents, and summaries of important signaling pathways mediating migration. Important signaling pathways and effector proteins described include small G proteins, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3-K), Rho activated protein kinase (ROCK), p21-activated protein kinases (PAK), Src family tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). These signaling modules control multiple critical effector proteins including actin nucleating, capping and severing proteins, myosin motors, and proteins that remodel microtubules. Actin filament remodeling, focal contact remodeling and propulsive force of molecular motors are all coordinated to move cells along gradients of chemical cues, matrix adhesiveness, or matrix stiffness. Airway smooth muscle cell migration can be modulated in vitro by drugs commonly used in pulmonary medicine including β-adrenergic agonists and corticosteroids. Future studies of airway smooth muscle cell migration may uncover novel targets for drugs aimed at modifying airway remodeling. PMID:18094091

  6. Influence of wakefulness on pharyngeal airway muscle activity

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yu‐Lun; Jordan, Amy S; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew; Heinzer, Raphael A; Eikermann, Matthias; Schory, Karen; Dover, Louise; White, David P

    2007-01-01

    Background Whether loss of wakefulness itself can influence pharyngeal dilator muscle activity and responsiveness is currently unknown. A study was therefore undertaken to assess the isolated impact of sleep on upper airway muscle activity after minimising respiratory/mechanical inputs. Methods Ten healthy subjects were studied. Genioglossus (GG), tensor palatini (TP) and diaphragm (DIA) electromyography (EMG), ventilation and sleep‐wake status were recorded. Non‐invasive positive pressure ventilation was applied. Expiratory pressure was adjusted to yield the lowest GGEMG, thereby minimising airway negative pressure (mechanoreceptor) effects. Inspiratory pressure, respiratory rate and inspiratory time were adjusted until the subjects ceased spontaneous ventilation, thereby minimising central respiratory input. Muscle activity during wakefulness, wake‐sleep transitions, stable non‐rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep were evaluated in the supine position. Results In transitions from wakefulness to sleep, significant decrements were observed in both mean GGEMG and TPEMG (1.6 (0.5)% to 1.3 (0.4)% of maximal GGEMG; 4.3 (2.3)% to 3.7 (2.1)% of maximal TPEMG). Compared with sleep onset, the activity of TP during stable NREM sleep and REM sleep was further decreased (3.7 (2.1)% vs 3.0 (2.0)% vs 3.0 (2.0)% of maximal EMG). However, GGEMG was only further reduced during REM sleep (1.3 (0.4)% vs 1.0 (0.3)% vs 1.1 (0.4)% of maximal EMG). Conclusion This study suggests that wakefulness per se, independent of respiratory/mechanical stimuli, can influence pharyngeal dilator muscle activity. PMID:17389755

  7. Motor unit number in a small facial muscle, dilator naris.

    PubMed

    Patel-Khurana, Nilam; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2015-10-01

    A loss of functioning motor units underlies many neuromuscular disorders. The facial nerve innervates the muscles of facial expression, including nasal muscles, which also play an important role in the regulation of airflow resistance. It is difficult to accurately assess motor unit number in the facial muscles, because the muscles are difficult to activate in isolation. Here, we apply the manual McComas method to estimate the number of motor units in a nasal dilator muscle. EMG of the dilator naris was recorded during graded stimulation of the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve in 26 subjects (12 males and 14 females), aged 20-41 years. Each subject was studied twice, on separate days, to estimate method reproducibility. As a check on our use of the McComas method, we also estimated motor unit number in the first dorsal interosseus muscle (FDI) of six subjects, as the muscle is also small and has been studied with the McComas method. Reproducibility was evaluated with a rigorous statistical approach, the Bland-Altman procedure. We estimate that dilator naris is composed of 75 ± 15.6 (SD) motor units, compared to 144 ± 35.5 in FDI. The coefficient of variation for test-retest reproducibility of dilator naris motor unit estimates was 29.6 %, similar to separate-day reproducibility reported for other muscles. Recording and stimulation were done with surface electrodes, and the recordings were of high quality and reproducible. This simple technique could be applied clinically to track motor neuron loss and to monitor facial nerve integrity.

  8. Motor unit number in a small facial muscle, dilator naris

    PubMed Central

    Patel-Khurana, Nilam; Fregosi, Ralph F.

    2015-01-01

    A loss of functioning motor units underlies many neuromuscular disorders. The facial nerve innervates the muscles of facial expression, including nasal muscles, which also play an important role in the regulation of airflow resistance. It is difficult to accurately assess motor unit number in the facial muscles, because the muscles are difficult to activate in isolation. Here we apply the manual McComas method to estimate the number of motor units in a nasal dilator muscle. EMG of the dilator naris was recorded during graded stimulation of the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve in 26 subjects (12 M/14 F), aged 20–41 years. Each subject was studied twice, on separate days, to estimate method reproducibility. As a check on our use of the McComas method, we also estimated motor unit number in the first dorsal interosseus muscle (FDI) of 6 subjects, as the muscle is also small, and has been studied with the McComas method. Reproducibility was evaluated with a rigorous statistical approach, the Bland-Altman procedure. We estimate that dilator naris is composed of 75 ±15.6 (SD) motor units, compared to 144 ± 35.5 in FDI. The coefficient of variation for test-retest reproducibility of dilator naris motor unit estimates was 29.6%, similar to separate-day reproducibility reported for other muscles. Recording and stimulation were done with surface electrodes, and the recordings were of high quality and reproducible. This simple technique could be applied clinically to track motor neuron loss, and to monitor facial nerve integrity. PMID:26169101

  9. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  10. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K(+)- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K(+) was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm.

  11. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K(+)- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K(+) was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca(2+) channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca(2+) channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  12. Non-Surgical Management of Critically Compromised Airway Due to Dilatation of Interposed Colon

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jinsoo

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of critically compromised airway secondary to a massively dilated sequestered colon conduit after several revision surgeries. A 71-year-old male patient had several operations after the diagnosis of gastric cancer. After initial treatment of pneumonia in the pulmonology department, he was transferred to the surgery department for feeding jejunostomy because of recurrent aspiration. However, he had respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. The chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed pneumonic consolidation at both lower lungs and massive dilatation of the substernal interposed colon compressing the trachea. The dilated interposed colon was originated from the right colon, which was sequestered after the recent esophageal reconstruction with left colon interposition resulting blind pouch at both ends. It was treated with CT-guided pigtail catheter drainage via right supraclavicular route, which was left in place for 2 weeks, and then removed. The patient remained well clinically, and was discharged home. PMID:27066087

  13. Non-Surgical Management of Critically Compromised Airway Due to Dilatation of Interposed Colon.

    PubMed

    Min, Jinsoo; Cho, Young-Jae

    2016-04-01

    We present a rare case of critically compromised airway secondary to a massively dilated sequestered colon conduit after several revision surgeries. A 71-year-old male patient had several operations after the diagnosis of gastric cancer. After initial treatment of pneumonia in the pulmonology department, he was transferred to the surgery department for feeding jejunostomy because of recurrent aspiration. However, he had respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. The chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed pneumonic consolidation at both lower lungs and massive dilatation of the substernal interposed colon compressing the trachea. The dilated interposed colon was originated from the right colon, which was sequestered after the recent esophageal reconstruction with left colon interposition resulting blind pouch at both ends. It was treated with CT-guided pigtail catheter drainage via right supraclavicular route, which was left in place for 2 weeks, and then removed. The patient remained well clinically, and was discharged home. PMID:27066087

  14. Airway smooth muscle dynamics: a common pathway of airway obstruction in asthma

    PubMed Central

    An, S.S.; Bai, T.R.; Bates, J.H.T.; Black, J.L.; Brown, R.H.; Brusasco, V.; Chitano, P.; Deng, L.; Dowell, M.; Eidelman, D.H.; Fabry, B.; Fairbank, N.J.; Ford, L.E.; Fredberg, J.J.; Gerthoffer, W.T.; Gilbert, S.H.; Gosens, R.; Gunst, S.J.; Halayko, A.J.; Ingram, R.H.; Irvin, C.G.; James, A.L.; Janssen, L.J.; King, G.G.; Knight, D.A.; Lauzon, A.M.; Lakser, O.J.; Ludwig, M.S.; Lutchen, K.R.; Maksym, G.N.; Martin, J.G.; Mauad, T.; McParland, B.E.; Mijailovich, S.M.; Mitchell, H.W.; Mitchell, R.W.; Mitzner, W.; Murphy, T.M.; Paré, P.D.; Pellegrino, R.; Sanderson, M.J.; Schellenberg, R.R.; Seow, C.Y.; Silveira, P.S.P.; Smith, P.G.; Solway, J.; Stephens, N.L.; Sterk, P.J.; Stewart, A.G.; Tang, D.D.; Tepper, R.S.; Tran, T.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive airway obstruction is the cause of symptoms and abnormal lung function in asthma. As airway smooth muscle (ASM) is the effecter controlling airway calibre, it is suspected that dysfunction of ASM contributes to the pathophysiology of asthma. However, the precise role of ASM in the series of events leading to asthmatic symptoms is not clear. It is not certain whether, in asthma, there is a change in the intrinsic properties of ASM, a change in the structure and mechanical properties of the noncontractile components of the airway wall, or a change in the interdependence of the airway wall with the surrounding lung parenchyma. All these potential changes could result from acute or chronic airway inflammation and associated tissue repair and remodelling. Anti-inflammatory therapy, however, does not “cure” asthma, and airway hyperresponsiveness can persist in asthmatics, even in the absence of airway inflammation. This is perhaps because the therapy does not directly address a fundamental abnormality of asthma, that of exaggerated airway narrowing due to excessive shortening of ASM. In the present study, a central role for airway smooth muscle in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma is explored. PMID:17470619

  15. Airway smooth muscle in the pathophysiology and treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solway, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays an integral part in the pathophysiology of asthma. It is responsible for acute bronchoconstriction, which is potentiated by constrictor hyperresponsiveness, impaired relaxation and length adaptation. ASM also contributes to airway remodeling and inflammation in asthma. In light of this, ASM is an important target in the treatment of asthma. PMID:23305987

  16. A theoretical analysis of the effect of airway smooth muscle load on airway narrowing.

    PubMed

    Macklem, P T

    1996-01-01

    We used published data for the elastic properties of a 2-mm outer-diameter canine bronchus and assumed values for the thickness of the wall components and lung parenchymal shear modulus to estimate the load on airway smooth muscle and its effect on airway narrowing. The following relationships were calculated: (1) luminal and smooth muscle radii of curvature and transmural pressure; (2) the isovolume, transmural pressures developed by the smooth muscle to narrow the lumen at distending pressures of 20, 10, 5, and 2 cm H2O; (3) the equilibrium tension developed by, and thus the load on, the airway smooth muscle as a function of smooth muscle length during isovolume bronchoconstriction. From these calculations a smooth muscle length-tension diagram was drawn allowing the interactions between submucosal thickening, peribronchial thickening, load, and smooth muscle contractility to be analyzed. The analysis indicates that: (1) the load on smooth muscle decreases by more than an order of magnitude between a distending pressure of 20 and 2 cm H2O; (2) increasing smooth muscle contractility has more effect at large rather than at small distending pressures; (3) peribronchial inflammation decreases both load and the slope of the relationship between peribronchial and pleural pressures. Decreases in load may be an important mechanism producing excessive bronchoconstriction in asthma. PMID:8542167

  17. Influence of sleep onset on upper-airway muscle activity in apnea patients versus normal controls.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, W S; Tangel, D J; White, D P

    1996-06-01

    Current evidence suggests that patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may have augmented pharyngeal dilator muscle activity during wakefulness, to compensate for deficient anatomy. However, the isolated effect of sleep on the activity of these muscles (comparing OSA patients with controls) has not been studied. We therefore determined waking levels of genioglossus (GG) and tensor palatini (TP) muscle activity (% of maximum electromyographic [EMG] activity) in 10 OSA patients and eight controls, and then assessed the impact of the first two breaths of sleep (theta electroencephalographic [EEG] activity) following a period of stable wakefulness. Apnea patients demonstrated greater genioglossal (27.4 +/- 4.0 versus 10.7 +/- 2.1%) and tensor palatini (31.9 +/- 6.5 versus 10.6 +/- 1.9%) EMG activity than did controls during wakefulness. This augmented muscle activity in apnea patients could be reduced to near control levels during wakefulness with the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to the upper airway. At sleep onset, control subjects demonstrated small but consistent decrements in the activity of both the TP and GG muscles. On the other hand, apnea patients demonstrated large, significantly greater decrements in TP EMG at sleep onset than did the control subjects. The effect of sleep on GG EMG in apnea patients was inconsistent, with most (n = 7) demonstrating large (significantly larger than controls) decrements in genioglossal activity. However, three OSA patients demonstrated small increments in GG EMG at sleep onset despite falling TP EMG and obstructive apnea or hypopnea. We conclude that sleep onset is associated with significantly larger decrements in TP muscle EMG activity in OSA patients than in controls, which may represent a loss of neuromuscular compensation that is present during wakefulness. However, our results for the GG muscle were more variable, and did not always support this hypothesis.

  18. Dramatic dilatation of the upper airway secondary to a Valsalva manoeuvre in a lateral cephalometric teleradiograph of a child

    PubMed Central

    Varela, M; Quiñones, D; Martínez-Pérez, D

    2010-01-01

    Radiographs are routinely used by orthodontists for the planning of treatment for their patients and they can, in some cases, play a decisive role in the early diagnosis of some unexpected medical or surgical disorders. This report presents the case of a substantial dilatation of the upper airway in a 10-year-old girl, which was attributed to a forced Valsalva manoeuvre. The diagnosis was confirmed upon repetition of the teleradiograph with the mouth open. PMID:21062946

  19. Influence of sleep on response to negative airway pressure of tensor palatini muscle and retropalatal airway.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, J R; Tangel, D J; Mezzanotte, W S; White, D P

    1993-11-01

    Increased retropalatal airway resistance may be caused by a sleep-induced loss of palatal muscle activity and a diminished ability of these muscles to respond to the increasing intrapharyngeal negative pressure that develops during sleep. To investigate these possibilities, in six normal subjects, we determined the effect of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep on 1) the tensor palatini (TP) electromyogram (EMG) response to rapid-onset negative-pressure generations (NPG) in the upper airway and 2) the collapsibility of the retropalatal airway during these NPGs. During wakefulness, the change in TP EMG from basal to peak levels (during NPG) was 19.8 +/- 3.2 arbitrary units (P < 0.005). This was markedly reduced during sleep (3.6 +/- 1.5 arbitrary units; P < 0.001). The latency of the TP EMG response was 48.5 +/- 5.6 ms during wakefulness but was prolonged during sleep (105.0 +/- 12.2 ms; P < 0.02). The peak transpalatal pressure during NPG (a measure of airway collapse) was 2.1 +/- 0.7 cmH2O during wakefulness and increased to 5.3 +/- 0.8 cmH2O during sleep (P < 0.05). We conclude that the brisk reflex response of the TP muscle to negative pressure during wakefulness is markedly reduced during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep, in association with a more collapsible retropalatal airway. We speculate that the reduction in this TP reflex response contributes to retropalatal airway narrowing during sleep in normal subjects.

  20. Percutaneous dilational tracheotomy for airway management in a newborn with Pierre-Robin syndrome and a glossopharyngeal web.

    PubMed

    Pirat, Arash; Candan, Selim; Unlükaplan, Aytekin; Kömürcü, Ozgür; Kuşlu, Selim; Arslan, Gülnaz

    2012-04-01

    Pierre-Robin syndrome (PRS) is often associated with difficulty in endotracheal intubation. We present the use of percutaneous dilational tracheotomy (PDT) for airway management of a newborn with PRS and a glossopharyngeal web. A 2-day-old term newborn with PRS and severe obstructive dyspnea was evaluated by the anesthesiology team for airway management. A direct laryngoscopy revealed a glossopharyngeal web extending from the base of the tongue to the posterior pharyngeal wall. The infant was spontaneously breathing through a 2 mm diameter fistula in the center of this web. It was decided that endotracheal intubation was impossible, and a PDT was planned. The trachea of the newborn was cannulated, using a 20 gauge peripheral venous catheter and a 0.71 mm guide wire was introduced through this catheter. Using 5 French, 7 French, 9 French, and 11 French central venous catheter kit dilators, staged tracheotomy stoma dilation was performed. By inserting a size 3.0 tracheotomy cannula, PDT was successfully completed in this newborn. This case describes the successful use of PDT for emergency airway management of a newborn with PRS and glossopharyngeal web.

  1. Platelet membranes induce airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Grenegård, Magnus; Lindström, Eva G

    2011-01-01

    The role of platelets in airway disease is poorly understood although they have been suggested to influence on proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). Platelets have been found localized in the airways in autopsy material from asthmatic patients and have been implicated in airway remodeling. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of various platelet fractions on proliferation of ASMC obtained from guinea pigs (GP-ASMC) and humans (H-ASMC). Proliferation of ASMC was measured by the MTS assay and the results confirmed by measurements of the DNA content. A key observation was that the platelet membrane preparations induced a significant increase in the proliferation of both GP-ASMC (129.9 ± 3.0 %) and H-ASMC (144.8 ± 12.2). However, neither supernatants from lysed or filtrated thrombin stimulated platelets induced ASMC proliferation to the same extent as the membrane preparation. We have previously shown that platelet-induced proliferation is dependent on 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) pathways. In the present work we established that platelet membrane-induced ASMC proliferation was reduced in the presence of the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI and the 5-LOX inhibitor AA-861. In conclusion, our results showed that platelet membranes significantly induced ASMC proliferation, demonstrating that the mitogenic effect of platelets and platelet membranes on ASMC is mainly due to membrane-associated factors. The effects of platelet membranes were evident on both GP-ASMC and H-ASMC and involved 5-LOX and ROS. These new findings are of importance in understanding the mechanisms contributing to airway remodeling and may contribute to the development of new pharmacological tools in the treatment of inflammatory airway diseases.

  2. Impact of obstructive apnea syndrome on upper airway respiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, Eva

    2005-07-28

    This article reviews studies of upper airway muscles in humans, with emphasis on muscle fiber structural and electrophysiological changes observed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The concept of OSAS as a progressive disease is discussed and also possible causes. These include local nervous lesions in the upper airway, both motor and sensory. Previous muscle biopsy studies have given evidence for motor neuron lesions such as, e.g., the phenomenon of type grouping in histological sections. New data obtained with concentric needle EMG recordings from the palatopharyngeus muscles are also presented. In 10/12 OSAS patients there were typical findings indicating motor neuropathy (reduced EMG activity at maximal voluntary effort, long and polyphasic motor-unit potentials and, in two cases, spontaneous denervation activity), whereas such findings were only present in 3/15 patients with habitual snoring. This supports the hypothesis that progression from habitual snoring to the clinical disease of OSAS could be attributed to peripheral neurogenic lesions. PMID:16054444

  3. Mechanisms of BDNF regulation in asthmatic airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin produced by airway smooth muscle (ASM), enhances inflammation effects on airway contractility, supporting the idea that locally produced growth factors influence airway diseases such as asthma. We endeavored to dissect intrinsic mechanisms regulating endogenous, as well as inflammation (TNF-α)-induced BDNF secretion in ASM of nonasthmatic vs. asthmatic humans. We focused on specific Ca(2+) regulation- and inflammation-related signaling cascades and quantified BDNF secretion. We find that TNF-α enhances BDNF release by ASM cells, via several mechanisms relevant to asthma, including transient receptor potential channels TRPC3 and TRPC6 (but not TRPC1), ERK 1/2, PI3K, PLC, and PKC cascades, Rho kinase, and transcription factors cAMP response element binding protein and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Basal BDNF expression and secretion are elevated in asthmatic ASM and increase further with TNF-α exposure, involving many of these regulatory mechanisms. We conclude that airway BDNF secretion is regulated at multiple levels, providing a basis for autocrine effects of BDNF under conditions of inflammation and disease, with potential downstream influences on contractility and remodeling. PMID:27317689

  4. Tumor necrosis factor regulates NMDA receptor-mediated airway smooth muscle contractile function and airway responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Anaparti, Vidyanand; Pascoe, Christopher D; Jha, Aruni; Mahood, Thomas H; Ilarraza, Ramses; Unruh, Helmut; Moqbel, Redwan; Halayko, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    We have shown that N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDA-Rs) are receptor-operated calcium entry channels in human airway smooth muscle (HASM) during contraction. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) augments smooth muscle contractility by influencing pathways that regulate intracellular calcium flux and can alter NMDA-R expression and activity in cortical neurons and glial cells. We hypothesized that NMDA-R-mediated Ca(2+) and contractile responses of ASM can be altered by inflammatory mediators, including TNF. In cultured HASM cells, we assessed TNF (10 ng/ml, 48 h) effect on NMDA-R subunit abundance by quantitative PCR, confocal imaging, and immunoblotting. We observed dose- and time-dependent changes in NMDA-R composition: increased obligatory NR1 subunit expression and altered regulatory NR2 and inhibitory NR3 subunits. Measuring intracellular Ca(2+) flux in Fura-2-loaded HASM cultures, we observed that TNF exposure enhanced cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization and changed the temporal pattern of Ca(2+) flux in individual myocytes induced by NMDA, an NMDA-R selective analog of glutamate. We measured airway responses to NMDA in murine thin-cut lung slices (TCLS) from allergen-naive animals and observed significant airway contraction. However, NMDA acted as a bronchodilator in TCLS from house dust mice-challenged mice and in allergen-naive TCLS subjected to TNF exposure. All contractile or bronchodilator responses were blocked by a selective NMDA-R antagonist, (2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate, and bronchodilator responses were prevented by N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) or indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor). Collectively, we show that TNF augments NMDA-R-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization in HASM cells, whereas in multicellular TCLSs allergic inflammation and TNF exposure leads to NMDA-R-mediated bronchodilation. These findings reveal the unique contribution of ionotrophic NMDA-R to airway hyperreactivity.

  5. Effect of antigenic exposure on airway smooth muscle remodeling in an equine model of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Leclere, Mathilde; Lavoie-Lamoureux, Anouk; Gélinas-Lymburner, Emilie; David, Florent; Martin, James G; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that airway smooth muscle remodeling is an early event in asthma, but whether it remains a dynamic process late in the course of the disease is unknown. Moreover, little is known about the effects of an antigenic exposure on chronically established smooth muscle remodeling. We measured the effects of antigenic exposure on airway smooth muscle in the central and peripheral airways of horses with heaves, a naturally occurring airway disease that shares similarities with chronic asthma. Heaves-affected horses (n = 6) and age-matched control horses (n = 5) were kept on pasture before being exposed to indoor antigens for 30 days to induce airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction. Peripheral lung and endobronchial biopsies were collected before and after antigenic exposure by thoracoscopy and bronchoscopy, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and enzymatic labeling were used for morphometric analyses of airway smooth muscle mass and proliferative and apoptotic myocytes. In the peripheral airways, heaves-affected horses had twice as much smooth muscle as control horses. Remodeling was associated with smooth muscle hyperplasia and in situ proliferation, without reduced apoptosis. Further antigenic exposure had no effect on the morphometric data. In central airways, proliferating myocytes were increased compared with control horses only after antigenic exposure. Peripheral airway smooth muscle mass is stable in chronically affected animals subjected to antigenic exposure. This increased mass is maintained in a dynamic equilibrium by an elevated cellular turnover, suggesting that targeting smooth muscle proliferation could be effective at decreasing chronic remodeling.

  6. Airway smooth muscle and bronchospasm: fluctuating, fluidizing, freezing

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Trepat, Xavier; Nguyen, Trang T. B.; Lenormand, Guillaume; Oliver, Madavi; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    We review here four recent findings that have altered in a fundamental way our understanding of airways smooth muscle (ASM), its dynamic responses to physiological loading, and their dominant mechanical role in bronchospasm. These findings highlight ASM remodeling processes that are innately out-of-equilibrium and dynamic, and bring to the forefront a striking intersection between topics in condensed matter physics and ASM cytoskeletal biology. By doing so, they place in a new light the role of enhanced ASM mass in airway hyper-responsiveness as well as in the failure of a deep inspiration to relax the asthmatic airway. These findings have established that (i) ASM length is equilibrated dynamically, not statically; (ii) ASM dynamics closely resemble physical features exhibited by so-called soft glassy materials; (iii) static force-length relationships fail to describe dynamically contracted ASM states; (iv) stretch fluidizes the ASM cytoskeleton. Taken together, these observations suggest that at the origin of the bronchodilatory effect of a deep inspiration, and its failure in asthma, may lie glassy dynamics of the ASM cell. PMID:18514592

  7. Structural and functional changes in the airway smooth muscle of asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Seow, C Y; Schellenberg, R R; Paré, P D

    1998-11-01

    It has been recognized since the early 1920s that the amount of smooth muscle in asthmatic subjects' airways is markedly increased. More recent studies have confirmed that in fatal asthma there is a significant increase in the thickness of airway smooth muscle. For subjects who have had asthma and who died for other reasons or had a lobectomy, the increase in muscle layer thickness is less striking. An increase in smooth muscle mass could have a dual effect on airway narrowing: one due to the thickening of airway wall, the other due to a concomitant increase in force generation. However, it is not known whether the increased muscle mass, due either to hypertrophy or hyperplasia, is accompanied by an increase in force. Proliferation of smooth muscle cells often produces noncontractile cells in vitro. Comparison of force generation by muscle preparations from asthmatic and control airways shows conflicting results, with some studies demonstrating an increase in force in asthmatic muscle preparations and others showing no increase. The discrepancy could be due to a failure to take into account the length-tension relationship of the muscle preparations in some studies. No force velocity data are available for human airway smooth muscle. However, there is some evidence for an increased amount of shortening in airway smooth muscle preparations from patients with asthma. This could be due to an increase in force generation and/or a decrease in tissue elastance in asthmatic airways. Muscle contractility and tissue elastance are in turn influenced by cytokines, matrix-degrading enzymes, and other inflammatory mediators present in the airways of asthmatic subjects. Data from in vitro studies of a canine "asthma model" indicate an increase in both shortening velocity and amount of shortening compared with littermate control animals. An increase in the compliance of the parallel elastic element of the sensitized airway preparation could account for the mechanical alterations

  8. IL-6 trans-signaling increases expression of airways disease genes in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mac B.; Deshpande, Deepak A.; Chou, Jeffery; Cui, Wei; Smith, Shelly; Langefeld, Carl; Hastie, Annette T.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic data suggest that IL-6 trans-signaling may have a pathogenic role in the lung; however, the effects of IL-6 trans-signaling on lung effector cells have not been investigated. In this study, human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells were treated with IL-6 (classical) or IL-6+sIL6R (trans-signaling) for 24 h and gene expression was measured by RNAseq. Intracellular signaling and transcription factor activation were assessed by Western blotting and luciferase assay, respectively. The functional effect of IL-6 trans-signaling was determined by proliferation assay. IL-6 trans-signaling had no effect on phosphoinositide-3 kinase and Erk MAP kinase pathways in HASM cells. Both classical and IL-6 trans-signaling in HASM involves activation of Stat3. However, the kinetics of Stat3 phosphorylation by IL-6 trans-signaling was different than classical IL-6 signaling. This was further reflected in the differential gene expression profile by IL-6 trans-signaling in HASM cells. Under IL-6 trans-signaling conditions 36 genes were upregulated, including PLA2G2A, IL13RA1, MUC1, and SOD2. Four genes, including CCL11, were downregulated at least twofold. The expression of 112 genes was divergent between IL-6 classical and trans-signaling, including the genes HILPDA, NNMT, DAB2, MUC1, WWC1, and VEGFA. Pathway analysis revealed that IL-6 trans-signaling induced expression of genes involved in regulation of airway remodeling, immune response, hypoxia, and glucose metabolism. Treatment of HASM cells with IL-6+sIL6R induced proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion, suggesting a role for IL-6 trans-signaling in asthma pathogenesis. These novel findings demonstrate differential effect of IL-6 trans-signaling on airway cells and identify IL-6 trans-signaling as a potential modifier of airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:26001777

  9. Targeting the airway smooth muscle for asthma treatment.

    PubMed

    Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca

    2009-10-01

    Asthma is a complex respiratory disease whose incidence has increased worldwide in the last decade. Currently there is no cure for asthma. Although bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory medications are effective medicines in some asthmatic patients, it is clear that an unmet therapeutic need persists for a subpopulation of individuals with severe asthma. This chronic lung disease is characterized by airflow limitation, lung inflammation, and remodeling that includes increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. In addition to its contractile properties, the ASM also contributes to the inflammatory process by producing active mediators, which modify the extracellular matrix composition and interact with inflammatory cells. These undesirable functions make interventions aimed at reducing ASM abundance an attractive strategy for novel asthma therapies. The following three mechanisms could limit the accumulation of smooth muscle: decreased cell proliferation, augmented cell apoptosis, and reduced cell migration into the smooth muscle layer. Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway or statins hold promise for asthma treatment, because they exhibit anti-inflammatory, antimigratory, and antiproliferative effects in preclinical and clinical studies, and they can target the smooth muscle. This review will discuss current knowledge of ASM biology and identify gaps in the field to stimulate future investigations of the cellular mechanisms that control ASM overabundance in asthma. Targeting ASM has the potential to be an innovative venue of treatment for patients with asthma.

  10. Insulin NO-dependent action on airways smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Papayianni, M; Gourgoulianis, K I; Molyvdas, P A

    2001-02-01

    In order to find out how insulin acts on airway smooth muscle and which mechanisms could be involved, we studied the effect of insulin on contraction induced, first, by KCl and, second, by Acetylcholine (Ach), before and after epithelium removal, and finally in the presence of N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Tracheal smooth muscle strips from 24 rabbits, 6 being used for each experiment. Each muscle strip was pretreated with a solution containing either 80 mM KCl or 10(-5) Ach and increasing doses of insulin (range 10(-10)--10(-5) M) in the presence or absence of 10(-4) M L-NAME. A reference curve for contraction evoked by 80 mM KCl or 10(-5) M Ach in the presence or absence of 10(-4) M L-NAME was recorded each time before the pretreatment mentioned above. Insulin evoked a concentration-dependent inhibition of tracheal smooth muscle contraction, induced by 80 mM KCl or 10(-5) M Ach. After epithelium removal, insulin (10(-8), 10(-7) M) evoked statistically significant increases to the contractions induced by 10(-5) M Ach compared to the contractions induced by 10(-5) M Ach and insulin in the presence of epithelium (P < 0.05). These increases were higher when 10(-4) M l-NAME was added to the bath (P < 0.05). In conclusion, these results indicate that insulin inhibits tracheal smooth muscle contraction by acting on epithelium and releasing NO.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of cytokine function in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Deborah; Damera, Gautam; Sukkar, Maria B.; Tliba, Omar

    2009-01-01

    The immuno-modulatory properties of airway smooth muscle have become of increasing importance in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation and structural remodeling of the airway wall in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). ASM cells respond to many cytokines, growth factors and lipid mediators to produce a wide array of immuno-modulatory molecules which may in turn orchestrate and perpetuate the disease process in asthma and COPD. Despite numerous studies of the cellular effects of cytokines on cultured ASM, few have identified intracellular signaling pathways by which cytokines modulate or induce these cellular responses. In this review we provide an overview of the transcriptional mechanisms as well as intracellular signaling pathways regulating cytokine functions in ASM cells. The recent discovery of toll-like receptors in ASM cells represents a significant development in our understanding of the immuno-modulatory capabilities of ASM cells. Thus, we also review emerging evidence of the inflammatory response to toll-like receptor activation in ASM cells. PMID:19393330

  12. Airway mechanics and methods used to visualize smooth muscle dynamics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cooper, P R; McParland, B E; Mitchell, H W; Noble, P B; Politi, A Z; Ressmeyer, A R; West, A R

    2009-10-01

    Contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is regulated by the physiological, structural and mechanical environment in the lung. We review two in vitro techniques, lung slices and airway segment preparations, that enable in situ ASM contraction and airway narrowing to be visualized. Lung slices and airway segment approaches bridge a gap between cell culture and isolated ASM, and whole animal studies. Imaging techniques enable key upstream events involved in airway narrowing, such as ASM cell signalling and structural and mechanical events impinging on ASM, to be investigated.

  13. AMPK Dilates Resistance Arteries via Activation of SERCA and BKCa Channels in Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Holger; Schubert, Kai Michael; Blodow, Stephanie; Kreutz, Claus-Peter; Erdogmus, Serap; Wiedenmann, Margarethe; Qiu, Jiehua; Fey, Theres; Ruth, Peter; Lubomirov, Lubomir T; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Mederos Y Schnitzler, Michael; Hardie, D Grahame; Gudermann, Thomas; Pohl, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The protective effects of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) on the metabolic syndrome may include direct effects on resistance artery vasomotor function. However, the precise actions of AMPK on microvessels and their potential interaction are largely unknown. Thus, we set to determine the effects of AMPK activation on vascular smooth muscle tone and the underlying mechanisms. Resistance arteries isolated from hamster and mouse exhibited a pronounced endothelium-independent dilation on direct pharmacological AMPK activation by 2 structurally unrelated compounds (PT1 and A769662). The dilation was associated with a decrease of intracellular-free calcium [Ca(2+)]i in vascular smooth muscle cell. AMPK stimulation induced activation of BKCa channels as assessed by patch clamp studies in freshly isolated hamster vascular smooth muscle cell and confirmed by direct proof of membrane hyperpolarization in intact arteries. The BKCa channel blocker iberiotoxin abolished the hyperpolarization but only partially reduced the dilation and did not affect the decrease of [Ca(2+)]i. By contrast, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) inhibitor thapsigargin largely reduced these effects, whereas combined inhibition of SERCA and BKCa channels virtually abolished them. AMPK stimulation significantly increased the phosphorylation of the SERCA modulator phospholamban at the regulatory T17 site. Stimulation of smooth muscle AMPK represents a new, potent vasodilator mechanism in resistance vessels. AMPK directly relaxes vascular smooth muscle cell by a decrease of [Ca(2+)]i. This is achieved by calcium sequestration via SERCA activation, as well as activation of BKCa channels. There is in part a mutual compensation of both calcium-lowering mechanisms. However, SERCA activation which involves an AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of phospholamban is the predominant mechanism in resistance vessels.

  14. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  15. Rapid biphasic arteriolar dilations induced by skeletal muscle contraction are dependent on stimulation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mihok, Marika L; Murrant, Coral L

    2004-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that measurable changes in microvasculature dilation occur in response to a single short-duration tetanic contraction, we contracted three to five skeletal muscle fibres of the hamster cremaster muscle microvascular preparation (in situ) and evaluated the response of an arteriole overlapping the active muscle fibres. Arteriolar diameter (baseline diameter = 16.4 +/- 0.9 micro m, maximum diameter = 34.7 +/- 1.2 micro m) was measured before and after a single contraction resulting from a range of stimulus frequencies (4, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, and 80 Hz) within a 250- or 500-ms train. Four and 10 Hz produced a significant dilation at 2.9 +/- 0.4 and 6.5 +/- 2.8 s, respectively, within a 250-ms train and 3.0 +/- 0.2 and 6.1 +/- 1.3 s, respectively, within a 500-ms train. Biphasic dilations were observed within a 250-ms train at 20 Hz (at 3.9 +/- 0.9 and 22.1 +/- 4.3 s), 30 Hz (at 2.7 +/- 0.3 and 17.5 +/- 2.9 s), and 40 Hz (at 3.8 +/- 0.4 and 23.2 +/- 2.6 s) and within a 500-ms train at 20 Hz (at 4.8 +/- 0.4 and 31.9 +/- 3.8 s) and 30 Hz (at 3.4 +/- 0.3 and 27.6 +/- 3.0 s). A single dilation was observed within a 250-ms train at 60 Hz (at 5.1 +/- 0.7 s) and 80 Hz (at 14.2 +/- 3.3 s) and within a 500-ms train at 40 Hz (at 9.9 +/- 3.2 s), 60 Hz (at 7.9 +/- 2.1 s), and 80 Hz (at 13.4 +/- 4.0 s). We have shown that a single contraction ranging from a single twitch (4 Hz, 250 ms) to fused tetanic contractions produces significant arteriolar dilations and that the pattern of dilation is dependent on the stimulus frequency and train duration.

  16. Functional significance of increased airway smooth muscle in asthma and COPD.

    PubMed

    Lambert, R K; Wiggs, B R; Kuwano, K; Hogg, J C; Paré, P D

    1993-06-01

    Using a computational model, we investigated the effect of the morphologically determined increased airway smooth muscle mass, adventitial mass, and submucosal mass observed in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on the increase in airway resistance in response to a bronchoconstricting stimulus. The computational model of Wiggs et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 69: 849-860, 1990) was modified in such a way that smooth muscle shortening was limited by the maximal stress that the muscle could develop at the constricted length. Increased adventitial thickness was found to increase constriction by reducing parenchymal interdependence. Increased submucosal thickness led to greater luminal occlusion for any degree of smooth muscle shortening. Increased muscle thickness allowed greater smooth muscle shortening against the elastic loads provided by parenchymal interdependence and airway wall stiffness. We found that for constant airway mechanics, as reflected by the passive area-pressure curves of the airways, the increased muscle mass is likely to be the most important abnormality responsible for the increased resistance observed in response to bronchoconstricting stimuli in asthma and COPD. For a given maximal muscle stress, greater muscle thickness allows the development of greater tension and thus more constriction of the lumen. PMID:8365980

  17. Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Danny J; Lo, Yu L; Saboisky, Julian P; Jordan, Amy S; White, David P; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (-0.68 ± 1.0 vs. -0.80 ± 2.0 cmH(2)O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression. PMID:21885797

  18. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction.

  19. Airway smooth muscle changes in the nitrofen-induced congenital diaphragmatic hernia rat model.

    PubMed

    Belik, Jaques; Davidge, Sandra T; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Jingyi; Greer, John J

    2003-05-01

    In the fetal rat, nitrofen induces congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and pulmonary vascular remodeling similar to what is observed in the human condition. Airway hyperactivity is common in infants with CDH and attributed to the ventilator-induced airway damage. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that airway smooth muscle mechanical properties are altered in the nitrofen-induced CDH rat model. Lungs from nitrofen-exposed fetuses with hernias (CDH) or intact diaphragm (nitrofen) and untreated fetuses (control) were studied on gestation d 21. The left intrapulmonary artery and bronchi were removed and mounted on a wire myograph, and lung expression, content, and immunolocalization of cyclooxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 were evaluated. Pulmonary artery muscle in the CDH group had significantly (p < 0.01) lower force generation compared with control and nitrofen groups. In contrast, the same generation bronchial smooth muscle of the CDH and nitrofen groups developed higher force compared with control. Whereas no differences were found in endothelium-dependent pulmonary vascular muscle tone, the epithelium-dependent airway muscle relaxation was significantly decreased (p < 0.01) in the CDH and nitrofen groups. The lung mRNA levels of COX-1 and COX-2 were increased in the CDH and nitrofen groups. COX-1 vascular and airway immunostaining, as well as COX-1 and COX-2 lung protein content, were increased in the CDH group. This is the first report of airway smooth muscle abnormalities in the nitrofen-induced fetal rat model of CDH. We speculate that congenital airway muscle changes may be present in the human form of this disease. PMID:12612200

  20. A study of airway smooth muscle in asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways using PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Present understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma has been severely limited by the lack of an imaging modality capable of assessing airway conditions of asthma patients in vivo. Of particular interest is the role that airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays in the development of asthma and asthma related symptoms. With standard Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), imaging ASM is often not possible due to poor structural contrast between the muscle and surrounding tissues. A potential solution to this problem is to utilize additional optical contrast factors intrinsic to the tissue, such as birefringence. Due to its highly ordered structure, ASM is strongly birefringent. Previously, we demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive OCT(PS-OCT) has the potential to be used to visualize ASM as well as easily segment it from the surrounding (weakly) birefringent tissue by exploiting a property which allows it to discriminate the orientation of birefringent fibers. We have already validated our technology with a substantial set of histological comparisons made against data obtained ex vivo. In this work we present a comprehensive comparison of ASM distributions in asthmatic and non-asthmatic human volunteers. By isolating the ASM we parameterize its distribution in terms of both thickness and band width, calculated volumetrically over centimeters of airway. Using this data we perform analyses of the asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways using a broad number and variety and subjects.

  1. Epithelium-generated neuropeptide Y induces smooth muscle contraction to promote airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanru; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jude, Joseph; Jiang, Meiqi; Zhao, Hengjiang; Cao, Gaoyuan; Yoo, Edwin; Jester, William; Morley, Michael P.; Zhou, Su; Wang, Yi; Lu, Min Min; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases globally and can be divided into presenting with or without an immune response. Current therapies have little effect on nonimmune disease, and the mechanisms that drive this type of asthma are poorly understood. Here, we have shown that loss of the transcription factors forkhead box P1 (Foxp1) and Foxp4, which are critical for lung epithelial development, in the adult airway epithelium evokes a non-Th2 asthma phenotype that is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) without eosinophilic inflammation. Transcriptome analysis revealed that loss of Foxp1 and Foxp4 expression induces ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y (Npy), which has been reported to be present in the airways of asthma patients, but whose importance in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Treatment of human lung airway explants with recombinant NPY increased airway contractility. Conversely, loss of Npy in Foxp1- and Foxp4-mutant airway epithelium rescued the AHR phenotype. We determined that NPY promotes AHR through the induction of Rho kinase activity and phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which induces airway smooth muscle contraction. Together, these studies highlight the importance of paracrine signals from the airway epithelium to the underlying smooth muscle to induce AHR and suggest that therapies targeting epithelial induction of this phenotype may prove useful in treatment of noneosinophilic asthma. PMID:27088802

  2. Cooling-induced contraction in ovine airways smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, S M; Pilcher, C W; Williams, K I

    1999-02-01

    The mechanism of cold-induced bronchoconstriction is poorly understood. This prompted the present study whose aim was to determine the step-wise direct effect of cooling on smooth muscle of isolated ovine airways and analyse the role of calcium in the mechanisms involved. Isolated tracheal strips and bronchial segments were suspended in organ baths containing Krebs' solution for isometric tension recording. Tissue responses during stepwise cooling from 37 to 5 degrees C were examined. Cooling induced a rapid and reproducible contraction proportional to cooling temperature in ovine tracheal and bronchial preparations which was epithelium-independent. On readjustment to 37 degrees C the tone returned rapidly to basal level. Maximum contraction was achieved at a temperature of 5 degrees C for trachea and 15 degrees C for bronchiole. Cooling-induced contractions (CIC) was resistant to tetrodotoxin (1; 10 micrometer), and not affected by the muscarinic antagonist atropine (1 micrometer) or the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine (1 micrometer), or the histamine H1-antagonist mepyramine (1 micrometer) or indomethacin (1 micrometer). Ca2+ antagonists (nifedipine and verapamil) and Mn2+ raised tracheal but not bronchiolar tone and augmented CIC. Incubation in Ca2+-free, EGTA-containing Krebs' solution for 5 min had no effect on CIC, although it significantly reduced KCl-induced contraction by up to 75%. Cooling inhibited Ca2+ influx measured using 45Ca2+ uptake. Caffeine (100 micrometer) significantly inhibited CIC. The results show that cooling-induced contractions do not appear to involve activation of nerve endings, all surface reception systems or Ca2+ influx. However, CIC is mainly dependent on release of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:10072702

  3. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2014-11-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constricted by either pressure or membrane depolarization (60 mM K) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that eugenol inhibited voltage-dependent calcium (Ca) currents, when using Ba as a charge carrier, in isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Eugenol inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca currents involved pore block, a hyperpolarizing shift (∼-10 mV) in voltage-dependent inactivation, an increase in the proportion of steady-state inactivating current, and acceleration of inactivation rate. In summary, our data indicate that eugenol dilates cerebral arteries by means of multimodal inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca channels.

  4. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constricted by either pressure or membrane depolarization (60 mM K+) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that eugenol inhibited voltage-dependent calcium (Ca2+) currents, when using Ba2+ as a charge carrier, in isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Eugenol inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents involved pore block, a hyperpolarizing shift ( ~−10 mV) in voltage-dependent inactivation, an increase in the proportion of steady-state inactivating current, and acceleration of inactivaiton rate. In summary, our data indicate that eugenol dilates cerebral arteries via multi-modal inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. PMID:24921632

  5. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2014-11-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constricted by either pressure or membrane depolarization (60 mM K) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that eugenol inhibited voltage-dependent calcium (Ca) currents, when using Ba as a charge carrier, in isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Eugenol inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca currents involved pore block, a hyperpolarizing shift (∼-10 mV) in voltage-dependent inactivation, an increase in the proportion of steady-state inactivating current, and acceleration of inactivation rate. In summary, our data indicate that eugenol dilates cerebral arteries by means of multimodal inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca channels. PMID:24921632

  6. Signaling and regulation of G protein-coupled receptors in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Charlotte K; Penn, Raymond B

    2003-01-01

    Signaling through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediates numerous airway smooth muscle (ASM) functions including contraction, growth, and "synthetic" functions that orchestrate airway inflammation and promote remodeling of airway architecture. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of the GPCRs that have been identified in ASM cells, and discuss the extent to which signaling via these GPCRs has been characterized and linked to distinct ASM functions. In addition, we examine the role of GPCR signaling and its regulation in asthma and asthma treatment, and suggest an integrative model whereby an imbalance of GPCR-derived signals in ASM cells contributes to the asthmatic state. PMID:12648290

  7. The effect of sleep on reflex genioglossus muscle activation by stimuli of negative airway pressure in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, R L; Innes, J A; Morrell, M J; Shea, S A; Guz, A

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of sleep on reflex pharyngeal dilator muscle activation by stimuli of negative airway pressure in human subjects. Intra-oral bipolar surface electrodes were used to record genioglossus electromyogram (EMG) responses to 500 ms duration pressure stimuli of 0 and -25 cmH2O applied, via a face-mask, in four normal subjects. Stimuli were applied during early inspiration in wakefulness and in periods of non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep, defined by electroencephalographic (EEG) criteria. The rectified and integrated EMG responses to repeated interventions were bin averaged for the 0 and -25 cmH2O stimuli applied in wakefulness and sleep. Response latency was defined as the time when the EMG activity significantly increased above prestimulus levels. Response magnitude was quantified as the in ratio of the EMG activity for an 80 ms post-stimulus period to an 80 ms prestimulus period; data from after the subject's voluntary reaction time for tongue protrusion (range, 150-230 ms) were not analysed. Application of the -25 cmH2O stimuli caused genioglossus muscle activation in wakefulness and sleep, but in all subjects response magnitude was reduced in sleep (mean decrease, 61%; range, 52-82%; P = 0.011, Student's paired t test). In addition, response latency was increased in sleep in each subject (mean latency awake, 38 ms; range, 30-50 ms; mean latency asleep, 75 ms; range, 40-110 ms; P = 0.072, Student's paired t test). Application of the -25 cmH2O stimuli caused arousal from sleep on 90% occasions, but in all cases the reflex genioglossus muscle responses (maximum latency, 110 ms) always proceeded any sign of EEG arousal (mean time to arousal, 643 ms; range, 424-760 ms). These results show that non-REM sleep attenuates reflex genioglossus muscle activation by stimuli of negative airway pressure. Attenuation of this reflex by sleep may impair the ability of the upper airway to defend itself from suction collapse by

  8. Sensorimotor function of the upper-airway muscles and respiratory sensory processing in untreated obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yu L.; Saboisky, Julian P.; Jordan, Amy S.; White, David P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated upper-airway neuromuscular abnormalities during wakefulness in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, the functional role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression and its potential effects on protective upper-airway reflexes, measures of respiratory sensory processing, and force characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to gain physiological insight into the potential role of sensorimotor impairment in OSA pathogenesis/disease progression by comparing sensory processing properties (respiratory-related evoked potentials; RREP), functionally important protective reflexes (genioglossus and tensor palatini) across a range of negative pressures (brief pulses and entrained iron lung ventilation), and tongue force and time to task failure characteristics between 12 untreated OSA patients and 13 controls. We hypothesized that abnormalities in these measures would be present in OSA patients. Upper-airway reflexes (e.g., genioglossus onset latency, 20 ± 1 vs. 19 ± 2 ms, P = 0.82), early RREP components (e.g., P1 latency 25 ± 2 vs. 25 ± 1 ms, P = 0.78), and the slope of epiglottic pressure vs. genioglossus activity during iron lung ventilation (−0.68 ± 1.0 vs. −0.80 ± 2.0 cmH2O/%max, P = 0.59) were not different between patients and controls. Maximal tongue protrusion force was greater in OSA patients vs. controls (35 ± 2 vs. 27 ± 2 N, P < 0.01), but task failure occurred more rapidly (149 ± 24 vs. 254 ± 23 s, P < 0.01). Upper-airway protective reflexes across a range of negative pressures as measured by electromyography and the early P1 component of the RREP are preserved in OSA patients during wakefulness. Consistent with an adaptive training effect, tongue protrusion force is increased, not decreased, in untreated OSA patients. However, OSA patients may be vulnerable to fatigue of upper-airway dilator muscles, which could contribute to disease progression. PMID:21885797

  9. O3-induced mucosa-linked airway muscle hyperresponsiveness in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Murlas, C.G.; Murphy, T.P.; Chodimella, V. )

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the effects of ozone exposure (3.0 ppm, 2 h) on the responsiveness of guinea pig airway muscle in vitro from animals developing bronchial hyperreactivity. Muscarinic reactivity in vivo was determined by measuring specific airway resistance (sRaw) in response to increasing concentrations of aerosolized acetylcholine (ACh) administered before and 30 min after exposure. Immediately after reactivity testing, multiple tracheal rings from ozone- and air-exposed animals were prepared and the contractile responses to increasing concentrations of substance P, ACh, or KCl were assessed in the presence of 10 microM indomethacin with or without 1 microM phosphoramidon, an inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase. Isometric force generation in vitro was measured on stimulation by cumulative concentrations of the agonists, and force generation (in g/cm2) was calculated after determination of muscle cross-sectional area. The smooth muscle of mucosa-intact airways from guinea pigs with ozone-induced bronchial hyper-reactivity proved to be hyperresponsive in vitro to substance P and ACh but not to KCl. Pretreatment with phosphoramidon abolished the increase in substance P responsiveness but had no effect on muscarinic hyperresponsiveness after ozone exposure. Furthermore, substance P responsiveness was not augmented in ozone-exposed airways in which the mucosa had been removed before testing in vitro. Likewise, muscarinic hyperresponsiveness was not present in ozone-exposed airways without mucosa. Our data indicate that airway smooth muscle responsiveness is increased in guinea pigs with ozone-induced bronchial hyperreactivity and suggest that this hyperresponsiveness may be linked to non-cyclooxygenase mucosa-derived factors.

  10. The Beta-1-Receptor Blocker Nebivolol Elicits Dilation of Cerebral Arteries by Reducing Smooth Muscle [Ca2+]i

    PubMed Central

    Cseplo, Peter; Vamos, Zoltan; Ivic, Ivan; Torok, Orsolya; Toth, Attila; Koller, Akos

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Nebivolol is known to have beta-1 blocker activity, but it was also suggested that it elicits relaxation of the peripheral arteries in part via release of nitric oxide (NO). However, the effect of nebivolol on the vasomotor tone of cerebral arteries is still unclear. Objective To assess the effects of nebivolol on the diameter of isolated rat basilar arteries (BA) in control, in the presence of inhibitors of vasomotor signaling pathways of know action and hemolysed blood. Methods and Results Vasomotor responses were measured by videomicroscopy and the intracellular Ca2+ by the Fura-2 AM ratiometric method. Under control conditions, nebivolol elicited a substantial dilation of the BA (from 216±22 to 394±20 μm; p<0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner (10−7 to 10−4 M). The dilatation was significantly reduced by endothelium denudation or by L-NAME (inhibitor of NO synthase) or by SQ22536 (adenylyl cyclase blocker). Dilatation of BA was also affected by beta-2 receptor blockade with butoxamine, but not by the guanylate cyclase blocker ODQ. Interestingly, beta-1 blockade by atenolol inhibited nebivolol-induced dilation. Also, the BKCa channel blocker iberiotoxin and KCa channel inhibitor TEA significantly reduced nebivolol-induced dilation. Nebivolol significantly reduced smooth muscle Ca2+ level, which correlated with the increases in diameters and moreover it reversed the hemolysed blood-induced constriction of BA. Conclusions Nebivolol seems to have an important dilator effect in cerebral arteries, which is mediated via several vasomotor mechanisms, converging on the reduction of smooth muscle Ca2+ levels. As such, nebivolol may be effective to improve cerebral circulation in various diseased conditions, such as hemorrhage. PMID:27716772

  11. Mechanical state of airway smooth muscle at very short lengths.

    PubMed

    Meiss, Richard A; Pidaparti, Ramana M

    2004-02-01

    Although the shortening of smooth muscle at physiological lengths is dominated by an interaction between external forces (loads) and internal forces, at very short lengths, internal forces appear to dominate the mechanical behavior of the active tissue. We tested the hypothesis that, under conditions of extreme shortening and low external force, the mechanical behavior of isolated canine tracheal smooth muscle tissue can be understood as a structure in which the force borne and exerted by the cross bridge and myofilament array is opposed by radially disposed connective tissue in the presence of an incompressible fluid matrix (cellular and extracellular). Strips of electrically stimulated tracheal muscle were allowed to shorten maximally under very low afterload, and large longitudinal sinusoidal vibrations (34 Hz, 1 s in duration, and up to 50% of the muscle length before vibration) were applied to highly shortened (active) tissue strips to produce reversible cross-bridge detachment. During the vibration, peak muscle force fell exponentially with successive forced elongations. After the episode, the muscle either extended itself or exerted a force against the tension transducer, depending on external conditions. The magnitude of this effect was proportional to the prior muscle stiffness and the amplitude of the vibration, indicating a recoil of strained connective tissue elements no longer opposed by cross-bridge forces. This behavior suggests that mechanical behavior at short lengths is dominated by tissue forces within a tensegrity-like structure made up of connective tissue, other extracellular matrix components, and active contractile elements.

  12. Airway smooth muscle in asthma: linking contraction and mechanotransduction to disease pathogenesis and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Noble, Peter B; Pascoe, Chris D; Lan, Bo; Ito, Satoru; Kistemaker, Loes E M; Tatler, Amanda L; Pera, Tonio; Brook, Bindi S; Gosens, Reinoud; West, Adrian R

    2014-12-01

    Asthma is an obstructive airway disease, with a heterogeneous and multifactorial pathogenesis. Although generally considered to be a disease principally driven by chronic inflammation, it is becoming increasingly recognised that the immune component of the pathology poorly correlates with the clinical symptoms of asthma, thus highlighting a potentially central role for non-immune cells. In this context airway smooth muscle (ASM) may be a key player, as it comprises a significant proportion of the airway wall and is the ultimate effector of acute airway narrowing. Historically, the contribution of ASM to asthma pathogenesis has been contentious, yet emerging evidence suggests that ASM contractile activation imparts chronic effects that extend well beyond the temporary effects of bronchoconstriction. In this review article we describe the effects that ASM contraction, in combination with cellular mechanotransduction and novel contraction-inflammation synergies, contribute to asthma pathogenesis. Specific emphasis will be placed on the effects that ASM contraction exerts on the mechanical properties of the airway wall, as well as novel mechanisms by which ASM contraction may contribute to more established features of asthma such as airway wall remodelling.

  13. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood. PMID:25204635

  14. Development and maintenance of force and stiffness in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lan, Bo; Norris, Brandon A; Liu, Jeffrey C-Y; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Deng, Linhong

    2015-03-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays a central role in the excessive narrowing of the airway that characterizes the primary functional impairment in asthma. This phenomenon is known as airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR). Emerging evidence suggests that the development and maintenance of ASM force involves dynamic reorganization of the subcellular filament network in both the cytoskeleton and the contractile apparatus. In this review, evidence is presented to support the view that regulation of ASM contraction extends beyond the classical actomyosin interaction and involves processes within the cytoskeleton and at the interfaces between the cytoskeleton, the contractile apparatus, and the extracellular matrix. These processes are initiated when the muscle is activated, and collectively they cause the cytoskeleton and the contractile apparatus to undergo structural transformation, resulting in a more connected and solid state that allows force generated by the contractile apparatus to be transmitted to the extracellular domain. Solidification of the cytoskeleton also serves to stiffen the muscle and hence the airway. Oscillatory strain from tidal breathing and deep inspiration is believed to be the counter balance that prevents hypercontraction and stiffening of ASM in vivo. Dysregulation of this balance could lead to AHR seen in asthma.

  15. Reflex tracheal smooth muscle contraction and bronchial vasodilation evoked by airway cooling in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pisarri, T E; Giesbrecht, G G

    1997-05-01

    Cooling intrathoracic airways by filling the pulmonary circulation with cold blood alters pulmonary mechanoreceptor discharge. To determine whether this initiates reflex changes that could contribute to airway obstruction, we measured changes in tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial arterial flow evoked by cooling. In nine chloralose-anesthetized open-chest dogs, the right pulmonary artery was cannulated and perfused; the left lung, ventilated separately, provided gas exchange. With the right lung phasically ventilated, filling the right pulmonary circulation with 5 degrees C blood increased smooth muscle tension in an innervated upper tracheal segment by 23 +/- 6 (SE) g from a baseline of 75 g. Contraction began within 10 s of injection and was maximal at approximately 30s. The response was abolished by cervical vagotomy. Bronchial arterial flow increased from 8 +/- 1 to 13 +/- 2 ml/min, with little effect on arterial blood pressure. The time course was similar to that of the tracheal response. This response was greatly attenuated after cervical vagotomy. Blood at 20 degrees C also increased tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial flow, whereas 37 degrees C blood had little effect. The results suggested that alteration of airway mechanoreceptor discharge by cooling can initiate reflexes that contribute to airway obstruction. PMID:9134906

  16. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  17. Swine confinement buildings: effects of airborne particles and settled dust on airway smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Demanche, Annick; Bonlokke, Jakob; Beaulieu, Marie-Josee; Assayag, Evelyne; Cormier, Yvon

    2009-01-01

    Swine confinement workers are exposed to various contaminants. These agents can cause airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction. This study was undertaken to evaluate if the bronchoconstrictive effects of swine barn air and settled dust are mediated by endotoxin, and if these effects are directly mediated on airway smooth muscles. Mouse tracheas where isolated and mounted isometrically in organ baths. Tracheas, with or without epithelium, were attached to a force transducer and tension was recorded. Concentrated swine building air at 68 EU/ml or settled dust extract at 0.01 g/ml were added for 20 minutes and tracheal smooth muscle contraction was measured. Direct role of LPS was assessed by removing it from air concentrates with an endotoxin affinity resin. Swine barn air and settled dust extract caused contraction of tracheal smooth muscle by 26 and 20%, respectively, of the maximal induced by methacholine. Removal of epithelium did not affect the contractile effects. LPS alone and LPS with peptidoglycans did not induce contraction. However, when endotoxin was removed from swine barn air concentrates, it lost 24% of its contractile effect. Concentrated swine barn air and settled dust have direct effects on airway smooth muscles. This effect is partially due to LPS but a synergy with other components of the environment of swine confinement buildings is required. PMID:20047256

  18. Airway responsiveness: role of inflammation, epithelium damage and smooth muscle tension.

    PubMed

    Gourgoulianis, K I; Domali, A; Molyvdas, P A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the effect of epithelium damage on mechanical responses of airway smooth muscles under different resting tension. We performed acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-5) M)-induced contraction on tracheal strips from 30 rabbits in five groups (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) before and after epithelium removal. At low resting tension (0.5-1.5 g), the epithelium removal decreased the ACh-induced contractions. At 2 g resting tension, the epithelium removal increased the ACh-induced contractions of airways with intact epithelium about 20%. At 2.5 g resting tension, the elevation of contraction is about 25% (P<0.01). Consequently, after epithelium loss, the resting tension determines the airway smooth muscles responsiveness. In asthma, mediators such as ACh act on already contracted inflammatory airways, which results in additional increase of contraction. In contrast, low resting tension, a condition that simulates normal tidal breathing, protects from bronchoconstriction even when the epithelium is damaged. PMID:10704081

  19. Matrix stiffness-modulated proliferation and secretory function of the airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Shkumatov, Artem; Thompson, Michael; Choi, Kyoung M; Sicard, Delphine; Baek, Kwanghyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Prakash, Y S; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-06-01

    Multiple pulmonary conditions are characterized by an abnormal misbalance between various tissue components, for example, an increase in the fibrous connective tissue and loss/increase in extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). Such tissue remodeling may adversely impact physiological function of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) responsible for contraction of airways and release of a variety of bioactive molecules. However, few efforts have been made to understand the potentially significant impact of tissue remodeling on ASMCs. Therefore, this study reports how ASMCs respond to a change in mechanical stiffness of a matrix, to which ASMCs adhere because mechanical stiffness of the remodeled airways is often different from the physiological stiffness. Accordingly, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, we found that the elastic modulus of the mouse bronchus has an arithmetic mean of 23.1 ± 14 kPa (SD) (median 18.6 kPa). By culturing ASMCs on collagen-conjugated polyacrylamide hydrogels with controlled elastic moduli, we found that gels designed to be softer than average airway tissue significantly increased cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Conversely, gels stiffer than average airways stimulated cell proliferation, while reducing VEGF secretion and agonist-induced calcium responses of ASMCs. These dependencies of cellular activities on elastic modulus of the gel were correlated with changes in the expression of integrin-β1 and integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that changes in matrix mechanics alter cell proliferation, calcium signaling, and proangiogenic functions in ASMCs.

  20. Matrix stiffness-modulated proliferation and secretory function of the airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Shkumatov, Artem; Thompson, Michael; Choi, Kyoung M.; Sicard, Delphine; Baek, Kwanghyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple pulmonary conditions are characterized by an abnormal misbalance between various tissue components, for example, an increase in the fibrous connective tissue and loss/increase in extracellular matrix proteins (ECM). Such tissue remodeling may adversely impact physiological function of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) responsible for contraction of airways and release of a variety of bioactive molecules. However, few efforts have been made to understand the potentially significant impact of tissue remodeling on ASMCs. Therefore, this study reports how ASMCs respond to a change in mechanical stiffness of a matrix, to which ASMCs adhere because mechanical stiffness of the remodeled airways is often different from the physiological stiffness. Accordingly, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, we found that the elastic modulus of the mouse bronchus has an arithmetic mean of 23.1 ± 14 kPa (SD) (median 18.6 kPa). By culturing ASMCs on collagen-conjugated polyacrylamide hydrogels with controlled elastic moduli, we found that gels designed to be softer than average airway tissue significantly increased cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Conversely, gels stiffer than average airways stimulated cell proliferation, while reducing VEGF secretion and agonist-induced calcium responses of ASMCs. These dependencies of cellular activities on elastic modulus of the gel were correlated with changes in the expression of integrin-β1 and integrin-linked kinase (ILK). Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that changes in matrix mechanics alter cell proliferation, calcium signaling, and proangiogenic functions in ASMCs. PMID:25724668

  1. Estrogen effects on human airway smooth muscle involve cAMP and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2012-11-15

    Clinically observed differences in airway reactivity and asthma exacerbations in women at different life stages suggest a role for sex steroids in modulating airway function although their targets and mechanisms of action are still being explored. We have previously shown that clinically relevant concentrations of exogenous estrogen acutely decrease intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), thereby facilitating bronchodilation. In this study, we hypothesized that estrogens modulate cyclic nucleotide regulation, resulting in decreased [Ca(2+)](i) in human ASM. In Fura-2-loaded human ASM cells, 1 nM 17β-estradiol (E(2)) potentiated the inhibitory effect of the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) agonist isoproterenol (ISO; 100 nM) on histamine-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activity (KT5720; 100 nM) attenuated E(2) effects on [Ca(2+)](i). Acute treatment with E(2) increased cAMP levels in ASM cells comparable to that of ISO (100 pM). In acetylcholine-contracted airways from female guinea pigs or female humans, E(2) potentiated ISO-induced relaxation. These novel data suggest that, in human ASM, physiologically relevant concentrations of estrogens act via estrogen receptors (ERs) and the cAMP pathway to nongenomically reduce [Ca(2+)](i), thus promoting bronchodilation. Activation of ERs may be a novel adjunct therapeutic avenue in reactive airway diseases in combination with established cAMP-activating therapies such as β(2)-agonists.

  2. HB-EGF-Promoted Airway Smooth Muscle Cells and Their Progenitor Migration Contribute to Airway Smooth Muscle Remodeling in Asthmatic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Li, Hequan; Yao, Yinan; Lu, Guohua; Wang, Yuehong; Xia, Dajing; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-03-01

    The airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells' proliferation, migration, and their progenitor's migration are currently regarded as causative factors for ASM remodeling in asthma. Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), a potent mitogen and chemotactic factor, could promote ASM cell proliferation through MAPK pathways. In this study, we obtained primary ASM cells and their progenitors from C57BL/6 mice and went on to explore the role of HB-EGF in these cells migration and the underlying mechanisms. We found that recombinant HB-EGF (rHB-EGF) intratracheal instillation accelerated ASM layer thickening in an OVA-induced asthmatic mouse. Modified Boyden chamber assay revealed that rHB-EGF facilitate ASM cell migration in a dose-dependent manner and ASM cells from asthmatic mice had a greater migration ability than that from normal counterparts. rHB-EGF could stimulate the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 in ASM cells but further migration assay showed that only epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (AG1478) or p38 inhibitor (SB203580), but not ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059), could inhibit rHB-EGF-mediated ASM cells migration. Actin cytoskeleton experiments exhibited that rHB-EGF could cause actin stress fibers disassembly and focal adhesions formation of ASM cells through the activation of p38. Finally, airway instillation of rHB-EGF promoted the recruitment of bone marrow-derived smooth muscle progenitor cells, which were transferred via caudal vein, migrating into the airway from the circulation. These observations demonstrated that ASM remodeling in asthma might have resulted from HB-EGF-mediated ASM cells and their progenitor cells migration, via p38 MAPK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling.

  3. Non-selective cation channels mediate chloroquine-induced relaxation in precontracted mouse airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Luo, Xiao-Jing; Sai, Wen-Bo; Yu, Meng-Fei; Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle.

  4. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Is Sufficient for Airway Smooth Muscle Hypertrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huan; Dokshin, Gregoriy A.; Lei, Jing; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Bitar, Khalil N.; Fingar, Diane C.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Bentley, J. Kelley

    2008-01-01

    We examined the role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibition in airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, a structural change found in patients with severe asthma. LiCl, SB216763, and specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) against GSK-3β, each of which inhibit GSK-3β activity or expression, increased human bronchial smooth muscle cell size, protein synthesis, and expression of the contractile proteins α-smooth muscle actin, myosin light chain kinase, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, and SM22. Similar results were obtained following treatment of cells with cardiotrophin (CT)-1, a member of the interleukin-6 superfamily, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, a proasthmatic cytokine. GSK-3β inhibition increased mRNA expression of α-actin and transactivation of nuclear factors of activated T cells and serum response factor. siRNA against eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2Bε (eIF2Bε) attenuated LiCl- and SB216763-induced protein synthesis and expression of α-actin and SM22, indicating that eIF2B is required for GSK-3β-mediated airway smooth muscle hypertrophy. eIF2Bε siRNA also blocked CT-1- but not TGF-β-induced protein synthesis. Infection of human bronchial smooth muscle cells with pMSCV GSK-3β-A9, a retroviral vector encoding a constitutively active, nonphosphorylatable GSK-3β, blocked protein synthesis and α-actin expression induced by LiCl, SB216763, and CT-1 but not TGF-β. Finally, lungs from ovalbumin-sensitized and -challenged mice demonstrated increased α-actin and CT-1 mRNA expression, and airway myocytes isolated from ovalbumin-treated mice showed increased cell size and GSK-3β phosphorylation. These data suggest that inhibition of the GSK-3β/eIF2Bε translational control pathway contributes to airway smooth muscle hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, TGF-β-induced hypertrophy does not depend on GSK-3β/eIF2B signaling. PMID:18252708

  5. The effects of cannabidiol on the antigen-induced contraction of airways smooth muscle in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed

    Dudášová, A; Keir, S D; Parsons, M E; Molleman, A; Page, C P

    2013-06-01

    (-)-Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol has been demonstrated to have beneficial effects in the airways, but its psychoactive effects preclude its therapeutic use for the treatment of airways diseases. In the present study we have investigated the effects of (-)-cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis for its actions on bronchial smooth muscle in vitro and in vivo. Guinea-pig bronchial smooth muscle contractions induced by exogenously applied spasmogens were measured isometrically. In addition, contractile responses of bronchial smooth muscle from ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs were investigated in the absence or presence of (-)-cannabidiol. Furthermore, the effect of (-)-cannabidiol against ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction was investigated in vivo in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs. (-)-Cannabidiol did not influence the bronchial smooth muscle contraction induced by carbachol, histamine or neurokinin A. In contrast, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited anandamide- and virodhamine-induced responses of isolated bronchi. A fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride reversed the inhibitory effect of (-)-cannabidiol on anandamide-induced contractions. In addition, (-)-cannabidiol inhibited the contractile response of bronchi obtained from allergic guinea-pigs induced by ovalbumin. In vivo, (-)-cannabidiol reduced ovalbumin-induced airway obstruction. In conclusion, our results suggest that cannabidiol can influence antigen-induced airway smooth muscle tone suggesting that this molecule may have beneficial effects in the treatment of obstructive airway disorders.

  6. Regulation of actin dynamics by WNT-5A: implications for human airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of asthma is airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which underlies the exaggerated bronchoconstriction response of asthmatics. The role of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) in AHR has garnered increasing interest over the years, but how asthmatic ASM differs from healthy ASM is still an active topic of debate. WNT-5A is increasingly expressed in asthmatic ASM and has been linked with Th2-high asthma. Due to its link with calcium and cytoskeletal remodelling, we propose that WNT-5A may modulate ASM contractility. We demonstrated that WNT-5A can increase maximum isometric tension in bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. In addition, we show that WNT-5A is preferentially expressed in contractile human airway myocytes compared to proliferative cells, suggesting an active role in maintaining contractility. Furthermore, WNT-5A treatment drives actin polymerisation, but has no effect on intracellular calcium flux. Next, we demonstrated that WNT-5A directly regulates TGF-β1-induced expression of α-SMA via ROCK-mediated actin polymerization. These findings suggest that WNT-5A modulates fundamental mechanisms that affect ASM contraction and thus may be of relevance for AHR in asthma. PMID:27468699

  7. Novel identification of the free fatty acid receptor FFAR1 that promotes contraction in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Kentaro; Zhang, Yi; Mizuta, Fumiko; Hoshijima, Hiroshi; Shiga, Toshiya; Masaki, Eiji; Emala, Charles W

    2015-11-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors for asthma. Previous studies have demonstrated that free fatty acid levels are elevated in the plasma of obese individuals. Medium- and long-chain free fatty acids act as endogenous ligands for the free fatty acid receptors FFAR1/GPR40 and FFAR4/GPR120, which couple to Gq proteins. We investigated whether FFAR1 and FFAR4 are expressed on airway smooth muscle and whether they activate Gq-coupled signaling and modulate airway smooth muscle tone. We detected the protein expression of FFAR1 and FFAR4 in freshly dissected native human and guinea pig airway smooth muscle and cultured human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The long-chain free fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) and GW9508 (FFAR1/FFAR4 dual agonist) dose-dependently stimulated transient intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) increases and inositol phosphate synthesis in HASM cells. Downregulation of FFAR1 or FFAR4 in HASM cells by small interfering RNA led to a significant inhibition of the long-chain free fatty acids-induced transient [Ca(2+)]i increases. Oleic acid, linoleic acid, or GW9508 stimulated stress fiber formation in HASM cells, potentiated acetylcholine-contracted guinea pig tracheal rings, and attenuated the relaxant effect of isoproterenol after an acetylcholine-induced contraction. In contrast, TUG-891 (FFAR4 agonist) did not induce the stress fiber formation or potentiate acetylcholine-induced contraction. These results suggest that FFAR1 is the functionally dominant free fatty acid receptor in both human and guinea pig airway smooth muscle. The free fatty acid sensors expressed on airway smooth muscle could be an important modulator of airway smooth muscle tone.

  8. Biomechanical properties of the human upper airway and their effect on its behavior during breathing and in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Bilston, Lynne E; Gandevia, Simon C

    2014-02-01

    The upper airway is a complex, multifunctional, dynamic neuromechanical system. Its patency during breathing requires moment-to-moment coordination of neural and mechanical behavior and varies with posture. Failure to continuously recruit and coordinate dilator muscles to counterbalance the forces that act to close the airway results in hypopneas or apneas. Repeated failures lead to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Obesity and anatomical variations, such as retrognathia, increase the likelihood of upper airway collapse by altering the passive mechanical behavior of the upper airway. This behavior depends on the mechanical properties of each upper airway tissue in isolation, their geometrical arrangements, and their physiological interactions. Recent measurements of respiratory-related deformation of the airway wall have shown that there are different patterns of airway soft tissue movement during the respiratory cycle. In OSA patients, airway dilation appears less coordinated compared with that in healthy subjects (matched for body mass index). Intrinsic mechanical properties of airway tissues are altered in OSA patients, but the factors underlying these changes have yet to be elucidated. How neural drive to the airway dilators relates to the biomechanical behavior of the upper airway (movement and stiffness) is still poorly understood. Recent studies have highlighted that the biomechanical behavior of the upper airway cannot be simply predicted from electromyographic activity (electromyogram) of its muscles. PMID:23823151

  9. Triptolide inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation in rat airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing Smad signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ming; Lv, Zhiqiang; Huang, Linjie; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Xiaoling; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Ruiyun; Jiang, Shanping

    2015-02-15

    Background: We have reported that triptolide can inhibit airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma via TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and the possible mechanism. Methods: Rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized, then pretreated with different concentration of triptolide before stimulated by TGF-β1. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of triptolide on cell cycle and apoptosis. Signal proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7) were detected by western blotting analysis. Results: Triptolide significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced ASMC proliferation (P<0.05). The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by triptolide dose dependently. No pro-apoptotic effects were detected under the concentration of triptolide we used. Western blotting analysis showed TGF-β1 induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation was inhibited by triptolide pretreatment, and the level of Smad7 was increased by triptolide pretreatment. Conclusions: Triptolide may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway. - Highlights: • In this study, rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized. • Triptolide inhibited TGF-β1-induced airway smooth muscle cells proliferation. • Triptolide inhibited ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway.

  10. T lymphocytes adhere to airway smooth muscle cells via integrins and CD44 and induce smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Asthma is a disease of airway inflammation and hyperreactivity that is associated with a lymphocytic infiltrate in the bronchial submucosa. The interactions between infiltrating T lymphocytes with cellular and extracellular matrix components of the airway and the consequences of these interactions have not been defined. We demonstrate the constitutive expression of CD44 on human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells in culture as well as in human bronchial tissue transplanted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. In contrast, basal levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) expression are minimal but are induced on ASM by inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Activated, but not resting T cells, adhere to cultured ASM; stimulation of the ASM with TNF-alpha enhanced this adhesion. Adhesion was partially blocked by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and very late antigen 4 (VLA-4) on T cells and ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 on ASM cells. The observed integrin-independent adhesion was mediated by CD44/hyaluronate interactions as it was inhibited by anti-CD44 mAb 5F12 and by hyaluronidase. Furthermore, the adhesion of activated T lymphocytes induced DNA synthesis in growth-arrested ASM cells. Thus, the interaction between T cells and ASM may provide insight into the mechanisms that induce bronchial inflammation and possibly ASM cell hyperplasia seen in asthma. PMID:7520473

  11. Sex Steroids Influence Brain-Derived Neurotropic Factor Secretion From Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Freeman, Michelle R; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-07-01

    Brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) is emerging as an important player in airway inflammation, remodeling, and hyperreactivity. Separately, there is increasing evidence that sex hormones contribute to pathophysiology in the lung. BDNF and sex steroid signaling are thought to be intricately linked in the brain. There is currently little information on BDNF and sex steroid interactions in the airway but is relevant to understanding growth factor signaling in the context of asthma in men versus women. In this study, we assessed the effect of sex steroids on BDNF expression and secretion in human airway smooth muscle (ASM). Human ASM was treated with estrogen (E2 ) or testosterone (T, 10 nM each) and intracellular BDNF and secreted BDNF measured. E2 and T significantly reduced secretion of BDNF; effects prevented by estrogen and androgen receptor inhibitor, ICI 182,780 (1 μM), and flutamide (10 μM), respectively. Interestingly, no significant changes were observed in intracellular BDNF mRNA or protein expression. High affinity BDNF receptor, TrkB, was not altered by E2 or T. E2 (but not T) significantly increased intracellular cyclic AMP levels. Notably, Epac1 and Epac2 expression were significantly reduced by E2 and T. Furthermore, SNARE complex protein SNAP25 was decreased. Overall, these novel data suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of E2 or T inhibit BDNF secretion in human ASM, suggesting a potential interaction of sex steroids with BDNF in the airway that is different from brain. The relevance of sex steroid-BDNF interactions may lie in their overall contribution to airway diseases such as asthma. PMID:26566264

  12. The effects of in utero vitamin D deficiency on airway smooth muscle mass and lung function.

    PubMed

    Foong, Rachel E; Bosco, Anthony; Jones, Anya C; Gout, Alex; Gorman, Shelley; Hart, Prue H; Zosky, Graeme R

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass and airway hyperresponsiveness in whole-life vitamin D-deficient female mice. In this study, we aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms contributing to altered lung structure and function. RNA was extracted from lung tissue of whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete female mice, and gene expression patterns were profiled by RNA sequencing. The data showed that genes involved in embryonic organ development, pattern formation, branching morphogenesis, Wingless/Int signaling, and inflammation were differentially expressed in vitamin D-deficient mice. Network analysis suggested that differentially expressed genes were connected by the hubs matrix metallopeptidase 9; NF-κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells inhibitor, α; epidermal growth factor receptor; and E1A binding protein p300. Given our findings that developmental pathways may be altered, we investigated if the timing of vitamin D exposure (in utero vs. postnatal) had an impact on lung health outcomes. Gene expression was measured in in utero or postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice, as well as whole-life vitamin D-deficient and -replete mice at 8 weeks of age. Baseline lung function, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation were measured and lungs fixed for lung structure assessment using stereological methods and quantification of ASM mass. In utero vitamin D deficiency was sufficient to increase ASM mass and baseline airway resistance and alter lung structure. There were increased neutrophils but decreased lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage. Expression of inflammatory molecules S100A9 and S100A8 was mainly increased in postnatal vitamin D-deficient mice. These observations suggest that in utero vitamin D deficiency can alter lung structure and function and increase inflammation, contributing to symptoms in chronic diseases, such as asthma.

  13. Antimitogenic effect of bitter taste receptor agonists on airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Panebra, Alfredo; Pera, Tonio; Tiegs, Brian C; Hershfeld, Alena; Kenyon, Lawrence C; Deshpande, Deepak A

    2016-02-15

    Airway remodeling is a hallmark feature of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Clinical studies and animal models have demonstrated increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and ASM thickness is correlated with severity of the disease. Current medications control inflammation and reverse airway obstruction effectively but have limited effect on remodeling. Recently we identified the expression of bitter taste receptors (TAS2R) on ASM cells, and activation with known TAS2R agonists resulted in ASM relaxation and bronchodilation. These studies suggest that TAS2R can be used as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of obstructive lung diseases. To further establish their effectiveness, in this study we aimed to determine the effects of TAS2R agonists on ASM growth and promitogenic signaling. Pretreatment of healthy and asthmatic human ASM cells with TAS2R agonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of ASM proliferation. The antimitogenic effect of TAS2R ligands was not dependent on activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or high/intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels. Immunoblot analyses revealed that TAS2R agonists inhibit growth factor-activated protein kinase B phosphorylation without affecting the availability of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, suggesting TAS2R agonists block signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Furthermore, the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists involved inhibition of induced transcription factors (activator protein-1, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, E2 factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells) and inhibition of expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes, suggesting a direct inhibition of cell cycle progression. Collectively, these findings establish the antimitogenic effect of TAS2R agonists and identify a novel class of receptors and signaling pathways that can be targeted to reduce or prevent airway remodeling as well as

  14. Steroids and antihistamines synergize to inhibit rat's airway smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Kao, Chuan-Hsiang; Wu, Chi-Chung; Wang, Hsing-Won

    2015-06-01

    Both glucocorticoids and H1-antihistamines were widely used on patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and obstructive airway diseases. However, their direct effects on airway smooth muscle were not fully explored. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of prednisolone (Kidsolone) and levocetirizine (Xyzal) on isolated rat trachea submersed in Kreb's solution in a muscle bath. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of parasympathetic mimetic agents were measured. The following assessments of the drug were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6) M methacholine; (3) effect of the drug on electrical field stimulation (EFS) induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. The result revealed sole use of Kidsolone or Xyzal elicited no significant effect or only a little relaxation response on tracheal tension after methacholine treatment. The tension was 90.5 ± 7.5 and 99.5 ± 0.8 % at 10(-4) M for Xyzal and 10(-5) M for Kidsolone, respectively. However, a dramatically spasmolytic effect was observed after co-administration of Kidsolone and Xyzal and the tension dropped to 67.5 ± 13.6 %, with statistical significance (p < 0.05). As for EFS-induced contractions, Kidsolone had no direct effect but Xyzal could inhibit it, with increasing basal tension. In conclusion, using glucocorticoids alone had no spasmolytic effect but they can be synergized with antihistamines to dramatically relax the trachea smooth muscle within minutes. Therefore, for AR patients with acute asthma attack, combined use of those two drugs is recommended. PMID:25115316

  15. Ovalbumin sensitization of guinea pig at birth prevents the ontogenetic decrease in airway smooth muscle responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chitano, Pasquale; Wang, Lu; Degan, Simone; Worthington, Charles L.; Pozzato, Valeria; Hussaini, Syed H.; Turner, Wesley C.; Dorscheid, Delbert R.; Murphy, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Airway smooth muscle (ASM) displays a hyperresponsive phenotype at young age and becomes less responsive in adulthood. We hypothesized that allergic sensitization, which causes ASM hyperresponsiveness and typically occurs early in life, prevents the ontogenetic loss of the ASM hyperresponsive phenotype. We therefore studied whether neonatal allergic sensitization, not followed by later allergen challenges, alters the ontogenesis of ASM properties. We neonatally sensitized guinea pigs to ovalbumin and studied them at 1 week, 3 weeks, and 3 months (adult). A Schultz‐Dale response in isolated tracheal rings confirmed sensitization. The occurrence of inflammation was evaluated in the blood and in the submucosa of large airways. We assessed ASM function in tracheal strips as ability to produce force and shortening. ASM content of vimentin was also studied. A Schultz‐Dale response was observed in all 3‐week or older sensitized animals. A mild inflammatory process was characterized by eosinophilia in the blood and in the airway submucosa. Early life sensitization had no effect on ASM force generation, but prevented the ontogenetic decline of shortening velocity and the increase in resistance to shortening. Vimentin increased with age in control but not in sensitized animals. Allergic sensitization at birth without subsequent allergen exposures is sufficient to prevent normal ASM ontogenesis, inducing persistence to adulthood of an ASM hyperresponsive phenotype. PMID:25501429

  16. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2014-05-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases. PMID:24610934

  17. Studying airway smooth muscle in vivo with PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Hariri, Lida P.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Villiger, Martin; Holz, Jasmin; Szabari, Margit V.; Bouma, Brett E.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Present understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma has been severely limited by the lack of an imaging modality capable of assessing airway conditions of asthma patients in vivo. Of particular interest is the role that airway smooth muscle (ASM) plays in the development of asthma and asthma related symptoms. We have developed novel techniques that we applied to Polarization Sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) in order to assess ASM, and validated our results with a substantial number of histological matches. In this work we employ our system in the study of ASM distributions in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic airways with data obtained in vivo from human volunteers. By isolating the ASM and performing volumetric analysis we obtain a variety of informative metrics such as ASM thickness and band width, and compare these quantities between subject types. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the degree of birefringence of the ASM can be associated with contractility, allowing us to estimate pressure exerted by ASM during contraction. We apply this technique to in vivo datasets from human volunteers as well.

  18. RANTES expression induced by Toll-like receptor 4 ligand in rat airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Okayasu, Kaori; Tamaoka, Meiyo; Takayama, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasunari; Sumi, Yuki; Inase, Naohiko; Yoshizawa, Yasuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) have been reported to express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and take part in the pathogenesis of asthma exacerbation. Though TLRs were found to activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in airway epithelial cells, little is known about the association of TLR ligands with EGFR signaling pathways in ASMCs. Using primary cultured ASMCs from Brown Norway rats, TLR4, eotaxin, and RANTES mRNA were examined by real-time quantitative RT-PCR after stimulation with the TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The concentration of RANTES protein in culture supernatant was measured by ELISA. The effect of EGFR signaling inhibitors on RANTES expression was examined as well. Phosphorylation of EGFR after stimulation was examined by Western Blotting. Rat ASMCs expressed TLR4 and eotaxin, and LPS upregulated RANTES production. The EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor GM6001 inhibited RANTES expression induced by LPS. LPS phosphorylated EGFR. TLR4 activation can induce RANTES expression via EGFR transactivation and PI3K/Akt pathway in rat ASMCs. MMP-induced EGFR proligand cleavage and ligand binding to EGFR seem to be involved in this pathway. These findings may be critical in the pathogenesis of asthma exacerbation by airway infection. PMID:23896774

  19. Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma: a problem of limited smooth muscle relaxation with inspiration.

    PubMed Central

    Skloot, G; Permutt, S; Togias, A

    1995-01-01

    We hypothesized that hyperresponsiveness in asthma is caused by an impairment in the ability of inspiration to stretch airway smooth muscle. If the hypothesis was correct, we reasoned that the sensitivity to inhaled methacholine in normal and asthmatic subjects should be the same if the challenge was carried out under conditions where deep inspirations were prohibited. 10 asthmatic and 10 normal subjects received increasing concentrations of inhaled methacholine under conditions where forced expirations from a normal end-tidal inspiration were performed. When no deep inspirations were allowed, the response to methacholine was similar in the normal and asthmatic subjects, compatible with the hypothesis we propose. Completely contrary to our expectations, however, was the marked responsivity to methacholine that remained in the normal subjects after deep breaths were initiated. 6 of the 10 normal subjects had > 20% reduction in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1) at doses of methacholine < 8 mg/ml, whereas there was < 15% reduction with 75 mg/ml during routine challenge. The ability of normal subjects to develop asthmatic responses when the modulating effects of increases in lung volume was voluntarily suppressed suggests that an intrinsic impairment of the ability of inspiration to stretch airway smooth muscle is a major feature of asthma. PMID:7593627

  20. A Synthetic Chloride Channel Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Kwok-hei; Mak, Judith Choi-wo; Leung, Susan Wai-sum; Yang, Dan; Vanhoutte, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic ion channels may have potential therapeutic applications, provided they possess appropriate biological activities. The present study was designed to examine the ability of small molecule-based synthetic Cl– channels to modulate airway smooth muscle responsiveness. Changes in isometric tension were measured in rat tracheal rings. Relaxations to the synthetic chloride channel SCC-1 were obtained during sustained contractions to KCl. The anion dependency of the effect of SCC-1 was evaluated by ion substitution experiments. The sensitivity to conventional Cl– transport inhibitors was also tested. SCC-1 caused concentration-dependent relaxations during sustained contractions to potassium chloride. This relaxing effect was dependent on the presence of extracellular Cl– and HCO3−. It was insensitive to conventional Cl– channels/transport inhibitors that blocked the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and calcium-activated Cl– channels. SCC-1 did not inhibit contractions induced by carbachol, endothelin-1, 5-hydroxytryptamine or the calcium ionophore A23187. SCC-1 relaxes airway smooth muscle during contractions evoked by depolarizing solutions. The Cl– conductance conferred by this synthetic compound is distinct from the endogenous transport systems for chloride anions. PMID:23049786

  1. [Inspiratory muscle resistance to fatigue during exercise and simulated airway obstruction].

    PubMed

    Segizbaeva, M O; Aleksandrova, N P

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue can develop during simulated airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to characterize the pattern of inspiratory muscle fatigue and to assess the resistance to fatigue of diaphragm (D), parasternal (PS), sternocleidomastoid (SM) and scalene (SC). 8 healthy untrained subjects participated in this study. To identify signs of inspiratory muscles fatigue development electromyographic activity of D, PS, SCM and SC was recorded during 5-min exercise with loaded breathing (40 cm H2O/L · s(-1)). The before-to-after exercise measurements of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and EMG power spectrum changes were performed. Maximal inspiratory pressure declined about 12% after exercise test compared with control, whereas the peak magnitude of integrated electrical activity of D, PS, SCM and SC during post-exercise Muller's maneuver was significantly greater than in pre-exercise test in all subjects. The extent ofinspiratory muscles fatigue was evaluated by analysis of shift in centroid frequency (fc) of EMG power spectrum. All subjects demonstrated a significant reduction in fc of PS, SCM and SC.fc of D was not changed. Diaphragm is more resistantto fatigue during obstructive breathing compared with PS, SCM and SC. The data suggest that the reduction of maximum inspiratory pressure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease also caused primarily by the weakening of the accessory muscles, while the weakness of the diaphragm may occur in the later stages of the disease. The functional failure of accessory muscles is an additional factor, which, along with the additional breathing resistance increases the load on the diaphragm, promoting its fatigue and reduced respiratory reserve.

  2. Cholinergic neuromodulation by prostaglandin D2 in canine airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tamaoki, J; Sekizawa, K; Graf, P D; Nadel, J A

    1987-10-01

    To determine whether prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) modulates cholinergic neurotransmission in airway smooth muscle and, if so, what the mechanism of action is, we studied bronchial segments from dogs under isometric conditions in vitro. PGD2 (10(-8)-10(-5) M) elicited dose-dependent muscle contraction, which was reduced after blockade of muscarinic receptors, so that 50% effective dose (ED50) increased from 1.3 +/- 0.3 X 10(-6) to 3.9 +/- 1.0 X 10(-6) M by atropine (10(-6) M) (mean +/- SE, P less than 0.05). Physostigmine, at a concentration insufficient to alter base-line tension (10(-8) M), enhanced the PGD2-induced contraction and decreased ED50 to 6.4 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M (P less than 0.05). When added at the highest doses that did not cause spontaneous contraction (1.9 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) M), PGD2 increased the contractile response to electrical field stimulation (1-50 Hz) by 21.9 +/- 6.6% (P less than 0.001). In contrast to this effect, the response to administered acetylcholine was not affected by PGD2. On the other hand, PGD2-induced augmentation of the response to electrical field stimulation (5 Hz) was further increased from 23.6 +/- 3.0 to 70.4 +/- 8.8% in the presence of physostigmine (10(-8) M) and was abolished by atropine but not affected by the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine or the histamine H1-blocker pyrilamine. These results suggest that the contraction of airway smooth muscle induced by PGD2 is in in part mediated by a cholinergic action and that PGD2 prejunctionally augments the parasympathetic contractile response, likely involving the accelerated release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction.

  3. Upregulation of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-33 by VEGF in human airway smooth muscle cells: Implications for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Qing-Mei; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Min; Qian, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Jiang-Bo; Zheng, Hong; Zhao, Li-Hong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction with persistent airway inflammation and airway remodeling. Features of airway remodeling include increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)–33 has been identified as playing a role in the pathophysiology of asthma. ADAM-33 is expressed in ASM cells and is suggested to play a role in the function of these cells. However, the regulation of ADAM-33 is not fully understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in inflammatory and airway blood vessel remodeling in asthmatics. Although VEGF was initially thought of as an endothelial-specific growth factor, recent reports have found that VEGF can promote proliferation of other cell types, including ASM cells. To investigate the precise mechanism of VEGF's effect on ASM cell proliferation, we tested the expression of ADAM-33, phospho-extracellularsignal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and phospho-Akt in VEGF-stimulated ASM cells. We found that VEGF up-regulates ADAM-33 mRNA and protein levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner as well as phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. We also found that VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation is inhibited by both ADAM-33 knockdown and a selective VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) inhibitor (SU1498). Furthermore, VEGF-induced ADAM-33 expression and ASM cell proliferation were suppressed by inhibiting ERK1/2 activity, but not by inhibiting Akt activity. Collectively, our findings suggest that VEGF enhances ADAM-33 expression and ASM cell proliferation by activating the VEGFR2/ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these observations might help develop therapeutic strategies for airway diseases associated with smooth muscle hyperplasia such as asthma. PMID:27579513

  4. Upregulation of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase-33 by VEGF in human airway smooth muscle cells: Implications for asthma.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qing-Mei; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Min; Qian, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Jiang-Bo; Zheng, Hong; Zhao, Li-Hong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2016-10-17

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction with persistent airway inflammation and airway remodeling. Features of airway remodeling include increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-33 has been identified as playing a role in the pathophysiology of asthma. ADAM-33 is expressed in ASM cells and is suggested to play a role in the function of these cells. However, the regulation of ADAM-33 is not fully understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in inflammatory and airway blood vessel remodeling in asthmatics. Although VEGF was initially thought of as an endothelial-specific growth factor, recent reports have found that VEGF can promote proliferation of other cell types, including ASM cells. To investigate the precise mechanism of VEGF's effect on ASM cell proliferation, we tested the expression of ADAM-33, phospho-extracellularsignal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and phospho-Akt in VEGF-stimulated ASM cells. We found that VEGF up-regulates ADAM-33 mRNA and protein levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner as well as phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. We also found that VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation is inhibited by both ADAM-33 knockdown and a selective VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) inhibitor (SU1498). Furthermore, VEGF-induced ADAM-33 expression and ASM cell proliferation were suppressed by inhibiting ERK1/2 activity, but not by inhibiting Akt activity. Collectively, our findings suggest that VEGF enhances ADAM-33 expression and ASM cell proliferation by activating the VEGFR2/ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these observations might help develop therapeutic strategies for airway diseases associated with smooth muscle hyperplasia such as asthma. PMID:27579513

  5. Hyaluronic acid influence on platelet-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B.; Bengtsson, Torbjoern; Grenegard, Magnus; Lindstroem, Eva G.

    2012-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and is expressed throughout the body including the lung and mostly in areas surrounding proliferating and migrating cells. Furthermore, platelets have been implicated as important players in the airway remodelling process, e.g. due to their ability to induce airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HA, the HA-binding surface receptor CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Proliferation of ASMC was measured using the MTS-assay, and we found that the CD44 blocking antibody and the HA synthase inhibitor 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) significantly inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. The interaction between ASMC and platelets was studied by fluorescent staining of F-actin. In addition, the ability of ASMC to synthesise HA was investigated by fluorescent staining using biotinylated HA-binding protein and a streptavidin conjugate. We observed that ASMC produced HA and that a CD44 blocking antibody and 4-MU significantly inhibited platelet binding to the area surrounding the ASMC. Furthermore, the FAK-inhibitor PF 573228 inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Co-culture of ASMC and platelets also resulted in increased phosphorylation of FAK as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, 4-MU significantly inhibited the increased FAK-phosphorylation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ECM has the ability to influence platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Specifically, we propose that HA produced by ASMC is recognised by platelet CD44. The platelet/HA interaction is followed by FAK activation and increased proliferation of co-cultured ASMC. We also suggest that the mitogenic effect of platelets represents a potential important and novel mechanism that may contribute to airway remodelling.

  6. Single-Cell Analysis of Mast Cell Degranulation Induced by Airway Smooth Muscle-Secreted Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Benjamin M.; Meyer, Audrey F.; Gruba, Sarah M.; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by narrowed airways, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, mucus hyper-secretion, and airway remodeling. Mast cell (MC) infiltration into airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a defining feature of asthma, and ASM regulates the inflammatory response by secreting chemokines, including CXCL10 and CCL5. Single cell analysis offers a unique approach to study specific cellular signaling interactions within large and complex signaling networks such as the inflammatory microenvironment in asthma. Methods Carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry was used to study the effects of ASM–secreted chemokines on mouse peritoneal MC degranulation. Results MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 was monitored at the single cell level. Relative to IgE-mediated degranulation, CXCL10- and CCL5-stimulated MCs released a decreased amount of serotonin per granule with fewer release events per cell. Decreased serotonin released per granule was correlated with increased spike half-width and rise-time values. Conclusions MCs are directly activated with ASM-associated chemokines. CXCL10 and CCL5 induce less robust MC degranulation compared to IgE- and A23187-stimulation. The kinetics of MC degranulation are signaling pathway-dependent, suggesting a biophysical mechanism of regulated degranulation that incorporates control over granule trafficking, transport, and docking machinery. General Significance The biophysical mechanisms, including variations in number of exocytotic release events, serotonin released per granule, and the membrane kinetics of exocytosis that underlie MC degranulation in response to CXCL10 and CCL5 were characterized at the single cell level. These findings clarify the function of ASM-derived chemokines as instigators of MC degranulation relative to classical mechanisms of MC stimulation. PMID:25986989

  7. Stress and strain in the contractile and cytoskeletal filaments of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Linhong; Bosse, Ynuk; Brown, Nathan; Chin, Leslie Y M; Connolly, Sarah C; Fairbank, Nigel J; King, Greg G; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Stephen, Newman L

    2009-10-01

    Stress and strain are omnipresent in the lung due to constant lung volume fluctuation associated with respiration, and they modulate the phenotype and function of all cells residing in the airways including the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. There is ample evidence that the ASM cell is very sensitive to its physical environment, and can alter its structure and/or function accordingly, resulting in either desired or undesired consequences. The forces that are either conferred to the ASM cell due to external stretching or generated inside the cell must be borne and transmitted inside the cytoskeleton (CSK). Thus, maintaining appropriate levels of stress and strain within the CSK is essential for maintaining normal function. Despite the importance, the mechanisms regulating/dysregulating ASM cytoskeletal filaments in response to stress and strain remained poorly understood until only recently. For example, it is now understood that ASM length and force are dynamically regulated, and both can adapt over a wide range of length, rendering ASM one of the most malleable living tissues. The malleability reflects the CSK's dynamic mechanical properties and plasticity, both of which strongly interact with the loading on the CSK, and all together ultimately determines airway narrowing in pathology. Here we review the latest advances in our understanding of stress and strain in ASM cells, including the organization of contractile and cytoskeletal filaments, range and adaptation of functional length, structural and functional changes of the cell in response to mechanical perturbation, ASM tone as a mediator of strain-induced responses, and the novel glassy dynamic behaviors of the CSK in relation to asthma pathophysiology.

  8. Hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy in Holstein-Friesian cattle in Japan: association with hereditary myopathy of the diaphragmatic muscles.

    PubMed

    Furuoka, H; Yagi, S; Murakami, A; Honma, A; Kobayashi, Y; Matsui, T; Miyahara, K; Taniyama, H

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the pathology and genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy in 10 Holstein-Friesian cows aged 3-6 years, a disease similar to that reported in Simmental-Red Holstein and Holstein-Friesian cattle in several other countries. The main clinical signs were associated with systemic circulatory failure, and at necropsy the animals showed cardiomegaly, severe congestion and fibrosis of the liver, and systemic cardiac oedema. Histologically, hypertrophy and vacuolation of the cardiac muscle fibres and severe fibrosis were noted. Electron microscopically, the sarcoplasm of the hypertrophic fibres was seen to be filled with fine structures of low electron-density, together with thin filamentous material, suggesting myofibrillar lysis. The mitochondria showed increased size, an abnormal cristae pattern and vacuolation due to partial loss of cristae. Pedigree analysis of the affected cattle indicated an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The family line of this cardiomyopathy overlapped with that of hereditary myopathy of the diaphragmatic muscles in Holstein-Friesian cattle, the pathological aspects and inheritance mode of which were reported previously. The available evidence suggested a genetic association between these two pathologically distinct diseases. PMID:11578132

  9. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  10. Effect of different bronchodilators on airway smooth muscle responsiveness to contractile agents.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, B; Persson, C G

    1991-05-01

    "Functional antagonism" is often used to describe the general relaxant effect of beta 2 agonists and xanthines and their ability to protect the airways against bronchoconstrictor stimuli. This study in guinea pig isolated trachea addresses the question of whether the capacity of these drugs to protect against constrictor stimuli is related to smooth muscle relaxation. Three antimuscarinic drugs were also examined to determine whether antagonism of mediators other than muscarinic agonists might contribute to bronchodilatation by these antimuscarinic drugs. Terbutaline (1.1 x 10(-7), 2.2 x 10(-7) M), theophylline (2.2 x 10(-4), 4.4 x 10(-4) M), and enprofylline (5.2 x 10(-5), 1.0 x 10(-4) M) relaxed the tracheal tension that remained after indomethacin treatment. They did not, however, alter the carbachol concentration-response curve significantly. In addition, neither theophylline (2.2 x 10(-4) M) nor terbutaline (1.1 x 10(-7) M) altered histamine induced contraction. Atropine sulphate, glycopyrrolate, and ipratropium bromide had EC50 values of 10(-9) - 10(-8) M for relaxation of carbachol induced contractions, whereas concentrations of 10(-6) - 10(-3) M or greater were required to relax contractions induced by allergen and nine other non-muscarinic mediators. It is suggested that bronchodilatation by antimuscarinic drugs in vivo is due to inhibition of acetylcholine induced bronchoconstriction alone and that beta 2 agonists and xanthines have poor ability to protect airway smooth muscle against constrictor stimuli. Hence mechanisms other than bronchodilatation and "functional antagonism" should be considered to explain the protection against constrictor stimuli in asthma seen with beta 2 agonists and xanthines. PMID:2068693

  11. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, P.; Park, C. Y.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Tsuda, A.; Sager, T. M.; Molina, R. M.; Donaghey, T. C.; Alencar, A. M.; Kasahara, D. I.; Ericsson, T.; Millet, E. J.; Swenson, J.; Tschumperlin, D. J.; Butler, J. P.; Brain, J. D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Gehr, P.; Zhou, E. H.

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40–100 nm and less than 44 μm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 μm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 μM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases. PMID:20356875

  12. Human airway smooth muscle maintain in situ cell orientation and phenotype when cultured on aligned electrospun scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Morris, G. E.; Bridge, J. C.; Eltboli, O. M. I.; Lewis, M. P.; Knox, A. J.; Aylott, J. W.; Brightling, C. E.; Ghaemmaghami, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle (HASM) contraction plays a central role in regulating airway resistance in both healthy and asthmatic bronchioles. In vitro studies that investigate the intricate mechanisms that regulate this contractile process are predominantly conducted on tissue culture plastic, a rigid, 2D geometry, unlike the 3D microenvironment smooth muscle cells are exposed to in situ. It is increasingly apparent that cellular characteristics and responses are altered between cells cultured on 2D substrates compared with 3D topographies. Electrospinning is an attractive method to produce 3D topographies for cell culturing as the fibers produced have dimensions within the nanometer range, similar to cells' natural environment. We have developed an electrospun scaffold using the nondegradable, nontoxic, polymer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) composed of uniaxially orientated nanofibers and have evaluated this topography's effect on HASM cell adhesion, alignment, and morphology. The fibers orientation provided contact guidance enabling the formation of fully aligned sheets of smooth muscle. Moreover, smooth muscle cells cultured on the scaffold present an elongated cell phenotype with altered contractile protein levels and distribution. HASM cells cultured on this scaffold responded to the bronchoconstrictor bradykinin. The platform presented provides a novel in vitro model that promotes airway smooth muscle cell development toward a more in vivo-like phenotype while providing topological cues to ensure full cell alignment. PMID:24793171

  13. Roxithromycin inhibits VEGF-induced human airway smooth muscle cell proliferation: Opportunities for the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Pei, Qing-Mei; Jiang, Ping; Yang, Min; Qian, Xue-Jiao; Liu, Jiang-Bo; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2016-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by reversible airway obstruction with persistent airway inflammation and airway remodelling, which is associated with increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. Roxithromycin (RXM) has been widely used in asthma treatment; however, its mechanism of action is poorly understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in inflammatory and airway blood vessel remodelling in patients with asthma, and shown to promote ASM cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the effect of RXM on VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation and attempted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. We tested the effect of RXM on proliferation and cell cycle progression, as well as on the expression of phospho-VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), phospho-Akt, and caveolin-1 in VEGF-stimulated ASM cells. RXM inhibited VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest. Additionally, VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation was suppressed by inhibiting the activity of ERK1/2, but not that of Akt. Furthermore, RXM treatment inhibits VEGF-induced activation of VEGFR2 and ERK and downregulation of caveolin-1 in a dose-dependent manner. RXM also inhibited TGF-β-induced VEGF secretion by ASM cells and BEAS-2B cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that RXM inhibits VEGF-induced ASM cell proliferation by suppression of VEGFR2 and ERK1/2 activation and caveolin-1 down-regulation, which may be involved in airway remodelling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying these observations should enable the development of treatments for smooth muscle hyperplasia-associated diseases of the airway such as asthma. PMID:27587274

  14. Functional expression of γ-amino butyric acid transporter 2 in human and guinea pig airway epithelium and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Sarah; Gallos, George; Yim, Peter D; Xu, Dingbang; Sonett, Joshua R; Panettieri, Reynold A; Gerthoffer, William; Emala, Charles W

    2011-08-01

    γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) is a primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is classically released by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane or by egress via GABA transporters (GATs). Recently, a GABAergic system comprised of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors has been identified on airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells that regulate mucus secretion and contractile tone of airway smooth muscle (ASM). In addition, the enzyme that synthesizes GABA, glutamic acid decarboxylase, has been identified in airway epithelial cells; however, the mechanism(s) by which this synthesized GABA is released from epithelial intracellular stores is unknown. We questioned whether any of the four known isoforms of GATs are functionally expressed in ASM or epithelial cells. We detected mRNA and protein expression of GAT2 and -4, and isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase in native and cultured human ASM and epithelial cells. In contrast, mRNA encoding vesicular GAT (VGAT), the neuronal GABA transporter, was not detected. Functional inhibition of (3)H-GABA uptake was demonstrated using GAT2 and GAT4/betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1) inhibitors in both human ASM and epithelial cells. These results demonstrate that two isoforms of GATs, but not VGAT, are expressed in both airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. They also provide a mechanism by which locally synthesized GABA can be released from these cells into the airway to activate GABA(A) channels and GABA(B) receptors, with subsequent autocrine and/or paracrine signaling effects on airway epithelium and ASM. PMID:21057105

  15. Models to study airway smooth muscle contraction in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro: implications in understanding asthma.

    PubMed

    Wright, David; Sharma, Pawan; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Rissé, Paul-Andre; Ngo, Melanie; Maarsingh, Harm; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Jha, Aruni; Halayko, Andrew J; West, Adrian R

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic obstructive airway disease characterised by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway wall remodelling. The effector of airway narrowing is the contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM), yet the question of whether an inherent or acquired dysfunction in ASM contractile function plays a significant role in the disease pathophysiology remains contentious. The difficulty in determining the role of ASM lies in limitations with the models used to assess contraction. In vivo models provide a fully integrated physiological response but ASM contraction cannot be directly measured. Ex vivo and in vitro models can provide more direct assessment of ASM contraction but the loss of factors that may modulate ASM responsiveness and AHR, including interaction between multiple cell types and disruption of the mechanical environment, precludes a complete understanding of the disease process. In this review we detail key advantages of common in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro models of ASM contraction, as well as emerging tissue engineered models of ASM and whole airways. We also highlight important findings from each model with respect to the pathophysiology of asthma.

  16. Vitamin D deficiency causes airway hyperresponsiveness, increases airway smooth muscle mass, and reduces TGF‐β expression in the lungs of female BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Foong, Rachel E.; Shaw, Nicole C.; Berry, Luke J.; Hart, Prue H.; Gorman, Shelley; Zosky, Graeme R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Vitamin D deficiency is associated with disease severity in asthma. We tested whether there is a causal association between vitamin D deficiency, airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A physiologically relevant mouse model of vitamin D deficiency was developed by raising BALB/c mice on vitamin D‐deficient or ‐replete diets. AHR was assessed by measuring lung function responses to increasing doses of inhaled methacholine. Five‐micron sections from formalin‐fixed lungs were used for ASM measurement and assessment of lung structure using stereological methods. Transforming growth factor (TGF)‐β levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Lungs were dissected from embryonic day (E) 17.5 vitamin D‐deficient and ‐replete fetal mice for quantification of ASM density and relative gene expression of TGF‐β signaling pathway molecules. Eight‐week‐old adult vitamin D‐deficient female mice had significantly increased airway resistance and ASM in the large airways compared with controls. Vitamin D‐deficient female mice had a smaller lung volume, volume of parenchyma, and alveolar septa. Both vitamin D‐deficient male and female mice had reduced TGF‐β levels in BALF. Vitamin D deficiency did not have an effect on ASM density in E17.5 mice, however, expression of TGF‐β1 and TGF‐β receptor I was downregulated in vitamin D‐deficient female fetal mice. Decreased expression of TGF‐β1 and TGF‐β receptor I during early lung development in vitamin D‐deficient mice may contribute to airway remodeling and AHR in vitamin D‐deficient adult female mice. This study provides a link between vitamin D deficiency and respiratory symptoms in chronic lung disease. PMID:24760528

  17. CD4+ T cells enhance the unloaded shortening velocity of airway smooth muscle by altering the contractile protein expression.

    PubMed

    Matusovsky, Oleg S; Nakada, Emily M; Kachmar, Linda; Fixman, Elizabeth D; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2014-07-15

    Abundant data indicate that pathogenesis in allergic airways disease is orchestrated by an aberrant T-helper 2 (Th2) inflammatory response. CD4(+) T cells have been localized to airway smooth muscle (ASM) in both human asthmatics and in rodent models of allergic airways disease, where they have been implicated in proliferative responses of ASM. Whether CD4(+) T cells also alter ASM contractility has not been addressed. We established an in vitro system to assess the ability of antigen-stimulated CD4(+) T cells to modify contractile responses of the Brown Norway rat trachealis muscle. Our data demonstrated that the unloaded velocity of shortening (Vmax) of ASM was significantly increased upon 24 h co-incubation with antigen-stimulated CD4(+) T cells, while stress did not change. Enhanced Vmax was dependent upon contact between the CD4(+) T cells and the ASM and correlated with increased levels of the fast (+)insert smooth muscle myosin heavy chain isoform. The levels of myosin light chain kinase and myosin light chain phosphorylation were also increased within the muscle. The alterations in mechanics and in the levels of contractile proteins were transient, both declining to control levels after 48 h of co-incubation. More permanent alterations in muscle phenotype might be attainable when several inflammatory cells and mediators interact together or after repeated antigenic challenges. Further studies will await new tissue culture methodologies that preserve the muscle properties over longer periods of time. In conclusion, our data suggest that inflammatory cells promote ASM hypercontractility in airway hyper-responsiveness and asthma.

  18. Comparison of gel contraction mediated by airway smooth muscle cells from patients with and without asthma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hisako; Moir, Lyn M; Oliver, Brian G G; Burgess, Janette K; Roth, Michael; Black, Judith L; McParland, Brent E

    2007-01-01

    Backgrounds Exaggerated bronchial constriction is the most significant and life threatening response of patients with asthma to inhaled stimuli. However, few studies have investigated the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) from these patients. The purpose of this study was to establish a method to measure contraction of ASM cells by embedding them into a collagen gel, and to compare the contraction between subjects with and without asthma. Methods Gel contraction to histamine was examined in floating gels containing cultured ASM cells from subjects with and without asthma following overnight incubation while unattached (method 1) or attached (method 2) to casting plates. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase protein levels were also examined. Results Collagen gels containing ASM cells reduced in size when stimulated with histamine in a concentration‐dependent manner and reached a maximum at a mean (SE) of 15.7 (1.2) min. This gel contraction was decreased by inhibitors for phospholipase C (U73122), myosin light chain kinase (ML‐7) and Rho kinase (Y27632). When comparing the two patient groups, the maximal decreased area of gels containing ASM cells from patients with asthma was 19 (2)% (n = 8) using method 1 and 22 (3)% (n = 6) using method 2, both of which were greater than that of cells from patients without asthma: 13 (2)% (n = 9, p = 0.05) and 10 (4)% (n = 5, p = 0.024), respectively. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase levels were not different between the two groups. Conclusion The increased contraction of asthmatic ASM cells may be responsible for exaggerated bronchial constriction in asthma. PMID:17412779

  19. GM-CSF production from human airway smooth muscle cells is potentiated by human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Sukkar, M B; Hughes, J M; Johnson, P R; Armour, C L

    2000-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) actively participate in the airway inflammatory process in asthma. Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induce ASMC to release inflammatory mediators in vitro. ASMC mediator release in vivo, however, may be influenced by features of the allergic asthmatic phenotype. We determined whether; (1) allergic asthmatic serum (AAS) modulates ASMC mediator release in response to IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, and (2) IL-1beta/TNF-alpha prime ASMC to release mediators in response to AAS. IL-5 and GM-CSF were quantified by ELISA in culture supernatants of; (1) ASMC pre-incubated with either AAS, nonallergic non-asthmatic serum (NAS) or Monomed (a serum substitute) and subsequently stimulated with IL-1beta and TNF-alpha and (2) ASMC stimulated with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha and subsequently exposed to either AAS, NAS or Monomed. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha induced GM-CSF release in ASMC pre-incubated with AAS was not greater than that in ASMC pre-incubated with NAS or Monomed. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, however, primed ASMC to release GM-CSF in response to human serum. GM-CSF production following IL-1beta/TNF-alpha and serum exposure (AAS or NAS) was significantly greater than that following IL-1beta/TNF-alpha and Monomed exposure or IL-1beta/TNF-alpha exposure only. Whilst the potentiating effects of human serum were not specific to allergic asthma, these findings suggest that the secretory capacity of ASMC may be up-regulated during exacerbations of asthma, where there is evidence of vascular leakage. PMID:11132773

  20. Development and characterization of a 3D multicell microtissue culture model of airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Nishat; Cole, Darren J.; Walker, Matthew J.; Legant, Wesley R.; Boudou, Thomas; Chen, Christopher S.; Favreau, John T.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Cowley, Elizabeth A.; Maksym, Geoffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cellular and molecular biology is typically studied with single-cell cultures grown on flat 2D substrates. However, cells in vivo exist as part of complex 3D structures, and it is well established in other cell types that altering substrate geometry exerts potent effects on phenotype and function. These factors may be especially relevant to asthma, a disease characterized by structural remodeling of the airway wall, and highlights a need for more physiologically relevant models of ASM function. We utilized a tissue engineering platform known as microfabricated tissue gauges to develop a 3D culture model of ASM featuring arrays of ∼0.4 mm long, ∼350 cell “microtissues” capable of simultaneous contractile force measurement and cell-level microscopy. ASM-only microtissues generated baseline tension, exhibited strong cellular organization, and developed actin stress fibers, but lost structural integrity and dissociated from the cantilevers within 3 days. Addition of 3T3-fibroblasts dramatically improved survival times without affecting tension development or morphology. ASM-3T3 microtissues contracted similarly to ex vivo ASM, exhibiting reproducible responses to a range of contractile and relaxant agents. Compared with 2D cultures, microtissues demonstrated identical responses to acetylcholine and KCl, but not histamine, forskolin, or cytochalasin D, suggesting that contractility is regulated by substrate geometry. Microtissues represent a novel model for studying ASM, incorporating a physiological 3D structure, realistic mechanical environment, coculture of multiple cells types, and comparable contractile properties to existing models. This new model allows for rapid screening of biochemical and mechanical factors to provide insight into ASM dysfunction in asthma. PMID:23125251

  1. Attenuation of airway smooth muscle contractility via flavonol-mediated inhibition of phospholipase-Cβ.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy; Danielsson, Jennifer; Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F; Emala, Charles W; Gallos, George

    2016-04-15

    Enhanced contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a major pathophysiological characteristic of asthma. Expanding the therapeutic armamentarium beyond β-agonists that target ASM hypercontractility would substantially improve treatment options. Recent studies have identified naturally occurring phytochemicals as candidates for acute ASM relaxation. Several flavonoids were evaluated for their ability to acutely relax human and murine ASM ex vivo and murine airways in vivo and were evaluated for their ability to inhibit procontractile signaling pathways in human ASM (hASM) cells. Two members of the flavonol subfamily, galangin and fisetin, significantly relaxed acetylcholine-precontracted murine tracheal rings ex vivo (n = 4 and n = 5, respectively, P < 0.001). Galangin and fisetin also relaxed acetylcholine-precontracted hASM strips ex vivo (n = 6-8, P < 0.001). Functional respiratory in vivo murine studies demonstrated that inhaled galangin attenuated the increase in lung resistance induced by inhaled methacholine (n = 6, P < 0.01). Both flavonols, galangin and fisetin, significantly inhibited purified phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) (n = 7, P < 0.05; n = 7, P < 0.05, respectively), and PLCβ enzymes (n = 6, P < 0.001 and n = 6, P < 0.001, respectively) attenuated procontractile Gq agonists' increase in intracellular calcium (n = 11, P < 0.001), acetylcholine-induced increases in inositol phosphates, and CPI-17 phosphorylation (n = 9, P < 0.01) in hASM cells. The prorelaxant effect retained in these structurally similar flavonols provides a novel pharmacological method for dual inhibition of PLCβ and PDE4 and therefore may serve as a potential treatment option for acute ASM constriction.

  2. Airway smooth muscle inflammation is regulated by microRNA-145 in COPD.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Lawrence; Sevinç, Kenan; Papazoglou, Ilektra M; Tildy, Bernadett; Detillieux, Karen; Halayko, Andrew J; Chung, Kian Fan; Perry, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, highly debilitating disease of the airways, primarily caused by smoking. Chronic inflammation and structural remodelling are key pathological features of this disease, in part caused by the aberrant function of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells under the regulation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. miRNA are short, noncoding gene transcripts involved in the negative regulation of specific target genes, through their interactions with mRNA. Previous studies have proposed that mRNA-145 (miR-145) may interact with SMAD3, an important downstream signalling molecule of the TGF-β pathway. TGF-β was used to stimulate primary human ASM cells isolated from healthy nonsmokers, healthy smokers and COPD patients. This resulted in a TGF-β-dependent increase in CXCL8 and IL-6 release, most notably in the cells from COPD patients. TGF-β stimulation increased SMAD3 expression, only in cells from COPD patients, with a concurrent increased miR-145 expression. Regulation of miR-145 was found to be negatively controlled by pathways involving the MAP kinases, MEK-1/2 and p38 MAPK. Subsequent, overexpression of miR-145 (using synthetic mimics) in ASM cells from patients with COPD suppressed IL-6 and CXCL8 release, to levels comparable to the nonsmoker controls. Therefore, this study suggests that miR-145 negatively regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine release from ASM cells in COPD by targeting SMAD3. PMID:27060571

  3. IL-17A mediates a selective gene expression profile in asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stéphane; Hirst, Stuart J; Lee, Tak H; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2014-06-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic asthma by orchestrating and perpetuating airway inflammation and remodeling responses. In this study, we evaluated the IL-17RA signal transduction and gene expression profile in ASM cells from subjects with mild asthma and healthy individuals. Human primary ASM cells were treated with IL-17A and probed by the Affymetrix GeneChip array, and gene targets were validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Genomic analysis underlined the proinflammatory nature of IL-17A, as multiple NF-κB regulatory factors and chemokines were induced in ASM cells. Transcriptional regulators consisting of primary response genes were overrepresented and displayed dynamic expression profiles. IL-17A poorly enhanced IL-1β or IL-22 gene responses in ASM cells from both subjects with mild asthma and healthy donors. Interestingly, protein modifications to the NF-κB regulatory network were not observed after IL-17A stimulation, although oscillations in IκBε expression were detected. ASM cells from subjects with mild asthma up-regulated more genes with greater overall variability in response to IL-17A than from healthy donors. Finally, in response to IL-17A, ASM cells displayed rapid activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/ribosomal S6 kinase signaling pathway and increased nuclear levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Taken together, our results suggest that IL-17A mediated modest gene expression response, which, in cooperation with the NF-κB signaling network, may regulate the gene expression profile in ASM cells.

  4. Nocturnal nasal continuous positive airway pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Influence on waking respiratory muscle function.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, W S; Tangel, D J; Fox, A M; Ballard, R D; White, D P

    1994-10-01

    Patients with COPD often have reduced inspiratory muscle strength and endurance as well as poor exercise tolerance. Increased inspiratory work during sleep (probably due to increased upper airway resistance) may further strain these compromised respiratory muscles in COPD patients. We hypothesized that nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) might reduce respiratory work during sleep in COPD patients and thereby improve waking inspiratory muscle function. To test this hypothesis, eight male COPD patients were treated with sustained nocturnal nasal CPAP. Inspiratory muscle strength (maximum inspiratory pressure) and endurance (sustained inspiratory pressure) as well as clinical performance (12-min walk) were assessed before and after therapy. We observed that compared with matched controls, COPD patients treated with nocturnal nasal CPAP had significant and substantial improvement in inspiratory muscle strength and endurance as well as functional ability as assessed by the 12-min walk. In addition, CPAP did not significantly alter sleep quality or oxygenation in the patients studied. We conclude that nocturnal nasal CPAP improves inspiratory muscle performance during wakefulness in COPD patients, which is very likely a product of the reduced work of breathing during sleep while these individuals received CPAP.

  5. Mechanisms of action of endothelin 1 in maturing rabbit airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Grunstein, M M; Rosenberg, S M; Schramm, C M; Pawlowski, N A

    1991-06-01

    Maturational differences in the effects and mechanisms of action of endothelin 1 (ET-1) on airway contractility were investigated in tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) segments isolated from 2-wk-old and adult rabbits. In TSM under passive tension, ET-1 elicited dose-dependent contractions, with a potency of action that was significantly greater (P less than 0.001) in the 2-wk-old vs. adult tissues (i.e., mean +/- SE - log 50% of maximal response values: 8.59 +/- 0.17 vs. 7.79 +/- 0.15 - log M, respectively). In TSM half-maximally contracted with acetylcholine (ACh), however, ET-1 elicited dual and opposing dose-dependent effects. At lower doses (less than or equal to 10(-9) M), ET-1 induced TSM relaxation that was significantly greater in the adult vs. 2-wk-old TSM segments (i.e., approximately 100 vs. 26.5% decrease in active tension, respectively). The relaxant responses were associated with significantly enhanced (P less than 0.001) ET-1-induced release of prostaglandins E2 and I2 in the adult tissues. At higher doses (greater than 10(-9) M), ET-1 induced TSM contractions that were 1) attenuated to a relatively greater extent by the Ca2+ channel blocker, nifedipine (10(-5) M) in the 2-wk-old tissues and 2) associated with significantly (P less than 0.001) enhanced ET-1-stimulated accumulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] in the immature TSM. Moreover, the TSM contractions were inhibited by the protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist, H-7, and the latter effect was more potent in the immature TSM. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that ET-1 exerts a potent duality of action in rabbit TSM which varies significantly with maturation, wherein 1) age-dependent differences in airway relaxation are associated with changes in the evoked release of bronchodilatory prostaglandins and 2) maturational differences in airway contraction are associated with changes in Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation and extracellular Ca2+ mobilization, coupled to differences in PKC

  6. Impaired coronary microvascular dilation correlates with enhanced vascular smooth muscle MLC phosphorylation in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Richard T; Sodha, Neel R.; Feng, Jun; Boodhwani, Munir; Liu, Yuhong; Mieno, Shigetoshi; Khabbaz, Kamal; Bianchi, Cesario; Sellke, Frank W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Impaired endothelium-independent vasodilation is a known consequence of type-1 and 2 diabetes, and the mechanism of impaired vasodilation is not well understood. The following study investigated the effects of type-1 and 2 diabetes in endothelial-independent vasodilation associated with coronary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) relaxation and contractile signaling mechanisms. Methods Type-1 diabetes was induced in Yucatan mini-swine via alloxan injection and treated with or without insulin(DM and IDM). Non-diabetic swine served as controls(ND). Expression and/or phosphorylation of determinants of VSM relaxation and contraction signaling were examined in coronary arteries and microvessels. Coronary microvessel relaxation was assessed using sodium nitroprusside(SNP). In addition, SNP-induced vasodilation and myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation was determined in coronary microvessels isolated from ND and type-2 diabetic human atrial appendage. Results Diabetic impairment in SNP-induced relaxation was completely normalized by insulin. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) VSM expression decreased in both DM and IDM groups and did not correlate with vasorelaxation. Phosphorylation of MLC and myosin phosphatase increased in the DM group and MLC phosphorylation strongly correlated with impaired VSM relaxation(r=.670, p<0.01). Coronary microvessels from type-2 diabetic human patients exhibited similarly impaired vasodilation and enhanced VSM MLC phosphorylation. Conclusions Impaired vasodilation in type-1 diabetes correlates with enhanced VSM MLC phosphorylation. In addition, enhanced VSM MLC phosphorylation is associated with impaired vasodilation in type 2 diabetes in humans. PMID:19152178

  7. The Expression of NOX4 in Smooth Muscles of Small Airway Correlates with the Disease Severity of COPD

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling is a hallmark in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in COPD pathogenesis. In the present study, the expression of NOX4 and its correlation with the ASM hypertrophy/hyperplasia, clinical pulmonary functions, and the expression of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the ASM of COPD small airways were investigated by semiquantitative morphological and/or immunohistochemistry staining methods. The results showed that an elevated expression of NOX4 and TGF-β, along with an increased volume of ASM mass, was found in the ASM of small airways in COPD patients. The abundance of NOX4 protein in the ASM was increased with disease severity and inversely correlated with the pulmonary functions in COPD patients. In addition, the expression of NOX4 and ASM marker α-SMA was colocalized, and the increased NOX4 expression was found to accompany an upregulated expression of TGF-β in the ASM of small airways of COPD lung. These results indicate that NOX4 may be a key regulator in ASM remodeling of small airway, in part through a mechanism interacting with TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of COPD, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27656649

  8. Exploiting the relationship between birefringence and force to measure airway smooth muscle contraction with PS-OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Hariri, Lida P.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to observe airway dynamics is fundamental to forming a complete understanding of pulmonary diseases such as asthma. We have previously demonstrated that Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can be used to observe structural changes in the airway during bronchoconstriction, but standard OCT lacks the contrast to discriminate airway smooth muscle (ASM) bands- ASM being responsible for generating the force that drives airway constriction- from the surrounding tissue. Since ASM in general exhibits a greater degree of birefringence than the surrounding tissue, a potential solution to this problem lies in the implementation of polarization sensitivity (PS) to the OCT system. By modifying the OCT system so that it is sensitive to the birefringence of tissue under inspection, we can visualize the ASM with much greater clarity and definition. In this presentation we show that the force of contraction can be indirectly measured by an associated increase in the birefringence signal of the ASM. We validate this approach by attaching segments of swine trachea to an isometric force transducer and stimulating contraction, while simultaneously measuring the exerted force and imaging the segment with PS-OCT. We then show how our results may be used to extrapolate the force of contraction of closed airways in absence of additional measurement devices. We apply this technique to assess ASM contractility volumetrically and in vivo, in both asthmatic and non-asthmatic human volunteers.

  9. The Expression of NOX4 in Smooth Muscles of Small Airway Correlates with the Disease Severity of COPD

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling is a hallmark in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in COPD pathogenesis. In the present study, the expression of NOX4 and its correlation with the ASM hypertrophy/hyperplasia, clinical pulmonary functions, and the expression of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the ASM of COPD small airways were investigated by semiquantitative morphological and/or immunohistochemistry staining methods. The results showed that an elevated expression of NOX4 and TGF-β, along with an increased volume of ASM mass, was found in the ASM of small airways in COPD patients. The abundance of NOX4 protein in the ASM was increased with disease severity and inversely correlated with the pulmonary functions in COPD patients. In addition, the expression of NOX4 and ASM marker α-SMA was colocalized, and the increased NOX4 expression was found to accompany an upregulated expression of TGF-β in the ASM of small airways of COPD lung. These results indicate that NOX4 may be a key regulator in ASM remodeling of small airway, in part through a mechanism interacting with TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of COPD, which warrants further investigation.

  10. TRPC3-mediated Ca(2+) entry contributes to mouse airway smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Xu; Zhang, Jia-Hua; Pan, Bin-Hua; Ren, Hui-Li; Feng, Xiu-Ling; Wang, Jia-Ling; Xiao, Jun-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Airway remodeling is a histopathological hallmark of chronic respiratory diseases that includes airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. Canonical transient receptor potential channel-3 (TRPC3)-encoded nonselective cation channels (NSCCs) are important native constitutively active channels that play significant roles in physiological and pathological conditions in ASMCs. Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), known as lipoglycans and endotoxin, have been proven to be inducers of airway remodeling, though the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized that TRPC3 is important in LPS-induced airway remodeling by regulating ASMC proliferation. To test this hypothesis, mouse ASMCs were cultured with or without LPS for 48h. Cell viability, TRPC3 protein expression, NSCC currents and changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were then analyzed using an MTT assay, western blotting, whole-cell patch clamp and calcium imaging, respectively. The results showed that LPS treatment significantly induced ASMC proliferation, up-regulation of TRPC3 protein expression and enhancement of NSCC currents, resting [Ca(2+)]i and ACh-elicited changes in [Ca(2+)]i. TRPC3 blocker Gd(3+), TRPC3 blocking antibody or TRPC3 gene silencing by siRNA significantly inhibited LPS-induced up-regulation of TRPC3 protein, enhancement of NSCC currents, resting [Ca(2+)]i and ACh-elicited changes in [Ca(2+)]i, eventually inhibiting LPS-induced ASMCproliferation. These results demonstrated that TRPC3-mediated Ca(2+) entry contributed to LPS-induced ASMC proliferation and identified TRPC3 as a possible key target in airway remodeling intervention.

  11. The effect of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel inhibitors on the vagal control of guinea pig airway smooth muscle tone

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Alice E; Robusto, Jed; Rakoczy, Joanna; Simmons, David G; Phipps, Simon; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Subtypes of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) family of cation channels are widely expressed on nerves and smooth muscle cells in many organ systems, where they serve to regulate membrane excitability. Here we have assessed whether HCN channel inhibitors alter the function of airway smooth muscle or the neurons that regulate airway smooth muscle tone. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of the HCN channel inhibitors ZD7288, zatebradine and Cs+ were assessed on agonist and nerve stimulation-evoked changes in guinea pig airway smooth muscle tone using tracheal strips in vitro, an innervated tracheal tube preparation ex vivo or in anaesthetized mechanically ventilated guinea pigs in vivo. HCN channel expression in airway nerves was assessed using immunohistochemistry, PCR and in situ hybridization. KEY RESULTS HCN channel inhibition did not alter airway smooth muscle reactivity in vitro to exogenously administered smooth muscle spasmogens, but significantly potentiated smooth muscle contraction evoked by the sensory nerve stimulant capsaicin and electrical field stimulation of parasympathetic cholinergic postganglionic neurons. Sensory nerve hyperresponsiveness was also evident in in vivo following HCN channel blockade. Cs+, but not ZD7288, potentiated preganglionic nerve-dependent airway contractions and over time induced autorhythmic preganglionic nerve activity, which was not mimicked by inhibitors of potassium channels. HCN channel expression was most evident in vagal sensory ganglia and airway nerve fibres. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS HCN channel inhibitors had a previously unrecognized effect on the neural regulation of airway smooth muscle tone, which may have implications for some patients receiving HCN channel inhibitors for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24762027

  12. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data. PMID:17406550

  13. Hydrogen sulphide inhibits Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors and relaxes airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Piedras, Isabel; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule that appears to regulate diverse cell physiological process in several organs and systems including vascular and airway smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. Decreases in endogenous H2S synthesis have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and asthma. Here we investigated the mechanism of airway SMC relaxation induced by H2S in small intrapulmonary airways using mouse lung slices and confocal and phase-contrast video microscopy. Exogenous H2S donor Na2S (100 μm) reversibly inhibited Ca2+ release and airway contraction evoked by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) uncaging in airway SMCs. Similarly, InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction was inhibited by endogenous H2S precursor l-cysteine (10 mm) but not by l-serine (10 mm) or either amino acid in the presence of dl-propargylglycine (PPG). Consistent with the inhibition of Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors (InsP3Rs), Na2S reversibly inhibited acetylcholine (ACh)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in airway SMCs. In addition, Na2S, the H2S donor GYY-4137, and l-cysteine caused relaxation of airways pre-contracted with either ACh or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Na2S-induced airway relaxation was resistant to a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and a protein kinase G inhibitor (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS). The effects of H2S on InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction as well as on the relaxation of agonist-contracted airways were mimicked by the thiol-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mm) and inhibited by the oxidizing agent diamide (30 μm). These studies indicate that H2S causes airway SMC relaxation by inhibiting Ca2+ release through InsP3Rs and consequent reduction of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in SMCs. The results suggest a novel role for endogenously produced H2S that involves the modulation of InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release – a cell-signalling system of critical importance for many physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID

  14. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  15. Common drive to the upper airway muscle genioglossus during inspiratory loading.

    PubMed

    Woods, Michael J; Nicholas, Christian L; Semmler, John G; Chan, Julia K M; Jordan, Amy S; Trinder, John

    2015-11-01

    Common drive is thought to constitute a central mechanism by which the efficiency of a motor neuron pool is increased. This study tested the hypothesis that common drive to the upper airway muscle genioglossus (GG) would increase with increased respiratory drive in response to an inspiratory load. Respiration, GG electromyographic (EMG) activity, single-motor unit activity, and coherence in the 0-5 Hz range between pairs of GG motor units were assessed for the 30 s before an inspiratory load, the first and second 30 s of the load, and the 30 s after the load. Twelve of twenty young, healthy male subjects provided usable data, yielding 77 pairs of motor units: 2 Inspiratory Phasic, 39 Inspiratory Tonic, 15 Expiratory Tonic, and 21 Tonic. Respiratory and GG inspiratory activity significantly increased during the loads and returned to preload levels during the postload periods (all showed significant quadratic functions over load trials, P < 0.05). As hypothesized, common drive increased during the load in inspiratory modulated motor units to a greater extent than in expiratory/tonic motor units (significant load × discharge pattern interaction, P < 0.05). Furthermore, this effect persisted during the postload period. In conclusion, common drive to inspiratory modulated motor units was elevated in response to increased respiratory drive. The postload elevation in common drive was suggestive of a poststimulus activation effect.

  16. Does smooth muscle in an intact airway undergo length adaptation during a sustained change in transmural pressure?

    PubMed

    Ansell, Thomas K; McFawn, Peter K; McLaughlin, Robert A; Sampson, David D; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Mitchell, Howard W; Noble, Peter B

    2015-03-01

    In isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM) strips, an increase or decrease in ASM length away from its current optimum length causes an immediate reduction in force production followed by a gradual time-dependent recovery in force, a phenomenon termed length adaptation. In situ, length adaptation may be initiated by a change in transmural pressure (Ptm), which is a primary physiological determinant of ASM length. The present study sought to determine the effect of sustained changes in Ptm and therefore, ASM perimeter, on airway function. We measured contractile responses in whole porcine bronchial segments in vitro before and after a sustained inflation from a baseline Ptm of 5 cmH2O to 25 cmH2O, or deflation to -5 cmH2O, for ∼50 min in each case. In one group of airways, lumen narrowing and stiffening in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were assessed from volume and pressure signals using a servo-controlled syringe pump with pressure feedback. In a second group of airways, lumen narrowing and the perimeter of the ASM in situ were determined by anatomical optical coherence tomography. In a third group of airways, active tension was determined under isovolumic conditions. Both inflation and deflation reduced the contractile response to EFS. Sustained Ptm change resulted in a further decrease in contractile response, which returned to baseline levels upon return to the baseline Ptm. These findings reaffirm the importance of Ptm in regulating airway narrowing. However, they do not support a role for ASM length adaptation in situ under physiological levels of ASM lengthening and shortening. PMID:25729015

  17. Functional expression of the TMEM16 family of calcium-activated chloride channels in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Kenneth E.; Danielsson, Jennifer; Funayama, Hiromi; Fu, Xiao Wen; Chang, Herng-Yu Sucie; Yim, Peter; Xu, Dingbang; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness is a key component in the pathophysiology of asthma. Although calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) flux has been described in many cell types, including human airway smooth muscle (HASM), the true molecular identity of the channels responsible for this chloride conductance remains controversial. Recently, a new family of proteins thought to represent the true CaCCs was identified as the TMEM16 family. This led us to question whether members of this family are functionally expressed in native and cultured HASM. We further questioned whether expression of these channels contributes to the contractile function of HASM. We identified the mRNA expression of eight members of the TMEM16 family in HASM cells and show immunohistochemical evidence of TMEM16A in both cultured and native HASM. Functionally, we demonstrate that the classic chloride channel inhibitor, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB), inhibited halide flux in cultured HASM cells. Moreover, HASM cells displayed classical electrophysiological properties of CaCCs during whole cell electrophysiological recordings, which were blocked by using an antibody selective for TMEM16A. Furthermore, two distinct TMEM16A antagonists (tannic acid and benzbromarone) impaired a substance P-induced contraction in isolated guinea pig tracheal rings. These findings demonstrate that multiple members of this recently described family of CaCCs are expressed in HASM cells, they display classic electrophysiological properties of CaCCs, and they modulate contractile tone in airway smooth muscle. The TMEM16 family may provide a novel therapeutic target for limiting airway constriction in asthma. PMID:23997176

  18. In vivo adenosine A(2B) receptor desensitization in guinea-pig airway smooth muscle: implications for asthma.

    PubMed

    Breschi, Maria Cristina; Blandizzi, Corrado; Fogli, Stefano; Martinelli, Cinzia; Adinolfi, Barbara; Calderone, Vincenzo; Camici, Marcella; Martinotti, Enrica; Nieri, Paola

    2007-12-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing the role of adenosine receptor subtypes in the contractility modulation of guinea-pig airway smooth muscle in normal and pathological settings. In vitro and in vivo experiments were performed by testing selective agonists and antagonists on isolated tracheal smooth muscle preparations and pulmonary inflation pressure, respectively, under normal conditions or following ovalbumin-induced allergic sensitization. In normal and sensitized animals, the adenosine A(2A)/A(2B) receptor agonist, NECA, evoked relaxing responses of isolated tracheal preparations precontracted with histamine, and such an effect was reversed by the adenosine A(2B) antagonist, MRS 1706, in the presence or in the absence of epithelium. The expression of mRNA coding for adenosine A(2B) receptors was demonstrated in tracheal specimens. In vitro desensitization with 100 microM NECA markedly reduced the relaxing effect of the agonist. In vivo NECA or adenosine administration to normal animals inhibited histamine-mediated bronchoconstriction, while these inhibitory effects no longer occurred in sensitized guinea-pigs. Adenosine plasma levels were significantly higher in sensitized than normal animals. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that: (i) adenosine A(2B) receptors are responsible for the relaxing effects of adenosine on guinea-pig airways; (ii) these receptors can undergo rapid adaptive changes that may affect airway smooth muscle responsiveness to adenosine; (iii) ovalbumin-induced sensitization promotes a reversible inactivation of adenosine A(2B) receptors which can be ascribed to homologous desensitization. These findings can be relevant to better understand adenosine functions in airways as well as mechanisms of action of asthma therapies targeting the adenosine system.

  19. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-09

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%-99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G₁/G₀ cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials.

  20. 17β-Aminoestrogens induce guinea pig airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness through L-type Ca(2+) channels activation.

    PubMed

    Flores-Soto, Edgar; Martínez-Villa, Inocencio; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Lemini, Cristina; Montaño, Luis M

    2015-09-01

    Therapy with estrogens is frequently used in menopausal women and as hormonal contraception. Because of its thrombotic effects, long term estrogen administration used in hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) and contraception could represent a health hazard. In this regard, 17β-aminoestrogens such as aminoestrol, butolame and pentolame have shown promising HRT potential, because they have a weak agonist estrogenic action and antithrombotic activity. Additionally, estrogens play a protective role in airway smooth muscle, but the effect of 17β-aminoestrogens on the airway smooth muscle has not been tested yet. In guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle pentolame and butolame induced hyperresponsiveness to histamine (His), carbachol (Cch) and KCl. Interestingly, aminoestrol did not show this effect at the highest concentration studied, it even lowered the contraction induced by Cch. The hyperresponsiveness induced by pentolame to His was abolished by nifedipine. In single tracheal myocytes, KCl induced an increment in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)]i, pentolame also showed an increase in [Ca(2+)]i and the addition of KCl in the plateau of this rise further significantly augmented the [Ca(2+)]i response. Additionally, in patch clamp experiments pentolame increased the L-type Ca(2+) currents. Thus, 17β-aminoestrogens such as pentolame and butolame, but not aminoestrol, activate L-type Ca(2+) channel to induced hyperresponsiveness to Cch, His and KCl in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle. Due to its lack of effect on airways and to its anticoagulant characteristics, aminoestrol seems to be the best alternative in the HRT among the 17β-aminoestrogens studied.

  1. Vitamin D Modulates Expression of the Airway Smooth Muscle Transcriptome in Fatal Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Martin; Nikolos, Christina; Jester, William; Klanderman, Barbara; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Truskowski, Kevin; MacDonald, Kevin; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Weiss, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, asthma is a chronic inflammatory respiratory disease affecting over 300 million people. Some asthma patients remain poorly controlled by conventional therapies and experience more life-threatening exacerbations. Vitamin D, as an adjunct therapy, may improve disease control in severe asthma patients since vitamin D enhances glucocorticoid responsiveness and mitigates airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperplasia. We sought to characterize differences in transcriptome responsiveness to vitamin D between fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM by using RNA-Seq to measure ASM transcript expression in five donors with fatal asthma and ten non-asthma-derived donors at baseline and with vitamin D treatment. Based on a Benjamini-Hochberg corrected p-value <0.05, 838 genes were differentially expressed in fatal asthma vs. non-asthma-derived ASM at baseline, and vitamin D treatment compared to baseline conditions induced differential expression of 711 and 867 genes in fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM, respectively. Functional gene categories that were highly represented in all groups included extracellular matrix, and responses to steroid hormone stimuli and wounding. Genes differentially expressed by vitamin D also included cytokine and chemokine activity categories. Follow-up qPCR and individual analyte ELISA experiments were conducted for four cytokines (i.e. CCL2, CCL13, CXCL12, IL8) to measure TNFα-induced changes by asthma status and vitamin D treatment. Vitamin D inhibited TNFα-induced IL8 protein secretion levels to a comparable degree in fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived ASM even though IL8 had significantly higher baseline levels in fatal asthma-derived ASM. Our findings identify vitamin D-specific gene targets and provide transcriptomic data to explore differences in the ASM of fatal asthma- and non-asthma-derived donors. PMID:26207385

  2. Technical and physiological determinants of airway smooth muscle mass in endobronchial biopsy samples of asthmatic horses.

    PubMed

    Bullone, Michela; Chevigny, Mylène; Allano, Marion; Martin, James G; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Morphometric analyses of endobronchial biopsies are commonly performed in asthma research but little is known about the technical and physiological parameters contributing to measurement variability. We investigated factors potentially affecting biopsy size, quality, and airway smooth muscle (ASM) content in heaves, an asthma-like disease of horses. Horses with heaves in clinical exacerbation (n = 6) or remission (n = 6) from the disease and six controls were studied using a crossover design. The effect of disease status, age, bronchodilation, biopsy forceps type, and carina size on total biopsy area (Atot), ASM area (AASM), ASM% (AASM/Atot), and histologic quality were assessed. Concordance among different measuring techniques was also assessed. Compared with other groups, horses with heaves in exacerbation yielded larger biopsies (P < 0.05). Better quality biopsies were obtained from carinae of small size compared with large ones (P = 0.02), and carina size and forceps type significantly affected the ASM content of the biopsy (interaction, P < 0.05). AASM increased with age only in heaves-affected horses (r = 0.9, P < 0.05), and ASM% was negatively correlated with pulmonary resistance at 5 Hz in heaves-affected horses (r = -0.74, P = 0.01), likely because of the increased thickness of the extracellular matrix layer in this group (P = 0.01). In conclusion, disease status, carina thickness, and the forceps used may significantly affect biopsy size, quality, and ASM content. Endobronchial biopsies are not appropriate samples for ASM quantification in heaves, and studies measuring ASM mass should not be compared when measuring techniques differ. PMID:25103978

  3. Bidirectional counter-regulation of human lung mast cell and airway smooth muscle β2-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Newby, Chris; Amrani, Yassine; Bradding, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human lung mast cells (HLMCs) play a central role in asthma pathogenesis through their relocation to the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles. β2 adrenoceptor (β2-AR)-agonists are used to relieve bronchoconstriction in asthma, but may reduce asthma control, particularly when used as monotherapy. We hypothesised that HLMC and human ASM cell (HASMC) responsiveness to β2-AR agonists would be attenuated when HLMCs are in contact with HASMCs. Cells were cultured in the presence of the short-acting β2-agonist albuterol, and the long-acting β2-agonists formoterol and olodaterol. Constitutive and FcεRI-dependent HLMC histamine release, HASMC contraction, and β2-AR phosphorylation at tyrosine 350 (Tyr350) were assessed. Constitutive HLMC histamine release was increased in HLMC-HASMC co-culture and this was enhanced by β2-AR agonists. Inhibition of FcεRI-dependent HLMC mediator release by β2-agonists was greatly reduced in HLMC-HASMC co-culture. These effects were reversed by neutralisation of stem cell factor (SCF) or cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1). β2-AR agonists did not prevent HASMC contraction when HLMCs were present, but this was reversed by fluticasone. β2-AR phosphorylation at Tyr350 occurred within 5 minutes in both HLMCs and HASMCs when the cells were co-cultured, and was inhibited by neutralising SCF or CADM1. HLMC interactions with HASMCs via CADM1 and Kit inhibit the potentially beneficial effects of β2-AR agonists on these cells via phosphorylation of the β2-AR. These results may explain the potentially adverse effects of β2-ARs agonists when used for asthma therapy. Targeting SCF and CADM1 may enhance β2-AR efficacy, particularly in corticosteroid-resistant patients. PMID:26608913

  4. Molecular cloning of magnesium-independent type 2 phosphatidic acid phosphatases from airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tate, R J; Tolan, D; Pyne, S

    1999-07-01

    Members of the type 2 phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP2) family catalyse the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA), lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a Mg(2+)-independent and N-ethymaleimide-insensitive PAP2 activity in cultured guinea-pig airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Two PAP2 cDNAs of 923 and 926 base pairs were identified and subsequently cloned from these cells. The ORF of the 923 base pair cDNA encoded a protein of 285 amino acids (Mr = 32.1 kDa), which had 94% homology with human PAP2a (hPAP2a) and which probably represents a guinea-pig specific PAP2a (gpPAP2a1). The ORF of the 926 base pair cDNA encoded a protein of 286 amino acids (Mr = 32.1 kDa) which had 84% and 91% homology with hPAP2a and gpPAP2a1, respectively. This protein, termed gpPAP2a2, has two regions (aa 21-33 and 51-74) of marked divergence and altered hydrophobicity compared with hPAP2a and gpPAP2a1. This occurs in the predicted first and second transmembrane domains and at the extremes of the first outer loop. Other significant differences between gpPAP2a1/2 and hPAP2a, hPAP2b and hPAP2c occur at the cytoplasmic C-terminal. Transient expression of gpPAP2a2 in Cos-7 cells resulted in an approx. 4-fold increase in Mg(2+)-independent PAP activity, thereby confirming that gpPAP2a2 is another catalytically active member of an extended PAP2 family.

  5. Dietary obesity increases NO and inhibits BKCa-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation in rat cremaster muscle artery: association with caveolins and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Howitt, Lauren; Grayson, T Hilton; Morris, Margaret J; Sandow, Shaun L; Murphy, Timothy V

    2012-06-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for hypertension and other vascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity on endothelium-dependent dilation of rat cremaster muscle arterioles. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (213 ± 1 g) were fed a cafeteria-style high-fat or control diet for 16-20 wk. Control rats weighed 558 ± 7 g compared with obese rats 762 ± 12 g (n = 52-56; P < 0.05). Diet-induced obesity had no effect on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced dilation of isolated, pressurized (70 mmHg) arterioles, but sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced vasodilation was enhanced. ACh-induced dilation of arterioles from control rats was abolished by a combination of the K(Ca) blockers apamin, 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34), and iberiotoxin (IBTX; all 0.1 μmol/l), with no apparent role for nitric oxide (NO). In arterioles from obese rats, however, IBTX had no effect on responses to ACh while the NO synthase (NOS)/guanylate cyclase inhibitors N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 μmol/l)/1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 10 μmol/l) partially inhibited ACh-induced dilation. Furthermore, NOS activity (but not endothelial NOS expression) was increased in arteries from obese rats. L-NAME/ODQ alone or removal of the endothelium constricted arterioles from obese but not control rats. Expression of caveolin-1 and -2 oligomers (but not monomers or caveolin-3) was increased in arterioles from obese rats. The number of caveolae was reduced in the endothelium of arteries, and caveolae density was increased at the ends of smooth muscle cells from obese rats. Diet-induced obesity abolished the contribution of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel to ACh-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation of rat cremaster muscle arterioles, while increasing NOS activity and inducing an NO-dependent component. PMID:22492718

  6. Computational simulation of human upper airway collapse using a pressure-/state-dependent model of genioglossal muscle contraction under laminar flow conditions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaqi; Malhotra, Atul; White, David P.

    2012-01-01

    A three-element, pressure- and state (sleep and wake) -dependent contraction model of the genioglossal muscle was developed based on the microstructure of skeletal muscle and the cross-bridge theory. This model establishes a direct connection between the contractile forces generated in muscle fibers and the measured electromyogram signals during various upper airway conditions. This effectively avoids the difficulty of determining muscle shortening velocity during complex pharyngeal conditions when modeling the muscle’s contractile behaviors. The activation of the genioglossal muscle under different conditions was then simulated. A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the effects of varying each modeled parameter on the muscle’s contractile behaviors. This muscle contraction model was then incorporated into our anatomically correct, two-dimensional computational model of the pharyngeal airway to perform a finite-element analysis of air flow, tissue deformation, and airway collapse. The model-predicted muscle deformations are consistent with previous observations regarding upper airway behavior in normal subjects. PMID:15831800

  7. CXCL8 histone H3 acetylation is dysfunctional in airway smooth muscle in asthma: regulation by BET.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Rachel L; Patel, Jamie K; John, Alison E; Tatler, Amanda L; Mazengarb, Lisa; Brightling, Christopher E; Knox, Alan J

    2015-05-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation and remodeling and CXCL8 is a CXC chemokine that drives steroid-resistant neutrophilic airway inflammation. We have shown that airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells isolated from asthmatic individuals secrete more CXCL8 than cells from nonasthmatic individuals. Here we investigated chromatin modifications at the CXCL8 promoter in ASM cells from nonasthmatic and asthmatic donors to further understand how CXCL8 is dysregulated in asthma. ASM cells from asthmatic donors had increased histone H3 acetylation, specifically histone H3K18 acetylation, and increased binding of histone acetyltransferase p300 compared with nonasthmatic donors but no differences in CXCL8 DNA methylation. The acetylation reader proteins Brd3 and Brd4 were bound to the CXCL8 promoter and Brd inhibitors inhibited CXCL8 secretion from ASM cells by disrupting Brd4 and RNA polymerase II binding to the CXCL8 promoter. Our results show a novel dysregulation of CXCL8 transcriptional regulation in asthma characterized by a promoter complex that is abnormal in ASM cells isolated from asthmatic donors and can be modulated by Brd inhibitors. Brd inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic strategy for steroid-resistant inflammation.

  8. Emergence of airway smooth muscle mechanical behavior through dynamic reorganization of contractile units and force transmission pathways.

    PubMed

    Brook, Bindi S

    2014-04-15

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in asthma remains poorly understood despite significant research effort to elucidate relevant underlying mechanisms. In particular, a significant body of experimental work has focused on the effect of tidal fluctuations on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, tissues, lung slices, and whole airways to understand the bronchodilating effect of tidal breathing and deep inspirations. These studies have motivated conceptual models that involve dynamic reorganization of both cytoskeletal components as well as contractile machinery. In this article, a biophysical model of the whole ASM cell is presented that combines 1) crossbridge cycling between actin and myosin; 2) actin-myosin disconnectivity, under imposed length changes, to allow dynamic reconfiguration of "force transmission pathways"; and 3) dynamic parallel-to-serial transitions of contractile units within these pathways that occur through a length fluctuation. Results of this theoretical model suggest that behavior characteristic of experimentally observed force-length loops of maximally activated ASM strips can be explained by interactions among the three mechanisms. Crucially, both sustained disconnectivity and parallel-to-serial transitions are necessary to explain the nature of hysteresis and strain stiffening observed experimentally. The results provide strong evidence that dynamic rearrangement of contractile machinery is a likely mechanism underlying many of the phenomena observed at timescales associated with tidal breathing. This theoretical cell-level model captures many of the salient features of mechanical behavior observed experimentally and should provide a useful starting block for a bottom-up approach to understanding tissue-level mechanical behavior.

  9. Bisulfite and sulfite as derivatives of sulfur dioxide alters biomechanical behaviors of airway smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Song, Aijing; Lin, Feng; Li, Jianming; Liao, Qingfeng; Liu, Enmei; Jiang, Xuemei; Deng, Linhong

    2014-02-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a common air pollutant that triggers asthmatic symptoms, but its toxicological mechanisms are not fully understood. Specifically, it is unclear how SO2 in vivo affects airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells of which the mechanics is known to ultimately mediate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) - a hallmark feature of asthma. To this end, we investigated the effects of bisulfite/sulfite (1:3 M/M in neutral fluid to simulate the in vivo derivatives of inhaled SO2 in the airways), on the viability, migration, stiffness and contractility of ASM cells cultured in vitro. The results showed that bisulfite/sulfite consistently increased viability, migration, F-actin intensity and stiffness of ASM cells in similar fashion as concentration increasing from 10(-4) to 10(-1) mmol/L. However, bisulfite/sulfite increased the ASM cell contractility induced by KCl only at the concentration between 10(-4) and 10(-3) mmol/L (p < 0.05), while having no consistent effect on that induced by histamine. At the concentration of 10(0) mmol/L, bisulfite/sulfite became acutely toxic to the ASM cells. Taken together, the data suggest that SO2 derivatives at low levels in vivo may directly increase the mass, stiffness and contractility of ASM cells, which may help understand the mechanism in which specific air pollutants contribute in vivo to the pathogenesis of asthma.

  10. Maturational regulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate metabolism in rabbit airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, S M; Berry, G T; Yandrasitz, J R; Grunstein, M M

    1991-01-01

    Airway reactivity has been shown to vary with age; however, the mechanism(s) underlying this process remain unidentified. To elucidate the role of ontogenetic changes in phosphoinositide-linked signal transduction, we examined whether age-related differences in tracheal smooth muscle (TSM) contractility to carbachol (CCh) are associated with developmental changes in the production and metabolism of the second messenger, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins (1,4,5)P3). In TSM segments isolated from 2-wk-old and adult rabbits, both the maximal isometric contractile force and sensitivity (i.e., -logED50) to CCh (10(-10)-10(-4) M) were significantly greater in the immature vs. adult tissues (P less than 0.001). Similarly, Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation elicited by either receptor-coupled stimulation with CCh (10(-10)-10(-4) M) or post-receptor-mediated guanine nucleotide binding protein activation of permeabilized TSM with GTP gamma S (100 microM) was also significantly enhanced in 2-wk-old vs. adult TSM. Measurement of the activities of the degradative enzymes for Ins(1,4,5)P3 demonstrated that: (a) mean +/- SE maximal Ins(1,4,5)P3 3'-kinase activity was significantly reduced in the immature vs. adult TSM (i.e., approximately 71.7 +/- 6.0 vs. 137.8 +/- 10.0 pmol/min per mg protein, respectively; P less than 0.005); (b) by contrast, maximal Ins(1,4,5)P3 5'-phosphatase activity was significantly increased in the immature vs. adult TSM (i.e., 27.9 +/- 1.2 vs. 15.6 +/- 1.5 nmol/min per mg protein, respectively; P less than 0.001); and (c) the Km values for Ins(1,4,5)P3 5'-phosphatase were 14- and 19-fold greater than those for Ins(1,4,5)P3 3'-kinase in the 2-wk-old and adult TSM, respectively. Collectively, the findings suggest that the age-related decrease in agonist-induced rabbit TSM contractility is associated with a diminution in Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation which is attributed, at least in part, to ontogenetic changes in the relative activities of the degradative enzymes for

  11. Nuclear factor-κB mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-κB in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-κB on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-κB in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (α-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-κB. Meanwhile, the expression of α-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-κB blocker. NF-κB blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-κB in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma. PMID:26722396

  12. Nuclear factor-κB mediates the phenotype switching of airway smooth muscle cells in a murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Su, Meiping; Fan, Xiujun

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) phenotype modulation, characterized by reversible switching between contractile and proliferative phenotypes, is considered to contribute to airway proliferative diseases such as allergic asthma. Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) has been reported as a key regulator for the occurrence and development of asthma. However, little is known regarding its role in ASM cell phenotypic modulation. To elucidate the role of NF-κB in regulating ASM cells phenotypic modulation, we investigated the effects of NF-κB on ASM cells contractile marker protein expression, and its impact on proliferation and apoptosis. We found that chronic asthma increased the activation of NF-κB in the primary murine ASM cells with a concomitant marked decrease in the expression of contractile phenotypic marker protein including smooth muscle alpha-actin (α-SMA). Additionally, we used the normal ASM cells under different processing to build the phenotype switching when we found the activation of NF-κB. Meanwhile, the expression of α-SMA in asthma was significantly increased by the NF-κB blocker. NF-κB blocker also suppressed asthma mouse ASM cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. These findings highlight a novel role for the NF-κB in murine ASM cell phenotypic modulation and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention for asthma.

  13. Effects of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists on anti-IgE-induced contraction and smooth muscle reactivity in human airways.

    PubMed Central

    Gorenne, I; Labat, C; Norel, X; De Montpreville, V; Guillet, M C; Cavero, I; Brink, C

    1995-01-01

    1. The beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, salbutamol, salmeterol and RP 58802 relaxed basal tone of human isolated bronchial smooth muscle. Salmeterol- and RP 58802-induced relaxations persisted for more than 4 h when the medium was constantly renewed after treatment. 2. Salbutamol, salmeterol and RP 58802 reversed histamine-induced contractions in human airways (pD2 values: 6.15 +/- 0.21, 6.00 +/- 0.19 and 6.56 +/- 0.12, respectively). 3. Anti-IgE-induced contractions were significantly inhibited immediately after pretreatment of preparations with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists (10 microM). However, when tissues were treated with beta 2-agonists and then washed for a period of 4 h, salmeterol was the only agonist which significantly inhibited the anti-IgE response. 4. Histamine response curves were shifted to the right immediately after pretreatment of tissues with the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists (10 microM; 20 min), but maximal contractions were not affected. After a 4 h washing period, the histamine curves were not significantly different from controls. Concentration-effect curves to acetylcholine (ACh) or leukotriene C4 (LTC4) were not significantly modified after beta 2-agonist pretreatment. 5. These results suggest that beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists may prevent anti-IgE-induced contraction by inhibition of mediator release rather than alterations of those mechanisms involved in airway smooth muscle contraction. PMID:7780648

  14. Airway smooth muscle cells synthesize hyaluronan cable structures independent of inter-alpha-inhibitor heavy chain attachment.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Mark E; Fulop, Csaba; Mukhopadhyay, Durba; Comhair, Suzy; Erzurum, Serpil C; Hascall, Vincent C

    2009-02-20

    The covalent association of inter-alpha-inhibitor-derived heavy chains (HCs) with hyaluronan was first described in synovial fluid from arthritic patients and later described as a structural and functional component of hyaluronan "cable" structures produced by many different cells and stimuli. HC transfer has been shown to be mediated by the protein product of TSG-6 (tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6). Considering the accumulation of hyaluronan in airways following asthmatic attacks and the subsequent infiltration of leukocytes, we sought to characterize HC substitution of hyaluronan "cables" in primary mouse airway smooth muscle cells (MASM) and primary human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM). We found that cells derived from mice lacking TSG-6 had no defect in hyaluronan production or hyaluronan-mediated leukocyte adhesion when treated with the viral mimic poly(I,C). Functional hyaluronan cables were induced by cycloheximide in the confirmed absence of protein synthesis, with or without simultaneous treatment with poly(I,C). We characterized the species specificity of the antibody other investigators used to describe the HC-hyaluronan complex of hyaluronan cables and found minimal affinity to bovine-derived HCs in contrast to HCs from mouse and human sera. Thus, we cultured MASM and HASM cells in serum from these three sources and analyzed hyaluronan extracts for HCs and other hyaluronan-binding proteins, using parallel cumulus cell-oocyte complex (COC) extracts as positive controls. We conclude that, if hyaluronan cables derived from MASM and HASM cells are substituted with HCs, the amount of substitution is significantly below the limit of detection when compared with COC extracts of similar hyaluronan mass.

  15. Protective effects of anisodamine on cigarette smoke extract-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and tracheal contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Ni; Yang, Kai; Xu, Zu-Peng; Zhu, Liang; Hou, Li-Na; Qi, Hong; Chen, Hong-Zhuan Cui, Yong-Yao

    2012-07-01

    Anisodamine, an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), has been used therapeutically to improve smooth muscle function, including microvascular, intestinal and airway spasms. Our previous studies have revealed that airway hyper-reactivity could be prevented by anisodamine. However, whether anisodamine prevents smoking-induced airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation remained unclear. In this study, a primary culture of rat ASM cells was used to evaluate an ASM phenotype through the ability of the cells to proliferate and express contractile proteins in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and intervention of anisodamine. Our results showed that CSE resulted in an increase in cyclin D1 expression concomitant with the G0/G1-to-S phase transition, and high expression of M2 and M3. Functional studies showed that tracheal hyper-contractility accompanied contractile marker α-SMA high-expression. These changes, which occur only after CSE stimulation, were prevented and reversed by anisodamine, and CSE-induced cyclin D1 expression was significantly inhibited by anisodamine and the specific inhibitor U0126, BAY11-7082 and LY294002. Thus, we concluded that the protective and reversal effects and mechanism of anisodamine on CSE-induced events might involve, at least partially, the ERK, Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways associated with cyclin D1 via mAChRs. Our study validated that anisodamine intervention on ASM cells may contribute to anti-remodeling properties other than bronchodilation. -- Highlights: ► CSE induces tracheal cell proliferation, hyper-contractility and α-SMA expression. ► Anisodamine reverses CSE-induced tracheal hyper-contractility and cell proliferation. ► ERK, PI3K, and NF-κB pathways and cyclin D1 contribute to the reversal effect.

  16. Effect of subchronic in vivo exposure to nitrogen dioxide on lung tissue inflammation, airway microvascular leakage, and in vitro bronchial muscle responsiveness in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Chitano, P; Rado, V; Di Stefano, A; Papi, A; Boniotti, A; Zancuoghi, G; Boschetto, P; Romano, M; Salmona, M; Ciaccia, A; Fabbri, L M; Mapp, C E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a previous study on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rats exposed in vivo for seven days to 10 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO2), it has been shown that there is an influx of macrophages into the airways. The present study investigated the effect of seven day exposure to 10 ppm NO2, on: (a) lung tissue inflammation and morphology; (b) airway microvascular leakage; (c) in vitro contractile response of main bronchi. METHODS: Lung tissue was studied by light microscopy, after fixing the lungs by inflation with 4% formalin at a pressure of 20 cm H2O. Microvascular leakage was measured by extravasation of Evans blue dye in the larynx, trachea, main bronchi, and intrapulmonary airways. Smooth muscle responsiveness was evaluated by concentration-responses curves to acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-3) M), serotonin (10(-9)-10(-4) M), and voltage-response curves (12-28 V) to electrical field stimulation. RESULTS: Histology showed an increased total inflammation at the level of respiratory bronchioles and alveoli. No influx of inflammatory cells was found in the main bronchi. A loss of cilia in the epithelium of small airways and ectasia of alveolar capillaries was also found. By contrast, no alterations to microvascular permeability or modification of bronchial smooth muscle responsiveness was found. CONCLUSIONS: Subchronic exposure to 10 ppm NO2 causes airway inflammation and structural damage, but does not cause any persistent alteration to microvascular permeability or bronchial smooth muscle responsiveness in rats. Images Figure 1 PMID:8758032

  17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: The Role of Upper Airway and Facial Skeletal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravi K; Afifi, Ahmed M; Sanchez, Ruston; King, Timothy W

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea represents a large burden of disease to the general population and may compromise patient quality of life; workplace and automotive safety; and metabolic, cardiovascular, and neurocognitive health. The disease is characterized by repetitive cycles of upper airway collapse resulting from a lack of pharyngeal airway structural support and loss of muscle tone among upper airway dilators. Polysomnography serves as the gold standard for diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea and the apnea-hypopnea index is the most commonly used metric for quantifying disease severity. Conservative treatments include lifestyle modification, continuous positive airway pressure treatment, and dental appliance therapy. Surgical treatment options include pharyngeal and facial skeletal surgery. Maxillomandibular advancement has been shown to be the most effective surgical approach for multilevel expansion of the upper airway and may significantly reduce an obstructive sleep apnea patient's apnea-hypopnea index. Patient age, obesity, and the degree of maxillary advancement may be key factors contributing to treatment success. PMID:27673521

  18. Differential effects of inhaled methacholine on circumferential wall and vascular smooth muscle of third-generation airways in awake sheep.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Damian; Parsons, Gibbe; Gunther, Robert; Quail, Anthony; Cottee, David; White, Saxon

    2012-10-15

    Evolution and natural selection ensure that specific mechanisms exist for selective airway absorption of inhaled atmospheric molecules. Indeed, nebulized cholinoceptor agonists used in asthma-challenge tests may or may not enter the systemic circulation. We examined the hypothesis that inhaled cholinoceptor agonists have selective access. Six sheep were instrumented under general anesthesia (propofol 5 mg/kg iv, 2-3% isoflurane-oxygen), each with pulsed-Doppler blood flow transducers mounted on the single bronchial artery and sonomicrometer probes mounted on the intrapulmonary third-generation lingula lobe bronchus. Continuous measurements were made of bronchial blood flow (Q(br)), Q(br) conductance (C(br)), bronchial hemicircumference (CIRC(br)), and bronchial wall thickness (WALL TH(br)) in recovered, standing, awake sheep. Methacholine (MCh; 0.125-2.0 μg/kg iv), at the highest dose, caused a 233% rise in Q(br) (P < 0.05) and a 286% rise in C(br) (P < 0.05). CIRC(br) fell to 90% (P < 0.05); WALL TH(br) did not change. In contrast, nebulized MCh (1-32 mg/ml), inhaled through a mask at the highest dose, caused a rise in ventilation and a rise in Q(br) proportional to aortic pressure without change in C(br). CIRC(br) fell to 91% (P < 0.01), and WALL TH(br) did not change. Thus inhaled MCh has access to cholinoceptors of bronchial circumferential smooth muscle to cause airway lumen narrowing but effectively not to those of the systemic bronchovascular circulation. It is speculated that the mechanism is selective neuroparacrine inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M3 bronchovascular cholinoceptors) by prostanoids released by intense MCh activation of epithelial and mucosal cells lining the airway. PMID:22898550

  19. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  20. Compliance Measurements of the Upper Airway in Pediatric Down Syndrome Sleep Apnea Patients.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Dhananjay Radhakrishnan; Mylavarapu, Goutham; McConnell, Keith; Fleck, Robert J; Shott, Sally R; Amin, Raouf S; Gutmark, Ephraim J

    2016-04-01

    Compliance of soft tissue and muscle supporting the upper airway are two of several factors contributing to pharyngeal airway collapse. We present a novel, minimally invasive method of estimating regional variations in pharyngeal elasticity. Magnetic resonance images for pediatric sleep apnea patients with Down syndrome [9.5 ± 4.3 years (mean age ± standard deviation)] were analyzed to segment airways corresponding to baseline (no mask pressure) and two positive pressures. A three dimensional map was created to evaluate axial and circumferential variation in radial displacements of the airway, dilated by the positive pressures. The displacements were then normalized with respect to the appropriate transmural pressure and radius of an equivalent circle to obtain a measure of airway compliance. The resulting elasticity maps indicated the least and most compliant regions of the pharynx. Airway stiffness of the most compliant region [403 ± 204 (mean ± standard deviation) Pa] decreased with severity of obstructive sleep apnea. The non-linear response of the airway wall to continuous positive airway pressure was patient specific and varied between anatomical locations. We identified two distinct elasticity phenotypes. Patient phenotyping based on airway elasticity can potentially assist clinical practitioners in decision making on the treatments needed to improve airway patency.

  1. Differentiated muscles are mandatory for gas-filling of the Drosophila airway system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiwen; Cruz, Tina; Irion, Uwe; Moussian, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT At the end of development, organs acquire functionality, thereby ensuring autonomy of an organism when it separates from its mother or a protective egg. In insects, respiratory competence starts when the tracheal system fills with gas just before hatching of the juvenile animal. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of this process are not fully understood. Analyses of the phenotype of Drosophila embryos with malformed muscles revealed that they fail to gas-fill their tracheal system. Indeed, we show that major regulators of muscle formation like Lame duck and Blown fuse are important, while factors involved in the development of subsets of muscles including cardiac and visceral muscles are dispensable for this process, suggesting that somatic muscles (or parts of them) are essential to enable tracheal terminal differentiation. Based on our phenotypic data, we assume that somatic muscle defect severity correlates with the penetrance of the gas-filling phenotype. This argues that a limiting molecular or mechanical muscle-borne signal tunes tracheal differentiation. We think that in analogy to the function of smooth muscles in vertebrate lungs, a balance of physical forces between muscles and the elasticity of tracheal walls may be decisive for tracheal terminal differentiation in Drosophila. PMID:26621831

  2. The effect of Shenmai injection on the proliferation of Rat airway smooth muscle cells in asthma and underlying mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over-proliferation of airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) is one of the important contributors to airway remodeling in asthma. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Shenmai injection (SMI) on the proliferation of the rat ASMC in asthma. Methods Rats were randomly divided into three groups: the control group, the asthma group, and the SMI treatment group. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry staining were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in rat ASMC respectively. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ( [Ca2+]i ) in rat ASMC were measured with Fluo-3/AM by confocal microscopy. The proliferation was detected by MTT assay. Results Compared with the control group, the asthma group showed an increased expression of TRPV1 and [Ca2+]i in rat ASMC. The expression of PCNA and absorbance of MTT assay in asthma rat ASMC was also significantly increased. SMI could significantly decrease the expression of TRPV1 channel and [Ca2+]i in the asthmatic rat ASMC. Furthermore, the expression of PCNA and absorbance of MTT assay in asthmatic rat ASMC was significantly reduced after SMI treatment. Conclusions SMI may prevent asthma-induced ASMC over-proliferation probably by inhibiting the expression of TRPV1 channel, which regulates the intracellular calcium concentration. PMID:24010863

  3. [Role of bronchodilators in therapy for COPD-mechanisms of LABA and LAMA on airway smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Kume, Hiroaki

    2016-05-01

    Long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonists (LABAs) and anticholinergics (LAMAs) are widely used clinically as therpy for COPD. Clinical reports have demonstrated that LABAs (salmeterol, formoterol, indacaterol, olodaterol, vilanterol) and LAMAs (tiotropium, glycopyrronium, umeclidinium, aclidinium) are useful to improving symptoms and lung function, and to reducing exacerbation and hospitarization. LABAs expect salmeterol are strong partial agonists, and LAMAs are non-specific antagonists. Ca2+ dynamics and Ca2+ sensitization contribute to relaxation of airway smooth muscle in these bronchodilators. LABAs act on orthosteric and allosteric sites on the β2-adrenergic receptors. In contrast, LAMAs act not only on orthosteric site on the muscarinic receptors, but also allosteric site on the β2-adrenergic receptors, leading to enhancing β2-adrenergic action. Allosteric GPCR modulation is involved in the synergistic effects between LABAs and LAMAs. PMID:27254952

  4. Pleiotropic Effects of Bitter Taste Receptors on [Ca2+]i Mobilization, Hyperpolarization, and Relaxation of Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Pauer, Susan H; Yong, Hwan Mee; Smith, Dan'elle C; Deshpande, Deepak A; An, Steven S; Liggett, Stephen B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation and airflow obstruction from human airway smooth muscle (HASM) constriction due to increased local bronchoconstrictive substances. We have recently found bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) on HASM, which increase [Ca2+]i and relax the muscle. We report here that some, but not all, TAS2R agonists decrease [Ca2+]i and relax HASM contracted by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that stimulate [Ca2+]i. This suggests both a second pathway by which TAS2Rs relax, and, a heterogeneity of the response phenotype. We utilized eight TAS2R agonists and five procontractile GPCR agonists in cultured HASM cells. We find that heterogeneity in the inhibitory response hinges on which procontractile GPCR is activated. For example, chloroquine inhibits [Ca2+]i increases from histamine, but failed to inhibit [Ca2+]i increases from endothelin-1. Conversely, aristolochic acid inhibited [Ca2+]i increases from endothelin-1 but not histamine. Other dichotomous responses were found when [Ca2+]i was stimulated by bradykinin, angiotensin, and acetylcholine. There was no association between [Ca2+]i inhibition and TAS2R subtype, nor whether [Ca2+]i was increased by Gq- or Gi-coupled GPCRs. Selected studies revealed a correlation between [Ca2+]i inhibition and HASM cell-membrane hyperpolarization. To demonstrate physiologic correlates, ferromagnetic beads were attached to HASM cells and cell stiffness measured by magnetic twisting cytometry. Consistent with the [Ca2+]i inhibition results, chloroquine abolished the cell stiffening response (contraction) evoked by histamine but not by endothelin-1, while aristolochic acid inhibited cell stiffening from endothelin-1, but not from histamine. In studies using intact human bronchi, these same differential responses were found. Those TAS2R agonists that decreased [Ca2+]i, promoted hyperpolarization, and decreased HASM stiffness, caused relaxation of human airways. Thus TAS2Rs relax HASM in two ways: a low

  5. Contribution of SRF, Elk-1, and myocardin to airway smooth muscle remodeling in heaves, an asthma-like disease of horses.

    PubMed

    Chevigny, Mylène; Guérin-Montpetit, Karine; Vargas, Amandine; Lefebvre-Lavoie, Josiane; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Myocyte hyperplasia and hypertrophy contribute to the increased mass of airway smooth muscle (ASM) in asthma. Serum-response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor that regulates myocyte differentiation in vitro in vascular and intestinal smooth muscles. When SRF is associated with phosphorylated (p)Elk-1, it promotes ASM proliferation while binding to myocardin (MYOCD) leading to the expression of contractile elements in these tissues. The objective of this study was therefore to characterize the expression of SRF, pElk-1, and MYOCD in ASM cells from central and peripheral airways in heaves, a spontaneously occurring asthma-like disease of horses, and in controls. Six horses with heaves and five aged-matched controls kept in the same environment were studied. Nuclear protein expression of SRF, pElk-1, and MYOCD was evaluated in peripheral airways and endobronchial biopsies obtained during disease remission and after 1 and 30 days of naturally occurring antigenic exposure using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence techniques. Nuclear expression of SRF (P = 0.03, remission vs. 30 days) and MYOCD (P = 0.05, controls vs. heaves at 30 days) increased in the peripheral airways of horses with heaves during disease exacerbation, while MYOCD (P = 0.04, remission vs. 30 days) decreased in the central airways of control horses. No changes were observed in the expression of pElk-1 protein in either tissue. In conclusion, SRF and its cofactor MYOCD likely contribute to the hypertrophy of peripheral ASM observed in equine asthmatic airways, while the remodeling of the central airways is more static or involves different transcription factors.

  6. L-thyroxine promotes a proliferative airway smooth muscle phenotype in the presence of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Bart G J; Naeimi, Saeideh; Bos, I Sophie T; Menzen, Mark H; Halayko, Andrew J; Hashjin, Goudarz Sadeghi; Meurs, Herman

    2015-02-01

    Hypothyroidism may reduce, whereas hyperthyroidism may aggravate, asthma symptoms. The mechanisms underlying this relationship are largely unknown. Since thyroid hormones have central roles in cell growth and differentiation, we hypothesized that airway remodeling, in particular increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, may be involved. To address this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) and l-thyroxine (T4) in the absence and presence of the profibrotic transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 on human ASM cell phenotype switching. T3 (1-100 nM) and T4 (1-100 nM) did not affect basal ASM proliferation. However, when combined with TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml), T4 synergistically increased the proliferative response, whereas only a minor effect was observed for T3. In line with a switch from a contractile to a proliferative ASM phenotype, T4 reduced the TGF-β1-induced contractile protein expression by ∼50%. Cotreatment with T3 reduced TGF-β1-induced contractile protein expression by ∼25%. The synergistic increase in proliferation was almost fully inhibited by the integrin αvβ3 antagonist tetrac (100 nM), whereas no significant effects of the thyroid receptor antagonist 1-850 (3 μM) were observed. Inhibition of MEK1/2, downstream of the integrin αvβ3, also inhibited the T4- and TGF-β1-induced proliferative responses. Collectively, the results indicate that T4, and to a lesser extent T3, promotes a proliferative ASM phenotype in the presence of TGF-β1, which is predominantly mediated by the membrane-bound T4 receptor αvβ3. These results indicate that thyroid hormones may enhance ASM remodeling in asthma, which could be of relevance for hyperthyroid patients with this disease. PMID:25480330

  7. L-thyroxine promotes a proliferative airway smooth muscle phenotype in the presence of TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Bart G J; Naeimi, Saeideh; Bos, I Sophie T; Menzen, Mark H; Halayko, Andrew J; Hashjin, Goudarz Sadeghi; Meurs, Herman

    2015-02-01

    Hypothyroidism may reduce, whereas hyperthyroidism may aggravate, asthma symptoms. The mechanisms underlying this relationship are largely unknown. Since thyroid hormones have central roles in cell growth and differentiation, we hypothesized that airway remodeling, in particular increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, may be involved. To address this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) and l-thyroxine (T4) in the absence and presence of the profibrotic transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 on human ASM cell phenotype switching. T3 (1-100 nM) and T4 (1-100 nM) did not affect basal ASM proliferation. However, when combined with TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml), T4 synergistically increased the proliferative response, whereas only a minor effect was observed for T3. In line with a switch from a contractile to a proliferative ASM phenotype, T4 reduced the TGF-β1-induced contractile protein expression by ∼50%. Cotreatment with T3 reduced TGF-β1-induced contractile protein expression by ∼25%. The synergistic increase in proliferation was almost fully inhibited by the integrin αvβ3 antagonist tetrac (100 nM), whereas no significant effects of the thyroid receptor antagonist 1-850 (3 μM) were observed. Inhibition of MEK1/2, downstream of the integrin αvβ3, also inhibited the T4- and TGF-β1-induced proliferative responses. Collectively, the results indicate that T4, and to a lesser extent T3, promotes a proliferative ASM phenotype in the presence of TGF-β1, which is predominantly mediated by the membrane-bound T4 receptor αvβ3. These results indicate that thyroid hormones may enhance ASM remodeling in asthma, which could be of relevance for hyperthyroid patients with this disease.

  8. Comparative Study of Protective Effects of Salbutamol and Beclomethasone against Insulin Induced Airway Hyper-reactivity on Isolated Tracheal Smooth Muscle of Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mahjabeen; Tayyaba Khan, Bushra; Bakhtiar, Salman; Anwar, Mohammad Asim

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational insulin was withdrawn from the market due to its potential to produce airway hyper-reactivity and bronchoconstriction. So the present study was designed to explore the acute effects of insulin on airway reactivity of guinea pigs and protective effects of salbutamol and beclomethasone against insulin induced airway hyper-responsiveness on isolated tracheal smooth muscle of guinea pig. Effects of varying concentrations of insulin (10-7 to 10-3 M), insulin pretreated with fixed concentration of salbutamol (10-7 M) and beclomethasone (10-6 M) were studied on isolated tracheal tissue of guinea pig by constructing cumulative concentration response curves. Changes in tracheal smooth muscle contractions were recorded on four channel oscillograph. The mean ± SEM of maximum amplitudes of contraction with increasing concentrations of insulin, insulin pretreated with fixed concentration of salbutamol and beclomethasone were 35 ± 1.13 mm, 14.55 ± 0.62 mm and 22 ± 1.154 mm respectively. Although salbutamol and beclomethasone both had a profound inhibitory effect on insulin induced airway hyper-reactivity, yet salbutamol is more efficacious than beclomethasone. So we suggest that pretreatment of inhaled insulin with salbutamol may be preferred over beclomethasone in amelioration of its potential respiratory adverse effects such as bronchoconstriction. PMID:25901165

  9. Characterization of neural control and contractile function in airway smooth muscle of the ferret.

    PubMed

    Maize, D F; Fedan, J S; Dey, R D

    1998-02-01

    Several recent studies have characterized neuroanatomical and neurophysiological aspects of ferret airways, but regional differences in reactivity and cholinergic, adrenergic and non-adrenergic-non-cholinergic (NANC) neural responses have not been examined. The aim of this study was to characterize the contractile and relaxant response elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS), and the contractions induced by cholinergic agonists in isolated ferret tracheal and bronchial preparations. EFS produced frequency-dependent contractions and relaxations. Contractions in both the trachea and bronchi were inhibited by atropine and potentiated by neostigmine. Tracheal relaxations were found to be entirely adrenergic, but bronchial relaxations were mediated by a combination of adrenergic and inhibitory NANC (i-NANC) innervations. Trachea and bronchi were more sensitive to methacholine (MCh) and carbachol than to acetylcholine (ACh); middle tracheal segments being more sensitive to ACh than distal segments, however, in the presence of neostigmine ACh potency was equal in both segments. The results suggest that regional differences exist in cholinergic responsiveness of ferret trachea and bronchi, resulting from differences in ACh degradation.

  10. Selective targeting of the α5-subunit of GABAA receptors relaxes airway smooth muscle and inhibits cellular calcium handling

    PubMed Central

    Yocum, Gene T.; Siviski, Matthew E.; Yim, Peter D.; Fu, Xiao Wen; Poe, Michael M.; Cook, James M.; Harrison, Neil; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Emala, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical need for novel bronchodilators for the treatment of bronchoconstrictive diseases remains a major medical issue. Modulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) chloride via GABAA receptor activation to achieve relaxation of precontracted ASM represents a potentially beneficial therapeutic option. Since human ASM GABAA receptors express only the α4- and α5-subunits, there is an opportunity to selectively target ASM GABAA receptors to improve drug efficacy and minimize side effects. Recently, a novel compound (R)-ethyl8-ethynyl-6-(2-fluorophenyl)-4-methyl-4H-benzo[f]imidazo[1,5-a][1,4] diazepine-3-carboxylate (SH-053-2′F-R-CH3) with allosteric selectivity for α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors has become available. We questioned whether this novel GABAA α5-selective ligand relaxes ASM and affects intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) regulation. Immunohistochemical staining localized the GABAA α5-subunit to human ASM. The selective GABAA α5 ligand SH-053-2′F-R-CH3 relaxes precontracted intact ASM; increases GABA-activated chloride currents in human ASM cells in voltage-clamp electrophysiology studies; and attenuates bradykinin-induced increases in [Ca2+]i, store-operated Ca2+ entry, and methacholine-induced Ca2+ oscillations in peripheral murine lung slices. In conclusion, selective subunit targeting of endogenous α5-subunit containing GABAA receptors on ASM may represent a novel therapeutic option to treat severe bronchospasm. PMID:25659897

  11. Activation of protein kinase C accelerates contraction kinetics of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Peiper, U; Knipp, S C; Thies, B; Henke, R

    1996-01-01

    Contraction kinetics of isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle were studied by analysing the increase of force subsequent to force-inhibiting passive length changes lasting 1 s (100 Hz, sinus, 5% of muscle length). Compared with carbachol activation, phorboldibutyrate (PDBu)-induced stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) demonstrated no significant difference in the extent of force development in the polarized preparation [mean peak force 9.16 +/- 0.37 mN (carbachol) vs. 9.12 +/- 0.37 mN (PDBu)]. However, the time constant calculated for the slow component of post-vibration force recovery was 6.40 +/- 0.29 s after addition of PDBu vs. 22.39 +/- 1.40 s during carbachol activation, indicating a significant phorbol ester-induced acceleration of the cross-bridge cycling rate. In the K-depolarized preparation, treatment with 26.4 microM indolactam (IL) to activate PKC produced muscle relaxation (9.94 +/- 0.16 mN measured 0-30 min after the onset of depolarization vs. 4.13 +/- 0.05 mN measured during 30-60 min of IL treatment). Again, even in the presence of high sarcoplasmic Ca2+ resulting from tonic depolarization, PKC activation was associated with a distinct diminution of the time constant (25.99 +/- 0.79 s during the first 30 min of depolarization vs. 10.32 +/- 0.21 s during 30-60 min of IL treatment). In contrast, addition of 0.035 microM verapamil, 1.5 microM isoproterenol, and 32 microM dibutyryl-cAMP to the bathing medium induced relaxation without affecting the rate of post-vibration force recovery. The results suggest that the calcium-dependent signal cascade (agonist receptor/inositol trisphosphate/ Ca(2+)-calmodulin/myosin light chain kinase) hardly affects the regulation of contraction kinetics in the tonically activated intact smooth muscle preparation. PKC stimulation, however, accelerates actin/myosin interaction kinetics, possibly by inhibition of phosphatase(s).

  12. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Komachi, Mayumi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Dobashi, Kunio; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Mori, Masatomo; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  13. Measurement of muscle strength in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bittner, Edward A; Martyn, Jeevendra A; George, Edward; Frontera, Walter R; Eikermann, Matthias

    2009-10-01

    Traditional (indirect) techniques, such as electromyography and nerve conduction velocity measurement, do not reliably predict intensive care unit-acquired muscle weakness and its clinical consequences. Therefore, quantitative assessment of skeletal muscle force is important for diagnosis of intensive care unit-acquired motor dysfunction. There are a number of ways for assessing objectively muscle strength, which can be categorized as techniques that quantify maximum voluntary contraction force and those that assess evoked (stimulated) muscle force. Important factors that limit the repetitive evaluation of maximum voluntary contraction force in intensive care unit patients are learning effects, pain during muscular contraction, and alteration of consciousness.The selection of the appropriate muscle is crucial for making adequate predictions of a patient's outcome. The upper airway dilators are much more susceptible to a decrease in muscle strength than the diaphragm, and impairment of upper airway patency is a key mechanism of extubation failure in intensive care unit patients. Data suggest that the adductor pollicis muscle is an appropriate reference muscle to predict weakness of muscles that are typically affected by intensive care unit-acquired weakness, i.e., upper airway as well as extremity muscles. Stimulated (evoked) force of skeletal muscles, such as the adductor pollicis, can be assessed repetitively, independent of brain function, even in heavily sedated patients during high acuity of their disease. PMID:20046117

  14. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) regulates actin polymerization and contraction in airway smooth muscle by a vinculin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yidi; Gunst, Susan J

    2015-05-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) can catalyze actin polymerization by elongating actin filaments. The elongation mechanism involves VASP oligomerization and its binding to profilin, a G-actin chaperone. Actin polymerization is required for tension generation during the contraction of airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, the role of VASP in regulating actin dynamics in ASM is not known. We stimulated ASM cells and tissues with the contractile agonist acetylcholine (ACh) or the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin (FSK), a dilatory agent. ACh and FSK stimulated VASP Ser(157) phosphorylation by different kinases. Inhibition of VASP Ser(157) phosphorylation by expression of the mutant VASP S157A in ASM tissues suppressed VASP phosphorylation and membrane localization in response to ACh, and also inhibited contraction and actin polymerization. ACh but not FSK triggered the formation of VASP-VASP complexes as well as VASP-vinculin and VASP-profilin complexes at membrane sites. VASP-VASP complex formation and the interaction of VASP with vinculin and profilin were inhibited by expression of the inactive vinculin mutant, vinculin Y1065F, but VASP phosphorylation and membrane localization were unaffected. We conclude that VASP phosphorylation at Ser(157) mediates its localization at the membrane, but that VASP Ser(157) phosphorylation and membrane localization are not sufficient to activate its actin catalytic activity. The interaction of VASP with activated vinculin at membrane adhesion sites is a necessary prerequisite for VASP-mediated molecular processes necessary for actin polymerization. Our results show that VASP is a critical regulator of actin dynamics and tension generation during the contractile activation of ASM.

  15. Infantile dilated X-linked cardiomyopathy, G4.5 mutations, altered lipids, and ultrastructural malformations of mitochondria in heart, liver, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bissler, John J; Tsoras, Monica; Göring, Harald H H; Hug, Peter; Chuck, Gail; Tombragel, Esther; McGraw, Catherine; Schlotman, James; Ralston, Michael A; Hug, George

    2002-03-01

    Mutations in the Xq28 gene G4.5 lead to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Differential splicing of G4.5 results in a family of proteins called "tafazzins" with homology to acyltransferases. These enzymes assemble fatty acids into membrane lipids. We sequenced G4.5 in two kindreds with X-linked DCM and in two unrelated men, one with idiopathic DCM and the other with DCM of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. We examined the ultrastructure of heart, liver, and muscle biopsy specimens in these three DCM types; we used gas chromatography to compare fatty acid composition in heart, liver, and muscle autopsy specimens of two patients of kindred 1 with that of controls. In X-linked DCM, G4.5 had a stop codon (E188X), a nonsense mutation, in kindred 1 and an amino acid substitution (G240R), a missense mutation, in kindred 2. In the two men with isolated DCM, G4.5 was not mutated. Ultrastructural mitochondrial malformations were present in the biopsy tissues of the patients with DCM. Cardiac biopsy specimens of both kindreds with X-linked DCM exhibited greatly enlarged mitochondria with large bundles of stacked, compacted, disarrayed cristae that differed from those of the two types of isolated DCM. Autopsy tissue of patients with X-linked DCM had decreased unsaturated and increased saturated fatty acid concentrations. Seven of 13 published G4.5 missense mutations, including the one presented here, occur in acyltransferase motifs. Impaired acyltransferase function could result in increased fatty acid saturation that would decrease membrane fluidity. Mitochondrial membrane proliferation may be an attempt to compensate for impaired function of acyltransferase. Cardiac ultrastructure separates X-linked DCM with G4.5 mutations from the two types of isolated DCM without G4.5 mutations. Electron microscopy of promptly fixed myocardial biopsy specimens has a role in defining the differential diagnosis of DCM. Mutational analysis of the G4.5 gene also serves this purpose.

  16. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A nasal... nasal airflow. The device decreases airway resistance and increases nasal airflow. The external...

  17. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A nasal... nasal airflow. The device decreases airway resistance and increases nasal airflow. The external...

  18. Dilation of the oropharynx via selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingtao; Sahin, Mesut; Durand, Dominique M.

    2005-12-01

    The functional effects of selective hypoglossal nerve (HG) stimulation with a multi-contact peripheral nerve electrode were assessed using images of the upper airways and the tongue in anesthetized beagles. A biphasic pulse train of 50 Hz frequency and 2 s duration was applied through each one of the tripolar contact sets of the nerve electrode while the pharyngeal images were acquired into a computer. The stimulation current was limited to 20% above the activation threshold for maximum selectivity. The images showed that various contact sets could generate several different activation patterns of the tongue muscles resulting in medial and/or lateral dilation and closing of the airways at the tongue root. Some of these patterns translated into an increase in the oropharyngeal size while others did not have any effect. The pharyngeal sizes were not statistically different during stimulation either between the two different positions of the head (30° and 60°), or when the lateral contacts were compared with the medial ones. The contacts that had the least effect generated an average of 53 ± 15% pharyngeal dilation relative to the best contacts, indicating that the results are marginally sensitive to the contact position around the HG nerve trunk. These results suggest that selective HG nerve stimulation can be a useful technique to produce multiple tongue activation patterns that can dilate the pharynx. This may in turn increase the size of the patient population who can benefit from HG nerve stimulation as a treatment method for obstructive sleep apnea.

  19. Dilation of the oropharynx via selective stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingtao; Sahin, Mesut; Durand, Dominique M

    2005-12-01

    The functional effects of selective hypoglossal nerve (HG) stimulation with a multi-contact peripheral nerve electrode were assessed using images of the upper airways and the tongue in anesthetized beagles. A biphasic pulse train of 50 Hz frequency and 2 s duration was applied through each one of the tripolar contact sets of the nerve electrode while the pharyngeal images were acquired into a computer. The stimulation current was limited to 20% above the activation threshold for maximum selectivity. The images showed that various contact sets could generate several different activation patterns of the tongue muscles resulting in medial and/or lateral dilation and closing of the airways at the tongue root. Some of these patterns translated into an increase in the oropharyngeal size while others did not have any effect. The pharyngeal sizes were not statistically different during stimulation either between the two different positions of the head (30 degrees and 60 degrees), or when the lateral contacts were compared with the medial ones. The contacts that had the least effect generated an average of 53 +/- 15% pharyngeal dilation relative to the best contacts, indicating that the results are marginally sensitive to the contact position around the HG nerve trunk. These results suggest that selective HG nerve stimulation can be a useful technique to produce multiple tongue activation patterns that can dilate the pharynx. This may in turn increase the size of the patient population who can benefit from HG nerve stimulation as a treatment method for obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:16317230

  20. Snoring-Induced Nerve Lesions in the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Poothrikovil, Rajesh P; Al Abri, Mohammed A

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of habitual snoring is extremely high in the general population, and is reported to be roughly 40% in men and 20% in women. The low-frequency vibrations of snoring may cause physical trauma and, more specifically, peripheral nerve injuries, just as jobs which require workers to use vibrating tools over the course of many years result in local nerve lesions in the hands. Histopathological analysis of upper airway (UA) muscles have shown strong evidence of a varying severity of neurological lesions in groups of snoring patients. Neurophysiological assessment shows evidence of active and chronic denervation and re-innervation in the palatopharyngeal muscles of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients. Neurogenic lesions of UA muscles induced by vibration trauma impair the reflex dilation abilities of the UA, leading to an increase in the possibility of UA collapse. The neurological factors which are partly responsible for the progressive nature of OSAS warrant the necessity of early assessment in habitual snorers. PMID:22548134

  1. Upper airway function in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea: a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Robert L.; Eckert, Danny J.; Yeh, Susie Yim; Malhotra, Atul

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Obstructive sleep apnea is an increasingly prevalent disease, with a considerable societal burden. The disease is defined by recurrent intermittent collapse of the upper airway. Understanding of and treatment for the disease is largely confined to relief of the mechanical obstruction of the upper airway by application of continuous positive airway pressure, and less commonly weight loss or surgery. However, recent work has focused on the function, rather than structure alone, of the upper airway. Recent findings The following contributors to upper airway structure and function have been studied: traditional fixed anatomical abnormalities, dynamic anatomical changes, upper airway dilator muscle dysfunction, lung volumes, and instability in control of breathing. In each patient with obstructive sleep apnea, the relative contribution of each of these components may be quite variable. The studies reviewed here describe methods to evaluate these factors, and some attempts at treatment. Summary Ongoing studies are attempting to classify patients on the basis of the underlying pathophysiology. This work suggests that obstructive sleep apnea is a heterogeneous disease with multiple root causes. Ultimately, such a classification may allow more individualized treatment, not only relying on mechanical relief of the upper airway obstruction. PMID:18812828

  2. Calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells-coupled vanilliod transient receptor potential channel 4 ca2+ sparklets stimulate airway smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Limin; Sullivan, Michelle N; Chase, Marlee; Gonzales, Albert L; Earley, Scott

    2014-06-01

    Proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) contributes to the remodeling and irreversible obstruction of airways during severe asthma, but the mechanisms underlying this disease process are poorly understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that Ca(2+) influx through the vanilliod transient receptor potential channel (TRPV) 4 stimulates ASMC proliferation. We found that synthetic and endogenous TRPV4 agonists increase proliferation of primary ASMCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Ca(2+) influx through individual TRPV4 channels produces Ca(2+) microdomains in ASMCs, called "TRPV4 Ca(2+) sparklets." We also show that TRPV4 channels colocalize with the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin in ASMCs. Activated calcineurin dephosphorylates nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factors cytosolic (c) to allow nuclear translocation and activation of synthetic transcriptional pathways. We show that ASMC proliferation in response to TRPV4 activity is associated with calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of the NFATc3 isoform tagged with green florescent protein. Our findings suggest that Ca(2+) microdomains created by TRPV4 Ca(2+) sparklets activate calcineurin to stimulate nuclear translocation of NFAT and ASMC proliferation. These findings further suggest that inhibition of TRPV4 could diminish asthma-induced airway remodeling.

  3. Exogenous S100A8 protein inhibits PDGF-induced migration of airway smooth muscle cells in a RAGE-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Dong; Wei, Ying; Wang, Yu; Yin, Lei-Miao; Park, Gyoung-Hee; Liu, Yan-Yan; Yang, Yong-Qing

    2016-03-25

    S100A8 is an important member of the S100 protein family, which is involved in intracellular and extracellular regulatory activities. We previously reported that the S100A8 protein was differentially expressed in the asthmatic respiratory tracts. To understand the potential role of S100A8 in asthma, we investigated the effect of recombinant S100A8 protein on the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) and the underlying molecular mechanism by using multiple methods, such as impedance-based xCELLigence migration assay, transwell migration assays and wound-healing assays. We found that exogenous S100A8 protein significantly inhibited PDGF-induced ASMC migration. Furthermore, the migration inhibition effect of S100A8 was blocked by neutralizing antibody against the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), a potential receptor for the S100A8 protein. These findings provide direct evidence that exogenous S100A8 protein inhibits the PDGF-induced migration of ASMCs through the membrane receptor RAGE. Our study highlights a novel role of S100A8 as a potential means of counteracting airway remodeling in chronic airway diseases.

  4. β2-Adrenoceptor agonist-mediated inhibition of human airway smooth muscle cell proliferation: importance of the duration of β2-adrenoceptor stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alastair G; Tomlinson, Paul R; Wilson, John W

    1997-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma has been ascribed to airway wall thickening as a result of smooth muscle proliferation and hypertrophy. We have previously shown that continuous exposure to the β2-adrenoceptor agonist, salbutamol inhibits mitogen-induced proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells. In the present study, the effects of variable durations and repeated periods of exposure to β2-adrenoceptor agonists on DNA synthesis in human cultured airway smooth muscle have been investigated to model some of the possible pharmacokinetic profiles of these agents following inhalation. DNA synthesis was measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Shorter periods of exposure (up to 2.5 h) of airway smooth muscle cells to salbutamol (100 nM) commencing 30 min before thrombin (0.3 u ml−1) stimulation had no effect on the subsequent increase in [3H]-thymidine incorporation. However, inhibition by salbutamol was evident with a 4.5 h exposure and was maximal after an 8.5 h exposure. Similar patterns of results were observed when fenoterol (100 nM) was used in place of salbutamol as the β2-adrenoceptor agonist or when epidermal growth factor (300 pM) was used in place of thrombin as the mitogen. Salbutamol had no effect on thrombin-stimulated [3H]-leucine incorporation after 8.5 h of exposure, but a statistically significant effect was observed after 48 h of exposure. Experiments in which DNA synthesis was measured up to 52 h after the addition of thrombin indicated that exposure to salbutamol during the first 8 h of mitogen stimulation delayed rather than inhibited the DNA synthesis. Addition of salbutamol (100 nM) at different times either before or up to 24 h after the addition of thrombin indicated that [3H]-thymidine incorporation (measured between 24 and 28 h after thrombin) could be significantly attenuated when salbutamol was added as late as 18 h after the addition of thrombin. The effects of more prolonged exposure to

  5. Stereoselectivity of tradinterol's inhibition on proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells induced by acetylcholine through suppressing Ca(2+) signalling.

    PubMed

    Song, X; Zhang, Y; Wang, H; Wen, H; Zhao, C; Lan, Y; Pan, L; Zhang, C; Cheng, M

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether the inhibition of tradinterol (SPFF) against acetylcholine (ACh)-induced proliferation is mediated by Ca(2+) signaling in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and whether stereoselectivity of the drug exists. Guinea pig ASMCs were primarily prepared with the method described and treated with ACh combined to SPFF isomers for 24 or 48 hours, respectively. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the proliferation of the guinea pig ASMCs. Ca(2+) fluorescent intensity in the guinea pig ASMCs, expressed with percentage increase in fluorescence when the intensity was determined with varioskan flash or shown with percentage increase in Geo Mean (GM) measured with flow cytometry, was recorded. Images of the intensity were obtained with fluorescent microscope. 2-APB, an (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor) IP3R blocker, and NiCl2, a store-operated channel (SOC) inhibitor, were used to investigate the mechanism of SPFF isomers regulating intracellular Ca(2+) via IP3R on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and/or SOC on plasma membrane. (-)SPFF and (±)SPFF, treated for 48 hours, showed significant inhibition against ACh-induced proliferation. The Ca(2+) elevation induced by ACh was concentration-dependently suppressed by SPFF isomers. (-)SPFF is the most effective but the potency of (±)SPFF is less than that of the former and stronger than that of (+)SPFF based on the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value. No significant additive effect was observed when (-)SPFF/(±)SPFF was used alone and combined with NiCl2/2-APB. As far as (+)SPFF is concerned, no similar phenomenon was observed. (-)SPFF and (±)SPFF but (+)SPFF showed significant inhibition against the percentage increase in fluorescence induced by CaCl2. It is likely that the influence of IP2RSOC-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in ASMCs helps (-)SPFF and (±)SPFF contribute to the suppression of ASMCs

  6. Interaction between endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress (ER/SR stress), mitochondrial signaling and Ca(2+) regulation in airway smooth muscle (ASM).

    PubMed

    Delmotte, Philippe; Sieck, Gary C

    2015-02-01

    Airway inflammation is a key aspect of diseases such as asthma. Several inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNFα and IL-13) increase cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]cyt) responses to agonist stimulation and Ca(2+) sensitivity of force generation, thereby enhancing airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility (hyper-reactive state). Inflammation also induces ASM proliferation and remodeling (synthetic state). In normal ASM, the transient elevation of [Ca(2+)]cyt induced by agonists leads to a transient increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]mito) that may be important in matching ATP production with ATP consumption. In human ASM (hASM) exposed to TNFα and IL-13, the transient increase in [Ca(2+)]mito is blunted despite enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt responses. We also found that TNFα and IL-13 induce reactive oxidant species (ROS) formation and endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) stress (unfolded protein response) in hASM. ER/SR stress in hASM is associated with disruption of mitochondrial coupling with the ER/SR membrane, which relates to reduced mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) expression. Thus, in hASM it appears that TNFα and IL-13 result in ROS formation leading to ER/SR stress, reduced Mfn2 expression, disruption of mitochondrion-ER/SR coupling, decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering, mitochondrial fragmentation, and increased cell proliferation.

  7. The role of arousal related brainstem reflexes in causing recovery from upper airway occlusion in infants.

    PubMed

    Wulbrand, Henning; McNamara, Frances; Thach, Bradley T

    2008-06-01

    During obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adults upper airway reopening coincides with a sudden burst in activity of pharyngeal dilating muscles. This has been attributed to arousal from sleep as indicated by increased EEG activity. Recovery from OSA in infants often occurs in the absence of cortical arousal. To investigate mechanisms involved in recovery, we performed experimental airway occlusions in sleeping infants. Based on past work, our hypothesis was that a sleep startle combined with an augmented breath and heart rate acceleration would occur during the occlusion, and that such brainstem mediated reflexes might provide an explanation for recovery from OSA in the absence of cortical arousal. However, this is contrary to expectations, since lung inflation is believed to be necessary for occurrence of an augmented breath. We studied 16 healthy infants during sleep. We recorded EEG, EOG, ECG, oxygen saturation, diaphragmatic, nuchal and limb electromyograms, face mask pressure, and airflow. A startle, accompanied by neck extension, limb and nuchal EMG activation, as well as heart rate acceleration occurred during all airway occlusions. The startle occurred simultaneously with a large biphasic inspiratory effort, having characteristics of an augmented breath (sigh). In more than a third of cases, this occurred without any evidence of cortical arousal activity. The magnitude of startles as well as the increase in heart rate correlated positively with peak airway negative pressure, indicating that arousal processes are graded in intensity. We conclude that the neck extension and pharyngeal dilating muscle activity associated with the startle and augmented breath may account for recovery of airway patency in infants as they do adults. Lung inflation is not a prerequisite for the reflex to occur. PMID:18548828

  8. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ... Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  9. Mechanisms of control of alae nasi muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, W S; Tangel, D J; White, D P

    1992-03-01

    Human upper airway dilator muscles are clearly influenced by chemical stimuli such as hypoxia and hypercapnia. Whether in humans there are upper airway receptors capable of modifying the activity of such muscles is unclear. We studied alae nasi electromyography (EMG) in normal men in an attempt to determine 1) whether increasing negative intraluminal pressure influences the activity of the alae nasi muscle, 2) whether nasal airway feedback mechanisms modify the activity of this muscle, and 3) if so, whether these receptor mechanisms are responding to mucosal temperature/pressure changes or to airway deformation. Alae nasi EMG was recorded in 10 normal men under the following conditions: 1) nasal breathing (all potential nasal receptors exposed), 2) oral breathing (nasal receptors not exposed), 3) nasal breathing with splints (airway deformation prevented), and 4) nasal breathing after nasal anesthesia (mucosal receptors anesthetized). In addition, in a separate group, the combined effects of anesthesia and nasal splints were assessed. Under each condition, EMG activity was monitored during basal breathing, progressive hypercapnia, and inspiratory resistive loading. Under all four conditions, both load and hypercapnia produced a significant increase in alae nasi EMG, with hypercapnia producing a similar increment in EMG regardless of nasal receptor exposure. On the other hand, loading produced greater increments in EMG during nasal than during oral breathing, with combined anesthesia plus splinting producing a load response similar to that observed during oral respiration. These observations suggest that nasal airway receptors have little effect on the alae nasi response to hypercapnia but appear to mediate the alae nasi response to loading or negative airway pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Effects of Gestational and Postnatal Exposure to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia on Diaphragm Muscle Contractile Function in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Fiona B.; Dempsey, Eugene M.; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations to the supply of oxygen during early life presents a profound stressor to physiological systems with aberrant remodeling that is often long-lasting. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a feature of apnea of prematurity, chronic lung disease, and sleep apnea. CIH affects respiratory control but there is a dearth of information concerning the effects of CIH on respiratory muscles, including the diaphragm—the major pump muscle of breathing. We investigated the effects of exposure to gestational CIH (gCIH) and postnatal CIH (pCIH) on diaphragm muscle function in male and female rats. CIH consisted of exposure in environmental chambers to 90 s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir, once every 5 min, 8 h a day. Exposure to gCIH started within 24 h of identification of a copulation plug and continued until day 20 of gestation; animals were studied on postnatal day 22 or 42. For pCIH, pups were born in normoxia and within 24 h of delivery were exposed with dams to CIH for 3 weeks; animals were studied on postnatal day 22 or 42. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Following gas exposures, diaphragm muscle contractile, and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. Neither gCIH nor pCIH exposure had effects on diaphragm muscle force-generating capacity or endurance in either sex. Similarly, early life exposure to CIH did not affect muscle tolerance of severe hypoxic stress determined ex vivo. The findings contrast with our recent observation of upper airway dilator muscle weakness following exposure to pCIH. Thus, the present study suggests a relative resilience to hypoxic stress in diaphragm muscle. Co-ordinated activity of thoracic pump and upper airway dilator muscles is required for optimal control of upper airway caliber. A mismatch in the force-generating capacity of the complementary muscle groups could have adverse consequences for the control of airway patency and respiratory homeostasis. PMID:27462274

  11. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats. PMID:27110242

  12. Sexual Dimorphism in the Regulation of Estrogen, Progesterone, and Androgen Receptors by Sex Steroids in the Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zarazúa, Abraham; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Ramírez-Vélez, Gabriela; Bazán-Perkins, Blanca; Guerra-Araiza, Christian; Campos-Lara, María G.

    2016-01-01

    The role of sex hormones in lung is known. The three main sex steroid receptors, estrogen, progesterone, and androgen, have not been sufficiently studied in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), and the sex hormone regulation on these receptors is unknown. We examined the presence and regulation of sex hormone receptors in female and male rat ASMC by Western blotting and flow cytometry. Gonadectomized rats were treated with 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17β-estradiol + progesterone, or testosterone. ASMC were enzymatically isolated from tracheas and bronchi. The experiments were performed with double staining flow cytometry (anti-α-actin smooth muscle and antibodies to each hormone receptor). ERα, ERβ, tPR, and AR were detected in females or males. ERα was upregulated by E2 and T and downregulated by P4 in females; in males, ERα was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T. ERβ was downregulated by each treatment in females, and only by E + P and T in males. tPR was downregulated by P4, E + P, and T in females. No hormonal regulation was observed in male receptors. AR was downregulated in males treated with E + P and T. We have shown the occurrence of sex hormone receptors in ASMC and their regulation by the sex hormones in female and male rats. PMID:27110242

  13. The importance of complete tissue homogenization for accurate stoichiometric measurement of myosin light chain phosphorylation in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2015-02-01

    The standard method for measuring the phosphorylation of the regulatory myosin light chain (MLC20) in smooth muscle is extraction of the light chain using a urea extraction buffer, urea-glycerol gel electrophoresis of the soluble portion of the extract (supernatant) and Western blot analysis. The undissolved portion of the tissue during extraction (the pellet) is usually discarded. Because the pellet contains a finite amount of MLC20, omission of the pellet could result in inaccurate measurement of MLC20 phosphorylation. In this study we compared the level of tracheal smooth muscle MLC20 phosphorylation in the supernatant alone, with that in the complete tissue homogenate (supernatant and pellet) using the standard method. The supernatant fraction showed the well-known double bands representing phosphorylated and un-phosphorylated MLC20. The dissolved pellet fraction showed varying amounts of un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated MLC20. There was a small but statistically significant overestimation of the percent MLC20 phosphorylation if the pellet was not taken into consideration. The overestimation was 7% ± 2% (mean ± SEM) (p < 0.05) in unstimulated muscle and 2% ± 1% (p < 0.05) in acetylcholine (10(-6) mol/L) stimulated muscle. This finding suggests that for accurate estimation of the stoichiometry of MLC20 phosphorylation it is necessary to consider the contribution from the pellet portion of the muscle tissue homogenate.

  14. Cigarette smoke and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes elicit VEGF release through the p38 MAPK pathway in human airway smooth muscle cells and lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Giorgia; Facchinetti, Fabrizio; Moretto, Nadia; Civelli, Maurizio; Patacchini, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic factor known to be elevated in the sputum of asymptomatic smokers as well as smokers with bronchitis type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute exposure to cigarette smoke extract altered VEGF production in lung parenchymal cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We exposed human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) and small airways epithelial cells (SAEC) to aqueous cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in order to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke on VEGF expression and release. KEY RESULTS Vascular endothelial growth factor release was elevated by sub-toxic concentrations of CSE in both ASMC and NHLF, but not in SAEC. CSE-evoked VEGF release was mimicked by its component acrolein at concentrations (10–100 µM) found in CSE, and prevented by the antioxidant and α,β-unsaturated aldehyde scavenger, N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Both CSE and acrolein (30 µM) induced VEGF mRNA expression in ASMC cultures, suggesting an effect at transcriptional level. Crotonaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, an endogenous α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, stimulated VEGF release, as did H2O2. CSE-evoked VEGF release was accompanied by rapid and lasting phosphorylation of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), which was abolished by NAC and mimicked by acrolein. Both CSE- and acrolein-evoked VEGF release were blocked by selective inhibition of p38 MAPK signalling. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS α,β-Unsaturated aldehydes and possibly reactive oxygen species contained in cigarette smoke stimulate VEGF expression and release from pulmonary cells through p38 MAPK signalling. PMID:21306579

  15. Upregulation of TRPM7 augments cell proliferation and interleukin-8 release in airway smooth muscle cells of rats exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    LIN, XIAOLING; YANG, CHENG; HUANG, LINJIE; CHEN, MING; SHI, JIANTING; OUYANG, LIHUA; TANG, TIANTIAN; ZHANG, WEI; LI, YIQUN; LIANG, RUIYUN; JIANG, SHANPING

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and synthetic function (i.e. the capacity to release numerous chemokines and cytokines) of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) are important in airway remodeling induced by cigarette smoke exposure. However, the molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 7 (TRPM7) is expressed ubiquitously and is crucial for the cellular physiological function of many cell types. The present study aimed to detect the expression of TRPM7 in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats and determine the importance of TRPM7 in proliferation and interleukin-8 (IL-8) release. ASMCs were isolated and cultured from smoke-exposed rats. Expression levels of TRPM7 were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 was silenced with TRPM7-short hairpin RNA lentivirus vector. DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release of ASMCs induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed using [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay, hemocytometer and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. It was determined that mRNA and protein expression levels of TRPM7 were increased in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. Stimulation with CSE or TNF-α elevated DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release were more marked in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. Silencing of TRPM7 reduced DNA synthesis, cell number and IL-8 release induced by CSE or TNF-α in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats. In conclusion, expression of TRPM7 increased significantly in ASMCs from smoke-exposed rats and the upregulation of TRPM7 led to augmented cell proliferation and IL-8 release in ASMCs from rats exposed to cigarette smoke. PMID:27108806

  16. Propofol protects against opioid-induced hyperresponsiveness of airway smooth muscle in a horse model of target-controlled infusion anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Calzetta, Luigino; Soggiu, Alessio; Roncada, Paola; Bonizzi, Luigi; Pistocchini, Elena; Urbani, Andrea; Rinaldi, Barbara; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2015-10-15

    General anaesthesia in horses is associated with elevated mortality rate in subjects suffering of heaves. Target-controlled infusion (TCI) of sedative-hypnotic medications and opioids represents a total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) method validated in veterinary medicine. Since there are no data concerning the impact of these classes of drugs in inducing bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) in horses, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect propofol and remifentanil on the contractile response of equine airway smooth muscle. The influence of propofol and remifentanil on the contractile response of equine isolated bronchi to electrical field stimulation (EFS) was assessed. The role of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and neurokinin 2 (NK2) receptor was also assessed. The interaction analysis was performed by Bliss Independence theory. Experiments were repeated in desensitized and passively sensitized airways. Remifentanil induced BHR in both non-sensitized and passively sensitized bronchi, (+56.33±8.01% and +99.10±14.52%, respectively; P<0.01 vs. control) and propofol significantly prevented this effect (P>0.05 vs. remifentanil). The inactivation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves via desensitization and blocking NK2 receptor inhibited the BHR remifentanil-induced (P>0.05 vs. controls). The inhibition of iNOS reverted the protective effect of propofol on the BHR induced by remifentanil (non-sensitized: +47.11±7.70%; passively sensitized: +70.51±11.39%; P<0.05 vs. control). Propofol synergistically interacted (overall ≈40%) in preventing the remifentanil-induced BHR. Remifentanil induces BHR via stimulating capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves that facilitate the cholinergic neurotransmission through the activation of NK2 receptor. The propofol/remifentanil combination may be safely administered in course of TCI-TIVA procedures also in heaves affected horses.

  17. Indirect airway challenges.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; O'Connor, B; Anderson, S D; Chung, F; Cockcroft, D W; Dahlén, B; DiMaria, G; Foresi, A; Hargreave, F E; Holgate, S T; Inman, M; Lötvall, J; Magnussen, H; Polosa, R; Postma, D S; Riedler, J

    2003-06-01

    Indirect challenges act by causing the release of endogenous mediators that cause the airway smooth muscle to contract. This is in contrast to the direct challenges where agonists such as methacholine or histamine cause airflow limitation predominantly via a direct effect on airway smooth muscle. Direct airway challenges have been used widely and are well standardised. They are highly sensitive, but not specific to asthma and can be used to exclude current asthma in a clinic population. Indirect bronchial stimuli, in particular exercise, hyperventilation, hypertonic aerosols, as well as adenosine, may reflect more directly the ongoing airway inflammation and are therefore more specific to identify active asthma. They are increasingly used to evaluate the prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and to assess specific problems in patients with known asthma, e.g. exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, evaluation before scuba diving. Direct bronchial responsiveness is only slowly and to a modest extent, influenced by repeated administration of inhaled steroids. Indirect challenges may reflect more closely acute changes in airway inflammation and a change in responsiveness to an indirect stimulus may be a clinically relevant marker to assess the clinical course of asthma. Moreover, some of the indirect challenges, e.g. hypertonic saline and mannitol, can be combined with the assessment of inflammatory cells by induction of sputum.

  18. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  19. Activation of muscarinic receptors in porcine airway smooth muscle elicits a transient increase in phospholipase D activity.

    PubMed

    Mamoon, A M; Smith, J; Baker, R C; Farley, J M

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is a phosphodiesterase that catalyses hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid and choline. In the presence of ethanol, PLD also catalyses the formation of phosphatidylethanol, which is a unique characteristic of this enzyme. Muscarinic receptor-induced changes in the activity of PLD were investigated in porcine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring the formation of [3H]phosphatidic acid ([3H]PA) and [3H]phosphatidylethanol ([3H]PEth) after labeling the muscle strips with [3H]palmitic acid. The cholinergic receptor agonist acetylcholine (Ach) significantly but transiently increased formation of both [3H]PA and [3H]PEth in a concentration-dependent manner (>105-400% vs. controls in the presence of 10(-6) to 10(-4) M Ach) when pretreated with 100 mM ethanol. The Ach receptor-mediated increase in PLD activity was inhibited by atropine (10(-6) M), indicating that activation of PLD occurred via muscarinic receptors. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) increased PLD activity that was effectively blocked by the PKC inhibitors calphostin C (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) and GFX (10(-8) to 10(-6) M). Ach-induced increases in PLD activity were also significantly, but incompletely, inhibited by both GFX and calphostin C. From the present data, we conclude that in tracheal smooth muscle, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-induced PLD activation is transient in nature and coupled to these receptors via PKC. However, PKC activation is not solely responsible for Ach-induced activation of PLD in porcine tracheal smooth muscle.

  20. Silver nanoparticles induce anti-proliferative effects on airway smooth muscle cells. Role of nitric oxide and muscarinic receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Lee, Manuel A; Rosas-Hernández, Héctor; Salazar-García, Samuel; Gutiérrez-Hernández, José Manuel; Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo; González, Francisco J; Ali, Syed F; González, Carmen

    2014-01-13

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are used to manufacture materials with new properties and functions. However, little is known about their toxic or beneficial effects on human health, especially in the respiratory system, where its smooth muscle (ASM) regulates the airway contractility by different mediators, such as acetylcholine (ACh) and nitric oxide (NO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of AgNPs on ASM cells. Exposure to AgNPs induced ACh-independent expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at 100 μg/mL, associated with excessive production of NO. AgNPs induced the muscarinic receptor activation, since its blockage with atropine and blockage of its downstream signaling pathway inhibited the NO production. AgNPs at 10 and 100 μg/mL induced ACh-independent prolonged cytotoxicity and decreased cellular proliferation mediated by the muscarinic receptor-iNOS pathway. However, the concentration of 100 μg/mL of AgNPs induced muscarinic receptor-independent apoptosis, suggesting the activation of multiple pathways. These data indicate that AgNPs induce prolonged cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on ASM cells, suggesting an activation of the muscarinic receptor-iNOS pathway. Further investigation is required to understand the full mechanisms of action of AgNPs on ASM under specific biological conditions.

  1. Long Term and Standard Incubations of WST-1 Reagent Reflect the Same Inhibitory Trend of Cell Viability in Rat Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lei-Miao; Wei, Yin; Wang, Yu; Xu, Yu-Dong; Yang, Yong-Qing

    2013-01-01

    The WST-1 assay is an efficient test for cell viability measurement and the standard incubation time is 2h. In order to test if one-time addition of WST-1 reagent can reflect the relative cell viability trend of the testing agents at different time points, the effects of 2h standard incubation time and long term incubation time (2h+24h, 2h+48h) of WST-1 were compared in the rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASM cells) after adding of the testing protein MRP-14. Our study demonstrated that the effect of different dosages of the protein after 2h WST-1 incubation on ASM cells showed a tendency of inhibition and achieved the maximal inhibition effect at 72h. The relative cell viability trend of the 2h+24h group was the same to that of the 2h WST-1 incubation, which means that 24h prolonged incubation time of WST-1 reagent could still reflect the relative cell viability trend. In conclusion, the study suggested that the WST-1 is a proper candidate reagent for continuous monitation of cell viability. PMID:23289007

  2. A new class of nitric oxide-releasing derivatives of cetirizine; pharmacological profile in vascular and airway smooth muscle preparations

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, A-K; Fumagalli, F; DiGennaro, A; Andersson, M; Lundberg, J; Edenius, C; Govoni, M; Monopoli, A; Sala, A; Dahlén, S-E; Folco, G C

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: The pharmacological properties of compounds NCX 1512 and NCX 1514, synthesized by linking the histamine H1-receptor antagonist cetirizine to NO-releasing spacer groups, are reported. The aim was to establish if the compounds retained the antihistamine action of the parent compound, to assess their efficacy as NO donors and to test if they had broader antiallergic activity than cetirizine in the lung. Experimental approach: Antihistamine activity of NCX 1512 and NCX 1514 was investigated in vitro in the guinea pig ileum, in tracheal rings (GPTR) and lung parenchymal strips (GPLP) of the guinea-pig. The NO-releasing capacity was investigated in vascular preparations; the isolated rabbit and guinea-pig aorta and guinea-pig pulmonary artery. Kinetics of NO release were assessed in a rat whole blood assay. Key results: Both NCX 1512 and NCX 1514 retained activity as H1-receptor antagonists in the guinea pig ileum and airway preparations. The NO-releasing NCX compounds relaxed the rabbit aorta, an action prevented by the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (10 μM). NCX 1512 and NCX 1514 did not relax the antigen (ovalbumin) pre-contracted GPTR, whereas the NO donors NCX 2057 and DEA-NONOate relaxed guinea-pig pre-contracted vascular and tracheal preparations. Cetirizine (1–100 μM) and NCX 1512 (1–100 μM) reduced the cumulative (0.01–100 μg ml−1) ovalbumin-induced constriction in GPTR, but had no significant effect in GPLP. Conclusions and implications: NCX 1512 and NCX 1514 act as antihistamines and NO donors. However, there was no improved effect compared to cetirizine on antigen-induced constriction of the central and peripheral lung. PMID:17351654

  3. Differential effects of respiratory and electrical stimulation-induced dilator muscle contraction on mechanical properties of the pharynx in the pig.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, A; Dotan, Y; Samri, M; Schwartz, A R; Oliven, A

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory stimulation (RS) during sleep often fails to discontinue flow limitation, whereas electrical stimulation (ES) of the hypoglossus (HG) nerve frequently prevents obstruction. The present work compares the effects of RS and HG-ES on pharyngeal mechanics and the relative contribution of tongue muscles and thoracic forces to pharyngeal patency. We determined the pressure-area relationship of the collapsible segment of the pharynx in anesthetized pigs under the following three conditions: baseline (BL), RS induced by partial obstruction of the tracheostomy tube, and HG-ES. Parameters were obtained also after transection of the neck muscles and the trachea (NMT) and after additional bilateral HG transection (HGT). In addition, we measured the force produced by in situ isolated geniohyoid (GH) during RS and HG-ES. Intense RS was recognized by large negative intrathoracic pressures and triggered high phasic genioglossus and GH EMG activity. GH contraction produced during maximal RS less than a quarter of the force obtained during HG-ES. The major finding of the study was that RS and ES differed in the mechanism by which they stabilized the pharynx: RS lowered the pressure-area slope, i.e., reduced pharyngeal compliance (14.1 ± 2.9 to 9.2 ± 1.9 mm(2)/cmH2O, P < 0.01). HG-ES shifted the slope toward lower pressures, i.e., lowered the calculated extraluminal pressure (17.4 ± 5.8 to 9.2 ± 7.4 cmH2O, P < 0.01). Changes during RS and HG-ES were not affected by NMT, but the effect of RS decreased significantly after HGT. In conclusion, HG-ES and RS affect the pharyngeal site of collapse differently. Tongue muscle contraction contributes to pharyngeal stiffening during RS. PMID:27311440

  4. Effects of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-13 on stromal interaction molecule-1 aggregation in human airway smooth muscle intracellular Ca(2+) regulation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Li; Delmotte, Philippe; Aravamudan, Bharathi; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S; Sieck, Gary C

    2013-10-01

    Inflammation elevates intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) concentrations in airway smooth muscle (ASM). Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is an important source of [Ca(2+)]i mediated by stromal interaction molecule-1 (STIM1), a sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) protein. In transducing SR Ca(2+) depletion, STIM1 aggregates to form puncta, thereby activating SOCE via interactions with a Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) channel protein (Orai1) in the plasma membrane. We hypothesized that STIM1 aggregation is enhanced by inflammatory cytokines, thereby augmenting SOCE in human ASM cells. We used real-time fluorescence microscopic imaging to assess the dynamics of STIM1 aggregation and SOCE after exposure to TNF-α or IL-13 in ASM cells overexpressing yellow fluorescent protein-tagged wild-type STIM1 (WT-STIM1) and STIM1 mutants lacking the Ca(2+)-sensing EF-hand (STIM1-D76A), or lacking the cytoplasmic membrane binding site (STIM1ΔK). STIM1 aggregation was analyzed by monitoring puncta size during the SR Ca(2+) depletion induced by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). We found that puncta size was increased in cells expressing WT-STIM1 after CPA. However, STIM1-D76A constitutively formed puncta, whereas STIM1ΔK failed to form puncta. Furthermore, cytokines increased basal WT-STIM1 puncta size, and the SOCE triggered by SR Ca(2+) depletion was increased in cells expressing WT-STIM1 or STIM1-D76A. Meanwhile, SOCE in cells expressing STIM1ΔK and STIM1 short, interfering RNA (siRNA) was decreased. Similarly, in cells overexpressing STIM1, the siRNA knockdown of Orai1 blunted SOCE. However, exposure to cytokines increased SOCE in all cells, increased basal [Ca(2+)]i, and decreased SR Ca(2+) content. These data suggest that cytokines induce a constitutive increase in STIM1 aggregation that contributes to enhanced SOCE in human ASM after inflammation. Such effects of inflammation on STIM1 aggregations may contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:23713409

  5. Tongue Protrusion Strength in Arousal State Is Predictive of the Airway Patency in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Kanezaki, Masashi; Ogawa, Teruhiro; Izumi, Tadafumi

    2015-01-01

    Contraction of the genioglossus affects either tongue protrusion strength or dilating forces of the upper airway. The upper airway in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is thought to collapse during sleep, at least in part because of a sleep related reduction in genioglossus muscle activity. Thus, although tongue protrusion strength by genioglossus activity during sleep contributes to the maintenance of airway patency in patients with OSA, the relationship between tongue protrusion strength in the arousal state and obstructive sleep apnea has not been fully elucidated. Conventional method of tongue protrusion strength cannot be used to evaluate in edentulous subjects and/or subjects with the decreased biting force. In this study, employing a novel measurement method that does not require biting a transducer, we investigated relationships between the tongue protrusion strength and polysomnographic findings. We enrolled twenty normal subjects and 26 subjects with OSA. All subjects completed the measurement of tongue protrusion strength. Each subject with OSA was evaluated by full polysomnography. The degree of tongue protrusion strength was assessed by maximum voluntary contraction against the tongue depressor connected with a strain gauge dynamometer. The tongue protrusion strength was negatively correlated with obstructive apnea time, apnea index (AI) and the percent of sleep stage 2 (r = -0.61, p < 0.0001, r = -0.41 p = 0.03 and r = -0.39 p = 0.04, respectively). Tongue protrusion strength measured in the arousal state is predictive of the airway patency during sleep in OSA.

  6. Role of cyclo-oxygenase-2 induction in interleukin-1β induced attenuation of cultured human airway smooth muscle cell cyclic AMP generation in response to isoprenaline

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Linhua; Holland, Elaine; Knox, Alan J

    1998-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) in human asthma shows reduced relaxation and cyclic AMP generation in response to β-adrenoceptor agonists. IL-β attenuates cyclic AMP generation but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We have reported that IL-1β induces cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human ASM cells and results in a marked increase in prostanoid generation with PGE2 and PGI2 as the major products.We investigated the role of COX-2 induction and prostanoid release (measured as PGE2) in IL-1β induced attenuation of cyclic AMP generation in response to the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline (ISO).Pre-treatment of human ASM cells with IL-1β significantly attenuated cyclic AMP generation in response to high concentrations of ISO (1.0–10.0 μM) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The effect was accompanied by a high concentration of PGE2 release. The non-selective COX inhibitor indomethacin (Ind), the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398, the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide (CHX) and actinomycin D and the steroid dexamethasone (Dex) all abolished the PGE2 release and prevented the attenuated cyclic AMP generation.COX substrate arachidonic acid time- and concentration-dependently mimicked IL-1β induced attenuation and the effect was prevented by the non-selective COX inhibitors Ind and flurbiprofen, but not by NS-398, CHX and Dex.In contrast to IL-1β, TNFα and IFNγ, which are ineffective in inducing COX-2 and releasing PGE2 from human ASM cells, did not affect the cyclic AMP formation.Our study demonstrates that COX-2 induction and the consequent release of prostanoids plays a crucial role in IL-1β induced attenuation of human ASM cell cyclic AMP response to ISO. PMID:9863663

  7. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca2+ channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María; Montaño, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway.

  9. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibits L-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensitized Guinea Pig Airway Smooth Muscle through ERK 1/2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reyes-García, Jorge; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Sommer, Bettina; Díaz-Hernández, Verónica; García-Hernández, Luz María; Montaño, Luis M

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a potent proinflammatory cytokine that plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of asthma by inducing hyperresponsiveness and airway remodeling. TNF-α diminishes the L-type voltage dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) current in cardiac myocytes, an observation that seems paradoxical. In guinea pig sensitized tracheas KCl responses were lower than in control tissues. Serum from sensitized animals (Ser-S) induced the same phenomenon. In tracheal myocytes from nonsensitized (NS) and sensitized (S) guinea pigs, an L-VDCC current (ICa) was observed and diminished by Ser-S. The same decrease was detected in NS myocytes incubated with TNF-α, pointing out that this cytokine might be present in Ser-S. We observed that a small-molecule inhibitor of TNF-α (SMI-TNF) and a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) antagonist (WP9QY) reversed ICa decrease induced by Ser-S in NS myocytes, confirming the former hypothesis. U0126 (a blocker of ERK 1/2 kinase) also reverted the decrease in ICa. Neither cycloheximide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) nor actinomycin D (a transcription inhibitor) showed any effect on the TNF-α-induced ICa reduction. We found that CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 mRNA and proteins were expressed in tracheal myocytes and that sensitization did not modify them. In cardiac myocytes, ERK 1/2 phosphorylates two sites of the L-VDCC, augmenting or decreasing ICa; we postulate that, in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, TNF-α diminishes ICa probably by phosphorylating the L-VDCC site that reduces its activity through the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway. PMID:27445440

  10. LncRNAs BCYRN1 promoted the proliferation and migration of rat airway smooth muscle cells in asthma via upregulating the expression of transient receptor potential 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Luo-Xian; Tian, Cui-Jie; Tang, Xue-Yi; Zhao, Li-Min; Guo, Ya-Li; Cheng, Dong-Jun; Chen, Xian-Liang; Ma, Li-Jun; Chen, Zhuo-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) played important roles in several biological processes through regulating the expression of protein. However, the function of lncRNA BCYRN1 in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) has not been reported. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into control and asthma groups and the ovalbumin (OVA) model was constructed. The expression of BCYRN1 and transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) were detected in the ASMCs separated from these rats. Then 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-1) assay, Roche real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) DP assay and Transwell cell migration assay were performed to detect the effect of BCYRN1 on the viability/proliferation and migration of ASMCs. RNA pull-down assays and RNA immunoprecipitation assay were used to identify and verify the binding between BCYRN1 and TRPC1. Inspiratory resistance and expiratory resistance were measured in OVA challenged rats with BCYRN1 knockdown. Results: We foundthe high expression of BCYRN1 and TRPC1 in asthma groups and ASMCs treated with PDGF-BB. Overexpression of BCYRN1 greatly promoted the proliferation and migration of ASMCs. In addition,TRPC1 overexpression reversed the function of si-BCYRN1 indecreasing the viability/proliferation and migration of ASMCs treated with PDGF-BB. BCYRN1 could up-regulate the protein level of TRPC1 through increasing the stability of TRPC1. Finally, we found that BCYRN1 knockdown reduced the inspiratory resistance and expiratory resistance in OVA challenged rats. Conclusion: Our study indicated that BCYRN1 promotedthe proliferation and migration of rat ASMCs in asthma via upregulating the expression of TRPC1. PMID:27648131

  11. Divergent modulation of Rho‐kinase and Ca2+ influx pathways by Src family kinases and focal adhesion kinase in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shaifta, Yasin; Irechukwu, Nneka; Prieto‐Lloret, Jesus; MacKay, Charles E; Marchon, Keisha A; Ward, Jeremy P T

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The importance of tyrosine kinases in airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Src‐family kinases (SrcFK) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in GPCR‐mediated ASM contraction and associated signalling events. Experimental Approach Contraction was recorded in intact or α‐toxin permeabilized rat bronchioles. Phosphorylation of SrcFK, FAK, myosin light‐chain‐20 (MLC20) and myosin phosphatase targeting subunit‐1 (MYPT‐1) was evaluated in cultured human ASM cells (hASMC). [Ca2+]i was evaluated in Fura‐2 loaded hASMC. Responses to carbachol (CCh) and bradykinin (BK) and the contribution of SrcFK and FAK to these responses were determined. Key Results Contractile responses in intact bronchioles were inhibited by antagonists of SrcFK, FAK and Rho‐kinase, while after α‐toxin permeabilization, they were sensitive to inhibition of SrcFK and Rho‐kinase, but not FAK. CCh and BK increased phosphorylation of MYPT‐1 and MLC20 and auto‐phosphorylation of SrcFK and FAK. MYPT‐1 phosphorylation was sensitive to inhibition of Rho‐kinase and SrcFK, but not FAK. Contraction induced by SR Ca2+ depletion and equivalent [Ca2+]i responses in hASMC were sensitive to inhibition of both SrcFK and FAK, while depolarization‐induced contraction was sensitive to FAK inhibition only. SrcFK auto‐phosphorylation was partially FAK‐dependent, while FAK auto‐phosphorylation was SrcFK‐independent. Conclusions and Implications SrcFK mediates Ca2+‐sensitization in ASM, while SrcFK and FAK together and individually influence multiple Ca2+ influx pathways. Tyrosine phosphorylation is therefore a key upstream signalling event in ASM contraction and may be a viable target for modulating ASM tone in respiratory disease. PMID:26294392

  12. Plasminogen-stimulated airway smooth muscle cell proliferation is mediated by urokinase and annexin A2, involving plasmin-activated cell signalling

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A G; Xia, Y C; Harris, T; Royce, S; Hamilton, J A; Schuliga, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The conversion of plasminogen into plasmin by interstitial urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) is potentially important in asthma pathophysiology. In this study, the effect of uPA-mediated plasminogen activation on airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation was investigated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Human ASM cells were incubated with plasminogen (0.5–50 μg·mL−1) or plasmin (0.5–50 mU·mL−1) in the presence of pharmacological inhibitors, including UK122, an inhibitor of uPA. Proliferation was assessed by increases in cell number or MTT reduction after 48 h incubation with plasmin(ogen), and by earlier increases in [3H]-thymidine incorporation and cyclin D1 expression. KEY RESULTS Plasminogen (5 μg·mL−1)-stimulated increases in cell proliferation were attenuated by UK122 (10 μM) or by transfection with uPA gene-specific siRNA. Exogenous plasmin (5 mU·mL−1) also stimulated increases in cell proliferation. Inhibition of plasmin-stimulated ERK1/2 or PI3K/Akt signalling attenuated plasmin-stimulated increases in ASM proliferation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of cell signalling mediated by the EGF receptor, a receptor trans-activated by plasmin, also reduced plasmin(ogen)-stimulated cell proliferation. Knock down of annexin A2, which has dual roles in both plasminogen activation and plasmin-signal transduction, also attenuated ASM cell proliferation following incubation with either plasminogen or plasmin. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Plasminogen stimulates ASM cell proliferation in a manner mediated by uPA and involving multiple signalling pathways downstream of plasmin. Targeting mediators of plasminogen-evoked ASM responses, such as uPA or annexin A2, may be useful in the treatment of asthma. PMID:24111848

  13. The small heat shock-related protein, HSP20, is a cAMP-dependent protein kinase substrate that is involved in airway smooth muscle relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Komalavilas, Padmini; Penn, Raymond B.; Flynn, Charles R.; Thresher, Jeffrey; Lopes, Luciana B.; Furnish, Elizabeth J.; Guo, Manhong; Pallero, Manuel A.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Brophy, Colleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the cAMP/cAMP-dependent PKA pathway leads to relaxation of airway smooth muscle (ASM). The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the small heat shock-related protein HSP20 in mediating PKA-dependent ASM relaxation. Human ASM cells were engineered to constitutively express a green fluorescent protein-PKA inhibitory fusion protein (PKI-GFP) or GFP alone. Activation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathways by isoproterenol (ISO) or forskolin led to increases in the phosphorylation of HSP20 in GFP but not PKI-GFP cells. Forskolin treatment in GFP but not PKI-GFP cells led to a loss of central actin stress fibers and decreases in the number of focal adhesion complexes. This loss of stress fibers was associated with dephosphorylation of the actin-depolymerizing protein cofilin in GFP but not PKI-GFP cells. To confirm that phosphorylated HSP20 plays a role in PKA-induced ASM relaxation, intact strips of bovine ASM were precontracted with serotonin followed by ISO. Activation of the PKA pathway led to relaxation of bovine ASM, which was associated with phosphorylation of HSP20 and dephosphorylation of cofilin. Finally, treatment with phosphopeptide mimetics of HSP20 possessing a protein transduction domain partially relaxed precontracted bovine ASM strips. In summary, ISO-induced phosphorylation of HSP20 or synthetic phosphopeptide analogs of HSP20 decreases phosphorylation of cofilin and disrupts actin in ASM, suggesting that one possible mechanism by which HSP20 mediates ASM relaxation is via regulation of actin filament dynamics. PMID:17993590

  14. LncRNAs BCYRN1 promoted the proliferation and migration of rat airway smooth muscle cells in asthma via upregulating the expression of transient receptor potential 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Luo-Xian; Tian, Cui-Jie; Tang, Xue-Yi; Zhao, Li-Min; Guo, Ya-Li; Cheng, Dong-Jun; Chen, Xian-Liang; Ma, Li-Jun; Chen, Zhuo-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) played important roles in several biological processes through regulating the expression of protein. However, the function of lncRNA BCYRN1 in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) has not been reported. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into control and asthma groups and the ovalbumin (OVA) model was constructed. The expression of BCYRN1 and transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) were detected in the ASMCs separated from these rats. Then 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (WST-1) assay, Roche real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) DP assay and Transwell cell migration assay were performed to detect the effect of BCYRN1 on the viability/proliferation and migration of ASMCs. RNA pull-down assays and RNA immunoprecipitation assay were used to identify and verify the binding between BCYRN1 and TRPC1. Inspiratory resistance and expiratory resistance were measured in OVA challenged rats with BCYRN1 knockdown. Results: We foundthe high expression of BCYRN1 and TRPC1 in asthma groups and ASMCs treated with PDGF-BB. Overexpression of BCYRN1 greatly promoted the proliferation and migration of ASMCs. In addition,TRPC1 overexpression reversed the function of si-BCYRN1 indecreasing the viability/proliferation and migration of ASMCs treated with PDGF-BB. BCYRN1 could up-regulate the protein level of TRPC1 through increasing the stability of TRPC1. Finally, we found that BCYRN1 knockdown reduced the inspiratory resistance and expiratory resistance in OVA challenged rats. Conclusion: Our study indicated that BCYRN1 promotedthe proliferation and migration of rat ASMCs in asthma via upregulating the expression of TRPC1.

  15. Theophylline Represses IL-8 Secretion from Airway Smooth Muscle Cells Independently of Phosphodiesterase Inhibition. Novel Role as a Protein Phosphatase 2A Activator.

    PubMed

    Patel, Brijeshkumar S; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Rumzhum, Nowshin N; Oliver, Brian G; Verrills, Nicole M; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-06-01

    Theophylline is an old drug experiencing a renaissance owing to its beneficial antiinflammatory effects in chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Multiple modes of antiinflammatory action have been reported, including inhibition of the enzymes that degrade cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE). Using primary cultures of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, we recently revealed that PDE4 inhibitors can potentiate the antiinflammatory action of β2-agonists by augmenting cAMP-dependent expression of the phosphatase that deactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-MAPK phosphatase (MKP)-1. Therefore, the aim of this study was to address whether theophylline repressed cytokine production in a similar, PDE-dependent, MKP-1-mediated manner. Notably, theophylline did not potentiate cAMP release from ASM cells treated with the long-acting β2-agonist formoterol. Moreover, theophylline (0.1-10 μM) did not increase formoterol-induced MKP-1 messenger RNA expression nor protein up-regulation, consistent with the lack of cAMP generation. However, theophylline (at 10 μM) was antiinflammatory and repressed secretion of the neutrophil chemoattractant cytokine IL-8, which is produced in response to TNF-α. Because theophylline's effects were independent of PDE4 inhibition or antiinflammatory MKP-1, we then wished to elucidate the novel mechanisms responsible. We investigated the impact of theophylline on protein phosphatase (PP) 2A, a master controller of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways, and show that theophylline increases TNF-α-induced PP2A activity in ASM cells. Confirmatory results were obtained in A549 lung epithelial cells. PP2A activators have beneficial effects in ex vivo and in vivo models of respiratory disease. Thus, our study is the first to link theophylline with PP2A activation as a novel mechanism to control respiratory inflammation.

  16. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  17. Coronary-bronchial blood flow and airway dimensions in exercise-induced syndromes.

    PubMed

    White, S W; Pitsillides, K F; Parsons, G H; Hayes, S G; Gunther, R A; Cottee, D B

    2001-01-01

    1. We have an incomplete understanding of integrative cardiopulmonary control during exercise and particularly during the postexercise period, when symptoms and signs of myocardial ischaemia and exercise-induced asthma not present during exercise may appear. 2. The hypothesis is advanced that baroreflex de-resetting during exercise recovery is normally associated with (i) a dominant sympathetic vasoconstrictor effect in the coronary circulation, which, when associated with obstructive coronary disease, may initiate a potentially positive-feedback cardiocardiac sympathetic reflex (variable myocardial ischaemia with symptoms and signs); and (ii) a dominant parasympathetic bronchoconstrictor effect in the presence of bronchovascular dilatation, which, when associated with raised mediator release in the bronchial wall, reinforces the tendency for airway obstruction (variable dyspnoea results). 3. There is a need for new techniques to examine hypotheses concerning autonomic control, during and after exercise, of the coronary and bronchial circulations and the dimensions of airways. Accordingly, a new ultrasonic instrument has been designed named an 'Airways Internal Diameter Assessment (AIDA) Sonomicrometer'. It combines pulsed Doppler flowmetry with transit-time sonomicrometry of airway circumference and single-crystal sonomicrometry of airway wall thickness. Initial evaluation suggests it is relatively easy to apply during thoracotomy in recovery animals. The component devices are linear and will measure target variables with excellent accuracy. 4. In anaesthetized sheep, intubated with controlled ventilation, intravenous isoproterenol causes large increases in bronchial blood flow, a fall in arterial pressure and a reduction in airway circumference. This may reflect the dominant action of reflex vagal activity over direct beta-adrenoceptor inhibition of bronchial smooth muscle, the reflex source being baroreflex secondary to the fall in arterial pressure. These

  18. Analysis of the interplay between neurochemical control of respiration and upper airway mechanics producing upper airway obstruction during sleep in humans.

    PubMed

    Longobardo, G S; Evangelisti, C J; Cherniack, N S

    2008-02-01

    Increased loop gain (a function of both controller gain and plant gain), which results in instability in feedback control, is of major importance in producing recurrent central apnoeas during sleep but its role in causing obstructive apnoeas is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of loop gain in producing obstructive sleep apnoeas. Owing to the complexity of factors that may operate to produce obstruction during sleep, we used a mathematical model to sort them out. The model used was based on our previous model of neurochemical control of breathing, which included the effects of chemical stimuli and changes in alertness on respiratory pattern generator activity. To this we added a model of the upper airways that contained a narrowed section which behaved as a compressible elastic tube and was tethered during inspiration by the contraction of the upper airway dilator muscles. These muscles in the model, as in life, responded to changes in hypoxia, hypercapnia and alertness in a manner similar to the action of the chest wall muscles, opposing the compressive action caused by the negative intraluminal pressure generated during inspiration which was magnified by the Bernoulli Effect. As the velocity of inspiratory airflow increased, with sufficiently large increase in airflow velocity, obstruction occurred. Changes in breathing after sleep onset were simulated. The simulations showed that increases in controller gain caused the more rapid onset of obstructive apnoeas. Apnoea episodes were terminated by arousal. With a constant controller gain, as stiffness decreased, obstructed breaths appeared and periods of obstruction recurred longer after sleep onset before disappearing. Decreased controller gain produced, for example, by breathing oxygen eliminated the obstructive apnoeas resulting from moderate reductions in constricted segment stiffness. This became less effective as stiffness was reduced more. Contraction of the upper airway muscles

  19. A Mechanism for Upper Airway Stability during Slow Wave Sleep

    PubMed Central

    McSharry, David G.; Saboisky, Julian P.; DeYoung, Pam; Matteis, Paul; Jordan, Amy S.; Trinder, John; Smales, Erik; Hess, Lauren; Guo, Mengshuang; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: The severity of obstructive sleep apnea is diminished (sometimes markedly) during slow wave sleep (SWS). We sought to understand why SWS stabilizes the upper airway. Increased single motor unit (SMU) activity of the major upper airway dilating muscle (genioglossus) should improve upper airway stability. Therefore, we hypothesized that genioglossus SMUs would increase their activity during SWS in comparison with Stage N2 sleep. Design: The activity of genioglossus SMUs was studied on both sides of the transition between Stage N2 sleep and SWS. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Twenty-nine subjects (age 38 ± 13 yr, 17 males) were studied. Intervention: SWS. Measurement and Results: Subjects slept overnight with fine-wire electrodes in their genioglossus muscles and with full polysomnographic and end tidal carbon dioxide monitors. Fifteen inspiratory phasic (IP) and 11 inspiratory tonic (IT) units were identified from seven subjects and these units exhibited significantly increased inspiratory discharge frequencies during SWS compared with Stage N2 sleep. The peak discharge frequency of the inspiratory units (IP and IT) was 22.7 ± 4.1 Hz in SWS versus 20.3 ± 4.5 Hz in Stage N2 (P < 0.001). The IP units also fired for a longer duration (expressed as a percentage of inspiratory time) during SWS (104.6 ± 39.5 %TI) versus Stage N2 sleep (82.6 ± 39.5 %TI, P < 0.001). The IT units fired faster during expiration in SWS (14.2 ± 1.8 Hz) versus Stage N2 sleep (12.6 ± 3.1 Hz, P = 0.035). There was minimal recruitment or derecruitment of units between SWS and Stage N2 sleep. Conclusion: Increased genioglossus SMU activity likely makes the airway more stable and resistant to collapse throughout the respiratory cycle during SWS. Citation: McSharry DG; Saboisky JP; DeYoung P; Matteis P; Jordan AS; Trinder J; Smales E; Hess L; Guo M; Malhotra A. A mechanism for upper airway stability during slow wave sleep. SLEEP 2013;36(4):555-563. PMID:23565001

  20. Incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abelmann, Walter H.

    1985-01-01

    Full reliable data on the incidence and prevalence of dilated cardiomyopathy are not available. In the United States, at least 0.7% of cardiac deaths are attributable to cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy probably contributes the great majority of these cases. The mortality rate for cardiomyopathy in males is twice that of females, and for blacks it is 2.4 times that of whites. Cardiomyopathy was diagnosed in 0.67% of patients discharged from hospitals in 1979 with diagnoses of disease of the circulatory system. Cardiomyopathy accounted for 1% of general cardiologists' and for 7% of academic cardiologists' patient encounters. In Scandinavia, population surveys suggested an annual incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy ranging from 0.73 to 7.5 cases per 100,000 population; for Tokyo this figure is 2.6. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy in underdeveloped and in tropical countries is considerably higher than in developed countries.

  1. Physiologic, metabolic, and muscle fiber type characteristics of musculus uvulae in sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and in snorers.

    PubMed Central

    Sériès, F; Côté, C; Simoneau, J A; Gélinas, Y; St Pierre, S; Leclerc, J; Ferland, R; Marc, I

    1995-01-01

    Upper airway dilator muscles play an important role in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (SAHS). The mechanical and structural characteristics of these muscles remain unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the physiologic, metabolic, and fiber type characteristics of one upper airway dilator muscle (musculus uvulae, MU) in 11 SAHS and in seven nonapneic snorers. The different analyses were done on MU obtained during uvulo-palato-pharyngoplasty. Snorers and SAHS differed only in their apnea + hypopnea indices (11.5 +/- 5.9 and 34.2 +/- 14.6/h, respectively, mean +/- SD). Absolute twitch and tetanic tension production of MU was significantly greater in SAHS than in snorers while the fatigability index was similar in the two groups. Protein content and anaerobic enzyme activities of MU were significantly greater in SAHS than in snorers; no difference was observed for aerobic enzyme activities. The total muscle fiber cross-sectional area of MU was significantly higher in SAHS (2.2 +/- 0.9 mm2) than in snorers (1.1 +/- 0.7 mm2). The surface occupied by type IIA muscle fibers of MU was larger in SAHS (2.00 +/- 0.96) than in snorers (0.84 +/- 0.63 mm2). We conclude that the capacity for tension production and the anaerobic metabolic activity of MU are greater in SAHS than in snorers. PMID:7814616

  2. Prospective randomized comparison of progressive dilational vs forceps dilational percutaneous tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, E; Cantais, E; Goutorbe, P; Salinier, L; Palmier, B

    2006-02-01

    This trial prospectively compares two methods of percutaneous tracheostomy, both routinely used in ICU: the Ciaglia progressive dilational tracheostomy and the Griggs forceps dilational tracheostomy. One hundred patients were randomized using a single-blinded envelope method to receive progressive or forceps percutaneous tracheostomy performed at the bedside. Operative time, the occurrence of hypoxaemia or hypercapnia and complications were recorded. The progressive technique took longer than the forceps technique (median 7 (range 2-26) vs. 4 (1-16) minutes, P = 0.0005). Hypercapnia occurred in both groups but was more marked with the progressive technique (56 (16) vs. 49 (13) mmHg, P = 0.0082). Minor complications (minor bleeding, transient hypoxaemia, damage to posterior tracheal wall without emphysema) were also more frequent with the progressive technique (31 vs. 9 complications, P < 0.0001). Six major complications occurred with the progressive technique, none with the forceps technique (P = 0.0085): tension pneumothorax, posterior tracheal wall injury with subcutaneous emphysema, loss of airway with hypoxaemia, loss of stoma with impossible re-catheterization, and two conversions to another technique. In conclusion, progressive dilational tracheostomy took longer, caused more hypercapnia and more minor and major difficulties than forceps dilational tracheostomy. PMID:16494150

  3. Chemoreceptor and vagal influences on genioglossal muscle responses to inspiratory resistive load.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, N P

    2004-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanisms underlying the involvement of upper airway dilating muscles in compensatory responses to added inspiratory resistive load. Experiments were performed in tracheostomized, anaesthetised rabbits. The effect of inspiratory resistive loading on the electromyographic activity of the genioglossus muscle, the major dilating muscle of the pharynx, was studied in vagotomized and vagally intact rabbits during spontaneous breathing with a hypoxic gas mixture (10% O(2) in N(2)) or oxygen. In the vagally intact animals the peak value and duration of genioglossus muscle inspiratory activity increased in the first loaded breath before any noticeable change in the arterial blood gases. Hyperoxia decreased, whereas hypoxia increased the immediate response of the genioglossus activity to inspiratory loading. Removal of vagal volume-related feedback (by vagotomy) significantly increased the genioglossus muscle activity; the increase being more under hypoxia than under hyperoxia. In contrast to vagally intact animals, there was no first-breath increase in genioglossus activity during loading. The results indicate that the immediate involvement of the genioglossus muscle in response to inspiratory resistive load is mediated by vagal-volume feedback. Baseline oxygen tension before loading modulates the immediate reflex vagal-related response of the genioglossus muscle. PMID:15611588

  4. Numerical simulation of pharyngeal airflow applied to obstructive sleep apnea: effect of the nasal cavity in anatomically accurate airway models.

    PubMed

    Cisonni, Julien; Lucey, Anthony D; King, Andrew J C; Islam, Syed Mohammed Shamsul; Lewis, Richard; Goonewardene, Mithran S

    2015-11-01

    Repetitive brief episodes of soft-tissue collapse within the upper airway during sleep characterize obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), an extremely common and disabling disorder. Failure to maintain the patency of the upper airway is caused by the combination of sleep-related loss of compensatory dilator muscle activity and aerodynamic forces promoting closure. The prediction of soft-tissue movement in patient-specific airway 3D mechanical models is emerging as a useful contribution to clinical understanding and decision making. Such modeling requires reliable estimations of the pharyngeal wall pressure forces. While nasal obstruction has been recognized as a risk factor for OSA, the need to include the nasal cavity in upper-airway models for OSA studies requires consideration, as it is most often omitted because of its complex shape. A quantitative analysis of the flow conditions generated by the nasal cavity and the sinuses during inspiration upstream of the pharynx is presented. Results show that adequate velocity boundary conditions and simple artificial extensions of the flow domain can reproduce the essential effects of the nasal cavity on the pharyngeal flow field. Therefore, the overall complexity and computational cost of accurate flow predictions can be reduced.

  5. Dilation and Curettage (D&C)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Dilation and Curettage (D&C) Home For Patients Search FAQs Dilation and ... FAQ062, February 2016 PDF Format Dilation and Curettage (D&C) Special Procedures What is dilation and curettage ( ...

  6. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD.

    PubMed

    Bidan, Cécile M; Veldsink, Annemiek C; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD.

  7. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  8. TNFα and IFNγ Synergistically Enhance Transcriptional Activation of CXCL10 in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells via STAT-1, NF-κB, and the Transcriptional Coactivator CREB-binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Deborah L.; Clifford, Rachel L.; Jindarat, Sarawut; Proud, David; Pang, Linhua; Belvisi, Maria; Knox, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Asthmatic airway smooth muscle (ASM) expresses interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (CXCL10), a chemokine known to mediate mast cell migration into ASM bundles that has been reported in the airways of asthmatic patients. CXCL10 is elevated in patients suffering from viral exacerbations of asthma and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diseases in which corticosteroids are largely ineffective. IFNγ and TNFα synergistically induce CXCL10 release from human ASM cells in a steroid-insensitive manner, via an as yet undefined mechanism. We report that TNFα activates the classical NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) pathway, whereas IFNγ activates JAK2/STAT-1α and that inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway is more effective in abrogating CXCL10 release than the steroid fluticasone. The synergy observed with TNFα and IFNγ together, however, did not lie at the level of NF-κB activation, STAT-1α phosphorylation, or in vivo binding of these transcription factors to the CXCL10 promoter. Stimulation of human ASM cells with TNFα and IFNγ induced histone H4 but not histone H3 acetylation at the CXCL10 promoter, although no synergism was observed when both cytokines were combined. We show, however, that TNFα and IFNγ exert a synergistic effect on the recruitment of CREB-binding protein (CBP) to the CXCL10, which is accompanied by increased RNA polymerase II. Our results provide evidence that synergism between TNFα and IFNγ lies at the level of coactivator recruitment in human ASM and suggest that inhibition of JAK/STAT signaling may be of therapeutic benefit in steroid-resistant airway disease. PMID:20833730

  9. TNFα and IFNγ synergistically enhance transcriptional activation of CXCL10 in human airway smooth muscle cells via STAT-1, NF-κB, and the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Deborah L; Clifford, Rachel L; Jindarat, Sarawut; Proud, David; Pang, Linhua; Belvisi, Maria; Knox, Alan J

    2010-09-17

    Asthmatic airway smooth muscle (ASM) expresses interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (CXCL10), a chemokine known to mediate mast cell migration into ASM bundles that has been reported in the airways of asthmatic patients. CXCL10 is elevated in patients suffering from viral exacerbations of asthma and in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diseases in which corticosteroids are largely ineffective. IFNγ and TNFα synergistically induce CXCL10 release from human ASM cells in a steroid-insensitive manner, via an as yet undefined mechanism. We report that TNFα activates the classical NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) pathway, whereas IFNγ activates JAK2/STAT-1α and that inhibition of the JAK/STAT pathway is more effective in abrogating CXCL10 release than the steroid fluticasone. The synergy observed with TNFα and IFNγ together, however, did not lie at the level of NF-κB activation, STAT-1α phosphorylation, or in vivo binding of these transcription factors to the CXCL10 promoter. Stimulation of human ASM cells with TNFα and IFNγ induced histone H4 but not histone H3 acetylation at the CXCL10 promoter, although no synergism was observed when both cytokines were combined. We show, however, that TNFα and IFNγ exert a synergistic effect on the recruitment of CREB-binding protein (CBP) to the CXCL10, which is accompanied by increased RNA polymerase II. Our results provide evidence that synergism between TNFα and IFNγ lies at the level of coactivator recruitment in human ASM and suggest that inhibition of JAK/STAT signaling may be of therapeutic benefit in steroid-resistant airway disease.

  10. Increased flow precedes remote arteriolar dilations for some microapplied agonists.

    PubMed

    Frame, M D

    2000-04-01

    This study asks which occurs first in time for remote responses: a dilation or a remote change in flow. Arteriolar diameter (approximately 20 microm) and fluorescently labeled red blood cell (RBC) velocity were measured in the cremaster muscle of anesthetized (pentobarbital sodium, 70 mg/kg) hamsters (n = 51). Arterioles were locally stimulated for 60 s with micropipette-applied 10 microg/ml LM-609 (alpha(v)beta(3)-integrin agonist), 10(-3) M adenosine, or 10(-3) M 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1, nitric oxide donor) as remote response agonists or with 10(-3) M papaverine, which dilates only locally. Observations were made at a remote site 1,200 microm upstream. With LM-609 or adenosine, the RBC velocity increased first (within 5 s), and the remote dilation followed 5-7 s later. N-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM) blocked the LM-609 (100%) and adenosine (60%) remote dilations. SIN-1 induced a concurrent remote dilation and decrease in RBC velocity (approximately 10 s), suggesting the primary signal was to dilate. Papaverine had no remote effects. This study suggests that, although remote responses to some agonists are induced by primary signals to dilate, additionally, network changes in flow can stimulate extensive remote changes in diameter.

  11. [The detection of biphasic reactivity of the airway by astograph].

    PubMed

    Ohe, Masashi; Kishi, Fujiya; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2010-03-01

    Dose-related curves of the airway responses to Methacholine by Astograph are frequently biphasic. That is, respiratory resistance (Rrs) increases slowly at first and rapidly after that. We proposed (-dGrs/dt)/Grs obtained by using Astograph as an index of dynamic property of the airway, which we suggested was related to a coefficient of the contraction or dilatation of the airway. Grs represents respiratory conductance. By calculating (-dGrs/dt)/Grs, we found that biphasic dose-related curves were composed of the slow and subsequently rapid contraction of the airways. And by mathematical analysis, we found that all segments of the airway contracted simultaneously at a uniform velocity. The combination of slow and rapid contraction explains three types of the airway responses, that is, the monophasic reactivity of the airway with slow contraction, the monophasic reactivity of the airway with rapid contraction and the biphasic reactivity of the airway with slow and subsequently rapid contraction. We found that the frequency of the monophasic reactivity of the airway with slow contraction was significantly higher in patients with COPD than in healthy subjects or in patients with mild asthma. But there was no significant difference in (-dGrs/dt)/Grs values among healthy subjects, patients with mild asthma and patients with COPD.

  12. Bootstrapping Time Dilation Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooding, Cisco; Unruh, William G.

    2015-10-01

    We present a general relativistic model of a spherical shell of matter with a perfect fluid on its surface coupled to an internal oscillator, which generalizes a model recently introduced by the authors to construct a self-gravitating interferometer (Gooding and Unruh in Phys Rev D 90:044071, 2014). The internal oscillator evolution is defined with respect to the local proper time of the shell, allowing the oscillator to serve as a local clock that ticks differently depending on the shell's position and momentum. A Hamiltonian reduction is performed on the system, and an approximate quantum description is given to the reduced phase space. If we focus only on the external dynamics, we must trace out the clock degree of freedom, and this results in a form of intrinsic decoherence that shares some features with a proposed "universal" decoherence mechanism attributed to gravitational time dilation (Pikovski et al in Nat Phys, 2015). We note that the proposed decoherence remains present in the (gravity-free) limit of flat spacetime, emphasizing that the effect can be attributed entirely to proper time differences, and thus is not necessarily related to gravity. Whereas the effect described in (Pikovski et al in Nat Phys, 2015) vanishes in the absence of an external gravitational field, our approach bootstraps the gravitational contribution to the time dilation decoherence by including self-interaction, yielding a fundamentally gravitational intrinsic decoherence effect.

  13. Dilated cardiomyopathy: an anaesthetic challenge.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Haramritpal; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Aggarwal, Shobha

    2013-06-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is a primary myocardial disease of unknown etiology characterized by left ventricular or biventricular dilation and impaired contractility. Depending upon diagnostic criteria used, the reported annual incidence varies between 5 and 8 cases per 100,000 populations. Dilated cardiomyopathy is defined by presence of: a) fractional myocardial shortening less than 25% (>2SD) and/or ejection fraction less than 45% (>2SD) and b) Left Ventricular End Diastolic Diameter (LVEDD) greater than 117% excluding any known cause of myocardial disease. Such cases are always a challenge to the anesthesiologist as they are most commonly complicated by progressive cardiac failure. We report the anesthetic management of a patient with dilated cardiomyopathy undergoing surgery for carcinoma breast. PMID:23905133

  14. Dilatancy in slow granular flows.

    PubMed

    Kabla, Alexandre J; Senden, Tim J

    2009-06-01

    When walking on wet sand, each footstep leaves behind a temporarily dry impression. This counterintuitive observation is the most common illustration of the Reynolds principle of dilatancy: that is, a granular packing tends to expand as it is deformed, therefore increasing the amount of porous space. Although widely called upon in areas such as soil mechanics and geotechnics, a deeper understanding of this principle is constrained by the lack of analytical tools to study this behavior. Using x-ray radiography, we track a broad variety of granular flow profiles and quantify their intrinsic dilatancy behavior. These measurements frame Reynolds dilatancy as a kinematic process. Closer inspection demonstrates, however, the practical importance of flow induced compaction which competes with dilatancy, leading more complex flow properties than expected. PMID:19658906

  15. Dilatancy in Slow Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabla, Alexandre J.; Senden, Tim J.

    2009-06-01

    When walking on wet sand, each footstep leaves behind a temporarily dry impression. This counterintuitive observation is the most common illustration of the Reynolds principle of dilatancy: that is, a granular packing tends to expand as it is deformed, therefore increasing the amount of porous space. Although widely called upon in areas such as soil mechanics and geotechnics, a deeper understanding of this principle is constrained by the lack of analytical tools to study this behavior. Using x-ray radiography, we track a broad variety of granular flow profiles and quantify their intrinsic dilatancy behavior. These measurements frame Reynolds dilatancy as a kinematic process. Closer inspection demonstrates, however, the practical importance of flow induced compaction which competes with dilatancy, leading more complex flow properties than expected.

  16. Post-earthquake dilatancy recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    Geodetic measurements of the 1964 Niigata, Japan earthquake and of three other examples are briefly examined. They show exponentially decaying subsidence for a year after the quakes. The observations confirm the dilatancy-fluid diffusion model of earthquake precursors and clarify the extent and properties of the dilatant zone. An analysis using one-dimensional consolidation theory is included which agrees well with this interpretation.

  17. Triggers of airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kerrebijn, K F

    1986-01-01

    Most asthmatics have hyperresponsive airways. This makes them more sensitive than non-asthmatics to bronchoconstricting environmental exposures which, in their turn, may enhance responsiveness. Airway inflammation is considered to be a key determinant of airway hyperresponsiveness: the fact that chronic airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis does not lead to airway hyperresponsiveness of any importance indicates, however, that the role of airway inflammation is complex and incompletely elucidated. The main inducers of airway inflammation are viral infections, antigens, occupational stimuli and pollutants. Although exercise, airway cooling and hyper- or hypotonic aerosols are potent stimuli of bronchoconstriction, it is questionable if airway inflammation is involved in their mode of action. Each of the above-mentioned stimuli is discussed, with emphasis laid on the relation of symptoms to mechanisms. PMID:3533597

  18. Esophageal dilation in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2015-10-01

    Tissue remodeling with scaring is common in adult EoE patients with long standing disease. This is the major factor contributing to their complaints of solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. The best tests to define the degree of remodeling are barium esophagram, high resolution manometry and endoscopy. Many physicians are fearful to dilate EoE patients because of concerns about mucosal tears and perforations. However, multiple recent case series attest to the safety of esophageal dilation and its efficacy with many patients having symptom relief for an average of two years. This chapter will review the sordid history of esophageal dilation in EoE patients and outline how to perform this procedure safely. The key is graduated dilation over one to several sessions to a diameter of 15-18 mm. Postprocedural pain is to be expected and mucosal tears are a sign of successful dilation, not complications. In some healthy adults, occasional dilation may be preferred to regular use of medications or restricted diets. This approach is now supported by recent EoE consensus statements and societal guidelines.

  19. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype‑3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hua; Wu, Song-Ze; Wang, Gang; Huang, Ni-Wen; Liu, Chun-Tao

    2015-06-01

    The persistent administration of β2‑adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long‑acting β2‑adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti‑α‑smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C‑β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5‑trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol‑induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR‑cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol‑induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  20. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype-3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YUAN-HUA; WU, SONG-ZE; WANG, GANG; HUANG, NI-WEN; LIU, CHUN-TAO

    2015-01-01

    The persistent administration of β2-adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C-β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol-induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR-cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol-induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  1. beta-hexosaminidase-induced activation of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase is dependent on p21Ras and protein kinase C and mediates bovine airway smooth-muscle proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lew, D B; Dempsey, B K; Zhao, Y; Muthalif, M; Fatima, S; Malik, K U

    1999-07-01

    Late-phase and sustained activation of p44/42(MAPK) has been reported to be a critical factor in cell mitogenesis. We therefore hypothesized that p44/42(MAPK) is involved in mannosyl-rich glycoprotein-induced mitogenesis in bovine airway smooth-muscle cells (ASMC). Treatment of adherent ASMC with beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A, 50 nM), an endogenous mannosyl-rich glycoprotein, resulted in a late-onset (30-min) activation of p44/42(MAPK) that lasted for 4 h. Activation of p44/42(MAPK) induced by Hex A was inhibited by an 18-mer phosphorothioate-derivatized antisense oligonucleotide (1-5 microM) directed to human p44(MAPK); the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1) inhibitor PD98059 (5 microM); the p42(MAPK) inhibitor Tyrphostin AG-126 (0.2 microM); the farnesyl transferase inhibitors SCH-56582 (10 microM) and FPT III (10 miroM), which inhibit p21Ras activation; and Calphostin C (0.2 microM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C. These agents also inhibited Hex A-induced cell proliferation in bovine ASMC. These data suggest that Hex A activates p44/42(MAPK) in a p21Ras- and PKC-dependent manner and that this activation mediates Hex A- induced mitogenesis in bovine ASMC.

  2. Long-term effects of acupuncture treatment on airway smooth muscle in a rat model of smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Wu, Song; Tang, Hongtu; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lushan; Zhou, Huanjiao; Zhou, Miao; Wang, Hua; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases. It is a chronic inflammatory process characterised by airway obstruction and progressive lung inflammation, associated with difficulty breathing and insensitivity to corticosteroid therapy. Although there is some preliminary evidence to suggest a beneficial effect of acupuncture on COPD, its mechanism of action has not been investigated. Our aim was to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture in a rat model of COPD induced by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS). Methods Sixty Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to the smoke of 15 cigarettes for 1 h/day, 6 days/week for 3 months to induce COPD and treated with acupuncture at BL13 (Feishu), BL23 (Shenshu) and Dingchuan (COPD+Acupuncture, n=15), sham acupuncture (COPD+Sham, n=15) or left untreated (n=15). Exposed rats were compared with controls not exposed to CS (control, n=15). Pulmonary function was measured, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by ELISA. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) protein and mRNA expression were examined in lung tissue and in bronchus. Results Acupuncture treatment appeared to protect pulmonary function and reduce the COPD-induced inflammatory response by decreasing cell inflammation and the production of TNF-α and IL-8. Acupuncture also enhanced HDAC2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting a possible direct effect on protein structure through post-translational modifications. Conclusions Our results suggest that acupuncture regulates inflammatory cytokines and contributes to lung protection in a rat model of smoke-induced COPD by modulating HDAC2. PMID:26345700

  3. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... efforts to assist with breathing have failed. A hollow needle or tube can be inserted into the ...

  4. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  5. Phenotyping airways disease: an A to E approach.

    PubMed

    Gonem, S; Raj, V; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D; Green, R; Siddiqui, S

    2012-12-01

    The airway diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous conditions with overlapping pathophysiological and clinical features. It has previously been proposed that this heterogeneity may be characterized in terms of five relatively independent domains labelled from A to E, namely airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchitis, cough reflex hypersensitivity, damage to the airways and surrounding lung parenchyma, and extrapulmonary factors. Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs in both asthma and COPD, accounting for variable day to day symptoms, although the mechanisms most likely differ between the two conditions. Bronchitis, or airway inflammation, may be predominantly eosinophilic or neutrophilic, with different treatments required for each. Cough reflex hypersensitivity is thought to underlie the chronic dry cough out of proportion to other symptoms that can occur in association with airways disease. Structural changes associated with airway disease (damage) include bronchial wall thickening, airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, bronchiectasis and emphysema. Finally, a variety of extrapulmonary factors may impact upon airway disease, including rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity and dysfunctional breathing. This article discusses the A to E concept in detail and describes how this framework may be used to assess and treat patients with airway diseases in the clinic. PMID:23181785

  6. Trichobezoar Causing Airway Compromise during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Erica Y.; Scalzitti, Nicholas J.; Dion, Gregory R.; Bowe, Sarah N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. (1) Report the case of a 5-year-old female with trichotillomania and trichophagia that suffered airway compromise during esophagogastroduodenoscopy for removal of a trichobezoar. (2) Provide management recommendations for an unusual foreign body causing extubation and partial airway obstruction. Methods. Case report of a rare situation of airway compromise caused by a trichobezoar. Results. A 5-year-old patient underwent endoscopic retrieval of a gastric trichobezoar (hairball) by the gastroenterology service under general endotracheal anesthesia in a sedation unit. During removal, the hairball, due to its large size, dislodged the endotracheal tube, effectively extubating the patient. The bezoar became lodged at the cricopharyngeus muscle. Attempts to remove the bezoar or reintubation were unsuccessful. The child was able to be mask ventilated while the otolaryngology service was called. Direct laryngoscopy revealed a hairball partially obstructing the view of the glottis from its position in the postcricoid area. The hairball, still entrapped in the snare from the esophagoscope, was grasped with Magill forceps and slowly extracted. The patient was then reintubated and the airway and esophagus were reevaluated. Conclusions. Trichobezoar is an uncommon cause of airway foreign body. Careful attention to airway management during these and similar foreign body extractions can prevent inadvertent extubations. PMID:26457086

  7. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  8. Early Life Exposure to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Primes Increased Susceptibility to Hypoxia-Induced Weakness in Rat Sternohyoid Muscle during Adulthood.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Fiona B; Dempsey, Eugene M; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia is a feature of apnea of prematurity (AOP), chronic lung disease, and sleep apnea. Despite the clinical relevance, the long-term effects of hypoxic exposure in early life on respiratory control are not well defined. We recently reported that exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during postnatal development (pCIH) causes upper airway muscle weakness in both sexes, which persists for several weeks. We sought to examine if there are persistent sex-dependent effects of pCIH on respiratory muscle function into adulthood and/or increased susceptibility to re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in animals previously exposed to CIH during postnatal development. We hypothesized that pCIH would cause long-lasting muscle impairment and increased susceptibility to subsequent hypoxia. Within 24 h of delivery, pups and their respective dams were exposed to CIH: 90 s of hypoxia reaching 5% O2 at nadir; once every 5 min, 8 h per day for 3 weeks. Sham groups were exposed to normoxia in parallel. Three groups were studied: sham; pCIH; and pCIH combined with adult CIH (p+aCIH), where a subset of the pCIH-exposed pups were re-exposed to the same CIH paradigm beginning at 13 weeks. Following gas exposures, sternohyoid and diaphragm muscle isometric contractile and endurance properties were examined ex vivo. There was no apparent lasting effect of pCIH on respiratory muscle function in adults. However, in both males and females, re-exposure to CIH in adulthood in pCIH-exposed animals caused sternohyoid (but not diaphragm) weakness. Exposure to this paradigm of CIH in adulthood alone had no effect on muscle function. Persistent susceptibility in pCIH-exposed airway dilator muscle to subsequent hypoxic insult may have implications for the control of airway patency in adult humans exposed to intermittent hypoxic stress during early life.

  9. Airway Surgery in Tracheostomised Patients with Wegener Granulomatosis Leading to Subglottic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Altun, Demet; Sivrikoz, Nükhet; Çamcı, Emre

    2015-10-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a multisystemic disorder characterised by granulomatous inflammation of the respiratory system. The growing of proliferative tissue towards the larynx and trachea may cause airway obstruction on account of subglottic stenosis. In this situation, the surgical goal is to eliminate the airway obstruction by providing natural airway anatomy. While mild lesions do not require surgical intervention, in fixed lesions, surgical intervention is required, such as tracheostomy, laser resection and dilatation. In tracheostomised patients, granuloma formation surrounding the tracheostomy cannula may occur in the trachea. Inflammation and newly formed granulation tissue result in severe stenosis in the airways. During surgical treatment of such patients, airway management is important. In this case report, we will discuss gas exchange and airway management with jet ventilation (JV) during excision of the granulation tissue with endolaryngeal laser surgery, leading to subglottic stenosis in tracheostomised patients in WG. PMID:27366530

  10. Airway Surgery in Tracheostomised Patients with Wegener Granulomatosis Leading to Subglottic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Altun, Demet; Sivrikoz, Nükhet; Çamcı, Emre

    2015-01-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a multisystemic disorder characterised by granulomatous inflammation of the respiratory system. The growing of proliferative tissue towards the larynx and trachea may cause airway obstruction on account of subglottic stenosis. In this situation, the surgical goal is to eliminate the airway obstruction by providing natural airway anatomy. While mild lesions do not require surgical intervention, in fixed lesions, surgical intervention is required, such as tracheostomy, laser resection and dilatation. In tracheostomised patients, granuloma formation surrounding the tracheostomy cannula may occur in the trachea. Inflammation and newly formed granulation tissue result in severe stenosis in the airways. During surgical treatment of such patients, airway management is important. In this case report, we will discuss gas exchange and airway management with jet ventilation (JV) during excision of the granulation tissue with endolaryngeal laser surgery, leading to subglottic stenosis in tracheostomised patients in WG. PMID:27366530

  11. Airway Surgery in Tracheostomised Patients with Wegener Granulomatosis Leading to Subglottic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Altun, Demet; Sivrikoz, Nükhet; Çamcı, Emre

    2015-10-01

    Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a multisystemic disorder characterised by granulomatous inflammation of the respiratory system. The growing of proliferative tissue towards the larynx and trachea may cause airway obstruction on account of subglottic stenosis. In this situation, the surgical goal is to eliminate the airway obstruction by providing natural airway anatomy. While mild lesions do not require surgical intervention, in fixed lesions, surgical intervention is required, such as tracheostomy, laser resection and dilatation. In tracheostomised patients, granuloma formation surrounding the tracheostomy cannula may occur in the trachea. Inflammation and newly formed granulation tissue result in severe stenosis in the airways. During surgical treatment of such patients, airway management is important. In this case report, we will discuss gas exchange and airway management with jet ventilation (JV) during excision of the granulation tissue with endolaryngeal laser surgery, leading to subglottic stenosis in tracheostomised patients in WG.

  12. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  13. Active contour approach for accurate quantitative airway analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Slabaugh, Greg G.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Lerallut, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    Chronic airway disease causes structural changes in the lungs including peribronchial thickening and airway dilatation. Multi-detector computed tomography (CT) yields detailed near-isotropic images of the lungs, and thus the potential to obtain quantitative measurements of lumen diameter and airway wall thickness. Such measurements would allow standardized assessment, and physicians to diagnose and locate airway abnormalities, adapt treatment, and monitor progress over time. However, due to the sheer number of airways per patient, systematic analysis is infeasible in routine clinical practice without automation. We have developed an automated and real-time method based on active contours to estimate both airway lumen and wall dimensions; the method does not require manual contour initialization but only a starting point on the targeted airway. While the lumen contour segmentation is purely region-based, the estimation of the outer diameter considers the inner wall segmentation as well as local intensity variation, in order anticipate the presence of nearby arteries and exclude them. These properties make the method more robust than the Full-Width Half Maximum (FWHM) approach. Results are demonstrated on a phantom dataset with known dimensions and on a human dataset where the automated measurements are compared against two human operators. The average error on the phantom measurements was 0.10mm and 0.14mm for inner and outer diameters, showing sub-voxel accuracy. Similarly, the mean variation from the average manual measurement was 0.14mm and 0.18mm for inner and outer diameters respectively.

  14. Upper Airway Elasticity Estimation in Pediatric Down Syndrome Sleep Apnea Patients Using Collapsible Tube Theory.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Dhananjay Radhakrishnan; Mylavarapu, Goutham; McConnell, Keith; Fleck, Robert J; Shott, Sally R; Amin, Raouf S; Gutmark, Ephraim J

    2016-05-01

    Elasticity of the soft tissues surrounding the upper airway lumen is one of the important factors contributing to upper airway disorders such as snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. The objective of this study is to calculate patient specific elasticity of the pharynx from magnetic resonance (MR) images using a 'tube law', i.e., the relationship between airway cross-sectional area and transmural pressure difference. MR imaging was performed under anesthesia in children with Down syndrome (DS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). An airway segmentation algorithm was employed to evaluate changes in airway cross-sectional area dilated by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A pressure-area relation was used to make localized estimates of airway wall stiffness for each patient. Optimized values of patient specific Young's modulus for tissue in the velopharynx and oropharynx, were estimated from finite element simulations of airway collapse. Patient specific deformation of the airway wall under CPAP was found to exhibit either a non-linear 'hardening' or 'softening' behavior. The localized airway and tissue elasticity were found to increase with increasing severity of OSA. Elasticity based patient phenotyping can potentially assist clinicians in decision making on CPAP and airway or tissue elasticity can supplement well-known clinical measures of OSA severity.

  15. Involvement of Ca2+ Signaling in the Synergistic Effects between Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists and β2-Adrenoceptor Agonists in Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Kentaro; Kume, Hiroaki; Oguma, Tetsuya; Shigemori, Wataru; Tohda, Yuji; Ogawa, Emiko; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) and short-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (SABAs) play important roles in remedy for COPD. To propel a translational research for development of bronchodilator therapy, synergistic effects between SABAs with LAMAs were examined focused on Ca2+ signaling using simultaneous records of isometric tension and F340/F380 in fura-2-loaded tracheal smooth muscle. Glycopyrronium (3 nM), a LAMA, modestly reduced methacholine (1 μM)-induced contraction. When procaterol, salbutamol and SABAs were applied in the presence of glycopyrronium, relaxant effects of these SABAs are markedly enhanced, and percent inhibition of tension was much greater than the sum of those for each agent and those expected from the BI theory. In contrast, percent inhibition of F340/F380 was not greater than those values. Bisindolylmaleimide, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), significantly increased the relaxant effect of LAMA without reducing F340/F380. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels, significantly suppressed the effects of these combined agents with reducing F340/F380. In conclusion, combination of SABAs with LAMAs synergistically enhances inhibition of muscarinic contraction via decreasing both Ca2+ sensitization mediated by PKC and Ca2+ dynamics mediated by KCa channels. PKC and KCa channels may be molecular targets for cross talk between β2-adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors. PMID:27657061

  16. Determination of mass changes in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and evidence for agonist-stimulated metabolism of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Chilvers, E R; Batty, I H; Challiss, R A; Barnes, P J; Nahorski, S R

    1991-01-01

    Stimulation of muscarinic receptors in bovine tracheal smooth muscle (BTSM) causes a sustained increase in muscle tone, but a transient increase in the second messenger Ins(1,4,5)P3. To examine whether this brief increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 mass results from transient formation or is due to agonist-stimulation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 metabolism, we have studied the relationship between mass changes in PtdIns(4,5)P2 and Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation, and changes in [3H]InsP3, [3H]PtdIns, [3H]PtdInsP1 and [3H]PtdInsP2 in carbachol-stimulated myo-[3H]inositol-prelabelled BTSM slices. Carbachol (0.1 mM) caused a rapid transient increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 concentration (basal, 12.9 +/- 0.8 pmol/mg of protein; 5 s carbachol treatment, 27.1 +/- 1.5 pmol/mg of protein), with values returning to basal levels by 30 s, but a sustained accumulation of total [3H]InsP3s, with [3H]Ins(1,3,4)P3 being the predominant isomer present at later time points. In contrast, PtdIns(4,5)P2 mass, determined by radioreceptor assay of Ins(1,4,5)P3 in desalted alkaline hydrolysates of acidified chloroform/methanol tissue extracts, declined rapidly (basal, 941 +/- 22 pmol/mg of protein; 120 s carbachol, 365 +/- 22 pmol/mg of protein; t1/2 14 s) and remained at this new steady-state level for at least 20 min in the continued presence of carbachol. Addition of 10 microM-atropine 2 min after carbachol caused a prompt return of PtdIns(4,5)P2 concentration to prestimulated values (t1/2 210 s). Ongoing resynthesis of PtdIns(4,5)P2 after carbachol stimulation was demonstrated in [3H]inositol-labelled tissue by observing a persistent increase in the specific radioactivity of [3H]PtdInsP2, shown to be exclusively [3H]PtdIns(4,5)P2, over a 10 min period. These findings strongly suggest the occurrence of persistent receptor-mediated increases in PtdIns(4,5)P2 hydrolysis and Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation which, in conjunction with the transient accumulation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 observed, provide evidence that regulation of the

  17. Pneumatic dilatation for childhood achalasia.

    PubMed

    Babu, R; Grier, D; Cusick, E; Spicer, R D

    2001-09-01

    Treatment of achalasia by pneumatic balloon dilatation (PBD) is well established in adults. Due to limited experience and the rarity of the condition in children, there are relatively few reports in the paediatric literature. Although PBD has been reported as a primary method of treatment, there are no reports of secondary PBD for childhood achalasia. Between 1995 and 1999, five patients underwent treatment for achalasia (age: 9-14 years, M:F = 4:1). The presenting symptoms were dysphagia (5). vomiting episodes (2), aspiration (1), food-bolus obstruction (1), and failure to thrive (1). In all patients a barium swallow and manometry were used to confirm the diagnosis. Three underwent primary PBD. Two who had previously undergone surgical myotomy underwent secondary PBD for recurrence of symptoms. Dilatation was performed using a 35-mm balloon with the child under general anaesthesia. Technical success was defined as demonstration of a waist under screening at lower pressures followed by abolition of the waist at higher pressures. In addition to reviewing our results, a systematic review of the literature was performed (Medline, Cochrane Library, Pubmed, Embase). Three patients (primary dilatation) showed excellent improvement after a single dilatation. In two cases (secondary dilatation) three and five attempts were required. No complications were encountered. The mean follow-up period was 2 years (1-3.5 years) and four patients remained asymptomatic, an overall success rate of 80%. The literature review revealed similar good results in most of the recent reports. Thus, PBD as a primary treatment for childhood achalasia has a success rate of 70%-90% with minimal side effects, short hospital stay, and good patient acceptability over an operation. We have also established the usefulness of this method as a secondary treatment when symptoms recur after surgery.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related Dilated Cardiomyopathy Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Primary dilated cardiomyopathy ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (36 links) ...

  19. The emergency airway.

    PubMed

    Goon, Serena S H; Stephens, Robert C M; Smith, Helen

    2009-12-01

    The 'can't intubate, can't ventilate' scenario is a nightmare for all clinicians who manage airways. Cricothyroidotomy is one of several emergency airway management techniques. Cricothyroidotomy is a short-term solution which provides oxygenation, not ventilation, and is not a definitive airway. Although there are tests which can help predict whether an intubation will be difficult, they are not always good predictors. As the can't intubate, can't ventilate scenario is rare, cricothyroidotomy is an unfamiliar procedure to many. In this situation, expert help must be called for early on. In the meantime, it is vital that all other simple airway manoeuvres have been attempted, such as good positioning of the patient with head tilt and chin lift, and use of airway adjuncts like the oral (Guedel) airway or nasopharyngeal airway, and the laryngeal mask airway. However, if attempts to secure the airway are unsuccessful, there may be no other option than to perform a cricothyroidotomy. It is a difficult decision to make, but with increasing hypoxia, it is essential that one oxygenates the patient. Cricothyroidotomy provides an opening in the pace between the anterior inferior border of the thyroid cartilage and the anterior superior border of the cricoid cartilage, allowing access to the airway below the glottis. The anatomical considerations are important when performing this procedure (Ellis, 2009), and there are other scenarios when it is used. It is not without consequence, as with any procedure.

  20. Modeling Upper Airway Collapse by a Finite Element Model with Regional Tissue Properties

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chun; Brennick, Michael J.; Dougherty, Lawrence; Wootton, David M.

    2009-01-01

    This study presents a new computational system for modeling the upper airway in rats that combines tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with tissue material properties to predict three-dimensional (3D) airway motion. The model is capable of predicting airway wall and tissue deformation under airway pressure loading up to airway collapse. The model demonstrates that oropharynx collapse pressure depends primarily on ventral wall (tongue muscle) elastic modulus and airway architecture. An iterative approach that involves substituting alternative possible tissue elastic moduli was used to improve model precision. The proposed 3D model accounts for stress-strain relationships in the complex upper airway that should present new opportunities for understanding pathogenesis of airway collapse, improving diagnosis and developing treatments. PMID:19747871

  1. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Y.S.; Martin, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their well-known roles in the nervous system, there is increasing recognition that neurotrophins such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as their receptors are expressed in peripheral tissues including the lung, and can thus potentially contribute to both normal physiology and pathophysiology of several diseases. The relevance of this family of growth factors lies in emerging clinical data indicating altered neurotrophin levels and function in a range of diseases including neonatal and adult asthma, sinusitis, influenza, and lung cancer. The current review focuses on 1) the importance of BDNF expression and signaling mechanisms in early airway and lung development, critical to both normal neonatal lung function and also its disruption in prematurity and insults such as inflammation and infection; 2) how BDNF, potentially derived from airway nerves modulate neurogenic control of airway tone, a key aspect of airway reflexes as well as dysfunctional responses to allergic inflammation; 3) the emerging idea that local BDNF production by resident airway cells such as epithelium and airway smooth muscle can contribute to normal airway structure and function, and to airway hyperreactivity and remodeling in diseases such as asthma. Furthermore, given its pleiotropic effects in the airway, BDNF may be a novel and appealing therapeutic target. PMID:24560686

  2. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... dilator is a device designed to dilate the anal sphincter and canal when the size of the anal opening...

  3. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  4. Airway contractility and remodeling: links to asthma symptoms.

    PubMed

    West, Adrian R; Syyong, Harley T; Siddiqui, Sana; Pascoe, Chris D; Murphy, Thomas M; Maarsingh, Harm; Deng, Linhong; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Bossé, Ynuk

    2013-02-01

    Respiratory symptoms are largely caused by obstruction of the airways. In asthma, airway narrowing mediated by airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction contributes significantly to obstruction. The spasmogens produced following exposure to environmental triggers, such as viruses or allergens, are initially responsible for ASM activation. However, the extent of narrowing of the airway lumen due to ASM shortening can be influenced by many factors and it remains a real challenge to decipher the exact role of ASM in causing asthmatic symptoms. Innovative tools, such as the forced oscillation technique, continue to develop and have been proven useful to assess some features of ASM function in vivo. Despite these technologic advances, it is still not clear whether excessive narrowing in asthma is driven by ASM abnormalities, by other alterations in non-muscle factors or simply because of the overexpression of spasmogens. This is because a multitude of forces are acting on the airway wall, and because not only are these forces constantly changing but they are also intricately interconnected. To counteract these limitations, investigators have utilized in vitro and ex vivo systems to assess and compare asthmatic and non-asthmatic ASM contractility. This review describes: 1- some muscle and non-muscle factors that are altered in asthma that may lead to airway narrowing and asthma symptoms; 2- some technologies such as the forced oscillation technique that have the potential to unveil the role of ASM in airway narrowing in vivo; and 3- some data from ex vivo and in vitro methods that probe the possibility that airway hyperresponsiveness is due to the altered environment surrounding the ASM or, alternatively, to a hypercontractile ASM phenotype that can be either innate or acquired.

  5. Multisensory signalling enhances pupil dilation

    PubMed Central

    Rigato, Silvia; Rieger, Gerulf; Romei, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and integrating information across the senses is an advantageous mechanism to efficiently respond to the environment. In this study, a simple auditory-visual detection task was employed to test whether pupil dilation, generally associated with successful target detection, could be used as a reliable measure for studying multisensory integration processing in humans. We recorded reaction times and pupil dilation in response to a series of visual and auditory stimuli, which were presented either alone or in combination. The results indicated faster reaction times and larger pupil diameter to the presentation of combined auditory and visual stimuli than the same stimuli when presented in isolation. Moreover, the responses to the multisensory condition exceeded the linear summation of the responses obtained in each unimodal condition. Importantly, faster reaction times corresponded to larger pupil dilation, suggesting that also the latter can be a reliable measure of multisensory processes. This study will serve as a foundation for the investigation of auditory-visual integration in populations where simple reaction times cannot be collected, such as developmental and clinical populations. PMID:27189316

  6. Characteristic adaptations of the extracellular matrix in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Louzao-Martinez, Laura; Vink, Aryan; Harakalova, Magdalena; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Verhaar, Marianne C; Cheng, Caroline

    2016-10-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a relatively common heart muscle disease characterized by the dilation and thinning of the left ventricle accompanied with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Myocardial fibrosis is a major feature in DCM and therefore it is inevitable that corresponding extracellular matrix (ECM) changes are involved in DCM onset and progression. Increasing our understanding of how ECM adaptations are involved in DCM could be important for the development of future interventions. This review article discusses the molecular adaptations in ECM composition and structure that have been reported in both animal and human studies of DCM. Furthermore, we provide a transcriptome-based catalogue of ECM genes that are associated with DCM, generated by using NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database sets for DCM. Based on this in silico analysis, many novel ECM components involved in DCM are identified and discussed in this review. With the information gathered, we propose putative pathways of ECM adaptations in onset and progression of DCM.

  7. Clinical management of dilated cardiomyopathy: current knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Marco; Cannatá, Antonio; Vitagliano, Alice; Zambon, Elena; Lardieri, Gerardina; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a primary heart muscle disease characterized by a progressive dilation and dysfunction of either the left or both ventricles. The management of DCM is currently challenging for clinicians. The persistent lack of knowledge about the etiology and pathophysiology of this disease continues to determine important fields of uncertainty in managing this condition. Molecular cardiology and genetics currently represent the most crucial horizon of increasing knowledge. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the disease allows clinicians to treat this disease more effectively and to further improve outcomes of DCM patients through advancements in etiologic characterization, prognostic stratification and individualized therapy. Left ventricular reverse remodeling predicts a lower rate of major cardiac adverse events independently from other factors. Optimized medical treatment and device implantation are pivotal in inducing left ventricular reverse remodeling. Newly identified targets, such as angiotensin-neprilysin inhibition, phosphodiesterase inhibition and calcium sensitizing are important in improving prognosis in patients affected by DCM.

  8. X-Linked Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Cardiospecific Phenotype of Dystrophinopathy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLDCM) is a distinct phenotype of dystrophinopathy characterized by preferential cardiac involvement without any overt skeletal myopathy. XLDCM is caused by mutations of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene and results in lethal heart failure in individuals between 10 and 20 years. Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy, an allelic disorder, have a milder phenotype of skeletal muscle involvement compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sometimes present with dilated cardiomyopathy. The precise relationship between mutations in the DMD gene and cardiomyopathy remain unclear. However, some hypothetical mechanisms are being considered to be associated with the presence of some several dystrophin isoforms, certain reported mutations, and an unknown dystrophin-related pathophysiological mechanism. Recent therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the severe dystrophinopathy phenotype, appears promising, but the presence of XLDCM highlights the importance of focusing on cardiomyopathy while elucidating the pathomechanism and developing treatment.

  9. Modeling the pressure-dilatation correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.

    1991-01-01

    It is generally accepted that pressure dilatation, which is an additional compressibility term in turbulence transport equations, may be important for high speed flows. Recent direct simulations of homogeneous shear turbulence have given concrete evidence that the pressure dilatation is important insofar that it contributes to the reduced growth of turbulent kinetic energy due to compressibility effects. The problem of modeling pressure dilatation is addressed. A component of the pressure dilatation is isolated which exhibits temporal oscillations and, using direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear turbulence and isotropic turbulence, show that it has a negligible contribution to the evolution of turbulent kinetic energy. Then, an analysis for the case of homogeneous turbulence is performed to obtain a model for the nonoscillatory pressure dilatation. This model algebraically relates the pressure dilatation to quantities traditionally obtained in incompressible turbulence closures. The model is validated by direct comparison with the pressure dilatation data obtained from the simulations.

  10. Reconstructive procedures for impaired upper airway function: laryngeal respiration

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The larynx is the "bottleneck" of the human airway. For this reason, the effects of stenosing laryngeal pathologies on the vital factor respiratory gas exchange are particularly critical. Internal stabilization is a prerequisite for recovery of the laryngeal respiratory function in severe forms of inspiratory collapse (laryngomalacia). Effective laser surgery techniques have been developed to this end in recent years. Glottis-dilating surgery in cases of bilateral vocal cord motion impairment is now moving in the direction of endoscopic laser cordotomy or cordectomy, whereas arytenoidectomy and open surgical procedures are now used only rarely due to higher secondary morbidity rates. In individual cases, in particular if functional recovery is expected, temporary laterofixation of a vocal cord using an endoscopic suturing technique can be a helpful approach. Extensive laryngeal defects can be covered by means of composite grafts with mucosal lining, a supporting skeleton and their own vascularization. Autologous transplantation of the larynx, with its complex surgical and immunological problems, has become a manageable procedure. The problems of post-transplantation reinnervation and risk assessment of immunosuppression-induced recurrence of the tumor are still under consideration. Reanimation of the bilaterally paralyzed larynx by means of neurorrhaphy (neurosuture), neural grafting and, more recently, functional electrostimulation (pacemaker) represents a challenge for the coming years. In most cases of paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, a part of the muscles is maintained by synkinetic reinnervation when therapy is carried out, which however also prevents effective vocal cord movement due to simultaneous activity of agonists and antagonists. Modulation of reinnervation by means of electrostimulation and modern genetic therapy approaches justify hopes of better outcomes in the future. PMID:22073057

  11. Recurrent gastric dilatation and intestinal dysmotility possibly resulting from autonomic neuropathy in a Great Dane.

    PubMed

    Spoo, Joseph W; Shelton, G Diane

    2014-01-01

    A 5 yr old female spayed Great Dane was presented for recurrent episodes of gastric dilatation, intestinal dysmotility, and one episode of gastric rupture. Numerous hematologic, radiographic, and endocrine diagnostic tests were performed with no identifiable underlying cause. Many risk factors have been identified for gastric dilatation and most were present in this Great Dane. A number of symptomatic treatments, aimed primarily at altering the gastrointestinal tract flora and motility were tried, but failed to influence the clinical course of the disease. The dog continued to worsen, experienced more frequent episodes of gastric dilatation, and developed generalized muscle atrophy. Biopsies were collected from the biceps femoris and triceps brachii muscles. A pattern of denervation atrophy was evident in both muscles, consistent with polyneuropathy. The owners elected humane euthanasia and a necropsy was performed. A striking finding at necropsy was severe loss of myelinated fibers with extensive endoneurial fibrosis in the vagus nerve, consistent with an autonomic neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy is a previously unexplored cause of gastric dilatation and intestinal dysmotility in dogs. These findings should open new directions for exploring pathogenic mechanisms for gastric dilatation in this species.

  12. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  13. Antarctic analog for dilational bands on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, T. A.; Brunt, K. M.

    2014-09-01

    Europa's surface shows signs of extension, which is revealed as lithospheric dilation expressed along ridges, dilational bands and ridged bands. Ridges, the most common tectonic feature on Europa, comprise a central crack flanked by two raised banks a few hundred meters high on each side. Together these three classes may represent a continuum of formation. In Tufts' Dilational Model ridge formation is dominated by daily tidal cycling of a crack, which can be superimposed with regional secular dilation. The two sources of dilation can combine to form the various band morphologies observed. New GPS data along a rift on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica is a suitable Earth analog to test the framework of Tufts' Dilational Model. As predicted by Tufts' Dilational Model, tensile failures in the Ross Ice Shelf exhibit secular dilation, upon which a tidal signal can be seen. From this analog we conclude that Tufts' Dilational Model for Europan ridges and bands may be credible and that the secular dilation is most likely from a regional source and not tidally driven.

  14. Antarctic Analog for Dilational Bands on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurford, T. A.; Brunt, K. M.

    2014-01-01

    Europa's surface shows signs of extension, which is revealed as lithospheric dilation expressed along ridges, dilational bands and ridged bands. Ridges, the most common tectonic feature on Europa, comprise a central crack flanked by two raised banks a few hundred meters high on each side. Together these three classes may represent a continuum of formation. In Tufts' Dilational Model ridge formation is dominated by daily tidal cycling of a crack, which can be superimposed with regional secular dilation. The two sources of dilation can combine to form the various band morphologies observed. New GPS data along a rift on the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica is a suitable Earth analog to test the framework of Tufts' Dilational Model. As predicted by Tufts' Dilational Model, tensile failures in the Ross Ice Shelf exhibit secular dilation, upon which a tidal signal can be seen. From this analog we conclude that Tufts' Dilational Model for Europan ridges and bands may be credible and that the secular dilation is most likely from a regional source and not tidally driven.

  15. Dilated cardiomyopathy due to a phospholamban duplication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa M; Addonizio, Linda J; Chung, Wendy K

    2014-10-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterised by dilation and impaired systolic function. We present the case of a child with dilated cardiomyopathy caused by a 624 kb duplication of 6q22.31, which includes the phospholamban gene. The patient also has failure to thrive and developmental delay due to complex cytogenetic abnormalities including a 5p15 deletion associated with Cri du Chat and an 11p15 duplication associated with Russell-Silver syndrome. PMID:24451198

  16. Management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Robert A; Noordhoek, Roseanna

    2010-03-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeon frequently encounters and manages difficult airways. Knowledge of and calm progression by practitioner and staff through different means to ventilate and manage a difficult airway are crucial. Practitioners should become comfortable with different types of alternative or rescue airways in order to intervene quickly in case of emergent or unanticipated airway compromise.

  17. Local renin-angiotensin system mediates endothelial dilator dysfunction in aging arteries.

    PubMed

    Flavahan, Sheila; Chang, Fumin; Flavahan, Nicholas A

    2016-09-01

    Aging impairs endothelium-dependent NO-mediated dilatation, which results from increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The local generation of angiotensin II (ANG II) is increased in aging arteries and contributes to inflammatory and fibrotic activity of smooth muscle cells and arterial wall remodeling. Although prolonged in vivo ANG II inhibition improves the impaired endothelial dilatation of aging arteries, it is unclear whether this reflects inhibition of intravascular or systemic ANG II systems. Experiments were therefore performed on isolated tail arteries from young (3-4 mo) and old (22-24 mo) F344 rats to determine if a local renin-angiotensin system contributes to the endothelial dilator dysfunction of aging. Aging impaired dilatation to the endothelial agonist acetylcholine but did not influence responses to a nitric oxide (NO) donor (DEA NONOate). Dilatation to acetylcholine was greatly reduced by NO synthase inhibition [nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)] in young and old arteries. In isolated arteries, acute inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) (perindoprilat), renin (aliskiren), or AT1 receptors (valsartan, losartan) did not influence dilatation to acetylcholine in young arteries but increased responses in old arteries. After ANG II inhibition, the dilator response to acetylcholine was similar in young and old arteries. ROS activity, which was increased in endothelium of aging arteries, was also reduced by inhibiting ANG II (perindoprilat, losartan). Renin expression was increased by 5.6 fold and immunofluorescent levels of ANG II were confirmed to be increased in aging compared with young arteries. Exogenous ANG II inhibited acetylcholine-induced dilatation. Therefore, aging-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent dilatation in aging is caused by a local intravascular renin-angiotensin system.

  18. Motor innervation of respiratory muscles and an opercular display muscle in Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Gorlick, D L

    1989-12-15

    Horseradish peroxidase was used to identify motor neurons projecting to the adductor mandibulae, levator hyomandibulae, levator operculi, adductor operculi, and dilator operculi muscles in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens. These muscles participate in the production of respiratory and feeding movements in teleost fishes. The dilator operculi is also the effector muscle for gill-cover erection behavior that is part of Betta's aggressive display. The motor innervation of these muscles in Betta was compared to that previously described for carp. Motor neurons of the adductor mandibulae, levator hyomandibulae, and dilator operculi are located in the trigeminal motor nucleus, and motor neurons of the adductor operculi and levator operculi are located in the facial motor nucleus in Betta and in carp. The trigeminal motor nucleus in both species is divided into rostral and caudal subnuclei. However, there are substantial differences in the organization of the subnuclei, and in the distribution of motor neurons within them. In Betta, the rostral trigeminal subnucleus consists of a single part but the caudal subnucleus is divided into two parts. Motor neurons for the dilator operculi and levator hyomandibulae muscles are located in the lateral part of the caudal subnucleus; the medial part of the caudal subnucleus contains only dilator operculi motor neurons. The single caudal subnucleus in carp is located laterally, and contains motor neurons of both the dilator operculi and levator hyomandibulae muscles. Differences in the organization of the trigeminal motor nucleus may relate to the use of the dilator operculi muscle for aggressive display behavior by perciform fishes such as Betta but not by cypriniform fishes such as carp. Five species of perciform fishes that perform gill-cover erection behavior had a Betta-like pattern of organization of the caudal trigeminal nucleus and a similar distribution of dilator operculi motor neurons. Goldfish, which like carp are

  19. Motor innervation of respiratory muscles and an opercular display muscle in Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Gorlick, D L

    1989-12-15

    Horseradish peroxidase was used to identify motor neurons projecting to the adductor mandibulae, levator hyomandibulae, levator operculi, adductor operculi, and dilator operculi muscles in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens. These muscles participate in the production of respiratory and feeding movements in teleost fishes. The dilator operculi is also the effector muscle for gill-cover erection behavior that is part of Betta's aggressive display. The motor innervation of these muscles in Betta was compared to that previously described for carp. Motor neurons of the adductor mandibulae, levator hyomandibulae, and dilator operculi are located in the trigeminal motor nucleus, and motor neurons of the adductor operculi and levator operculi are located in the facial motor nucleus in Betta and in carp. The trigeminal motor nucleus in both species is divided into rostral and caudal subnuclei. However, there are substantial differences in the organization of the subnuclei, and in the distribution of motor neurons within them. In Betta, the rostral trigeminal subnucleus consists of a single part but the caudal subnucleus is divided into two parts. Motor neurons for the dilator operculi and levator hyomandibulae muscles are located in the lateral part of the caudal subnucleus; the medial part of the caudal subnucleus contains only dilator operculi motor neurons. The single caudal subnucleus in carp is located laterally, and contains motor neurons of both the dilator operculi and levator hyomandibulae muscles. Differences in the organization of the trigeminal motor nucleus may relate to the use of the dilator operculi muscle for aggressive display behavior by perciform fishes such as Betta but not by cypriniform fishes such as carp. Five species of perciform fishes that perform gill-cover erection behavior had a Betta-like pattern of organization of the caudal trigeminal nucleus and a similar distribution of dilator operculi motor neurons. Goldfish, which like carp are

  20. Mechanisms of flow and ACh-induced dilation in rat soleus arterioles are altered by hindlimb unweighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, William G.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Laughlin, M. Harold

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that endothelium-dependent dilation (flow-induced dilation and ACh-induced dilation) in rat soleus muscle arterioles is impaired by hindlimb unweighting (HLU). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (approximately 300 g) were exposed to HLU or weight-bearing control (Con) conditions for 14 days. Soleus first-order (1A) and second-order (2A) arterioles were isolated, cannulated, and exposed to step increases in luminal flow at constant pressure. Flow-induced dilation was not impaired by HLU in 1A or 2A arterioles. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin (Indo; 50 microM) did not alter flow-induced dilation in 1As or 2As. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA; 300 microM) reduced flow-induced dilation by 65-70% in Con and HLU 1As. In contrast, L-NNA abolished flow-induced dilation in 2As from Con rats but had no effect in HLU 2As. Combined treatment with L-NNA + Indo reduced tone in 1As and 2As from Con rats, but flow-induced dilation in the presence of L-NNA + Indo was not different from responses without inhibitors in either Con or HLU 1As or 2As. HLU also did not impair ACh-induced dilation (10(-9)-10(-4) M) in soleus 2As. L-NNA reduced ACh-induced dilation by approximately 40% in Con 2As but abolished dilation in HLU 2As. Indo did not alter ACh-induced dilation in Con or HLU 2As, whereas combined treatment with L-NNA + Indo abolished ACh-induced dilation in 2As from both groups. We conclude that flow-induced dilation (1As and 2As) was preserved after 2 wk HLU, but HLU decreased the contribution of NOS in mediating flow-induced dilation and increased the contribution of a NOS- and cyclooxygenase-independent mechanism (possibly endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor). In soleus 2As, ACh-induced dilation was preserved after 2-wk HLU but the contribution of NOS in mediating ACh-induced dilation was increased.

  1. Interplay between the effects of a Protein Kinase C phosphomimic (T204E) and a dilated cardiomyopathy mutation (K211Δ or R206W) in rat cardiac troponin T blunts the magnitude of muscle length-mediated crossbridge recruitment against the β-myosin heavy chain background.

    PubMed

    Michael, John Jeshurun; Gollapudi, Sampath K; Chandra, Murali

    2016-06-01

    Failing hearts of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)-patients reveal systolic dysfunction and upregulation of several Protein Kinase C (PKC) isoforms. Recently, we demonstrated that the functional effects of T204E, a PKC phosphomimic of cardiac troponin T (TnT), were differently modulated by α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. Therefore, we hypothesized that the interplay between the effects of T204E and a DCM-linked mutation (K211Δ or R206W) in TnT would modulate contractile parameters linked-to systolic function in an MHC-dependent manner. To test our hypothesis, five TnT variants (wildtype, K211Δ, K211Δ + T204E, R206W, and R206W + T204E) were generated and individually reconstituted into demembranated cardiac muscle fibers from normal (α-MHC) and propylthiouracil-treated (β-MHC) rats. Steady-state and mechano-dynamic measurements were performed on reconstituted fibers. Myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity (pCa50) was decreased by both K211Δ and R206W to a greater extent in α-MHC fibers (~0.15 pCa units) than in β-MHC fibers (~0.06 pCa units). However, T204E exacerbated the attenuating influence of both mutants on pCa50 only in β-MHC fibers. Moreover, the magnitude of muscle length (ML)-mediated crossbridge (XB) recruitment was decreased by K211Δ + T204E (~47 %), R206W (~34 %), and R206W + T204E (~36 %) only in β-MHC fibers. In relevance to human hearts, which predominantly express β-MHC, our data suggest that the interplay between the effects of DCM mutations, PKC phosphomimic in TnT, and β-MHC lead to systolic dysfunction by attenuating pCa50 and the magnitude of ML-mediated XB recruitment. PMID:27411801

  2. Rapamycin decreases airway remodeling and hyperreactivity in a transgenic model of noninflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Elizabeth L; Hardie, William D; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Acciani, Thomas H; Pastura, Patricia A; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Hershey, Gurjit Khurana; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2011-12-01

    Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and remodeling are cardinal features of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New therapeutic targets are needed as some patients are refractory to current therapies and develop progressive airway remodeling and worsening AHR. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cellular proliferation and survival. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin inhibits inflammation and AHR in allergic asthma models, but it is unclear if rapamycin can directly inhibit airway remodeling and AHR, or whether its therapeutic effects are entirely mediated through immunosuppression. To address this question, we utilized transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) transgenic mice null for the transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1) (TGF-α Tg/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice). These mice develop airway smooth muscle thickening and AHR in the absence of altered lung inflammation, as previously reported. In this study, TGF-α Tg/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice lost body weight and developed severe AHR after 3 wk of lung-specific TGF-α induction. Rapamycin treatment prevented body weight loss, airway wall thickening, abnormal lung mechanics, and increases in airway resistance to methacholine after 3 wk of TGF-α induction. Increases in tissue damping and airway elastance were also attenuated in transgenic mice treated with rapamycin. TGF-α/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice on doxycycline for 8 wk developed severe airway remodeling. Immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin and morphometric analysis showed that rapamycin treatment prevented airway smooth muscle thickening around small airways. Pentachrome staining, assessments of lung collagen and fibronectin mRNA levels, indicated that rapamycin also attenuated fibrotic pathways induced by TGF-α expression for 8 wk. Thus rapamycin reduced airway remodeling and AHR, demonstrating an important role for mTOR signaling in TGF-α-induced/EGF receptor-mediated reactive airway disease. PMID:21903885

  3. Rapamycin decreases airway remodeling and hyperreactivity in a transgenic model of noninflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Elizabeth L; Hardie, William D; Mushaben, Elizabeth M; Acciani, Thomas H; Pastura, Patricia A; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Hershey, Gurjit Khurana; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Le Cras, Timothy D

    2011-12-01

    Airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and remodeling are cardinal features of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. New therapeutic targets are needed as some patients are refractory to current therapies and develop progressive airway remodeling and worsening AHR. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of cellular proliferation and survival. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin inhibits inflammation and AHR in allergic asthma models, but it is unclear if rapamycin can directly inhibit airway remodeling and AHR, or whether its therapeutic effects are entirely mediated through immunosuppression. To address this question, we utilized transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) transgenic mice null for the transcription factor early growth response-1 (Egr-1) (TGF-α Tg/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice). These mice develop airway smooth muscle thickening and AHR in the absence of altered lung inflammation, as previously reported. In this study, TGF-α Tg/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice lost body weight and developed severe AHR after 3 wk of lung-specific TGF-α induction. Rapamycin treatment prevented body weight loss, airway wall thickening, abnormal lung mechanics, and increases in airway resistance to methacholine after 3 wk of TGF-α induction. Increases in tissue damping and airway elastance were also attenuated in transgenic mice treated with rapamycin. TGF-α/Egr-1(ko/ko) mice on doxycycline for 8 wk developed severe airway remodeling. Immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin and morphometric analysis showed that rapamycin treatment prevented airway smooth muscle thickening around small airways. Pentachrome staining, assessments of lung collagen and fibronectin mRNA levels, indicated that rapamycin also attenuated fibrotic pathways induced by TGF-α expression for 8 wk. Thus rapamycin reduced airway remodeling and AHR, demonstrating an important role for mTOR signaling in TGF-α-induced/EGF receptor-mediated reactive airway disease.

  4. On turbulence in dilatant dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, Helmut Z.; Wessling, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new theory on the behaviour of shear-thickening (dilatant) fluids under turbulent conditions. The structure of a dilatant colloidal fluid in turbulent motion may be characterized by (at least) four characteristic length scales: (i) the ‘statistically largest’ turbulent scale, {λ }0, labeling the begin of the inertial part of the wavenumber spectrum; (ii) the energy-containing scale, { L }; (iii) Kolmogorov’s micro-scale, {λ }{ K }, related with the size of the smallest vortices existing for a given kinematic viscosity and forcing; (iv) the inner (‘colloidal’) micro-scale, {λ }i, typically representing a major stable material property of the colloidal fluid. In particular, for small ratios r={λ }i/{λ }{ K }∼ { O }(1), various interactions between colloidal structures and smallest turbulent eddies can be expected. In the present paper we discuss particularly that for ρ ={λ }0/{λ }{ K }\\to { O }(1) turbulence (in the narrow, inertial sense) is strangled and chaotic but less mixing fluid motions remain. We start from a new stochastic, micro-mechanical turbulence theory without empirical parameters valid for inviscid fluids as seen in publications by Baumert in 2013 and 2015. It predicts e.g. von Karman’s constant correctly as 1/\\sqrt{2 π }=0.399. In its generalized version for non-zero viscosity and shear-thickening behavior presented in this contribution, it predicts two solution branches for the steady state: The first characterizes a family of states with swift (inertial) turbulent mixing and small {λ }{ K }, potentially approaching {λ }i. The second branch characterizes a state family with ρ \\to { O }(1) and thus strangled turbulence, ρ ≈ { O }(1). Stability properties and a potential dynamic commuting between the two solution branches had to be left for future research.

  5. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  6. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  7. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  8. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator....

  10. 21 CFR 876.5520 - Urethral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urethral dilator. 876.5520 Section 876.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5520 Urethral dilator....

  11. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  12. 21 CFR 876.5520 - Urethral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urethral dilator. 876.5520 Section 876.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5520 Urethral dilator....

  13. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator....

  14. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator....

  15. 21 CFR 876.5520 - Urethral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urethral dilator. 876.5520 Section 876.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5520 Urethral dilator....

  16. 21 CFR 876.5520 - Urethral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urethral dilator. 876.5520 Section 876.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5520 Urethral dilator....

  17. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  18. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator....

  19. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5450 - Rectal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rectal dilator. 876.5450 Section 876.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5450 Rectal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5520 - Urethral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urethral dilator. 876.5520 Section 876.5520 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5520 Urethral dilator....

  2. 21 CFR 876.5470 - Ureteral dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral dilator. 876.5470 Section 876.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5470 Ureteral dilator....

  3. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal dilator. 876.5365 Section 876.5365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator....

  4. Outpatient experience with oesophageal endoscopic dilation.

    PubMed

    Jani, P G; Mburugu, P G

    1998-07-01

    Between March 1990 and August 1997, outpatient endoscopic balloon dilation was performed for oesophageal strictures which developed secondary to malignancies, peptic strictures, post surgical narrowing, achalasia cardia, corrosive ingestion and other causes. A total of 169 dilations were performed in the 92 cases with an average of 1.8 dilation/case (Range 1 to 8). Dilation was possible in all 92 cases without the need for fluoroscopic monitoring. Twenty three (13.6%) of the dilations were performed using pneumatic balloon while in 146(86.4%) cases wire guided metal olives were used. There were nine minor complications which were treated with medication on an outpatient basis and four major complications which required inpatient care. Three of these had perforation of the oesophagus and one died. One other patient developed aspiration pneumonia and subsequently died.

  5. Dilation framing camera with 4 ps resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Houzhi; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Jinyuan; Xie, Weixin; Bai, Yanli; Lei, Yunfei; Liao, Yubo; Niu, Hanben

    2016-04-01

    A framing camera using pulse-dilation technology is reported in this article. The camera uses pulse dilation of an electron signal from a pulsed photo-cathode (PC) to achieve high temporal resolution. While the PC is not pulsed, the measured temporal resolution of the camera without pulse-dilation is about 71 ps. While the excitation pulse is applied on the PC, the measured temporal resolution is improved to 4 ps by using the pulse-dilation technology. The spatial resolution of the dilation framing camera is also measured, which is better than 100 μm. The relationship between the temporal resolution and the PC bias voltage is obtained. The variation of the temporal resolution with the gradient of the PC excitation pulse is also provided.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description Dilated cardiomyopathy with ataxia (DCMA) syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  7. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  8. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future.

  9. Gastric dilatation and volvulus in a brachycephalic dog with hiatal hernia.

    PubMed

    Aslanian, M E; Sharp, C R; Garneau, M S

    2014-10-01

    A brachycephalic dog was presented with an acute onset of retching and abdominal discomfort. The dog had a chronic history of stertor and exercise intolerance suggestive of brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome. Radiographs were consistent with a Type II hiatal hernia. The dog was referred and within hours of admission became acutely painful and developed tympanic abdominal distension. A right lateral abdominal radiograph confirmed gastric dilatation and volvulus with herniation of the pylorus through the hiatus. An emergency exploratory coeliotomy was performed, during which the stomach was derotated, and an incisional gastropexy, herniorrhaphy and splenectomy were performed. A staphylectomy was performed immediately following the exploratory coeliotomy. The dog recovered uneventfully. Gastric dilatation and volvulus is a potentially life-threatening complication that can occur in dogs with Type II hiatal hernia and should be considered a surgical emergency.

  10. Mechanical properties of different airway stents.

    PubMed

    Ratnovsky, Anat; Regev, Noa; Wald, Shaily; Kramer, Mordechai; Naftali, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Airway stents improve pulmonary function and quality of life in patients suffering from airway obstruction. The aim of this study was to compare main types of stents (silicone, balloon-dilated metal, self-expanding metal, and covered self-expanding metal) in terms of their mechanical properties and the radial forces they exert on the trachea. Mechanical measurements were carried out using a force gauge and specially designed adaptors fabricated in our lab. Numerical simulations were performed for eight different stent geometries, inserted into trachea models. The results show a clear correlation between stent diameter (oversizing) and the levels of stress it exerts on the trachea. Compared with uncovered metal stents, metal stents that are covered with less stiff material exert significantly less stress on the trachea while still maintaining strong contact with it. The use of such stents may reduce formation of mucosa necrosis and fistulas while still preventing stent migration. Silicone stents produce the lowest levels of stress, which may be due to weak contact between the stent and the trachea and can explain their propensity for migration. Unexpectedly, stents made of the same materials exerted different stresses due to differences in their structure. Stenosis significantly increases stress levels in all stents.

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor as a key inducer of angiogenesis in the asthmatic airways.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Norbert; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2013-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by structural airway changes, which are known as airway remodeling, including smooth muscle hypertrophy, goblet cell hyperplasia, subepithelial fibrosis, and angiogenesis. Vascular remodeling in asthmatic lungs results from increased angiogenesis, which is mainly mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF is a key regulator of blood vessel growth in the airways of asthma patients by promoting proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells and inducing vascular leakage and permeability. In addition, VEGF induces allergic inflammation, enhances allergic sensitization, and has a role in Th2 type inflammatory responses. Specific inhibitors of VEGF and blockers of its receptors might be useful to control chronic airway inflammation and vascular remodeling, and might be a new therapeutic approach for chronic inflammatory airway disease like asthma.

  12. The genetics of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dellefave, Lisa; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review More than forty different individual genes have been implicated in the inheritance of dilated cardiomyopathy. For a subset of these genes, mutations can lead to a spectrum of cardiomyopathy that extends to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction. In nearly all cases, there is an increased risk of arrhythmias. With some genetic mutations, extracardiac manifestations are likely to be present. The precise genetic etiology can usually not be discerned from the cardiac and/or extracardiac manifestations and requires molecular genetic diagnosis for prognostic determination and cardiac care. Recent findings Newer technologies are influencing genetic testing, especially cardiomyopathy genetic testing, where an increased number of genes are now routinely being tested simultaneously. While this approach to testing multiple genes is increasing the diagnostic yield, the analysis of multiple genes in one test is also resulting in a large amount of genetic information of unclear significance. Summary Genetic testing is highly useful in the care of patients and families, since it guides diagnosis, influences care and aids in prognosis. However, the large amount of benign human genetic variation may complicate genetic results, and often requires a skilled team to accurately interpret the findings. PMID:20186049

  13. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient's risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  14. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient’s risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  15. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient's risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  16. Airway statuses and nasopharyngeal airway use for airway obstruction in syndromic craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Kouga, Takeshi; Tanoue, Koji; Matsui, Kiyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Syndromic craniosynostosis is associated with a high rate of respiratory difficulty, due mainly to midfacial hypoplasia. Nasopharyngeal airway establishment has been reported as the first-line approach to airway obstruction and may obviate the need for a highly invasive tracheotomy. No previous studies have compared airway obstruction status in syndromic craniosynostosis between cases requiring and not requiring airway managements. We focus on nasopharyngeal airway use and airway status outcomes to assess respiratory difficulty in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis. A retrospective data analysis of 51 cases with syndromic craniosynostosis was carried out. We divided 30 of the 51 cases with lateral pharyngeal x-rays taken before operations affecting airway diameters into 2 groups, one with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and the other with one or both of these interventions, and the mean diameters for 8 indices related to the pharyngeal space were compared. Cases with respiratory difficulty due to nasopharyngeal stenosis and requiring airway managements comprised a significantly higher proportion of those with Pfeiffer syndrome than patients with Crouzon or Apert syndrome. Comparative examination of lateral x-ray cephalometry between cases with neither nasopharyngeal airway insertion nor tracheotomy and cases with one or both revealed oropharyngeal diameters tended to be smaller in those with interventions. Cases requiring nasopharyngeal airway insertion were able to continue nasopharyngeal airway use for more than 1 year and a considerable number avoided tracheotomy. It may be worth considering an oropharyngeal-bypass nasopharyngeal airway before performing a tracheotomy. PMID:24820706

  17. From electrocautery, balloon dilatation, neodymium-doped:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser to argon plasma coagulation and cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Ashutosh; Pickering, Edward M; Lee, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant advancement in the development/application of therapeutics in thoracic diseases. Ablation methods using heat or cold energy in the airway is safe and effective for treating complex airway disorders including malignant and non-malignant central airway obstruction (CAO) without limiting the impact of future definitive therapy. Timely and efficient use of endobronchial ablative therapies combined with mechanical debridement or stent placement results in immediate relief of dyspnea for CAO. Therapeutic modalities reviewed in this article including electrocautery, balloon dilation (BD), neodymium-doped:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and cryotherapy are often combined to achieve the desired results. This review aims to provide a clinically oriented review of these technologies in the modern era of interventional pulmonology (IP).

  18. From electrocautery, balloon dilatation, neodymium-doped:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser to argon plasma coagulation and cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Edward M.; Lee, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant advancement in the development/application of therapeutics in thoracic diseases. Ablation methods using heat or cold energy in the airway is safe and effective for treating complex airway disorders including malignant and non-malignant central airway obstruction (CAO) without limiting the impact of future definitive therapy. Timely and efficient use of endobronchial ablative therapies combined with mechanical debridement or stent placement results in immediate relief of dyspnea for CAO. Therapeutic modalities reviewed in this article including electrocautery, balloon dilation (BD), neodymium-doped:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and cryotherapy are often combined to achieve the desired results. This review aims to provide a clinically oriented review of these technologies in the modern era of interventional pulmonology (IP). PMID:26807284

  19. The effect of asthma on the perimeter of the airway basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Elliot, John G; Budgeon, Charley A; Harji, Salima; Jones, Robyn L; James, Alan L; Green, Francis H

    2015-11-15

    When comparing the pathology of airways in individuals with and without asthma, the perimeter of the basement membrane (Pbm) is used as a marker of airway size, as it is independent of airway smooth muscle shortening or airway collapse. The extent to which the Pbm is itself altered in asthma has not been quantified. The aim of this study was to compare the Pbm from the same anatomical sites in postmortem lungs from subjects with (n = 55) and without (n = 30) asthma (nonfatal or fatal). Large and small airways were systematically sampled at equidistant "levels" from the apical segment of the left upper lobes and anterior and basal segments of the left lower lobes of lungs fixed in inflation. The length of the Pbm was estimated from cross sections of airway at each relative level. Linear mixed models were used to investigate the relationships between Pbm and sex, age, height, smoking status, airway level, and asthma group. The final model showed significant interactions between Pbm and airway level in small (<3 mm) airways, in subjects having asthma (P < 0.0001), and by sex (P < 0.0001). No significant interactions for Pbm between asthma groups were observed for larger airways (equivalent to a diameter of ∼3 mm and greater) or smoking status. Asthma is not associated with remodeling of the Pbm in large airways. In medium and small airways, the decrease in Pbm in asthma (≤20%) would not account for the published differences in wall area or area of smooth muscle observed in cases of severe asthma.

  20. Vascular Anomalies and Airway Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Caroline; Lee, Edward I.; Edmonds, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies, both tumors and malformations, can occur anywhere in the body, including the airway, often without any external manifestations. However, vascular anomalies involving the airway deserve special consideration as proper recognition and management can be lifesaving. In this article, the authors discuss vascular anomalies as they pertains to the airway, focusing on proper diagnosis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:25045336

  1. Epithelial expression of profibrotic mediators in a model of allergen-induced airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Margaret M; Leigh, Richard; Bonniaud, Philippe; Ellis, Russ; Wattie, Jennifer; Smith, Mary Jo; Martin, Gail; Panju, Mohammed; Inman, Mark D; Gauldie, Jack

    2005-02-01

    Airway remodeling, including subepithelial fibrosis, is a characteristic feature of asthma and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. We examined expression of genes related to airway wall fibrosis in a model of chronic allergen-induced airway dysfunction using laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time PCR. BALB/c mice were sensitized and subjected to chronic ovalbumin exposure over a 12-wk period, after which they were rested and then harvested 2 and 8 wk after the last exposure. Chronic allergen-exposed mice had significantly increased indices of airway remodeling and airway hyperreactivity at all time points, although no difference in expression of fibrosis-related genes was found when mRNA extracted from whole lung was examined. In contrast, fibrosis-related gene expression was significantly upregulated in mRNA obtained from microdissected bronchial wall at 2 wk after chronic allergen exposure. In addition, when bronchial wall epithelium and smooth muscle were separately microdissected, gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta1 and plasminogen activating inhibitor-1 were significantly upregulated only in the airway epithelium. These data suggest that transforming growth factor-beta1 and other profibrotic mediators produced by airway wall, and specifically, airway epithelium, play an important role in the pathophysiology of airway remodeling.

  2. Airway Defense Control Mediated via Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Kocmalova, M; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Banovcin, P; Sutovska, M

    2016-01-01

    Expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) takes place in the airways and the role of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 in the control of airway's defense reflexes has been confirmed. The activation of Nav channels is crucial for cough initiation and airway smooth muscle reactivity, but it is unknown whether these channels regulate ciliary beating. This study evaluated the involvement of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 channels in the airway defense mechanisms using their pharmacological blockers in healthy guinea pigs and in the experimental allergic asthma model. Asthma was modeled by ovalbumin sensitization over a period of 21 days. Blockade of Nav1.7 channels significantly decreased airway smooth muscle reactivity in vivo, the number of cough efforts, and the cilia beat frequency in healthy animals. In the allergic asthma model, blockade of Nav1.8 efficiently relieved symptoms of asthma, without adversely affecting cilia beat frequency. The study demonstrates that Nav1.8 channel antagonism has a potential to alleviate cough and bronchial hyperreactivity in asthma. PMID:27161110

  3. An Erupted Dilated Odontoma: A Rare Presentation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nagra, Amritpreet; Singh, Gurkeerat; Nagpal, Archna; Soin, Atul; Bhardwaj, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    A dilated odontoma is an extremely rare developmental anomaly represented as a dilatation of the crown and root as a consequence of a deep, enamel-lined invagination and is considered a severe variant of dens invaginatus. An oval shape of the tooth lacking morphological characteristics of a crown or root implies that the invagination happened in the initial stages of morphodifferentiation. Spontaneous eruption of an odontoma is a rare occurrence and the occurrence of a dilated odontoma in a supernumerary tooth is even rarer with only a few case reports documented in the English literature. We present an extremely rare case of erupted dilated odontoma occurring in the supernumerary tooth in anterior maxillary region in an 18-year-old male, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first ever case reported in English literature.

  4. Nemaline myopathy with dilated cardiomyopathy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Gatayama, Ryohei; Ueno, Kentaro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Yanagi, Sadamitsu; Ueda, Hideaki; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Seiyo

    2013-06-01

    We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with nemaline myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. The combination of nemaline myopathy and cardiomyopathy is rare, and this is the first reported case of dilated cardiomyopathy associated with childhood-onset nemaline myopathy. A novel mutation, p.W358C, in ACTA1 was detected in this patient. An unusual feature of this case was that the patient's cardiac failure developed during early childhood with no delay of gross motor milestones. The use of a β-blocker did not improve his clinical course, and the patient died 6 months after diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Congenital nonprogressive nemaline myopathy is not necessarily a benign disorder: deterioration can occur early in the course of dilated cardiomyopathy with neuromuscular disease, and careful clinical evaluation is therefore necessary. PMID:23650303

  5. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  9. An Erupted Dilated Odontoma: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Nagra, Amritpreet; Singh, Gurkeerat; Nagpal, Archna; Soin, Atul; Bhardwaj, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    A dilated odontoma is an extremely rare developmental anomaly represented as a dilatation of the crown and root as a consequence of a deep, enamel-lined invagination and is considered a severe variant of dens invaginatus. An oval shape of the tooth lacking morphological characteristics of a crown or root implies that the invagination happened in the initial stages of morphodifferentiation. Spontaneous eruption of an odontoma is a rare occurrence and the occurrence of a dilated odontoma in a supernumerary tooth is even rarer with only a few case reports documented in the English literature. We present an extremely rare case of erupted dilated odontoma occurring in the supernumerary tooth in anterior maxillary region in an 18-year-old male, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first ever case reported in English literature. PMID:26989523

  10. Molecular Pathology of Dilated Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Pathak, S K; Kukreja, R C; Hess, M

    1996-02-01

    The term idiopathic, defined as being of unknown etiology or mechanism, is no longer applicable to the dilated cardiomyopathies. The tools of molecular biology and clinical investigation have made significant progress, and it is now to the rare and exceptional case that one is forced to apply the term idiopathic. Further, having arrived at more precise cause, direct therapeutic intervention will become possible. The concept of gene insertion and "genetic therapy" is under active investigation. Unfortunately, the significant advances in the cause and disease mechanisms of DCM have not been matched in therapeutics. With few exceptions, we indirectly treat the DCMs by managing the CHF syndrome. However, several important points have emerged. The concept of LV afterload reduction is valid and efficacious. The use of vasodilator therapy has significantly reduced both mortality and morbidity and, in certain forms of cardiomyopathy (e.g., hypertensive, alcoholic, and doxorubicin-related), have significantly altered hemodynamics and permitted the injured heart to heal and return to a near normal functional state. However, as much as we want to congratulate ourselves on the progress bought with the use of vasodilators and ACE inhibitors, one must keep in mind that under the best of circumstances, the DCMs still carry an unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. A 40% to 50% 4- to 5-year mortality rate is depressing. Herein lies the challenge. With the significant progress in pathogenesis and etiology, we now stand at the threshold of new, innovative advances in therapeutics. These new concepts in both therapeutics and prevention will require courage, dedication, and hard work. But bit by bit, these seemingly insolvable problems will yield to the discipline and imagination of the investigator. The DCMs will continue to be a challenging problem for future investigators. Progress has been dramatic, and it should continue even at an accelerated pace as we approach the twenty

  11. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  12. Airway clearance strategies in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Main, Eleanor; Grillo, Lizzie; Rand, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Many patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis present with common symptoms in clinical domains that appear to benefit from airway clearance strategies. These symptoms include chronic productive cough, retention of excessive, purulent mucus in dilated airways, impairment of normal mucociliary clearance (MCC), atelectasis, breathlessness, fatigue, respiratory inflammation, fever, infection, and airflow obstruction. Airway clearance strategies may involve singular and focused interventions for the purpose of removing secretions and improving lung recruitment and gas exchange in patients with atelectasis. Strategies may also involve indirect or adjunctive interventions that facilitate or enhance effective airway clearance at different ages or stages of the disease process, for example, inhalation therapy, exercise, oxygen therapy, or noninvasive ventilation. The aim is to optimize care by selecting any one or combination of these in responding intelligently and sensitively to individual and changing patient requirements during their lifetime. Currently, a solid evidence base does not exist for airway clearance strategies in CF and non-CF bronchiectasis, and much of airway clearance clinical practice remains in the domain of clinical expertise. The paucity of evidence is partly explained by the relatively immature research machinery in allied health care internationally but is also partly to do with inadequate or inappropriate research designs. This article aims to provide an overview of the nature of, and physiological basis for, the direct and indirect airway clearance strategies in CF and non-CF bronchiectasis with reference to the best available evidence. PMID:25826592

  13. Resveratrol Inhibits Aortic Root Dilatation in the Fbn1C1039G/+ Marfan Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hibender, Stijntje; Franken, Romy; van Roomen, Cindy; ter Braake, Anique; van der Made, Ingeborg; Schermer, Edith E.; Gunst, Quinn; van den Hoff, Maurice J.; Lutgens, Esther; Pinto, Yigal M.; Groenink, Maarten; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Mulder, Barbara J.M.; de Vries, Carlie J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective— Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. Patients with MFS are at risk of aortic aneurysm formation and dissection. Usually, blood pressure–lowering drugs are used to reduce aortic events; however, this is not sufficient for most patients. In the aorta of smooth muscle cell–specific sirtuin-1–deficient mice, spontaneous aneurysm formation and senescence are observed. Resveratrol is known to enhance sirtuin-1 activity and to reduce senescence, which prompted us to investigate the effectiveness of resveratrol in inhibition of aortic dilatation in the Fbn1C1039G/+ MFS mouse model. Approach and Results— Aortic senescence strongly correlates with aortic root dilatation rate in MFS mice. However, although resveratrol inhibits aortic dilatation, it only shows a trend toward reduced aortic senescence. Resveratrol enhances nuclear localization of sirtuin-1 in the vessel wall and, in contrast to losartan, does not affect leukocyte infiltration nor activation of SMAD2 and extracellular signal–regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Interestingly, specific sirtuin-1 activation (SRT1720) or inhibition (sirtinol) in MFS mice does not affect aortic root dilatation rate, although senescence is changed. Resveratrol reduces aortic elastin breaks and decreases micro-RNA-29b expression coinciding with enhanced antiapoptotic Bcl-2 expression and decreased number of terminal apoptotic cells. In cultured smooth muscle cells, the resveratrol effect on micro-RNA-29b downregulation is endothelial cell and nuclear factor κB-dependent. Conclusions— Resveratrol inhibits aortic root dilatation in MFS mice by promoting elastin integrity and smooth muscle cell survival, involving downregulation of the aneurysm-related micro-RNA-29b in the aorta. On the basis of these data, resveratrol holds promise as a novel intervention strategy for patients with MFS. PMID:27283746

  14. Novel short-duration heating balloon dilatation with uniform temperature distribution: the heating conditions to suppress neo-intimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kunio, M; Shimazaki, N; Arai, T; Sakurada, M

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the influences on smooth muscle cells and the chronic performances of our novel short-duration heating balloon dilatation to reveal the heating conditions which can suppress the neo-intimal hyperplasia after our heating dilatations. The temperature of prototype balloon catheter surface was measured during short-duration heating balloon dilatation ex vivo. There existed 2 °C temperature variations in the long direction of prototype balloon catheter at a maximum. The neo-intimal hyperplasia occupancy rate after our short-duration heating dilatations were measured in vivo porcine study. The neo-intimal hyperplasia was suppressed most at 75 °C in balloon peak temperature in vivo. The estimated dead rate of smooth muscle cells at this condition was about 13% by the Arrhenius equation. We think that the suppression of neo-intimal hyperplasia was obtained after our short-duration heating dilatation due to the proper decrease of smooth muscle cells by heating and no thermal damages to the adventitia and surrounding tissues.

  15. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  16. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  17. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  18. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  19. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  20. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry.

  1. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

    PubMed

    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures.

  2. ROCK insufficiency attenuates ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, David I; Mathews, Joel A; Park, Chan Y; Cho, Youngji; Hunt, Gabrielle; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Liao, James K; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-10-01

    Ozone causes airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and pulmonary inflammation. Rho kinase (ROCK) is a key regulator of smooth muscle cell contraction and inflammatory cell migration. To determine the contribution of the two ROCK isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2 to ozone-induced AHR, we exposed wild-type, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice to air or ozone (2 ppm for 3 h) and evaluated mice 24 h later. ROCK1 or ROCK2 haploinsufficiency did not affect airway responsiveness in air-exposed mice but significantly reduced ozone-induced AHR, with a greater reduction in ROCK2(+/-) mice despite increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) inflammatory cells in ROCK2(+/-) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, ozone-induced increases in BAL hyaluronan, a matrix protein implicated in ozone-induced AHR, were lower in ROCK1(+/-) but not ROCK2(+/-) mice. Ozone-induced increases in other inflammatory moieties reported to contribute to ozone-induced AHR (IL-17A, osteopontin, TNFα) were not different in wild-type vs. ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. We also observed a dose-dependent reduction in ozone-induced AHR after treatment with the ROCK1/ROCK2 inhibitor fasudil, even though fasudil was administered after induction of inflammation. Ozone increased pulmonary expression of ROCK2 but not ROCK1 or RhoA. A ROCK2 inhibitor, SR3677, reduced contractile forces in primary human airway smooth muscle cells, confirming a role for ROCK2 in airway smooth muscle contraction. Our results demonstrate that ozone-induced AHR requires ROCK. Whereas ROCK1-dependent changes in hyaluronan may contribute to ROCK1's role in O3-induced AHR, the role of ROCK2 is downstream of inflammation, likely at the level of airway smooth muscle contraction.

  3. A case of nemaline myopathy with associated dilated cardiomyopathy and respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Rihito; Kamimura, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yoji; Saito, Toshihiko; Toyama, Hideshi; Dejima, Tohru; Inada, Haruhiko; Miwa, Yoshiyuki; Uchino, Kazuaki; Umemura, Satoshi; Shimizu, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a representative form of congenital myopathy, and is characterized by nemaline bodies in muscle fibers. Here we report a 47-year-old man with congenital nemaline myopathy complicated with dilated cardiomyopathy-related heart failure, and restrictive respiratory failure. The complication of dilated cardiomyopathy in nemaline myopathy has rarely been reported. In this case, nemaline bodies were detected in the cardiac muscle fibers, demonstrating the presence of underlying disease-related myocardial degeneration. The patient responded to the combination of conventional therapy for heart failure including β-blocker and noninvasive continuous positive-pressure ventilation for respiratory failure. His general condition has been stable during a 10-month follow up period. PMID:22188717

  4. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  5. Hyperinsulinemia Potentiates Airway Responsiveness to Parasympathetic Nerve Stimulation in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, David B.; Fryer, Allison D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a substantial risk factor for developing asthma, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. We tested the role of insulin in airway responsiveness to nerve stimulation using rats genetically prone or resistant to diet-induced obesity. Airway response to vagus nerve stimulation and airway M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor function were measured in obese-prone and -resistant rats with high or low circulating insulin. The effects of insulin on nerve-mediated human airway smooth muscle contraction and human M2 muscarinic receptor function were tested in vitro. Our data show that increased vagally mediated bronchoconstriction in obesity is associated with hyperinsulinemia and loss of inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptor function on parasympathetic nerves. Obesity did not induce airway inflammation or increase airway wall thickness. Smooth muscle contraction to acetylcholine was not increased, indicating that hyperresponsiveness is mediated at the level of airway nerves. Reducing serum insulin with streptozotocin protected neuronal M2 receptor function and prevented airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in obese rats. Replacing insulin restored dysfunction of neuronal M2 receptors and airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in streptozotocin-treated obese rats. Treatment with insulin caused loss of M2 receptor function, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in obese-resistant rats, and inhibited human neuronal M2 receptor function in vitro. This study shows that it is not obesity per se but hyperinsulinemia accompanying obesity that potentiates vagally induced bronchoconstriction by inhibiting neuronal M2 muscarinic receptors and increasing acetylcholine release from airway parasympathetic nerves. PMID:24605871

  6. Biliary amylase and congenital choledochal dilatation.

    PubMed

    Davenport, M; Stringer, M D; Howard, E R

    1995-03-01

    The relationship between levels of biliary amylase measured at operation and clinical features was studied in a series of 55 children with congenital biliary dilatation (choledochal cyst) who presented between 1976 and 1993. There were 36 cystic and 19 fusiforms dilatations in the series. The most common modes of presentation were painless jaundice (n = 23) and pancreatitis (n = 22). Five infants presented with abnormal antenatal ultrasound examinations. Children with pancreatitis were older than those with painless jaundice (4.2 versus 1.5 years; P = .005), and a higher proportion had raised levels of biliary amylase (100% versus 44%; P < .0001). There was no difference in the age at presentation (P = .32), clinical mode of presentation (P = .3), or the level of biliary amylase (P = .25) between cystic and fusiform dilatations. A correlation was found between age at surgery and biliary amylase in the cystic (rs = 0.55; P = .001) but not in the fusiform group (P = .22). All infants with antenatal diagnoses were cystic dilatations. Choledochal cystic dilatations that were diagnosed antenatally did not have significant amylase reflux, suggesting that the aetiology of this subgroup is truly congenital. Children who present at a later age with pancreatitis invariably have high levels of biliary amylase, which is presumed to occur because of a common channel and reflux of biliary and pancreatic secretions.

  7. A new rodent model for obstructive sleep apnea: effects on ATP-mediated dilations in cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Crossland, Randy F; Durgan, David J; Lloyd, Eric E; Phillips, Sharon C; Reddy, Anilkumar K; Marrelli, Sean P; Bryan, Robert M

    2013-08-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a condition in which the upper airway collapses during sleep, is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Little is known how OSA affects the cerebral circulation. The goals of this study were 1) to develop a rat model of chronic OSA that involved apnea and 2) to test the hypothesis that 4 wk of apneas during the sleep cycle alters endothelium-mediated dilations in middle cerebral arteries (MCAs). An obstruction device, which was chronically implanted into the trachea of rats, inflated to obstruct the airway 30 times/h for 8 h during the sleep cycle. After 4 wk of apneas, MCAs were isolated, pressurized, and exposed to luminally applied ATP, an endothelial P2Y2 receptor agonist that dilates through endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH). Dilations to ATP were attenuated ~30% in MCAs from rats undergoing apneas compared with those from a sham control group (P < 0.04 group effect; n = 7 and 10, respectively). When the NO component of the dilation was blocked to isolate the EDH component, the response to ATP in MCAs from the sham and apnea groups was similar. This finding suggests that the attenuated dilation to ATP must occur through reduced NO. In summary, we have successfully developed a novel rat model for chronic OSA that incorporates apnea during the sleep cycle. Using this model, we demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction occurred by 4 wk of apnea, likely increasing the vulnerability of the brain to cerebrovascular related accidents.

  8. Orthogonal arrays in normal and injured respiratory airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Gordon, R E

    1985-02-01

    Orthogonal arrays are found on plasma membranes of glial cells, in the central nervous system, on muscle plasma membranes at neuromuscular junctions, and on a variety of epithelial cells. These structures have been correlated with ion flux. With the aid of freeze fracture technique, orthogonal particle arrays were found on plasma membranes on airway epithelial cells of rats and hamsters. They have been found in abundance at the base of secretory cells throughout normal airway epithelium. These structures were found to increase in number during regeneration in response to injury and they were found in great numbers on plasma membranes of all airway cells in response to acute and chronic NO2 exposure. The lateral and basal plasma membranes of the respiratory epithelium are a new source for studying orthogonal arrays. The normal number and distribution of these arrays can be perturbed in response to mechanical and chemical injury. PMID:3968185

  9. Managing upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Innes, M H

    A complete respiratory obstruction can lead to death in 3 minutes. The first and constant duty of the nurse aider is to check that the person is breathing by looking, listening and feeling. Partial obstruction is no less serious than complete obstruction. The nurse aider, in any situation, should assess the problem and attempt to overcome the airway obstruction using the measures described. PMID:1490067

  10. Airway gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jane C; Alton, Eric W F W

    2005-01-01

    Given both the accessibility and the genetic basis of several pulmonary diseases, the lungs and airways initially seemed ideal candidates for gene therapy. Several routes of access are available, many of which have been refined and optimized for nongene drug delivery. Two respiratory diseases, cystic fibrosis (CF) and alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) deficiency, are relatively common; the single gene responsible has been identified and current treatment strategies are not curative. This type of inherited disease was the obvious initial target for gene therapy, but it has become clear that nongenetic and acquired diseases, including cancer, may also be amenable to this approach. The majority of preclinical and clinical studies in the airway have involved viral vectors, although for diseases such as CF, likely to require repeated application, non-viral delivery systems have clear advantages. However, with both approaches a range of barriers to gene expression have been identified that are limiting success in the airway and alveolar region. This chapter reviews these issues, strategies aimed at overcoming them, and progress into clinical trials with non-viral vectors in a variety of pulmonary diseases.

  11. Causes of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Orfanos, John G; Quereshy, Faisal A

    2010-03-01

    Recognizing a potentially difficult airway is important in avoiding a life-threatening emergency. There are 2 separate scenarios for considering the difficult airway: difficult mask ventilation (DMV) and difficult tracheal intubation (DTI). DMV can be described as lacking the ability to maintain oxygen saturation or lacking the ability to reverse signs of inadequate ventilation with positive-pressure mask ventilation under general anesthesia. DTI remains constant among anesthesia-related patient injuries, and is the third most common respiratory-related episode leading to death and possible brain damage. It is important to preoperatively assess every patient by completing a full history and physical. A thorough history can provide clues in detecting a possible difficult airway. Airway impairment has been further subdivided into the anatomic regions that affect the airway, namely above the larynx, supraglottic, glottic, subglottic, and tracheobronchial. This article discusses the factors that can result in a difficult airway.

  12. A sensory neuronal ion channel essential for airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in asthma.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Ana I; Brackmann, Marian; Elia, Maxwell D; Bessac, Bret F; del Camino, Donato; D'Amours, Marc; Witek, JoAnn S; Fanger, Chistopher M; Chong, Jayhong A; Hayward, Neil J; Homer, Robert J; Cohn, Lauren; Huang, Xiaozhu; Moran, Magdalene M; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-06-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disorder caused by airway exposures to allergens and chemical irritants. Studies focusing on immune, smooth muscle, and airway epithelial function revealed many aspects of the disease mechanism of asthma. However, the limited efficacies of immune-directed therapies suggest the involvement of additional mechanisms in asthmatic airway inflammation. TRPA1 is an irritant-sensing ion channel expressed in airway chemosensory nerves. TRPA1-activating stimuli such as cigarette smoke, chlorine, aldehydes, and scents are among the most prevalent triggers of asthma. Endogenous TRPA1 agonists, including reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation products, are potent drivers of allergen-induced airway inflammation in asthma. Here, we examined the role of TRPA1 in allergic asthma in the murine ovalbumin model. Strikingly, genetic ablation of TRPA1 inhibited allergen-induced leukocyte infiltration in the airways, reduced cytokine and mucus production, and almost completely abolished airway hyperreactivity to contractile stimuli. This phenotype is recapitulated by treatment of wild-type mice with HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist. HC-030031, when administered during airway allergen challenge, inhibited eosinophil infiltration and prevented the development of airway hyperreactivity. Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed deficiencies in chemically and allergen-induced neuropeptide release in the airways, providing a potential explanation for the impaired inflammatory response. Our data suggest that TRPA1 is a key integrator of interactions between the immune and nervous systems in the airways, driving asthmatic airway inflammation following inhaled allergen challenge. TRPA1 may represent a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory conditions. PMID:19458046

  13. Parallelized dilate algorithm for remote sensing image.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suli; Hu, Haoran; Pan, Xin

    2014-01-01

    As an important algorithm, dilate algorithm can give us more connective view of a remote sensing image which has broken lines or objects. However, with the technological progress of satellite sensor, the resolution of remote sensing image has been increasing and its data quantities become very large. This would lead to the decrease of algorithm running speed or cannot obtain a result in limited memory or time. To solve this problem, our research proposed a parallelized dilate algorithm for remote sensing Image based on MPI and MP. Experiments show that our method runs faster than traditional single-process algorithm.

  14. Cystic dilation of the ventriculus terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, Masahiro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yokoyama, Kunio; Yamada, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The ventriculus terminalis (VT) is a virtual cavity of the conus medullaris that appears during embryonic life. We presented a case with the cystic dilation of the ventriculus terminalis (CDVT) in a symptomatic patient. A 66-year-old female suffered from disturbance while walking evolving for the past 2 years. An MR image revealed a cystic dilatation of ventriculus terminalis. The patient experienced marked improvement of lower extremity strength by a fenestration of cyst and cyst-subarachnoid shunt. Treatment for asymptomatic patients seems to be the best conducted conservatively, whereas patients with focal neurological deficits seem to be best handled surgically. PMID:27695242

  15. Cystic dilation of the ventriculus terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Kawanishi, Masahiro; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Yokoyama, Kunio; Yamada, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The ventriculus terminalis (VT) is a virtual cavity of the conus medullaris that appears during embryonic life. We presented a case with the cystic dilation of the ventriculus terminalis (CDVT) in a symptomatic patient. A 66-year-old female suffered from disturbance while walking evolving for the past 2 years. An MR image revealed a cystic dilatation of ventriculus terminalis. The patient experienced marked improvement of lower extremity strength by a fenestration of cyst and cyst-subarachnoid shunt. Treatment for asymptomatic patients seems to be the best conducted conservatively, whereas patients with focal neurological deficits seem to be best handled surgically.

  16. Difficult Airway Due to an Undiagnosed Subglottic Tumor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Kohji; Tokumine, Joho; Lefor, Alan Kawarai; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Kunitaro; Yorozu, Tomoko

    2016-04-01

    The "cannot ventilate, cannot intubate" scenario during anesthesia induction can be lethal. We present a patient with an undiagnosed subglottic tumor who developed the "cannot ventilate, cannot intubate" situation after induction of general anesthesia, due to the presence of an undiagnosed subglottic tumor. A 93-year-old woman was brought to the operating room for repair of a femoral neck fracture. Both ventilation and intubation could not be accomplished, and the patient was awakened without complications after trials of maintaining the airway. In order to reverse muscle relaxation, sugammadex was useful to allow resumption of spontaneous breathing. A difficult airway can be caused by an undiagnosed subglottic tumor. Subglottic tumors can be misdiagnosed as asthma, because the clinical presentation can be very similar. If cricothyrotomy had been performed based on airway management algorithms, the airway may not have been controlled with a possibly fatal outcome. Ultrasound examination of the trachea may be useful to diagnose obstructive lesions in the airway. PMID:27082606

  17. Understanding the dilation and dilation relaxation behavior of graphite-based lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Marius; Wachtler, Mario; Stöwe, Hendrik; Persson, Jon V.; Danzer, Michael A.

    2016-06-01

    The dilation of lithium-ion cells is sensitive towards swelling phenomena caused by both graphite staging processes and lithium plating on graphite anodes. In this work, the dilation behavior of graphite/NMC pouch cells is studied with a focus on relaxation phenomena occurring after current pulses. In order to prevent misleading interpretations due to thermal effects, thermal expansion is quantified and a method for the thermal compensation of dilation data is developed. Dilation data are recorded for quasi-equilibrium cycling as well as for current pulses at high rates. In the quasi-equilibrium case, the staging behavior is characterized based on dilation and voltage data. By comparison with a graphite half-cell measurement, the major effects in full cell dilation are confirmed to be anode related. In the high rate case, the dilation responses to the actual pulse and the subsequent relaxation phases are recorded systematically. Positive and negative relaxation phenomena are observed depending on the SOC. They are ascribed to both graphite staging and lithium plating processes. A model is presented explaining the unexpected relaxation effects by a temporary coexistence of three or more staging compounds during high rate lithiation and delithiation. Our data thereby confirm the shrinking annuli model introduced by Heβ and Novák.

  18. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway regulates the development of airway remodeling in patients with asthma.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyun Jung; Park, Dong Won; Seo, Ji-Young; Moon, Ji-Yong; Kim, Tae Hyung; Sohn, Jang Won; Shin, Dong Ho; Yoon, Ho Joo; Park, Sung Soo; Kim, Sang-Heon

    2015-12-11

    Airway remodeling is a key characteristic of chronic asthma, particularly in patients with a fixed airflow limitation. The mechanisms underlying airway remodeling are poorly understood, and no therapeutic option is available. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including fibrosis and smooth muscle hypertrophy. In this study, we investigated the roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in airway remodeling in patients with asthma. Wnt7a mRNA expression was prominent in induced sputum from patients with asthma compared with that from healthy controls. Next, we induced a chronic asthma mouse model with airway remodeling features, including subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle hyperplasia. Higher expression of Wnt family proteins and β-catenin was detected in the lung tissue of mice with chronic asthma compared to control mice. Blocking β-catenin expression with a specific siRNA attenuated airway inflammation and airway remodeling. Decreased subepithelial fibrosis and collagen accumulation in the β-catenin siRNA-treated mice was accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor-β. We further showed that suppressing β-catenin in the chronic asthma model inhibited smooth muscle hyperplasia by downregulating the tenascin C/platelet-derived growth factor receptor pathway. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is highly expressed and regulates the development of airway remodeling in chronic asthma.

  19. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway regulates the development of airway remodeling in patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun Jung; Park, Dong Won; Seo, Ji-Young; Moon, Ji-Yong; Kim, Tae Hyung; Sohn, Jang Won; Shin, Dong Ho; Yoon, Ho Joo; Park, Sung Soo; Kim, Sang-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a key characteristic of chronic asthma, particularly in patients with a fixed airflow limitation. The mechanisms underlying airway remodeling are poorly understood, and no therapeutic option is available. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including fibrosis and smooth muscle hypertrophy. In this study, we investigated the roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in airway remodeling in patients with asthma. Wnt7a mRNA expression was prominent in induced sputum from patients with asthma compared with that from healthy controls. Next, we induced a chronic asthma mouse model with airway remodeling features, including subepithelial fibrosis and airway smooth muscle hyperplasia. Higher expression of Wnt family proteins and β-catenin was detected in the lung tissue of mice with chronic asthma compared to control mice. Blocking β-catenin expression with a specific siRNA attenuated airway inflammation and airway remodeling. Decreased subepithelial fibrosis and collagen accumulation in the β-catenin siRNA-treated mice was accompanied by reduced expression of transforming growth factor-β. We further showed that suppressing β-catenin in the chronic asthma model inhibited smooth muscle hyperplasia by downregulating the tenascin C/platelet-derived growth factor receptor pathway. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is highly expressed and regulates the development of airway remodeling in chronic asthma. PMID:26655831

  20. Ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness: roles of ROCK isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lambert, James A; Song, Weifeng

    2015-12-15

    Acute ozone (O3) inhalation has been shown to cause airway and pulmonary epithelial injury with accompanying inflammation responses. Robust evidence exists that O3 induces airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in humans and in animal models. Several pathways exist that culminate in airway smooth muscle contraction, but the mechanism(s) by which O3 elicits AHR are unclear. Here, we review the recent report by Kasahara et al. (Kasahara DI, Mathews JA, Park CY, Cho Y, Hunt G, Wurmbrand AP, Liao JK, Shore SA. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 309: L736-L746, 2015.) describing the role of two Rho kinase (ROCK) isoforms in O3-induced AHR utilizing a murine haploinsufficiency model. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, the authors report that ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) mice exhibited significantly reduced AHR following acute exposure to O3. Additionally, WT mice treated with fasudil, an FDA-approved ROCK1/2 inhibitor, recapitulated reduction in AHR as seen in ROCK haplotypes. It was suggested that, although the two ROCK isoforms are both induced by Rho, they have different mechanisms by which they mediate O3-induced AHR: ROCK1 via hyaluronan signaling vs. ROCK2 acting downstream of inflammation at the level of airway smooth muscle contraction. These observations provide an important framework to develop novel ROCK-targeting therapies for acute O3-induced AHR.

  1. Difficult airway in a patient with Marshall-Smith syndrome.

    PubMed

    Antila, H; Laitio, T; Aantaa, R; Silvoniemi, P; Pakkanen, A

    1998-01-01

    Marshall-Smith syndrome is a rare clinical disorder characterized by accelerated bone maturation, dysmorphic facial features, airway abnormalities and death in early infancy because of respiratory complications. Although patients with Marshall-Smith syndrome have several features with potential anaesthetic problems, previous reports about anaesthetic management of these patients do not exist. We present a case, in which severe hypoxia developed rapidly after routine anaesthesia induction in an eight-month-old male infant with this syndrome. After several unsuccessful attempts the airway was finally secured by blind oral intubation. After 2 weeks, laryngeal anatomy was examined with fibreoptic laryngoscopy which revealed significant laryngomalacia. Laryngoscopy was performed without problems with ketamine anaesthesia and spontaneous breathing. The possibility of a compromised airway should always be borne in mind when anaesthetizing patients with Marshall-Smith syndrome. Anaesthesia maintaining spontaneous breathing is safest for children with this syndrome. If tracheal intubation or muscle relaxation is required, precautions are needed to maintain a patent airway. Muscle relaxants should possibly be avoided before intubation.

  2. Hyaluronan mediates airway hyperresponsiveness in oxidative lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lazrak, Ahmed; Creighton, Judy; Yu, Zhihong; Komarova, Svetlana; Doran, Stephen F.; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Emala, Charles W.; Stober, Vandy P.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) inhalation induces severe oxidative lung injury and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) that lead to asthmalike symptoms. When inhaled, Cl2 reacts with epithelial lining fluid, forming by-products that damage hyaluronan, a constituent of the extracellular matrix, causing the release of low-molecular-weight fragments (L-HA, <300 kDa), which initiate a series of proinflammatory events. Cl2 (400 ppm, 30 min) exposure to mice caused an increase of L-HA and its binding partner, inter-α-trypsin-inhibitor (IαI), in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Airway resistance following methacholine challenge was increased 24 h post-Cl2 exposure. Intratracheal administration of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (H-HA) or an antibody against IαI post-Cl2 exposure decreased AHR. Exposure of human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells to Cl2 (100 ppm, 10 min) or incubation with Cl2-exposed H-HA (which fragments it to L-HA) increased membrane potential depolarization, intracellular Ca2+, and RhoA activation. Inhibition of RhoA, chelation of intracellular Ca2+, blockade of cation channels, as well as postexposure addition of H-HA, reversed membrane depolarization in HASM cells. We propose a paradigm in which oxidative lung injury generates reactive species and L-HA that activates RhoA and Ca2+ channels of airway smooth muscle cells, increasing their contractility and thus causing AHR. PMID:25747964

  3. Expression and function of a novel variant of estrogen receptor-α36 in murine airways.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuping; Zhang, Xintian; He, David Z Z; Segal, Manav; Berro, Abdo; Gerson, Trevor; Wang, Zhaoyi; Casale, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Evidence suggests that estrogen signaling is involved in sex differences in the prevalence rates and control of asthma, but the expression patterns of estrogen receptor variants and estrogen function in the lung are not well established. We investigated the expression of major estrogen receptor variants occurring naturally and after the development of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity in a murine model of allergic asthma, along with the role of estrogen signaling in small-airway ciliary motion and smooth muscle contraction. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with ovalbumin, and estrogen receptor expression patterns were examined by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Time-lapse video and photodiode-based displacement measurement systems were used to assess the effects of estrogen signaling on airway ciliary beat frequency and smooth muscle contraction. We found that a novel variant of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ER-α36, is expressed in airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. ER-α36 was predominately localized on the plasma membranes of airway cells. After sensitization to allergen, the expression levels of ER-α36 increased significantly (P < 0.01), whereas the expression of ER-β and ER-α66 did not significantly change. Estrogen treatment in vitro resulted in a rapid increase in airway cilia motion in a dose-dependent fashion, but did not exert any effect on airway smooth muscle contraction. We speculate that the up-regulation of estrogen receptor expression associated with allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness may constitute a protective mechanism to facilitate the clearance of mucus. The identification and localization of specific estrogen receptor subtypes in the lung could lead to newer therapeutic avenues aimed at addressing sex differences of asthma susceptibility. PMID:21642591

  4. Cardiovascular and airway relaxant activities of peony root extract.

    PubMed

    Ghayur, Muhammad N; Gilani, Anwarul H; Rasheed, Huma; Khan, Abdullah; Iqbal, Zafar; Ismail, Muhammad; Saeed, Sheikh A; Janssen, Luke J

    2008-11-01

    Paeonia emodi (peony) is a well known plant used medicinally to treat hypertension, palpitations, and asthma. Despite its popularity, there are few reports in the scientific literature examining its use in such conditions. We prepared a 70% ethanolic extract of peony root (Pe.Cr) and applied it to segments of guinea pig atria and trachea and rat aorta suspended separately in tissue baths. Activity against arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation was measured in human platelet-rich plasma. Airway relaxant effect was evaluated against acetylcholine (ACh)-induced airway contraction in mouse lung slices loaded with fluo-4. Pe.Cr (0.3-10 mg/mL) showed an atropine-resistant negative inotropic effect in atria. In rat aorta, an endothelium-independent vasodilatory effect (0.3-10 mg/mL) was seen in phenylephrine- and high-K+-induced contractions. Pe.Cr (0.01-1 mg/mL) also inhibited AA-induced platelet aggregation. In isolated trachea, Pe.Cr (0.3-10 mg/mL) relaxed carbachol- and histamine-induced contractions independently of beta-adrenergic receptors. In mouse lung slices, Pe.Cr (0.3-1 mg/mL) inhibited ACh-induced airway narrowing and oscillations of intracellular Ca2+ in airway smooth muscle cells. The results showed cardiosuppressant, vasodilatory, antiplatelet, and tracheal and airway relaxant activities of peony, providing potential justification for its medicinal use in different hyperactive cardiovascular and respiratory disorders.

  5. Effects of pentobarbital on upper airway patency during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Eikermann, M.; Eckert, D.J.; Chamberlin, N.L.; Jordan, A.S.; Zaremba, S.; Smith, S.; Rosow, C.; Malhotra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesised that pentobarbital would improve upper airway mechanics based on an increase in latency to arousal and amplitude of the phasic genioglossus electromyogram (EMG), and a decrease in the active upper airway critical closing pressure (Pcrit). 12 healthy subjects received pentobarbital (100 mg) or placebo in a double-blind, crossover protocol. During wakefulness, we measured the genioglossus reflex response to negative pressure pulses. During sleep, carbon dioxide was insufflated into the inspired air. Airway pressure was then decreased in a stepwise fashion until arousal from sleep. With basal breathing during sleep: flow rate was lower in volunteers given pentobarbital; end-tidal CO2 concentration and upper airway resistance were greater; and Pcrit was unaffected (pentobarbital mean±sd -11.7±4.5 versus placebo -10.25±3.6 cmH2O; p=0.11). Pentobarbital increased the time to arousal (297±63s versus 232±67 s; p<0.05), at which time phasic genioglossus EMG was higher (6.2±4.8% maximal versus 3.1±3%; p<0.05) as were CO2 levels. The increase in genioglossus EMG after CO2 administration was greater after pentobarbital versus placebo. Pentobarbital did not affect the genioglossus negative-pressure reflex. Pentobarbital increases the time to arousal and stimulates genioglossus muscle activity, but it also increases upper airway resistance during sleep. PMID:20032012

  6. Effects of pentobarbital on upper airway patency during sleep.

    PubMed

    Eikermann, M; Eckert, D J; Chamberlin, N L; Jordan, A S; Zaremba, S; Smith, S; Rosow, C; Malhotra, A

    2010-09-01

    We hypothesised that pentobarbital would improve upper airway mechanics based on an increase in latency to arousal and amplitude of the phasic genioglossus electromyogram (EMG), and a decrease in the active upper airway critical closing pressure (P(crit)). 12 healthy subjects received pentobarbital (100 mg) or placebo in a double-blind, crossover protocol. During wakefulness, we measured the genioglossus reflex response to negative pressure pulses. During sleep, carbon dioxide was insufflated into the inspired air. Airway pressure was then decreased in a stepwise fashion until arousal from sleep. With basal breathing during sleep: flow rate was lower in volunteers given pentobarbital; end-tidal CO(2) concentration and upper airway resistance were greater; and P(crit) was unaffected (pentobarbital mean ± SD -11.7 ± 4.5 versus placebo -10.25 ± 3.6 cmH(2)O; p = 0.11). Pentobarbital increased the time to arousal (297 ± 63s versus 232 ± 67 s; p<0.05), at which time phasic genioglossus EMG was higher (6.2 ± 4.8% maximal versus 3.1 ± 3%; p<0.05) as were CO(2) levels. The increase in genioglossus EMG after CO(2) administration was greater after pentobarbital versus placebo. Pentobarbital did not affect the genioglossus negative-pressure reflex. Pentobarbital increases the time to arousal and stimulates genioglossus muscle activity, but it also increases upper airway resistance during sleep.

  7. Airway Injury from Initiating Ventilation in Preterm Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Noah H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Pillow, J. Jane; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Polglase, Graeme R.; Nitsos, Ilias; Jobe, Alan H.

    2009-01-01

    Premature infants exposed to ventilation are at risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and persistent lung disease in childhood. We report where injury occurred within the lung following brief ventilation at birth. Preterm sheep (129d gestation) were ventilated with an escalating VT to 15mL/kg by 15 min to injure the lungs, with the placental circulation intact (Fetal) or after delivery (Newborn). Fetal lambs were returned to the uterus for 2h 45min, while Newborn lambs were maintained with gentle ventilatory support for the same period. The control group was not ventilated. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were analysed. In both Fetal and Newborn lambs, ventilation caused bronchial epithelial disruption in medium-sized airways. Egr-1, MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-1β mRNA increased in lung tissue from Fetal and Newborn lambs. Egr-1, MCP-1 and IL-6 mRNA were induced in mesenchymal cells surrounding small airways, whereas IL-1β mRNA localized to the epithelium of medium/small airways. Ventilation caused loss of HSP70 mRNA from the bronchial epithelium, but induced mRNA in smooth muscle surrounding large airways. HSP70 protein decreased in lung tissue and increased in BALF with ventilation. Initiation of ventilation induced a stress response and inflammatory cytokines in small and medium-sized airways. PMID:19816239

  8. Management of achalasia: surgery or pneumatic dilation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2011-06-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder of unknown cause, characterised by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and impaired lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Patients present at all ages, primarily with dysphagia for solids/liquids and bland regurgitation. The diagnosis is suggested by barium esophagram or endoscopy and confirmed by esophageal manometry. Achalasia cannot be cured. Instead, our goal is to relieve symptoms, improve esophageal emptying and prevent the development of megaesophagus. The most successful therapies are pneumatic dilation and surgical myotomy. The advantages of pneumatic dilation include an outpatient procedure, minimal pain, return to work the next day, mild if any GERD, and can be performed in any age group and even during pregnancy. Pneumatic dilation does not hinder future myotomy, and all cost analyses find it less expensive than Heller myotomy. Laparoscopic myotomy with a partial fundoplication has the advantage of being a single procedure, dysphagia relief is longer at the cost of more troubling heartburn, and a myotomy may be more effective treatment in adolescents and younger adults, especially men. Over a two year horizon, the clinical success of pneumatic dilation and laparoscopic myotomy are comparable in a recent large European randomised trial. The prognosis for achalasia patients to return to near-normal swallowing and good quality of life are excellent, but few are "cured" with a single treatment and intermittent "touch up" procedures may be required. PMID:21303915

  9. Periodically correlated processes and their stationary dilations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miamee, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    An explicit form for a stationary dilation for periodically correlated random processes is obtained. This is then used to give spectral conditions for a periodically correlated process to be non-deterministic, purely deterministic, minimal, and to have a positive angle between its past and future.

  10. Surface dilatational viscosity of Langmuir monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Juan; Vogel, Michael; Hirsa, Amir

    2003-11-01

    With increased interest in microfluidic systems, interfacial phenomena is receiving more attention. As the length scales of fluid problems decrease, the surface to volume ratio increases and the coupling between interfacial flow and bulk flow becomes increasingly dominated by effects due to intrinsic surface viscosities (shear and dilatational), in comparison to elastic effects (due to surface tension gradients). The surface shear viscosity is well-characterized, as cm-scale laboratory experiments are able to isolate its effects from other interfacial processes (e.g., in the deep-channel viscometer). The same is not true for the dilatational viscosity, because it acts in the direction of surface tension gradients. Their relative strength scale with the capillary number, and for cm-scale laboratory flows, surface tension effects tend to dominate. In microfluidic scale flows, the scaling favors viscosity. We have devised an experimental apparatus which is capable of isolating and enhancing the effects of dilatational viscosity at the cm scales by driving the interface harmonically in time, while keeping the interface flat. In this talk, we shall present both the theory for how this works as well as experimental measurements of surface velocity from which we deduce the dilatational viscosity of several monolayers on the air-water interface over a substantial range of surface concentrations. Anomalous behavior over some range of concentration, which superficially indicates negative viscosity, maybe explained in terms of compositional effects due to large spatial and temporal variations in concentration and corresponding viscosity.

  11. A Symmetry Approach to Time Dilation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Outlines an approach to introduce students to special relativity using a discussion of stopclocks and measurement of the transmission of light pulses to produce a natural derivation of the time dilation factor. Aims at providing a frame of reference from which they can be tempted to explore special relativity at a more sophisticated level. (JRH)

  12. A difficult airway in a patient with nephrogenic sclerosing fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gist, Richard S; Miller, David W; Warren, Ty

    2010-02-01

    Nephrogenic sclerosing fibrosis (dermopathy) is a relatively rare complication of long-term renal dialysis. The syndrome includes marked thickening of the skin and diffuse fibrosis of fascia, muscle, heart, and lungs, leading to contractures of the joints and limbs and cardiopulmonary compromise. We present the case of a 29-year-old woman who required emergent intubation because of respiratory compromise, and who had had normal airway examinations and intubations before the onset of nephrogenic sclerosing fibrosis symptoms.

  13. Effect of P2X4R on airway inflammation and airway remodeling in allergic airway challenge in mice

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, HONGXIA; XIA, QINGQING; FENG, XIAOQIAN; CAO, FANGYUAN; YU, HANG; SONG, YINLI; NI, XIUQIN

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptor (P2X4R) is the most widely expressed subtype of the P2XRs in the purinergic receptor family. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a ligand for this receptor, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. ATP-P2X4R signaling is involved in pulmonary vascular remodeling, and in the proliferation and differentiation of airway and alveolar epithelial cell lines. However, the role of P2X4R in asthma remains to be elucidated. This aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of P2X4R in a murine experimental asthma model. The asthmatic model was established by the inhalation of ovalbumin (OVA) in BALB/c mice. The mice were treated with P2X4R-specific agonists and antagonists to investigate the role of this receptor in vivo. Pathological changes in the bronchi and lung tissues were examined using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Masson's trichrome staining and Alcian blue staining. The inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were counted, and the expression levels of P2X4R, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected using western blotting. In the OVA-challenged mice, inflammation, infiltration, collagen deposition, mucus production, and the expression levels of P2X4R and PCNA were all increased; however, the expression of α-SMA was decreased, compared with the mice in the control group. Whereas treatment with the P2X4R agonist, ATP, enhanced the allergic reaction, treatment with the P2X4R antagonist, 5-BDBD, attenuated the allergic reaction. The results suggested that ATP-P2X4R signaling may not only contribute to airway inflammation, but it may also contribute to airway remodeling in allergic asthma in mice. PMID:26648454

  14. Dilated common duct sign. A potential indicator of a sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia

    SciTech Connect

    DeRidder, P.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1984-05-01

    The cholescintigraphic findings of a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia (SOD) in a 45-year-old woman with persistent right upper quadrant pain and biliary colic are reported. After an overnight fast, the patient was injected with 5 mCi of Tc-99 disofenin and .02 micrograms/kg of cholecystokinin (CCK) post maximal gallbladder filling. Pre and postcholescintiscans were obtained and gallbladder ejection fractions determined. The hepatobiliary scan was normal, except for a delay in biliary-bowel transit. The gallbladder responded normally to CCK, however, the Sphincter of Oddi responded abnormally, as there was a paradoxical response to CCK manifested by a marked dilatation of the common bile duct. It was postulate that this dilatation (the dilated common duct sign) was due to an inappropriate response of the smooth muscle of the Sphincter of Oddi (contraction vs relaxation) to CCK and was the cause of this patient's biliary colic. The dilated common duct sign should alert the physician to the possibility of a Sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia.

  15. Global airway disease beyond allergy.

    PubMed

    Hellings, Peter W; Prokopakis, Emmanuel P

    2010-03-01

    Besides the anatomic continuity of the upper and lower airways, inflammation in one part of the airway influences the homeostasis of the other. The mechanisms underlying this interaction have been studied primarily in allergic disease, showing systemic immune activation, induction of inflammation at a distance, and a negative impact of nasal inflammation on bronchial homeostasis. In addition to allergy, other inflammatory conditions of the upper airways are associated with lower airway disease. Rhinosinusitis is frequently associated with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The impairment of purification, humidification, and warming up of the inspired air by the nose in rhinosinusitis may be responsible in part for bronchial pathology. The resolution of sinonasal inflammation via medical and/or surgical treatment is responsible for the beneficial effect of the treatment on bronchial disease. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of upper and lower airway communication beyond allergic disease.

  16. The mechanics of airway closure.

    PubMed

    Heil, Matthias; Hazel, Andrew L; Smith, Jaclyn A

    2008-11-30

    We describe how surface-tension-driven instabilities of the lung's liquid lining may lead to pulmonary airway closure via the formation of liquid bridges that occlude the airway lumen. Using simple theoretical models, we demonstrate that this process may occur via a purely fluid-mechanical "film collapse" or through a coupled, fluid-elastic "compliant collapse" mechanism. Both mechanisms can lead to airway closure in times comparable with the breathing cycle, suggesting that surface tension is the primary mechanical effect responsible for the closure observed in peripheral regions of the human lungs. We conclude by discussing the influence of additional effects not included in the simple models, such as gravity, the presence of pulmonary surfactant, respiratory flow and wall motion, the airways' geometry, and the mechanical structure of the airway walls. PMID:18595784

  17. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  18. Morphometric changes during the early airway response to allergen challenge in the rat.

    PubMed

    Du, T; Xu, L J; Lei, M; Wang, N S; Eidelman, D H; Ghezzo, H; Martin, J G

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of airway wall edema and smooth muscle contraction to the early response (ER) of allergic bronchoconstriction. Brown Norway rats, 6 to 7 wk old, were sensitized with ovalbumin (OA). Anesthetized rats were challenged with either OA or saline 2 wk later. Pulmonary resistance (RL) was measured every minute until either it increased to 150% of the baseline, defined as a significant ER, or until 15 min elapsed. Eight OA-challenged test rats with a significant ER and eight saline-challenged control rats were used for morphometric studies. The lungs were quick-frozen with liquid nitrogen, processed with freeze substitution, and sagittal sections (5 microns) were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The airway lumen subtended by the epithelial basement membrane (LuB) and cross sectional airway wall area (AW) of all airways were measured by camera lucida and digitization. The LuB and AW of each airway was standardized for size by dividing by the ideal airway lumen (LuBideal), which was calculated from the length of basement membrane, assuming a perfect circle in the unconstricted state. The cumulative frequency distribution of the LuB/LuBideal for the airways from test rats was shifted to the left compared with the control rats (p less than 0.01), indicating airway narrowing after challenge. Airway narrowing increased as a function of airway size. Cumulative frequency distributions of AW/LuBideal showed that there was a significant increase in the wall thickness of only the small airways of test animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1416393

  19. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. 884.4260 Section 884.4260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cervical dilator is a device designed to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os by cervical insertion of...

  20. 21 CFR 884.4270 - Vibratory cervical dilators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vibratory cervical dilators. 884.4270 Section 884.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....4270 Vibratory cervical dilators. (a) Identification. A vibratory cervical dilator is a device...

  1. Clinical review: Biphasic positive airway pressure and airway pressure release ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Putensen, Christian; Wrigge, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on mechanical ventilation strategies that allow unsupported spontaneous breathing activity in any phase of the ventilatory cycle. By allowing patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome to breathe spontaneously, one can expect improvements in gas exchange and systemic blood flow, based on findings from both experimental and clinical trials. In addition, by increasing end-expiratory lung volume, as occurs when using biphasic positive airway pressure or airway pressure release ventilation, recruitment of collapsed or consolidated lung is likely to occur, especially in juxtadiaphragmatic lung legions. Traditional approaches to mechanical ventilatory support of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome require adaptation of the patient to the mechanical ventilator using heavy sedation and even muscle relaxation. Recent investigations have questioned the utility of sedation, muscle paralysis and mechanical control of ventilation. Furthermore, evidence exists that lowering sedation levels will decrease the duration of mechanical ventilatory support, length of stay in the intensive care unit, and overall costs of hospitalization. Based on currently available data, we suggest considering the use of techniques of mechanical ventilatory support that maintain, rather than suppress, spontaneous ventilatory effort, especially in patients with severe pulmonary dysfunction. PMID:15566621

  2. [Anaesthesia for patients with obstructive airway diseases].

    PubMed

    Groeben, H; Keller, V; Silvanus, M T

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive lung diseases like asthma or chronic obstructive lung diseases have a high prevalence and are one of the four most frequent causes of death. Obstructive lung diseases can be significantly influenced by the choice of anesthetic techniques and anesthetic agents. Basically, the severity of the COPD and the degree of bronchial hyperreactivity will determine the perioperative anesthetic risk. This risk has to be assessed by a thorough preoperative evaluation and will give the rationale on which to decide for the adequate anaesthetic technique. In particular, airway instrumentation can cause severe reflex bronchoconstriction. The use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia can help to avoid airway irritation and leads to reduced postoperative complications. Prophylactic antiobstructive treatment, volatile anesthetics, propofol, opioids, and an adequate choice of muscle relaxants minimize the anesthetic risk, when general anesthesia is required In case, despite all precautions intra-operative bronchospasm occurs, deepening of anaesthesia, repeated administration of beta2-adrenergic agents and parasympatholytics, and a single systemic dose of corticosteroids represent the main treatment options. PMID:24749300

  3. Safety of dilation in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Ally, M R; Dias, J; Veerappan, G R; Maydonovitch, C L; Wong, R K; Moawad, F J

    2013-04-01

    Esophageal dilation is an effective therapy for dysphagia in patients with stenosing eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Historically, there have been significant concerns of increased perforation rates when dilating EoE patients. More recent studies suggest that improved techniques and increased awareness have decreased complication rates. The aim of this study was to explore the safety of dilation in our population of EoE patients. A retrospective review of all adult EoE patients enrolled in a registry from 2006 to 2010 was performed. All patients who underwent esophageal dilation during this time period were identified and included in the analysis. Our hospital inpatient/outpatient medical records, radiology reports, and endoscopy reports were searched for evidence of any complication following dilation. Perforation, hemorrhage, and hospitalization were identified as a major complication, and chest pain was considered a minor complication. One hundred and ninety-six patients (41 years [12]; mean age [standard deviation], 80% white, 85% male) were identified. In this cohort, 54 patients (28%) underwent 66 total dilations (seven patients underwent two dilations, one patient underwent three dilations, and one patient underwent four dilations). Three dilation techniques were used (Maloney [24], Savary [29] and through-the-scope [13]). There were no major complications encountered. Chest pain was noted in two patients (4%). There were no endoscopic features (rings, furrows, plaques) associated with any complication. Type of dilator, size of dilator, number of prior dilations, and age of patient were also not associated with complications. Endoscopic dilation using a variety of dilators can be safely performed with minimal complications in patients with EoE.

  4. Universal decoherence due to gravitational time dilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikovski, Igor; Zych, Magdalena; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Caslav

    2016-05-01

    The absence of quantum behavior on macroscopic scales is usually attributed to decoherence -- the suppression of quantum superpositions due to interaction with an environment. Here we show that time dilation provides a universal decoherence mechanism for any complex system. The effect takes place even for isolated particles that do not interact with any external environment and causes decoherence of position and momentum of the center of mass of the system. While time dilation is very weak on earth, it is already sufficient to decohere gram-scale objects and complex molecules. The results show that novel phenomena arise at the interplay between quantum theory and general relativity even in the low energy limit. Possible experimental verifications of the effect are briefly discussed.

  5. Charged Dilation Black Holes as Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-07-01

    We examine the possibility of arbitrarily high energy in the Center-of-mass frame of colliding neutral particles in the vicinity of the horizon of a charged dilation black hole(BH). We show that it is possible to achieve the infinite energy in the background of the dilation black hole without fine-tuning of the angular momentum parameter. It is found that the center-of-mass energy (E_{cm}) of collisions of particles near the infinite red-shift surface of the extreme dilation BHs are arbitrarily large while the non-extreme charged dilation BHs have the finite energy. We have also compared the E_{cm} at the horizon with the ISCO(Innermost Stable Circular Orbit) and MBCO (Marginally Bound Circular Orbit) for extremal RN BH and Schwarzschild BH. We find that for extreme RN BH the inequality becomes E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}}>E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}}> E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}} i.e. E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}= ({3+√{5}}/{2})M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=4M} =∞ : 3.23 : 2.6 . While for Schwarzschild BH the ratio of CM energy is E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=4M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=6M} = √{5} : √{2} : {√{13}}/{3}. Also for Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger (GMGHS) BHs the ratio is being E_{cm}mid_{r_{+}=2M}: E_{cm}mid_{r_{mb}=2M} : E_{cm}mid_{r_{ISCO}=2M}=∞ : ∞ : ∞.

  6. Formation and interpretation of dilatant echelon cracks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Segall, P.; Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative displacements of the walls of many veins, joints, and dikes demonstrate that these structures are dilatant cracks. We infer that dilatant cracks propagate in a principal stress plane, normal to the maximum tensile or least compressive stress. Arrays of echelon crack segments appear to emerge from the peripheries of some dilatant cracks. Breakdown of a parent crack into an echelon array may be initiated by a spatial or temporal rotation of the remote principal stresses about an axis parallel to the crack propagation direction. Near the parent-crack tip, a rotation of the local principal stresses is induced in the same sense, but not necessarily through the same angle. Incipient echelon cracks form at the parent-crack tip normal to the local maximum tensile stress. Further longitudinal growth along surfaces that twist about axes parallel to the propagation direction realigns each echelon crack into a remote principal stress plane. The walls of these twisted cracks may be idealized as helicoidal surfaces. An array of helicoidal cracks sweeps out less surface area than one parent crack twisting through the same angle. Thus, many echelon cracks grow from a single parent because the work done in creating the array, as measured by its surface area decreases as the number of cracks increases. -from Authors

  7. Dilatancy and shear thickening of particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Shear thickening is a fascinating subject, as 99.9% of complex fluids are thinning; thickening systems thus are the ``exception to the rule'' that needs to be understood. Moreover, such tunable systems show very promising applications, e.g. to block large underground pores in oil recovery to maintain a constant oil flow by plugging water filled pores (an approach used in oil recovery by e.g. Shell), or to manufacture bulletproof vests that are comfortable to wear, but stop bullets nonetheless. We study the rheology of non-Brownian particle suspensions (notably, cornstarch) that exhibit shear thickening. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the local properties of the flow are obtained by the determination of local velocity profiles and concentrations in a Couette cell. We also perform macroscopic rheology experiments in different geometries. The results suggest that the shear thickening is a consequence of dilatancy: the system under flow attempts to dilate but instead undergoes a jamming transition, because it is confined. This proposition is confirmed by an independent measurement of the dilation of the suspension as a function of the shear rate.

  8. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids on intrinsic responsiveness and histology of airways from infant monkeys exposed to house dust mite allergen and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Plopper, Charles G.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2008-01-15

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to treat infants with asthma, some with intermittent asthma. We previously showed that exposing infant monkeys to allergen/ozone resulted in asthma-like characteristics of their airways. We evaluated the effects of ICS on histology and intrinsic responsiveness of allergen/ozone-exposed and normal infant primate airways. Infant monkeys were exposed by inhalation to (1) filtered air and saline, (2) house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + ozone and saline, (3) filtered air and ICS (budesonide) or (4) HDMA + ozone and ICS. Allergen/ozone exposures started at 1 month and ICS at 3 months of age. At 6 months of age, methacholine-induced changes in luminal area of airways in proximal and distal lung slices were determined using videomicrometry, followed by histology of the same slices. Proximal airway responsiveness was increased by allergen/ozone and by ICS. Eosinophil profiles were increased by allergen/ozone in both proximal and distal airways, an effect that was decreased by ICS in distal airways. In both allergen/ozone- and air-exposed monkeys, ICS increased the number of alveolar attachments in distal airways, decreased mucin in proximal airways and decreased epithelial volume in both airways. ICS increased smooth muscle in air-exposed animals while decreasing it in allergen/ozone-exposed animals in both airways. In proximal airways, there was a small but significant positive correlation between smooth muscle and airway responsiveness, as well as between alveolar attachments and responsiveness. ICS change morphology and function in normal airways as well as allergen/ozone-exposed airways, suggesting that they should be reserved for infants with active symptoms.

  9. Risk Stratification for Sudden Cardiac Death In Patients With Non-ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shekha, Karthik; Ghosh, Joydeep; Thekkoott, Deepak; Greenberg, Yisachar

    2005-01-01

    Non ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) is a disorder of myocardium. It has varying etiologies. Albeit the varying etiologies of this heart muscle disorder, it presents with symptoms of heart failure, and rarely as sudden cardiac death (SCD). Manifestations of this disorder are in many ways similar to its counterpart, ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM). A proportion of patients with NIDCM carries a grave prognosis and is prone to sudden cardiac death from sustained ventricular arrhythmias. Identification of this subgroup of patients who carry the risk of sudden cardiac death despite adequate medical management is a challenge .Yet another method is a blanket treatment of patients with this disorder with anti arrhythmic medications or anti tachyarrhythmia devices like implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). However this modality of treatment could be a costly exercise even for affluent economies. In this review we try to analyze the existing data of risk stratification of NIDCM and its clinical implications in practice. PMID:16943952

  10. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  11. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  12. Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) caused by duplication of exons 3-6 of the dystrophin gene presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, A.C.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Becker, L.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is a progressive myocardial disease presenting with congestive heart failure in teenage males without clinical signs of skeletal myopathy. Tight linkage of XLCM to the DMD locus has been demonstrated; it has been suggested that, at least in some families, XLCM is a {open_quotes}dystrophinopathy.{close_quotes} We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with acute heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He had no history of muscle weakness, but physical examination revealed pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles. He subsequently received a heart transplantation. Family history was negative. Serum CK level at the time of diagnosis was 10,416. Myocardial biopsy showed no evidence of carditis. Dystrophin staining of cardiac and skeletal muscle with anti-sera to COOH and NH{sub 2}termini showed a patchy distribution of positivity suggestive of Becker muscular dystrophy. Analysis of 18 of the 79 dystrophin exons detected a duplication that included exons 3-6. The proband`s mother has an elevated serum CK and was confirmed to be a carrier of the same duplication. A mutation in the muscle promotor region of the dystrophin gene has been implicated in the etiology of SLCM. However, Towbin et al. (1991) argued that other 5{prime} mutations in the dystrophin gene could cause selective cardiomyopathy. The findings in our patient support the latter hypothesis. This suggests that there are multiple regions in the dystrophin gene which, when disrupted, can cause isolated dilated cardiomyopathy.

  13. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  14. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  15. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  16. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the removal of a small piece of muscle tissue for examination. ... dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis Additional conditions ...

  17. Chronic exposure to high levels of particulate air pollution and small airway remodeling.

    PubMed Central

    Churg, Andrew; Brauer, Michael; del Carmen Avila-Casado, Maria; Fortoul, Teresa I; Wright, Joanne L

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that chronic exposure to high levels of ambient particulate matter (PM) is associated with decreased pulmonary function and the development of chronic airflow obstruction. To investigate the possible role of PM-induced abnormalities in the small airways in these functional changes, we examined histologic sections from the lungs of 20 women from Mexico City, a high PM locale. All subjects were lifelong residents of Mexico City, were never-smokers, never had occupational dust exposure, and never used biomass fuel for cooking. Twenty never-smoking, non-dust-exposed subjects from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, a low PM region, were used as a control. By light microscopy, abnormal small airways with fibrotic walls and excess muscle, many containing visible dust, were present in the Mexico City lungs. Formal grading analysis confirmed the presence of significantly greater amounts of fibrous tissue and muscle in the walls of the airways in the Mexico City compared with the Vancouver lungs. Electron microscopic particle burden measurements on four cases from Mexico City showed that carbonaceous aggregates of ultrafine particles, aggregates likely to be combustion products, were present in the airway mucosa. We conclude that PM penetrates into and is retained in the walls of small airways, and that, even in nonsmokers, long-term exposure to high levels of ambient particulate pollutants is associated with small airway remodeling. This process may produce chronic airflow obstruction. PMID:12727599

  18. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  19. Extraglottic airway devices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Ramesh; Das, Debasmita; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Joffe, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    Extraglottic airway devices (EAD) have become an integral part of anesthetic care since their introduction into clinical practice 25 years ago and have been used safely hundreds of millions of times, worldwide. They are an important first option for difficult ventilation during both in-hospital and out-of-hospital difficult airway management and can be utilized as a conduit for tracheal intubation either blindly or assisted by another technology (fiberoptic endoscopy, lightwand). Thus, the EAD may be the most versatile single airway technique in the airway management toolbox. However, despite their utility, knowledge regarding specific devices and the supporting data for their use is of paramount importance to patient's safety. In this review, number of commercially available EADs are discussed and the reported benefits and potential pitfalls are highlighted. PMID:24741502

  20. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  1. Dynamic Visco-elastic Buckling Analysis for Airway Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bando, Kiyoshi; Ohba, Kenkichi; Yamanoi, Yuta

    In order to clarify the mechanism by which the lung airway narrows during an asthma attack, dynamic buckling analysis of the wall was conducted. The wall was modeled using a visco-elastic thin-walled circular cylinder of the Voigt model for the planestress state. A governing equation for dynamic buckling was derived, and in the equation, the contraction of smooth muscle was replaced by uniform inward transmural pressure. The non-dimensional parameters for the buckling wave number n were nondimensional retardation time τ, non-dimensional increasing velocity of inward transmural pressure β, thickness radius ratio α2, radius length ratio η, density ratio ζ, and Poisson's ratio ν. The validity of the theoretical model was confirmed by comparing the calculated wave number with that obtained from the experiment, in which a silicone rubber tube blended with silicone potting gel was used as the in vitro airway model. In addition, the wave number n increased with β. It was necessary to consider the damping effect of the tube model or the airway wall, and n increased by 1.5 to 2 due to the additional mass effect of surrounding tissues of the basement membrane in the airway wall.

  2. Clinical significance of upper airway dysfunction in motor neurone disease.

    PubMed Central

    García-Pachón, E.; Martí, J.; Mayos, M.; Casan, P.; Sanchis, J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--To assess the occurrence, functional characteristics and prognostic value of upper airway dysfunction in motor neurone disease, 27 patients unselected for respiratory symptoms were studied. METHODS--Upper airway function was evaluated by analysis of the maximal flow-volume loop. Neurological diagnosis was established from the clinical history and physical examination. The degree of impairment was quantified by the Appel score. RESULTS--Twelve patients (group A) showed abnormalities of the maximal flow-volume loop consistent with flow limitation (seven patients) or instability of upper airway function (gross oscillations of airflow, five patients). The remaining 15 patients (group B) exhibited a normal or generally reduced maximal flow-volume loop, suggestive of muscle weakness. No differences were observed between groups in general physical condition, rate of disease progression, or duration of disease. CONCLUSIONS--Upper airway dysfunction in patients with motor neurone disease was a frequent finding. It was present more often, but not exclusively, in patients with bulbar features and was unrelated to prognosis. PMID:7940430

  3. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and

  4. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction.

  5. A new removable airway stent

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Tore; Sørhaug, Sveinung; Leira, Håkon Olav; Tyvold, Stig Sverre; Langø, Thomas; Hammer, Tommy; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Mattsson, Erney

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant airway obstruction is a feared complication and will most probably occur more frequently in the future because of increasing cancer incidence and increased life expectancy in cancer patients. Minimal invasive treatment using airway stents represents a meaningful and life-saving palliation. We present a new removable airway stent for improved individualised treatment. Methods To our knowledge, the new airway stent is the world's first knitted and uncovered self-expanding metal stent, which can unravel and be completely removed. In an in vivo model using two anaesthetised and spontaneously breathing pigs, we deployed and subsequently removed the stents by unravelling the device. The procedures were executed by flexible bronchoscopy in an acute and a chronic setting – a ‘proof-of-principle’ study. Results The new stent was easily and accurately deployed in the central airways, and it remained fixed in its original position. It was easy to unravel and completely remove from the airways without clinically significant complications. During the presence of the stent in the chronic study, granulation tissue was induced. This tissue disappeared spontaneously with the removal. Conclusions The new removable stent functioned according to its purpose and unravelled easily, and it was completely removed without significant technical or medical complications. Induced granulation tissue disappeared spontaneously. Further studies on animals and humans are needed to define its optimal indications and future use. PMID:27608269

  6. Airway obstruction with cricoid pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartsilver, E L; Vanner, R G

    2000-03-01

    Cricoid pressure may cause airway obstruction. We investigated whether this is related to the force applied and to the technique of application. We recorded expired tidal volumes and inflation pressures during ventilation via a face-mask and oral airway in 52 female patients who were anaesthetised and about to undergo elective surgery. An inspired tidal volume of 900 ml was delivered using a ventilator. Ventilation was assessed under five different conditions: no cricoid pressure, backwards cricoid pressure applied with a force of 30 N, cricoid pressure applied in an upward and backward direction with a force of 30 N, backwards cricoid pressure with a force of 44 N and through a tracheal tube. An expired tidal volume of < 200 ml was taken to indicate airway obstruction. Airway obstruction did not occur without cricoid pressure, but did occur in one patient (2%) with cricoid pressure at 30 N, in 29 patients (56%) with 30 N applied in an upward and backward direction and in 18 (35%) patients with cricoid pressure at 44 N. Cricoid pressure applied with a force of 44 N can cause airway obstruction but if cricoid pressure is applied with a force of 30 N, airway obstruction occurs less frequently (p = 0.0001) unless the force is applied in an upward and backward direction. PMID:10671836

  7. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  8. Origins of and implementation concepts for upper airway stimulation therapy for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strohl M D, Kingman P; Baskin M D, Jonathan; Lance M D, Colleen; Ponsky M D, Diana; Weidenbecher M D, Mark; Strohl B A, Madeleine; Yamauchi M D, Motoo

    2016-07-01

    Upper airway stimulation, specifically hypoglossal (CN XII) nerve stimulation, is a new, alternative therapy for patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome who cannot tolerate positive airway pressure, the first-line therapy for symptomatic patients. Stimulation therapy addresses the cause of inadequate upper airway muscle activation for nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal airway collapse during sleep. The purpose of this report is to outline the development of this first-in-class therapy and its clinical implementation. Another practical theme is assessment of the features for considering a surgically implanted device and the insight as to how both clinical and endoscopic criteria increase the likelihood of safe and durable outcomes for an implant and how to more generally plan for management of CPAP-intolerant patients. A third theme is the team building required among sleep medicine and surgical specialties in the provision of individualized neurostimulation therapy. PMID:27424823

  9. Pericytes contribute to airway remodeling in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Folestad, Erika; Rowley, Jessica E.; Noll, Elisa M.; Walker, Simone A.; Lloyd, Clare M.; Rankin, Sara M.; Pietras, Kristian; Eriksson, Ulf; Fuxe, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Myofibroblast accumulation, subepithelial fibrosis, and vascular remodeling are complicating features of chronic asthma, but the mechanisms are not clear. Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) regulate the fate and function of various mesenchymal cells and have been implicated as mediators of lung fibrosis. However, it is not known whether PDGF-BB signaling via PDGFRβ, which is critical for the recruitment of pericytes to blood vessels, plays a role in airway remodeling in chronic asthma. In the present study, we used a selective PDGFRβ inhibitor (CP-673451) to investigate the role of PDGFRβ signaling in the development of airway remodeling and lung dysfunction in an established mouse model of house dust mite-induced chronic allergic asthma. Unexpectedly, we found that pharmacological inhibition of PDGFRβ signaling in the context of chronic aeroallergen exposure led to exacerbated lung dysfunction and airway smooth muscle thickening. Further studies revealed that the inflammatory response to aeroallergen challenge in mice was associated with decreased PDGF-BB expression and the loss of pericytes from the airway microvasculature. In parallel, cells positive for pericyte markers accumulated in the subepithelial region of chronically inflamed airways. This process was exacerbated in animals treated with CP-673451. The results indicate that perturbed PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ signaling and pericyte accumulation in the airway wall may contribute to airway remodeling in chronic allergic asthma. PMID:25637607

  10. Pericytes contribute to airway remodeling in a mouse model of chronic allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jill R; Folestad, Erika; Rowley, Jessica E; Noll, Elisa M; Walker, Simone A; Lloyd, Clare M; Rankin, Sara M; Pietras, Kristian; Eriksson, Ulf; Fuxe, Jonas

    2015-04-01

    Myofibroblast accumulation, subepithelial fibrosis, and vascular remodeling are complicating features of chronic asthma, but the mechanisms are not clear. Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) regulate the fate and function of various mesenchymal cells and have been implicated as mediators of lung fibrosis. However, it is not known whether PDGF-BB signaling via PDGFRβ, which is critical for the recruitment of pericytes to blood vessels, plays a role in airway remodeling in chronic asthma. In the present study, we used a selective PDGFRβ inhibitor (CP-673451) to investigate the role of PDGFRβ signaling in the development of airway remodeling and lung dysfunction in an established mouse model of house dust mite-induced chronic allergic asthma. Unexpectedly, we found that pharmacological inhibition of PDGFRβ signaling in the context of chronic aeroallergen exposure led to exacerbated lung dysfunction and airway smooth muscle thickening. Further studies revealed that the inflammatory response to aeroallergen challenge in mice was associated with decreased PDGF-BB expression and the loss of pericytes from the airway microvasculature. In parallel, cells positive for pericyte markers accumulated in the subepithelial region of chronically inflamed airways. This process was exacerbated in animals treated with CP-673451. The results indicate that perturbed PDGF-BB/PDGFRβ signaling and pericyte accumulation in the airway wall may contribute to airway remodeling in chronic allergic asthma. PMID:25637607

  11. Refractory dilated cardiomyopathy associated with metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Peter; Jefferies, John L; Kearney, Debra; Russell, Heidi

    2010-10-01

    A 2-year-old African American male presented with heart failure and an abdominal mass. Computerized tomography (CT) scan revealed a 7 cm adrenal lesion, confirmed as poorly differentiated neuroblastoma (NB). CT and meta-iodobenzoguanidine (MIBG) scans identified multiple metastases, but cardiac MIBG imaging was absent. Cardiac ejection fraction (EF) was 8% with 7% shortening fraction. The patient underwent six cycles of chemotherapy and investigational immunotherapy. Cardiac function improved to 26% EF. However, the tumor proved unresponsive to treatment. The patient died from stage IV congestive heart failure (CHF) and progressive NB. Autopsy confirmed dilated cardiomyopathy with endocardial fibroelastosis.

  12. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with toluene abuse.

    PubMed

    Vural, Mutlu; Ogel, Kultegin

    2006-01-01

    The use of paint thinner and glue to achieve an euphoric state has been associated with serious social and health problems in children and young adults. We present the case of a 21-year-old man with dilated cardiomyopathy occurring following abuse of paint thinner and glue containing toluene as main compound. After cessation of toluene abuse, the patient recovered rapidly and completely. Because of the increasing prevalence of toluene abuse, harmful effects of this volatile agent on the heart are also discussed. PMID:16479101

  13. Human airway ciliary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kristin; Knowles, Michael R.; Davis, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Airway cilia depend on precise changes in shape to transport the mucus gel overlying mucosal surfaces. The ciliary motion can be recorded in several planes using video microscopy. However, cilia are densely packed, and automated computerized systems are not available to convert these ciliary shape changes into forms that are useful for testing theoretical models of ciliary function. We developed a system for converting planar ciliary motions recorded by video microscopy into an empirical quantitative model, which is easy to use in validating mathematical models, or in examining ciliary function, e.g., in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The system we developed allows the manipulation of a model cilium superimposed over a video of beating cilia. Data were analyzed to determine shear angles and velocity vectors of points along the cilium. Extracted waveforms were used to construct a composite waveform, which could be used as a standard. Variability was measured as the mean difference in position of points on individual waveforms and the standard. The shapes analyzed were the end-recovery, end-effective, and fastest moving effective and recovery with mean (± SE) differences of 0.31(0.04), 0.25(0.06), 0.50(0.12), 0.50(0.10), μm, respectively. In contrast, the same measures for three different PCD waveforms had values far outside this range. PMID:23144323

  14. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  15. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Methods: Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Results: Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh–Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Conclusion: Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty. PMID:26567879

  16. [Obstruction of the upper airways in humans and animal models].

    PubMed

    Schulz, R

    2010-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is caused by repetitive collapse of a narrow upper airway during sleep with the main risk factor being obesity. Apneas are followed by hypoxia, sympathetic activation, intrathoracic pressure swings and arousals. In most animal studies, only the cyclical pattern of hypoxia characteristic of OSA is simulated, however, more complex models have also been developed which additionally reflect the other pathophysiological changes associated with sleep-disordered breathing. These models have contributed to a deeper understanding of the cardiovascular and metabolic consequences of OSA. From other experiments the concept of the pharynx behaving like a collapsible tube, i. e. a Starling resistor, has emerged. Finally, the neurotransmitter modulation of upper airway muscle tone has been elucidated by using IN VIVO microdialysis of the caudal medulla of rats. It is hoped that findings from animal studies will in the future impact on the management of patients with OSA, in particular if they are non-compliant with CPAP therapy. PMID:20632239

  17. Visual recovery using small dilating eye drops.

    PubMed

    Gray, R H; Franklin, S J; Reeves, B C

    1992-08-01

    It is well established that reduced size dilating eye drops of 1% tropicamide and 10% phenylephrine (micro drops) are effective for clinical purposes. Excellent pupil dilatation (mydriasis) is achieved and pupil constriction does not occur in response to light. In this study, the effect of micro drops of 1% tropicamide on distance and near visual recovery was compared with standard drops in a group of 20 healthy volunteers. For each person studied, one eye was selected at random to be tested first with the standard drop size, and then after a minimum of one week, the same eye was again tested using a drop of the same drug one fifth standard size. An iris photograph, Snellen visual acuity at 6 m, and reading visual acuity was obtained for each test procedure: before drop instillation and at 30 min, 1, 2 and 4 h after drug instillation. Use of the micro drops caused a small but statistically significant improvement in the rate of recovery of distance and near visual acuity. These findings, allied to the known beneficial effects of reduced systemic absorption using micro drops, lend further weight to the argument that mydriasis may be achieved more safely, with fewer side effects, and with earlier return of normal vision when reduced size drops are used. It is hoped that practical micro drop dispensers will be developed.

  18. Right ventricular filling in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, S.; Parker, K. H.; Gibson, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE--To assess right ventricular filling in dilated cardiomyopathy. PATIENTS--32 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and 24 healthy controls. METHODS--Stroke distances were measured by pulsed Doppler echocardiography at left ventricular outflow and left and right ventricular inflow. The inflow tract dimensions of both ventricles and the outflow tract dimension of the left ventricle were measured from two dimensional images. Right and left sided atrioventricular (AV) ring excursions were measured by M mode echocardiography at the tricuspid and mitral rings. Stroke volume was derived as stroke distance multiplied by left ventricular outflow tract area. Total stroke distances were calculated as the sum of AV valve Doppler stroke distances and ring excursion. The effective orifice areas of the two AV valves were thus defined as stroke volumes divided by total stroke distance. RESULTS--Total tricuspid stroke distance was normally less than mitral (6.0 (1.7) v 7.6 (1.7) cm, P < 0.05), implying that effective orifice area of the tricuspid valve was consistently greater (6.6 (1.6) v 4.5 (0.8) cm2, P < 0.01). Total tricuspid ring excursion was normally more than mitral (2.30 (0.30) v 1.62 (0.22) cm, P < 0.01). Total tricuspid stroke distance in dilated cardiomyopathy was also less than mitral (7.8 (2.4) v 9.7 (2.8) cm, P < 0.05). Tricuspid stroke distance was significantly increased in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy compared with that in healthy controls (P < 0.05 v controls), though stroke volume was much smaller (26 (10) v 63 (11) ml, P < 0.01) so that tricuspid effective orifice area was reduced to less than half normal (2.7 (1.2) cm2, P < 0.01). Total tricuspid ring long axis excursion was more than mitral (1.37 (0.6) v 0.74 (0.21) cm, P < 0.01). Right ventricular end diastolic inflow dimension was increased compared with that in healthy controls (3.9 (0.7) v 2.8 (0.5) cm, P < 0.01), correlating inversely with tricuspid effective orifice area (r = -0.71, P

  19. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation: revival of the old technique.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Uk; Moon, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2013-12-01

    Radiologists first described the removal of bile duct stones using balloon dilation in the early 1980s. Recently, there has been renewed interest in endoscopic balloon dilation with a small balloon to avoid the complications of endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) in young patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, there is a disparity in using endoscopic balloon papillary dilation (EPBD) between the East and the West, depending on the origin of the studies. In the early 2000s, EST followed by endoscopic balloon dilation with a large balloon was introduced to treat large or difficult biliary stones. Endoscopic balloon dilation with a large balloon has generally been recognized as an effective and safe method, unlike EPBD. However, fatal complications have occurred in patients with endoscopic papillary large balloon dilation (EPLBD). The safety of endoscopic balloon dilation is still a debatable issue. Moreover, guidelines of indications and techniques have not been established in performing endoscopic balloon dilation with a small balloon or a large balloon. In this article, we discuss the issue of conventional and large balloon endoscopic dilation. We also suggest the indications and optimal techniques of EPBD and EPLBD.

  20. Fluoroscopically Guided Balloon Dilation for Postintubation Tracheal Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyoung Park, Jung-Hun

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Little was known about the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods: From February 2000 to November 2010, 14 patients underwent fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. Technical success, clinical success, and complications were evaluated. Patients were followed up for recurrent symptoms. Results: In all patients, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation was technically and clinically successful with no major complications. Following the initial procedure, six patients (43 %) remained asymptomatic during a follow-up period. Obstructive symptoms recurred in eight patients (57 %) within 6 months (mean, 1.7 months), who were treated with repeat balloon dilation (n = 4) and other therapies. Of the four patients who underwent repeat balloon dilation, three became asymptomatic. One patient became asymptomatic after a third balloon dilation. On long-term (mean, 74 months) follow-up, 71 % of patients experienced relief of symptoms following fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation. Conclusions: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation may be safe, is easy to perform, and resulted in effective treatment in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis.

  1. Duodenal adenocarcinoma presenting as a mass with aneurismal dilatation.

    PubMed

    Mama, Nadia; Ben Slama, Aïda; Arifa, Nadia; Kadri, Khaled; Sriha, Badreddine; Ksiaa, Mehdi; Jemni, Hela; Tlili-Graiess, Kalthoum

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal adenocarcinoma is frequent. Aneurysmal dilatation of the small bowel is reported to be a lymphoma characteristic imaging finding. A 57-year-old male was found to have a duodenal adenocarcinoma with aneurismal dilatation on imaging which is an exceptional feature. On laparotomy, the wall thickening of the dilated duodenum extended to the first jejunal loop, with multiple mesenteric lymph nodes and ascites. Segmental palliative resection with gastro-entero-anastomosis was done. Histopathology revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with neuro-endocrine differentiation foci. Wide areas of necrosis and vascular emboli were responsible for the radiological feature of the dilated duodenum with wall thickening.

  2. The Role of Airway and Endobronchial Ultrasound in Perioperative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Votruba, Jiri; Zemanová, Petra; Lambert, Lukas; Vesela, Michaela Michalkova

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increased use of ultrasound in evaluation of the airway and the lower parts of the respiratory system. Ultrasound examination is fast and reliable and can be performed at the bedside and does not carry the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. Apart from use in diagnostics it may also provide safe guidance for invasive and semi-invasive procedures. Ultrasound examination of the oral cavity structures, epiglottis, vocal cords, and subglottic space may help in the prediction of difficult intubation. Preoperative ultrasound may diagnose vocal cord palsy or deviation or stenosis of the trachea. Ultrasonography can also be used for confirmation of endotracheal tube, double-lumen tube, or laryngeal mask placement. This can be achieved by direct examination of the tube inside the trachea or by indirect methods evaluating lung movements. Postoperative airway ultrasound may reveal laryngeal pathology or subglottic oedema. Conventional ultrasound is a reliable real-time navigational tool for emergency cricothyrotomy or percutaneous dilational tracheostomy. Endobronchial ultrasound is a combination of bronchoscopy and ultrasonography and is used for preoperative examination of lung cancer and solitary pulmonary nodules. The method is also useful for real-time navigated biopsies of such pathological structures. PMID:26788507

  3. The Role of Airway and Endobronchial Ultrasound in Perioperative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Votruba, Jiri; Zemanová, Petra; Lambert, Lukas; Vesela, Michaela Michalkova

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an increased use of ultrasound in evaluation of the airway and the lower parts of the respiratory system. Ultrasound examination is fast and reliable and can be performed at the bedside and does not carry the risk of exposure to ionizing radiation. Apart from use in diagnostics it may also provide safe guidance for invasive and semi-invasive procedures. Ultrasound examination of the oral cavity structures, epiglottis, vocal cords, and subglottic space may help in the prediction of difficult intubation. Preoperative ultrasound may diagnose vocal cord palsy or deviation or stenosis of the trachea. Ultrasonography can also be used for confirmation of endotracheal tube, double-lumen tube, or laryngeal mask placement. This can be achieved by direct examination of the tube inside the trachea or by indirect methods evaluating lung movements. Postoperative airway ultrasound may reveal laryngeal pathology or subglottic oedema. Conventional ultrasound is a reliable real-time navigational tool for emergency cricothyrotomy or percutaneous dilational tracheostomy. Endobronchial ultrasound is a combination of bronchoscopy and ultrasonography and is used for preoperative examination of lung cancer and solitary pulmonary nodules. The method is also useful for real-time navigated biopsies of such pathological structures. PMID:26788507

  4. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  5. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  6. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  7. Intratracheal Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulates Tachykinin System, Suppresses Airway Remodeling and Reduces Airway Hyperresponsiveness in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Spaziano, Giuseppe; Piegari, Elena; Matteis, Maria; Cappetta, Donato; Esposito, Grazia; Russo, Rosa; Tartaglione, Gioia; De Palma, Raffaele; Rossi, Francesco; D’Agostino, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for new options for chronic lung diseases promotes the research on stem cells for lung repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can modulate lung inflammation, but the data on cellular processes involved in early airway remodeling and the potential involvement of neuropeptides are scarce. Objectives To elucidate the mechanisms by which local administration of MSCs interferes with pathophysiological features of airway hyperresponsiveness in an animal model. Methods GFP-tagged mouse MSCs were intratracheally delivered in the ovalbumin mouse model with subsequent functional tests, the analysis of cytokine levels, neuropeptide expression and histological evaluation of MSCs fate and airway pathology. Additionally, MSCs were exposed to pro-inflammatory factors in vitro. Results Functional improvement was observed after MSC administration. Although MSCs did not adopt lung cell phenotypes, cell therapy positively affected airway remodeling reducing the hyperplastic phase of the gain in bronchial smooth muscle mass, decreasing the proliferation of epithelium in which mucus metaplasia was also lowered. Decrease of interleukin-4, interleukin-5, interleukin-13 and increase of interleukin-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage was also observed. Exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines, MSCs upregulated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Moreover, asthma-related in vivo upregulation of pro-inflammatory neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 2 receptors was counteracted by MSCs that also determined a partial restoration of VIP, a neuropeptide with anti-inflammatory properties. Conclusion Intratracheally administered MSCs positively modulate airway remodeling, reduce inflammation and improve function, demonstrating their ability to promote tissue homeostasis in the course of experimental allergic asthma. Because of a limited tissue retention, the functional impact of MSCs may be attributed to their immunomodulatory response combined with the interference of neuropeptide

  8. Airway hyperresponsiveness in a rat model of chronic bronchitis: role of C fibers.

    PubMed

    Long, N C; Martin, J G; Pantano, R; Shore, S A

    1997-04-01

    We evaluated the role of C fibers in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in a rat model of chronic bronchitis. Neonatal rats were treated with capsaicin (50 mg/kg, subcutaneously), a procedure which results in permanent depletion of tachykinins from the lungs and airways as well as degeneration of C fibers. Control rats were treated with the vehicle used to dissolve capsaicin. Three months later, rats from both groups were exposed either to SO2 gas (250 ppm, 5 h/d, 5 d/wk for 4 wk) or to filtered air for the same period of time. One day after the last exposure, rats were anesthetized and instrumented for the measurement of pulmonary resistance (R(L)), dynamic compliance (Cdyn), and airway responsiveness to inhaled aerosolized methacholine. There was a small (30%) but significant increase in R(L) in neonatal capsaicin- but not vehicle-treated rats exposed to SO2. Chronic exposure to SO2 resulted in increased airway responsiveness in both groups of rats, but the effect was more pronounced in the neonatal capsaicin-treated animals in which the doses of methacholine required to double R(L) or decrease Cdyn by 50% decreased 6.3-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively, compared with only 2.2- and 1.3-fold decreases in vehicle-treated rats. Morphometric analysis of histologic sections of airways demonstrated that the average area of smooth muscle in the airway wall, normalized by the length of basement membrane, was significantly greater in SO2 compared with air-exposed capsaicin-treated rats, but not in vehicle-treated control rats (p < 0.012). The maximal tension generated by tracheal rings in response to cholinergic agonists was also significantly increased by SO2 exposure in neonatal capsaicin-treated, but not vehicle-treated rats (p < 0.002). These results support the hypothesis that rather than contributing to the pathophysiologic manifestations of bronchitis, C fibers limit the development of airway obstruction and airway hyperresponsiveness during induction of

  9. Modeling airway resistance dynamics after tidal and deep inspirations.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, C William; Salome, Cheryl M; Berend, Norbert; King, Gregory G

    2004-11-01

    Using the forced oscillation technique, we tracked airway resistance continuously during quiet breathing (QB) and deep inspiration (DI), thus observing fluctuations in resistance that may reflect mechanisms of airway stretch and renarrowing. After DI, however, the resistance may be depressed for a period not related to volume changes. We hypothesized that this gradual increase in resistance after DI-induced dilation was determined by a simple time constant. Furthermore, to the extent that this effect reflects dynamic characteristics of airway renarrowing, the resistance change after each tidal inspiration should also be constrained by this temporal limit. A model relating resistance fluctuations to the breathing pattern, including both instantaneous and delayed effects, was developed and applied to data from 14 nonasthmatic and 17 asthmatic subjects (forced expiratory volume in 1 s = 103 +/- 13 and 83 +/- 12%, respectively, means +/- SD) after methacholine challenge (dose 145 +/- 80 and 3.0 +/- 3.4 micromol, respectively) that resulted in respective forced expiratory volume in 1 s reductions of 16 +/- 7 and 24 +/- 6% from baseline. Resistance was measured continuously for 1 min of QB, a DI, followed by a further minute of QB. Resistance values at end expiration (Ree) and end inspiration were calculated. We found that the sequence of Ree after DI was best modeled by a power-law function of time rather than an exponential decay (r2 = 0.82 +/- 0.18 compared with 0.63 +/- 0.16; P < 0.01). Furthermore, the coefficient characterizing this "renarrowing function" was close to equal to the coefficient characterizing the equivalent function of resistance change between each resistance value at end inpiration and subsequent Ree during QB, particularly in the nonasthmatic subjects for whom the intraclass correlation was 0.66. This suggests that the same time-dependent factors determine renarrowing after both large and small breaths.

  10. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  11. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  12. Postnatal Exposure History and Airways

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Edwards, Patricia C.; Miller, Lisa A.; Hyde, Dallas M.

    2012-01-01

    Postnatally, the lung continues to grow and differentiate while interacting with the environment. Exposure to ozone (O3) and allergens during postnatal lung development alters structural elements of conducting airways, including innervation and neurokinin abundance. These changes have been linked with development of asthma in a rhesus monkey model. We hypothesized that O3 exposure resets the ability of the airways to respond to oxidant stress and that this is mediated by changes in the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). Infant rhesus monkeys received episodic exposure to O3 biweekly with or without house dust mite antigen (HDMA) from 6 to 12 months of age. Age-matched monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA). Microdissected airway explants from midlevel airways (intrapulmonary generations 5–8) for four to six animals in each of four groups (FA, O3, HDMA, and HDMA+O3) were tested for NK-1R gene responses to acute oxidant stress using exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1.2 mM), a lipid ozonide (10 μM), or sham treatment for 4 hours in vitro. Airway responses were measured using real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NK-1R and IL-8 gene expression. Basal NK-1R gene expression levels were not different between the exposure groups. Treatment with ozonide or hydrogen peroxide did not change NK-1R gene expression in animals exposed to FA, HDMA, or HDMA+O3. However, treatment in vitro with lipid ozonide significantly increased NK-1R gene expression in explants from O3–exposed animals. We conclude that a history of prior O3 exposure resets the steady state of the airways to increase the NK-1R response to subsequent acute oxidant stresses. PMID:22962062

  13. Matrix Metalloproteinases as Potential Targets in the Venous Dilation Associated with Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Kucukguven, Arda; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Varicose veins (VVs) are a common venous disease of the lower extremity characterized by incompetent valves, venous reflux, and dilated and tortuous veins. If untreated, VVs could lead to venous thrombosis, thrombophlebitis and chronic venous leg ulcers. Various genetic, hormonal and environmental factors may lead to structural changes in the vein valves and make them incompetent, leading to venous reflux, increased venous pressure and vein wall dilation. Prolonged increases in venous pressure and vein wall tension are thought to increase the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Members of the MMPs family include collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins, membrane-type MMPs and others. MMPs are known to degrade various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). MMPs may also affect the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle, causing changes in the vein relaxation and contraction mechanisms. ECs injury also triggers leukocyte infiltration, activation and inflammation, which lead to further vein wall damage. The vein wall dilation and valve dysfunction, and the MMP activation and superimposed inflammation and fibrosis would lead to progressive venous dilation and VVs formation. Surgical ablation is an effective treatment for VVs, but may be associated with high recurrence rate, and other less invasive approaches that target the cause of the disease are needed. MMP inhibitors including endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) and pharmacological inhibitors such as zinc chelators, doxycycline, batimastat and marimastat, have been used as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer, autoimmune and cardiovascular disease. However, MMP inhibitors may have side effects especially on the musculoskeletal system. With the advent of new genetic and pharmacological tools, specific MMP inhibitors with fewer undesirable effects could be useful to retard the progression and prevent the recurrence of VVs. PMID:23316963

  14. Matrix metalloproteinases as potential targets in the venous dilation associated with varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Kucukguven, Arda; Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-03-01

    Varicose veins (VVs) are a common venous disease of the lower extremity characterized by incompetent valves, venous reflux, and dilated and tortuous veins. If untreated, VVs could lead to venous thrombosis, thrombophlebitis and chronic venous leg ulcers. Various genetic, hormonal and environmental factors may lead to structural changes in the vein valves and make them incompetent, leading to venous reflux, increased venous pressure and vein wall dilation. Prolonged increases in venous pressure and vein wall tension are thought to increase the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Members of the MMPs family include collagenases, gelatinases, stromelysins, matrilysins, membrane- type MMPs and others. MMPs are known to degrade various components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). MMPs may also affect the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle, causing changes in the vein relaxation and contraction mechanisms. Endothelial cell injury also triggers leukocyte infiltration, activation and inflammation, which lead to further vein wall damage. The vein wall dilation and valve dysfunction, and the MMP activation and superimposed inflammation and fibrosis would lead to progressive venous dilation and VVs formation. Surgical ablation is an effective treatment for VVs, but may be associated with high recurrence rate, and other less invasive approaches that target the cause of the disease are needed. MMP inhibitors including endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) and pharmacological inhibitors such as zinc chelators, doxycycline, batimastat and marimastat, have been used as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in cancer, autoimmune and cardiovascular disease. However, MMP inhibitors may have side effects especially on the musculoskeletal system. With the advent of new genetic and pharmacological tools, specific MMP inhibitors with fewer undesirable effects could be useful to retard the progression and prevent the recurrence of VVs.

  15. Respiratory-related activity of cricothyroid muscle in awake normal humans.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, J R; Brancatisano, A; Engel, L A

    1991-05-01

    The role of the cricothyroid muscle (CT) in respiration is unclear. To examine the respiratory-related electrical activity of the CT, we measured its electromyogram (EMG) and compared it with that of the alae nasi (AN) in eight healthy subjects. During quiet breathing the CT EMG phasing was inspiratory in seven subjects. This pattern was similar to the AN with respect to phasing and shape of the integrated EMG. The onset of phasic CT and AN activity related to inspiration preceded flow by 173 +/- 39 and 570 +/- 76 (SE) ms, respectively (P less than 0.01). We measured the duration from onset of phasic activity to peak of the EMG (TA) and the total cycle duration (TT). TA/TT of the CT was 0.29 +/- 0.02, similar to that of the AN (0.28 +/- 0.03). Inspiratory resistive loading, panting, and voluntary hyperventilation increased CT activity above the peak level seen during tidal breathing. Voluntary glottic closure increased CT activity to a level above tonic but below peak tidal activity. The findings suggest that the phasic electrical activity of the CT simulates predominantly that of an upper airway dilator. PMID:1864803

  16. Genetics of Human and Canine Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Siobhan; Edwards, Jennifer; Ferguson-Mignan, Thomas F. N.; Cobb, Malcolm; Mongan, Nigel P.; Rutland, Catrin S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in both humans and dogs. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) accounts for a large number of these cases, reported to be the third most common form of cardiac disease in humans and the second most common in dogs. In human studies of DCM there are more than 50 genetic loci associated with the disease. Despite canine DCM having similar disease progression to human DCM studies into the genetic basis of canine DCM lag far behind those of human DCM. In this review the aetiology, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of canine DCM are examined, along with highlighting possible different subtypes of canine DCM and their potential relevance to human DCM. Finally the current position of genetic research into canine and human DCM, including the genetic loci, is identified and the reasons many studies may have failed to find a genetic association with canine DCM are reviewed. PMID:26266250

  17. Dilatant hardening of fluid-saturated sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhnenko, Roman Y.; Labuz, Joseph F.

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pore fluid in rock affects both the elastic and inelastic deformation processes, yet laboratory testing is typically performed on dry material even though in situ the rock is often saturated. Techniques were developed for testing fluid-saturated porous rock under the limiting conditions of drained, undrained, and unjacketed response. Confined compression experiments, both conventional triaxial and plane strain, were performed on water-saturated Berea sandstone to investigate poroelastic and inelastic behavior. Measured drained response was used to calibrate an elasto-plastic constitutive model that predicts undrained inelastic deformation. The experimental data show good agreement with the model: dilatant hardening in undrained triaxial and plane strain compression tests under constant mean stress was predicted and observed.

  18. Airway Assessment for Office Sedation/Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Morton B; Phero, James C

    2015-01-01

    Whenever a patient is about to receive sedation or general anesthesia, no matter what the technique, the preoperative assessment of the airway is one of the most important steps in ensuring patient safety and positive outcomes. This article, Part III in the series on airway management, is directed at the ambulatory office practice and focuses on predicting the success of advanced airway rescue techniques.

  19. [Pulmonary function results in healthy subjects breathing through external stenoses compared to patients with airway obstruction].

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Thorsten; Schätt, Dieter; Schläfke, Marianne E; Ulmer, Wolfgang T

    2004-01-01

    We compared body plethysmographic data, flow-volume curves during spontaneous breathing, P0.1 and PETCO2 in healthy subjects breathing through external stenoses (ES) of varying magnitude to the results in patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Inspiratory vital capacity (IVC) remained unchanged by experimental airway stenoses. IVC is mainly determined by the end-expiratory closure of the airways, which only weakly correlates with airway resistance in patients. External stenoses had no effect on the physiological end-expiratory closure of the airways. For the other spirometric parameters the available force of the respiratory muscles and the degree of the experimental stenosis played the major role. The mouth occlusion pressure (P0.1) showed considerably lower variation during ES as well as in COPD patients than total resistance (Rt). There was no increase in intrathoracic gas volume (IGV) causing increased tension of the lungs and the thorax during ES. The well-known correlation between Rt and IGV is attributed to the end-expiratory closure of the airways during increased flow resistance and to "trapped air". It remains open, if and how the expiratory muscles act to overcome the increased resistance. With consideration of the underlying factors of the different lung function measures, the combination and the analysis of the correlation between different values may lead to far-reaching results in lung function testing. PMID:15518089

  20. Intraventricular vortex properties in nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Yotti, Raquel; Martínez-Legazpi, Pablo; del Villar, Candelas Pérez; Pérez-David, Esther; González-Mansilla, Ana; Santa-Marta, Cristina; Barrio, Alicia; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Vortices may have a role in optimizing the mechanical efficiency and blood mixing of the left ventricle (LV). We aimed to characterize the size, position, circulation, and kinetic energy (KE) of LV main vortex cores in patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM) and analyze their physiological correlates. We used digital processing of color-Doppler images to study flow evolution in 61 patients with NIDCM and 61 age-matched control subjects. Vortex features showed a characteristic biphasic temporal course during diastole. Because late filling contributed significantly to flow entrainment, vortex KE reached its maximum at the time of the peak A wave, storing 26 ± 20% of total KE delivered by inflow (range: 1–74%). Patients with NIDCM showed larger and stronger vortices than control subjects (circulation: 0.008 ± 0.007 vs. 0.006 ± 0.005 m2/s, respectively, P = 0.02; KE: 7 ± 8 vs. 5 ± 5 mJ/m, P = 0.04), even when corrected for LV size. This helped confining the filling jet in the dilated ventricle. The vortex Reynolds number was also higher in the NIDCM group. By multivariate analysis, vortex KE was related to the KE generated by inflow and to chamber short-axis diameter. In 21 patients studied head to head, Doppler measurements of circulation and KE closely correlated with phase-contract magnetic resonance values (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82 and 0.76, respectively). Thus, the biphasic nature of filling determines normal vortex physiology. Vortex formation is exaggerated in patients with NIDCM due to chamber remodeling, and enlarged vortices are helpful for ameliorating convective pressure losses and facilitating transport. These findings can be accurately studied using ultrasound. PMID:24414062

  1. Hindlimb unweighting decreases endothelium-dependent dilation and eNOS expression in soleus not gastrocnemius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodman, C. R.; Schrage, W. G.; Rush, J. W.; Ray, C. A.; Price, E. M.; Hasser, E. M.; Laughlin, M. H.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that hindlimb unweighting (HLU) decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) in arteries of skeletal muscle with reduced blood flow during HLU. Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g) were exposed to HLU (n = 15) or control (n = 15) conditions for 14 days. ACh-induced dilation was assessed in muscle with reduced [soleus (Sol)] or unchanged [gastrocnemius (Gast)] blood flow during HLU. eNOS and SOD-1 expression were measured in feed arteries (FA) and in first-order (1A), second-order (2A), and third-order (3A) arterioles. Dilation to infusion of ACh in vivo was blunted in Sol but not Gast. In arteries of Sol muscle, HLU decreased eNOS mRNA and protein content. eNOS mRNA content was significantly less in Sol FA (35%), 1A arterioles (25%) and 2A arterioles (18%). eNOS protein content was less in Sol FA (64%) and 1A arterioles (65%) from HLU rats. In arteries of Gast, HLU did not decrease eNOS mRNA or protein. SOD-1 mRNA expression was less in Sol 2A arterioles (31%) and 3A arterioles (29%) of HLU rats. SOD-1 protein content was less in Sol FA (67%) but not arterioles. SOD-1 mRNA and protein content were not decreased in arteries from Gast. These data indicate that HLU decreases endothelium-dependent vasodilation, eNOS expression, and SOD-1 expression primarily in arteries of Sol muscle where blood flow is reduced during HLU.

  2. Airway shape assessment with visual feed-back in asthma and obstructive diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Ortner, Margarete; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Ould Hmeidi, Yahya; Pr"teux, Françoise

    2010-02-01

    Airway remodeling in asthma patients has been studied in vivo by means of endobronchial biopsies allowing to assess structural and inflammatory changes. However, this technique remains relatively invasive and difficult to use in longitudinal trials. The development of alternative non-invasive tests, namely exploiting high-resolution imaging modalities such as MSCT, is gaining interest in the medical community. This paper develops a fullyautomated airway shape assessment approach based on the 3D segmentation of the airway lumen from MSCT data. The objective is to easily notify the radiologist on bronchus shape variations (stenoses, bronchiectasis) along the airway tree during a simple visual investigation. The visual feed-back is provided by means of a volumerendered color coding of the airway calibers which are robustly defined and computed, based on a specific 3D discrete distance function able to deal with small size structures. The color volume rendering (CVR) information is further on reinforced by the definition and computation of a shape variation index along the airway medial axis enabling to detect specific configurations of stenoses. Such cases often occur near bifurcations (bronchial spurs) and they are either missed in the CVR or difficult to spot due to occlusions by other segments. Consequently, all detected shape variations (stenoses, dilations and thickened spurs) can be additionally displayed on the medial axis and investigated together with the CVR information. The proposed approach was evaluated on a MSCT database including twelve patients with severe or moderate persistent asthma, or severe COPD, by analyzing segmental and subsegmental bronchi of the right lung. The only CVR information provided for a limited number of views allowed to detect 78% of stenoses and bronchial spurs in these patients, whereas the inclusion of the shape variation index enabled to complement the missing information.

  3. Significance of Main Pulmonary Artery Dilation on Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Timothy E.; Khabbaza, Joseph E.; Yadav, Ruchi

    2014-01-01

    Proper and early identification of patients who harbor serious occult illness is the first step in developing a disease-management strategy. Identification of illnesses through the use of noninvasive techniques provides assurance of patient safety and is ideal. PA dilation is easily measured noninvasively and is due to a variety of conditions, including pulmonary hypertension (PH). The clinician should be able to thoroughly assess the significance of PA dilation in each individual patient. This involves knowledge of the ability of PA dilation to accurately predict PH, understand the wide differential diagnosis of causes of PA dilation, and reverse its life-threatening complications. We found that although PA dilation is suggestive of PH, data remain inconclusive regarding its ability to accurately predict PH. At this point, data are insufficient to place PA dilation into a PH risk-score equation. Here we review the causes and complications of PA dilation, define normal and abnormal PA measurements, and summarize the data linking its association to PH, while suggesting an algorithm designed to assist clinicians in patient work-up after recognizing PA dilation. PMID:25406836

  4. Dilated Canine Hearts: A Specimen for Teaching Cardiac Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Lee Anne

    2008-01-01

    Dilated canine hearts were used to teach undergraduate students internal and external cardiac anatomy. The specimens were dilated using hydrostatic pressure and then fixed using 5% formalin. These specimens provided the students with an alternative to prepackaged embalmed hearts and anatomical models for studying the external and internal cardiac…

  5. Psoriasis and dilated cardiomyopathy: coincidence or associated diseases?

    PubMed

    Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Shuvy, Mony; Lotan, Chaim; Planer, David

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated disease which affects 1-3% of the population. The etiology of psoriasis is unknown. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is probably the end result of a variety of toxic, metabolic or infectious agents. During a computerized search for cardiomyopathy among all patients hospitalized with psoriasis in the Hadassah University Hospital since 1980 we found an increased prevalence of cardiomyopathy, and specifically dilated cardiomyopathy. We present 4 patients who suffer from both conditions. In accordance with previous data, an association between preexisting psoriasis and dilated cardiomyopathy is suggested. We suggest that the genetic risk factors of dilated cardiomyopathy are shared by psoriasis, and more specifically psoriatic arthritis. Alternatively, the immune reaction that is triggered in dilated cardiomyopathy leading to the progression of the disease might be enhanced in patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Chronic inflammation and persistent secretion of proinflammatory cytokines may be considered a potential pathway, triggering the initiation and progression of dilated cardiomyopathy in psoriatic patients. Further investigation of the genetic and immune risk factors involved in dilated cardiomyopathy and in psoriasis may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2344-7. Review. Citation on PubMed Berko BA, Swift M. X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy. N Engl J ... Gelb B, Zhu XM, Chamberlain JS, McCabe ER, Swift M. X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy. Molecular genetic evidence ...

  7. Dilated aortic root and severe aortic regurgitation causing dilated cardiomyopathy in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zainal, Abir; Hamad, Mahmoud Nidal; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders characterised by vast clinical heterogeneity ranging from the classic constellation of symptoms including skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility and skin fragility to the exceedingly critical consequences of arterial rupture and visceral perforation. We describe the case of a 65-year-old male with a history of classic EDS who reported of dyspnoea on exertion, orthopnoea, fatigue and palpitations. He was found to have dilated cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of 35%, aortic root dilation and severe aortic valve regurgitation. The authors intend to draw attention to the rare cardiac manifestations of this condition and the therapeutic challenges involved in managing such patients. PMID:27413024

  8. Control of airway tube diameter and integrity by secreted chitin-binding proteins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Tiklová, Katarína; Tsarouhas, Vasilios; Samakovlis, Christos

    2013-01-01

    The transporting function of many branched tubular networks like our lungs and circulatory system depend on the sizes and shapes of their branches. Understanding the mechanisms of tube size control during organ development may offer new insights into a variety of human pathologies associated with stenoses or cystic dilations in tubular organs. Here, we present the first secreted luminal proteins involved in tube diametric expansion in the Drosophila airways. obst-A and gasp are conserved among insect species and encode secreted proteins with chitin binding domains. We show that the widely used tracheal marker 2A12, recognizes the Gasp protein. Analysis of obst-A and gasp single mutants and obst-A; gasp double mutant shows that both genes are primarily required for airway tube dilation. Similarly, Obst-A and Gasp control epidermal cuticle integrity and larval growth. The assembly of the apical chitinous matrix of the airway tubes is defective in gasp and obst-A mutants. The defects become exaggerated in double mutants indicating that the genes have partially redundant functions in chitin structure modification. The phenotypes in luminal chitin assembly in the airway tubes are accompanied by a corresponding reduction in tube diameter in the mutants. Conversely, overexpression of Obst-A and Gasp causes irregular tube expansion and interferes with tube maturation. Our results suggest that the luminal levels of matrix binding proteins determine the extent of diametric growth. We propose that Obst-A and Gasp organize luminal matrix assembly, which in turn controls the apical shapes of adjacent cells during tube diameter expansion. PMID:23826295

  9. Synthetic double-stranded RNA enhances airway inflammation and remodelling in a rat model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Satoshi; Tamaoka, Meiyo; Takayama, Koji; Okayasu, Kaori; Tsuchiya, Kimitake; Miyazaki, Yasunari; Sumi, Yuki; Martin, James G; Inase, Naohiko

    2011-10-01

    Respiratory viral infections are frequently associated with exacerbations of asthma. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) produced during viral infections may be one of the stimuli for exacerbation. We aimed to assess the potential effect of dsRNA on certain aspects of chronic asthma through the administration of polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), synthetic dsRNA, to a rat model of asthma. Brown Norway rats were sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged three times to evoke airway remodelling. The effect of poly I:C on the ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and structural changes was assessed from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and histological findings. The expression of cytokines and chemokines was evaluated by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR and ELISA. Ovalbumin-challenged animals showed an increased number of total cells and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with PBS-challenged controls. Ovalbumin-challenged animals treated with poly I:C showed an increased number of total cells and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with those without poly I:C treatment. Ovalbumin-challenged animals showed goblet cell hyperplasia, increased airway smooth muscle mass, and proliferation of both airway epithelial cells and airway smooth muscle cells. Treatment with poly I:C enhanced these structural changes. Among the cytokines and chemokines examined, the expression of interleukins 12 and 17 and of transforming growth factor-β(1) in ovalbumin-challenged animals treated with poly I:C was significantly increased compared with those of the other groups. Double-stranded RNA enhanced airway inflammation and remodelling in a rat model of bronchial asthma. These observations suggest that viral infections may promote airway remodelling.

  10. [Cervical incompetence after previous cervical dilatation and curettage (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Grünberger, W; Riss, P

    1979-07-15

    Out of a total of 3502 deliveries over a period of two years 254 patients (7.25%) had a surgical closure of the cervix according to Shirodkar because of cervical incompetence. All 3502 records were reviewed with regard to previous obstetrical and gynecological history. In the group with Shirodkar operation the percentage of women with a history of spontaneous or induced abortions was almost twice as high as in the comparison group. The reason for the development of cervical incompetence could be a trauma to the endocervix due to mechanical dilatation since diagnostic or therapeutic dilatation and curettage was found five times more often in women with Shirodkar operation than in patients without cervical incompetence. The results show that dilatation and curettage for any indication should be performed as carefully as possible, especially in younger women of childbearing age. Chemical dilatation of the endocervix--for example with prostaglandins--seems to be preferable to mechanical dilatation.

  11. Cylindrical dilatation of the choledochus: a special type of congenital bile duct dilatation.

    PubMed

    Todani, T; Watanabe, Y; Fujii, T; Toki, A; Uemura, S; Koike, Y

    1985-11-01

    Cylindrical dilatation of the choledochus develops in 20% of patients with congenital bile duct dilatation and usually has acute-angled unions of the pancreatobiliary ductal system. Symptoms generally develop in patients over 1 year of age. The patients frequently complain of abdominal pain, vomiting, and fever as in those with acute pancreatitis. Ultrasonography and infusion cholangiography are the most useful tools in making a correct diagnosis. A high amylase level in the bile caused by the refluxing of pancreatic juice through anomalous ductal unions is commonly observed. This is responsible for biliary perforation in infancy and possibly carcinoma arising in the bile duct. The amylase concentration in the serum at the time of epigastric pain often is high, which leads to the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. However, evidence of pancreatic inflammation is seldom noted. Accordingly, amylase in the bile may enter the circulating blood through the denuded epithelium or sinusoids of the liver. Excision of the whole extrahepatic duct along with hepaticoenterostomy would be essential for the treatment of cylindrical dilatation of the bile duct, especially when an anomalous ductal union is present.

  12. Risk assessment of sleeping disorder breathing based on upper airway centerline evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsufyani, Noura; Shen, Rui; Cheng, Irene; Major, Paul

    2013-02-01

    One of the most important breathing disorders in childhood is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome which affects 2-3% of children, and the reported failure rate of surgical treatment was as high as 54%. A possible reason in respiratory complications is having reduced dimensions of the upper airway which are further compressed when muscle tone is decreased during sleep. In this study, we use Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to assess the location or cause of the airway obstruction. To date, all studies analyzing the upper airway in subjects with Sleeping Disorder Breathing were based on linear, area, or volumetric measurements, which are global computations and can easily ignore local significance. Skeletonization was initially introduced as a 3D modeling technique by which representative medial points of a model are extracted to generate centerlines for evaluations. Although centerlines have been commonly used in guiding surgical procedures, our novelty lies in comparing its geometric properties before and after surgeries. We apply 3D data refinement, registration and projection steps to quantify and localize the geometric deviation in target airway regions. Through cross validation with corresponding subjects' therapy data, we expect to quantify the tolerance threshold beyond which reduced dimensions of the upper airway are not clinically significant. The ultimate goal is to utilize this threshold to identify patients at risk of complications. Outcome from this research will also help establish a predictive model for training and to estimate treatment success based on airway measurements prior to intervention. Preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of our approach.

  13. Lung morphometry changes in prevention of airway remodeling by protocatechuic aldehyde in asthmatic mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiankai; Ma, Mulan; Qin, Dongyun; Huang, Jianping; Cui, Xiaojun; Wu, Yongfu; Yang, Huiling; Fu, Hui; Liao, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling can lead to irreversible airflow obstruction and persistent airway hyper-responsiveness, which is the pathological basis of refractory asthma. To investigate the preventive effect of protocatechuic aldehyde on airway remodeling in asthmatic mice by lung morphometry methods. BALB/c mice were used to establish model of airway remodeling by ovalbumin (OVA) inhalation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected for eosinophils (EOS) count and detection of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin-13 (IL-13) and interferon (IFN-γ) content. The left lung pathological sections were performed HE, AB-PAS and Masson staining. The epithelial lamina thickness of the left main bronchus (Re), the smooth muscle layer thickness (Rm), the number of goblet cells and goblet cell area percentage (%Ac) and gas side of the road and vascular collagen deposition (%Aco, %Avc) situation were measured. Protocatechuic aldehyde gavage made the reduction of BALF EOS count. IL-4 and IL-13 levels also decreased, while the IFN-γ level increased. The left main bronchus Re, Rm, goblet cell count, Ac% and Aco% and Avc% reduced. Protocatechuic aldehyde can significantly control airway inflammation and prevent airway remodeling. PMID:26221226

  14. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline: Effectiveness of Pharmacologic Airway Clearance Therapies in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Shawna L; Rubin, Bruce K; Haas, Carl F; Volsko, Teresa A; Drescher, Gail S; O'Malley, Catherine A

    2015-07-01

    Aerosolized medications are used as airway clearance therapy to treat a variety of airway diseases. These guidelines were developed from a systematic review with the purpose of determining whether the use of these medications to promote airway clearance improves oxygenation and respiratory mechanics, reduces ventilator time and ICU stay, and/or resolves atelectasis/consolidation compared with usual care. Recombinant human dornase alfa should not be used in hospitalized adult and pediatric patients without cystic fibrosis. The routine use of bronchodilators to aid in secretion clearance is not recommended. The routine use of aerosolized N-acetylcysteine to improve airway clearance is not recommended. Aerosolized agents to change mucus biophysical properties or promote airway clearance are not recommended for adult or pediatric patients with neuromuscular disease, respiratory muscle weakness, or impaired cough. Mucolytics are not recommended to treat atelectasis in postoperative adult or pediatric patients, and the routine administration of bronchodilators to postoperative patients is not recommended. There is no high-level evidence related to the use of bronchodilators, mucolytics, mucokinetics, and novel therapy to promote airway clearance in these populations. PMID:26113566

  15. [Airway equipment and its maintenance for a non difficult adult airway management (endotracheal intubation and its alternative: face mask, laryngeal mask airway, laryngeal tube)].

    PubMed

    Francon, D; Estèbe, J P; Ecoffey, C

    2003-08-01

    The airway equipment for a non difficult adult airway management are described: endotracheal tubes with a specific discussion on how to inflate the balloon, laryngoscopes and blades, stylets and intubation guides, oral airways, face masks, laryngeal mask airways and laryngeal tubes. Cleaning and disinfections with the maintenance are also discussed for each type of airway management.

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact. PMID:27678355

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease and airway diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vutcovici, Maria; Brassard, Paul; Bitton, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Airway diseases are the most commonly described lung manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the similarities in disease pathogenesis and the sharing of important environmental risk factors and genetic susceptibility suggest that there is a complex interplay between IBD and airway diseases. Recent evidence of IBD occurrence among patients with airway diseases and the higher than estimated prevalence of subclinical airway injuries among IBD patients support the hypothesis of a two-way association. Future research efforts should be directed toward further exploration of this association, as airway diseases are highly prevalent conditions with a substantial public health impact.

  18. Lung function and airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Scott T

    2010-01-01

    Two studies report genome-wide association studies for lung function, using cross-sectional spirometric measurements in healthy individuals. They identify six genetic loci newly associated to natural variation in lung function, which may have implications for the related airway diseases of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:20037613

  19. Airway management of tetanus after the Haitian earthquake: new aspects of old observations.

    PubMed

    Firth, Paul G; Solomon, James B; Roberts, Laura L; Gleeson, Todd D

    2011-09-01

    Two men developed severe tetanus after the 2010 Haitian earthquake. They were admitted to the United States Naval Ship Comfort, a hospital ship sent to provide humanitarian relief. Severe masseter and intercostal muscle spasm impaired airway access and ventilation. Propofol and sevoflurane relieved the tetany, allowing airway control and ventilation without intubation or neuromuscular blocking drugs during wound debridement. Presynaptic impairment of inhibitory neurotransmitter release by tetanospasmin toxin is countered by enhancement of spinal cord postsynaptic inhibitory receptor activity by general anesthetics. Avoidance of tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation during anesthesia may be desirable in the settings of limited resources in which tetanus usually presents.

  20. Airway management of tetanus after the Haitian earthquake: new aspects of old observations.

    PubMed

    Firth, Paul G; Solomon, James B; Roberts, Laura L; Gleeson, Todd D

    2011-09-01

    Two men developed severe tetanus after the 2010 Haitian earthquake. They were admitted to the United States Naval Ship Comfort, a hospital ship sent to provide humanitarian relief. Severe masseter and intercostal muscle spasm impaired airway access and ventilation. Propofol and sevoflurane relieved the tetany, allowing airway control and ventilation without intubation or neuromuscular blocking drugs during wound debridement. Presynaptic impairment of inhibitory neurotransmitter release by tetanospasmin toxin is countered by enhancement of spinal cord postsynaptic inhibitory receptor activity by general anesthetics. Avoidance of tracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation during anesthesia may be desirable in the settings of limited resources in which tetanus usually presents. PMID:21778337

  1. Management of the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, D E; Wiener-Kronish, J P

    1991-09-01

    For clinicians involved in airway management, a plan of action for dealing with the difficult airway or a failed intubation should be developed well in advance of encountering a patient in whom intubation is not routine. When difficulty is anticipated, the equipment necessary for performing a difficult intubation should be immediately available. It also is prudent to have a surgeon skilled in performing a tracheotomy and a criothyroidotomy stand by. The intubation should be attempted in the awake state, preferably using the fiberoptic bronchoscope. The more challenging situation is when the difficult airway is confronted unexpectedly. After the first failed attempt at laryngoscopy, head position should be checked and the patient ventilated with oxygen by mask. A smaller styletted tube and possibly a different laryngoscope blade should be selected for a second attempt at intubation. The fiberoptic bronchoscope and other equipment for difficult intubation should be obtained. A second attempt should then be made. If this is unsuccessful, the patient should be reoxygenated, and assistance including a skilled anesthesiologist and surgeon should be summoned. On a third attempt, traction to the tongue can be applied by an assistant, a tube changer could be used to enter the larynx, or one of the other special techniques previously described can be used. If this third attempt fails, it may be helpful to have a physician more experienced in airway management attempt intubation after oxygen has been administered to the patient. If all attempts are unsuccessful, then invasive techniques to secure the airway will have to be performed. PMID:1934950

  2. [Supraglottic airways in infants and children].

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Kai

    2013-04-01

    The development of the LMA-Classic™ revolutionized anaesthesia practice as its wide-spread use led to the establishment of a unique form of airway management, the "supraglottic airway management", besides the existing classical airway management with the face mask or endotracheal tube. Today, 25 years later, along with the original prototype of supraglottic airways quite a few numbers of different devices exist that can be used to secure the airway "above the glottis". After initially primarily marketing adult sizes many suppliers offer paediatric sizes nowadays. However, the scientific evidence in terms of superiority or at a least equality to the original LMA-Classic( of any of these airway devices must be considered insufficient except for the LMA-ProSeal™. Consequently, the routine use of these devices outside controlled clinical studies must be considered questionable. The following article aims at providing a critical appraisal of currently available supraglottic airway devices for neonates and infants. PMID:23633256

  3. Laryngeal mask airway: uses in anesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Pinosky, M

    1996-06-01

    The laryngeal mask airway (LMA), developed in 1983, is a new device to assist in the management of the pediatric and adult airway. In 1991, the Food and Drug Administration gave its approval for use of the LMA in the United States. The LMA is reusable and appears to provide cost-effective airway management in numerous situations. The LMA is simple to use, atraumatic to insert, and helpful in overcoming an obstructed airway. Its role in management of the difficult airway and the traumatic airway is still evolving. This review will introduce the LMA to the nonanesthesiologist and review for the anesthesiologist the origins of the LMA, its physical structure, the technical aspects of insertion, problems with aspiration, its role in the difficult airway, and experience with the pediatric population.

  4. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  5. Chronic increases in transmural pressure reduce NO-mediated dilations in isolated resistance arteries of the hamster.

    PubMed

    Bolz, S; Pieperhoff, S; De Wit, C; Pohl, U

    2000-01-01

    It is unclear whether the impairment of NO-mediated dilation in hypertension is the cause or the consequence of high blood pressure. We therefore studied in isolated resistance arteries whether elevated transmural pressure affects NO-mediated dilation. Arteries (n=5-7) were perfused at hydrostatic pressures of either 45, 120 or 160 mmHg for 48 h. Subsequently, diameter and calcium responses (fura 2) were studied at a transmural pressure of 45 mmHg. Pre-exposure to 120 and 160 mmHg reduced resting diameters and minimal diameters after stimulation with noradrenaline and significantly increased corresponding intracellular free calcium levels in vascular smooth muscle. Moreover, the NO-mediated dilation in response to acetylcholine was significantly reduced although the increase in endothelial calcium was not altered. Dilations induced by the NO donor SNP were not affected. It is concluded that chronically elevated pressure per se impairs endothelial NO production by a mechanism distal to receptor-dependent calcium increases.

  6. Ablation of the Cardiac-Specific Gene Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing 10 (Lrrc10) Results in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Matthew J.; Hacker, Timothy A.; Patel, Jitandrakumar R.; Feng, Li; Sadoshima, Junichi; Tevosian, Sergei G.; Balijepalli, Ravi C.; Moss, Richard L.; Lee, Youngsook

    2012-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing 10 (LRRC10) is a cardiac-specific protein exclusively expressed in embryonic and adult cardiomyocytes. However, the role of LRRC10 in mammalian cardiac physiology remains unknown. To determine if LRRC10 is critical for cardiac function, Lrrc10-null (Lrrc10−/−) mice were analyzed. Lrrc10−/− mice exhibit prenatal systolic dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy in postnatal life. Importantly, Lrrc10−/− mice have diminished cardiac performance in utero, prior to ventricular dilation observed in young adults. We demonstrate that LRRC10 endogenously interacts with α-actinin and α-actin in the heart and all actin isoforms in vitro. Gene expression profiling of embryonic Lrrc10−/− hearts identified pathways and transcripts involved in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton to be significantly upregulated, implicating dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton as an early defective molecular signal in the absence of LRRC10. In contrast, microarray analyses of adult Lrrc10−/− hearts identified upregulation of oxidative phosphorylation and cardiac muscle contraction pathways during the progression of dilated cardiomyopathy. Analyses of hypertrophic signal transduction pathways indicate increased active forms of Akt and PKCε in adult Lrrc10−/− hearts. Taken together, our data demonstrate that LRRC10 is essential for proper mammalian cardiac function. We identify Lrrc10 as a novel dilated cardiomyopathy candidate gene and the Lrrc10−/− mouse model as a unique system to investigate pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:23236519

  7. Influence of sleep on tensor palatini EMG and upper airway resistance in normal men.

    PubMed

    Tangel, D J; Mezzanotte, W S; White, D P

    1991-06-01

    We propose that a sleep-induced decrement in the activity of the tensor palatini (TP) muscle could induce airway narrowing in the area posterior to the soft palate and therefore lead to an increase in upper airway resistance in normal subjects. We investigated the TP to determine the influence of sleep on TP muscle activity and the relationship between changing TP activity and upper airway resistance over the entire night and during short sleep-awake transitions. Seven normal male subjects were studied on a single night with wire electrodes placed in both TP muscles. Sleep stage, inspiratory airflow, transpalatal pressure, and TP moving time average electromyogram (EMG) were continuously recorded. In addition, in two of the seven subjects the activity (EMG) of both the TP and the genioglossus muscle simultaneously was recorded throughout the night. Upper airway resistance increased progressively from wakefulness through the various non-rapid-eye-movement sleep stages, as has been previously described. The TP EMG did not commonly demonstrate phasic activity during wakefulness or sleep. However, the tonic EMG decreased progressively and significantly (P less than 0.05) from wakefulness through the non-rapid-eye-movement sleep stages [awake, 4.6 +/- 0.3 (SE) arbitrary units; stage 1, 2.6 +/- 0.3; stage 2, 1.7 +/- 0.5; stage 3/4, 1.5 +/- 0.8]. The mean correlation coefficient between TP EMG and upper airway resistance across all sleep states was (-0.46). This mean correlation improved over discrete sleep-awake transitions (-0.76). No sleep-induced decrement in the genioglossus activity was observed in the two subjects studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Small airway obstruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shunsuke; Koga, Yukinori; Sugimoto, Mineharu

    2011-04-01

    This work was intended to evaluate the prevalence of obstructive small-airway disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its association with clinical characteristics. Pulmonary function testing (PFT) and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) were performed on 189 consecutive RA patients. Each case was diagnosed based on abnormal HRCT findings. We defined obstructive dysfunction of small airways as a forced expiratory flow from 25% to 75% of vital capacity (FEF(25-75)) value >1.96 residual standard deviation (RSD) below predicted values. We found 19 patients (10.1%) with an interstitial pneumonia (IP) pattern and 15 (7.9%) with a bronchiolitis pattern; the other 155 (82.0%) had no abnormal HRCT patterns. In patients with neither abnormal pattern, median values of percentage predicted for carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DL(CO)) and ratio of DL(CO) to alveolar ventilation (DLco/VA) were within the normal range, but median FEF(25-75), forced expiratory flow at 25% of vital capacity (V(25)), and V(25)/height were <70% of predicted values. Forty-seven patients (30.3%) in this group had obstructive small-airway dysfunction. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that this type of abnormality is strongly associated with respiratory symptoms [odds ratio (OR) 5.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.70-15.75; p = 0.012), smoking history (OR 2.78; 95% CI 1.10-6.99; p = 0.03), and disease duration >10 years (OR 2.86; 95% CI 1.27-6.48; p = 0.012). Parenchymal micronodules, bronchial-wall thickening, and bronchial dilatation on HRCT scans were also predictive factors for abnormal FEF(25-75), although these morphological changes were too limited for us to diagnose these patients with the bronchiolitis pattern. Obstructive dysfunction of small airways is apparently common among RA patients, even among those with neither the IP nor the bronchiolitis pattern on HRCT scans. Factors significantly associated with abnormal FEF(25-75) are respiratory

  9. Endothelial-derived hyperpolarization factor (EDHF) contributes to PlGF-induced dilation of mesenteric resistance arteries from pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Maurizio; Gokina, Natalia; Barron, Carolyn; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular mechanism involved in the potent vasodilatory action of PlGF on mesenteric resistance arteries from pregnant rats. PlGF (3 nM) induced a vasodilation of 64 ± 3.8% that was completely abolished by endothelial denudation. Significant dilation (28 ± 4.0%) remained, however, in the presence of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase inhibition, and was associated with significant reductions in vascular smooth muscle cell calcium. Absence of dilation in potassium-depolarizing solution (30 mM) confirmed its dependence on endothelial-derived hyperpolarization factor. Subsequent studies established that vasodilation was abolished by pharmacologic inhibition of SK(Ca) (apamin) and BK(Ca) (iberiotoxin) but not IK(Ca) (tram-34) potassium channels. In summary, PlGF acts through the release of a combination of endothelium-derived relaxation factors. Based on the results of potassium channel blockade, we suggest that it induces endothelial hyperpolarization via SK(Ca) channel activation; this, in turn, leads to the release of a diffusible mediator that activates vascular smooth muscle BK(Ca) channels, hyperpolarization and vasodilation. This is the first study to identify the mechanism for PlGF/VEGFR-1 resistance artery dilation in the pregnant state, whose attenuation likely contributes to the systemic hypertension characteristic of pre- eclampsia.

  10. Predictors for frequent esophageal dilations of benign peptic strictures.

    PubMed

    Agnew, S R; Pandya, S P; Reynolds, R P; Preiksaitis, H G

    1996-05-01

    Recurrence of esophageal peptic stricture necessitating repeated dilation treatments remains a problem for many patients despite optimal acid suppressive therapy. The factors associated with frequent relapses are poorly understood. We studied retrospectively a population of 58 patients with benign peptic strictures and dysphagia treated by esophageal dilation and followed for 66.5 +/- 6.7 months. Data was collected for age, sex, heartburn, weight loss, esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus, number of dilation treatments during the first year of follow-up, frequency and number of subsequent dilation treatments, type of dilator used, and history of other concurrent treatments. Patients who lacked heartburn (P = 0.007) or who reported a history of weight loss (P = 0.006) at the time of their initial presentation required more frequent dilations during the first year of follow-up. The mean number of dilations in year 1 was 6.2 +/- 0.9 for patients lacking heartburn versus 3.2 +/- 0.5 for patients with heartburn (P = 0.004), and 9.0 +/- 1.8 for patients who reported weight loss versus 4.1 +/- 0.5 (P = 0.006) for those who did not. The patients requiring frequent treatment during their first year also required frequent subsequent dilations because of stricture recurrence (P < 0.0001). We did not demonstrate any relationship between the other factors studied and treatment frequency. These observations suggest that patients who require frequent retreatment for recurrent peptic stricture are more likely to provide a history of weight loss and less likely to complain of heartburn at initial presentation. The pattern of frequent repeat dilation for recurrent peptic strictures is established during the first year of follow-up.

  11. A micromechanical study of dilatancy of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruyt, N. P.; Rothenburg, L.

    2016-10-01

    In micromechanics of granular materials, relationships are investigated between micro-scale characteristics of particles and contacts and macro-scale, continuum characteristics. Dilatancy is an important property of granular materials, defined as volume changes (dilative or compressive) induced by shear deformation. To obtain detailed information at the micro-scale, two-dimensional Discrete Element Method simulations of isobaric tests with disk-shaped particles have been performed. The required information includes the fabric tensor which characterizes statistical properties of the contact network. The dependence of the dilatancy rate on the shear strength and the fabric tensor has been investigated, based on the results of the simulations employing a dense and a loose initial system. The dilatancy rate depends in a complex, non-unique way on the shear strength, while the dependence on the fabric tensor is more amenable to analytical description. Two micromechanical mechanisms of dilatancy have been identified: (i) dilatancy due to deformation of loops that are determined by the interparticle contact network and (ii) dilatancy due to topological changes in the interparticle contact network that correspond to the creation or disruption of contacts. For the first mechanism the anisotropy in the contact network is the primary parameter, while for the second mechanism the average number of contacts per particle is the primary parameter. A fabric-based micromechanical relation for the dilatancy rate has been formulated that describes these identified mechanisms. Parameters present in this relation are determined by fitting this relation to the results of the Discrete Element Method simulations, using combined data for the dense and the loose initial system. Employing these fitted coefficients, good agreement is obtained between the results of the simulations and the predictions of the micromechanical dilatancy relation.

  12. [Dilated cardiomyopathy induced by ectopic atrial tachycardia].

    PubMed

    Velázquez Rodríguez, E; Martínez Enríquez, A

    2000-01-01

    The deleterious effect of chronic or incessant supraventricular tachycardia on ventricular function is well-known and it has been demonstrated than can ultimately lead to dilated cardiomyopathy if unrecognized. Any variety of supraventricular tachycardia with chronic evolution may lead to left ventricular dysfunction, ectopic atrial tachycardia because of its persistent nature, often incessant and poorly responsive to antiarrhythmic drugs is a frequent cause of reversible congestive heart failure in patients without other demonstrable organic heart disease. Five patients (aged 14 to 52 years) were referred with symptoms of heart failure, NYHA functional class II (one patient), class III (one patient) and class IV (3 patients) associated with an incessant ectopic atrial tachycardia. Four patients underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of the ectopic focus and one patient was treated with amiodarone. All patients were successfully treated and the echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular function indicated regression of the cardiomyopathy picture with recovery of systolic function, (mean left ventricular ejection fraction 39.2 +/- 6.1% before vs mean 62.4 +/- 4.8% after (p < 0.01). The clinical and echocardiographic picture of cardiomyopathy induced by incessant ectopic atrial tachycardia is reversible after successful treatment. This stresses the necessity of recognizing such arrhythmia as cause of primary heart failure. PMID:10959459

  13. Multiscale Analysis of a Collapsible Respiratory Airway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiali, Samir; Bell, E. David; Swarts, J. Douglas

    2006-11-01

    The Eustachian tube (ET) is a collapsible respiratory airway that connects the nasopharynx with the middle ear (ME). The ET normally exists in a collapsed state and must be periodically opened to maintain a healthy and sterile ME. Although the inability to open the ET (i.e. ET dysfunction) is the primary etiology responsible for several common ME diseases (i.e. Otitis Media), the mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction are not well established. To investigate these mechanisms, we developed a multi-scale model of airflow in the ET and correlated model results with experimental data obtained in healthy and diseased subjects. The computational models utilized finite-element methods to simulate fluid-structure interactions and molecular dynamics techniques to quantify the adhesive properties of mucus glycoproteins. Results indicate that airflow in the ET is highly sensitive to both the dynamics of muscle contraction and molecular adhesion forces within the ET lumen. In addition, correlation of model results with experimental data obtained in diseased subjects was used to identify the biomechanical mechanisms responsible for ET dysfunction.

  14. Unilateral pupillary dilatation following septoplasty: cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Muhammad; Trinidade, Aaron; Khan, Imran; Johnston, Graham; Hussain, Akhtar

    2013-07-01

    We report and explain unilateral pupillary dilatation following routine septoplasty and trimming of inferior turbinates. The unilateral pupillary dilatation was caused by inadvertent instillation of sympathomimetic, (xylometazoline hydrochloride) in the eye during preparation for nasal surgery. The effect was short-lived and the patient made a full recovery. Unilateral pupillary dilatation after sinonasal surgery can be alarming due to the possibility of injury to the globe and intracranial haemorrhage but can also be explained by the mydriatic effect of the sympathomimetic nasal drops and sprays used to decongest the nose. Such possibility should be borne in mind and would help to explain and reduce the anxiety and avoid unnecessary investigations. PMID:23823962

  15. Analysis of Compressible Mixing Layers Using Dilatational Covariances Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thangam, S.; Zhou, Y.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Compressible mixing layers are analyzed using a dilatational covariances model based on a pseudo-sound constitutive relation. The calculations are used to evaluate the different physical phenomena affecting compressible mixing layers. The rate of growth of the mixing layer is retarded by both the compressible dissipation and the pressure-dilatational covariances. The pressure-dilatational, essentially a nonequilibrium effect, reduces the amount of excess production over dissipation available for the turbulence energy growth. The pseudo-sound model also includes a history dependent portion: this is also investigated. All constants in the model and used in these computations are predicted by the theory.

  16. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers). PMID:24925919

  17. UPPER AIRWAY BLOCKS FOR AWAKE DIFFICULT AIRWAY MANAGEMENT.

    PubMed

    Pintaric, Tatjana Stopar

    2016-03-01

    Airway anesthesia is pivotal for successful awake intubation provided either topically or by blocks. Airway blocks are considered technically more difficult to perform and carry a higher risk of complications. However, in experienced hands, they can be useful as they provide excellent intubating conditions. For complete upper airway anesthesia, bilateral glossopharyngeal and superior laryngeal nerve blocks with translaryngeal injection are required. Superior laryngeal nerve block and translaryngeal injection can be performed easily, safely and with a high success rate in patients with normal anatomy. In those with difficult landmarks, ultrasound can be of assistance. For the superior laryngeal nerve block, other targets than the nerve itself must be established to make the technique consistently successful, easy to teach, learn and perform. The same applies to the translaryngeal injection, where the use of ultrasound is necessary for correct midline identification. Intraoral glossopharyngeal nerve block is also safe and easy to perform, but associated with long lasting discomfort. Bilateral extraoral peristyloid approach should be discouraged since inadvertent blocks of the closely adjacent vagus nerve cannot be prevented in this location. A safe and easy method of blocking the distal portions of the glossopharyngeal nerve for awake intubation is therefore required. PMID:27276778

  18. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers).

  19. Functional Measurement of Respiratory Muscle Motor Behaviors Using Transdiaphragmatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Greising, Sarah M; Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2016-01-01

    The diaphragm muscle must be able to generate sufficient forces to accomplish a range of ventilatory and non-ventilatory behaviors throughout life. Measurements of transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi) can be conducted during eupnea, hypoxia (10 % O2)-hypercapnia (5 % CO2), chemical airway stimulation (i.e., sneezing), spontaneously occurring deep breaths (i.e., sighs), sustained airway or tracheal occlusion, and maximal efforts elicited via bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation, representing the full range of motor behaviors available by the diaphragm muscle. We provide detailed methods on the in vivo measurements of Pdi in mice. PMID:27492181

  20. Characterization of dilatation induced by electrical field stimulation in mammalian cerebral and peripheral vessels.

    PubMed

    Hardebo, J E; Kåhrström, J; Owman, C

    1989-07-01

    The ability of electrical field stimulation in releasing transmitter from isolated blood vessels in vitro, during recordings of constrictor or dilator responses, is dependent upon an appropriate choice of stimulation parameters which avoid concomitant change in tone due to a direct effect on the vascular smooth muscle membrane. In many species, including man, small arteries such as pial arteries frequently respond to electrical field stimulation with a dilatation which is TTX-resistant. Such dilatations occur even with stimulus parameters of 7.5 V/60 mA at 0.1 ms, 6 Hz. The stimulation parameters required to induce the TTX-resistant response are just above those needed to obtain a purely neurogenic contractile or dilatory response in vessels equipped with a dense net of adrenergic nerves, such as rabbit central ear artery, and, in addition, highly sensitive postsynaptic alpha- or beta-adrenergic receptors, such as the buccal segment of the facial vein. This prompted us to characterize further the nature of the response. It was tested whether the relaxation, despite being TTX-resistant, might be neurogenic in origin. 4-Aminopyridine, in doses that usually enhance the transmitter release from nerves, did not affect the response. Blockade by a variety of dilator antagonists, the presence of excess amounts of known dilators or removal or emptying of known vasodilator nerves did not inhibit the response. Removal of extracellular calcium did not abolish the response. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that neuronal release is involved to any measurable extent in this response. The relaxation was not significantly affected by removal of endothelium, blockade of endothelium-derived relaxing factor, or interference with mast cells. At modest stimulatory parameters (12-13 V/96-104 mA at 0.1 ms, 7-8 V/56-64 mA at 0.3 ms, at 6 Hz) chlorine gas bubbles could be seen forming at the electrode or mounting hook; this gas is toxic to the musculature and relaxes a pre-contracted vessel

  1. Characterization and Long-Term Prognosis of Postmyocarditic Dilated Cardiomyopathy Compared With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Marco; Anzini, Marco; Bussani, Rossana; Artico, Jessica; Barbati, Giulia; Stolfo, Davide; Gigli, Marta; Muça, Matilda; Naso, Paola; Ramani, Federica; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Pinamonti, Bruno; Sinagra, Gianfranco

    2016-09-15

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DC) is the final common pathway of different pathogenetic processes and presents a significant prognostic heterogeneity, possibly related to its etiologic variety. The characterization and long-term prognosis of postmyocarditic dilated cardiomyopathy (PM-DC) remain unknown. This study assesses the clinical-instrumental evolution and long-term prognosis of a large cohort of patients with PM-DC. We analyzed 175 patients affected with DC consecutively enrolled from 1993 to 2008 with endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) data available. PM-DC was defined in the presence of borderline myocarditis at EMB or persistent left ventricular dysfunction 1 year after diagnosis of active myocarditis at EMB. Other patients were defined as affected by idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC). Analysis of follow-up evaluations was performed at 24, 60, and 120 months. We found 72 PM-DC of 175 enrolled patients (41%). Compared with IDC, patients with PM-DC were more frequently females and less frequently presented a familial history of DC. No other baseline significant differences were found. During the long-term follow-up (median 154, first to third interquartile range 78 to 220 months), patients with PM-DC showed a trend toward slower disease progression. Globally, 18 patients with PM-DC (25%) versus 49 with IDC (48%) experienced death/heart transplantation (p = 0.045). The prognostic advantage for patients with PM-DC became significant beyond 40 months of follow-up. At multivariable time-dependent Cox analysis, PM-DC was confirmed to have a global independent protective role (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.28 to 0.97, p = 0.04). In conclusion, PM-DC is characterized by better long-term prognosis compared with IDC. An exhaustive etiologic characterization appears relevant in the prognostic assessment of DC.

  2. Chronic respiratory illness as a predictor of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: the Washington, DC, Dilated Cardiomyopathy Study.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. A.; Coughlin, S. S.; Metayer, C.; René, A. A.; Hammond, I. W.

    1996-01-01

    Although bronchial asthma and emphysema have been associated with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy in case-control studies, little is known about the prognostic importance of chronic respiratory disease in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. To study this, we examined history of bronchial asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis, and respiratory medication use as possible predictors of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy using data from a Washington, DC, population-based study (n = 129). The cumulative survival rates among patients with a history of emphysema or chronic bronchitis were 60% and 48% at 12 and 36 months, respectively, compared with 81.8% and 67.2% among patients without emphysema or chronic bronchitis. The survival rates of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy patients with and without a history of bronchial asthma at the time of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy diagnosis were similar. In multivariate analysis using the proportional hazards model, only ventricular arrhythmias and ejection fraction were found to be statistically significant predictors of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. The adjusted relative risk estimate for emphysema and chronic bronchitis was close to one. Thus, the results of this population-based study do not suggest that history of chronic respiratory illness is an independent predictor of survival in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:8961693

  3. Keep Your Vision Healthy: Learn About Comprehensive Dilated Eye Exams

    MedlinePlus

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Keep Your Vision Healthy Learn About Comprehensive Dilated Eye Exams People ... should have their eyesight tested to keep their vision at its best. Children usually have vision screening ...

  4. Aortic dilatation and aortopathy in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Zanjani, Keyhan Sayadpour; Niwa, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Longer survival after corrective surgery for congenital heart diseases has rendered late complications more important. One of these complications is aortic dilatation which may occur in patients with repaired or unrepaired disease and can progress to aneurysm, dissection, and rupture. This aortic dilatation in various congenital heart diseases does not simply mean anatomical dilatation of the aortic root, but it closely relates to the aortic pathophysiological abnormality, aortic regurgitation, and aortic and ventricular dysfunction; therefore, we can recognize this complex lesion as a new concept: "aortopathy". The pathophysiology of this disease is complex and only partially understood. In this review, we first discuss history, pathophysiology, and clinical features of aortic dilatation and aortopathy of congenital heart disease. Then we provide a review of the evaluation and management of this disease.

  5. An unusual triad: Bilateral dilated odontoma, hypodontia and peg laterals.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Alphy Alphonsa; Ahsan, Auswaf; George, Ahkin John; Aby, John

    2013-09-01

    The dilated odontoma is an infrequent developmental alteration that appears in any area of the dental arches and can affect deciduous, permanent and supernumerary tooth. Dens invaginatus is a developmental anomaly resulting from invagination of a portion of crown forming within the enamel organ during odontogenesis. The most extreme form of dens invaginatus is known as dilated odontoma. The aim of this case report is to present a rare case of bilateral dilated odontoma affecting a microdontic permanent lateral incisor in a 30 year old female patient with hypodontia and peglateral teeth with its clinical, radiological and histological features, which has yet been not reported. Bilateral presence of dilated odontoma is not a common occurrence, although a single tooth involvement in each case has been reported in the literature.

  6. The use of radiofrequency catheter ablation to cure dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S B; Lobban, J H; Reddy, S; Hoelper, M; Palmer, D L

    1997-01-01

    Incessant supraventricular tachycardia can cause a dilated cardiomyopathy. This article discusses the case of a 55-year-old woman whose cardiomyopathy was reversed when she underwent successful radiofrequency catheter ablation of a unifocal atrial tachycardia. PMID:9197188

  7. Targeted inhibition of KCa3.1 channel attenuates airway inflammation and remodeling in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Jian-Rong; Wang, Yan-Xia; Xu, Guang-Ni; Xu, Zu-Peng; Yang, Kai; Wu, Da-Zheng; Cui, Yong-Yao; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2013-06-01

    KCa3.1 has been suggested to be involved in regulating cell activation, proliferation, and migration in multiple cell types, including airway inflammatory and structural cells. However, the contributions of KCa3.1 to airway inflammation and remodeling and subsequent airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in allergic asthma remain to be explored. The main purpose of this study was to elucidate the roles of KCa3.1 and the potential therapeutic value of KCa3.1 blockers in chronic allergic asthma. Using real-time PCR, Western blotting, or immunohistochemical analyses, we explored the precise role of KCa3.1 in the bronchi of allergic mice and asthmatic human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMCs). We found that KCa3.1 mRNA and protein expression were elevated in the bronchi of allergic mice, and double labeling revealed that up-regulation occurred primarily in airway smooth muscle cells. Triarylmethane (TRAM)-34, a KCa3.1 blocker, dose-dependently inhibited the generation and maintenance of the ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation associated with increased Th2-type cytokines and decreased Th1-type cytokine, as well as subepithelial extracellular matrix deposition, goblet-cell hyperplasia, and AHR in a murine model of asthma. Moreover, the pharmacological blockade and gene silencing of KCa3.1, which was evidently elevated after mitogen stimulation, suppressed asthmatic human BSMC proliferation and migration, and arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. In addition, the KCa3.1 activator 1-ethylbenzimidazolinone-induced membrane hyperpolarization and intracellular calcium increase in asthmatic human BSMCs were attenuated by TRAM-34. We demonstrate for the first time an important role for KCa3.1 in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and remodeling in allergic asthma, and we suggest that KCa3.1 blockers may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for asthma.

  8. Obesity and upper airway control during sleep

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Susheel P.; Squier, Samuel; Schneider, Hartmut; Kirkness, Jason P.; Smith, Philip L.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms linking obesity with upper airway dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea are reviewed. Obstructive sleep apnea is due to alterations in upper airway anatomy and neuromuscular control. Upper airway structural alterations in obesity are related to adipose deposition around the pharynx, which can increase its collapsibility or critical pressure (Pcrit). In addition, obesity and, particularly, central adiposity lead to reductions in resting lung volume, resulting in loss of caudal traction on upper airway structures and parallel increases in pharyngeal collapsibility. Metabolic and humoral factors that promote central adiposity may contribute to these alterations in upper airway mechanical function and increase sleep apnea susceptibility. In contrast, neural responses to upper airway obstruction can mitigate these mechanical loads and restore pharyngeal patency during sleep. Current evidence suggests that these responses can improve with weight loss. Improvements in these neural responses with weight loss may be related to a decline in systemic and local pharyngeal concentrations of specific inflammatory mediators with somnogenic effects. PMID:19875707

  9. Airway management in cervical spine injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Naola; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Dagal, Arman

    2014-01-01

    To minimize risk of spinal cord injury, airway management providers must understand the anatomic and functional relationship between the airway, cervical column, and spinal cord. Patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury may require emergent intubation for airway protection and ventilatory support or elective intubation for surgery with or without rigid neck stabilization (i.e., halo). To provide safe and efficient care in these patients, practitioners must identify high-risk patients, be comfortable with available methods of airway adjuncts, and know how airway maneuvers, neck stabilization, and positioning affect the cervical spine. This review discusses the risks and benefits of various airway management strategies as well as specific concerns that affect patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury. PMID:24741498

  10. Airway obstruction in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reverdin, Alexandra K; Mosquera, Ricardo; Colasurdo, Giuseppe N; Jon, Cindy K; Clements, Roya M

    2014-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is the failure of the autonomic system to control adequate ventilation while asleep with preserved ventilatory response while awake. We report a case of a patient with CCHS who presented with intrathoracic and extrathoracic airway obstruction after tracheostomy tube decannulation and phrenic nerve pacer placement. Nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) revealed hypoxia, hypercapnia and obstructive sleep apnoea, which required bilevel positive airway pressure titration. Airway endoscopy demonstrated tracheomalacia and paretic true vocal cords in the paramedian position during diaphragmatic pacing. Laryngeal electromyography demonstrated muscular electrical impulses that correlated with diaphragmatic pacer settings. Thus, we surmise that the patient's upper and lower airway obstruction was secondary to diaphragmatic pacer activity. Thorough airway evaluation, including NPSG and endoscopy, may help identify the side effects of diaphragmatic pacing, such as airway obstruction, in patients with CCHS.

  11. Asymptomatic Bile Duct Dilatation in Children: Is It a Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeo Ju; Lee, Mi Jung; Koh, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bile duct dilatation is a relatively common sonographic finding; nevertheless, its clinical significance in children is controversial because little research has been done in the area. Therefore, we investigated the natural course and clinical significance of biliary duct dilatation in children. Methods We performed a retrospective study of 181 children (range, 1-day-old to 17-year-old) in whom dilatation of the intrahepatic duct and/or common hepatic duct and/or common bile duct was detected by abdominal ultrasonography at the Severance Children's Hospital between November 2005 and March 2014. We reviewed and analyzed laboratory test results, clinical manifestations, and clinical course in these patients. Results Pediatric patients (n=181) were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups. The first group included 59 subjects, without definitive cause of bile duct dilatation, who did not require treatment; the second group included 122 subjects, with definitive cause of bile duct dilatation or underlying biliary disease, who did require treatment. In the first group, 24 patients (40.7%) showed spontaneous resolution of bile duct dilatation, 20 patients (33.9%) showed no change, and 15 patients (25.4%) were lost to follow-up. In the second group, 31 patients were diagnosed with choledochal cysts, and 91 patients presented with biliary tract dilatations due to secondary causes, such as gallbladder or liver disease, post-operative complications, or malignancy. Conclusion Biliary dilatation in pediatric patients without symptoms, and without laboratory and other sonographic abnormalities, showed a benign clinical course. No pathologic conditions were noted on follow-up ultrasonography. PMID:26473138

  12. Clusters, deformation, and dilation: Diagnostics for material accumulation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntley, Helga S.; Lipphardt, B. L.; Jacobs, Gregg; Kirwan, A. D.

    2015-10-01

    Clusters of material at the ocean surface have been frequently observed. Such accumulations of material play an important role in a variety of applications, from biology to pollution mitigation. Identifying where clusters will form can aid in locating, for example, hotspots of biological activity or regions of high pollutant concentration. Here cluster strength is introduced as a new metric for defining clusters when all particle positions are known. To diagnose regions likely to contain clusters without the need to integrate millions of particle trajectories, we propose to use dilation, which quantifies area changes of Lagrangian patches. Material deformation is decomposed into dilation and area-preserving stretch processes to refine previous approaches based on finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) by splitting the FTLE into fundamental kinematic properties. The concepts are developed theoretically and illustrated in the context of a state-of-the-art data-assimilating predictive ocean model of the Gulf of Mexico. Regions of dilation less than one are shown to be much more likely (6 times more likely in the given example) to be visited by particles than those of dilation greater than one. While the relationship is nonlinear, dilation and cluster strength exhibit a fairly good correlation. In contrast, both stretch and Eulerian divergence are found to be uncorrelated with cluster strength. Thus, dilation maps can be used as guides for identifying cluster locations, while saving some of the computational cost of trajectory integrations.

  13. Congenital duodenal web: successful management with endoscopic dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ujjal; Jain, Vikas; Yachha, Surender Kumar; Srivastava, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Congenital duodenal web (CDW) is an uncommon cause of duodenal obstruction and endoscopic balloon dilatation has been reported in just eight pediatric cases to date. Here we are reporting three cases of CDW managed successfully with balloon dilatation. Cases and methods: In 2014 we diagnosed three cases of CDW on the basis of typical radiological and endoscopic findings. Endoscopic balloon dilatation was done under conscious sedation with a through-the-scope controlled radial expansion (CRE) balloon. Results: All three children presented late (median age 8 [range 2 – 9] years) with bilious vomiting, upper abdominal distension, and failure to thrive. One of them had associated Down syndrome and another had horseshoe kidney. In all cases, CDW was observed in the second part of the duodenum beyond the ampulla, causing partial duodenal obstruction. After repeated endoscopic dilatation (2 – 4 sessions), all three patients became asymptomatic. None of the patients experienced complications after balloon dilatation. Conclusions: Duodenal diaphragm should be suspected in patients with abdominal distension with bilious vomiting, even in relatively older children. Endoscopic balloon dilatation is a simple and effective method of treating this condition. PMID:27004237

  14. The cardiac mechanical stretch sensor machinery involves a Z disc complex that is defective in a subset of human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Knöll, Ralph; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Hoffman, Hal M; Person, Veronika; Lorenzen-Schmidt, Ilka; Bang, Marie-Louise; Hayashi, Takeharu; Shiga, Nobuyuki; Yasukawa, Hideo; Schaper, Wolfgang; McKenna, William; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Schork, Nicholas J; Omens, Jeffrey H; McCulloch, Andrew D; Kimura, Akinori; Gregorio, Carol C; Poller, Wolfgang; Schaper, Jutta; Schultheiss, Heinz P; Chien, Kenneth R

    2002-12-27

    Muscle cells respond to mechanical stretch stimuli by triggering downstream signals for myocyte growth and survival. The molecular components of the muscle stretch sensor are unknown, and their role in muscle disease is unclear. Here, we present biophysical/biochemical studies in muscle LIM protein (MLP) deficient cardiac muscle that support a selective role for this Z disc protein in mechanical stretch sensing. MLP interacts with and colocalizes with telethonin (T-cap), a titin interacting protein. Further, a human MLP mutation (W4R) associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) results in a marked defect in T-cap interaction/localization. We propose that a Z disc MLP/T-cap complex is a key component of the in vivo cardiomyocyte stretch sensor machinery, and that defects in the complex can lead to human DCM and associated heart failure.

  15. Anatomic Optical Coherence Tomography of Upper Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Loy, Anthony; Jing, Joseph; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Yong; Elghobashi, Said; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    The upper airway is a complex and intricate system responsible for respiration, phonation, and deglutition. Obstruction of the upper airways afflicts an estimated 12-18 million Americans. Pharyngeal size and shape are important factors in the pathogenesis of airway obstructions. In addition, nocturnal loss in pharyngeal muscular tone combined with high pharyngeal resistance can lead to collapse of the airway and periodic partial or complete upper airway obstruction. Anatomical optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to provide high-speed three-dimensional tomographic images of the airway lumen without the use of ionizing radiation. In this chapter we describe the methods behind endoscopic OCT imaging and processing to generate full three dimensional anatomical models of the human airway which can be used in conjunction with numerical simulation methods to assess areas of airway obstruction. Combining this structural information with flow dynamic simulations, we can better estimate the site and causes of airway obstruction and better select and design surgery for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  16. AIRWAY VISUALIZATION: EYES SEE WHAT MIND KNOWS.

    PubMed

    Sorbello, Massimiliano; Frova, Giulio; Zdravković, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Airway management is basic for anesthesia practice, and sometimes it can represent a really dramatic scenario for both the patient and the physicians. Laryngoscopy has been the gold standard of airway visualization for more than 60 years, showing its limitations and failure rates with time. New technology has made available an opportunity to move the physician's eye inside patient airways thanks to video laryngoscopy and video assisted airway management technique. Undoubtedly, we have entered a new era of high resolution airway visualization and different approach in airway instrumentation. Nevertheless, each new technology needs time to be tested and considered reliable, and pitfalls and limitations may come out with careful and long lasting analysis, so it is probably not the right time yet to promote video assisted approach as a new gold standard for airway visualization, despite the fact that it certainly offers some new prospects. In any case, whatever the visualization approach, no patient dies because of missed airway visualization or failed intubation, but due to failed ventilation, which remains without doubt the gold standard of any patient safety goal and airway management technique.

  17. Method for 3D Airway Topology Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Grothausmann, Roman; Kellner, Manuela; Heidrich, Marko; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Kuehnel, Mark P.; Ochs, Matthias; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    In lungs the number of conducting airway generations as well as bifurcation patterns varies across species and shows specific characteristics relating to illnesses or gene variations. A method to characterize the topology of the mouse airway tree using scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) tomograms is presented in this paper. It is used to test discrimination between two types of mice based on detected differences in their conducting airway pattern. Based on segmentations of the airways in these tomograms, the main spanning tree of the volume skeleton is computed. The resulting graph structure is used to distinguish between wild type and surfactant protein (SP-D) deficient knock-out mice. PMID:25767561

  18. Sequential Stenting for Extensive Malignant Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Tei, Keiko; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Malignant airway stenosis extending from the bronchial bifurcation to the lower lobar orifice was treated with airway stenting. We herein examine the effectiveness of airway stenting for extensive malignant airway stenosis. Methods: Twelve patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis underwent placement of a silicone Dumon Y stent (Novatech, La Ciotat, France) at the tracheal bifurcation and a metallic Spiral Z-stent (Medico’s Hirata, Osaka, Japan) at either distal side of the Y stent. We retrospectively analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of the sequential placement of these silicone and metallic stents in these 12 patients. Results: The primary disease was lung cancer in eight patients, breast cancer in two patients, tracheal cancer in one patient, and thyroid cancer in one patient. The median survival period after airway stent placement was 46 days. The Hugh–Jones classification and performance status improved in nine patients after airway stenting. One patient had prolonged hemoptysis and died of respiratory tract hemorrhage 15 days after the treatment. Conclusion: Because the initial disease was advanced and aggressive, the prognosis after sequential airway stent placement was significantly poor. However, because respiratory distress decreased after the treatment in most patients, this treatment may be acceptable for selected patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis. PMID:25273272

  19. Spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures and its application to stationary dilation for Banach space valued processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miamee, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    Let B be a Banach space and H and K two Hilbert spaces. The spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures is studied and it is shown that the recent results of Makagon and Salehi (1986) and Rosenberg (1982) on the dilation of L(K,H)-valued measures can be extended to hold for the general Banach space setting of L(B,H)-valued measures. These L(B,H)-valued measures are closely connected to the Banach space valued processes. This connection is recalled and as application of spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures the well known stationary dilation results for scalar valued processes is extended to the case of Banach space valued processes.

  20. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  1. Intracerebroventricular application of S100B selectively impairs pial arteriolar dilating function in rats.

    PubMed

    Changyaleket, Benjarat; Xu, Haoliang; Vetri, Francesco; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Paisansathan, Chanannait; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Pelligrino, Dale A; Testai, Fernando D

    2016-03-01

    S100B is an astrocyte-derived protein that can act through the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) to mediate either "trophic" or "toxic" responses. Its levels increase in many neurological conditions with associated microvascular dysregulation, such as subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and traumatic brain injury. The role of S100B in the p