Science.gov

Sample records for airway diseases including

  1. Lung function score including a parameter of small airway disease as a highly predictive indicator of survival after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakamae, Mika; Yamashita, Mariko; Koh, Hideo; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Nakane, Takahiko; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Asao; Hino, Masayuki; Nakamae, Hirohisa

    2016-06-01

    Some studies on the predictive value of determining pulmonary function prior to allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) have shown a significant association between pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters and pulmonary complications, and mortality. However, the percentage of patients showing abnormalities in pretransplant PFT parameters is low. We comprehensively evaluated the effect of pretransplant PFT parameters, including a marker of small airway disease (ratio of the airflow rate of 50% vital capacity to the airflow rate of 25% vital capacity (V˙50/V˙25), on outcomes in 206 evaluable patients who underwent allo-HCT at our institute. Notable among the significant parameters in a univariable analysis, V˙50/V˙25 was the most powerful indicator of survival following allo-HCT (delta-Akaike information criterion [∆AIC] = 12.47, ∆χ(2)  = 14.47; P = 0.0001). Additionally, a pretransplant lung function score (pLFS) established by applying three parameters with superior predictive values including V˙50/V˙25 represented a better discriminating variable for the prediction of survival. Our data demonstrate that a pLFS incorporating a parameter of small airway disease, rather than the parameters of central airway obstruction, may be useful for predicting patient survival following allo-HCT. PMID:27018997

  2. Airway Surface Mycosis in Chronic Th2-Associated Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Paul; Lim, Dae Jun; Maskatia, Zahida Khan; Mak, Garbo; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Citardi, Martin J; Fakhri, Samer; Shaw, Joanne L.; Fothergil, Annette; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B; Luong, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental fungi have been linked to T helper type 2 (Th2) cell-related airway inflammation and the Th2-associated chronic airway diseases asthma, chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS), but whether these organisms participate directly or indirectly in disease pathology remains unknown. Objective To determine the frequency of fungus isolation and fungus-specific immunity in Th2-associated and non-associated airway disease patients. Methods Sinus lavage fluid and blood were collected from sinus surgery patients (n=118) including CRS patients with and without nasal polyps and AFRS and non-CRS/non-asthmatic control patients. Asthma status was deteremined from medical history. Sinus lavage fluids were cultured and directly examined for evidence of viable fungi. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were restimulated with fungal antigens in an enzyme linked immunocell spot (ELISpot) assay to determine total memory fungus-specific IL-4-secreting cells. These data were compared to fungus-specific IgE levels measured from plasma by ELISA. Results Filamentous fungi were significantly more commonly cultured from Th2-associated airway disease subjects (asthma, CRSwNP, or AFRS: n=68) compared to non-Th2-associated control patients (n=31); 74% vs 16% respectively, p<0.001. Both fungus-specific IL-4 ELISpot (n=48) and specific IgE (n=70) data correlated with Th2-associated diseases (sensitivity 73% and specificity 100% vs. 50% and 77%, respectively). Conclusions The frequent isolation of fungi growing directly within the airways accompanied by specific immunity to these organisms only in patients with Th2-associated chronic airway diseases suggests that fungi participate directly in the pathogenesis of these conditions. Efforts to eradicate airway fungi from the airways should be considered in selected patients. Clinical Implications Airway fungi may contribute to the expression of sinusitis with nasal polyps and

  3. United airway disease: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Aun, Marcelo Vivolo; Takejima, Priscila; Kalil, Jorge; Agondi, Rosana Câmara

    2016-01-01

    Upper and lower airways are considered a unified morphological and functional unit, and the connection existing between them has been observed for many years, both in health and in disease. There is strong epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical evidence supporting an integrated view of rhinitis and asthma: united airway disease in the present review. The term “united airway disease” is opportune, because rhinitis and asthma are chronic inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower airways, which can be induced by allergic or nonallergic reproducible mechanisms, and present several phenotypes. Management of rhinitis and asthma must be jointly carried out, leading to better control of both diseases, and the lessons of the Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma initiative cannot be forgotten. PMID:27257389

  4. Eosinophilic phenotypes of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Pavord, Ian D

    2013-12-01

    Our understanding of the clinical implications of eosinophilic airway inflammation has increased significantly over the last 20 years, aided by the development of noninvasive means to assess it. This pattern of airway inflammation can occur in a diverse range of airway diseases. It is associated with a positive response to corticosteroids and a high risk of preventable exacerbations. Our new understanding of the role of eosinophilic airway inflammation has paved the way for the clinical development of a number of more specific inhibitors that may become new treatment options. Different definitions, ideas of disease, and adoption of biomarkers that are not well known are necessary to fully realize the potential of these treatments. PMID:24313765

  5. Medical management considerations for upper airway disease.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, G L

    1992-06-01

    The conducting airways, also commonly referred to as the upper airways, provide for the passage of air to and from the atmosphere and lungs. Anatomical components include the nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, trachea, and mainstem bronchi. Clinical problems involving the conducting airways can be manifested by relatively mild clinical signs of stertorous breathing, by life-threatening dyspnea, or by chronic bouts of inspiratory stridor and cough. Concurrent disease of the lower respiratory system (ie, chronic bronchitis) as well as other organ systems (ie, cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine) may significantly contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of upper airway disease. Diagnosis of the diseases of the conducting airways is primarily based on history and physical examination. The dynamic nature of some conditions, related to the phases of respiration, can make diagnosis more difficult. In addition to direct visualization, radiographic and endoscopic evaluation are often useful. Many upper airway problems, especially congenital conditions, lend themselves to surgical palliation that should be performed as early in life as possible. Medical management is often directed at treating underlying diseases and the relief of clinical signs. Historically, the use of variety of drugs have been advocated and frequently include decongestants, cough suppressants, bronchodilators, glucocorticoids, and antibiotics. However, their use may be detrimental and contraindicated. In addition, therapy for some conditions (ie, laryngeal paralysis and intrathoracic tracheal collapse) may be better directed at increasing airway muscle tone in order to stabilized airway patency. Therapeutic agents that may be useful include aspirin and digitalis. The overall objective to medical management must be to balance potential therapeutic benefit against untoward effects in order to minimize clinical signs and to improve the animal's quality of life. PMID:1643322

  6. Phenotyping airways disease: an A to E approach.

    PubMed

    Gonem, S; Raj, V; Wardlaw, A J; Pavord, I D; Green, R; Siddiqui, S

    2012-12-01

    The airway diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous conditions with overlapping pathophysiological and clinical features. It has previously been proposed that this heterogeneity may be characterized in terms of five relatively independent domains labelled from A to E, namely airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), bronchitis, cough reflex hypersensitivity, damage to the airways and surrounding lung parenchyma, and extrapulmonary factors. Airway hyperresponsiveness occurs in both asthma and COPD, accounting for variable day to day symptoms, although the mechanisms most likely differ between the two conditions. Bronchitis, or airway inflammation, may be predominantly eosinophilic or neutrophilic, with different treatments required for each. Cough reflex hypersensitivity is thought to underlie the chronic dry cough out of proportion to other symptoms that can occur in association with airways disease. Structural changes associated with airway disease (damage) include bronchial wall thickening, airway smooth muscle hypertrophy, bronchiectasis and emphysema. Finally, a variety of extrapulmonary factors may impact upon airway disease, including rhinosinusitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, obesity and dysfunctional breathing. This article discusses the A to E concept in detail and describes how this framework may be used to assess and treat patients with airway diseases in the clinic. PMID:23181785

  7. Allergic airways disease develops after an increase in allergen capture and processing in the airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    von Garnier, Christophe; Wikstrom, Matthew E; Zosky, Graeme; Turner, Debra J; Sly, Peter D; Smith, Miranda; Thomas, Jennifer A; Judd, Samantha R; Strickland, Deborah H; Holt, Patrick G; Stumbles, Philip A

    2007-11-01

    Airway mucosal dendritic cells (AMDC) and other airway APCs continuously sample inhaled Ags and regulate the nature of any resulting T cell-mediated immune response. Although immunity develops to harmful pathogens, tolerance arises to nonpathogenic Ags in healthy individuals. This homeostasis is thought to be disrupted in allergic respiratory disorders such as allergic asthma, such that a potentially damaging Th2-biased, CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response develops against intrinsically nonpathogenic allergens. Using a mouse model of experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD), we have investigated the functional changes occurring in AMDC and other airway APC populations during disease onset. Onset of EAAD was characterized by early and transient activation of airway CD4(+) T cells coinciding with up-regulation of CD40 expression exclusively on CD11b(-) AMDC. Concurrent enhanced allergen uptake and processing occurred within all airway APC populations, including B cells, macrophages, and both CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) AMDC subsets. Immune serum transfer into naive animals recapitulated the enhanced allergen uptake observed in airway APC populations and mediated activation of naive allergen-specific, airway CD4(+) T cells following inhaled allergen challenge. These data suggest that the onset of EAAD is initiated by enhanced allergen capture and processing by a number of airway APC populations and that allergen-specific Igs play a role in the conversion of normally quiescent AMDC subsets into those capable of inducing airway CD4(+) T cell activation. PMID:17947647

  8. A bug's view of allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Peter S; Campbell, Dianne E

    2016-06-01

    The increase in allergic airways disease has been linked to modern urbanization and lifestyle. Recent evidence suggests that the associated reduction in microbial exposure, reduction in dietary fibre intake and increased antibiotic use may cause early dysbiosis in infancy, which predisposes to immune dysregulation and allergic airways disease later in life. This implies that there may be a window of opportunity for primary prevention strategies aimed to protect or restore the microbiome early in life and thereby decrease the risk of developing allergic airways disease. Alternatively, strategies that correct dysbiosis may aid in the treatment of established allergic airways disease. PMID:27012478

  9. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  10. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Knight, John M; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A; Milner, Joshua D; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah; McMurray, John S; Corry, David B

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  11. Classification of pulmonary airway disease based on mucosal color analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Melissa; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Riker, David; Ferguson, John Scott; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Airway mucosal color changes occur in response to the development of bronchial diseases including lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. These associated changes are often visualized using standard macro-optical bronchoscopy techniques. A limitation to this form of assessment is that the subtle changes that indicate early stages in disease development may often be missed as a result of this highly subjective assessment, especially in inexperienced bronchoscopists. Tri-chromatic CCD chip bronchoscopes allow for digital color analysis of the pulmonary airway mucosa. This form of analysis may facilitate a greater understanding of airway disease response. A 2-step image classification approach is employed: the first step is to distinguish between healthy and diseased bronchoscope images and the second is to classify the detected abnormal images into 1 of 4 possible disease categories. A database of airway mucosal color constructed from healthy human volunteers is used as a standard against which statistical comparisons are made from mucosa with known apparent airway abnormalities. This approach demonstrates great promise as an effective detection and diagnosis tool to highlight potentially abnormal airway mucosa identifying a region possibly suited to further analysis via airway forceps biopsy, or newly developed micro-optical biopsy strategies. Following the identification of abnormal airway images a neural network is used to distinguish between the different disease classes. We have shown that classification of potentially diseased airway mucosa is possible through comparative color analysis of digital bronchoscope images. The combination of the two strategies appears to increase the classification accuracy in addition to greatly decreasing the computational time.

  12. Integrated care pathways for airway diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, J; Addis, A; Adcock, I; Agache, I; Agusti, A; Alonso, A; Annesi-Maesano, I; Anto, J M; Bachert, C; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Bai, C; Baigenzhin, A; Barbara, C; Barnes, P J; Bateman, E D; Beck, L; Bedbrook, A; Bel, E H; Benezet, O; Bennoor, K S; Benson, M; Bernabeu-Wittel, M; Bewick, M; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Blain, H; Blasi, F; Bonini, M; Bonini, S; Boulet, L P; Bourdin, A; Bourret, R; Bousquet, P J; Brightling, C E; Briggs, A; Brozek, J; Buhl, R; Bush, A; Caimmi, D; Calderon, M; Calverley, P; Camargos, P A; Camuzat, T; Canonica, G W; Carlsen, K H; Casale, T B; Cazzola, M; Cepeda Sarabia, A M; Cesario, A; Chen, Y Z; Chkhartishvili, E; Chavannes, N H; Chiron, R; Chuchalin, A; Chung, K F; Cox, L; Crooks, G; Crooks, M G; Cruz, A A; Custovic, A; Dahl, R; Dahlen, S E; De Blay, F; Dedeu, T; Deleanu, D; Demoly, P; Devillier, P; Didier, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Djukanovic, R; Dokic, D; Douagui, H; Dubakiene, R; Eglin, S; Elliot, F; Emuzyte, R; Fabbri, L; Fink Wagner, A; Fletcher, M; Fokkens, W J; Fonseca, J; Franco, A; Frith, P; Furber, A; Gaga, M; Garcés, J; Garcia-Aymerich, J; Gamkrelidze, A; Gonzales-Diaz, S; Gouzi, F; Guzmán, M A; Haahtela, T; Harrison, D; Hayot, M; Heaney, L G; Heinrich, J; Hellings, P W; Hooper, J; Humbert, M; Hyland, M; Iaccarino, G; Jakovenko, D; Jardim, J R; Jeandel, C; Jenkins, C; Johnston, S L; Jonquet, O; Joos, G; Jung, K S; Kalayci, O; Karunanithi, S; Keil, T; Khaltaev, N; Kolek, V; Kowalski, M L; Kull, I; Kuna, P; Kvedariene, V; Le, L T; Lodrup Carlsen, K C; Louis, R; MacNee, W; Mair, A; Majer, I; Manning, P; de Manuel Keenoy, E; Masjedi, M R; Melen, E; Melo-Gomes, E; Menzies-Gow, A; Mercier, G; Mercier, J; Michel, J P; Miculinic, N; Mihaltan, F; Milenkovic, B; Molimard, M; Momas, I; Montilla-Santana, A; Morais-Almeida, M; Morgan, M; N'Diaye, M; Nafti, S; Nekam, K; Neou, A; Nicod, L; O'Hehir, R; Ohta, K; Paggiaro, P; Palkonen, S; Palmer, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Papi, A; Passalacqua, G; Pavord, I; Pigearias, B; Plavec, D; Postma, D S; Price, D; Rabe, K F; Radier Pontal, F; Redon, J; Rennard, S; Roberts, J; Robine, J M; Roca, J; Roche, N; Rodenas, F; Roggeri, A; Rolland, C; Rosado-Pinto, J; Ryan, D; Samolinski, B; Sanchez-Borges, M; Schünemann, H J; Sheikh, A; Shields, M; Siafakas, N; Sibille, Y; Similowski, T; Small, I; Sola-Morales, O; Sooronbaev, T; Stelmach, R; Sterk, P J; Stiris, T; Sud, P; Tellier, V; To, T; Todo-Bom, A; Triggiani, M; Valenta, R; Valero, A L; Valiulis, A; Valovirta, E; Van Ganse, E; Vandenplas, O; Vasankari, T; Vestbo, J; Vezzani, G; Viegi, G; Visier, L; Vogelmeier, C; Vontetsianos, T; Wagstaff, R; Wahn, U; Wallaert, B; Whalley, B; Wickman, M; Williams, D M; Wilson, N; Yawn, B P; Yiallouros, P K; Yorgancioglu, A; Yusuf, O M; Zar, H J; Zhong, N; Zidarn, M; Zuberbier, T

    2014-08-01

    The objective of Integrated Care Pathways for Airway Diseases (AIRWAYS-ICPs) is to launch a collaboration to develop multi-sectoral care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases in European countries and regions. AIRWAYS-ICPs has strategic relevance to the European Union Health Strategy and will add value to existing public health knowledge by: 1) proposing a common framework of care pathways for chronic respiratory diseases, which will facilitate comparability and trans-national initiatives; 2) informing cost-effective policy development, strengthening in particular those on smoking and environmental exposure; 3) aiding risk stratification in chronic disease patients, using a common strategy; 4) having a significant impact on the health of citizens in the short term (reduction of morbidity, improvement of education in children and of work in adults) and in the long-term (healthy ageing); 5) proposing a common simulation tool to assist physicians; and 6) ultimately reducing the healthcare burden (emergency visits, avoidable hospitalisations, disability and costs) while improving quality of life. In the longer term, the incidence of disease may be reduced by innovative prevention strategies. AIRWAYSICPs was initiated by Area 5 of the Action Plan B3 of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing. All stakeholders are involved (health and social care, patients, and policy makers). PMID:24925919

  13. Mucoactive agents for airway mucus hypersecretory diseases.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Duncan F

    2007-09-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a feature of a number of severe respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). However, each disease has a different airway inflammatory response, with consequent, and presumably linked, mucus hypersecretory phenotype. Thus, it is possible that optimal treatment of the mucus hypersecretory element of each disease should be disease-specific. Nevertheless, mucoactive drugs are a longstanding and popular therapeutic option, and numerous compounds (eg, N-acetylcysteine, erdosteine, and ambroxol) are available for clinical use worldwide. However, rational recommendation of these drugs in guidelines for management of asthma, COPD, or CF has been hampered by lack of information from well-designed clinical trials. In addition, the mechanism of action of most of these drugs is unknown. Consequently, although it is possible to categorize them according to putative mechanisms of action, as expectorants (aid and/or induce cough), mucolytics (thin mucus), mucokinetics (facilitate cough transportability), and mucoregulators (suppress mechanisms underlying chronic mucus hypersecretion, such as glucocorticosteroids), it is likely that any beneficial effects are due to activities other than, or in addition to, effects on mucus. It is also noteworthy that the mucus factors that favor mucociliary transport (eg, thin mucus gel layer, "ideal" sol depth, and elasticity greater than viscosity) are opposite to those that favor cough effectiveness (thick mucus layer, excessive sol height, and viscosity greater than elasticity), which indicates that different mucoactive drugs would be required for treatment of mucus obstruction in proximal versus distal airways, or in patients with an impaired cough reflex. With the exception of mucoregulatory agents, whose primary action is unlikely to be directed against mucus, well-designed clinical trials are required to unequivocally determine the

  14. Epithelial injury and repair in airways diseases.

    PubMed

    Grainge, Christopher L; Davies, Donna E

    2013-12-01

    Asthma is a common chronic disease characterized by variable respiratory distress with underlying airway inflammation and airflow obstruction. The incidence of asthma has risen inexorably over the past 50 years, suggesting that environmental factors are important in its etiology. All inhaled environmental stimuli interact with the lung at the respiratory epithelium, and it is a testament to the effectiveness of the airway innate defenses that the majority of inhaled substances are cleared without the need to elicit an inflammatory response. However, once this barrier is breached, effective communication with immune and inflammatory cells is required to protect the internal milieu of the lung. In asthma, the respiratory epithelium is known to be structurally and functionally abnormal. Structurally, the epithelium shows evidence of damage and has more mucus-producing cells than normal airways. Functionally, the airway epithelial barrier can be more permeable and more sensitive to oxidants and show a deficient innate immune response to respiratory virus infection compared with that in normal individuals. The potential of a susceptible epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme to create a microenvironment that enables deviation of immune and inflammatory responses to external stimuli may be crucial in the development and progression of asthma. In this review, we consider three important groups of environmental stimuli on the epithelium in asthma: oxidants, such as environmental pollution and acetaminophen; viruses, including rhinovirus; and agents that cause barrier disruption, such as house dust mite allergens. The pathology associated with each stimulus is considered, and potential future treatments arising from research on their effects are presented. PMID:24297122

  15. Airway tissue engineering for congenital laryngotracheal disease.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Elizabeth; Lesage, Flore; Butler, Colin R; Hynds, Robert E; Hewitt, Richard; Janes, Sam M; Deprest, Jan A; Coppi, Paolo De

    2016-06-01

    Regenerative medicine offers hope of a sustainable solution for severe airway disease by the creation of functional, immunocompatible organ replacements. When considering fetuses and newborns, there is a specific spectrum of airway pathologies that could benefit from cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. While hypoplastic lungs associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) could benefit from cellular based treatments aimed at ameliorating lung function, patients with upper airway obstruction could take advantage from a de novo tissue engineering approach. Moreover, the international acceptance of the EXIT procedure as a means of securing the precarious neonatal airway, together with the advent of fetal surgery as a method of heading off postnatal co-morbidities, offers the revolutionary possibility of extending the clinical indication for tissue-engineered airway transplantation to infants affected by diverse severe congenital laryngotracheal malformations. This article outlines the necessary basic components for regenerative medicine solutions in this potential clinical niche. PMID:27301606

  16. MicroRNA in United Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Xin-Hao; Callejas-Díaz, Borja; Mullol, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The concept of united airway diseases (UAD) has received increasing attention in recent years. Sustained and increased inflammation is a common feature of UAD, which is inevitably accompanied with marked gene modification and tight gene regulation. However, gene regulation in the common inflammatory processes in UAD remains unclear. MicroRNA (miRNA), a novel regulator of gene expression, has been considered to be involved in many inflammatory diseases. Although there are an increasing number of studies of miRNAs in inflammatory upper and lower airway diseases, few miRNAs have been identified that directly link the upper and lower airways. In this article, therefore, we reviewed the relevant studies available in order to improve the understanding of the roles of miRNAs in the interaction and pathogenesis of UAD. PMID:27187364

  17. MicroRNA in United Airway Diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Xin-Hao; Callejas-Díaz, Borja; Mullol, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    The concept of united airway diseases (UAD) has received increasing attention in recent years. Sustained and increased inflammation is a common feature of UAD, which is inevitably accompanied with marked gene modification and tight gene regulation. However, gene regulation in the common inflammatory processes in UAD remains unclear. MicroRNA (miRNA), a novel regulator of gene expression, has been considered to be involved in many inflammatory diseases. Although there are an increasing number of studies of miRNAs in inflammatory upper and lower airway diseases, few miRNAs have been identified that directly link the upper and lower airways. In this article, therefore, we reviewed the relevant studies available in order to improve the understanding of the roles of miRNAs in the interaction and pathogenesis of UAD. PMID:27187364

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of airway targeted PLGA nanoparticles for drug delivery in obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation is a hallmark of chronic obstructive airway diseases, including asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and CF (cystic fibrosis). It is also a major challenge in delivery and therapeutic efficacy of nano-based delivery systems in these chronic airway conditions as nanoparticle (NP) need to bypass airways defense mechanisms as we recently discussed. NPs which are capable of overcoming airways defense mechanisms should allow targeted drug delivery to disease cells. Over the last decade there has been increasing interest in development of targeted NPs for cancer but relatively little effort on designing novel systems for treating chronic inflammatory and obstructive airway conditions. Here we describe methods for preparing drug loaded multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted delivery to specific cell types in airways. The formulations and methods for selective drug delivery, discussed here are currently under preclinical development in our laboratory for treating chronic airway conditions such as COPD, CF, and asthma. PMID:22791443

  19. Antileukotrienes in upper airway inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Cingi, Cemal; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Ipci, Kagan; Şahin, Ethem

    2015-11-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are a family of inflammatory mediators including LTA4, LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4. By competitive binding to the cysteinyl LT1 (CysLT1) receptor, LT receptor antagonist drugs, such as montelukast, zafirlukast, and pranlukast, block the effects of CysLTs, improving the symptoms of some chronic respiratory diseases, particularly bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis. We reviewed the efficacy of antileukotrienes in upper airway inflammatory diseases. An update on the use of antileukotrienes in upper airway diseases in children and adults is presented with a detailed literature survey. Data on LTs, antileukotrienes, and antileukotrienes in chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps, asthma, and allergic rhinitis are presented. Antileukotriene drugs are classified into two groups: CysLT receptor antagonists (zafirlukast, pranlukast, and montelukast) and LT synthesis inhibitors (5-lipoxygenase inhibitors such as zileuton, ZD2138, Bay X 1005, and MK-0591). CysLTs have important proinflammatory and profibrotic effects that contribute to the extensive hyperplastic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis (NP) that characterise these disorders. Patients who receive zafirlukast or zileuton tend to show objective improvements in, or at least stabilisation of, NP. Montelukast treatment may lead to clinical subjective improvement in NP. Montelukast treatment after sinus surgery can lead to a significant reduction in eosinophilic cationic protein levels in serum, with a beneficial effect on nasal and pulmonary symptoms and less impact in NP. Combined inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β-agonists treatments are most effective for preventing exacerbations among paediatric asthma patients. Treatments with medium- or high-dose inhaled corticosteroids, combined inhaled corticosteroids and LT receptor antagonists, and low-dose inhaled corticosteroids have been reported to be equally effective. Antileukotrienes have also been reported to be effective for allergic

  20. The microbiome in chronic inflammatory airway disease: A threatened species.

    PubMed

    Green, Robin John; Van Niekerk, Andre; Jeevarathnum, Ashley C; Feldman, Charles; Richards On Behalf Of The South African Allergic Rhinitis Working Group, Guy A

    2016-08-01

    The human body is exposed to a multitude of microbes and infectious organisms throughout life. Many of these organisms colonise the skin, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and airway. We now recognise that this colonisation includes the lower airway, previously thought to be sterile. These colonising organisms play an important role in disease prevention, including an array of chronic inflammatory conditions that are unrelated to infectious diseases. However, new evidence of immune dysregulation suggests that early colonisation, especially of the GITand airway, by pathogenic micro-organisms, has deleterious effects that may contribute to the potential to induce chronic inflammation in young children, which may only express itself in adult life. PMID:27499401

  1. TRP channels and temperature in airway disease-clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Millqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Temperatures above and below what is generally regarded as "comfortable" for the human being have long been known to induce various airway symptoms, especially in combination with exercise in cold climate with temperatures below 0°C, which is naturally since exercise is followed by enhanced ventilation and thus greater amounts of inhaled cold air. The aim was to highlight the knowledge we have today on symptoms from the airways (here also including the eyes) arisen from various temperatures; the mechanisms, the pathophysiology and their clinical significance. The most common eye and airway conditions related to temperature changes are dry eye disease, rhinitis, laryngeal dysfunction, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic cough. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are probably involved in all temperature induced airway symptoms but via different pathways, which are now beginning to be mapped out. In asthma, the most persuasive hypothesis today is that cold-induced asthmatic bronchoconstriction is induced by dehydration of the airway mucosa, from which it follows that provocations with osmotic stimuli like hypertonic saline and mannitol can be used as a surrogate for exercise provocation as well as dry air inhalation. In chronic unexplained cough there seems to be a direct influence of cold air on the TRP ion channels followed by coughing and increased cough sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin. Revelations in the last decades of the ability of several airway TRP ion channels to sense and react to ambient air temperature have opened new windows for the understanding of the pathogenesis in a diversity of airway reactions appearing in many common respiratory diseases. PMID:27227021

  2. Fungal glycan interactions with epithelial cells in allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, René M.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to fungi results in a wide range of health outcomes, from invasive disease or allergy to immune tolerance. Inhaled fungi contact airway epithelial cells as an early event, and this host:fungal interaction can shape the eventual immunological outcome. Emerging evidence points to exposure to fungal cell wall carbohydrates in the development of allergic airway disease. Herein, we describe determinants of fungal allergenicity, and review the responses of airway epithelial cells to fungal carbohydrates. A greater understanding of the recognition of and response to fungal carbohydrates by airway epithelial cells may lead to the development of targeted therapies that ameliorate allergic airway disease. PMID:23602359

  3. [Airway Management in a Patient with Forestier's Disease].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuriko; Echigo, Noriyuki; Akata, Mariko; Yokoyama, Kaori; Takasugi, Naoya; Goto, Takahisa

    2016-04-01

    Airway management in a patient with Forestier's disease can be challenging clinically because this disease may cause not only dysphagia but also airway obstruction due to the compression of the pharynx and esophagus caused by the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament. We report our anesthetic management in a patient with Forestier's disease. Meanwhile, we studied the causes of difficult airway and the most suitable airway device for a patient with this disease from a standpoint of anatomy of upper airway. Our study indicated the possibility that the most suitable airway device differed depending on the actual location of the ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine and that more prudent airway management would be required if its lesion location extended to upper cervical spine. PMID:27188118

  4. Lung peptidases, including carboxypeptidase, modulate airway reactivity to intravenous bradykinin.

    PubMed

    Chodimella, V; Skidgel, R A; Krowiak, E J; Murlas, C G

    1991-10-01

    We investigated the effect of inhibition of carboxypeptidase, neutral endopeptidase, or angiotensin converting enzyme on airway reactivity to intravenous bradykinin in guinea pigs. Bradykinin reactivity in intact, unanesthetized, spontaneously breathing animals was determined by measuring specific airway resistance in response to increasing doses of intravenous bradykinin or acetylcholine. We found that phosphoramidon and/or captopril (specific antagonists of neutral endopeptidase and angiotensin converting enzyme, respectively) increased airway reactivity to bradykinin, but the combination had no effect on muscarinic reactivity. Although 2-mercaptomethyl-3-guanidinoethylthiopropanoic acid (MGTA, a carboxypeptidase inhibitor) alone did not alter bradykinin reactivity, MGTA in the presence of both phosphoramidon and captopril significantly potentiated bradykinin-induced airway reactivity. In comparison, this did not affect reactivity to acetylcholine. Having found that carboxypeptidase inhibition could augment kinin-induced airway reactivity, we subsequently assayed for and identified carboxypeptidase M activity in guinea pig lung. We found considerable carboxypeptidase M activity in guinea pig lung subcellular fractions, the 100,000 x g membrane pellet having the highest specific activity. Our data indicate that airway reactivity to intravenous bradykinin is modulated by the activity of endogenous neutral endopeptidase, angiotensin converting enzyme, and carboxypeptidase, all of which are present in lung cell membranes. This study also suggests that the influence of carboxypeptidase per se may be substantially enhanced if endogenous pulmonary neutral endopeptidase and angiotensin converting enzyme activities are reduced. PMID:1928964

  5. Trefoil factor-2 reverses airway remodeling changes in allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Lim, Clarice; Muljadi, Ruth C; Samuel, Chrishan S; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C; Giraud, Andrew S; Tang, Mimi L K

    2013-01-01

    Trefoil factor 2 (TFF2) is a small peptide with an important role in mucosal repair. TFF2 is up-regulated in asthma, suggesting a role in asthma pathogenesis. Given its known biological role in promoting epithelial repair, TFF2 might be expected to exert a protective function in limiting the progression of airway remodeling in asthma. The contribution of TFF2 to airway remodeling in asthma was investigated by examining the expression of TFF2 in the airway and lung, and evaluating the effects of recombinant TFF2 treatment on established airway remodeling in a murine model of chronic allergic airways disease (AAD). BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline for 9 weeks, whereas mice with established OVA-induced AAD were treated with TFF2 or vehicle control (intranasally for 14 d). Effects on airway remodeling, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness were then assessed, whereas TFF2 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. TFF2 expression was significantly increased in the airways of mice with AAD, compared with expression levels in control mice. TFF2 treatment resulted in reduced epithelial thickening, subepithelial collagen deposition, goblet-cell metaplasia, bronchial epithelium apoptosis, and airway hyperresponsiveness (all P < 0.05, versus vehicle control), but TFF2 treatment did not influence airway inflammation. The increased expression of endogenous TFF2 in response to chronic allergic inflammation is insufficient to prevent the progression of airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic AAD. However, exogenous TFF2 treatment is effective in reversing aspects of established airway remodeling. TFF2 has potential as a novel treatment for airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:22652198

  6. Hyperresponsiveness in the human nasal airway: new targets for the treatment of allergic airway disease.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, P J; Foreman, J C

    1999-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a condition which affects over 15% of the population in the United Kingdom. The pathological process involves two stages: nasal inflammation, and the development of nasal airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to allergen and a number of other stimuli. This results in the amplification of any subsequent allergic reaction, contributing to the chronic allergic state. A number of different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of AHR, including a role for eosinophil-derived proteins, free radicals and neuropeptides. While there may be a number of independent pathways which can result in AHR, evidence obtained from both animal models and in vivo experiments in humans indicate that some mediators may interact with one another, resulting in AHR. Further research into these interactions may open new avenues for the pharmacological treatment of chronic allergic rhinitis, and possibly other allergic airway diseases. PMID:10704051

  7. Effect of a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, on HDM-induced allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Siddesha, Jalahalli M; Nakada, Emily M; Mihavics, Bethany R; Hoffman, Sidra M; Rattu, Gurkiranjit K; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Cahoon, Jonathon M; Lahue, Karolyn G; Daphtary, Nirav; Aliyeva, Minara; Chapman, David G; Desai, Dhimant H; Poynter, Matthew E; Anathy, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response plays a critical role in inflammatory diseases, including allergic airway disease. However, the benefits of inhibiting ER stress in the treatment of allergic airway disease are not well known. Herein, we tested the therapeutic potential of a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), in combating allergic asthma, using a mouse model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway disease. TUDCA was administered during the HDM-challenge phase (preventive regimen), after the HDM-challenge phase (therapeutic regimen), or therapeutically during a subsequent HDM rechallenge (rechallenge regimen). In the preventive regimen, TUDCA significantly decreased HDM-induced inflammation, markers of ER stress, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and fibrosis. Similarly, in the therapeutic regimen, TUDCA administration efficiently decreased HDM-induced airway inflammation, mucus metaplasia, ER stress markers, and AHR, but not airway remodeling. Interestingly, TUDCA administered therapeutically in the HDM rechallenge regimen markedly attenuated HDM-induced airway inflammation, mucus metaplasia, ER stress markers, methacholine-induced AHR, and airway fibrotic remodeling. These results indicate that the inhibition of ER stress in the lungs through the administration of chemical chaperones could be a valuable strategy in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:27154200

  8. Systems physiology of the airways in health and obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T

    2016-09-01

    Fresh air entering the mouth and nose is brought to the blood-gas barrier in the lungs by a repetitively branching network of airways. Provided the individual airway branches remain patent, this airway tree achieves an enormous amplification in cross-sectional area from the trachea to the terminal bronchioles. Obstructive lung diseases such as asthma occur when airway patency becomes compromised. Understanding the pathophysiology of these obstructive diseases thus begins with a consideration of the factors that determine the caliber of an individual airway, which include the force balance between the inward elastic recoil of the airway wall, the outward tethering forces of its parenchymal attachments, and any additional forces due to contraction of airway smooth muscle. Other factors may also contribute significantly to airway narrowing, such as thickening of the airway wall and accumulation of secretions in the lumen. Airway obstruction becomes particularly severe when these various factors occur in concert. However, the effect of airway abnormalities on lung function cannot be fully understood only in terms of what happens to a single airway because narrowing throughout the airway tree is invariably heterogeneous and interdependent. Obstructive lung pathologies thus manifest as emergent phenomena arising from the way in which the airway tree behaves a system. These emergent phenomena are studied with clinical measurements of lung function made by spirometry and by mechanical impedance measured with the forced oscillation technique. Anatomically based computational models are linking these measurements to underlying anatomic structure in systems physiology terms. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:423-437. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1347 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27340818

  9. Mast cells in airway diseases and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Glenn; Bradding, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are major effector cells of inflammation and there is strong evidence that mast cells play a significant role in asthma pathophysiology. There is also a growing body of evidence that mast cells contribute to other inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This review discusses the role that mast cells play in airway diseases and highlights how mast cell microlocalisation within specific lung compartments and their cellular interactions are likely to be critical for their effector function in disease. PMID:25959386

  10. Clinical application of expectorant therapy in chronic inflammatory airway diseases (Review)

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, TING; ZHOU, XIANGDONG

    2014-01-01

    Airway mucus hypersecretion is a significant clinical and pathological feature of chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Its clinical presentations include recurrent coughing and phlegm. Airway mucus is closely associated with the occurrence, development and prognosis of chronic inflammatory airway diseases and critically affects the lung function, quality of life, hospitalization rate and mortality of patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases. Therefore, expectorant therapies targeting the potential mechanisms of mucus hypersecretion have been the focus of numerous studies. Conventional expectorants are mainly mucoactive medicines, including nausea-stimulating expectorants, mucolytics, mucokinetics, and proteases and nucleases. In addition, certain traditional Chinese herbal medicines and non-mucoactive agents, including muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists and macrolide antibiotics, have also shown expectorant effects. Several novel medicines for expectorant therapy have emerged, including cholesterol-lowering statins, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, stanozolol, surfactants, flavonoids, tachykinin receptor antagonists, protease inhibitors, cytokine antagonists and purinergic agonists. With the increasing number of multidisciplinary studies, the effectiveness of expectorant therapy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory airway diseases has been confirmed. Therefore, the development of novel expectorants and the standardization of expectorant therapy are the direction and focus of future studies, thus benefiting patients who have a chronic inflammatory airway disease. PMID:24660026

  11. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES PERSISTENT AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The endotoxin component of organic dusts causes acute reversible airflow obstruction and airway inflammation. To test the hypothesis that endotoxin alone causes airway remodeling, we have compared the response of two inbred mouse strains to subchronic endotoxin ...

  12. Patient-Specific Airway Wall Remodeling in Chronic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mona; Kuschner, Ware G; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lung disease affects more than a quarter of the adult population; yet, the mechanics of the airways are poorly understood. The pathophysiology of chronic lung disease is commonly characterized by mucosal growth and smooth muscle contraction of the airways, which initiate an inward folding of the mucosal layer and progressive airflow obstruction. Since the degree of obstruction is closely correlated with the number of folds, mucosal folding has been extensively studied in idealized circular cross sections. However, airflow obstruction has never been studied in real airway geometries; the behavior of imperfect, non-cylindrical, continuously branching airways remains unknown. Here we model the effects of chronic lung disease using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth. We perform finite element analysis of patient-specific Y-branch segments created from magnetic resonance images. We demonstrate that the mucosal folding pattern is insensitive to the specific airway geometry, but that it critically depends on the mucosal and submucosal stiffness, thickness, and loading mechanism. Our results suggests that patient-specific airway models with inherent geometric imperfections are more sensitive to obstruction than idealized circular models. Our models help to explain the pathophysiology of airway obstruction in chronic lung disease and hold promise to improve the diagnostics and treatment of asthma, bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and respiratory failure. PMID:25821112

  13. Microbiology of airway disease in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gilligan, P H

    1991-01-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis have abbreviated life spans primarily due to chronic airway infection. A limited number of types of organisms are responsible for these infections, with Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being of primary importance. In the pre-antibiotic era, greater than 90% of deaths due to infection were caused by S. aureus and death usually occurred in the first 2 years of life. With the advent of effective antistaphylococcal therapy, life spans increased and P. aeruginosa became the pathogen of primary importance. P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients with cystic fibrosis have a unique phenotypic characteristic referred to as "mucoid." The mucoid phenotype is due to the production of a mucoid exopolysaccharide. A mucoid exopolysaccharide is believed to play a central role in the establishment of chronic pseudomonal lung infection in these patients. A third organism, Pseudomonas cepacia, has recently been detected in the airways of older patients with cystic fibrosis and is associated with increased mortality. The virulence of P. cepacia is not understood, but the organism is extremely refractory to antimicrobial therapy. Other bacteria, including Haemophilus influenzae and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, appear to play a secondary role in airway infection. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important fungal agent causing allergic bronchopulmonary disease. The role of viruses has only recently been examined. At least in some patients with cystic fibrosis, respiratory syncytial virus may be important in predisposing to subsequent bacterial infections. PMID:1900735

  14. AEROSOL DEPOSITION AS A FUNCTION OF AIRWAY DISEASE: CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Progressive lung disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a continuous interaction of the processes of airway obstruction, infection and inflammation. ecent literature has suggested that the manifestation of CF could compromise the successful administration of pharmacologi...

  15. CT Metrics of Airway Disease and Emphysema in Severe COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jin; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hoffman, Eric; Criner, Gerard J.; Mosenifar, Zab; Sciurba, Frank C.; Make, Barry J.; Carey, Vincent; Estépar, Raúl San José; Diaz, Alejandro; Reilly, John J.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Washko, George R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: CT scan measures of emphysema and airway disease have been correlated with lung function in cohorts of subjects with a range of COPD severity. The contribution of CT scan-assessed airway disease to objective measures of lung function and respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea in severe emphysema is less clear. Methods: Using data from 338 subjects in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) Genetics Ancillary Study, densitometric measures of emphysema using a threshold of −950 Hounsfield units (%LAA-950) and airway wall phenotypes of the wall thickness (WT) and the square root of wall area (SRWA) of a 10-mm luminal perimeter airway were calculated for each subject. Linear regression analysis was performed for outcome variables FEV1 and percent predicted value of FEV1 with CT scan measures of emphysema and airway disease. Results: In univariate analysis, there were significant negative correlations between %LAA-950 and both the WT (r = −0.28, p = 0.0001) and SRWA (r = −0.19, p = 0.0008). Airway wall thickness was weakly but significantly correlated with postbronchodilator FEV1% predicted (R = −0.12, p = 0.02). Multivariate analysis showed significant associations between either WT or SRWA (β = −5.2, p = 0.009; β = −2.6, p = 0.008, respectively) and %LAA-950 (β = −10.6, p = 0.03) with the postbronchodilator FEV1% predicted. Male subjects exhibited significantly thicker airway wall phenotypes (p = 0.007 for WT and p = 0.0006 for SRWA). Conclusions: Airway disease and emphysema detected by CT scanning are inversely related in patients with severe COPD. Airway wall phenotypes were influenced by gender and associated with lung function in subjects with severe emphysema. PMID:19411295

  16. A Persistent and Diverse Airway Microbiota Present during Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.; Kim, Eugenia; Cox, Michael J.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Brown, Ron; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine P.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are a major source of morbidity and contribute significantly to healthcare costs. Although bacterial infections are implicated in nearly 50% of exacerbations, only a handful of pathogens have been consistently identified in COPD airways, primarily by culture-based methods, and the bacterial microbiota in acute exacerbations remains largely uncharacterized. The aim of this study was to comprehensively profile airway bacterial communities using a culture-independent microarray, the 16S rRNA PhyloChip, of a cohort of COPD patients requiring ventilatory support and antibiotic therapy for exacerbation-related respiratory failure. PhyloChip analysis revealed the presence of over 1,200 bacterial taxa representing 140 distinct families, many previously undetected in airway diseases; bacterial community composition was strongly influenced by the duration of intubation. A core community of 75 taxa was detected in all patients, many of which are known pathogens. Bacterial community diversity in COPD airways is substantially greater than previously recognized and includes a number of potential pathogens detected in the setting of antibiotic exposure. Comprehensive assessment of the COPD airway microbiota using high-throughput, culture-independent methods may prove key to understanding the relationships between airway bacterial colonization, acute exacerbation, and clinical outcomes in this and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:20141328

  17. Relationship between airway ion transport and a mild pulmonary disease mutation in CFTR.

    PubMed

    Walker, L C; Venglarik, C J; Aubin, G; Weatherly, M R; McCarty, N A; Lesnick, B; Ruiz, F; Clancy, J P; Sorscher, E J

    1997-05-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) display defects in airway ion transport, but the influence of airway transport phenotype on improved prognosis is not known. We studied airway bioelectric properties in five CF patients with the rare A455E mutation that is associated with mild pulmonary disease. We also evaluated five patients possessing premature truncation mutations (G542X and R553X) for which an association with mild pulmonary disease has not been as well established. We found no evidence in vivo that a mild lung disease mutation in the CF transmembrane regulator gene (CFTR) led to correction or partial correction of: (1) unstimulated Cl- secretion; (2) beta-agonist-activated Cl- secretion; (3) basal sodium reabsorption; or (4) amiloride-sensitive airway sodium transport. Early phase therapeutic trials in CF, including human gene transfer trials, rely heavily on improvements in airway potential difference to identify promising interventions and an improved prognosis. Based on our findings in a naturally occurring group of CF patients with an improved pulmonary prognosis (A455E), one can argue that marked clinical benefit might be possible without any improvement whatsoever in airway bioelectric phenotype. Moreover, if genetic modifiers exist that influence the severity of a particular CFTR mutation (e.g., A455E), these may be independent of human airway Cl-secretion in vivo, since we detected minimal Cl--secretory responses in patients with A455E. PMID:9154877

  18. The Role of CLCA Proteins in Inflammatory Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anand C.; Brett, Tom J.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit stereotyped traits that are variably expressed in each person. In experimental mouse models of chronic lung disease, these individual disease traits can be genetically segregated and thereby linked to distinct determinants. Functional genomic analysis indicates that at least one of these traits, mucous cell metaplasia, depends on members of the calcium-activated chloride channel (CLCA) gene family. Here we review advances in the biochemistry of the CLCA family and the evidence of a role for CLCA family members in the development of mucous cell metaplasia and possibly airway hyperreactivity in experimental models and in humans. Based on this information, we develop the model that CLCA proteins are not integral membrane proteins with ion channel function, but instead are secreted signaling molecules that specifically regulate airway target cells in healthy and disease conditions. PMID:18954282

  19. Unmet needs in severe chronic upper airway disease (SCUAD).

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Jean; Bachert, Claus; Canonica, Giorgio W; Casale, Thomas B; Cruz, Alvaro A; Lockey, Richard J; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2009-09-01

    Although the majority of patients with chronic upper airway diseases have controlled symptoms during treatment, many patients have severe chronic upper airway diseases (SCUADs). SCUAD defines those patients whose symptoms are inadequately controlled despite adequate (ie, effective, safe, and acceptable) pharmacologic treatment based on guidelines. These patients have impaired quality of life, social functioning, sleep, and school/work performance. Severe uncontrolled allergic rhinitis, nonallergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory diseases, or occupational airway diseases are defined as SCUADs. Pediatric SCUADs are still unclear. In developing countries SCUADs exist, but risk factors can differ from those seen in developed countries. Comorbidities are common in patients with SCUADs and might increase their severity. The present document is the position of a group of experts considering that SCUADs should be considered differently from mild chronic upper airway diseases. It reviews the state of the art, highlighting gaps in our knowledge, and proposes several areas for a better understanding, prevention, and management of SCUADs. This document can also serve to optimize the pharmacoeconomic evaluation of SCUADs by means of comparison with mild chronic upper airway diseases. PMID:19660803

  20. Airway Microbiome Dynamics in Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sanjay; Murphy, Timothy; Nariya, Snehal; Boushey, Homer A.; Lynch, Susan V.

    2014-01-01

    Specific bacterial species are implicated in the pathogenesis of exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, recent studies of clinically stable COPD patients have demonstrated a greater diversity of airway microbiota, whose role in acute exacerbations is unclear. In this study, temporal changes in the airway microbiome before, at the onset of, and after an acute exacerbation were examined in 60 sputum samples collected from subjects enrolled in a longitudinal study of bacterial infection in COPD. Microbiome composition and predicted functions were examined using 16S rRNA-based culture-independent profiling methods. Shifts in the abundance (≥2-fold, P < 0.05) of many taxa at exacerbation and after treatment were observed. Microbiota members that were increased at exacerbation were primarily of the Proteobacteria phylum, including nontypical COPD pathogens. Changes in the bacterial composition after treatment for an exacerbation differed significantly among the therapy regimens clinically prescribed (antibiotics only, oral corticosteroids only, or both). Treatment with antibiotics alone primarily decreased the abundance of Proteobacteria, with the prolonged suppression of some microbiota members being observed. In contrast, treatment with corticosteroids alone led to enrichment for Proteobacteria and members of other phyla. Predicted metagenomes of particular microbiota members involved in these compositional shifts indicated exacerbation-associated loss of functions involved in the synthesis of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory products, alongside enrichment in functions related to pathogen-elicited inflammation. These trends reversed upon clinical recovery. Further larger studies will be necessary to determine whether specific compositional or functional changes detected in the airway microbiome could be useful indicators of exacerbation development or outcome. PMID:24850358

  1. Byssinosis and small airways disease: Terminal progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    In a study of byssinosis and small-airway disease, pulmonary-function measurements including helium and oxygen flow volume curves were made on 470 cotton mill employees exposed to various dust levels. The employees in these cotton mills had been screened previously for pulmonary abnormalities, and some employees had moved to work areas with lower dust levels. Results showed that there was no significant increase in bronchitis or byssinosis in the dust areas nor were there any significant decreases in the percentages of normal forced vital capacity (PFVC) or forced expiratory volume in 1 second (PFEV1) in the dusty areas. These results differ from those reported from mills in which no previous pulmonary testing had been conducted. A strong smoking/tenure/dust exposure interaction on PFVC and PFEV1 was found, with the long-tenured, high-dust-exposure, smokers having the lowest PFVC and PFEV1. There was no significant increase in small airways abnormalities with increased dust and smoking, but the mean change in the density dependence ratio is too small to have clinical significance.

  2. Airway disease: similarities and differences between asthma, COPD and bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Athanazio, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Airway diseases are highly prevalent worldwide; however, the prevalence of these diseases is underestimated. Although these diseases present several common characteristics, they have different clinical outcomes. The differentiation between asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and bronchiectasis in the early stage of disease is extremely important for the adoption of appropriate therapeutic measures. However, because of the high prevalence of these diseases and the common pathophysiological pathways, some patients with different diseases may present with similar symptoms. The objective of this review is to highlight the similarities and differences between these diseases in terms of the risk factors, pathophysiology, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23184213

  3. Lysophosphatidylcholine plays critical role in allergic airway disease manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Preeti; Gaur, Shailendera Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), pivotal for allergic and inflammatory response, hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC) to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In present study, the role of LPC in allergic airway disease manifestation was studied using mouse model. Balb/c mice were immunized using cockroach extract (CE) and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2 inhibitor. Airway hyperresponse (AHR), lung-histology, total and differential leukocyte count (TLC&DLC), Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. Exogenous LPC was given to the mice with or without CE sensitization, to demonstrate its role in allergic airway disease manifestation. Anti-CD1d antibody was given to study the involvement of natural killer T (NKT) cells in LPC induced response. AHR, lung-inflammation, TLC, DLC, Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels were increased on CE challenge. sPLA2 activity and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2-inhibitor, which decreased AHR, and inflammatory parameters. Exogenous LPC with or without CE sensitization increased above parameters. CE challenge or LPC exposure increased LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells in BALF and spleen, which was reduced by anti-CD1d antibody, accompanied with reduction in AHR and allergic airway inflammation parameters. Conclusively, LPC induces allergic airway disease manifestation and it does so probably via CD1d-restricted LY49C+TCRβ+ NKT cells. PMID:27282246

  4. Lysophosphatidylcholine plays critical role in allergic airway disease manifestation.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Preeti; Gaur, Shailendera Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), pivotal for allergic and inflammatory response, hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine (PC) to lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). In present study, the role of LPC in allergic airway disease manifestation was studied using mouse model. Balb/c mice were immunized using cockroach extract (CE) and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2 inhibitor. Airway hyperresponse (AHR), lung-histology, total and differential leukocyte count (TLC&DLC), Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. Exogenous LPC was given to the mice with or without CE sensitization, to demonstrate its role in allergic airway disease manifestation. Anti-CD1d antibody was given to study the involvement of natural killer T (NKT) cells in LPC induced response. AHR, lung-inflammation, TLC, DLC, Th2 type cytokines, sPLA2 activity and LPC levels were increased on CE challenge. sPLA2 activity and LPC release was blocked by sPLA2-inhibitor, which decreased AHR, and inflammatory parameters. Exogenous LPC with or without CE sensitization increased above parameters. CE challenge or LPC exposure increased LY49C(+)TCRβ(+) NKT cells in BALF and spleen, which was reduced by anti-CD1d antibody, accompanied with reduction in AHR and allergic airway inflammation parameters. Conclusively, LPC induces allergic airway disease manifestation and it does so probably via CD1d-restricted LY49C(+)TCRβ(+) NKT cells. PMID:27282246

  5. Advances in Surgical Treatment of Congenital Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Ragalie, William S; Mitchell, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) is frequently present in infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Infants with CHD and TBM appear to do worse than those without TBM. The principle of operative intervention for TBM is to improve function of the airway and clinical status. When indicated, conventional surgical options include tracheostomy, aortopexy, tracheoplasty, and anterior tracheal suspension. There is no consensus on the optimal treatment of severe tracheobonchomalacia, which can be associated with a mortality rate as high as 80%. Congenital tracheal stenosis is also frequently associated with CHD (vascular rings, atrioventricular canal defects, and septal defects) and may require concomitant repair. Repair of tracheal stenosis is often associated with distal TBM. This article addresses new techniques that can be performed in corrective surgery for both TBM and congenital tracheal stenosis. PMID:27568138

  6. In Utero Cigarette Smoke Affects Allergic Airway Disease But Does Not Alter the Lung Methylome.

    PubMed

    Eyring, Kenneth R; Pedersen, Brent S; Yang, Ivana V; Schwartz, David A

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal and postnatal cigarette smoke exposure enhances the risk of developing asthma. Despite this as well as other smoking related risks, 11% of women still smoke during pregnancy. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal development generates long lasting differential methylation altering transcriptional activity that correlates with disease. In a house dust mite (HDM) model of allergic airway disease, we measured airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation between mice exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (FA). DNA methylation and gene expression were then measured in lung tissue. We demonstrate that HDM-treated CS mice develop a more severe allergic airway disease compared to HDM-treated FA mice including increased AHR and airway inflammation. While DNA methylation changes between the two HDM-treated groups failed to reach genome-wide significance, 99 DMRs had an uncorrected p-value < 0.001. 6 of these 99 DMRs were selected for validation, based on the immune function of adjacent genes, and only 2 of the 6 DMRs confirmed the bisulfite sequencing data. Additionally, genes near these 6 DMRs (Lif, Il27ra, Tle4, Ptk7, Nfatc2, and Runx3) are differentially expressed between HDM-treated CS mice and HDM-treated FA mice. Our findings confirm that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is sufficient to modify allergic airway disease; however, it is unlikely that specific methylation changes account for the exposure-response relationship. These findings highlight the important role in utero cigarette smoke exposure plays in the development of allergic airway disease. PMID:26642056

  7. In Utero Cigarette Smoke Affects Allergic Airway Disease But Does Not Alter the Lung Methylome

    PubMed Central

    Eyring, Kenneth R.; Pedersen, Brent S.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal and postnatal cigarette smoke exposure enhances the risk of developing asthma. Despite this as well as other smoking related risks, 11% of women still smoke during pregnancy. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal development generates long lasting differential methylation altering transcriptional activity that correlates with disease. In a house dust mite (HDM) model of allergic airway disease, we measured airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway inflammation between mice exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (CS) or filtered air (FA). DNA methylation and gene expression were then measured in lung tissue. We demonstrate that HDM-treated CS mice develop a more severe allergic airway disease compared to HDM-treated FA mice including increased AHR and airway inflammation. While DNA methylation changes between the two HDM-treated groups failed to reach genome-wide significance, 99 DMRs had an uncorrected p-value < 0.001. 6 of these 99 DMRs were selected for validation, based on the immune function of adjacent genes, and only 2 of the 6 DMRs confirmed the bisulfite sequencing data. Additionally, genes near these 6 DMRs (Lif, Il27ra, Tle4, Ptk7, Nfatc2, and Runx3) are differentially expressed between HDM-treated CS mice and HDM-treated FA mice. Our findings confirm that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is sufficient to modify allergic airway disease; however, it is unlikely that specific methylation changes account for the exposure-response relationship. These findings highlight the important role in utero cigarette smoke exposure plays in the development of allergic airway disease. PMID:26642056

  8. Review of the upper airway, including olfaction, as mediator of symptoms.

    PubMed Central

    Shusterman, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    The upper airway serves as air conditioner, filter, and warning device. Two neurological modalities, olfaction and trigeminal chemoreception, inform us of the chemical qualities of the air we breathe. A number of poorly understood conditions, including nonallergic rhinitis, irritant-induced rhinitis, odor-triggered asthma, odor-triggered panic attacks, chemical-induced olfactory dysfunction, and irritant-associated vocal cord dysfunction, involve induction of symptoms by odorant and/or irritant chemicals in the upper airway. This article is a summary of the knowledge and theories about these various conditions, and highlights those aspects of nasal anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology relevant to their understanding. PMID:12194901

  9. Interdicting Gq Activation in Airway Disease by Receptor-Dependent and Receptor-Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Lam, Hong; An, Steven S; Tall, Gregory G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Gαqβγ heterotrimer (Gq), an important mediator in the pathology of airway disease, plays a central role in bronchoconstriction and airway remodeling, including airway smooth muscle growth and inflammation. Current therapeutic strategies to treat airway disease include the use of muscarinic and leukotriene receptor antagonists; however, these pharmaceuticals demonstrate a limited clinical efficacy as multiple Gq-coupled receptor subtypes contribute to these pathologies. Thus, broadly inhibiting the activation of Gq may be an advantageous therapeutic approach. Here, we investigated the effects of broadly inhibiting Gq activation in vitro and ex vivo using receptor-dependent and receptor-independent strategies. P4pal-10 is a protease activated receptor 4-derived pepducin that exhibits efficacy toward multiple Gq-coupled receptors. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that P4pal-10 selectively inhibits all G protein coupling to several Gq-coupled receptors, including protease activated receptor 1, muscarinic acetylcholine M3, and histamine H1 receptors, while demonstrating no direct effect on Gq. We also evaluated the ability of FR900359, also known as UBO-QIC, to directly inhibit Gq activation. FR900359 inhibited spontaneous Gαq nucleotide exchange, while having little effect on Gαsβγ, Gαiβγ, or Gα12/13βγ heterotrimer activity. Both P4pal-10 and FR900359 inhibited Gq-mediated intracellular signaling and primary human airway smooth muscle growth, whereas only FR900359 effectively interdicted agonist-promoted airway contraction in human precision cut lung slices. These studies serve as a proof of concept that the broad-based inhibition of Gq activation may be a useful therapeutic approach to treat multiple common pathologies of airway disease. PMID:26464325

  10. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol in airway disease.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lisa G; Wark, Peter A B; Garg, Manohar L

    2010-11-15

    Respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are a significant and increasing global health problem. These diseases are characterized by airway inflammation, which develops in response to various stimuli. In asthma, inflammation is driven by exposure to a variety of triggers, including allergens and viruses, which activate components of both the innate and acquired immune responses. In COPD, exposure to cigarette smoke is the primary stimulus of airway inflammation. Activation of airway inflammatory cells leads to the release of excessive quantities of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative stress. Antioxidants provide protection against the damaging effects of oxidative stress and thus may be useful in the management of inflammatory airways disease. Resveratrol, a polyphenol that demonstrates both antioxidative and anti-inflammatory functions, has been shown to improve outcomes in a variety of diseases, in particular, in cancer. We review the evidence for a protective role of resveratrol in respiratory disease. Mechanisms of resveratrol action that may be relevant to respiratory disease are described. We conclude that resveratrol has potential as a therapeutic agent in respiratory disease, which should be further investigated. PMID:20214495

  11. Vagal Afferent Innervation of the Airways in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Stuart B; Undem, Bradley J

    2016-07-01

    Vagal sensory neurons constitute the major afferent supply to the airways and lungs. Subsets of afferents are defined by their embryological origin, molecular profile, neurochemistry, functionality, and anatomical organization, and collectively these nerves are essential for the regulation of respiratory physiology and pulmonary defense through local responses and centrally mediated neural pathways. Mechanical and chemical activation of airway afferents depends on a myriad of ionic and receptor-mediated signaling, much of which has yet to be fully explored. Alterations in the sensitivity and neurochemical phenotype of vagal afferent nerves and/or the neural pathways that they innervate occur in a wide variety of pulmonary diseases, and as such, understanding the mechanisms of vagal sensory function and dysfunction may reveal novel therapeutic targets. In this comprehensive review we discuss historical and state-of-the-art concepts in airway sensory neurobiology and explore mechanisms underlying how vagal sensory pathways become dysfunctional in pathological conditions. PMID:27279650

  12. FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE RELATIVE POTENCY OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES AS ADJUVANTS IN ALLERGIC AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Description: Studies have shown that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) worsen respiratory diseases including allergic asthma. The adjuvant effects of DEP in the airways have been widely reported; however, the precise determinants and mechanisms of these effects are ill-defined. S...

  13. Insights into Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells in Human Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Karta, Maya R; Broide, David H; Doherty, Taylor A

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries have led to the identification of a novel group of immune cells, the innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). The members of this group are divided into three subpopulations: ILC1s, ILC2s, and ILC3s. ILC2s produce Th2 cytokines, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, upon activation by epithelial cell-derived cytokines, lipid mediators (cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2), and TNF family member TL1A and promote structural and immune cell responses in the airways after antigen exposure. In addition, ILC2 function is also influenced by inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS)/ICOS-ligand (ICOS-L) interactions via direct contact between immune cells. The most common airway antigens are allergens and viruses which are highly linked to the induction of airway diseases with underlying type 2 inflammation including asthma and allergic rhinitis. Based on recent findings linking ILC2s and airway Th2 responses, there is intensive investigation into the role of ILC2s in human disease with the hope of a better understanding of the pathophysiology and the discovery of novel potential therapeutic targets. This review summarizes the recent advances made in elucidating ILC2 involvement in human Th2 airway disease. PMID:26746844

  14. Oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction. Possible role in airway disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, W.J.; Martin, W.J. 2d.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of reactive species of oxygen on the airway are not well known. This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the structure and function of the airway epithelium. Tracheal rings were prepared from 200 g male rats. Damage to the airway epithelium was assayed by monitoring the ciliary beat frequency, the release of 51Cr, and histology. H2O2 at concentrations of 1.0 mM and above caused a very rapid decrease in ciliary beat frequency. After ten minutes' exposure to 1.0 mM, the ciliary beat frequency was 72 +/- 20 percent of control. Release of 51Cr was a less sensitive measure with significant release occurring after four hours of exposure to ciliotoxic concentrations of H2O2. Histologic changes were not evident within the experimental time period. All toxic effects of H2O2 were completely blocked by catalase. This study shows that H2O2 causes a rapid decline in ciliary activity and suggests that oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction could play a role in the pathogenesis of airway disease. The ciliary beat frequency provides a sensitive, physiologically relevant parameter for the in vitro study of these diseases.

  15. Divers' lung function: small airways disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, E; Segadal, K; Kambestad, B; Gulsvik, A

    1990-01-01

    Pulmonary function was measured in 152 professional saturation divers and in a matched control group of 106 subjects. Static lung volumes, dynamic lung volumes and flows, transfer factor for carbon monoxide (T1CO), transfer volume per unit alveolar volume (KCO), delta-N2, and closing volume (CV) were measured and compared with reference values from recent Scandinavian studies, British submariners, and the European Community for Coal and Steel (ECCS) recommended reference values. Diving exposure was assessed as years of diving experience, total number of days in saturation and depth, and as the product of days in saturation and mean depth. Divers had significantly lower values for forced expired volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio, FEF25-75%, FEF75-85%, FEF50%, FEF75%, T1CO, and KCO compared with the controls and a significantly higher CV. There was a positive correlation between diving exposure and CV, whereas the other variables had negative correlations with diving exposure. Values for the control group were not different from the predictive values of Scandinavian reference studies or British submariners, although the ECCS standard predicted significantly lower values for the lung function variables both in divers and the control group. The pattern of the differences in lung function variables between the divers and controls is consistent with small airways dysfunction and with the transient changes in lung function found immediately after a single saturation dive. The association between reduced pulmonary function and previous diving exposure further indicates the presence of cumulative long term effects of diving on pulmonary function. PMID:2393630

  16. Patterns of airway involvement in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Ilias; Kagouridis, Konstantinos; Papiris, Spyros A

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur commonly in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Pulmonary manifestations (PM) of IBD may be divided in airway disorders, interstitial lung disorders, serositis, pulmonary vasculitis, necrobiotic nodules, drug-induced lung disease, thromboembolic lung disease and enteropulmonary fistulas. Pulmonary involvement may often be asymptomatic and detected solely on the basis of abnormal screening tests. The common embryonic origin of the intestine and the lungs from the primitive foregut, the co-existence of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue in both organs, autoimmunity, smoking and bacterial translocation from the colon to the lungs may all be involved in the pathogenesis of PM in IBD. PM are mainly detected by pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography. This review will focus on the involvement of the airways in the context of IBD, especially stenoses of the large airways, tracheobronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchitis, mucoid impaction, bronchial granulomas, bronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and the co-existence of IBD with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sarcoidosis and a1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:25400999

  17. [Environmental causes of the distal airways disease. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis and rare causes].

    PubMed

    Dalphin, J-C; Didier, A

    2013-10-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is one of the most frequent causes of distal airways disease. It is associated with inflammation of the bronchioles, predominantly by lymphocytic infiltrates, and with granuloma formation causing bronchial obstruction. This inflammation explains the clinical manifestations and the airways obstruction seen on pulmonary function tests, most often in the distal airways but proximal in almost 20%. CT scan abnormalities reflect the lymphocytic infiltrates and air trapping and, in some cases, the presence of emphysema. Bronchiolitis induced by chronic inhalation of mineral particles or acute inhalation of toxic gases (such as NO2) are other examples of small airways damage due to environmental exposure. The pathophysiological mechanisms are different and bronchiolar damage is either exclusive or predominant. Bronchiolitis induced by tobacco smoke exposure, usually classified as interstitial pneumonitis, is easily diagnosed thanks to broncho-alveolar lavage. Its prognosis is linked to the other consequences of tobacco smoke exposure including respiratory insufficiency. Finally, the complex lung exposure observed in some rare cases (such as the World Trade Center fire or during wars) may lead to a less characteristic pattern of small airways disease. PMID:24182653

  18. IL-6 trans-signaling increases expression of airways disease genes in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mac B; Deshpande, Deepak A; Chou, Jeffery; Cui, Wei; Smith, Shelly; Langefeld, Carl; Hastie, Annette T; Bleecker, Eugene R; Hawkins, Gregory A

    2015-07-15

    Genetic data suggest that IL-6 trans-signaling may have a pathogenic role in the lung; however, the effects of IL-6 trans-signaling on lung effector cells have not been investigated. In this study, human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells were treated with IL-6 (classical) or IL-6+sIL6R (trans-signaling) for 24 h and gene expression was measured by RNAseq. Intracellular signaling and transcription factor activation were assessed by Western blotting and luciferase assay, respectively. The functional effect of IL-6 trans-signaling was determined by proliferation assay. IL-6 trans-signaling had no effect on phosphoinositide-3 kinase and Erk MAP kinase pathways in HASM cells. Both classical and IL-6 trans-signaling in HASM involves activation of Stat3. However, the kinetics of Stat3 phosphorylation by IL-6 trans-signaling was different than classical IL-6 signaling. This was further reflected in the differential gene expression profile by IL-6 trans-signaling in HASM cells. Under IL-6 trans-signaling conditions 36 genes were upregulated, including PLA2G2A, IL13RA1, MUC1, and SOD2. Four genes, including CCL11, were downregulated at least twofold. The expression of 112 genes was divergent between IL-6 classical and trans-signaling, including the genes HILPDA, NNMT, DAB2, MUC1, WWC1, and VEGFA. Pathway analysis revealed that IL-6 trans-signaling induced expression of genes involved in regulation of airway remodeling, immune response, hypoxia, and glucose metabolism. Treatment of HASM cells with IL-6+sIL6R induced proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion, suggesting a role for IL-6 trans-signaling in asthma pathogenesis. These novel findings demonstrate differential effect of IL-6 trans-signaling on airway cells and identify IL-6 trans-signaling as a potential modifier of airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:26001777

  19. Repurposing tromethamine as inhaled therapy to treat CF airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Launspach, Janice L.; Sheets, Kelsey A.; Rivera, Jade A.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Thorne, Peter S.; Welsh, Michael J.; Stoltz, David A.; Zabner, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), loss of CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel activity causes airway surface liquid (ASL) pH to become acidic, which impairs airway host defenses. One potential therapeutic approach is to correct the acidic pH in CF airways by aerosolizing HCO3− and/or nonbicarbonate pH buffers. Here, we show that raising ASL pH with inhaled HCO3− increased pH. However, the effect was transient, and pH returned to baseline values within 30 minutes. Tromethamine (Tham) is a buffer with a long serum half-life used as an i.v. formulation to treat metabolic acidosis. We found that Tham aerosols increased ASL pH in vivo for at least 2 hours and enhanced bacterial killing. Inhaled hypertonic saline (7% NaCl) is delivered to people with CF in an attempt to promote mucus clearance. Because an increased ionic strength inhibits ASL antimicrobial factors, we added Tham to hypertonic saline and applied it to CF sputum. We found that Tham alone and in combination with hypertonic saline increased pH and enhanced bacterial killing. These findings suggest that aerosolizing the HCO3−-independent buffer Tham, either alone or in combination with hypertonic saline, might be of therapeutic benefit in CF airway disease. PMID:27390778

  20. Relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and airway diseases: the airway reflux paradigm.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Galván, Adalberto; Hart, Simon P; Morice, Alyn H

    2011-04-01

    Our understanding of the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux and respiratory disease has recently undergone important changes. The previous paradigm of airway reflux as synonymous with the classic gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) causing heartburn has been overturned. Numerous epidemiological studies have shown a highly significant association of the acid, liquid, and gaseous reflux of GORD with conditions such as laryngeal diseases, chronic rhinosinusitis, treatment resistant asthma, COPD and even idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, it has become clear from studies on cough hypersensitivity syndrome that much reflux of importance in the airways has been missed, since it is either non- or weakly acid and gaseous in composition. The evidence for such a relationship relies on the clinical history pointing to symptom associations with known precipitants of reflux. The tools for the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal reflux, in contrast to the oesophageal reflux of GORD, lack sensitivity and reproducibility. Unfortunately, methodology for detecting such reflux is only just becoming available and much additional work is required to properly delineate its role. PMID:21459504

  1. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the airway: role in airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Grace, M S; Baxter, M; Dubuis, E; Birrell, M A; Belvisi, M G

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, there has been an explosion of scientific publications reporting the many and varied roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in physiological and pathological systems throughout the body. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing literature on the role of TRP channels in the lungs and discuss what is known about their function under normal and diseased conditions. The review will focus mainly on the pathogenesis and symptoms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the role of four members of the TRP family: TRPA1, TRPV1, TRPV4 and TRPM8. We hope that the article will help the reader understand the role of TRP channels in the normal airway and how their function may be changed in the context of respiratory disease. PMID:24286227

  2. Within-breath respiratory impedance and airway obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Karla Kristine Dames; Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Lopes, Agnaldo José; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent work has suggested that within-breath respiratory impedance measurements performed using the forced oscillation technique may help to noninvasively evaluate respiratory mechanics. We investigated the influence of airway obstruction on the within-breath forced oscillation technique in smokers and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the contribution of this analysis to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS: Twenty healthy individuals and 20 smokers were assessed. The study also included 74 patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We evaluated the mean respiratory impedance (Zm) as well as values for the inspiration (Zi) and expiration cycles (Ze) at the beginning of inspiration (Zbi) and expiration (Zbe), respectively. The peak-to-peak impedance (Zpp=Zbe-Zbi) and the respiratory cycle dependence (ΔZrs=Ze-Zi) were also analyzed. The diagnostic utility was evaluated by investigating the sensitivity, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01888705. RESULTS: Airway obstruction increased the within-breath respiratory impedance parameters that were significantly correlated with the spirometric indices of airway obstruction (R=−0.65, p<0.0001). In contrast to the control subjects and the smokers, the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients presented significant expiratory-inspiratory differences (p<0.002). The adverse effects of moderate airway obstruction were detected based on the Zpp with an accuracy of 83%. Additionally, abnormal effects in severe and very severe patients were detected based on the Zm, Zi, Ze, Zbe, Zpp and ΔZrs with a high degree of accuracy (>90%). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude the following: (1) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease introduces higher respiratory cycle dependence, (2) this increase is proportional to airway obstruction, and (3) the within-breath forced oscillation technique may

  3. Incense smoke: clinical, structural and molecular effects on airway disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ta-Chang; Krishnaswamy, Guha; Chi, David S

    2008-01-01

    In Asian countries where the Buddhism and Taoism are mainstream religions, incense burning is a daily practice. A typical composition of stick incense consists of 21% (by weight) of herbal and wood powder, 35% of fragrance material, 11% of adhesive powder, and 33% of bamboo stick. Incense smoke (fumes) contains particulate matter (PM), gas products and many organic compounds. On average, incense burning produces particulates greater than 45 mg/g burned as compared to 10 mg/g burned for cigarettes. The gas products from burning incense include CO, CO2, NO2, SO2, and others. Incense burning also produces volatile organic compounds, such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes, as well as aldehydes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The air pollution in and around various temples has been documented to have harmful effects on health. When incense smoke pollutants are inhaled, they cause respiratory system dysfunction. Incense smoke is a risk factor for elevated cord blood IgE levels and has been indicated to cause allergic contact dermatitis. Incense smoke also has been associated with neoplasm and extracts of particulate matter from incense smoke are found to be mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella test with TA98 and activation. In order to prevent airway disease and other health problem, it is advisable that people should reduce the exposure time when they worship at the temple with heavy incense smokes, and ventilate their house when they burn incense at home. PMID:18439280

  4. Lung clearance index in the assessment of airways disease.

    PubMed

    Horsley, Alex

    2009-06-01

    In the last few years there has been a growing interest in lung clearance index (LCI), a measure of lung physiology derived from multiple breath washout tests. This resurgence of interest was initially driven by the recognition that such assessments were capable of detecting early airways disease in children, and are more sensitive and easier to perform in this population than conventional lung function tests [Aurora P, Kozlowska W, Stocks J. Gas mixing efficiency from birth to adulthood measured by multiple-breath washout. Respir Physiol Neurobiol, 2005;148(1-2):125-39]. With an appreciation of the importance of earlier identification of airways dysfunction, and prevention of irreversible structural airway changes, methods of following airways disease in these "silent years" are especially important. LCI has now been reported in studies involving all age groups, from infants to adults [Lum S, Gustafsson P, Ljungberg H, Hulskamp G, Bush A, Carr SB, et al. Early detection of cystic fibrosis lung disease: multiple-breath washout versus raised volume tests. Thorax, 2007;62(4):341-7; Horsley AR, Gustafsson PM, Macleod K, Saunders CJ, Greening AP, Porteous D, et al. Lung clearance index is a sensitive, repeatable and practical measure of airways disease in adults with cystic fibrosis. Thorax, 2008;63:135-40], and has a narrow range of normal over this wide age range, making it especially suitable for long-term follow-up studies. In cystic fibrosis (CF) particularly, there is a pressing need for sensitive and repeatable clinical endpoints for therapeutic interventions [Rosenfeld M. An overview of endpoints for cystic fibrosis clinical trials: one size does not fit all. Proc Am Thorac Soc, 2007;4(4):299-301], and LCI has been proposed as an outcome measure in future CF gene therapy studies [Davies JC, Cunningham S, Alton EW, Innes JA. Lung clearance index in CF: a sensitive marker of lung disease severity. Thorax, 2008;63(2):96-7]. This review will consider how LCI is

  5. What's in a name? Inflammatory airway disease in racehorses in training.

    PubMed

    Cardwell, J M; Christley, R M; Gerber, V; Malikides, N; Wood, J L N; Newton, J R; Hodgson, J L

    2011-11-01

    The term 'inflammatory airway disease' (IAD) is often used to describe the syndrome of lower airway inflammation that frequently affects young racehorses in training around the world. In practice, this inflammation is generally diagnosed using a combination of endoscopic tracheal examination, including grading of amounts of mucus present and tracheal wash sampling. However, a recent consensus statement from the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine concluded that bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) sampling, rather than tracheal wash (TW) sampling, is required for cytological diagnosis of IAD and that tracheal mucus is not an essential criterion. However, as BAL is a relatively invasive procedure that is not commonly used on racing yards, this definition can only be applied routinely to a biased referral population. In contrast, many practitioners continue to diagnose IAD using endoscopic tracheal examination and sampling. We argue that, rather than restricting the use of the term IAD to phenotypes diagnosed by BAL, it is important to distinguish in the literature between airway inflammation diagnosed by BAL and that identified in the field using TW sampling. We suggest the use of the term brIAD for the former and trIAD for the latter. It is essential that we continue to endeavour to improve our understanding of the aetiology, pathogenesis and clinical relevance of airway inflammation identified in racehorses in training using tracheal examination and sampling. Future studies should focus on investigations of the component signs of airway inflammation. PMID:21668488

  6. Upper Airway Genioglossal Activity in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingtao; Pinto, Swaroop J.; Allen, Julian L.; Arens, Raanan; Bowdre, Cheryl Y.; Jawad, Abbas F.; Mason, Thornton B.A.; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Marcus, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in sickle cell disease (SCD) has been reported to be higher than that in the general pediatric population. However, not all subjects with SCD develop OSAS. We hypothesized that SCD patients with OSAS have a blunted neuromuscular response to subatmospheric pressure loads during sleep, making them more likely to develop upper airway collapse. Design: Subjects with SCD with and without OSAS underwent pressure-flow measurements during sleep using intraoral surface electrodes to measure genioglossal EMG (EMGgg). Two techniques were applied to decrease the nasal pressure (PN) to subatmospheric levels, resulting in an activated and relatively hypotonic upper airway. The area under the curve of the inspiratory EMGgg moving time average was analyzed. EMGgg activity was expressed as a percentage of baseline. Changes in EMGgg in response to decrements in nasal pressure were expressed as the slope of the EMGgg vs. nasal pressure (slope of EMGgg-PN). Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: 4 children with SCD and OSAS and 18 children with SCD but without OSAS. Results: The major findings of this study were: (1) using the activated but not the hypotonic technique, the slope of EMGgg-PN was more negative in SCD controls than SCD OSAS; (2) the slope of EMGgg-PN was significantly lower using the activated technique compared to the hypotonic technique in SCD controls only; (3) similarly, the critical closing pressure, Pcrit, was more negative using the activated technique than the hypotonic technique in SCD controls but not in SCD OSAS. Conclusion: This preliminary study has shown that children with SCD but without OSAS have more prominent upper airway reflexes than children with SCD and OSAS. Citation: Huang J; Pinto SJ; Allen JL; Arens R; Bowdre CY; Jawad AF; Mason TBA; Ohene-Frempong K; Smith-Whitely K; Marcus CL. Upper airway genioglossal activity in children with sickle cell disease. SLEEP 2011

  7. A Novel Nonhuman Primate Model of Cigarette Smoke–Induced Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polverino, Francesca; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; McDonald, Jacob; Wilder, Julie A.; Royer, Christopher; Laucho-Contreras, Maria; Kelly, Emer M.; Divo, Miguel; Pinto-Plata, Victor; Mauderly, Joe; Celli, Bartolome R.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Owen, Caroline A.

    2016-01-01

    Small animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have several limitations for identifying new therapeutic targets and biomarkers for human COPD. These include a pulmonary anatomy that differs from humans, the limited airway pathologies and lymphoid aggregates that develop in smoke-exposed mice, and the challenges associated with serial biological sampling. Thus, we assessed the utility of cigarette smoke (CS)–exposed cynomolgus macaque as a nonhuman primate (NHP) large animal model of COPD. Twenty-eight NHPs were exposed to air or CS 5 days per week for up to 12 weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage and pulmonary function tests were performed at intervals. After 12 weeks, we measured airway pathologies, pulmonary inflammation, and airspace enlargement. CS-exposed NHPs developed robust mucus metaplasia, submucosal gland hypertrophy and hyperplasia, airway inflammation, peribronchial fibrosis, and increases in bronchial lymphoid aggregates. Although CS-exposed NHPs did not develop emphysema over the study time, they exhibited pathologies that precede emphysema development, including increases in the following: i) matrix metalloproteinase-9 and proinflammatory mediator levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, ii) lung parenchymal leukocyte counts and lymphoid aggregates, iii) lung oxidative stress levels, and iv) alveolar septal cell apoptosis. CS-exposed NHPs can be used as a model of airway disease occurring in COPD patients. Unlike rodents, NHPs can safely undergo longitudinal sampling, which could be useful for assessing novel biomarkers or therapeutics for COPD. PMID:25542772

  8. A novel nonhuman primate model of cigarette smoke-induced airway disease.

    PubMed

    Polverino, Francesca; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; McDonald, Jacob; Wilder, Julie A; Royer, Christopher; Laucho-Contreras, Maria; Kelly, Emer M; Divo, Miguel; Pinto-Plata, Victor; Mauderly, Joe; Celli, Bartolome R; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Owen, Caroline A

    2015-03-01

    Small animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have several limitations for identifying new therapeutic targets and biomarkers for human COPD. These include a pulmonary anatomy that differs from humans, the limited airway pathologies and lymphoid aggregates that develop in smoke-exposed mice, and the challenges associated with serial biological sampling. Thus, we assessed the utility of cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed cynomolgus macaque as a nonhuman primate (NHP) large animal model of COPD. Twenty-eight NHPs were exposed to air or CS 5 days per week for up to 12 weeks. Bronchoalveolar lavage and pulmonary function tests were performed at intervals. After 12 weeks, we measured airway pathologies, pulmonary inflammation, and airspace enlargement. CS-exposed NHPs developed robust mucus metaplasia, submucosal gland hypertrophy and hyperplasia, airway inflammation, peribronchial fibrosis, and increases in bronchial lymphoid aggregates. Although CS-exposed NHPs did not develop emphysema over the study time, they exhibited pathologies that precede emphysema development, including increases in the following: i) matrix metalloproteinase-9 and proinflammatory mediator levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, ii) lung parenchymal leukocyte counts and lymphoid aggregates, iii) lung oxidative stress levels, and iv) alveolar septal cell apoptosis. CS-exposed NHPs can be used as a model of airway disease occurring in COPD patients. Unlike rodents, NHPs can safely undergo longitudinal sampling, which could be useful for assessing novel biomarkers or therapeutics for COPD. PMID:25542772

  9. Mucosal-associated invariant T cells in autoimmunity, immune-mediated diseases and airways disease.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Timothy S C

    2016-05-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a novel class of innate-like T cells, expressing a semi-invariant T-cell receptor (TCR) and able to recognize small molecules presented on the non-polymorphic MHC-related protein 1. Their intrinsic effector-memory phenotype, enabling secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and their relative abundance in humans imply a significant potential to contribute to autoimmune processes. However, as MAIT cells were unknown until recently and specific immunological tools were unavailable, little is known of their roles in disease. Here I review observations from clinical studies and animal models of autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases including the roles of MAIT cells in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease and airways diseases. MAIT cell deficiencies are frequently observed in peripheral blood, and at sites of disease such as the airways in asthma. However, MAIT cells have a specific sensitivity to suppression by therapeutic corticosteroids that may confound many of these observations, as may the tendency of the surface marker CD161 to activation-induced down-regulation. Nonetheless, the dependence on bacteria for the development of MAIT cells suggests a potentially important protective role linking the influences of early life microbial exposures and subsequent development of autoimmunity. Conversely, MAIT cells could contribute to chronic inflammation either through TCR-independent activation, or potentially by TCR recognition of as yet undiscovered ligands. Future research will be greatly facilitated by the immunological tools that are now available, including murine genetic models and human and murine specific tetramers. PMID:26778581

  10. Serum periostin in obstructive airways disease.

    PubMed

    Fingleton, James; Braithwaite, Irene; Travers, Justin; Bowles, Darren; Strik, Rianne; Siebers, Rob; Holweg, Cecile; Matthews, John; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Serum periostin is a potential biomarker of response to therapies that target type 2 inflammation in asthma. The objectives of this study were to describe: 1) the distribution of serum periostin levels in adults with symptomatic airflow obstruction; 2) its relationship with other variables, including type 2 biomarkers; and 3) the effect of inhaled corticosteroids on periostin levels.Serum periostin levels were measured in a cross-sectional study exploring phenotypes and biomarkers in 386 patients aged 18-75 years who reported wheeze and breathlessness in the past 12 months. In 49 ICS-naïve patients, periostin levels were measured again after 12 weeks of budesonide (800 μg·day(-1)).The distribution of serum periostin levels was right skewed (mean±sd 57.3±18.6 ng·mL(-1), median (interquartile range) 54.0 (45.1-65.6) ng·mL(-1), range 15.0-164.7 ng·mL(-1)). Periostin was positively associated with exhaled nitric oxide (Spearman's rho=0.22, p<0.001), blood eosinophil count (Spearman's rho=0.21, p<0.001), and total IgE (Spearman's rho=0.14, p=0.007). The Hodges-Lehmann estimator (95% CI) of change in periostin level after ICS therapy was -4.8 (-6.7- -3.2) ng·mL(-1) (p<0.001).These findings provide data on the distribution of serum periostin in adults with symptomatic airflow obstruction, the weak associations between periostin and other type 2 markers, and the reduction in periostin with inhaled corticosteroid therapy. PMID:26917610

  11. Serum periostin in obstructive airways disease

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Irene; Travers, Justin; Bowles, Darren; Strik, Rianne; Siebers, Rob; Holweg, Cecile; Matthews, John; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Serum periostin is a potential biomarker of response to therapies that target type 2 inflammation in asthma. The objectives of this study were to describe: 1) the distribution of serum periostin levels in adults with symptomatic airflow obstruction; 2) its relationship with other variables, including type 2 biomarkers; and 3) the effect of inhaled corticosteroids on periostin levels. Serum periostin levels were measured in a cross-sectional study exploring phenotypes and biomarkers in 386 patients aged 18–75 years who reported wheeze and breathlessness in the past 12 months. In 49 ICS-naïve patients, periostin levels were measured again after 12 weeks of budesonide (800 μg·day−1). The distribution of serum periostin levels was right skewed (mean±sd 57.3±18.6 ng·mL−1, median (interquartile range) 54.0 (45.1–65.6) ng·mL−1, range 15.0–164.7 ng·mL−1). Periostin was positively associated with exhaled nitric oxide (Spearman's rho=0.22, p<0.001), blood eosinophil count (Spearman's rho=0.21, p<0.001), and total IgE (Spearman's rho=0.14, p=0.007). The Hodges–Lehmann estimator (95% CI) of change in periostin level after ICS therapy was −4.8 (−6.7– −3.2) ng·mL−1 (p<0.001). These findings provide data on the distribution of serum periostin in adults with symptomatic airflow obstruction, the weak associations between periostin and other type 2 markers, and the reduction in periostin with inhaled corticosteroid therapy. PMID:26917610

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells and serelaxin synergistically abrogate established airway fibrosis in an experimental model of chronic allergic airways disease.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Shen, Matthew; Patel, Krupesh P; Huuskes, Brooke M; Ricardo, Sharon D; Samuel, Chrishan S

    2015-11-01

    This study determined if the anti-fibrotic drug, serelaxin (RLN), could augment human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated reversal of airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) associated with chronic allergic airways disease (AAD/asthma). Female Balb/c mice subjected to the 9-week model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced chronic AAD were either untreated or treated with MSCs alone, RLN alone or both combined from weeks 9-11. Changes in airway inflammation (AI), epithelial thickness, goblet cell metaplasia, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression, myofibroblast differentiation, subepithelial and total lung collagen deposition, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression, and AHR were then assessed. MSCs alone modestly reversed OVA-induced subepithelial and total collagen deposition, and increased MMP-9 levels above that induced by OVA alone (all p<0.05 vs OVA group). RLN alone more broadly reversed OVA-induced epithelial thickening, TGF-β1 expression, myofibroblast differentiation, airway fibrosis and AHR (all p<0.05 vs OVA group). Combination treatment further reversed OVA-induced AI and airway/lung fibrosis compared to either treatment alone (all p<0.05 vs either treatment alone), and further increased MMP-9 levels. RLN appeared to enhance the therapeutic effects of MSCs in a chronic disease setting; most likely a consequence of the ability of RLN to limit TGF-β1-induced matrix synthesis complemented by the MMP-promoting effects of MSCs. PMID:26426509

  13. Pathway Reconstruction of Airway Remodeling in Chronic Lung Diseases: A Systems Biology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Ali; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohamad-Reza; Moeini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Airway remodeling is a pathophysiologic process at the clinical, cellular, and molecular level relating to chronic obstructive airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma and mustard lung. These diseases are associated with the dysregulation of multiple molecular pathways in the airway cells. Little progress has so far been made in discovering the molecular causes of complex disease in a holistic systems manner. Therefore, pathway and network reconstruction is an essential part of a systems biology approach to solve this challenging problem. In this paper, multiple data sources were used to construct the molecular process of airway remodeling pathway in mustard lung as a model of airway disease. We first compiled a master list of genes that change with airway remodeling in the mustard lung disease and then reconstructed the pathway by generating and merging the protein-protein interaction and the gene regulatory networks. Experimental observations and literature mining were used to identify and validate the master list. The outcome of this paper can provide valuable information about closely related chronic obstructive airway diseases which are of great importance for biologists and their future research. Reconstructing the airway remodeling interactome provides a starting point and reference for the future experimental study of mustard lung, and further analysis and development of these maps will be critical to understanding airway diseases in patients. PMID:24978043

  14. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  15. Smokers with emphysema and small airway disease on computed tomography have lower bone density

    PubMed Central

    Pompe, Esther; de Jong, Pim A; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Gallardo Estrella, Leticia; de Jong, Werner U; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Oudkerk, Matthijs; van der Aalst, Carlijn M; van Ginneken, Bram; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus AA

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is more common in patients with COPD and in smokers. The aim of this study was to assess whether measures of emphysema and airway disease on computed tomography (CT) were associated with lower bone density or vertebral fractures in smokers with and without COPD. For this purpose, we included participants from the NELSON lung cancer screening trial. Bone density was measured as Hounsfield Units in the first lumbar vertebra, and vertebral fractures were assessed semiquantitatively. The 15th percentile method (Perc15) was used to assess emphysema, and the airway lumen perimeter (Pi10) was used for airway wall thickness. Expiratory/inspiratory-ratiomean lung density (E/I-ratioMLD) was used as a measure for air trapping and tracheal index to assess tracheal deformity. Linear regression models and logistic regression models were used to assess associations between CT biomarkers, bone density, and presence of fractures. Exactly 1,093 male participants were eligible for analysis. Lower Perc15 and higher E/I-ratioMLD were significantly associated with lower bone density (b=−1.27, P=0.02 and b=−0.37, P=0.02, respectively). Pi10 and tracheal index were not associated with bone density changes. CT-derived biomarkers were not associated with fracture prevalence. Bone density is lower with increasing extent of emphysema and small airway disease but is not associated with large airway disease and tracheal deformity. This may indicate the necessity to measure bone density early in smokers with emphysema and air trapping to prevent vertebral fractures. PMID:27354779

  16. Early events in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Smoking-induced reprogramming of airway epithelial basal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-12-01

    The airway epithelium is the primary site of the earliest pathologic changes induced by smoking, contributing to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The normal human airway epithelium is composed of several major cell types, including differentiated ciliated and secretory cells, intermediate undifferentiated cells, and basal cells (BC). BC contain the stem/progenitor cell population responsible for maintenance of the normally differentiated airway epithelium. Although inflammatory and immune processes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of COPD, the earliest lesions include hyperplasia of the BC population, suggesting that the disease may start with this cell type. Apart from BC hyperplasia, smoking induces a number of COPD-relevant airway epithelial remodeling phenotypes that are likely initiated in the BC population, including mucous cell hyperplasia, squamous cell metaplasia, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, altered ciliated and nonmucous secretory cell differentiation, and suppression of junctional barrier integrity. Significant progress has been recently made in understanding the biology of human airway BC, including gene expression features, stem/progenitor, and other functions, including interaction with other airway cell types. Accumulating evidence suggests that human airway BC function as both sensors and cellular sources of various cytokines and growth factors relevant to smoking-associated airway injury, as well as the origin of various molecular and histological phenotypes relevant to the pathogenesis of COPD. In the context of these considerations, we suggest that early BC-specific smoking-induced molecular changes are critical to the pathogenesis of COPD, and these represent a candidate target for novel therapeutic approaches to prevent COPD progression in susceptible individuals. PMID:25525728

  17. Tracheobronchomalacia/excessive dynamic airway collapse in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with persistent expiratory wheeze: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sindhwani, Girish; Sodhi, Rakhee; Saini, Manju; Jethani, Varuna; Khanduri, Sushant; Singh, Baltej

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) refers to a condition in which structural integrity of cartilaginous wall of trachea is lost. Excessive dynamic airway collapse (EDAC) is characterized by excessive invagination of posterior wall of trachea. In both these conditions, airway lumen gets compromised, especially during expiration, which can lead to symptoms such as breathlessness, cough, and wheezing. Both these conditions can be present in obstructive lung diseases; TBM due to chronic airway inflammation and EDAC due to dynamic compressive forces during expiration. The present study was planned with the hypothesis that TBM/EDAC could also produce expiratory wheeze in patients with obstructive airway disorders. Hence, prevalence and factors affecting presence of this entity in patients with obstructive airway diseases were the aims and objectives of this study. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients with obstructive airway disorders (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] or bronchial asthma), who were stable on medical management, but having persistent expiratory wheezing, were included in the study. They were evaluated for TBM/EDAC by bronchoscopy and computed tomographic scan of chest. The presence of TBM/EDAC was correlated with variables including age, sex, body mass index (BMI), smoking index, level of dyspnea, and severity of disease. Results: Mean age of the patients was 62.7 ± 7.81 years. Out of 25 patients, 14 were males. TBM/EDAC was found in 40% of study subjects. Age, sex, BMI, severity of disease, frequency of exacerbations and radiological findings etc., were not found to have any association with presence of TBM/EDAC. Conclusion: TBM/EDAC is common in patients with obstructive airway disorders and should be evaluated in these patients, especially with persistent expiratory wheezing as diagnosis of this entity could provide another treatment option in these patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management. PMID:27578929

  18. Volumetric capnography for the evaluation of chronic airways diseases

    PubMed Central

    Veronez, Liliani; Pereira, Monica Corso; Doria da Silva, Silvia Maria; Barcaui, Luisa Affi; De Capitani, Eduardo Mello; Moreira, Marcos Mello; Paschoal, Ilma Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive lung diseases of different etiologies present with progressive peripheral airway involvement. The peripheral airways, known as the silent lung zone, are not adequately evaluated with conventional function tests. The principle of gas washout has been used to detect pulmonary ventilation inhomogeneity and to estimate the location of the underlying disease process. Volumetric capnography (VC) analyzes the pattern of CO2 elimination as a function of expired volume. Objective To measure normalized phase 3 slopes with VC in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCB) and in bronchitic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in order to compare the slopes obtained for the groups. Methods NCB and severe COPD were enrolled sequentially from an outpatient clinic (Hospital of the State University of Campinas). A control group was established for the NCB group, paired by sex and age. All subjects performed spirometry, VC, and the 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT). Two comparisons were made: NCB group versus its control group, and NCB group versus COPD group. The project was approved by the ethical committee of the institution. Statistical tests used were Wilcoxon or Student’s t-test; P<0.05 was considered to be a statistically significant difference. Results Concerning the NCB group (N=20) versus the control group (N=20), significant differences were found in body mass index and in several functional variables (spirometric, VC, 6MWT) with worse results observed in the NCB group. In the comparison between the COPD group (N=20) versus the NCB group, although patients with COPD had worse spirometric and 6MWT values, the capnographic variables mean phase 2 slope (Slp2), mean phase 3 slope normalized by the mean expiratory volume, or mean phase 3 slope normalized by the end-tidal CO2 concentration were similar. Conclusion These findings may indicate that the gas elimination curves are not sensitive enough to monitor the severity of

  19. THE SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RAT: AN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF SULFUR DIOXIDE-INDUCED AIRWAYS DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airway obstruction, inflammation and mucus hypersecretion; features that capture bronchitis, emphysema and often asthma. However, current rodent models do not reflect this human disease. Because genetically predisp...

  20. NEUROTROPHIN MEDIATION OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES TO INHALED DIESEL PARTICLES IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway hyper-responsiveness. Diesel exhaust particulates (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbate many of these allergic airways respons...

  1. A Biophysical Basis for Mucus Solids Concentration as a Candidate Biomarker for Airways Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David B.; Vasquez, Paula A.; Mellnik, John; McKinley, Scott A.; Vose, Aaron; Mu, Frank; Henderson, Ashley G.; Donaldson, Scott H.; Alexis, Neil E.; Boucher, Richard C.; Forest, M. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    In human airways diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), host defense is compromised and airways inflammation and infection often result. Mucus clearance and trapping of inhaled pathogens constitute key elements of host defense. Clearance rates are governed by mucus viscous and elastic moduli at physiological driving frequencies, whereas transport of trapped pathogens in mucus layers is governed by diffusivity. There is a clear need for simple and effective clinical biomarkers of airways disease that correlate with these properties. We tested the hypothesis that mucus solids concentration, indexed as weight percent solids (wt%), is such a biomarker. Passive microbead rheology was employed to determine both diffusive and viscoelastic properties of mucus harvested from human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cultures. Guided by sputum from healthy (1.5–2.5 wt%) and diseased (COPD, CF; 5 wt%) subjects, mucus samples were generated in vitro to mimic in vivo physiology, including intermediate range wt% to represent disease progression. Analyses of microbead datasets showed mucus diffusive properties and viscoelastic moduli scale robustly with wt%. Importantly, prominent changes in both biophysical properties arose at ∼4 wt%, consistent with a gel transition (from a more viscous-dominated solution to a more elastic-dominated gel). These findings have significant implications for: (1) penetration of cilia into the mucus layer and effectiveness of mucus transport; and (2) diffusion vs. immobilization of micro-scale particles relevant to mucus barrier properties. These data provide compelling evidence for mucus solids concentration as a baseline clinical biomarker of mucus barrier and clearance functions. PMID:24558372

  2. Take the Wnt out of the inflammatory sails: modulatory effects of Wnt in airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Sebastian; Beckert, Hendrik; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic diseases that are associated with inflammation and structural changes in the airways and lungs. Recent findings have implicated Wnt pathways in critically regulating inflammatory responses, especially in asthma. Furthermore, canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathways are involved in structural changes such as airway remodeling, goblet cell metaplasia, and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation. In COPD, Wnt pathways are not only associated with structural changes in the airways but also involved in the development of emphysema. The present review summarizes the role and function of the canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathway with regard to airway inflammation and structural changes in asthma and COPD. Further identification of the role and function of different Wnt molecules and pathways could help to develop novel therapeutic options for these diseases. PMID:26595171

  3. The role of airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells in chronic respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Michael J.; Byers, Derek E.; Alexander-Brett, Jennifer; Wang, Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    An abnormal immune response to environmental agents is generally thought to be responsible for causing chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Based on studies of experimental models and human subjects, there is increasing evidence that the response of the innate immune system is crucial for the development of this type of airway disease. Airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells represent key components of the pathogenesis of chronic airway disease and are emerging targets for new therapies. In this Review, we summarize the innate immune mechanisms by which airway epithelial cells and innate immune cells regulate the development of chronic respiratory diseases. We also explain how these pathways are being targeted in the clinic to treat patients with these diseases. PMID:25234144

  4. Occupational rhinitis and occupational asthma; one airway two diseases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seed, M. J.; Gittins, M.; DeVocht, F.; Agius, R. M.

    2009-02-01

    The concept of 'one airway, one disease' refers to the frequent comorbidity of asthma and rhinitis. However, only limited research has been done on this association for the diverse range of occupational respiratory sensitisers. The relative frequency of rhinitis was determined for the 15 respiratory sensitisers reported to cause at least 10 cases of rhinitis or asthma to The Health and Occupation Reporting (THOR) network between 1997 and 2006. Of 1408 cases, 1190 were sole diagnoses of asthma, 138 sole diagnoses of rhinitis and in 80 cases asthma coexisted with rhinitis. The six sensitisers for which rhinitis featured in over 15% of cases were all particulates and known to cause release of mast cell mediators, either directly or through IgE antibodies. Four of the other nine sensitisers often exist as vapours and only two have been consistently associated with IgE-mediated disease mechanisms. Particle size did not appear to correlate with the relative frequency of rhinitis. Despite its limitations this study would support the hypothesis that there are at least two mechanistic categories of respiratory sensitisation with rhinitis being relatively more common where the mechanism is IgE-mediated. Particulate nature may be another important factor to consider in future studies.

  5. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z Index MENU CDC A-Z SEARCH A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # Start of Search Controls Search Form Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Note: Javascript is disabled or ...

  6. European symposium on precision medicine in allergy and airways diseases: report of the European Union parliament symposium (October 14, 2015).

    PubMed

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S; Borrelli, D; Agache, I; Bousquet, J; Costigliola, V; Joos, G; Lund, V J; Poulsen, L K; Price, D; Rolland, C; Zuberbier, T; Hellings, P W

    2015-12-01

    On 14 October 2015, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS) and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP David Borrelli and with active participation of the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) and the Respiratory Effectiveness Group (REG). MEP Sirpa Pietikainen, Chair of the European Parliament Interest Group on Allergy and Asthma, underlined the importance of the need for a better diagnostic and therapeutic approach for patients with Allergies and Chronic Airways Diseases, and encouraged a joint initiative to control the epidemic of Allergy and Asthma in Europe. The socio-economic impact of allergies and chronic airways diseases cannot be underestimated, as they represent the most frequently diagnosed chronic non-communicable diseases in the EU. Despite the fact that 30% of the total European population is nowadays suffering from allergies and asthma, more than half of these patients are deprived from adequate diagnosis and treatment. Precision Medicine represents a novel approach in medicine, embracing 4 key features: personalized care based on molecular, immunologic and functional endotyping of the disease, with participation of the patient in the decision making process of therapeutic actions, and taking into account predictive and preventive aspects of the treatment. Implementation of Precision Medicine into clinical practice may help to achieve the arrest of the Epidemic of Allergies and Chronic Airways Diseases. This report summarizes the key messages delivered during the symposium by the speakers, including the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vitenys Andriukaitis. The

  7. Barrier function of the nasal mucosa in health and type-2 biased airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Van Crombruggen, K; Gevaert, E; Bachert, C

    2016-03-01

    The mucosal lining of the upper airways represents the outer surface of the body to the ambient air and its contents and is prepared for it as the first line of defense. Apart from the well-described physical barrier and the mucociliary clearance, a variety of systems, including the airway microbiome, antimicrobial proteins, damage-associated molecular patterns, innate lymphoid cells, epithelial-derived cytokines and chemokines, and finally the adaptive immune system, as well as eosinophils as newly appreciated defense cells form different levels of protection against and response to any possible intruder. Of interest especially for allergic airway disease, mucosal germs might not just elicit a classical Th1/Th17-biased inflammatory response, but may directly induce a type-2 mucosal inflammation. Innovative therapeutic interventions may be possible at different levels also; however, whether modulations of the innate or adaptive immune responses will finally be more successful, and how the correction of the adaptive immune response might impact on the innate side, will be determined in the near future. PMID:26606240

  8. Novel Roles for Chloride Channels, Exchangers, and Regulators in Chronic Inflammatory Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Yurtsever, Zeynep; Berry, Kayla N.; Brett, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    Chloride transport proteins play critical roles in inflammatory airway diseases, contributing to the detrimental aspects of mucus overproduction, mucus secretion, and airway constriction. However, they also play crucial roles in contributing to the innate immune properties of mucus and mucociliary clearance. In this review, we focus on the emerging novel roles for a chloride channel regulator (CLCA1), a calcium-activated chloride channel (TMEM16A), and two chloride exchangers (SLC26A4/pendrin and SLC26A9) in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26612971

  9. Solid fuel smoke exposure and risk of obstructive airways disease.

    PubMed

    Qorbani, Mostafa; Yunesian, Masud

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether there is an association between Obstructive Airways Disease (OAD) and indoor exposure to baking home-made bread smoke (BHBS) in ground oven at home. In this hospital-based case-control study, 83 patients with OAD (cases) were compared with 72 patients without any known pulmonary diseases from the surgical ward (controls) who were frequently matched with cases on age. The interview was performed using the modified questionnaire recommended by the "American Thoracic Society". The questionnaire comprised of demographic information, occupational history, cigarette smoking and indoor exposure to BHBS in ground oven at home. The exposure to BHBS was considered both as a dichotomous and quantitative variable (number of years being exposed to smoke) and the population attributable fraction (PAF) was estimated due to BHBS exposure. The percentage of indoor exposure to BHBS was measured as 51.8% and 30.6% in the cases and the controls, respectively. The average years of exposure to BHBS was 20.46 years (SD: 11.60) for the cases and 15.38 years (SD: 13.20) for the controls. The univariate analysis comparing the cases and the controls showed that exposure to BHBS (as a binary variable) and occupational exposure to dust was significantly associated with OAD. In the multivariate model, only exposure to BHBS was associated with OAD (OR=2.22, 95%CI = 1.14-4.35). Duration of exposure to BHBS (as a quantitative variable) was significantly associated with OAD in the univariate model. In the multivariate model, only the duration of exposure to BHBS (years) showed a significant association with OAD (OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.08). Population attributable risk due to BHBS exposure was equal to 28.5%. PMID:23369551

  10. Chronic inflammatory airway diseases: the central role of the epithelium revisited.

    PubMed

    Gohy, S T; Hupin, C; Pilette, C; Ladjemi, M Z

    2016-04-01

    The respiratory epithelium plays a critical role for the maintenance of airway integrity and defense against inhaled particles. Physical barrier provided by apical junctions and mucociliary clearance clears inhaled pathogens, allergens or toxics, to prevent continuous stimulation of adaptive immune responses. The "chemical barrier", consisting of several anti-microbial factors such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, constitutes another protective mechanism of the mucosae against external aggressions before adaptive immune response starts. The reconstruction of damaged respiratory epithelium is crucial to restore this barrier. This review examines the role of the airway epithelium through recent advances in health and chronic inflammatory diseases in the lower conducting airways (in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Better understanding of normal and altered epithelial functions continuously provides new insights into the physiopathology of chronic airway diseases and should help to identify new epithelial-targeted therapies. PMID:27021118

  11. The role of the small airways in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Matteo; Usmani, Omar S

    2015-12-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), represent a major social and economic burden for worldwide health systems. During recent years, increasing attention has been directed to the role of small airways in respiratory diseases, and their exact contribution to the pathophysiology of asthma and COPD continues to be clarified. Indeed, it has been suggested that small airways play a distinct role in specific disease phenotypes. Besides providing information on small airways structure and diagnostic procedures, this review therefore aims to present updated and evidence-based findings on the role of small airways in the pathophysiology of asthma and COPD. Most of the available information derives from either pathological studies or review articles and there are few data on the natural history of small airways disease in the onset or progression of asthma and COPD. Comparisons between studies on the role of small airways are hard to draw because both asthma and COPD are highly heterogeneous conditions. Most studies have been performed in small population samples, and different techniques to characterize aspects of small airways function have been employed in order to assess inflammation and remodelling. Most methods of assessing small airways dysfunction have been largely confined to research purposes, but some data are encouraging, supporting the utilization of certain techniques into daily clinical practice, particularly for early-stage diseases, when subjects are often asymptomatic and routine pulmonary function tests may be within normal ranges. In this context further clinical trials and real-life feedback on large populations are desirable. PMID:26037949

  12. Automated detection of presence of mucus foci in airway diseases: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Ko, Jane; Godoy, Myrna C. B.

    2009-02-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is often characterized by partial or complete obstruction of airflow in the lungs. This can be due to airway wall thickening and retained secretions, resulting in foci of mucoid impactions. Although radiologists have proposed scoring systems to assess extent and severity of airway diseases from CT images, these scores are seldom used clinically due to impracticality. The high level of subjectivity from visual inspection and the sheer number of airways in the lungs mean that automation is critical in order to realize accurate scoring. In this work we assess the feasibility of including an automated mucus detection method in a clinical scoring system. Twenty high-resolution datasets of patients with mild to severe bronchiectasis were randomly selected, and used to test the ability of the computer to detect the presence or absence of mucus in each lobe (100 lobes in all). Two experienced radiologists independently scored the presence or absence of mucus in each lobe based on the visual assessment method recommended by Sheehan et al [1]. These results were compared with an automated method developed for mucus plug detection [2]. Results showed agreement between the two readers on 44% of the lobes for presence of mucus, 39% of lobes for absence of mucus, and discordant opinions on 17 lobes. For 61 lobes where 1 or both readers detected mucus, the computer sensitivity was 75.4%, the specificity was 69.2%, and the positive predictive value (PPV) was 79.3%. Six computer false positives were a-posteriori reviewed by the experts and reassessed as true positives, yielding results of 77.6% sensitivity, 81.8% for specificity, and 89.6% PPV.

  13. Chronic cough in subjects with upper airway diseases - analysis of mechanisms and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Cough is the commonest respiratory symptom leading to a medical consultation. Although acute cough which is usually associated with respiratory viral infection is not a problem to manage, chronic cough is frequently a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge as it does not respond to usual treatments. Specific group of chronic coughers are considered to have upper airway diseases, lately categorized as having upper airway cough syndrome. There is an increasing pool of evidence that upper airway diseases have significant involvements in the regulation of cough reflex, indicating that they must be taken into considerations as major triggers of coughing in the patients. Here we summarize current literature and experiences on the pathogenesis of upper airway cough syndrome, and discuss further clinical applications. PMID:23667837

  14. Kalanchoe pinnata inhibits mast cell activation and prevents allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, E A; Reuter, S; Martin, H; Dehzad, N; Muzitano, M F; Costa, S S; Rossi-Bergmann, B; Buhl, R; Stassen, M; Taube, C

    2012-01-15

    Aqueous extract of Kalanchoe pinnata (Kp) have been found effective in models to reduce acute anaphylactic reactions. In the present study, we investigate the effect of Kp and the flavonoid quercetin (QE) and quercitrin (QI) on mast cell activation in vitro and in a model of allergic airway disease in vivo. Treatment with Kp and QE in vitro inhibited degranulation and cytokine production of bone marrow-derived mast cells following IgE/FcɛRI crosslinking, whereas treatment with QI had no effect. Similarly, in vivo treatment with Kp and QE decreased development of airway hyperresponsiveness, airway inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia and production of IL-5, IL-13 and TNF. In contrast, treatment with QI had no effect on these parameters. These findings demonstrate that treatment with Kp or QE is effective in treatment of allergic airway disease, providing new insights to the immunomodulatory functions of this plant. PMID:21802918

  15. Assessment of Risk in Chronic Airways Disease Evaluation (ARCADE): Protocol and preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Gale, Nichola S; Albarrati, Ali M; Munnery, Margaret M; Munnery, Iain C; Irfan, Mujammil; Bolton, Charlotte E; Rambaran, Curtis N; Singer, Ruth M Tal; Cockcroft, John R; Shale, Dennis J

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multisystem disease. Established comorbidities include cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, loss of muscle mass and function, depression, and impaired quality of life. The natural history is not well understood. The Assessment of Risk in Chronic Airways Disease Evaluation (ARCADE) is a longitudinal study of comorbidities in COPD. The primary aims are to delineate the progression and interrelationships of cardiovascular disease and associated comorbidities. Each year ARCADE aims to recruit 250 patients diagnosed with COPD and 50 comparators (free from respiratory disease). Assessments include spirometry, body composition, blood pressure, aortic stiffness (pulse wave velocity (PWV)), noninvasive measures of cardiac output, systemic inflammatory mediators, blood and urine biochemistry, and physical and health outcomes. These will be repeated at 2 and 5 years. In the first year of recruitment, 350 patients and 100 comparators were recruited. The reproducibility of aortic PWV, cardiac output, stroke volume, and cardiac index was evaluated and accepted in 30 patients free from overt cardiovascular disease. The preliminary data from ARCADE have demonstrated acceptable reproducibility of hemodynamic outcome measures. Further longitudinal data collection will increase knowledge of the progression and interactions between cardiovascular risk factors and other comorbidities in COPD. PMID:25159833

  16. Nonmicrobial-mediated inflammatory airway diseases--an update.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Babu, Polani B; Krishnamoorthy, P

    2014-03-01

    In lungs, airways are in constant contact with air, microbes, allergens, and environmental pollutants. The airway epithelium represents the first line of lung defense through different mechanisms, which facilitate clearance of inhaled pathogens and environmental particles while minimizing an inflammatory response. The innate immune system facilitates immediate recognition of both foreign pathogens and tissue damage through toll-like receptor, which acts as a gateway for all intracellular events leading to inflammation. In the absence of microbial stimulus, the immune system is capable of detecting a wide range of insults against the host. This review focuses on various molecular mechanisms involved in pathophysiology of airway inflammation mediated by environmental factors, cellular stress, and pharmacological and clinical agents. PMID:24293217

  17. Acetaminophen Attenuates House Dust Mite-Induced Allergic Airway Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory J; Thrall, Roger S; Cloutier, Michelle M; Manautou, Jose E; Morris, John B

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests that N-acetyl-para-aminophenol (APAP) may play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, likely through pro-oxidant mechanisms. However, no studies have investigated the direct effects of APAP on the development of allergic inflammation. To determine the likelihood of a causal relationship between APAP and asthma pathogenesis, we explored the effects of APAP on inflammatory responses in a murine house dust mite (HDM) model of allergic airway disease. We hypothesized that APAP would enhance the development of HDM-induced allergic inflammation. The HDM model consisted of once daily intranasal instillations for up to 2 weeks with APAP or vehicle administration 1 hour prior to HDM during either week 1 or 2. Primary assessment of inflammation included bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), cytokine expression in lung tissue, and histopathology. Contrary to our hypothesis, the effects of HDM treatment were substantially diminished in APAP-treated groups compared with controls. APAP-treated groups had markedly reduced airway inflammation: including decreased inflammatory cells in the BAL fluid, lower cytokine expression in lung tissue, and less perivascular and peribronchiolar immune cell infiltration. The anti-inflammatory effect of APAP was not abrogated by an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (P450) metabolism, suggesting that the effect was due to the parent compound or a non-P450 generated metabolite. Taken together, our studies do not support the biologic plausibility of the APAP hypothesis that APAP use may contribute to the causation of asthma. Importantly, we suggest the mechanism by which APAP modulates airway inflammation may provide novel therapeutic targets for asthma. PMID:27402277

  18. Etiology and pathogenesis of airway disease in children and adults from rural communities.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, D A

    1999-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood and affects nearly 5 million children. The prevalence and severity of childhood asthma have continued to increase over the past decade despite major advances in the recognition and treatment of this condition. A comparison of urban and rural children suggests that the etiology of airway disease is multifactorial and that unique exposures and genetic factors contribute to the development of asthma in both settings. The most important environmental exposure that distinguishes the rural environment and is known to cause asthma is the organic dusts. However, animal-derived proteins, common allergens, and low concentrations of irritants also contribute to the development of airway disease in children and adults living in rural communities. A fundamental unanswered question regarding asthma is why only a minority of children who wheeze at an early age develop persistent airway disease that continues throughout their life. Although genetic factors are important in the development of asthma, recurrent airway inflammation, presumably mediated by environmental exposures, may result in persistent airway hyperresponsiveness and the development of chronic airway disease. Increasing evidence indicates that control of the acute inflammatory response substantially improves airflow and reduces chronic airway remodeling. Reducing exposure to agricultural dusts and treatment with anti-inflammatory medication is indicated in most cases of childhood asthma. In addition, children with asthma from rural (in comparison to urban) America face multiple barriers that adversely affect their health e.g., more poverty, geographic barriers to health care, less health insurance, and poorer access to health care providers. These unique problems must be considered in developing interventions that effectively reduce the morbidity and mortality of asthma in children from rural communities. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10346988

  19. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Maximizing Adherence Including Using Novel Information Technology-based Systems.

    PubMed

    Hevener, Bretton; Hevener, William

    2016-09-01

    Sleep apnea is a form of sleep-disordered breathing that is associated with an increase in disease comorbidities, mortality risks, health care costs, and traffic accidents. Sleep apnea is most commonly treated with positive airway pressure (PAP). PAP can be difficult for patients to tolerate. This leads to initial and long-term noncompliance. Most insurance companies require compliance with PAP treatment to cover ongoing reimbursements for the device and related disposable supplies. Therefore, there are both clinical and financial incentives to a sleep apneic patient's compliance with PAP therapy. PMID:27542878

  20. BLOCKADE OF TRKA OR P75 NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTORS ATTENUATES DIESEL PARTICULATE-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS RESPONSES IN BALB/C MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) partially mediate many features of allergic airways disease including airway resistance. Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) associated with the combustion of diesel fuel exacerbates allergic airways responses. We tested t...

  1. Effects of Educational Interventions for Chronic Airway Disease on Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Education has been known to essential for management of chronic airway diseases. However the real benefits remain unclear. We evaluated the effectiveness of an organized educational intervention for chronic airway diseases directed at primary care physicians and patients. The intervention was a 1-month education program of three visits, during which subjects were taught about their disease, an action plan in acute exacerbation and inhaler technique. Asthma control tests (ACT) for asthma and, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment tests (CAT) for COPD subjects were compared before and after education as an index of quality of life. Educational effectiveness was also measured associated with improvement of their knowledge for chronic airway disease itself, proper use of inhaler technique, and satisfaction of the subjects and clinicians before and after education. Among the 285 participants, 60.7% (n = 173) were men and the mean age was 62.2 ± 14.7. ACT for asthma and CAT in COPD patients were significantly improved by 49.7% (n = 79) and 51.2% (n = 65) more than MCID respectively after education (P < 0.05). In all individual items, knowledge about their disease, inhaler use and satisfaction of the patients and clinicians were also improved after education (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates the well-organized education program for primary care physicians and patients is a crucial process for management of chronic airway diseases. PMID:27366004

  2. A Prediction Model for Chronic Kidney Disease Includes Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Monica A.; Taylor, George W.

    2009-01-01

    Background An estimated 75% of the seven million Americans with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease are undiagnosed. Improved prediction models to identify high-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease enhance the ability of health care providers to prevent or delay serious sequelae, including kidney failure, cardiovascular disease, and premature death. Methods We identified 11,955 adults ≥18 years of age in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Chronic kidney disease was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 ml/minute/1.73 m2. High-risk subgroups for chronic kidney disease were identified by estimating the individual probability using β coefficients from the model of traditional and non-traditional risk factors. To evaluate this model, we performed standard diagnostic analyses of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value using 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% probability cutoff points. Results The estimated probability of chronic kidney disease ranged from virtually no probability (0%) for an individual with none of the 12 risk factors to very high probability (98%) for an older, non-Hispanic white edentulous former smoker, with diabetes ≥10 years, hypertension, macroalbuminuria, high cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein, high C-reactive protein, lower income, and who was hospitalized in the past year. Evaluation of this model using an estimated 5% probability cutoff point resulted in 86% sensitivity, 85% specificity, 18% positive predictive value, and 99% negative predictive value. Conclusion This United States population–based study suggested the importance of considering multiple risk factors, including periodontal status, because this improves the identification of individuals at high risk for chronic kidney disease and may ultimately reduce its burden. PMID:19228085

  3. Dementia (Including Alzheimer Disease) (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems are caused by early Alzheimer disease. Normal age-related changes usually cause minor difficulties in short term memory and a slowed ability to learn and process information. These changes are usually mild and do not ...

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study Identification of Novel Loci Associated with Airway Responsiveness in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Nadia N; Paré, Peter D; Rafaels, Nicholas; Sin, Don D; Sandford, Andrew; Daley, Denise; Vergara, Candelaria; Huang, Lili; Elliott, W Mark; Pascoe, Chris D; Arsenault, Bryna A; Postma, Dirkje S; Boezen, H Marike; Bossé, Yohan; van den Berge, Maarten; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Cho, Michael H; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Ober, Carole; Wise, Robert A; Connett, John; Neptune, Enid R; Beaty, Terri H; Ruczinski, Ingo; Mathias, Rasika A; Barnes, Kathleen C

    2015-08-01

    Increased airway responsiveness is linked to lung function decline and mortality in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the genetic contribution to airway responsiveness remains largely unknown. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using the Illumina (San Diego, CA) Human660W-Quad BeadChip on European Americans with COPD from the Lung Health Study. Linear regression models with correlated meta-analyses, including data from baseline (n = 2,814) and Year 5 (n = 2,657), were used to test for common genetic variants associated with airway responsiveness. Genotypic imputation was performed using reference 1000 Genomes Project data. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses in lung tissues were assessed for the top 10 markers identified, and immunohistochemistry assays assessed protein staining for SGCD and MYH15. Four genes were identified within the top 10 associations with airway responsiveness. Markers on chromosome 9p21.2 flanked by LINGO2 met a predetermined threshold of genome-wide significance (P < 9.57 × 10(-8)). Markers on chromosomes 3q13.1 (flanked by MYH15), 5q33 (SGCD), and 6q21 (PDSS2) yielded suggestive evidence of association (9.57 × 10(-8) < P ≤ 4.6 × 10(-6)). Gene expression studies in lung tissue showed single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosomes 5 and 3 to act as eQTL for SGCD (P = 2.57 × 10(-9)) and MYH15 (P = 1.62 × 10(-6)), respectively. Immunohistochemistry confirmed localization of SGCD protein to airway smooth muscle and vessels and MYH15 to airway epithelium, vascular endothelium, and inflammatory cells. We identified novel loci associated with airway responsiveness in a GWAS among smokers with COPD. Risk alleles on chromosomes 5 and 3 acted as eQTLs for SGCD and MYH15 messenger RNA, and these proteins were expressed in lung cells relevant to the development of airway responsiveness. PMID:25514360

  5. The effect of increased lung volume in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on upper airway obstruction during sleep.

    PubMed

    Biselli, Paolo; Grossman, Peter R; Kirkness, Jason P; Patil, Susheel P; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R; Schneider, Hartmut

    2015-08-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exhibit increases in lung volume due to expiratory airflow limitation. Increases in lung volumes may affect upper airway patency and compensatory responses to inspiratory flow limitation (IFL) during sleep. We hypothesized that COPD patients have less collapsible airways inversely proportional to their lung volumes, and that the presence of expiratory airflow limitation limits duty cycle responses to defend ventilation in the presence of IFL. We enrolled 18 COPD patients and 18 controls, matched by age, body mass index, sex, and obstructive sleep apnea disease severity. Sleep studies, including quantitative assessment of airflow at various nasal pressure levels, were conducted to determine upper airway mechanical properties [passive critical closing pressure (Pcrit)] and for quantifying respiratory timing responses to experimentally induced IFL. COPD patients had lower passive Pcrit than their matched controls (COPD: -2.8 ± 0.9 cmH2O; controls: -0.5 ± 0.5 cmH2O, P = 0.03), and there was an inverse relationship of subject's functional residual capacity and passive Pcrit (-1.7 cmH2O/l increase in functional residual capacity, r(2) = 0.27, P = 0.002). In response to IFL, inspiratory duty cycle increased more (P = 0.03) in COPD patients (0.40 to 0.54) than in controls (0.41 to 0.51) and led to a marked reduction in expiratory time from 2.5 to 1.5 s (P < 0.01). COPD patients have a less collapsible airway and a greater, not reduced, compensatory timing response during upper airway obstruction. While these timing responses may reduce hypoventilation, it may also increase the risk for developing dynamic hyperinflation due to a marked reduction in expiratory time. PMID:26048975

  6. TGF-β-dependent dendritic cell chemokinesis in murine models of airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Sen, Debasish; Ma, Royce; Murray, Lynne A.; Tsui, Ping; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Baron, Jody L.; Krummel, Matthew F.; Nishimura, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Small airway chronic inflammation is a major pathologic feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is refractory to current treatments. Dendritic cells (DCs) accumulate around small airways in COPD. DCs are critical mediators of antigen surveillance and antigen presentation and amplify adaptive immune responses. How DCs accumulate around airways remains largely unknown. We use 2-photon DC imaging of living murine lung sections to directly visualize the dynamic movement of living DCs around airways in response to either soluble mediators (IL-1β) or environmental stimuli (cigarette smoke or TLR3 ligands) implicated in COPD pathogenesis. We find that DCs accumulate around murine airways primarily by increasing velocity (chemokinesis) rather than directional migration (chemotaxis) in response to all three stimuli. DC accumulation maximally occurs in a specific zone located 26-50 μm from small airways, which overlaps with zones of maximal DC velocity. Our data suggest that increased accumulation of DCs around airways results from increased numbers of highly chemokinetic DCs entering the lung from the circulation with balanced rates of immigration and emigration. Increases in DC accumulation and chemokinesis are partially dependent on ccr6, a crucial DC chemokine receptor, and fibroblast expression of the integrin αvβ8, a critical activator of TGF-β αvβ8-mediated TGF-β activation is known to enhance IL-1β-dependent fibroblast expression of the only known endogenous ccr6 chemokine ligand, ccl20. Taken together, these data suggest a mechanism by which αvβ8, ccl20 and ccr6 interact to lead to DC accumulation around airways in response to COPD-relevant stimuli. PMID:26109638

  7. Flat trachea syndrome: a rare condition with symptoms similar to obstructive airway disease.

    PubMed

    Gani, Mohammed Akil D; Rogers, Vanessa J C; Sachak, Khalid H; Marzouk, Joseph F K

    2015-01-01

    Flat trachea syndrome, commonly known as 'tracheobronchomalacia', is a central airway disease characterised by excessive expiratory collapse of the tracheobronchial posterior membrane due to weakness in the airway walls. Patients present with symptoms such as chronic cough, dyspnoea and recurrent respiratory tract infections, which are often attributed to more common conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The term 'Flat Trachea Syndrome' was first proposed by Niranjan and Marzouk in 2010 following a retrospective study of 28 patients with the condition who underwent surgery for it. The authors advocated the term due to the primary abnormality being collapse of the posterior membranous wall of the central airways as opposed to softening of the tracheal cartilage (tracheobronchomalacia), which they proposed is a misnomer. We present a rare case of a patient with flat trachea syndrome on a history of COPD who initially presented with recurrent respiratory tract infections. PMID:25721828

  8. Engineered silica nanoparticles act as adjuvants to enhance allergic airway disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the increase in production and use of engineered nanoparticles (NP; ≤ 100 nm), safety concerns have risen about the potential health effects of occupational or environmental NP exposure. Results of animal toxicology studies suggest that inhalation of NP may cause pulmonary injury with subsequent acute or chronic inflammation. People with chronic respiratory diseases like asthma or allergic rhinitis may be even more susceptible to toxic effects of inhaled NP. Few studies, however, have investigated adverse effects of inhaled NP that may enhance the development of allergic airway disease. Methods We investigated the potential of polyethylene glycol coated amorphous silica NP (SNP; 90 nm diameter) to promote allergic airway disease when co-exposed during sensitization with an allergen. BALB/c mice were sensitized by intranasal instillation with 0.02% ovalbumin (OVA; allergen) or saline (control), and co-exposed to 0, 10, 100, or 400 μg of SNP. OVA-sensitized mice were then challenged intranasally with 0.5% OVA 14 and 15 days after sensitization, and all animals were sacrificed a day after the last OVA challenge. Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected, and pulmonary tissue was processed for histopathology and biochemical and molecular analyses. Results Co-exposure to SNP during OVA sensitization caused a dose-dependent enhancement of allergic airway disease upon challenge with OVA alone. This adjuvant-like effect was manifested by significantly greater OVA-specific serum IgE, airway eosinophil infiltration, mucous cell metaplasia, and Th2 and Th17 cytokine gene and protein expression, as compared to mice that were sensitized to OVA without SNP. In saline controls, SNP exposure did cause a moderate increase in airway neutrophils at the highest doses. Conclusions These results suggest that airway exposure to engineered SNP could enhance allergen sensitization and foster greater manifestation of allergic airway disease upon

  9. A critical role for dendritic cells in the evolution of IL-1β-mediated murine airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Minagawa, Shunsuke; Sen, Debasish; Goodsell, Amanda; Ma, Royce; Moermans, Catherine; McKnelly, Kate J.; Baron, Jody L.; Krummel, Matthew F.; Nishimura, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation and fibrosis, known as airway remodeling, are defining features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and are refractory to current treatments. How and if chronic inflammation contributes to airway fibrosis remains controversial. Here, we use a model of COPD airway disease utilizing adenoviral (Ad) delivery of IL-1β to determine that adaptive T-cell immunity is required for airway remodeling since mice deficient in α/β T-cells (tcra −/−) are protected. Dendritic cells (DCs) accumulate around COPD airways and are critical to prime adaptive immunity, but have not been shown to directly influence airway remodeling. We show that DC depletion or deficiency in the crucial DC chemokine receptor, ccr6, both protect from Ad-IL-1β-induced airway adaptive T-cell immune responses, and fibrosis in mice. These results provide evidence that chronic airway inflammation, mediated by accumulation of α/β T-cells and driven by DCs, is critical to airway fibrosis. PMID:25786688

  10. Approaches to prevent the patients with chronic airway diseases from exacerbation in the haze weather

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jin; Li, Bo; Yu, Dan; Liu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Haze weather is becoming one of the biggest problems in many big cities in China. It triggers both public anxiety and official concerns. Particulate matter (PM) plays the most important role in causing the adverse health effects. Chemical composition of PM2.5 includes primary particles and secondary particles. The toxicological mechanisms of PM2.5 to the human body include the oxidative stress, inflammation and carcinogenesis. Short or long-term exposure to PM (especially PM2.5) can cause a series of symptoms including respiratory symptoms such as cough, wheezing and dyspnea as well as other symptoms. There are positive associations between PM2.5 and mortality due to a number of causes. PM2.5 is considered to contribute to the onset of asthma, the exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in haze weather. Some approaches including outdoor health care, indoor health care and preventive medications can prevent the patients with chronic airway diseases from exacerbations. PMID:26904232

  11. Newly Recognized Occupational and Environmental Causes of Chronic Terminal Airways and Parenchymal Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sauler, Maor; Gulati, Mridu

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis With the introduction of new materials and changes in manufacturing practices, occupational health investigators continue to uncover associations between novel exposures and chronic forms of diffuse parenchymal lung disease and terminal airways disease. In order to discern exposure disease relationships, clinicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for the potential toxicity of occupational and environmental exposures. This article details several newly recognized chronic parenchymal and terminal airways. Diseases related to exposure to Indium, Nylon Flock, Diacetyl used in the flavorings industry, nanoparticles, and the World Trade Center disaster are reviewed. Additionally, this article will review methods in worker surveillance as well as the potential use of biomarkers in the evaluation of exposure disease relationships. PMID:23153608

  12. EFFECTS OF SYSTEMIC NEUTROPHIL DEPLETION ON LPS-INDUCED AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Systemic Neutrophil Depletion on LPS-induced Airway Disease
    Jordan D. Savov, Stephen H. Gavett*, David M. Brass, Daniel L. Costa*, David A. Schwartz
    Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Dept of Medicine ? Duke University Medical Center
    * National Health and E...

  13. NEUTROPHILS PLAY A CRITICAL ROLE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF LPS-INDUCED AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-045 (GAVETT) GPRA # 10108

    Neutrophils Play a Critical Role in the Development of LPS-Induced Airway Disease.
    Jordan D. Savov, Stephen H. Gavett*, David M. Brass, Daniel L. Costa*, and David A. Schwartz

    ABSTRACT
    We investigated the role of neutrophils...

  14. Acute response of airway muscle to extreme temperature includes disruption of actin-myosin interaction.

    PubMed

    Dyrda, Peter; Tazzeo, Tracy; DoHarris, Lindsay; Nilius, Berndt; Roman, Horia Nicolae; Lauzon, Anne-Marie; Aziz, Tariq; Lukic, Dusan; Janssen, Luke J

    2011-02-01

    Despite the emerging use of bronchial thermoplasty in asthma therapy, the response of airway smooth muscle (ASM) to extreme temperatures is unknown. We investigated the immediate effects of exposing ASM to supraphysiologic temperatures. Isometric contractions were studied in bovine ASM before and after exposure to various thermal loads and/or pharmacologic interventions. Actin-myosin interactions were investigated using a standard in vitro motility assay. We found steep thermal sensitivity for isometric contractions evoked by acetylcholine, with threshold and complete inhibition at less than 50°C and greater than 55°C, respectively. Contractile responses to serotonin or KCl were similarly affected, whereas isometric relaxations evoked by the nitric oxide donor S-nitrosyl-N-acetylpenicillamine or the β-agonist isoproterenol were unaffected. This thermal sensitivity developed within 15 minutes, but did not evolve further over the course of several days (such a rapid time-course rules out heat shock proteins, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis). Although heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRPV2) channels and the calmodulin-dependent (Cam) kinase-II-induced inactivation of myosin light chain kinase are both acutely thermally sensitive, with a temperature producing half-maximal effect (T(1/2)) of 52.5°C, the phenomenon we describe was not prevented by blockers of TRPV2 channels (e.g., ruthenium red, gadolinium, zero-Ca(2+) or zero-Na(+)/zero-Ca(2+) media, and cromakalim) or of Cam kinase-II (e.g., W7, trifluoperazine, and KN-93). However, direct measurements of actin-myosin interactions showed the same steep thermal profile. The functional changes preceded any histologic evidence of necrosis or apoptosis. We conclude that extreme temperatures (such as those used in bronchial thermoplasty) directly disrupt actin-myosin interactions, likely through a denaturation of the motor protein, leading to an immediate loss of ASM cell function. PMID:20395634

  15. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... is considered invasive. Symptoms of pneumonia usually include: Fever and chills Cough Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Sweating ... the blood. It can cause symptoms such as: Fever and chills Excessive tiredness Pain in the belly Nausea with ...

  16. Pluripotent Allospecific CD8+ Effector T Cells Traffic to Lung in Murine Obliterative Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    West, Erin E.; Lavoie, Tera L.; Orens, Jonathan B.; Chen, Edward S.; Ye, Shui Q.; Finkelman, Fred D.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; McDyer, John F.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term success in lung transplantation is limited by obliterative bronchiolitis, whereas T cell effector mechanisms in this process remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse heterotopic allogeneic airway transplant model, we studied T cell effector responses during obliterative airways disease (OAD). Allospecific CD8+IFN-γ+ T cells were detected in airway allografts, with significant coexpression of TNF-α and granzyme B. Therefore, using IFN-γ as a surrogate marker, we assessed the distribution and kinetics of extragraft allo-specific T cells during OAD. Robust allospecific IFN-γ was produced by draining the lymph nodes, spleen, and lung mononuclear cells from allograft, but not isograft recipients by Day 14, and significantly decreased by Day 28. Although the majority of allospecific T cells were CD8+, allospecific CD4+ T cells were also detected in these compartments, with each employing distinct allorecognition pathways. An influx of pluripotent CD8+ effector cells with a memory phenotype were detected in the lung during OAD similar to those seen in the allografts and secondary lymphoid tissue. Antibody depletion of CD8+ T cells markedly reduced airway lumen obliteration and fibrosis at Day 28. Together, these data demonstrate that allospecific CD8+ effector T cells play an important role in OAD and traffic to the lung after heterotopic airway transplant, suggesting that the lung is an important immunologic site, and perhaps a reservoir, for effector cells during the rejection process. PMID:16195540

  17. Electronic Nose and Exhaled Breath NMR-based Metabolomics Applications in Airways Disease.

    PubMed

    Santini, Giuseppe; Mores, Nadia; Penas, Andreu; Capuano, Rosamaria; Mondino, Chiara; Trové, Andrea; Macagno, Francesco; Zini, Gina; Cattani, Paola; Martinelli, Eugenio; Motta, Andrea; Macis, Giuseppe; Ciabattoni, Giovanni; Montuschi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Breathomics, the multidimensional molecular analysis of exhaled breath, includes analysis of exhaled breath with gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and electronic noses (e-noses), and metabolomics of exhaled breath condensate (EBC), a non-invasive technique which provides information on the composition of airway lining fluid, generally by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or MS methods. Metabolomics is the identification and quantification of small molecular weight metabolites in a biofluid. Specific profiles of volatile compounds in exhaled breath and metabolites in EBC (breathprints) are potentially useful surrogate markers of inflammatory respiratory diseases. Electronic noses (e-noses) are artificial sensor systems, usually consisting of chemical cross-reactive sensor arrays for characterization of patterns of breath volatile compounds, and algorithms for breathprints classification. E-noses are handheld, portable, and provide real-time data. E-nose breathprints can reflect respiratory inflammation. E-noses and NMR-based metabolomics of EBC can distinguish patients with respiratory diseases such as asthma, COPD, and lung cancer, or diseases with a clinically relevant respiratory component including cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia, and healthy individuals. Breathomics has also been reported to identify patients affected by different types of respiratory diseases. Patterns of breath volatile compounds detected by e-nose and EBC metabolic profiles have been associated with asthma phenotypes. In combination with other -omics platforms, breathomics might provide a molecular approach to respiratory disease phenotyping and a molecular basis to tailored pharmacotherapeutic strategies. Breathomics might also contribute to identify new surrogate markers of respiratory inflammation, thus, facilitating drug discovery. Validation in newly recruited, prospective independent cohorts is essential for development of e

  18. Early-Life Intranasal Colonization with Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Exacerbates Juvenile Airway Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    McCann, Jessica R; Mason, Stanley N; Auten, Richard L; St Geme, Joseph W; Seed, Patrick C

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a connection between asthma development and colonization with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Specifically, nasopharyngeal colonization of human infants with NTHi within 4 weeks of birth is associated with an increased risk of asthma development later in childhood. Monocytes derived from these infants have aberrant inflammatory responses to common upper respiratory bacterial antigens compared to those of cells derived from infants who were not colonized and do not go on to develop asthma symptoms in childhood. In this study, we hypothesized that early-life colonization with NTHi promotes immune system reprogramming and the development of atypical inflammatory responses. To address this hypothesis in a highly controlled model, we tested whether colonization of mice with NTHi on day of life 3 induced or exacerbated juvenile airway disease using an ovalbumin (OVA) allergy model of asthma. We found that animals that were colonized on day of life 3 and subjected to induction of allergy had exacerbated airway disease as juveniles, in which exacerbated airway disease was defined as increased cellular infiltration into the lung, increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-13 in lung lavage fluid, decreased regulatory T cell-associated FOXP3 gene expression, and increased mucus production. We also found that colonization with NTHi amplified airway resistance in response to increasing doses of a bronchoconstrictor following OVA immunization and challenge. Together, the murine model provides evidence for early-life immune programming that precedes the development of juvenile airway disease and corroborates observations that have been made in human children. PMID:27113355

  19. Quantitative computed tomography detects peripheral airway disease in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neal; Covar, Ronina A; Gleason, Melanie C; Newell, John D; Gelfand, Erwin W; Spahn, Joseph D

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare air-trapping as quantified by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the chest with measures of lung function and airway inflammation in children with mild to moderate asthma. Plethysmography indices, respiratory resistance, and reactance before and after bronchodilator with impulse oscillation (IOS), exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), total eosinophil count (TEC), and serum eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) levels were measured in 21 subjects. A single-cut HRCT image at end-expiration was obtained. Air-trapping was quantified and expressed in terms of the pixel index (PI) by determining the percentage of pixels in lung fields below -856 and -910 Hounsfeld units (HU). Pairwise linear correlations between PI and other parameters were evaluated. Subjects had only mild airflow limitation based on prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1)), but were hyperinflated and had air-trapping based on elevated total lung capacity (TLC) and residual volume (RV)/TLC ratio, respectively. The PI at -856 HU was positively correlated with % predicted TLC, total gas volume (TGV), and ECP level, and was inversely correlated with FEV(1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) and % predicted forced expiratory flow between 25-75% FVC (FEF(25-75)). The PI at -910 HU correlated similarly with these variables, and also correlated positively with IOS bronchodilator reversibility. This data suggest that quantitative HRCT may be a useful tool in the evaluation of peripheral airflow obstruction in children with asthma. PMID:16015663

  20. Animal Models of Allergic Airways Disease: Where Are We and Where to Next?

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, David G.; Tully, Jane E.; Nolin, James D.; Jansen-Heininger, Yvonne M; Irvin, Charles G.

    2014-01-01

    In a complex inflammatory airways disease such as asthma, abnormalities in a plethora of molecular and cellular pathways ultimately culminate in characteristic impairments in respiratory function. The ability to study disease pathophysiology in the setting of a functioning immune and respiratory system therefore makes mouse models an invaluable tool in translational research. Despite the vast understanding of inflammatory airways diseases gained from mouse models to date, concern over the validity of mouse models continues to grow. Therefore the aim of this review is two-fold; firstly, to evaluate mouse models of asthma in light of current clinical definitions, and secondly, to provide a framework by which mouse models can be continually refined so that they continue to stand at the forefront of translational science. Indeed, it is in viewing mouse models as a continual work in progress that we will be able to target our research to those patient populations in whom current therapies are insufficient. PMID:25043224

  1. Bactericidal/Permeability-Increasing Protein Fold–Containing Family Member A1 in Airway Host Protection and Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Britto, Clemente J.

    2015-01-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein fold–containing family member A1 (BPIFA1), formerly known as SPLUNC1, is one of the most abundant proteins in respiratory secretions and has been identified with increasing frequency in studies of pulmonary disease. Its expression is largely restricted to the respiratory tract, being highly concentrated in the upper airways and proximal trachea. BPIFA1 is highly responsive to airborne pathogens, allergens, and irritants. BPIFA1 actively participates in host protection through antimicrobial, surfactant, airway surface liquid regulation, and immunomodulatory properties. Its expression is modulated in multiple lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory malignancies, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, the role of BPIFA1 in pulmonary pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. This review highlights the versatile properties of BPIFA1 in antimicrobial protection and its roles as a sensor of environmental exposure and regulator of immune cell function. A greater understanding of the contribution of BPIFA1 to disease pathogenesis and activity may clarify if BPIFA1 is a biomarker and potential drug target in pulmonary disease. PMID:25265466

  2. The Endogenous Th17 Response in NO2-Promoted Allergic Airway Disease Is Dispensable for Airway Hyperresponsiveness and Distinct from Th17 Adoptive Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Daggett, Rebecca; Hoyt, Laura; Alcorn, John F.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Weiss, Daniel J.; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Poynter, Matthew E.

    2013-01-01

    Severe, glucocorticoid-resistant asthma comprises 5-7% of patients with asthma. IL-17 is a biomarker of severe asthma, and the adoptive transfer of Th17 cells in mice is sufficient to induce glucocorticoid-resistant allergic airway disease. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental toxin that correlates with asthma severity, exacerbation, and risk of adverse outcomes. Mice that are allergically sensitized to the antigen ovalbumin by exposure to NO2 exhibit a mixed Th2/Th17 adaptive immune response and eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment to the airway following antigen challenge, a phenotype reminiscent of severe clinical asthma. Because IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling is critical in the generation of the Th17 response in vivo, we hypothesized that the IL-1R/Th17 axis contributes to pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease and manifests in glucocorticoid-resistant cytokine production. IL-17A neutralization at the time of antigen challenge or genetic deficiency in IL-1R resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment to the airway following antigen challenge but did not protect against the development of AHR. Instead, IL-1R-/- mice developed exacerbated AHR compared to WT mice. Lung cells from NO2-allergically inflamed mice that were treated in vitro with dexamethasone (Dex) during antigen restimulation exhibited reduced Th17 cytokine production, whereas Th17 cytokine production by lung cells from recipient mice of in vitro Th17-polarized OTII T-cells was resistant to Dex. These results demonstrate that the IL-1R/Th17 axis does not contribute to AHR development in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease, that Th17 adoptive transfer does not necessarily reflect an endogenously-generated Th17 response, and that functions of Th17 responses are contingent on the experimental conditions in which they are generated. PMID:24069338

  3. Nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 regulates T-cell differentiation and allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Chemmannur, S V; Badhwar, A J; Mirlekar, B; Malonia, S K; Gupta, M; Wadhwa, N; Bopanna, R; Mabalirajan, U; Majumdar, S; Ghosh, B; Chattopadhyay, S

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a complex airway allergic disease involving the interplay of various cell types, cytokines, and transcriptional factors. Though many factors contribute to disease etiology, the molecular control of disease phenotype and responsiveness is not well understood. Here we report an essential role of the matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding protein SMAR1 in regulating immune response during allergic airway disease. Conditional knockout of SMAR1 in T cells rendered the mice resistant to eosinophilic airway inflammation against ovalbumin (OVA) allergen with low immunoglobulin E (IgE) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) levels. Moreover, a lower IgE/IgG2a ratio and higher interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response suggested aberrant skewing of T-cell differentiation toward type 1 helper T cell (Th1) response. We show that SMAR1 functions as a negative regulator of Th1 and Th17 differentiation by interacting with two potential and similar MAR regions present on the promoters of T-bet and IL-17. Thus, we present SMAR1 as a regulator of T-cell differentiation that favors the establishment of Th2 cells by modulating Th1 and Th17 responses. PMID:25736456

  4. Selective targeting of TGF-β activation to treat fibroinflammatory airway disease.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Shunsuke; Lou, Jianlong; Seed, Robert I; Cormier, Anthony; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Murray, Lynne; Tsui, Ping; Connor, Jane; Herbst, Ronald; Govaerts, Cedric; Barker, Tyren; Cambier, Stephanie; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Goodsell, Amanda; Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Brand, Oliver J; Cheng, Ran; Ma, Royce; McKnelly, Kate J; Wen, Weihua; Hill, Arthur; Jablons, David; Wolters, Paul; Kitamura, Hideya; Araya, Jun; Barczak, Andrea J; Erle, David J; Reichardt, Louis F; Marks, James D; Baron, Jody L; Nishimura, Stephen L

    2014-06-18

    Airway remodeling, caused by inflammation and fibrosis, is a major component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and currently has no effective treatment. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in COPD. TGF-β is expressed in a latent form that requires activation. The integrin αvβ8 (encoded by the itgb8 gene) is a receptor for latent TGF-β and is essential for its activation. Expression of integrin αvβ8 is increased in airway fibroblasts in COPD and thus is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of airway remodeling in COPD. We demonstrate that an engineered optimized antibody to human αvβ8 (B5) inhibited TGF-β activation in transgenic mice expressing only human and not mouse ITGB8. The B5 engineered antibody blocked fibroinflammatory responses induced by tobacco smoke, cytokines, and allergens by inhibiting TGF-β activation. To clarify the mechanism of action of B5, we used hydrodynamic, mutational, and electron microscopic methods to demonstrate that αvβ8 predominantly adopts a constitutively active, extended-closed headpiece conformation. Epitope mapping and functional characterization of B5 revealed an allosteric mechanism of action due to locking-in of a low-affinity αvβ8 conformation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a new model for integrin function and present a strategy to selectively target the TGF-β pathway to treat fibroinflammatory airway diseases. PMID:24944194

  5. Increased Epicardial Adipose Tissue Is Associated with the Airway Dominant Phenotype of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Higami, Yuichi; Ogawa, Emiko; Ryujin, Yasushi; Goto, Kenichi; Seto, Ruriko; Wada, Hiroshi; Tho, Nguyen Van; Lan, Le Thi Tuyet; Paré, Peter D.; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has been shown to be a non-invasive marker that predicts the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It has been reported that the EAT volume is increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, little is known about which phenotypes of COPD are associated with increased EAT. Methods One hundred and eighty smokers who were referred to the clinic were consecutively enrolled. A chest CT was used for the quantification of the emphysematous lesions, airway lesions, and EAT. These lesions were assessed as the percentage of low attenuation volume (LAV%), the square root of airway wall area of a hypothetical airway with an internal perimeter of 10 mm (√Aaw at Pi10) and the EAT area, respectively. The same measurements were made on 225 Vietnamese COPD patients to replicate the results. Results Twenty-six of the referred patients did not have COPD, while 105 were diagnosed as having COPD based on a FEV1/FVC<0.70. The EAT area was significantly associated with age, BMI, FEV1 (%predicted), FEV1/FVC, self-reported hypertension, self-reported CVD, statin use, LAV%, and √Aaw at Pi10 in COPD patients. The multiple regression analyses showed that only BMI, self-reported CVD and √Aaw at Pi10 were independently associated with the EAT area (R2 = 0.51, p<0.0001). These results were replicated in the Vietnamese population. Conclusions The EAT area is independently associated with airway wall thickness. Because EAT is also an independent predictor of CVD risk, these data suggest a mechanistic link between the airway predominant form of COPD and CVD. PMID:26866482

  6. Selective Targeting of TGF-β Activation to Treat Fibroinflammatory Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Minagawa, Shunsuke; Lou, Jianlong; Seed, Robert I.; Cormier, Anthony; Wu, Shenping; Cheng, Yifan; Murray, Lynne; Tsui, Ping; Connor, Jane; Herbst, Ronald; Govaerts, Cedric; Barker, Tyren; Cambier, Stephanie; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Goodsell, Amanda; Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Brand, Oliver J.; Cheng, Ran; Ma, Royce; McKnelly, Kate J.; Wen, Weihua; Hill, Arthur; Jablons, David; Wolters, Paul; Kitamura, Hideya; Araya, Jun; Barczak, Andrea J.; Erle, David J.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Marks, James D.; Baron, Jody L.; Nishimura, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Airway remodeling, caused by inflammation and fibrosis, is a major component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and currently has no effective treatment. Transforming growth factor–β (TGF-β) has been widely implicated in the pathogenesis of airway remodeling in COPD. TGF-β is expressed in a latent form that requires activation. The integrin αvβ8 (encoded by the itgb8 gene) is a receptor for latent TGF-β and is essential for its activation. Expression of integrin αvβ8 is increased in airway fibroblasts in COPD and thus is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of airway remodeling in COPD. We demonstrate that an engineered optimized antibody to human αvβ8 (B5) inhibited TGF-β activation in transgenic mice expressing only human and not mouse ITGB8. The B5 engineered antibody blocked fibroinflammatory responses induced by tobacco smoke, cytokines, and allergens by inhibiting TGF-β activation. To clarify the mechanism of action of B5, we used hydrodynamic, mutational, and electron microscopic methods to demonstrate that αvβ8 predominantly adopts a constitutively active, extended-closed headpiece conformation. Epitope mapping and functional characterization of B5 revealed an allosteric mechanism of action due to locking-in of a low-affinity αvβ8 conformation. Collectively, these data demonstrate a new model for integrin function and present a strategy to selectively target the TGF-β pathway to treat fibroinflammatory airway diseases. PMID:24944194

  7. Murine Cytomegalovirus Influences Foxj1 Expression, Ciliogenesis, and Mucus Plugging in Mice with Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Carol A.; Peluso, John J.; Shanley, John D.; Puddington, Lynn; Thrall, Roger S.

    2008-01-01

    We have followed throughout time the development of allergic airway disease (AAD) in both uninfected mice and mice infected intranasally with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). Histological evaluation of lung tissue from uninfected mice with AAD demonstrated mucus plugging after 14 and 21 days of ovalbumin-aerosol challenge, with resolution of mucus plugging occurring by 42 days. In MCMV/AAD mice, mucus plugging was observed after 7 days of ovalbumin-aerosol challenge and remained present at 42 days. The level of interleukin-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from MCMV/AAD mice was decreased compared with AAD mice and was accompanied by increased levels of interferon-γ. Levels of Muc5A/C, Muc5B, or Muc2 mucin mRNA in the lungs of MCMV/AAD mice were not elevated compared with AAD mice. MCMV was able to infect the airway epithelium, resulting in decreased expression of Foxj1, a transcription factor critical for ciliogenesis, and a loss of ciliated epithelial cells. In addition, an increase in the number of epithelial cells staining positive for periodic acid-Schiff was observed in MCMV/AAD airways. Together, these findings suggest that MCMV infection of the airway epithelium enhances goblet cell metaplasia and diminishes efficient mucociliary clearance in mice with AAD, resulting in increased mucus plugging. PMID:18258850

  8. Antibodies generated against conserved antigens expressed by bacteria and allergen-bearing fungi suppress airway disease.

    PubMed

    Kin, Nicholas W; Stefanov, Emily K; Dizon, Brian L P; Kearney, John F

    2012-09-01

    There has been a sharp rise in allergic asthma and asthma-related deaths in the developed world, in contrast to many childhood illnesses that have been reduced or eliminated. The hygiene hypothesis proposes that excessively sanitary conditions early in life result in autoimmune and allergic phenomena because of a failure of the immune system to receive proper microbial stimulation during development. We demonstrate that Abs generated against conserved bacterial polysaccharides are reactive with and dampen the immune response against chitin and Aspergillus fumigatus. A reduction in Ag uptake, cell influx, cell activation, and cytokine production occurred in the presence of anti-polysaccharide Abs, resulting in a striking decrease in the severity of allergic airway disease in mice. Overall, our results suggest that Ag exposure--derived from environmental sources, self-antigens, or vaccination--during the neonatal period has dramatic effects on the adult Ab response and modifies the development of allergic airway disease. PMID:22837487

  9. Airway shape assessment with visual feed-back in asthma and obstructive diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Ortner, Margarete; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Ould Hmeidi, Yahya; Pr"teux, Françoise

    2010-02-01

    Airway remodeling in asthma patients has been studied in vivo by means of endobronchial biopsies allowing to assess structural and inflammatory changes. However, this technique remains relatively invasive and difficult to use in longitudinal trials. The development of alternative non-invasive tests, namely exploiting high-resolution imaging modalities such as MSCT, is gaining interest in the medical community. This paper develops a fullyautomated airway shape assessment approach based on the 3D segmentation of the airway lumen from MSCT data. The objective is to easily notify the radiologist on bronchus shape variations (stenoses, bronchiectasis) along the airway tree during a simple visual investigation. The visual feed-back is provided by means of a volumerendered color coding of the airway calibers which are robustly defined and computed, based on a specific 3D discrete distance function able to deal with small size structures. The color volume rendering (CVR) information is further on reinforced by the definition and computation of a shape variation index along the airway medial axis enabling to detect specific configurations of stenoses. Such cases often occur near bifurcations (bronchial spurs) and they are either missed in the CVR or difficult to spot due to occlusions by other segments. Consequently, all detected shape variations (stenoses, dilations and thickened spurs) can be additionally displayed on the medial axis and investigated together with the CVR information. The proposed approach was evaluated on a MSCT database including twelve patients with severe or moderate persistent asthma, or severe COPD, by analyzing segmental and subsegmental bronchi of the right lung. The only CVR information provided for a limited number of views allowed to detect 78% of stenoses and bronchial spurs in these patients, whereas the inclusion of the shape variation index enabled to complement the missing information.

  10. EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ALLERGIC AIRWAYS DISEASE ON INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN BROWN NORWAY RATS (P. Singhl, D.W. Winsett2, M.J. Daniels2,
    C.A.J. Dick', K.B. Adlerl and M.I. Gilmour2, INCSU, Raleigh, N.C., 2NHEERL/ORD/ USEPA, RTP, N.C. and 3UNC, Chapel Hill, N.C.)The interaction between ...

  11. Porous antioxidant polymer microparticles as therapeutic systems for the airway inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dahee; Kang, Changsun; Jung, Eunkyeong; Yoo, Donghyuck; Wu, Dongmei; Lee, Dongwon

    2016-07-10

    Inhaling steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is the most common treatment for airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma. However, frequent steroid administration causes adverse side effects. Therefore, the successful clinical translation of numerous steroidal drugs greatly needs pulmonary drug delivery systems which are formulated from biocompatible and non-immunogenic polymers. We have recently developed a new family of biodegradable polymer, vanillyl alcohol-containing copolyoxalate (PVAX) which is able to scavenge hydrogen peroxide and exert potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. In this work, we report the therapeutic potential of porous PVAX microparticles which encapsulate dexamethasone (DEX) as a therapeutic system for airway inflammatory diseases. PVAX microparticles themselves reduced oxidative stress and suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-alpha and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the lung of ovalbumin-challenged asthmatic mice. However, DEX-loaded porous PVAX microparticles showed significantly enhanced therapeutic effects than PVAX microparticles, suggesting the synergistic effects of PVAX with DEX. In addition, PVAX microparticles showed no inflammatory responses to lung tissues. Given their excellent biocompatibility and intrinsic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, PVAX microparticles hold tremendous potential as therapeutic systems for the treatment of airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma. PMID:27151077

  12. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10–40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  13. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10-40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  14. Neutrophil extracellular traps cause airway obstruction during respiratory syncytial virus disease.

    PubMed

    Cortjens, Bart; de Boer, Onno J; de Jong, Rineke; Antonis, Adriaan Fg; Sabogal Piñeros, Yanaika S; Lutter, René; van Woensel, Job Bm; Bem, Reinout A

    2016-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of severe lower respiratory tract disease (LRTD) in young children worldwide. Extensive neutrophil accumulation in the lungs and occlusion of small airways by DNA-rich mucus plugs are characteristic features of severe RSV-LRTD. Activated neutrophils can release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), extracellular networks of DNA covered with antimicrobial proteins, as part of the first-line defence against pathogens. NETs can trap and eliminate microbes; however, abundant NET formation may also contribute to airway occlusion. In this study, we investigated whether NETs are induced by RSV and explored their potential anti-viral effect in vitro. Second, we studied NET formation in vivo during severe RSV-LRTD in infants and bovine RSV-LRTD in calves, by examining bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue sections, respectively. NETs were visualized in lung cytology and tissue samples by DNA and immunostaining, using antibodies against citrullinated histone H3, elastase and myeloperoxidase. RSV was able to induce NET formation by human neutrophils in vitro. Furthermore, NETs were able to capture RSV, thereby precluding binding of viral particles to target cells and preventing infection. Evidence for the formation of NETs in the airways and lungs was confirmed in children with severe RSV-LRTD. Detailed histopathological examination of calves with RSV-LRTD showed extensive NET formation in dense plugs occluding the airways, either with or without captured viral antigen. Together, these results suggest that, although NETs trap viral particles, their exaggerated formation during severe RSV-LRTD contributes to airway obstruction. PMID:26468056

  15. Evidence and Role for Bacterial Mucin Degradation in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jeffrey M.; Niccum, David; Dunitz, Jordan M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are composed of complex microbial communities that incite persistent inflammation and airway damage. Despite the high density of bacteria that colonize the lower airways, nutrient sources that sustain bacterial growth in vivo, and how those nutrients are derived, are not well characterized. In this study, we examined the possibility that mucins serve as an important carbon reservoir for the CF lung microbiota. While Pseudomonas aeruginosa was unable to efficiently utilize mucins in isolation, we found that anaerobic, mucin-fermenting bacteria could stimulate the robust growth of CF pathogens when provided intact mucins as a sole carbon source. 16S rRNA sequencing and enrichment culturing of sputum also identified that mucin-degrading anaerobes are ubiquitous in the airways of CF patients. The collective fermentative metabolism of these mucin-degrading communities in vitro generated amino acids and short chain fatty acids (propionate and acetate) during growth on mucin, and the same metabolites were also found in abundance within expectorated sputum. The significance of these findings was supported by in vivo P. aeruginosa gene expression, which revealed a heightened expression of genes required for the catabolism of propionate. Given that propionate is exclusively derived from bacterial fermentation, these data provide evidence for an important role of mucin fermenting bacteria in the carbon flux of the lower airways. More specifically, microorganisms typically defined as commensals may contribute to airway disease by degrading mucins, in turn providing nutrients for pathogens otherwise unable to efficiently obtain carbon in the lung. PMID:27548479

  16. Evidence and Role for Bacterial Mucin Degradation in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jeffrey M; Niccum, David; Dunitz, Jordan M; Hunter, Ryan C

    2016-08-01

    Chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are composed of complex microbial communities that incite persistent inflammation and airway damage. Despite the high density of bacteria that colonize the lower airways, nutrient sources that sustain bacterial growth in vivo, and how those nutrients are derived, are not well characterized. In this study, we examined the possibility that mucins serve as an important carbon reservoir for the CF lung microbiota. While Pseudomonas aeruginosa was unable to efficiently utilize mucins in isolation, we found that anaerobic, mucin-fermenting bacteria could stimulate the robust growth of CF pathogens when provided intact mucins as a sole carbon source. 16S rRNA sequencing and enrichment culturing of sputum also identified that mucin-degrading anaerobes are ubiquitous in the airways of CF patients. The collective fermentative metabolism of these mucin-degrading communities in vitro generated amino acids and short chain fatty acids (propionate and acetate) during growth on mucin, and the same metabolites were also found in abundance within expectorated sputum. The significance of these findings was supported by in vivo P. aeruginosa gene expression, which revealed a heightened expression of genes required for the catabolism of propionate. Given that propionate is exclusively derived from bacterial fermentation, these data provide evidence for an important role of mucin fermenting bacteria in the carbon flux of the lower airways. More specifically, microorganisms typically defined as commensals may contribute to airway disease by degrading mucins, in turn providing nutrients for pathogens otherwise unable to efficiently obtain carbon in the lung. PMID:27548479

  17. Systems-level airway models of bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Graham M

    2016-09-01

    Understanding lung and airway behavior presents a number of challenges, both experimental and theoretical, but the potential rewards are great in terms of both potential treatments for disease and interesting biophysical phenomena. This presents an opportunity for modeling to contribute to greater understanding, and here, we focus on modeling efforts that work toward understanding the behavior of airways in vivo, with an emphasis on asthma. We look particularly at those models that address not just isolated airways but many of the important ways in which airways are coupled both with each other and with other structures. This includes both interesting phenomena involving the airways and the layer of airway smooth muscle that surrounds them, and also the emergence of spatial ventilation patterns via dynamic airway interaction. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:459-467. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1349 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27348217

  18. Physiological phenotyping of pediatric chronic obstructive airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Nyilas, Sylvia; Singer, Florian; Kumar, Nitin; Yammine, Sophie; Meier-Girard, Delphine; Koerner-Rettberg, Cordula; Casaulta, Carmen; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    Inert tracer gas washout (IGW) measurements detect increased ventilation inhomogeneity (VI) in chronic lung diseases. Their suitability for different diseases, such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), has already been shown. However, it is still unclear if physiological phenotypes based on different IGW variables can be defined independently of underlying disease. Eighty school-age children, 20 with CF, 20 with PCD, 20 former preterm children, and 20 healthy children, performed nitrogen multiple-breath washout, double-tracer gas (DTG) single-breath washout, and spirometry. Our primary outcome was the definition of physiological phenotypes based on IGW variables. We applied principal component analysis, hierarchical Ward's clustering, and enrichment analysis to compare clinical characteristics between the clusters. IGW variables used for clustering were lung clearance index (LCI) and convection-dependent [conductive ventilation heterogeneity index (Scond)] and diffusion-convection-dependent variables [acinar ventilation heterogeneity index (Sacin) and carbon dioxide and DTG phase III slopes]. Three main phenotypes were identified. Phenotype I (n = 38) showed normal values in all IGW outcome variables. Phenotype II (n = 21) was characterized by pronounced global and convection-dependent VI while diffusion-dependent VI was normal. Phenotype III (n = 21) was characterized by increased global and diffusion- and convection-dependent VI. Enrichment analysis revealed an overrepresentation of healthy children and former preterm children in phenotype I and of CF and PCD in phenotypes II and III. Patients in phenotype III showed the highest proportion and frequency of exacerbations and hospitalization in the year prior to the measurement. IGW techniques allow identification of clinically meaningful, disease-independent physiological clusters. Their predictive value of future disease outcomes remains to be determined. PMID:27231309

  19. Airway epithelial repair in health and disease: Orchestrator or simply a player?

    PubMed

    Iosifidis, Thomas; Garratt, Luke W; Coombe, Deirdre R; Knight, Darryl A; Stick, Stephen M; Kicic, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial cells represent the most important surface of contact in the body and form the first line of defence of the body to external environment. Consequently, epithelia have numerous roles in order to maintain a homeostatic defence barrier. Although the epithelium has been extensively studied over several decades, it remains the focus of new research, indicating a lack of understanding that continues to exist around these cells in specific disease settings. Importantly, evidence is emerging that airway epithelial cells in particular have varied complex functions rather than simple passive roles. One area of current interest is its role following injury. In particular, the epithelial-specific cellular mechanisms regulating their migration during wound repair remain poorly understood and remain an area that requires much needed investigation. A better understanding of the physiological, cellular and molecular wound repair mechanisms could assist in elucidating pathological processes that contribute to airway epithelial pathology. This review attempts to highlight migration-specific and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) aspects of repair used by epithelial cells under normal and disease settings, in the context of human airways. PMID:26804630

  20. The innate immune function of airway epithelial cells in inflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Pieter S; McCray, Paul B; Bals, Robert

    2015-04-01

    The airway epithelium is now considered to be central to the orchestration of pulmonary inflammatory and immune responses, and is also key to tissue remodelling. It acts as the first barrier in the defence against a wide range of inhaled challenges, and is critically involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses to these challenges. Recent progress in our understanding of the developmental regulation of this tissue, the differentiation pathways, recognition of pathogens and antimicrobial responses is now exploited to help understand how epithelial cell function and dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory lung diseases. Herein, advances in our knowledge of the biology of airway epithelium, as well as its role and (dys)function in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis will be discussed. PMID:25700381

  1. The innate immune function of airway epithelial cells in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Pieter S.; McCray, Paul B.; Bals, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The airway epithelium is now considered central to the orchestration of pulmonary inflammatory and immune responses, and is also key to tissue remodelling. It acts as a first barrier in the defence against a wide range of inhaled challenges, and is critically involved in the regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses to these challenges. Recent progress in our understanding of the developmental regulation of this tissue, the differentiation pathways, recognition of pathogens and antimicrobial responses is now exploited to help understand how epithelial cell function and dysfunction contributes to the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory lung diseases. In the review, advances in our knowledge of the biology of airway epithelium, as well as its role and (dys)function in asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis, are discussed. PMID:25700381

  2. Isoflurane anesthesia precipitates tauopathy and upper airways dysfunction in pre-symptomatic Tau.P301L mice: possible implication for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Menuet, Clément; Borghgraef, Peter; Voituron, Nicolas; Gestreau, Christian; Gielis, Lies; Devijver, Herman; Dutschmann, Mathias; Van Leuven, Fred; Hilaire, Gérard

    2012-04-01

    The postoperative cognitive decline resulting from volatile anesthesia is gaining acceptance as a major health problem. The common anesthetic isoflurane is suspected to precipitate neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease by unknown mechanisms. We previously validated that 8month old Tau.P301L mice suffer upper airways defects related to tauopathy within the Kolliker-Fuse nucleus that controls upper airways function. We now report that isoflurane anesthesia in young, pre-symptomatic Tau.P301L mice triggered precocious upper airways defects and tauopathy in several brainstem nuclei, including the nucleus ambiguus that contains upper airways motor neurons and the Kolliker-Fuse. The prescription drug memantine, identified as an NMDA receptor antagonist, prevented the post-anesthesia upper airways dysfunction and alleviated tauopathy in the nucleus ambiguus and Kolliker-Fuse. We further identified protocols of anesthesia in young Tau.P301L mice that mitigated adverse effects of isoflurane anesthesia. Thus, our experimental findings in a validated mouse model for tauopathy demonstrate the link between isoflurane anesthesia, earlier onset of tauopathy and earlier onset of functional deficits, highlight the implication of NMDA-receptors in the mechanisms mediating the adverse effects of isoflurane, and potentially identify safer protocols for anesthesia in patients with tauopathy. PMID:22316605

  3. [Expert meeting obstructive airway disease measuring and evaluating in COPD].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, J; Bals, R; Ewert, R; Heussel, C P; Kauczor, H U; Randerath, W; Steinkamp, G; Watz, H; Worth, H

    2015-09-01

    This report gives an overview on the contributions presented in an expert meeting in February, 2015. They deal with the analysis and evaluation of the multiple dimensions of COPD. This complex disease not only interferes with pulmonary mechanics and gas exchange, but also with cardiopulmonary crosstalk and the ventilator pump. A bulk of inflammatory and microbial activity develops during the progression of disease. As a consequence, systemic effects on muscles, metabolism and psyche develop.The sections consider the value of multiple endpoints in clinical research. Quantifiable parameters of lung mechanics and gas exchange, of exercise tolerance and biomarkers improve the measurability of effects in interventions. However, do we really know in a biological sense what we are measuring? What conclusions can we draw in terms of prognosis?Vice versa, we have to look into the origin and meaning of integrative endpoints e.g. quality or life, dyspnoea and spontaneous physical activity. As a new dimension, the clinical significance of morphological findings in HRCT and MRT is analyzed. PMID:26335896

  4. Inhaled corticosteroids as combination therapy with beta-adrenergic agonists in airways disease: present and future.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan; Caramori, Gaetano; Adcock, Ian M

    2009-09-01

    either binding to DNA and inducing anti-inflammatory genes or by repressing the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators. Local side effects of ICS include oral candidiasis, hoarseness and dysphonia, while systemic side effects, such as easy bruising and reduction in growth velocity or bone mineral densitometry, are usually restricted to doses above maximally recommended doses. Use of LABA alone in patients with asthma increases the risk of asthma-related events including deaths, but this is less observed with the combination of ICS and LABA. Therefore, use of LABA alone is not recommended for asthma therapy. Future progress in ICS development will be characterised by the introduction of ICS with greater efficacy with a limited side-effect profile, and by longer-acting ICS that can be used in combination with once-daily LABAs. Other agents that could improve the efficacy of corticosteroids or reverse corticosteroid insensitivity may be added to ICS. ICS in combination with LABAs will continue to remain the main focus of treatment of airways diseases. PMID:19557399

  5. Allergic airway disease in Italian bakers and pastry makers.

    PubMed Central

    De Zotti, R; Larese, F; Bovenzi, M; Negro, C; Molinari, S

    1994-01-01

    A survey was carried out on respiratory symptoms and skin prick test response to common allergens (atopy), storage mites, and occupational allergens among 226 bakers and pastry makers from 105 small businesses in northern Italy. Atopy was present in 54 workers (23.4%); 40 workers (17.7%) were skin positive to at least one storage mite, 27 (11.9%) to wheat flour and 17 (7.5%) to alpha-amylase. Work related asthma was reported by 11 (4.9%) workers and rhinoconjunctivitis by 31 (17.7%); 22 workers (10.2%) complained of chronic bronchitis. The distribution of skin prick test results among bakers and among 119 white collar workers did not indicate (by logistic analysis) an increased risk for bakers to skin sensitisation to common allergens, storage mite, or to a group of five flours. Sensitisation to wheat flour, on the other hand, was present only among exposed workers. Skin sensitisation to occupational allergens was significantly associated with atopy (p < 0.001), smoking habit (p = 0.015), and work seniority (p = 0.027). The risk of work related symptoms was associated with sensitisation to wheat or alpha-amylase, and with atopy, but not with sensitisation to storage mites, work seniority, or smoking habit. The results of the study indicate that there is still a significant risk of allergic respiratory disease among Italian bakers. Not only wheat allergens, but also alpha-amylase must be considered as causative agents, although sensitisation to storage mites is not important in the occupational allergic response. Atopy must be regarded as an important predisposing factor for skin sensitisation to occupational allergens and for the onset of symptoms at work. The data confirm that for effective prevention, greater care should be taken not only in limiting environmental exposure, but also in identifying susceptible people. PMID:7951780

  6. Analysis of airway secretions in a model of sulfur dioxide induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Ulrich; Staats, Petra; Fehmann, Hans-Christoph; Fischer, Axel; Welte, Tobias; Groneberg, David A

    2006-01-01

    Hypersecretion and chronic phlegm are major symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but animal models of COPD with a defined functional hypersecretion have not been established so far. To identify an animal model of combined morphological signs of airway inflammation and functional hypersecretion, rats were continuously exposed to different levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2, 5 ppm, 10 ppm, 20 ppm, 40 ppm, 80 ppm) for 3 (short-term) or 20–25 (long-term) days. Histology revealed a dose-dependent increase in edema formation and inflammatory cell infiltration in short-term-exposed animals. The submucosal edema was replaced by fibrosis after long-term-exposure. The basal secretory activity was only significantly increased in the 20 ppm group. Also, stimulated secretion was significantly increased only after exposure to 20 ppm. BrdU-assays and AgNOR-analysis demonstrated cellular metaplasia and glandular hypertrophy rather than hyperplasia as the underlying morphological correlate of the hypersecretion. In summary, SO2-exposure can lead to characteristic airway remodeling and changes in mucus secretion in rats. As only long-term exposure to 20 ppm leads to a combination of hypersecretion and airway inflammation, only this mode of exposure should be used to mimic human COPD. Concentrations less or higher than 20 ppm or short term exposure do not induce the respiratory symptom of hypersecretion. The present model may be used to characterize the effects of new compounds on mucus secretion in the background of experimental COPD. PMID:16759388

  7. Induction of obliterative airway disease by anti-HLA class I antibodies.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Takahiro; Jaramillo, Andrés; Narayanan, Kishore; Higuchi, Toru; Mohanakumar, T

    2005-09-01

    Anti-HLA class I Abs are associated with the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after lung transplantation. BOS is characterized histologically by fibrosis and airway epithelial cell apoptosis. We have previously shown that anti-HLA class I Abs induce proliferation, growth factor production and apoptosis in airway epithelial cells in vitro. Thus, this study was designed to determine whether anti-HLA class I Abs alone could induce obliterative airway disease (OAD) in heterotopic murine tracheal allografts. Toward this, HLA-A*0201-transgenic tracheal allografts were transplanted into Rag1-deficient mice treated with the W6/32 anti-HLA class I mAb. Allografts were harvested at days +30, +45, +60 and +90. Allografts displayed epithelial metaplasia by day +45, epithelial destruction and mild cellular infiltration by day +60 and complete lumen obliteration and moderate cellular infiltration by day +90. Anti-HLA class I Abs induced the production of several growth factors and growth factor receptors and apoptosis of parenchymal cells in the allograft. In addition, anti-HLA class I Abs induced macrophages and granulocytes infiltration. The results from this study demonstrate that anti-HLA class I Abs play an important role in the pathogenesis of OAD by inducing growth factor production, apoptosis and chemotaxis of inflammatory cells. PMID:16095491

  8. A Screening Study to Determine the Prevalence of Airway Disease in Heroin Smokers.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Burke, Nadia; Vlies, Ben; Wooding, Olivia; Davies, Lisa; Walker, Paul P

    2016-06-01

    Over the last 20 years smoking has become the most common method of heroin use and increasing numbers of heroin smokers are presenting to local medical services, before the age of 40 years, with severe airway disease. To determine COPD prevalence we recruited 129 subjects from two local community drug services, of whom 107 were heroin smokers. We collected demographic, medical and treatment data, smoking history (including cannabis and opiates) and details of symptoms including MRC dyspnoea. Subjects completed the COPD Assessment Tool and spirometry. Thirty heroin smokers were identified as having COPD resulting in a COPD prevalence of 28%. Mean age was 43 (4) years and FEV1 was 2.71 (0.98) L; 70 (23) %predicted. Breathlessness and wheeze were more common in subjects with COPD (p < 0.04 and p < 0.05) but symptoms were common in all heroin smokers. MRC score was higher (3 vs. 2.4; p < 0.04) in those with COPD and health status appeared poorer (CAT 20.4 vs. 15.8; p < 0.07). Only 4 (11%) had previously been diagnosed with COPD and only 16 (53%) received any inhaled medication. Asthma prevalence was also high at 33% and asthmatic subjects had similar symptoms and health status compared with the COPD subjects, and were also significantly undertreated. COPD and asthma are common in current and former heroin smokers. They are often present at a young age and are underdiagnosed and undertreated. Awareness of this issue should be highlighted within drug services and in particular to heroin smokers. Screening this high-risk population with spirometry should be considered. PMID:26701201

  9. Occupational airways diseases from chronic low-level exposures to irritants.

    PubMed

    Balmes, John R

    2002-12-01

    Short-term, high-level exposures to dusts, gases, mists, fumes, and smoke that are irritating to the respiratory tract are capable of inducing asthma, the so-called reactive airways dysfunction syndrome. Such exposures, however, do not occur frequently; chronic or recurrent exposures to lower levels of irritants are much more common. This article reviews the evidence that supports the concept that low-level exposures to respiratory tract irritants can contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. PMID:12512162

  10. The Influence of Asian Dust, Haze, Mist, and Fog on Hospital Visits for Airway Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinkyeong; Lim, Myoung Nam; Hong, Yoonki

    2015-01-01

    Background Asian dust is known to have harmful effects on the respiratory system. Respiratory conditions are also influenced by environmental conditions regardless of the presence of pollutants. The same pollutant can have different effects on the airway when the air is dry compared with when it is humid. We investigated hospital visits for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma in relation to the environmental conditions. Methods We conducted a retrospective study using the Korean National Health Insurance Service claims database of patients who visited hospitals in Chuncheon between January 2006 and April 2012. Asian dust, haze, mist, and fog days were determined using reports from the Korea Meteorological Administration. Hospital visits for asthma or COPD on the index days were compared with the comparison days. We used two-way case-crossover techniques with one to two matching. Results The mean hospital visits for asthma and COPD were 59.37 ± 34.01 and 10.04 ± 6.18 per day, respectively. Hospital visits for asthma significantly increased at lag0 and lag1 for Asian dust (relative risk [RR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.19; p<0.05) and haze (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.06-1.22; p<0.05), but were significantly lower on misty (RR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.80-0.99; p<0.05) and foggy (RR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.84-0.93; p<0.05) days than on control days. The hospital visits for COPD also significantly increased on days with Asian dust (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.05-1.59; p<0.05), and were significantly lower at lag4 for foggy days, compared with days without fog (RR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75-0.97; p<0.05). Conclusion Asian dust showed an association with airway diseases and had effects for several days after the exposure. In contrast to Asian dust, mist and fog, which occur in humid air conditions, showed the opposite effects on airway diseases, after adjusting to the pollutants. It would require more research to investigate the effects of various air conditions on

  11. A novel model for post-transplant obliterative airway disease reveals angiogenesis from the pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Dutly, Andre E; Andrade, Cristiano F; Verkaik, Ryan; Kugathasan, Lakshmi; Trogadis, Judy; Liu, Mingyao; Waddell, Thomas K; Stewart, Duncan J; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2005-02-01

    We present a novel animal model for post-transplant obliterative airway disease in which the donor trachea is implanted into the recipient's lung parenchyma. Although this procedure is technically more challenging than the heterotopic model of implantation into a subcutaneous pouch, it has several important advantages some of which are the appropriate local environment and the possibility of local immunosuppressive therapy after transtracheal gene, cell or drug delivery. This model has revealed new insights into angiogenic potential of the pulmonary circulation. PMID:15643984

  12. Tachykinin receptors and airway pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A

    1993-05-01

    The mammalian tachykinins (TKs), substance P and neurokinin A, are present in sensory nerve fibres in the upper and lower airways of various mammalian species, including humans. TKs are released from these afferent nerves in an "efferent" mode at peripheral level, especially in response to irritant stimuli. TKs exert a variety of biological effects (bronchoconstriction, plasma protein extravasation, stimulation of mucus secretion), collectively known as "neurogenic inflammation", and this process is thought to be of potential pathogenic relevance for various airway diseases. The recent development of potent and selective TK receptor antagonists on the one hand provides important new tools for the understanding of basic airway physiology and pathophysiology and, on the other, opens new possibilities for therapy of airway diseases. PMID:8390944

  13. The spectrum of allergic fungal diseases of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jonathan; Caruthers, Carrie; Azmeh, Roua; Dykewicz, Mark S; Slavin, Raymond G; Knutsen, Alan P

    2016-05-01

    Fungi cause a wide spectrum of fungal diseases of the upper and lower airways. There are three main phyla involved in allergic fungal disease: (1) Ascomycota (2) Basidiomycota (3) Zygomycota. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS) causes chronic rhinosinusitis symptoms and is caused predominantly by Aspergillus fumigatus in India and Bipolaris in the United States. The recommended treatment approach for AFRS is surgical intervention and systemic steroids. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (APBA) is most commonly diagnosed in patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Long term systemic steroids are the mainstay treatment option for ABPA with the addition of an antifungal medication. Fungal sensitization or exposure increases a patient's risk of developing severe asthma and has been termed severe asthma associated with fungal sensitivity (SAFS). Investigating for triggers and causes of a patient's asthma should be sought to decrease worsening progression of the disease. PMID:26776889

  14. Vitronectin expression in the airways of subjects with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Peláez, Lina M; Abraham, Thomas; Herrera, Ana M; Correa, Mario A; Ortega, Jorge E; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2015-01-01

    Vitronectin, a multifunctional glycoprotein, is involved in coagulation, inhibition of the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), cell adhesion and migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling. The primary cellular source of vitronectin is hepatocytes; it is not known whether resident cells of airways produce vitronectin, even though the glycoprotein has been found in exhaled breath condensate and bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. It is also not known whether vitronectin expression is altered in subjects with asthma and COPD. In this study, bronchial tissue from 7 asthmatic, 10 COPD and 14 control subjects was obtained at autopsy and analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the percent area of submucosal glands occupied by vitronectin. In a separate set of experiments, quantitative colocalization analysis was performed on tracheobronchial tissue sections obtained from donor lungs (6 asthmatics, 4 COPD and 7 controls). Vitronectin RNA and protein expressions in bronchial surface epithelium were examined in 12 subjects who undertook diagnostic bronchoscopy. Vitronectin was found in the tracheobronchial epithelium from asthmatic, COPD, and control subjects, although its expression was significantly lower in the asthmatic group. Colocalization analysis of 3D confocal images indicates that vitronectin is expressed in the glandular serous epithelial cells and in respiratory surface epithelial cells other than goblet cells. Expression of the 65-kDa vitronectin isoform was lower in bronchial surface epithelium from the diseased subjects. The cause for the decreased vitronectin expression in asthma is not clear, however, the reduced concentration of vitronectin in the epithelial/submucosal layer of airways may be linked to airway remodeling. PMID:25768308

  15. Vitronectin Expression in the Airways of Subjects with Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Peláez, Lina M.; Abraham, Thomas; Herrera, Ana M.; Correa, Mario A.; Ortega, Jorge E.; Paré, Peter D.; Seow, Chun Y.

    2015-01-01

    Vitronectin, a multifunctional glycoprotein, is involved in coagulation, inhibition of the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC), cell adhesion and migration, wound healing, and tissue remodeling. The primary cellular source of vitronectin is hepatocytes; it is not known whether resident cells of airways produce vitronectin, even though the glycoprotein has been found in exhaled breath condensate and bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy subjects and patients with interstitial lung disease. It is also not known whether vitronectin expression is altered in subjects with asthma and COPD. In this study, bronchial tissue from 7 asthmatic, 10 COPD and 14 control subjects was obtained at autopsy and analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine the percent area of submucosal glands occupied by vitronectin. In a separate set of experiments, quantitative colocalization analysis was performed on tracheobronchial tissue sections obtained from donor lungs (6 asthmatics, 4 COPD and 7 controls). Vitronectin RNA and protein expressions in bronchial surface epithelium were examined in 12 subjects who undertook diagnostic bronchoscopy. Vitronectin was found in the tracheobronchial epithelium from asthmatic, COPD, and control subjects, although its expression was significantly lower in the asthmatic group. Colocalization analysis of 3D confocal images indicates that vitronectin is expressed in the glandular serous epithelial cells and in respiratory surface epithelial cells other than goblet cells. Expression of the 65-kDa vitronectin isoform was lower in bronchial surface epithelium from the diseased subjects. The cause for the decreased vitronectin expression in asthma is not clear, however, the reduced concentration of vitronectin in the epithelial/submucosal layer of airways may be linked to airway remodeling. PMID:25768308

  16. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1.5 MB] More Data Age-adjusted death rates for selected causes of death, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin (chronic lower respiratory disease includes chronic bronchitis, emphysema, asthma, and other ...

  17. Long-term exposure to house dust mite leads to suppression of allergic airway disease despite persistent lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Sonali J.; Adami, Alexander J.; Szczepanek, Steven M.; Ehsan, Mohsin; Natarajan, Prabitha; Guernsey, Linda A.; Shahriari, Neda; Rafti, Ektor; Matson, Adam P.; Schramm, Craig M.; Thrall, Roger S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergic asthma is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and results from inadequate immune regulation in response to innocuous, environmental antigens. The need exists to understand the mechanisms that promote non-reactivity to human-relevant allergens such as house dust mite (HDM) in order to develop curative therapies for asthma. The aim of our study was to compare the effects of short-, intermediate- and long-term HDM administration in a murine asthma model and determine the ability of long-term HDM exposure to suppress allergic inflammation. Methods C57BL/6 mice were intranasally instilled with HDM for short-term (2 weeks), intermediate-term (5 weeks) and long-term (11 weeks) periods to induce allergic airway disease (AAD). Severity of AAD was compared across all stages of the model via both immunologic and pulmonary parameters. Results Short- and intermediate-term HDM exposure stimulated development of AAD that included eosinophilia in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), pronounced airway hyper-reactivity (AHR), and evidence of lung inflammation. Long-term HDM exposure promoted suppression of AAD, with loss of BAL eosinophilia and AHR despite persistent mononuclear inflammation in the lungs. Suppression of AAD with long-term HDM exposure was associated with an increase in both Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and IL-10+ alveolar macrophages at the site of inflammation. Conclusions This model recapitulates key features of human asthma and may facilitate investigation into the mechanisms that promote immunological tolerance against clinically relevant aeroallergens. PMID:25924733

  18. Paranasal sinus opacification at MRI in lower airway disease (the HUNT study-MRI).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Aleksander Grande; Helvik, Anne-Sofie; Thorstensen, Wenche Moe; Nordgård, Ståle; Langhammer, Arnulf; Bugten, Vegard; Stovner, Lars Jacob; Eggesbø, Heidi Beate

    2016-07-01

    The study builds on the concept of united airways, which describes the link between the upper and lower airways. Explorations of this concept have mainly related to asthma and less to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to investigate paranasal sinus opacification at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in COPD, self-reported asthma and respiratory symptoms. In this cross-sectional study, 880 randomly selected participants in the Nord-Trøndelag health survey (HUNT) (mean age 57.7 years, range 50-66 years, 463 women) were investigated using MRI of the paranasal sinuses. Participants were allocated to four mutually exclusive groups: (1) COPD (n = 20), (2) asthma (n = 89), (3) respiratory symptoms (n = 199), and (4) reference group (n = 572). Paranasal sinus opacifications were categorised as mucosal thickening, polyps and retention cysts, and fluid. In each participant, measurements ≥1 mm from all sinuses were summed to give a total for each category of opacities. The sums for these three categories were further added together, and referred to as the total sum. Using the 75th percentile cut-off values, the likelihood of having paranasal sinus opacifications was more than six times higher in participants with COPD and twice as high in participants with asthma than among the reference group. Respiratory symptoms were only associated with mucosal thickening. The present study shows that paranasal sinus opacification is associated not only with asthma, but also with COPD and respiratory symptoms. This is in accordance with the united airways hypothesis, and should be kept in mind when handling patients with these conditions. PMID:26499376

  19. Characterizing Lung Disease in Cystic Fibrosis with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Airway Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Darquenne, Chantal; Elliott, Ann R.; Bailey, Barbara A.; Conrad, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Translational investigations in cystic fibrosis (CF) have a need for improved quantitative and longitudinal measures of disease status. To establish a non-invasive quantitative MRI technique to monitor lung health in patients with CF and correlate MR metrics with airway physiology as measured by multiple breath washout (MBW). Data were collected in 12 CF patients and 12 healthy controls. Regional (central and peripheral lung) measures of fractional lung water density (FLD: air to 100% fluid) were acquired both at FRC and TLC on a 1.5T MRI. The median FLD (mFLD) and the FRC-to-TLC mFLD ratio were calculated for each region at both lung volumes. Spirometry and MBW data were also acquired for each subject. Ventilation inhomogeneities were quantified by the lung clearance index (LCI) and by indices Scond* and Sacin* that assess inhomogeneities in the conducting (central) and acinar (peripheral) lung regions, respectively. MBW indices and mFLD at TLC (both regions) were significantly elevated in CF (p<0.01) compared to controls. The mFLD at TLC (central: R = 0.82) and the FRC-to-TLC mFLD ratio (peripheral: R = -0.77) were strongly correlated with Scond* and LCI. CF patients had high lung water content at TLC when compared to controls. This is likely due to the presence of retained airway secretions and airway wall edema (more water) and to limited expansions of air trapping areas (less air) in CF subjects. FRC-to-TLC ratios of mFLD strongly correlated with central ventilation inhomogeneities. These combined measures may provide a useful marker of both retained mucus and air trapping in CF lungs. PMID:27337056

  20. Occupational obstructive airway diseases in Germany: Frequency and causes in an international comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Latza, U.; Baur, X.

    2005-08-01

    Occupational inhalative exposures contribute to a significant proportion of obstructive airway diseases (OAD), namely chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The number of occupational OAD in the German industrial sector for the year 2003 are presented. Other analyses of surveillance data were retrieved from Medline. Most confirmed reports of OAD are cases of sensitizer induced occupational asthma (625 confirmed cases) followed by COPD in coal miners (414 cases), irritant induced occupational asthma (156 cases), and isocyanate asthma (54 cases). Main causes of occupational asthma in Germany comprise flour/flour constituents (35.9%), food/feed dust (9.0%), and isocyanates (6.5%). Flour and grain dust is a frequent cause of occupational asthma in most European countries and South Africa. Isocyanates are still a problem worldwide. Although wide differences in the estimated incidences between countries exist due to deficits in the coverage of occupational OAD, the high numbers necessitate improvement of preventive measures.

  1. Immunoglobulin G Subclass Deficiencies in Adult Patients with Chronic Airway Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Hee; Park, Sunghoon; Hwang, Yong Il; Jang, Seung Hun; Jung, Ki Suck; Sim, Yun Su; Kim, Cheol Hong; Kim, Changhwan; Kim, Dong Gyu

    2016-10-01

    Immunoglobulin G subclass deficiency (IgGSCD) is a relatively common primary immunodeficiency disease (PI) in adults. The biological significance of IgGSCD in patients with chronic airway diseases is controversial. We conducted a retrospective study to characterize the clinical features of IgGSCD in this population. This study examined the medical charts from 59 adult patients with IgGSCD who had bronchial asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) from January 2007 to December 2012. Subjects were classified according to the 10 warning signs developed by the Jeffrey Modell Foundation (JMF) and divided into two patient groups: group I (n = 17) met ≥ two JMF criteria, whereas group II (n = 42) met none. IgG3 deficiency was the most common subclass deficiency (88.1%), followed by IgG4 (15.3%). The most common infectious complication was pneumonia, followed by recurrent bronchitis, and rhinosinusitis. The numbers of infections, hospitalizations, and exacerbations of asthma or COPD per year were significantly higher in group I than in group II (P < 0.001, P = 0.012, and P < 0.001, respectively). The follow-up mean forced expiratory volume (FEV1) level in group I was significantly lower than it was at baseline despite treatment of asthma or COPD (P = 0.036). In conclusion, IgGSCD is an important PI in the subset of patients with chronic airway diseases who had recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections as they presented with exacerbation-prone phenotypes, decline in lung function, and subsequently poor prognosis. PMID:27550483

  2. Small airway dysfunction and flow and volume bronchodilator responsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Pisi, Roberta; Aiello, Marina; Zanini, Andrea; Tzani, Panagiota; Paleari, Davide; Marangio, Emilio; Spanevello, Antonio; Nicolini, Gabriele; Chetta, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated whether a relationship between small airways dysfunction and bronchodilator responsiveness exists in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods We studied 100 (20 female; mean age: 68±10 years) patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 55% pred ±21%; FEV1/forced vital capacity [FVC]: 53%±10%) by impulse oscillometry system. Resistance at 5 Hz and 20 Hz (R5 and R20, in kPa·s·L−1) and the fall in resistance from 5 Hz to 20 Hz (R5 – R20) were used as indices of total, proximal, and peripheral airway resistance; reactance at 5 Hz (X5, in kPa·s·L−1) was also measured. Significant response to bronchodilator (salbutamol 400 μg) was expressed as absolute (≥0.2 L) and percentage (≥12%) change relative to the prebronchodilator value of FEV1 (flow responders, FRs) and FVC (volume responders, VRs). Results Eighty out of 100 participants had R5 – R20 >0.03 kPa·s·L−1 (> upper normal limit) and, compared to patients with R5 – R20 ≤0.030 kPa·s·L−1, showed a poorer health status, lower values of FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, and X5, along with higher values of residual volume/total lung capacity and R5 (P<0.05 for all comparisons). Compared to the 69 nonresponders and the 8 FRs, the 16 VRs had significantly higher R5 and R5 – R20 values (P<0.05), lower X5 values (P<0.05), and greater airflow obstruction and lung hyperinflation. Conclusion This study shows that peripheral airway resistance is increased in the vast majority of patients with COPD, who showed worse respiratory reactance, worse spirometry results, more severe lung hyperinflation, and poorer health status. Small airway dysfunction was also associated with the bronchodilator responsiveness in terms of FVC, but not in terms of FEV1. PMID:26150710

  3. Alterations of the Murine Gut Microbiome with Age and Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Marius; Harkema, Jack R.; Rizzo, Mike; Tiedje, James; Brandenberger, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an important role in the development of asthma. With advanced age the microbiome and the immune system are changing and, currently, little is known about how these two factors contribute to the development of allergic asthma in the elderly. In this study we investigated the associations between the intestinal microbiome and allergic airway disease in young and old mice that were sensitized and challenged with house dust mite (HDM). After challenge, the animals were sacrificed, blood serum was collected for cytokine analysis, and the lungs were processed for histopathology. Fecal pellets were excised from the colon and subjected to 16S rRNA analysis. The microbial community structure changed with age and allergy development, where alterations in fecal communities from young to old mice resembled those after HDM challenge. Allergic mice had induced serum levels of IL-17A and old mice developed a greater allergic airway response compared to young mice. This study demonstrates that the intestinal bacterial community structure differs with age, possibly contributing to the exaggerated pulmonary inflammatory response in old mice. Furthermore, our results show that the composition of the gut microbiota changes with pulmonary allergy, indicating bidirectional gut-lung communications. PMID:26090504

  4. Alterations of the Murine Gut Microbiome with Age and Allergic Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Harkema, Jack R; Rizzo, Mike; Tiedje, James; Brandenberger, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays an important role in the development of asthma. With advanced age the microbiome and the immune system are changing and, currently, little is known about how these two factors contribute to the development of allergic asthma in the elderly. In this study we investigated the associations between the intestinal microbiome and allergic airway disease in young and old mice that were sensitized and challenged with house dust mite (HDM). After challenge, the animals were sacrificed, blood serum was collected for cytokine analysis, and the lungs were processed for histopathology. Fecal pellets were excised from the colon and subjected to 16S rRNA analysis. The microbial community structure changed with age and allergy development, where alterations in fecal communities from young to old mice resembled those after HDM challenge. Allergic mice had induced serum levels of IL-17A and old mice developed a greater allergic airway response compared to young mice. This study demonstrates that the intestinal bacterial community structure differs with age, possibly contributing to the exaggerated pulmonary inflammatory response in old mice. Furthermore, our results show that the composition of the gut microbiota changes with pulmonary allergy, indicating bidirectional gut-lung communications. PMID:26090504

  5. A novel thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide, attenuates allergic airway disease by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Sun; Kim, So Ri; Park, Hee Sun; Park, Seoung Ju; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Ka Young; Choe, Yeong Hun; Hong, Sang Hyun; Han, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young Rae; Kim, Jong Suk; Atlas, Daphne; Lee, Yong Chul

    2007-12-31

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Recent studies have demonstrated that antioxidants are able to reduce airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in animal models of allergic airway disease. A newly developed antioxidant, small molecular weight thiol compound, N-acetylcysteine amide (AD4) has been shown to increase cellular levels of glutathione and to attenuate oxidative stress related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, the effects of AD4 on allergic airway disease such as asthma are unknown. We used ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled mice to evaluate the role of AD4 in allergic airway disease. In this study with OVA-inhaled mice, the increased ROS generation, the increased levels of Th2 cytokines and VEGF, the increased vascular permeability, the increased mucus production, and the increased airway resistance in the lungs were significantly reduced by the administration of AD4. We also found that the administration of AD4 decreased the increases of the NF-kappaB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) levels in nuclear protein extracts of lung tissues after OVA inhalation. These results suggest that AD4 attenuates airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by regulating activation of NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha as well as reducing ROS generation in allergic airway disease. PMID:18160846

  6. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES CHRONIC AIRWAY DISEASE IN ENDOTOXIN-SENSITIVE BUT NOT ENDOTOXIN-RESISTANT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES CHRONIC AIRWAY DISEASE IN ENDOTOXIN-SENSITIVE BUT NOT ENDOTOXIN-RESISTANT MICE. D. M. Brass, J. D. Savov, *S. H. Gavett, ?C. George, D. A. Schwartz. Duke Univ Medical Center Durham, NC, *U.S. E.P.A. Research Triangle Park, NC, ?Univ of Iowa,...

  7. Predictors of Long-Term Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Disease in the SAVE Study

    PubMed Central

    Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; Luo, Yuan-Ming; Antic, Nick A.; Zhang, Xi-Long; Chen, Bao-Yuan; He, Quan-Ying; Heeley, Emma; Huang, Shao-Guang; Anderson, Craig; Zhong, Nan-Shan; McEvoy, R. Doug

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the clinical variables that best predict long- term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence among patients with cardiovascular disease who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design: 12-mo prospective within-trial observational study. Setting: Centers in China, Australia, and New Zealand participating in the Sleep Apnea cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) study. Patients: There were 275 patients age 45-70 y with cardiovascular disease (i.e., previously documented transient ischemic attack, stroke, or coronary artery disease) and OSA (4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) > 12) who were randomized into the CPAP arm of the SAVE trial prior to July 1, 2010. Methods: Age, sex, country of residence, type of cardiovascular disease, baseline ODI, severity of sleepiness, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores plus CPAP side effects and adherence at 1 mo were entered in univariate analyses in an attempt to identify factors predictive of CPAP adherence at 12 mo. Variables with P < 0.2 were then included in a multivariate analysis using a linear mixed model with sites as a random effect and 12-mo CPAP use as the dependent outcome variable. Measurements and Results: CPAP adherence at 1, 6, and 12 mo was (mean ± standard deviation) 4.4 ± 2.0, 3.8 ± 2.3, and 3.3 ± 2.4 h/night, respectively. CPAP use at 1 mo (effect estimate ± standard error, 0.65 ± 0.07 per h increase, P < 0.001) and side effects at 1 mo (-0.24 ± 0.092 per additional side effect, P = 0.009) were the only independent predictors of 12- mo CPAP adherence. Conclusion: Continuous positive airway pressure use in patients with coexisting cardiovascular disease and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea decreases significantly over 12 months. This decline can be predicted by early patient experiences with continuous positive airway pressure (i.e., adherence and side effects at 1 month), raising the possibility that intensive early interventions could

  8. Functional assessment of expiratory flow pattern in feline lower airway disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Hui; Lee, Jih-Jong; Liu, Chen-Hsuan

    2014-08-01

    Feline lower airway disease (FLAD) is a chronic respiratory disease of which there is a lack of information on functional assessment in current veterinary medicine. The purposes of this study were to investigate expiratory pattern and evaluate the diagnostic utility of functional parameters in cats with FLAD. Thirty-three client-owned cats (23 FLAD cats and 10 control cats) were studied. Under quiet tidal breathing, pseudo-tidal breathing flow-volume loop (pTBFVL) was obtained from a barometric whole body plethysmography (BWBP) device. There were significant differences in the shapes of expiratory, but not inspiratory, curves between FLAD and control cats. The incidence of the presence of concave expiratory curve indicating lower airway obstruction was 74% in FLAD cats. To assess the diagnostic utility of pTBFVL indices in cats with FLAD, area under the receiver-operator curve was 0.86 for PEF/EF50 (peak expiratory flow divided by expiratory flow at end expiratory volume plus 50% tidal volume); a cuff-off value of PEF/EF50 >1.51 distinguished normal from FLAD (73.9% sensitivity, 100% specificity). There were no significant differences in traditionally measured BWBP parameters (ie, enhanced pause) between cats with and without FLAD in the present study. In conclusion, underlying change on expiratory flow pattern during natural tidal breathing existed in FLAD cats, and selected pTBFVL indices were useful in discriminating FLAD from normal cats. Tidal breathing pattern depicted by pseudoflow-pseudovolume loops from a BWBP system could be a non-invasive tool for functional assessment in client-owned cats. PMID:24327372

  9. Reversible Control by Vitamin D of Granulocytes and Bacteria in the Lungs of Mice: An Ovalbumin-Induced Model of Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Shelley; Weeden, Clare E.; Tan, Daryl H. W.; Scott, Naomi M.; Hart, Julie; Foong, Rachel E.; Mok, Danny; Stephens, Nahiid; Zosky, Graeme; Hart, Prue H.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D may be essential for restricting the development and severity of allergic diseases and asthma, but a direct causal link between vitamin D deficiency and asthma has yet to be established. We have developed a ‘low dose’ model of allergic airway disease induced by intraperitoneal injection with ovalbumin (1 µg) and aluminium hydroxide (0.2 mg) in which characteristics of atopic asthma are recapitulated, including airway hyperresponsiveness, antigen-specific immunoglobulin type-E and lung inflammation. We assessed the effects of vitamin D deficiency throughout life (from conception until adulthood) on the severity of ovalbumin-induced allergic airway disease in vitamin D-replete and -deficient BALB/c mice using this model. Vitamin D had protective effects such that deficiency significantly enhanced eosinophil and neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of male but not female mice. Vitamin D also suppressed the proliferation and T helper cell type-2 cytokine-secreting capacity of airway-draining lymph node cells from both male and female mice. Supplementation of initially vitamin D-deficient mice with vitamin D for four weeks returned serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D to levels observed in initially vitamin D-replete mice, and also suppressed eosinophil and neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of male mice. Using generic 16 S rRNA primers, increased bacterial levels were detected in the lungs of initially vitamin D-deficient male mice, which were also reduced by vitamin D supplementation. These results indicate that vitamin D controls granulocyte levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in an allergen-sensitive manner, and may contribute towards the severity of asthma in a gender-specific fashion through regulation of respiratory bacteria. PMID:23826346

  10. Interleukin-1 Receptor and Caspase-1 Are Required for the Th17 Response in Nitrogen Dioxide–Promoted Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rebecca A.; Ather, Jennifer L.; Lundblad, Lennart K. A.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Boyson, Jonathan E.; Budd, Ralph C.; Alcorn, John F.; Flavell, Richard A.; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an environmental pollutant and endogenously generated oxidant associated with the development, severity, and exacerbation of asthma. NO2 exposure is capable of allergically sensitizing mice to the innocuous inhaled antigen ovalbumin (OVA), promoting neutrophil and eosinophil recruitment, and a mixed Th2/Th17 response upon antigen challenge that is reminiscent of severe asthma. However, the identity of IL-17A–producing cells and the mechanisms governing their ontogeny in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease remain unstudied. We measured the kinetics of lung inflammation after antigen challenge in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease, including inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage and antigen-specific IL-17A production from the lung. We determined that IL-17A+ cells were predominately CD4+T cell receptor (TCR)β+ Th17 cells, and that a functional IL-1 receptor was required for Th17, but not Th2, cytokine production after in vitro antigen restimulation of lung cells. The absence of natural killer T cells, γδ T cells, or the inflammasome scaffold nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain, leucine rich repeat and pyrin domain (Nlrp)3 did not affect the development of NO2-promoted allergic inflammation or IL-17A production. Similarly, neutrophil depletion or the neutralization of IL-1α during sensitization exerted no effect on these parameters. However, the absence of caspase-1 significantly reduced IL-17A production from lung cells without affecting Th2 cytokines or lung inflammation. Finally, the intranasal administration of IL-1β and the inhalation of antigen promoted allergic sensitization that was reflected by neutrophilic airway inflammation and IL-17A production from CD4+TCRβ+ Th17 cells subsequent to antigen challenge. These data implicate a role for caspase-1 and IL-1β in the IL-1 receptor–dependent Th17 response manifest in NO2-promoted allergic airway disease. PMID:23371061

  11. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia including Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Heather M; Corriveau, Roderick A; Craft, Suzanne; Faber, James E; Greenberg, Steven M; Knopman, David; Lamb, Bruce T; Montine, Thomas J; Nedergaard, Maiken; Schaffer, Chris B; Schneider, Julie A; Wellington, Cheryl; Wilcock, Donna M; Zipfel, Gregory J; Zlokovic, Berislav; Bain, Lisa J; Bosetti, Francesca; Galis, Zorina S; Koroshetz, Walter; Carrillo, Maria C

    2015-06-01

    Scientific evidence continues to demonstrate the linkage of vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia such as Alzheimer's disease. In December, 2013, the Alzheimer's Association, with scientific input from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute from the National Institutes of Health, convened scientific experts to discuss the research gaps in our understanding of how vascular factors contribute to Alzheimer's disease and related dementia. This manuscript summarizes the meeting and the resultant discussion, including an outline of next steps needed to move this area of research forward. PMID:25510382

  12. Temperature effects on outpatient visits of respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated the risk of outpatient visits for respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction not elsewhere classified (CAO) associated with ambient temperatures and extreme temperature events from 2000 to 2008 in Taiwan. Based on geographical and socioeconomics characteristics, this study divided the whole island into seven areas. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the area-disease-specific cumulative relative risk (RR), and random-effect meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled RR of outpatient visits, from lag 0 to lag 7 days, associated with daily temperature, and added effects of prolonged extreme heat and cold for population of all ages, the elderly and younger than 65 years. Pooled analyses showed that younger population had higher outpatient visits for exposing to low temperature of 18 °C, with cumulative 8-day RRs of 1.36 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.31-1.42) for respiratory diseases, 1.10 (95 % CI 1.03-1.18) for asthma, and 1.12 (95 % CI 1.02-1.22) for CAO. The elderly was more vulnerable to high temperature of 30 °C with the cumulative 8-day RR of 1.08 (95 % CI 1.03-1.13) for CAO. Elevated outpatient visits for all respiratory diseases and asthma were associated with extreme heat lasting for 6 to 8 days. On the contrary, the extreme cold lasting more than 8 days had significant negative association with outpatient visits of all respiratory diseases. In summary, elderly patients of respiratory diseases and CAO are vulnerable to high temperature. Cold temperature is associated with all types of respiratory diseases for younger patients.

  13. Temperature effects on outpatient visits of respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Lin, Yu-Kai

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated the risk of outpatient visits for respiratory diseases, asthma, and chronic airway obstruction not elsewhere classified (CAO) associated with ambient temperatures and extreme temperature events from 2000 to 2008 in Taiwan. Based on geographical and socioeconomics characteristics, this study divided the whole island into seven areas. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to estimate the area-disease-specific cumulative relative risk (RR), and random-effect meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled RR of outpatient visits, from lag 0 to lag 7 days, associated with daily temperature, and added effects of prolonged extreme heat and cold for population of all ages, the elderly and younger than 65 years. Pooled analyses showed that younger population had higher outpatient visits for exposing to low temperature of 18 °C, with cumulative 8-day RRs of 1.36 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.31-1.42) for respiratory diseases, 1.10 (95 % CI 1.03-1.18) for asthma, and 1.12 (95 % CI 1.02-1.22) for CAO. The elderly was more vulnerable to high temperature of 30 °C with the cumulative 8-day RR of 1.08 (95 % CI 1.03-1.13) for CAO. Elevated outpatient visits for all respiratory diseases and asthma were associated with extreme heat lasting for 6 to 8 days. On the contrary, the extreme cold lasting more than 8 days had significant negative association with outpatient visits of all respiratory diseases. In summary, elderly patients of respiratory diseases and CAO are vulnerable to high temperature. Cold temperature is associated with all types of respiratory diseases for younger patients.

  14. Spray cryotherapy (SCT): institutional evolution of techniques and clinical practice from early experience in the treatment of malignant airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J. Francis; Parrish, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Spray cryotherapy (SCT) was initially developed for gastroenterology (GI) endoscopic use in the esophagus. In some institutions where a device has been utilized by GI, transition to use in the airways by pulmonologists and thoracic surgeons occurred. Significant differences exist, however, in the techniques for safely using SCT in the airways. Methods We describe the early experience at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center from 2011 to 2013 using SCT in patients with malignant airway disease and the evolution of our current techniques and clinical practice patterns for SCT use in patients. In November 2013 enrollment began in a multi-institutional prospective SCT registry in which we are still enrolling and will be reported on separately. Results Twenty-seven patients that underwent 80 procedures (2.96 procedures/patient). The average age was 63 years with a range of 20 to 87 years old. The average Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status was 1.26. All malignancies were advanced stage disease. All procedures were performed in the central airways. Other modalities were used in combination with SCT in 31 (39%) of procedures. Additionally 45 of the 80 (56%) procedures were performed in proximity to a silicone, hybrid, or metal stent. Three complications occurred out of the 80 procedures. All three were transient hypoxia that limited continued SCT treatments. These patients were all discharged from the bronchoscopy recovery room to their pre-surgical state. Conclusions SCT can be safely used for treatment of malignant airway tumor (MAT) in the airways. Understanding passive venting of the nitrogen gas produced as the liquid nitrogen changes to gas is important for safe use of the device. Complications can be minimized by adopting strict protocols to maximize passive venting and to allow for adequate oxygenation in between sprays. PMID:26807288

  15. Morbidly obese parturient: Challenges for the anaesthesiologist, including managing the difficult airway in obstetrics. What is new?

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Durga Prasada; Rao, Venkateswara A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the fundamental aspects of obesity, pregnancy and a combination of both. The scientific aim is to understand the physiological changes, pathological clinical presentations and application of technical skills and pharmacological knowledge on this unique clinical condition. The goal of this presentation is to define the difficult airway, highlight the main reasons for difficult or failed intubation and propose a practical approach to management Throughout the review, an important component is the necessity for team work between the anaesthesiologist and the obstetrician. Certain protocols are recommended to meet the anaesthetic challenges and finally concluding with “what is new?” in obstetric anaesthesia. PMID:21224967

  16. Airway segmentation and analysis for the study of mouse models of lung disease using micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaechevarria, X.; Pérez-Martín, D.; Ceresa, M.; de Biurrun, G.; Blanco, D.; Montuenga, L. M.; van Ginneken, B.; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, C.; Muñoz-Barrutia, A.

    2009-11-01

    Animal models of lung disease are gaining importance in understanding the underlying mechanisms of diseases such as emphysema and lung cancer. Micro-CT allows in vivo imaging of these models, thus permitting the study of the progression of the disease or the effect of therapeutic drugs in longitudinal studies. Automated analysis of micro-CT images can be helpful to understand the physiology of diseased lungs, especially when combined with measurements of respiratory system input impedance. In this work, we present a fast and robust murine airway segmentation and reconstruction algorithm. The algorithm is based on a propagating fast marching wavefront that, as it grows, divides the tree into segments. We devised a number of specific rules to guarantee that the front propagates only inside the airways and to avoid leaking into the parenchyma. The algorithm was tested on normal mice, a mouse model of chronic inflammation and a mouse model of emphysema. A comparison with manual segmentations of two independent observers shows that the specificity and sensitivity values of our method are comparable to the inter-observer variability, and radius measurements of the mainstem bronchi reveal significant differences between healthy and diseased mice. Combining measurements of the automatically segmented airways with the parameters of the constant phase model provides extra information on how disease affects lung function.

  17. Outgrowth of the Bacterial Airway Microbiome after Rhinovirus Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Molyneaux, Philip L.; Mallia, Patrick; Cox, Michael J.; Footitt, Joseph; Willis-Owen, Saffron A. G.; Homola, Daniel; Trujillo-Torralbo, Maria-Belen; Elkin, Sarah; Kon, Onn Min; Cookson, William O. C.; Johnston, Sebastian L.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Rhinovirus infection is followed by significantly increased frequencies of positive, potentially pathogenic sputum cultures in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unclear whether these represent de novo infections or an increased load of organisms from the complex microbial communities (microbiome) in the lower airways. Objectives: To investigate the effect of rhinovirus infection on the airway bacterial microbiome. Methods: Subjects with COPD (n = 14) and healthy control subjects with normal lung function (n = 17) were infected with rhinovirus. Induced sputum was collected at baseline before rhinovirus inoculation and again on Days 5, 15, and 42 after rhinovirus infection and DNA was extracted. The V3–V5 region of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified and pyrosequenced, resulting in 370,849 high-quality reads from 112 of the possible 124 time points. Measurements and Main Results: At 15 days after rhinovirus infection, there was a sixfold increase in 16S copy number (P = 0.007) and a 16% rise in numbers of proteobacterial sequences, most notably in potentially pathogenic Haemophilus influenzae (P = 2.7 × 10-20), from a preexisting community. These changes occurred only in the sputum microbiome of subjects with COPD and were still evident 42 days after infection. This was in contrast to the temporal stability demonstrated in the microbiome of healthy smokers and nonsmokers. Conclusions: After rhinovirus infection, there is a rise in bacterial burden and a significant outgrowth of Haemophilus influenzae from the existing microbiota of subjects with COPD. This is not observed in healthy individuals. Our findings suggest that rhinovirus infection in COPD alters the respiratory microbiome and may precipitate secondary bacterial infections. PMID:23992479

  18. Role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and an inhibitory effect of erythromycin on IL-8 release in the airways of patients with chronic airway diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, K; Sonoda, F; Kobayashi, S; Iwagaki, A; Nagatake, T; Matsushima, K; Matsumoto, K

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate of the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a chemotactic cytokine, in the continuous neutrophil accumulation in the airways of patients with chronic airway disease (CAD) and persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, we investigated the cell population, IL-8 levels, IL-1 beta levels, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activities, and neutrophil elastase (NE) activities of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids in 17 CAD patients (with P. aeruginosa infections [CAD+PA], n = 9; without any bacterial infections [CAD-PA], n = 8) and 8 normal volunteers. We found significant elevations of neutrophil numbers, IL-8/albumin ratios, and NE/albumin ratios in BAL fluids from CAD patients, in the following rank order: CAD+PA > CAD-PA > normal volunteers. IL-1 beta/albumin ratios were elevated only in CAD+PA, while no TNF bioactivity was detected in BAL fluids. The neutrophil numbers correlated significantly with the IL-8/albumin ratios and NE/albumin ratios in the BAL fluids of CAD patients. When anti-human IL-8 immunoglobulin G was used for neutralizing neutrophil chemotactic factor (NCF) activities in BAL fluids, the mean reduction rate of NCF activities in CAD+PA patients was significantly higher than that in CAD-PA patients. We also evaluated the effects of low-dose, long-term erythromycin therapy in BAL fluids from three CAD+PA and two CAD-PA patients. Treatment with erythromycin caused significant reductions of neutrophil numbers, IL-8/albumin ratios, and NE/albumin ratios in BAL fluids from these patients. To elucidate the mechanism of erythromycin therapy, we also examined whether erythromycin suppressed IL-8 production by human alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in vitro. We demonstrated a moderate inhibitory effect of erythromycin on IL-8 production in Pseudomonas-stimulated neutrophils but not in alveolar macrophages. Our data support the view that persistent P. aeruginosa infection enhances IL-8 production and IL-8-derived NCF activity, causing neutrophil

  19. European Symposium on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases: Report of the European Union Parliament Symposium (October 14, 2015).

    PubMed

    Muraro, A; Fokkens, W J; Pietikainen, S; Borrelli, D; Agache, I; Bousquet, J; Costigliola, V; Joos, G; Lund, V J; Poulsen, L K; Price, D; Rolland, C; Zuberbier, T; Hellings, P W

    2016-05-01

    The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the European Rhinologic Society (ERS), and the European Medical Association (EMA) organized, on October 14, 2015, a symposium in the European Parliament in Brussels on Precision Medicine in Allergy and Airways Diseases, hosted by MEP David Borrelli, and with active participation of the EU Commissioner for Health and Food Safety Vytenis Andriukaitis, MEP Sirpa Pietikainen, Chair of the European Parliament Interest Group on Allergy and Asthma, the European Respiratory Society (ERS), the European Federations of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients Associations (EFA), the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (Ga2len), Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA), and the Respiratory Effectiveness Group (REG). The socioeconomic impact of allergies and chronic airways diseases cannot be underestimated, as they represent the most frequently diagnosed chronic noncommunicable diseases in the EU; 30% of the total European population is suffering from allergies and asthma, and more than half are deprived from adequate diagnosis and treatment. Precision medicine represents a novel approach, embracing four key features: personalized care based on molecular, immunologic, and functional endotyping of the disease, with participation of the patient in the decision-making process of therapeutic actions, and considering predictive and preventive aspects of the treatment. Implementation of precision medicine into clinical practice may help to achieve the arrest of the epidemic of allergies and chronic airways diseases. Participants underscored the need for optimal patient care in Europe, supporting joint action plans for disease prevention, patient empowerment, and cost-effective treatment strategies. PMID:26660289

  20. Rhinovirus-Induced Airway Disease: A Model to Understand the Antiviral and Th2 Epithelial Immune Dysregulation in Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Geovanny F.; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Nino, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) infections account for most asthma exacerbations among children and adults, yet the fundamental mechanism responsible for why asthmatics are more susceptible to RV than otherwise healthy individuals remains largely unknown. Nonetheless, the use of models to understand the mechanisms of RV-induced airway disease in asthma has dramatically expanded our knowledge about the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of the disease. For instance, ground-breaking studies have recently established that the susceptibility to RV in asthmatic subjects is associated with a dysfunctional airway epithelial inflammatory response generated after innate recognition of viral-related molecules, such as double stranded (ds) RNA. This review summarizes the novel cardinal features of the asthmatic condition identified in the past few years through translational and experimental RV-based approaches. Specifically, we discuss the evidence demonstrating the presence of an abnormal innate antiviral immunity (airway epithelial secretion of type I and III interferons), exaggerated production of the master Th2 molecule thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and altered antimicrobial host defense in the airways of asthmatic individuals with acute RV infection. PMID:26057561

  1. DNA Methylation Is Globally Disrupted and Associated with Expression Changes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Small Airways

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Raj; Thu, Kelsie L.; Wilson, Ian M.; Cotton, Allison M.; Kennett, Jennifer Y.; Zhang, May; Lonergan, Kim M.; Steiling, Katrina; Brown, Carolyn J.; McWilliams, Annette; Ohtani, Keishi; Lenburg, Marc E.; Sin, Don D.; Spira, Avrum; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Lam, Wan L.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that is highly disrupted in response to cigarette smoke and involved in a wide spectrum of malignant and nonmalignant diseases, but surprisingly not previously assessed in small airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Small airways are the primary sites of airflow obstruction in COPD. We sought to determine whether DNA methylation patterns are disrupted in small airway epithelia of patients with COPD, and evaluate whether changes in gene expression are associated with these disruptions. Genome-wide methylation and gene expression analysis were performed on small airway epithelial DNA and RNA obtained from the same patient during bronchoscopy, using Illumina’s Infinium HM27 and Affymetrix’s Genechip Human Gene 1.0 ST arrays. To control for known effects of cigarette smoking on DNA methylation, methylation and gene expression profiles were compared between former smokers with and without COPD matched for age, pack-years, and years of smoking cessation. Our results indicate that aberrant DNA methylation is (1) a genome-wide phenomenon in small airways of patients with COPD, and (2) associated with altered expression of genes and pathways important to COPD, such as the NF-E2–related factor 2 oxidative response pathway. DNA methylation is likely an important mechanism contributing to modulation of genes important to COPD pathology. Because these methylation events may underlie disease-specific gene expression changes, their characterization is a critical first step toward the development of epigenetic markers and an opportunity for developing novel epigenetic therapeutic interventions for COPD. PMID:24298892

  2. Airway smooth muscle in airway reactivity and remodeling: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is now established that airway smooth muscle (ASM) has roles in determining airway structure and function, well beyond that as the major contractile element. Indeed, changes in ASM function are central to the manifestation of allergic, inflammatory, and fibrotic airway diseases in both children and adults, as well as to airway responses to local and environmental exposures. Emerging evidence points to novel signaling mechanisms within ASM cells of different species that serve to control diverse features, including 1) [Ca2+]i contractility and relaxation, 2) cell proliferation and apoptosis, 3) production and modulation of extracellular components, and 4) release of pro- vs. anti-inflammatory mediators and factors that regulate immunity as well as the function of other airway cell types, such as epithelium, fibroblasts, and nerves. These diverse effects of ASM “activity” result in modulation of bronchoconstriction vs. bronchodilation relevant to airway hyperresponsiveness, airway thickening, and fibrosis that influence compliance. This perspective highlights recent discoveries that reveal the central role of ASM in this regard and helps set the stage for future research toward understanding the pathways regulating ASM and, in turn, the influence of ASM on airway structure and function. Such exploration is key to development of novel therapeutic strategies that influence the pathophysiology of diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24142517

  3. Dual PDE3/4 and PDE4 inhibitors: novel treatments for COPD and other inflammatory airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Abbott-Banner, Katharine H; Page, Clive P

    2014-05-01

    Selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 and dual PDE3/4 inhibitors have attracted considerable interest as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of respiratory diseases, largely by virtue of their anti-inflammatory (PDE4) and bifunctional bronchodilator/anti-inflammatory (PDE3/4) effects. Many of these agents have, however, failed in early development for various reasons, including dose-limiting side effects when administered orally and lack of sufficient activity when inhaled. Indeed, only one selective PDE4 inhibitor, the orally active roflumilast-n-oxide, has to date received marketing authorization. The majority of the compounds that have failed were, however, orally administered and non-selective for either PDE3 (A,B) or PDE4 (A,B,C,D) subtypes. Developing an inhaled dual PDE3/4 inhibitor that is rapidly cleared from the systemic circulation, potentially with subtype specificity, may represent one strategy to improve the therapeutic index and also exhibit enhanced efficacy versus inhibition of either PDE3 or PDE4 alone, given the potential positive interactions with regard to anti-inflammatory and bronchodilator effects that have been observed pre-clinically with dual inhibition of PDE3 and PDE4 compared with inhibition of either isozyme alone. This MiniReview will summarize recent clinical data obtained with PDE inhibitors and the potential for these drugs to treat COPD and other inflammatory airways diseases such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. PMID:24517491

  4. INHIBITION OF PAN NEUROTROPHIN RECEPTOR P75 ATTENUATES DIESEL PARTICULATE-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF ALLERGIC AIRWAY RESPONSES IN C57/BL6J MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent investigations have linked neurotrophins including nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to allergic airways diseases. Antibody blockade of NGF attenuates airway resistance in allergic mice. Diesel exhaust particle...

  5. Dose response relation to oral theophylline in severe chronic obstructive airways disease.

    PubMed Central

    Chrystyn, H.; Mulley, B. A.; Peake, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate measurement of the trapped gas volume as a measure of respiratory function in patients with chronic obstructive airways disease and their response to treatment with theophylline. DESIGN--Patients able to produce consistent results on testing of respiratory function spent two weeks having dosage of theophylline adjusted to give individual pharmacokinetic data. This was followed by random assignment to four consecutive two month treatment periods--placebo and low, medium, and high dose, as assessed by serum concentrations of theophylline. Respiratory function and exercise performance was assessed at the end of each two month period. SETTING--Chest unit in district hospital. PATIENTS--Thirty eight patients with chronic bronchitis and moderate to severe chronic obstruction to airflow were recruited; 33 aged 53-73 years completed the study. INTERVENTIONS--Dosage of oral theophylline increased during two week optimisation period to 800 mg daily unless toxicity was predicted, when 400 mg was given. Targets for the steady state serum theophylline concentrations were 5-10 mg/l in the low dose period, 10-15 mg/l in the medium dose, and 15-20 mg/l in the high dose period. ENDPOINTS--Respiratory function as measured by forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity, peak expiratory flow rate, slow vital capacity, and static lung volumes using helium dilution and body plethysmography from which trapped gas volume was derived. Exercise performance assessed by six minute walking test and diary cards using visual analogue scale. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--The forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow rate changed only slightly (about 13%) over the range of doses. There was a linear dose dependent fall of trapped gas volume from 1.84 l (SE 0.157) to 1.42 l (0.152), 1.05 l (0.128), and 0.67 l (0.102) during the placebo and low, medium, and high dose treatment periods. Mean walking distance

  6. The novel compound Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Poppinga, Wilfred J.; Zuo, Haoxiao; Zuidhof, Annet B.; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Smit, Marieke; Vogelaar, Pieter; Krenning, Guido; Henning, Robert H.; Maarsingh, Harm; Halayko, Andrew J.; van Vliet, Bernard; Stienstra, Stef; Graaf, Adrianus Cornelis van der; Meurs, Herman; Schmidt, Martina

    2016-01-01

    COPD is characterized by persistent airflow limitation, neutrophilia and oxidative stress from endogenous and exogenous insults. Current COPD therapy involving anticholinergics, β2-adrenoceptor agonists and/or corticosteroids, do not specifically target oxidative stress, nor do they reduce chronic pulmonary inflammation and disease progression in all patients. Here, we explore the effects of Sul-121, a novel compound with anti-oxidative capacity, on hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in experimental models of COPD. Using a guinea pig model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neutrophilia, we demonstrated that Sul-121 inhalation dose-dependently prevented LPS-induced airway neutrophilia (up to ~60%) and AHR (up to ~90%). Non-cartilaginous airways neutrophilia was inversely correlated with blood H2S, and LPS-induced attenuation of blood H2S (~60%) was prevented by Sul-121. Concomitantly, Sul-121 prevented LPS-induced production of the oxidative stress marker, malondialdehyde by ~80%. In immortalized human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, Sul-121 dose-dependently prevented cigarette smoke extract-induced IL-8 release parallel with inhibition of nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit, p65 (each ~90%). Sul-121 also diminished cellular reactive oxygen species production in ASM cells, and inhibited nuclear translocation of the anti-oxidative response regulator, Nrf2. Our data show that Sul-121 effectively inhibits airway inflammation and AHR in experimental COPD models, prospectively through inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:27229886

  7. The novel compound Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Poppinga, Wilfred J; Zuo, Haoxiao; Zuidhof, Annet B; Bos, I Sophie T; Smit, Marieke; Vogelaar, Pieter; Krenning, Guido; Henning, Robert H; Maarsingh, Harm; Halayko, Andrew J; van Vliet, Bernard; Stienstra, Stef; Graaf, Adrianus Cornelis van der; Meurs, Herman; Schmidt, Martina

    2016-01-01

    COPD is characterized by persistent airflow limitation, neutrophilia and oxidative stress from endogenous and exogenous insults. Current COPD therapy involving anticholinergics, β2-adrenoceptor agonists and/or corticosteroids, do not specifically target oxidative stress, nor do they reduce chronic pulmonary inflammation and disease progression in all patients. Here, we explore the effects of Sul-121, a novel compound with anti-oxidative capacity, on hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in experimental models of COPD. Using a guinea pig model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neutrophilia, we demonstrated that Sul-121 inhalation dose-dependently prevented LPS-induced airway neutrophilia (up to ~60%) and AHR (up to ~90%). Non-cartilaginous airways neutrophilia was inversely correlated with blood H2S, and LPS-induced attenuation of blood H2S (~60%) was prevented by Sul-121. Concomitantly, Sul-121 prevented LPS-induced production of the oxidative stress marker, malondialdehyde by ~80%. In immortalized human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, Sul-121 dose-dependently prevented cigarette smoke extract-induced IL-8 release parallel with inhibition of nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit, p65 (each ~90%). Sul-121 also diminished cellular reactive oxygen species production in ASM cells, and inhibited nuclear translocation of the anti-oxidative response regulator, Nrf2. Our data show that Sul-121 effectively inhibits airway inflammation and AHR in experimental COPD models, prospectively through inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:27229886

  8. Regulation of airway neurogenic inflammation by neutral endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, G U; Bellofiore, S; Geppetti, P

    1998-12-01

    Airway neurogenic inflammation is caused by tachykinins released from peripheral nerve endings of sensory neurons within the airways, and is characterized by plasma protein extravasation, airway smooth muscle contraction and increased secretion of mucus. Tachykinins are degraded and inactivated by neutral endopeptidase (NEP), a membrane-bound metallopeptidase, which is located mainly at the surface of airway epithelial cells, but is also present in airway smooth muscle cells, submucosal gland cells and fibroblasts. The key role of NEP in limiting and regulating the neurogenic inflammation provoked by different stimuli has been demonstrated in a large series of studies published in recent years. It has also been shown that a variety of factors, which are relevant for airway diseases, including viral infections, allergen exposure, inhalation of cigarette smoke and other respiratory irritants, is able to reduce NEP activity, thus enhancing the effects of tachykinins within the airways. On the basis of these observations, the reduction of neutral endopeptidase activity may be regarded as a factor that switches neurogenic airway responses from their physiological and protective functions to a detrimental role that increases and perpetuates airway inflammation. However, further studies are needed to assess the role of neutral endopeptidase down regulation in the pathogenesis of asthma and other inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:9877509

  9. Evidence of prednisolone induced mood change ('steroid euphoria') in patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

    PubMed Central

    Swinburn, C R; Wakefield, J M; Newman, S P; Jones, P W

    1988-01-01

    1. It is a clinical impression that some patients given oral corticosteroids develop a sense of wellbeing that is 'inappropriate' to improvements in physical health. This has been termed steroid 'euphoria', but unlike steroid-induced psychosis it has not been documented. 2. To test for the size and frequency of this phenomenon, 20 patients with severe chronic obstructive airways disease (mean FEV1 0.86 l) were given 30 mg of prednisolone for 14 days, after a period of placebo administration in a single-blind study. 3. Lung spirometry and arterial saturation during exercise were measured serially, together with established measures of mood state. 4. No changes in spirometry or arterial saturation during exercise were detected until 7 days of active therapy. 5. Mood state did not change during the placebo period, but small significant reductions in anxiety and depression were measured after 3 days of prednisolone and before any measurable improvement in lung function. Mood state did not then further improve, despite measurable improvements in lung spirometry. 6. This is evidence that prednisolone may produce a mild 'inappropriate' sense of wellbeing within a population receiving the drug, rather than as an occasional idiosyncratic response. PMID:3242575

  10. The Physiologically Difficult Airway.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Jarrod M; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C

    2015-12-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  11. The Physiologically Difficult Airway

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Jarrod M.; Joshi, Raj; Hypes, Cameron; Pacheco, Garrett; Valenzuela, Terence; Sakles, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation. PMID:26759664

  12. Role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Idzko, Marco; Pitchford, Simon; Page, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role for platelets and their products (e.g., platelet factor 4, β-thromboglobulin, RANTES, thromboxane, or serotonin) in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. A variety of changes in platelet function have been observed in patients with asthma, such as alterations in platelet secretion, expression of surface molecules, aggregation, and adhesion. Moreover, platelets have been found to actively contribute to most of the characteristic features of asthma, including bronchial hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and airway remodeling. This review brings together the current available data from both experimental and clinical studies that have investigated the role of platelets in allergic airway inflammation and asthma. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the role of platelets in the pathogenesis of asthma might lead to novel promising therapeutic approaches in the treatment of allergic airway diseases. PMID:26051948

  13. Human airway measurement from CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaesung; Reeves, Anthony P.; Fotin, Sergei; Apanasovich, Tatiyana; Yankelevitz, David

    2008-03-01

    A wide range of pulmonary diseases, including common ones such as COPD, affect the airways. If the dimensions of airway can be measured with high confidence, the clinicians will be able to better diagnose diseases as well as monitor progression and response to treatment. In this paper, we introduce a method to assess the airway dimensions from CT scans, including the airway segments that are not oriented axially. First, the airway lumen is segmented and skeletonized, and subsequently each airway segment is identified. We then represent each airway segment using a segment-centric generalized cylinder model and assess airway lumen diameter (LD) and wall thickness (WT) for each segment by determining inner and outer wall boundaries. The method was evaluated on 14 healthy patients from a Weill Cornell database who had two scans within a 2 month interval. The corresponding airway segments were located in two scans and measured using the automated method. The total number of segments identified in both scans was 131. When 131 segments were considered altogether, the average absolute change over two scans was 0.31 mm for LD and 0.12 mm for WT, with 95% limits of agreement of [-0.85, 0.83] for LD and [-0.32, 0.26] for WT. The results were also analyzed on per-patient basis, and the average absolute change was 0.19 mm for LD and 0.05 mm for WT. 95% limits of agreement for per-patient changes were [-0.57, 0.47] for LD and [-0.16, 0.10] for WT.

  14. Intrathoracic airway measurement: ex-vivo validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Raab, Stephen A.; D'Souza, Neil D.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1997-05-01

    High-resolution x-ray CT (HRCT) provides detailed images of the lungs and bronchial tree. HRCT-based imaging and quantitation of peripheral bronchial airway geometry provides a valuable tool for assessing regional airway physiology. Such measurements have been sued to address physiological questions related to the mechanics of airway collapse in sleep apnea, the measurement of airway response to broncho-constriction agents, and to evaluate and track the progression of disease affecting the airways, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Significant attention has been paid to the measurements of extra- and intra-thoracic airways in 2D sections from volumetric x-ray CT. A variety of manual and semi-automatic techniques have been proposed for airway geometry measurement, including the use of standardized display window and level settings for caliper measurements, methods based on manual or semi-automatic border tracing, and more objective, quantitative approaches such as the use of the 'half-max' criteria. A recently proposed measurements technique uses a model-based deconvolution to estimate the location of the inner and outer airway walls. Validation using a plexiglass phantom indicates that the model-based method is more accurate than the half-max approach for thin-walled structures. In vivo validation of these airway measurement techniques is difficult because of the problems in identifying a reliable measurement 'gold standard.' In this paper we report on ex vivo validation of the half-max and model-based methods using an excised pig lung. The lung is sliced into thin sections of tissue and scanned using an electron beam CT scanner. Airways of interest are measured from the CT images, and also measured with using a microscope and micrometer to obtain a measurement gold standard. The result show no significant difference between the model-based measurements and the gold standard; while the half-max estimates exhibited a measurement bias and were significantly

  15. The asthma–COPD overlap syndrome: do we really need another syndrome in the already complex matrix of airway disease?

    PubMed Central

    Kostikas, Konstantinos; Clemens, Andreas; Patalano, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The term asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) is one of multiple terms used to describe patients with characteristics of both COPD and asthma, representing ~20% of patients with obstructive airway diseases. The recognition of both sets of morbidities in patients is important to guide practical treatment decisions. It is widely recognized that patients with COPD and coexisting asthma present with a higher disease burden, despite the conceptual expectation that the “reversible” or “treatable” component of asthma would allow for more effective management and better outcomes. However, subcategorization into terms such as ACOS is complicated by the vast spectrum of heterogeneity that is encapsulated by asthma and COPD, resulting in different clinical clusters. In this review, we discuss the possibility that these different clusters are suboptimally described by the umbrella term “ACOS”, as this additional categorization may lead to clinical confusion and potential inappropriate use of resources. We suggest that a more clinically relevant approach would be to recognize the extreme variability and the numerous phenotypes encompassed within obstructive airway diseases, with various degrees of overlapping in individual patients. In addition, we discuss some of the evidence to be considered when making practical decisions on the treatment of patients with overlapping characteristics between COPD and asthma, as well as the potential options for phenotype and biomarker-driven management of airway disease with the aim of providing more personalized treatment for patients. Finally, we highlight the need for more evidence in patients with overlapping disease characteristics and to facilitate better characterization of potential treatment responders. PMID:27366057

  16. Airway Microbiota and the Implications of Dysbiosis in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Durack, Juliana; Boushey, Homer A; Lynch, Susan V

    2016-07-01

    The mucosal surfaces of the human body are typically colonized by polymicrobial communities seeded in infancy and are continuously shaped by environmental exposures. These communities interact with the mucosal immune system to maintain homeostasis in health, but perturbations in their composition and function are associated with lower airway diseases, including asthma, a developmental and heterogeneous chronic disease with various degrees and types of airway inflammation. This review will summarize recent studies examining airway microbiota dysbioses associated with asthma and their relationship with the pathophysiology of this disease. PMID:27393699

  17. Citrus diseases with global ramifications including citrus canker and huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although there are a number of diseases that plague citrus production worldwide, two bacterial diseases are particularly problematic. Both are of Asian origin and currently cause severe economic damage: Asiatic citrus canker (ACC) and citrus huanglongbing (HLB). Although ACC has been found in the ...

  18. Non-Invasive Optical Imaging of Eosinophilia during the Course of an Experimental Allergic Airways Disease Model and in Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Markus, M. Andrea; Dullin, Christian; Mitkovski, Miso; Prieschl-Grassauer, Eva; Epstein, Michelle M.; Alves, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular imaging of lung diseases, including asthma, is limited and either invasive or non-specific. Central to the inflammatory process in asthma is the recruitment of eosinophils to the airways, which release proteases and proinflammatory factors and contribute to airway remodeling. The aim of this study was to establish a new approach to non-invasively assess lung eosinophilia during the course of experimental asthma by combining non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging with the specific detection of Siglec-F, a lectin found predominantly on eosinophils. Methodology/Principal Findings An ovalbumin (OVA)-based model was used to induce asthma-like experimental allergic airway disease (EAAD) in BALB/c mice. By means of a NIRF imager, we demonstrate that 48 h–72 h after intravenous (i.v.) application of a NIRF-labeled anti-Siglec-F antibody, mice with EAAD exhibited up to 2 times higher fluorescence intensities compared to lungs of control mice. Furthermore, average lung intensities of dexamethasone-treated as well as beta-escin-treated mice were 1.8 and 2 times lower than those of untreated, EAAD mice, respectively and correlated with the reduction of cell infiltration in the lung. Average fluorescence intensities measured in explanted lungs confirmed the in vivo findings of significantly higher values in inflamed lungs as compared to controls. Fluorescence microscopy of lung cryosections localized the i.v. applied NIRF-labeled anti-Siglec-F antibody predominantly to eosinophils in the peribronchial areas of EAAD lungs as opposed to control lungs. Conclusion/Significance We show that monitoring the occurrence of eosinophils, a prominent feature of allergic asthma, by means of a NIRF-labeled antibody directed against Siglec-F is a novel and powerful non-invasive optical imaging approach to assess EAAD and therapeutic response in mice over time. PMID:24587190

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Airway Remodeling in Pulmonary Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nejad-Moghaddam, Amir; Panahi, Yunes; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, Meghdad; Borna, Hojat; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-12-01

    According to significant improvements in the tissue engineering field over the past several years, lung tissue cells have recently attracted more attention due to the high prevalence and diversity in related diseases. However, selection of an appropriate cell type, screening of suitable conditions for growth and proliferation, as well as subsequent implantation into the body to repair and regenerate damaged tissues are considered as important issues in this context. It should also be noted that most studies have been described in animal models, but not in humans. Because of the high regenerative capacity, predominant immunomodulatory feature, and inhibition of T-lymphocyte proliferation, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may play an important role in the reconstruction of damaged tissues including bronchioles in pulmonary diseases. Interestingly, clinical trial studies demonstrated that MSCs have the significant potential to treat a wide variety of diseases including acute myocardial infarction (AMI), liver cirrhosis, crohn's disease, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). PMID:26725553

  20. Increased volume of conducting airways in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is independent of disease severity: a volumetric capnography study.

    PubMed

    Plantier, Laurent; Debray, Marie-Pierre; Estellat, Candice; Flamant, Martin; Roy, Carine; Bancal, Catherine; Borie, Raphaël; Israël-Biet, Dominique; Mal, Hervé; Crestani, Bruno; Delclaux, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Bronchiectasis, bronchiolectasis, and bronchiolisation of alveolar regions are salient features of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We asked whether IPF was associated with physiological changes consistent with increases in the volume of conducting airways, and whether airway volume was related to the severity of lung fibrosis. Patients with IPF (N  =  57, vital capacity-VC: 73  ±  20%), patients with non-IPF interstitial lung disease (non-IPF ILD, N  =  24, VC  =  78  ±  18%) and controls without lung disease (N  =  51, VC  =  112  ±  21%) underwent volumetric capnography for the determination of conducting airway volume using Fletcher's equal area method, reported to predicted total lung capacity to control for the effect of lung size (VDaw/TLCp, mL/L). VDaw/TLCp was higher in patients with IPF (45.3  ±  12.8 ml L(-1)) in comparison with controls (34.2  ±  11.0 ml L(-1), p  <  0.0001) and patients with non-IPF ILD (39.5  ±  9.2 ml L(-1), p  =  0.0496). The same differences were observed when analysis was restricted to subjects with moderate IPF (VC  ⩾  80% predicted). Among IPF patients, VDaw/TLCp was correlated with neither the mMRC dyspnea scale, nor VC, nor carbon monoxide transfer factor, nor computed tomography fibrosis scores. Volumetric capnography showed higher conducting airway volume in IPF patients in comparison with controls and non-IPF ILDs, independent of disease severity. This result is consistent with either anatomical predisposition or dilation/longitudinal growth of conducting airways in IPF. PMID:26828240

  1. Mechanical Properties of the Upper Airway

    PubMed Central

    Strohl, Kingman P.; Butler, James P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The importance of the upper airway (nose, pharynx, and larynx) in health and in the pathogenesis of sleep apnea, asthma, and other airway diseases, discussed elsewhere in the Comprehensive Physiology series, prompts this review of the biomechanical properties and functional aspects of the upper airway. There is a literature based on anatomic or structural descriptions in static circumstances, albeit studied in limited numbers of individuals in both health and disease. As for dynamic features, the literature is limited to studies of pressure and flow through all or parts of the upper airway and to the effects of muscle activation on such features; however, the links between structure and function through airway size, shape, and compliance remain a topic that is completely open for investigation, particularly through analyses using concepts of fluid and structural mechanics. Throughout are included both historically seminal references, as well as those serving as signposts or updated reviews. This article should be considered a resource for concepts needed for the application of biomechanical models of upper airway physiology, applicable to understanding the pathophysiology of disease and anticipated results of treatment interventions. PMID:23723026

  2. Perinatal paracetamol exposure in mice does not affect the development of allergic airways disease in early life

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Debbie C P; Walker, Simone A; Byrne, Adam J; Gregory, Lisa G; Buckley, James; Bush, Andrew; Shaheen, Seif O; Saglani, Sejal; Lloyd, Clare M

    2015-01-01

    Background Current data concerning maternal paracetamol intake during pregnancy, or intake during infancy and risk of wheezing or asthma in childhood is inconclusive based on epidemiological studies. We have investigated whether there is a causal link between maternal paracetamol intake during pregnancy and lactation and the development of house dust mite (HDM) induced allergic airways disease (AAD) in offspring using a neonatal mouse model. Methods Pregnant mice were administered paracetamol or saline by oral gavage from the day of mating throughout pregnancy and/or lactation. Subsequently, their pups were exposed to intranasal HDM or saline from day 3 of life for up to 6 weeks. Assessments of airway hyper-responsiveness, inflammation and remodelling were made at weaning (3 weeks) and 6 weeks of age. Results Maternal paracetamol exposure either during pregnancy and/or lactation did not affect development of AAD in offspring at weaning or at 6 weeks. There were no effects of maternal paracetamol at any time point on airway remodelling or IgE levels. Conclusions Maternal paracetamol did not enhance HDM induced AAD in offspring. Our mechanistic data do not support the hypothesis that prenatal paracetamol exposure increases the risk of childhood asthma. PMID:25841236

  3. Effects of cessation of terbutaline treatment on airway obstruction and responsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, J. W.; Koëter, G. H.; van der Mark, T. W.; Postma, D. S.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cessation of regular therapy with inhaled beta 2 agonists in patients with asthma may lead to a temporary deterioration of lung function and airway responsiveness. Few such studies have been reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), so an investigation was carried out to determine whether rebound airway responsiveness and rebound bronchoconstriction also occurs in COPD and if there is any relationship with the dose of beta 2 agonist being used. METHODS: Lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and peak expiratory flow (PEF)), airway responsiveness (PC20 methacholine (PC20)) and symptoms were assessed in a double blind, placebo controlled crossover study during and after cessation of two weeks regular treatment with placebo, and low dose (250 micrograms) and high dose (1000 micrograms) inhaled terbutaline via a dry powder inhaler (Turbohaler) all given three times a day. Sixteen non-allergic patients with COPD of mean (SD) age 58.7 (6.5) years, FEV1 57.1 (12.8)% of predicted, and reversibility on 1000 micrograms terbutaline of 4.5 (3.5)% predicted were studied. PC20 and FEV1 were measured 10, 14, 34 and 82 hours after the last inhalation of terbutaline or placebo. Measurements performed at 10, 14, and 34 hours were expressed relative to 82 hour values in each period, transformed into an area under the curve (AUC) value and analysed by ANOVA. RESULTS: Mean morning and evening PEF increased during terbutaline treatment. PC20 and FEV1 did not change after cessation of terbutaline treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Cessation of regular treatment with both low and high dose inhaled terbutaline does not result in a rebound bronchoconstriction and rebound airway responsiveness in patients with COPD. PMID:8882073

  4. Nicoletella semolina gen. nov., sp. nov., a New Member of Pasteurellaceae Isolated from Horses with Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuhnert, Peter; Korczak, Bożena; Falsen, Enevold; Straub, Reto; Hoops, Anneliese; Boerlin, Patrick; Frey, Joachim; Mutters, Reinier

    2004-01-01

    Gram-negative, nonmotile bacteria that are catalase, oxidase, and urease positive are regularly isolated from the airways of horses with clinical signs of respiratory disease. On the basis of the findings by a polyphasic approach, we propose that these strains be classified as Nicoletella semolina gen. nov, sp. nov., a new member of the family Pasteurellaceae. N. semolina reduces nitrate to nitrite but is otherwise biochemically inert; this includes the lack of an ability to ferment glucose and other sugars. Growth is fastidious, and the isolates have a distinctive colony morphology, with the colonies being dry and waxy and looking like a semolina particle that can be moved around on an agar plate without losing their shape. DNA-DNA hybridization data and multilocus phylogenetic analysis, including 16S rRNA gene (rDNA), rpoB, and infB sequencing, clearly placed N. semolina as a new genus in the family Pasteurellaceae. In all the phylogenetic trees constructed, N. semolina is on a distinct branch displaying ∼5% 16S rDNA, ∼16% rpoB, and ∼20% infB sequence divergence from its nearest relative within the family Pasteurellaceae. High degrees of conservation of the 16S rDNA (99.8%), rpoB (99.6%), and infB (99.7%) sequences exist within the species, indicating that N. semolina isolates not only are phenotypically homogeneous but also are genetically homogeneous. The type strain of N. semolina is CCUG43639T (DSM16380T). PMID:15583279

  5. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jiantao; Gu, Suicheng; Liu, Shusen; Zhu, Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David

    2012-01-01

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work. PMID:22559631

  6. CT based computerized identification and analysis of human airways: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Pu Jiantao; Gu Suicheng; Liu Shusen; Zhu Shaocheng; Wilson, David; Siegfried, Jill M.; Gur, David

    2012-05-15

    As one of the most prevalent chronic disorders, airway disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In order to understand its underlying mechanisms and to enable assessment of therapeutic efficacy of a variety of possible interventions, noninvasive investigation of the airways in a large number of subjects is of great research interest. Due to its high resolution in temporal and spatial domains, computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in clinical practices for studying the normal and abnormal manifestations of lung diseases, albeit there is a need to clearly demonstrate the benefits in light of the cost and radiation dose associated with CT examinations performed for the purpose of airway analysis. Whereas a single CT examination consists of a large number of images, manually identifying airway morphological characteristics and computing features to enable thorough investigations of airway and other lung diseases is very time-consuming and susceptible to errors. Hence, automated and semiautomated computerized analysis of human airways is becoming an important research area in medical imaging. A number of computerized techniques have been developed to date for the analysis of lung airways. In this review, we present a summary of the primary methods developed for computerized analysis of human airways, including airway segmentation, airway labeling, and airway morphometry, as well as a number of computer-aided clinical applications, such as virtual bronchoscopy. Both successes and underlying limitations of these approaches are discussed, while highlighting areas that may require additional work.

  7. Simvastatin Inhibits Airway Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, Amir A.; Franzi, Lisa; Last, Jerold; Kenyon, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Statin use has been linked to improved lung health in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We hypothesize that statins inhibit allergic airway inflammation and reduce airway hyperreactivity via a mevalonate-dependent mechanism. Objectives: To determine whether simvastatin attenuates airway inflammation and improves lung physiology by mevalonate pathway inhibition. Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized to ovalbumin over 4 weeks and exposed to 1% ovalbumin aerosol over 2 weeks. Simvastatin (40 mg/kg) or simvastatin plus mevalonate (20 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally before each ovalbumin exposure. Measurements and Main Results: Simvastatin reduced total lung lavage leukocytes, eosinophils, and macrophages (P < 0.05) in the ovalbumin-exposed mice. Cotreatment with mevalonate, in addition to simvastatin, reversed the antiinflammatory effects seen with simvastatin alone (P < 0.05). Lung lavage IL-4, IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were all reduced by treatment with simvastatin (P < 0.05). Simvastatin treatment before methacholine bronchial challenge increased lung compliance and reduced airway hyperreactivity (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Simvastatin attenuates allergic airway inflammation, inhibits key helper T cell type 1 and 2 chemokines, and improves lung physiology in a mouse model of asthma. The mevalonate pathway appears to modulate allergic airway inflammation, while the beneficial effects of simvastatin on lung compliance and airway hyperreactivity may be independent of the mevalonate pathway. Simvastatin and similar agents that modulate the mevalonate pathway may prove to be treatments for inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma. PMID:19608720

  8. Conquering the difficult airway.

    PubMed

    Gandy, William E

    2008-01-01

    Every medic should practice regularly for the inevitable difficult airway case. Practice should include review of the causes of difficult airways, as well as skill practice. Having a preassembled airway kit can make your response to an unexpected difficult situation easier. Of all the devices mentioned, the bougie is the airway practitioner's best friend. Using the BURP technique, if not contraindicated, together with the bougie will enable you to intubate many difficult patients with confidence. Remember, "If your patient cannot breathe, nothing else matters. PMID:18251307

  9. Cluster Analysis in the COPDGene Study Identifies Subtypes of Smokers with Distinct Patterns of Airway Disease and Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, Peter J; Dy, Jennifer; Ross, James; Chang, Yale; Washko, George R; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Williams, Andre; Lynch, David A; Make, Barry J; Crapo, James D; Bowler, Russ P; Regan, Elizabeth A; Hokanson, John E; Kinney, Greg L; Han, Meilan K; Soler, Xavier; Ramsdell, Joseph W; Barr, R Graham; Foreman, Marilyn; van Beek, Edwin; Casaburi, Richard; Criner, Gerald J; Lutz, Sharon M; Rennard, Steven I; Santorico, Stephanie; Sciurba, Frank C; DeMeo, Dawn L; Hersh, Craig P; Silverman, Edwin K; Cho, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Background There is notable heterogeneity in the clinical presentation of patients with COPD. To characterize this heterogeneity, we sought to identify subgroups of smokers by applying cluster analysis to data from the COPDGene Study. Methods We applied a clustering method, k-means, to data from 10,192 smokers in the COPDGene Study. After splitting the sample into a training and validation set, we evaluated three sets of input features across a range of k (user-specified number of clusters). Stable solutions were tested for association with four COPD-related measures and five genetic variants previously associated with COPD at genome-wide significance. The results were confirmed in the validation set. Findings We identified four clusters that can be characterized as 1) relatively resistant smokers (i.e. no/mild obstruction and minimal emphysema despite heavy smoking), 2) mild upper zone emphysema predominant, 3) airway disease predominant, and 4) severe emphysema. All clusters are strongly associated with COPD-related clinical characteristics, including exacerbations and dyspnea (p<0.001). We found strong genetic associations between the mild upper zone emphysema group and rs1980057 near HHIP, and between the severe emphysema group and rs8034191 in the chromosome 15q region (p<0.001). All significant associations were replicated at p<0.05 in the validation sample (12/12 associations with clinical measures and 2/2 genetic associations). Interpretation Cluster analysis identifies four subgroups of smokers that show robust associations with clinical characteristics of COPD and known COPD-associated genetic variants. PMID:24563194

  10. The infant airway microbiome in health and disease impacts later asthma development

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Shu Mei; Mok, Danny; Pham, Kym; Kusel, Merci; Serralha, Michael; Troy, Niamh; Holt, Barbara J.; Hales, Belinda J.; Walker, Michael L.; Hollams, Elysia; Bochkov, Yury A.; Grindle, Kristine; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Gern, James E.; Sly, Peter D.; Holt, Patrick G.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Inouye, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The nasopharynx (NP) is a reservoir for microbes associated with acute respiratory illnesses (ARI). The development of asthma is initiated during infancy, driven by airway inflammation associated with infections. Here, we report viral and bacterial community profiling of NP aspirates across a birth cohort, capturing all lower respiratory illnesses during their first year. Most infants were initially colonized with Staphylococcus or Corynebacterium before stable colonization with Alloiococcus or Moraxella, with transient incursions of Streptococcus, Moraxella or Haemophilus marking virus-associated ARIs. Our data identify the NP microbiome as a determinant for infection spread to the lower airways, severity of accompanying inflammatory symptoms, and risk for future asthma development. Early asymptomatic colonization with Streptococcus was a strong asthma predictor, and antibiotic usage disrupted asymptomatic colonization patterns. PMID:25865368

  11. IL-18 Does not Increase Allergic Airway Disease in Mice When Produced by BCG

    PubMed Central

    Amniai, L.; Biet, F.; Marquillies, P.; Locht, C.; Pestel, J.; Tonnel, A.-B.; Duez, C.

    2007-01-01

    Whilst BCG inhibits allergic airway responses in murine models, IL-18 has adversary effects depending on its environment. We therefore constructed a BCG strain producing murine IL-18 (BCG-IL-18) and evaluated its efficiency to prevent an asthma-like reaction in mice. BALB/cByJ mice were sensitized (day (D) 1 and D10) by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and primary (D20–22) and secondary (D62, 63) challenged with OVA aerosols. BCG or BCG-IL-18 were intraperitonealy administered 1 hour before each immunization (D1 and D10). BCG-IL-18 and BCG were shown to similarly inhibit the development of AHR, mucus production, eosinophil influx, and local Th2 cytokine production in BAL, both after the primary and secondary challenge. These data show that IL-18 did not increase allergic airway responses in the context of the mycobacterial infection, and suggest that BCG-IL-18 and BCG are able to prevent the development of local Th2 responses and therefore inhibit allergen-induced airway responses even after restimulation. PMID:18299704

  12. Airway Remodeling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Asthma: the Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Grzela, Katarzyna; Litwiniuk, Malgorzata; Zagorska, Wioletta; Grzela, Tomasz

    2016-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma are both associated with airflow restriction and progressive remodeling, which affect the respiratory tract. Among various biological factors involved in the pathomechanisms of both diseases, proteolytic enzymes--matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)--play an important role, especially MMP-9. In this review, the authors discuss the current topics of research concerning the possible role of MMP-9 in both mentioned diseases. They include the analysis of protein levels, nucleotide polymorphisms of MMP-9 gene and their possible correlation with asthma and COPD. Finally, the authors refer to the studies on MMP-9 inhibition as a new perspective for increasing the effectiveness of treatment in asthma and COPD. PMID:26123447

  13. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  14. Long term transtracheal oxygen delivery through microcatheter in patients with hypoxaemia due to chronic obstructive airways disease.

    PubMed Central

    Banner, N R; Govan, J R

    1986-01-01

    Transtracheal administration of oxygen is a new technique for long term treatment. Twenty patients with hypoxaemia due to chronic obstructive airways disease were studied while receiving oxygen through a microcatheter inserted percutaneously into the trachea. By bypassing most of the dead space and avoiding oxygen wastage at the face this method of delivery reduced oxygen requirements by roughly half compared with delivery through nasal cannulas, thus reducing costs and facilitating portable treatment. Twelve of these patients continued to use the system for up to 13 months in preference to using nasal cannulas. Two important complications were a staphylococcal infection and a fractured catheter. Transtracheal oxygen reduced breathlessness and helped patients with routine daily activities. Transtracheal administration of oxygen is a practical method of treatment which may have an important role in rehabilitating patients with chronic lung disease. Images p112-a PMID:3089412

  15. Ultrasound in obstructive lung diseases: the effect of airway obstruction on diaphragm kinetics. A short pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Zanforlin, Alessandro; Smargiassi, Andrea; Inchingolo, Riccardo; Valente, Salvatore; Ramazzina, Emilio

    2015-12-01

    The ultrasound study of the chest is showing a continuous development. This technique could be helpful in managing several chest diseases, but it is limited to the acoustic windows provided by intercostal spaces and by the inability to study healthy lung parenchyma and all intra-parenchymal diseases such as chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), because the interaction between ventilated lung and ultrasound generates only artifacts. Currently, there are few applications of ultrasound that are useful in COPD, with recent studies providing some innovation potentially useful in clinical practice. The similarity of the trend between the time/volume curve of spirometry and the M-mode representation of diaphragm during forced breath allowed to identify the M-mode Index of Obstruction (MIO), an index obtained from the ratio between forced diaphragmatic excursion in the first second (FEDE1, cm) and the maximal expiratory diaphragmatic excursion (EDEMax, cm). MIO has shown a linear correlation with the ratio between forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and vital capacity (VC), used in spirometry to identify airways obstruction. The value of MIO seems to be lower in patients affected by airways obstruction as showed by a recent study. The technique is easy to learn and fast to perform and the analysis could be provided with any ultrasound machine equipped with M-mode. In conclusion, these findings, if confirmed by other studies, could suggest a new add-on screening tool for obstructive lung diseases, in particular COPD, that could be performed during a routine abdominal ultrasound exam. PMID:26550063

  16. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    PubMed

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    Airway clearance techniques are indicated for specific diseases that have known clearance abnormalities (Table 2). Murray and others have commented that such techniques are required only for patients with a daily sputum production of greater than 30 mL. The authors have observed that patients with diseases known to cause clearance abnormalities can have sputum clearance with some techniques, such as positive expiratory pressure, autogenic drainage, and active cycle of breathing techniques, when PDPV has not been effective. Hasani et al has shown that use of the forced exhalatory technique in patients with nonproductive cough still resulted in movement of secretions proximally from all regions of the lung in patients with airway obstruction. It is therefore reasonable to consider airway clearance techniques for any patient who has a disease known to alter mucous clearance, including CF, dyskinetic cilia syndromes, and bronchiectasis from any cause. Patients with atelectasis from mucous plugs and hypersecretory states, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, patients with pain secondary to surgical procedures, and patients with neuromuscular disease, weak cough, and abnormal patency of the airway may also benefit from the application of airway clearance techniques. Infants and children up to 3 years of age with airway clearance problems need to be treated with PDPV. Manual percussion with hands alone or a flexible face mask or cup and small mechanical vibrator/percussors, such as the ultrasonic devices, can be used. The intrapulmonary percussive ventilator shows growing promise in this area. The high-frequency oscillator is not supplied with vests of appropriate sizes for tiny babies and has not been studied in this group. Young patients with neuromuscular disease may require assisted ventilation and airway oscillations can be applied. CPAP alone has been shown to improve achievable flow rates that will increase air-liquid interactions for patients with these diseases

  17. Macrophage adaptation in airway inflammatory resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manminder; Bell, Thomas; Salek-Ardakani, Samira; Hussell, Tracy

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial and viral infections (exacerbations) are particularly problematic in those with underlying respiratory disease, including post-viral infection, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis. Patients experiencing exacerbations tend to be at the more severe end of the disease spectrum and are often difficult to treat. Most of the unmet medical need remains in this patient group. Airway macrophages are one of the first cell populations to encounter airborne pathogens and, in health, exist in a state of reduced responsiveness due to interactions with the respiratory epithelium and specific factors found in the airway lumen. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-10, transforming growth factor-β, surfactant proteins and signalling via the CD200 receptor, for example, all raise the threshold above which airway macrophages can be activated. We highlight that following severe respiratory inflammation, the airspace microenvironment does not automatically re-set to baseline and may leave airway macrophages more restrained than they were at the outset. This excessive restraint is mediated in part by the clearance of apoptotic cells and components of extracellular matrix. This implies that one strategy to combat respiratory exacerbations would be to retune airway macrophage responsiveness to allow earlier bacterial recognition. PMID:26324813

  18. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  19. Chlorinated pool attendance, airway epithelium defects and the risks of allergic diseases in adolescents: Interrelationships revealed by circulating biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Alfred Nickmilder, Marc; Dumont, Xavier

    2015-07-15

    It has been suggested that allergic diseases might be epithelial disorders driven by various environmental stressors but the epidemiological evidence supporting this concept is limited. In a cross-sectional study of 835 school adolescents (365 boys; mean age, 15.5 yr), we measured the serum concentrations of Club cell protein (CC16), surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D) and of total and aeroallergen-specific IgE. We used the serum CC16/SP-D concentration ratio as an index integrating changes in the permeability (SP-D) and secretory function (CC16) of the airway epithelium. In both sexes, early swimming in chlorinated pools emerged as the most consistent and strongest predictor of low CC16 and CC16/SP-D ratio in serum. Among girls, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds (lowest vs. highest tertile) for pet sensitization (OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.19–8.22) and for hay fever in subjects sensitized to pollen (OR 4.12, 95% CI 1.28–14.4). Among boys, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds for house-dust mite (HDM) sensitization (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.11–3.73), for allergic rhinitis in subjects sensitized to HDM (OR 3.52, 95% CI 1.22–11.1) and for asthma in subjects sensitized to any aeroallergen (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.17–11.0), HDM (OR 5.20, 95% CI 1.40–24.2) or pollen (OR 5.82, 95% CI 1.51–27.4). Odds for allergic sensitization or rhinitis also increased with increasing SP-D or decreasing CC16 in serum. Our findings support the hypothesis linking the development of allergic diseases to epithelial barrier defects due to host factors or environmental stressors such as early swimming in chlorinated pools. - Highlights: • We conducted a cross-sectional study of 835 school adolescents. • The airway epithelium integrity was evaluated by measuring serum pneumoproteins. • The risk of allergic diseases was associated with a defective airway epithelium. • Childhood swimming in chlorinated pools can cause persistent epithelial

  20. Sarcoidosis of the upper and lower airways.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Teirstein, Alvin S

    2011-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology characterized by a variable clinical presentation and disease course. Although clinical granulomatous inflammation may occur within any organ system, more than 90% of sarcoidosis patients have lung disease. Sarcoidosis is considered an interstitial lung disease that is frequently characterized by restrictive physiologic dysfunction on pulmonary function tests. However, sarcoidosis also involves the airways (large and small), causing obstructive airways disease. It is one of a few interstitial lung diseases that affects the entire length of the respiratory tract - from the nose to the terminal bronchioles - and causes a broad spectrum of airways dysfunction. This article examines airway dysfunction in sarcoidosis. The anatomical structure of the airways is the organizational framework for our discussion. We discuss sarcoidosis involving the nose, sinuses, nasal passages, larynx, trachea, bronchi and small airways. Common complications of airways disease, such as, atelectasis, fibrosis, bullous leions, bronchiectasis, cavitary lesions and mycetomas, are also reviewed. PMID:22082167

  1. Transient receptor potential A1 channels: insights into cough and airway inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Belvisi, Maria G; Dubuis, Eric; Birrell, Mark A

    2011-10-01

    Cough is a common symptom of diseases such as asthma and COPD and also presents as a disease in its own right. Treatment options are limited; a recent meta-analysis concluded that over-the-counter remedies are ineffective, and there is increasing concern about their use in children. Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) channels are nonselective cation channels that are activated by a range of natural products (eg, allyl isothiocyanate), a multitude of environmental irritants (eg, acrolein, which is present in air pollution, vehicle exhaust, and cigarette smoke), and inflammatory mediators (eg, cyclopentenone prostaglandins). TRPA1 is primarily expressed in small-diameter, nociceptive neurons where its activation probably contributes to the perception of noxious stimuli. Inhalational exposure to irritating gases, fumes, dusts, vapors, chemicals, and endogenous mediators can lead to the development of cough. The respiratory tract is innervated by primary sensory afferent nerves, which are activated by mechanical and chemical stimuli. Recent data suggest that activation of TRPA1 on these vagal sensory afferents by these irritant substances could lead to central reflexes, including dyspnea, changes in breathing pattern, and cough, which contribute to the symptoms and pathophysiology of respiratory diseases. PMID:21972382

  2. Risks for Infection in Patients With Asthma (or Other Atopic Conditions): Is Asthma More Than a Chronic Airway Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Juhn, Young J.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the research effort regarding asthma has been devoted to its causes, therapy, and prognosis. There is also evidence that the presence of asthma can influence patients’ susceptibility to infections, yet research in this aspect of asthma has been limited. There is additional debate in this field, with current literature tending to view the increased risk of infection among atopic patients as due to opportunistic infections secondary to airway inflammation, especially in severe atopic diseases. Other evidence, however, suggests that such risk and its underlying immune dysfunction may be a phenotypic or clinical feature of atopic conditions. This review argues that 1) improved understanding of the effects of asthma or other atopic conditions on the risk of microbial infections will bring important and new perspectives to clinical practice, research, and public health concerning atopic conditions and that 2) research efforts into the causes and effects of asthma must be juxtaposed because they are likely to guide each other. PMID:25087224

  3. What does airway resistance tell us about lung function?

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, David A

    2012-01-01

    Spirometry is considered the primary method to detect the air flow limitation associated with obstructive lung disease. However, air flow limitation is the end-result of many factors that contribute to obstructive lung disease. One of these factors is increased airway resistance. Airway resistance is traditionally measured by relating air flow and driving pressure using body plethysmography, thus deriving airway resistance (R(aw)), specific airway resistance (sR(aw)), and specific airway conductance (sG(aw)). Other methods to measure airway resistance include the forced oscillation technique (FOT), which allows calculation of respiratory system resistance (R(RS)) and reactance (X(RS)), and the interrupter technique, which allows calculation of interrupter resistance (R(int)). An advantage of these other methods is that they may be easier to perform than spirometry, making them particularly suited to patients who cannot perform spirometry, such as young children, patients with neuromuscular disorders, or patients on mechanical ventilation. Since spirometry also requires a deep inhalation, which can alter airway resistance, these alternative methods may provide more sensitive measures of airway resistance. Furthermore, the FOT provides unique information about lung mechanics that is not available from analysis using spirometry, body plethysmography, or the interrupter technique. However, it is unclear whether any of these measures of airway resistance contribute clinically important information to the traditional measures derived from spirometry (FEV(1), FVC, and FEV(1)/FVC). The purpose of this paper is to review the physiology and methodology of these measures of airway resistance, and then focus on their clinical utility in relation to each other and to spirometry. PMID:22222128

  4. Intratracheal Bleomycin Causes Airway Remodeling and Airflow Obstruction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Degryse, Amber L.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Jones, Brittany R.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Lee, Jae Woo; Loyd, James E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Lawson, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In addition to parenchymal fibrosis, fibrotic remodeling of the distal airways has been reported in interstitial lung diseases. Mechanisms of airway wall remodeling, which occurs in a variety of chronic lung diseases, are not well defined and current animal models are limited. Methods We quantified airway remodeling in lung sections from subjects with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and controls. To investigate intratracheal bleomycin as a potential animal model for fibrotic airway remodeling, we evaluated lungs from C57BL/6 mice after bleomycin treatment by histologic scoring for fibrosis and peribronchial inflammation, morphometric evaluation of subepithelial connective tissue volume density, TUNEL assay, and immunohistochemistry for transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), TGFβ2, and the fibroblast marker S100A4. Lung mechanics were determined at 3 weeks post-bleomycin. Results IPF lungs had small airway remodeling with increased bronchial wall thickness compared to controls. Similarly, bleomycin treated mice developed dose-dependent airway wall inflammation and fibrosis and greater airflow resistance after high dose bleomycin. Increased TUNEL+ bronchial epithelial cells and peribronchial inflammation were noted by 1 week, and expression of TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 and accumulation of S100A4+ fibroblasts correlated with airway remodeling in a bleomycin dose-dependent fashion. Conclusions IPF is characterized by small airway remodeling in addition to parenchymal fibrosis, a pattern also seen with intratracheal bleomycin. Bronchial remodeling from intratracheal bleomycin follows a cascade of events including epithelial cell injury, airway inflammation, pro-fibrotic cytokine expression, fibroblast accumulation, and peribronchial fibrosis. Thus, this model can be utilized to investigate mechanisms of airway remodeling. PMID:22394287

  5. Natural antibody repertoires: development and functional role in inhibiting allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Kearney, John F; Patel, Preeyam; Stefanov, Emily K; King, R Glenn

    2015-01-01

    In this review we discuss the effects of microbial exposure on the B cell repertoire. Neonatal exposure to conserved bacterial carbohydrates and phospholipids permanently reprograms the natural antibody repertoire directed toward these antigens by clonal expansion, alterations in clonal dominance, and increased serum antibody levels. These epitopes are present not only in bacterial cell walls, but also in common environmental allergens. Neonatal immunization with bacterial polysaccharide vaccines results in attenuated allergic airway responses to fungi-, house dust mite-, and cockroach-associated allergens in mouse models. The similarities between mouse and human natural antibody repertoires suggest that reduced microbial exposure in children may have the opposite effect, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for the hygiene hypothesis. We propose that understanding the effects of childhood infections on the natural antibody repertoire and the mechanisms of antibody-mediated immunoregulation observed in allergy models will lead to the development of prevention/interventional strategies for treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:25622195

  6. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of dendritic cells induces interleukin-10 producing allergen-specific T cells in vitro but fails to prevent allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Birgit; Freund, Tobias; Rha, Ro-Dug; Dittrich, Anna-Maria; Quarcoo, David; Hutloff, Andreas; Hamelmann, Eckard

    2009-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in directing naive T cells towards a Th1/Th2 or regulatory T cells (Treg) cell phenotype. In this context, interleukin (IL)-10 has been shown to exhibit immune regulatory capacities. The aim of this study was to delineate the influence of high-IL-10-producing DCs on DC-T-cell interactions in inhibiting allergen-induced airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in a murine model of allergic airway disease. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were generated from hemopoietic progenitors by culture with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stimulated with ovalbumin (OVA) +/- lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The effects of ovalbumin-pulsed BMDCs on cytokine production by allergen-specific naive T cells were studied in vitro. The development of airway inflammation in Balb/c mice was determined after intranasal administration of BMDCs in vivo. LPS stimulation of BMDCs strongly enhanced IL-10 production. Coculture of LPS-modulated DCs exhibiting increased IL-10 production with allergen-specific naive T cells reduced the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-5, but enhanced the production of IL-10. After blockade with anti-IL-10 plus anti-IL-10-receptor antibodies, the level of IFN-gamma and IL-5 production by cocultured T cells was restored, underlining the regulatory function of IL-10. Intranasal administration of high-IL-10-producing LPS-stimulated, OVA-primed BMDCs prior to repetitive airway allergen challenges resulted in an even enhanced airway inflammation. These data demonstrate that increased IL-10 production by DCs may be a critical element for T-cell activation and differentiation in the context of allergen-induced immune responses in vitro. However, this DC modulation did not translate into suppression of allergic airway disease in vivo. PMID:19415548

  7. Occupational asthma and occupational rhinitis: the united airways disease model revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ameille, Jacques; Hamelin, Karine; Andujar, Pascal; Bensefa-Colas, Lynda; Bonneterre, Vincent; Dupas, Dominique; Garnier, Robert; Loddé, Brice Alain; Rinaldo, Mickael; Descatha, Alexis; Lasfargues, Gérard; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Whereas accumulating evidence indicates close associations between rhinitis and asthma, little is known about the relationships between occupational rhinitis (OR) and occupational asthma (OA). This study analyses the prevalence of OR associated with OA, globally and according to the various causal agents, and investigates the temporal relationships between these two conditions. Methods Data on incident cases of OA (2008–2010) were collected through the French national occupational disease surveillance and prevention network, using a standardized form including information on occupation, causal agents, presence of OR, and respective dates of occurrence of rhinitis and asthma. Results Among the 596 reported OA cases with latency period, 555 could be attributed to identified agents: high molecular weight (HMW) agents (n=174); low molecular weight (LMW) agents (n=381). Overall, OR was associated with OA in 324 (58.4%) cases. The frequency of association was significantly higher for HMW agents than for LMW agents (72.2% vs 51.5%, p<0.001). OR occurred before OA significantly more frequently for HMW agents than for LMW agents (p<0.01). Conclusions These results show that OR is frequently associated with OA, especially when HMW agents are involved. They are consistent with the hypothesis that OR, in conjunction with OA, is more likely to be caused by sensitizers that cause disease via IgE-mediated mechanisms and suggest that symptoms of OR should be taken into account in the medical surveillance of workers exposed to HMW agents. PMID:23390199

  8. Methods of airway resistance assessment.

    PubMed

    Urbankowski, Tomasz; Przybyłowski, Tadeusz

    2016-01-01

    Airway resistance is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of the airflow in the airways. The most frequent methods used to measure airway resistance are whole-body plethysmography, the interrupter technique and the forced oscillation technique. All these methods allow to measure resistance during respiration at the level close to tidal volume, they do not require forced breathing manoeuvres or deep breathing during measurement. The most popular method for measuring airway resistance is whole-body plethysmography. The results of plethysmography include among others the following parameters: airway resistance (Raw), airway conductance (Gaw), specific airway resistance (sRaw) and specific airway conductance (sGaw). The interrupter technique is based on the assumption that at the moment of airway occlusion, air pressure in the mouth is equal to the alveolar pressure . In the forced oscillation technique (FOT), airway resistance is calculated basing on the changes in pressure and flow caused by air vibration. The methods for measurement of airway resistance that are described in the present paper seem to be a useful alternative to the most common lung function test - spirometry. The target group in which these methods may be widely used are particularly the patients who are unable to perform spirometry. PMID:27238174

  9. Abdominal adiposity and obstructive airway disease: testing insulin resistance and sleep disordered breathing mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study examined associations of abdominal adiposity with lung function, asthma symptoms and current doctor-diagnosed asthma and mediation by insulin resistance (IR) and sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Methods A random sample of 2500 households was drawn from the community of Whyalla, South Australia (The Whyalla Intergenerational Study of Health, WISH February 2008 - July 2009). Seven-hundred twenty-two randomly selected adults (≥18 years) completed clinical protocols (32.2% response rate). Lung function was measured by spirometry. Post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC was used to measure airway obstruction and reversibility of FEV1 was calculated. Current asthma was defined by self-reported doctor-diagnosis and evidence of currently active asthma. Symptom scores for asthma (CASS) and SDB were calculated. Intra-abdominal fat (IAF) was estimated using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). IR was calculated from fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Results The prevalence of current doctor-diagnosed asthma was 19.9% (95% CI 16.7 – 23.5%). The ratio of observed to expected cases given the age and sex distribution of the population was 2.4 (95%CI 2.1, 2.9). IAF was not associated with current doctor-diagnosed asthma, FEV1/FVC or FEV1 reversibility in men or women but was positively associated with CASS independent of IR and SDB in women. A 1% increase in IAF was associated with decreases of 12 mL and 20 mL in FEV1 and FVC respectively in men, and 4 mL and 7 mL respectively in women. SDB mediated 12% and 26% of these associations respectively in men but had minimal effects in women. Conclusions In this population with an excess of doctor-diagnosed asthma, IAF was not a major factor in airway obstruction or doctor-diagnosed asthma, although women with higher IAF perceived more severe asthma symptoms which did not correlate with lower FEV1. Higher IAF was significantly associated with lower FEV1 and FVC and in men SDB mechanisms may

  10. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products and progression of airway disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is highly expressed in the lung, where it is believed to have a homeostatic role. Reduced plasma levels of soluble RAGE (sRAGE) have been reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of plasma sRAGE levels with a longitudinal decline of lung function. We have also measured plasma levels of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a RAGE ligand which has been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases including COPD. Methods Baseline plasma concentrations of sRAGE and HMGB1 were measured in non-smokers (n = 32), smokers without COPD (n = 212), and smokers with COPD (n = 51), and the associations of the plasma sRAGE and HMGB1 levels with longitudinal declines of lung function during a 4-year follow-up period were analysed. Results The plasma levels of sRAGE were significantly lower in smokers without COPD and in smokers with COPD, as compared to those of non-smokers. Plasma sRAGE levels positively correlated with FVC and FEV1 and inversely correlated with BMI and pack-years. Lower sRAGE levels were associated with greater declines of FEV1/FVC over 4 years in all participants. Moreover, multivariate regression analysis indicated that the baseline plasma sRAGE concentration was an independent predictor of FEV1/FVC decline in all groups. A subgroup analysis showed that decreased sRAGE levels are significantly associated with a more rapid decline of FEV1/FVC in smokers with COPD. There was no significant correlation between plasma HMGB1 levels and longitudinal decline of lung function. Conclusions Lower plasma concentrations of sRAGE were associated with greater progression of airflow limitations over time, especially in smokers with COPD, suggesting that RAGE might have a protective role in the lung. PMID:24758342

  11. The impact of vitamin D on asthmatic human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sannette C; Fischer, Kimberly D; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic heterogeneous disorder, which involves airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway remodeling. The airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle regulates the broncho-motor tone and plays a critical role in AHR as well as orchestrating inflammation. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased severity and exacerbations of symptoms in asthmatic patients. It has been shown to modulate both immune and structural cells, including ASM cells, in inflammatory diseases. Given that current asthma therapies have not been successful in reversing airway remodeling, vitamin D supplementation as a potential therapeutic option has gained a great deal of attention. Here, we highlight the potential immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D in regulating ASM function and airway inflammation in bronchial asthma. PMID:26634624

  12. Collaborative interactions between type 2 innate lymphoid cells and antigen-specific CD4+ Th2 cells exacerbate murine allergic airway diseases with prominent eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Lee, Jee-Boong; Chen, Chun-Yu; Hershey, Gurjit K Khurana; Wang, Yui-Hsi

    2015-04-15

    Type-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and the acquired CD4(+) Th2 and Th17 cells contribute to the pathogenesis of experimental asthma; however, their roles in Ag-driven exacerbation of chronic murine allergic airway diseases remain elusive. In this study, we report that repeated intranasal rechallenges with only OVA Ag were sufficient to trigger airway hyperresponsiveness, prominent eosinophilic inflammation, and significantly increased serum OVA-specific IgG1 and IgE in rested mice that previously developed murine allergic airway diseases. The recall response to repeated OVA inoculation preferentially triggered a further increase of lung OVA-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, whereas CD4(+) Th17 and ILC2 cell numbers remained constant. Furthermore, the acquired CD4(+) Th17 cells in Stat6(-/-)/IL-17-GFP mice, or innate ILC2s in CD4(+) T cell-ablated mice, failed to mount an allergic recall response to OVA Ag. After repeated OVA rechallenge or CD4(+) T cell ablation, the increase or loss of CD4(+) Th2 cells resulted in an enhanced or reduced IL-13 production by lung ILC2s in response to IL-25 and IL-33 stimulation, respectively. In return, ILC2s enhanced Ag-mediated proliferation of cocultured CD4(+) Th2 cells and their cytokine production, and promoted eosinophilic airway inflammation and goblet cell hyperplasia driven by adoptively transferred Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells. Thus, these results suggest that an allergic recall response to recurring Ag exposures preferentially triggers an increase of Ag-specific CD4(+) Th2 cells, which facilitates the collaborative interactions between acquired CD4(+) Th2 cells and innate ILC2s to drive the exacerbation of a murine allergic airway diseases with an eosinophilic phenotype. PMID:25780046

  13. Management of the artificial airway.

    PubMed

    Branson, Richard D; Gomaa, Dina; Rodriquez, Dario

    2014-06-01

    Management of the artificial airway includes securing the tube to prevent dislodgement or migration as well as removal of secretions. Preventive measures include adequate humidification and appropriate airway suctioning. Monitoring airway patency and removing obstruction are potentially life-saving components of airway management. Cuff pressure management is important for preventing aspiration and mucosal damage as well as assuring adequate ventilation. A number of new monitoring techniques have been introduced, and automated cuff pressure control is becoming more common. The respiratory therapist should be adept with all these devices and understand the appropriate application and management. PMID:24891202

  14. A mouse model of airway disease: oncostatin M-induced pulmonary eosinophilia, goblet cell hyperplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness are STAT6 dependent, and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis is STAT6 independent.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Dominik K; Kerr, Christine; Fattouh, Ramzi; Llop-Guevara, Alba; Khan, Waliul I; Jordana, Manel; Richards, Carl D

    2011-01-15

    Oncostatin M (OSM), a pleiotropic cytokine of the gp130 cytokine family, has been implicated in chronic allergic inflammatory and fibrotic disease states associated with tissue eosinophilia. Mouse (m)OSM induces airway eosinophilic inflammation and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis in vivo and regulates STAT6 activation in vitro. To determine the requirement of STAT6 in OSM-induced effects in vivo, we examined wild-type (WT) and STAT6-knockout (STAT6(-/-)) C57BL/6 mouse lung responses to transient ectopic overexpression of mOSM using an adenoviral vector (AdmOSM). Intratracheal AdmOSM elicited persistent eosinophilic lung inflammation that was abolished in STAT6(-/-) mice. AdmOSM also induced pronounced pulmonary remodeling characterized by goblet cell hyperplasia and parenchymal interstitial fibrosis. Goblet cell hyperplasia was STAT6 dependent; however, parenchymal interstitial fibrosis was not. OSM also induced airway hyperresponsiveness in WT mice that was abolished in STAT6(-/-) mice. OSM stimulated an inflammatory signature in the lungs of WT mice that demonstrated STAT6-dependent regulation of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13), chemokines (eotaxin-1/2, MCP-1, keratinocyte chemoattractant), and extracellular matrix modulators (tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, matrix metalloproteinase-13), but STAT6-independent regulation of IL-4Rα, total lung collagen, collagen-1A1, -1A2 mRNA, and parenchymal collagen and α smooth muscle actin accumulation. Thus, overexpression of mOSM induces STAT6-dependent pulmonary eosinophilia, mucous/goblet cell hyperplasia, and airway hyperresponsiveness but STAT6-independent mechanisms of lung tissue extracellular matrix accumulation. These results also suggest that eosinophil or neutrophil accumulation in mouse lungs is not required for OSM-induced lung parenchymal collagen deposition and that OSM may have unique roles in the pathogenesis of allergic and fibrotic lung disease. PMID:21160052

  15. Cross-species immunoreactivity of airway mucin as revealed by monoclonal antibodies directed against mucins from human, hamster, and rat.

    PubMed

    Shin, C Y; Lee, W J; Kim, D J; Park, C S; Choi, E Y; Ko, K H

    2000-10-01

    Airway mucin plays crucial role in host-defense and has been implicated in pathophysiology of various airway diseases including asthma and cystic fibrosis. The analysis of airway mucin has been hampered mostly by the lack of specific and efficient methods for the detection of mucin. Recent production of antibodies against airway mucin from several species and also the development of immunoassay procedures make it more efficient to study the airway mucin. However, the cross-species immunoreactivity of antibodies against airway mucin has not been clearly demonstrated and this prompted us to investigate the cross-species immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies against human (HM02), hamster (HTA), and rat airway mucin (RT03), which is three most widely used species in the study of mucin. All the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) used in this study is IgM isotype and recognizes N-acetyl-galactosamine-linked carbohydrate core or backbone portion of airway mucin. In enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemical staining experiments, it was demonstrated that human and hamster airway mucin showed strong cross-species immunoreactivity. However, rat airway mucin did not show any cross-species immunoreactivity against human and hamster airway mucin. Endotoxin-induced secretory cell metaplasia and hence the increase in mucin release from hamster airway mucin could be detected with antibodies against hamster and human airway mucin in vivo and in vitro. However, the same increase from rat airway could only be detected with antibody against rat airway mucin but not with antibodies against human and hamster airway mucin. In addition, the increase in mucin release from asthmatic patients could be detected with antibodies against human and hamster airway mucin but not with the antibody against rat airway mucin. The data from the present study implicates that the carbohydrate chain of human and hamster airway mucin, but not that

  16. Mitochondrial Transplantation Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness by Inhibition of Cholinergic Hyperactivity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuan; Zhu, Liping; Yu, Xiangyuan; Cai, Lei; Lu, Yankai; Zhang, Jiwei; Li, Tongfei; Li, Jiansha; Xia, Jingyan; Xu, Feng; Hu, Qinghua

    2016-01-01

    Increased cholinergic activity has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness, and alternations of mitochondrial structure and function appear to be involved in many lung diseases including airway hyperresponsiveness. It is crucial to clarify the cause-effect association between mitochondrial dysfunction and cholinergic hyperactivity in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. Male SD rats and cultured airway epithelial cells were exposed to cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide administration; mitochondria isolated from airway epithelium were delivered into epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Both the cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-induced cholinergic hyperactivity in vitro and the airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine in vivo were reversed by the transplantation of exogenous mitochondria. The rescue effects of exogenous mitochondria were imitated by the elimination of excessive reactive oxygen species or blockage of muscarinic M3 receptor, but inhibited by M receptor enhancer. Mitochondrial transplantation effectively attenuates cigarette smoke plus lipopolysaccharide-stimulated airway hyperresponsiveness through the inhibition of ROS-enhanced epithelial cholinergic hyperactivity. PMID:27279915

  17. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolated from the airways of animals with chronic respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Albini, S; Abril, C; Franchini, M; Hüssy, D; Filioussis, G

    2009-07-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) is a nonfermentative bacterium, which is naturally resistant against a panel of commonly-used antibiotics. It is frequently isolated from humans with chronic respiratory disease, e.g. cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In veterinary medicine S. maltophilia is perceived to be a mere coloniser. We herewith report 7 strains of S. maltophilia isolated from animals, of which 5 strains were harvested from 3 horses, a dog and a cat with chronic respiratory disease. The dog isolate showed resistance to trimethoprim / sulphamethoxazole, which was confirmed by detection of the sul 1 gene. Analysis with pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed that 2 horses, which were boarded in the same clinic but two years apart, harboured the same strain of S. maltophilia. This is indicative of a hospital acquired colonisation / infection, which contradicts involvement in the pre-existing chronic disease. PMID:19565454

  18. Alternative approaches for the treatment of airway diseases: focus on nanoparticle medicine.

    PubMed

    Ratemi, E; Sultana Shaik, A; Al Faraj, A; Halwani, R

    2016-08-01

    Despite the various treatment options and international guidelines currently available for the appropriate therapeutic management of asthma, a large population of patients with asthma continues to have poorly controlled disease. There is therefore a need for novel approaches to achieve better asthma control, especially for severe asthmatics. This review discusses the use of nanoparticles for the specific targeting of inflammatory pathways as a promising approach for the effective control of severe persistent asthma as well as other chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27404025

  19. Mass psychogenic illness: psychological predisposition and iatrogenic pseudo-vocal cord dysfunction and pseudo-reactive airways disease syndrome.

    PubMed

    Staudenmayer, Herman; Christopher, Kent L; Repsher, Lawrence; Hill, Ronald H

    2011-06-01

    A multidisciplinary team assessed five patients who alleged chronic medically unexplained multiorgan system symptoms described by idiopathic environmental intolerance allegedly triggered by exposure to solvents used in membrane roofing repair work on an office building. The event precipitated an incident of mass psychogenic illness (MPI). Treating physicians diagnosed irritant-associated vocal cord dysfunction (IVCD) and reactive airways disease syndrome (RADS) resulting from exposure. The authors conducted medical, psychological, and industrial hygiene evaluations. Air monitoring data for total volatile organic compounds obtained during the 2-day exposure period, measurements of emissions during membrane roofing repair at a similar site, mathematical modeling of air contaminant concentrations, and injection of tracer gas into the incident building revealed exposure levels well below those doses anticipated to cause clinical symptoms. There was no objective medical evidence validating symptoms. Review of the medical records indicated that the video laryngoscopy data, pulmonary function tests, and medical examinations relied upon by the treating physicians were inconsistent with published criteria for IVCD and RADS. Psychological evaluation identified defensiveness and self-serving misrepresentations of exaggerated health concerns associated with somatization and malingering. Each case had personality traits associated with at least one personality disorder. Social histories identified premorbid life events and stressors associated with distress. This is the first study to assess psychological predisposition, social interaction among the plaintiffs, and iatrogenic reinforcement of beliefs by diagnoses of pseudo-disorders associated with patient misrepresentation of exaggerated health concerns in an incident of MPI. PMID:21302017

  20. RSV-specific airway resident memory CD8+ T cells and differential disease severity after experimental human infection

    PubMed Central

    Jozwik, Agnieszka; Habibi, Maximillian S.; Paras, Allan; Zhu, Jie; Guvenel, Aleks; Dhariwal, Jaideep; Almond, Mark; Wong, Ernie H. C.; Sykes, Annemarie; Maybeno, Matthew; Del Rosario, Jerico; Trujillo-Torralbo, Maria-Belen; Mallia, Patrick; Sidney, John; Peters, Bjoern; Kon, Onn Min; Sette, Alessandro; Johnston, Sebastian L.; Openshaw, Peter J.; Chiu, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In animal models, resident memory CD8+ T (Trm) cells assist in respiratory virus elimination but their importance in man has not been determined. Here, using experimental human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, we investigate systemic and local virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in adult volunteers. Having defined the immunodominance hierarchy, we analyse phenotype and function longitudinally in blood and by serial bronchoscopy. Despite rapid clinical recovery, we note surprisingly extensive lower airway inflammation with persistent viral antigen and cellular infiltrates. Pulmonary virus-specific CD8+ T cells display a CD69+CD103+ Trm phenotype and accumulate to strikingly high frequencies into convalescence without continued proliferation. While these have a more highly differentiated phenotype, they express fewer cytotoxicity markers than in blood. Nevertheless, their abundance before infection correlates with reduced symptoms and viral load, implying that CD8+ Trm cells in the human lung can confer protection against severe respiratory viral disease when humoral immunity is overcome. PMID:26687547

  1. Multi-scale computational models of the airways to unravel the pathophysiological mechanisms in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AirPROM)

    PubMed Central

    Burrowes, K. S.; De Backer, J.; Smallwood, R.; Sterk, P. J.; Gut, I.; Wirix-Speetjens, R.; Siddiqui, S.; Owers-Bradley, J.; Wild, J.; Maier, D.; Brightling, C.

    2013-01-01

    The respiratory system comprises several scales of biological complexity: the genes, cells and tissues that work in concert to generate resultant function. Malfunctions of the structure or function of components at any spatial scale can result in diseases, to the detriment of gas exchange, right heart function and patient quality of life. Vast amounts of data emerge from studies across each of the biological scales; however, the question remains: how can we integrate and interpret these data in a meaningful way? Respiratory disease presents a huge health and economic burden, with the diseases asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affecting over 500 million people worldwide. Current therapies are inadequate owing to our incomplete understanding of the disease pathophysiology and our lack of recognition of the enormous disease heterogeneity: we need to characterize this heterogeneity on a patient-specific basis to advance healthcare. In an effort to achieve this goal, the AirPROM consortium (Airway disease Predicting Outcomes through patient-specific computational Modelling) brings together a multi-disciplinary team and a wealth of clinical data. Together we are developing an integrated multi-scale model of the airways in order to unravel the complex pathophysiological mechanisms occurring in the diseases asthma and COPD. PMID:24427517

  2. STAT5-induced lunatic fringe during Th2 development alters delta-like 4-mediated Th2 cytokine production in respiratory syncytial virus-exacerbated airway allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sumanta; Rasky, Andrew J; Lundy, Phil A; Kittan, Nicolai A; Kunkel, Steven L; Maillard, Ivan P; Kowalski, Paul E; Kousis, Philaretos C; Guidos, Cynthia J; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2014-02-01

    Notch activation plays an important role in T cell development and mature T cell differentiation. In this study, we investigated the role of Notch activation in a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-exacerbated allergic airway disease. During RSV exacerbation, in vivo neutralization of a specific Notch ligand, Delta-like ligand (Dll)-4, significantly decreased airway hyperreactivity, mucus production, and Th2 cytokines. Lunatic Fringe (Lfng), a glycosyltransferase that enhances Notch activation by Dll4, was increased during RSV exacerbation. Lfng loss of function in Th2-skewed cells inhibited Dll4-Notch activation and subsequent IL-4 production. Further knockdown of Lfng in T cells in CD4Cre(+)Lfng(fl/fl) mice showed reduced Th2 response and disease pathology during RSV exacerbation. Finally, we identified STAT5-binding cis-acting regulatory element activation as a critical driver of Lfng transcriptional activation. These data demonstrate that STAT5-dependent amplification of Notch-modifying Lfng augments Th2 response via Dll4 and is critical for amplifying viral exacerbation during allergic airway disease. PMID:24367028

  3. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient’s risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  4. Anatomic and physiopathologic changes affecting the airway of the elderly patient: implications for geriatric-focused airway management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathleen N; Botros, Daniel B; Groban, Leanne; Bryan, Yvon F

    2015-01-01

    There are many anatomical, physiopathological, and cognitive changes that occur in the elderly that affect different components of airway management: intubation, ventilation, oxygenation, and risk of aspiration. Anatomical changes occur in different areas of the airway from the oral cavity to the larynx. Common changes to the airway include tooth decay, oropharyngeal tumors, and significant decreases in neck range of motion. These changes may make intubation challenging by making it difficult to visualize the vocal cords and/or place the endotracheal tube. Also, some of these changes, including but not limited to, atrophy of the muscles around the lips and an edentulous mouth, affect bag mask ventilation due to a difficult face-mask seal. Physiopathologic changes may impact airway management as well. Common pulmonary issues in the elderly (eg, obstructive sleep apnea and COPD) increase the risk of an oxygen desaturation event, while gastrointestinal issues (eg, achalasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease) increase the risk of aspiration. Finally, cognitive changes (eg, dementia) not often seen as related to airway management may affect patient cooperation, especially if an awake intubation is required. Overall, degradation of the airway along with other physiopathologic and cognitive changes makes the elderly population more prone to complications related to airway management. When deciding which airway devices and techniques to use for intubation, the clinician should also consider the difficulty associated with ventilating the patient, the patient's risk of oxygen desaturation, and/or aspiration. For patients who may be difficult to bag mask ventilate or who have a risk of aspiration, a specialized supralaryngeal device may be preferable over bag mask for ventilation. Patients with tumors or decreased neck range of motion may require a device with more finesse and maneuverability, such as a flexible fiberoptic broncho-scope. Overall, geriatric-focused airway

  5. Early Airway Structural Changes in Cystic Fibrosis Pigs as a Determinant of Particle Distribution and Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Awadalla, Maged; Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Alaiwa, Mahmoud H. Abou; Adam, Ryan J.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Fuld, Matthew K.; Reynolds, Karen J.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long; Stoltz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease is not well understood. A porcine CF model was recently generated, and these animals develop lung disease similar to humans with CF. At birth, before infection and inflammation, CF pigs have airways that are irregularly shaped and have a reduced caliber compared to non-CF pigs. We hypothesized that these airway structural abnormalities affect airflow patterns and particle distribution. To test this hypothesis we used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on airway geometries obtained by computed tomography of newborn non-CF and CF pigs. For the same flow rate, newborn CF pig airways exhibited higher air velocity and resistance compared to non-CF. Moreover we found that, at the carina bifurcation, particles greater than 5-µm preferably distributed to the right CF lung despite almost equal airflow ventilation in non-CF and CF. CFD modeling also predicted that deposition efficiency was greater in CF compared to non-CF for 5- and 10-µm particles. These differences were most significant in the airways included in the geometry supplying the right caudal, right accessory, left caudal, and left cranial lobes. The irregular particle distribution and increased deposition in newborn CF pig airways suggest that early airway structural abnormalities might contribute to CF disease pathogenesis. PMID:24310865

  6. SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS ARE SUSCEPTIBLE TO AIRWAY DISEASE INDUCED BY SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent models of chronic pulmonary diseases induced by sulfur dioxide (SO2), elastase or tobacco smoke have limited utility because of their lack of chronicity of inflammation, and they demonstrate limited sensitivity to a given experimental manipulation. We hypothesized that dis...

  7. Estimating the Time Interval Between Exposure to the World Trade Center Disaster and Incident Diagnoses of Obstructive Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Michelle S.; Webber, Mayris P.; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W.; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Kelly, Kerry J.; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D.; Prezant, David J.; Hall, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13–24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk. PMID:24980522

  8. Effects of inhaled budesonide on spirometric values, reversibility, airway responsiveness, and cough threshold in smokers with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Auffarth, B; Postma, D S; de Monchy, J G; van der Mark, T W; Boorsma, M; Koëter, G H

    1991-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids are known to reduce respiratory symptoms and airway responsiveness in allergic patients with asthma. The aim of the present randomised, double blind study was to assess the effect of eight weeks' treatment with inhaled budesonide in non-allergic smokers with chronic obstructive lung disease. Twenty four subjects (23 male) entered the study. Their ages ranged from 40 to 70 (mean 57) years, with a mean of 35 (range 9-80) pack years of smoking; the mean FEV1 was 53% (range 32-74%) predicted and geometric mean PC20 (histamine concentration causing a 20% fall in FEV1) 0.96 (range 0.07-7.82) mg/ml. After a two week washout, single blind, placebo period, 12 patients were allocated to treatment with budesonide 1600 microgram/day and 12 to placebo for eight weeks. The only additional drug to be taken was ipratropium bromide "if needed." Twenty one patients completed the study, 10 in the budesonide group and 11 in the placebo group. The standard deviation of the difference between duplicate measurements of PC20 histamine and citric acid cough threshold made two weeks apart was below one doubling dose step. There was a significant reduction in dyspnoea in the budesonide group, but otherwise no change in symptom scores or use of ipratropium bromide over the eight weeks of treatment within or between the two groups. No significant differences in spirometric values, peak expiratory flow, PC20 histamine, or citric acid cough threshold were found between the groups. Although differences were not significant, some of the changes showed a trend in favour of budesonide. Whether a longer observation period would show a significant influence of inhaled corticosteroids in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease remains to be determined. Images PMID:2068695

  9. Oxidant stress stimulates anion secretion from the human airway epithelial cell line calu-3: implications for cystic fibrosis lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with tissue damage in the lung and may be a common element in the pathogenesis of all inflammatory lung diseases. Exposure to the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) evoked a rapid increase in transepithelial anion secretion across monolayers of the human submucosal gland serous cell line Calu-3. This increase was almost entirely abolished by the addition of diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC), implicating the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel in the response. The response was also reduced by inhibitors of basolateral K+ channels. Studies of electrically isolated apical and basolateral membranes revealed that H2O2 stimulated both apical Cl− and basolateral K+ conductances (GCl and GK). Apical GCl was sensitive to DPC, but unaffected by 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS), suggesting that CFTR is the major anion conduction pathway mediating the response to H2O2. Additionally, H2O2 had no effect on GCl in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 or following maximal stimulation of GCl with forskolin, implicating the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway in the apical response to H2O2. Basolateral GK was reduced by the K+ channel inhibitors clotrimazole and clofilium, indicating roles for KCNN4 and KCNQ1 in the H2O2-stimulated response. We propose that ROS-stimulated anion secretion from serous cells plays an important role in keeping the airways clear from damaging radicals that could potentially initiate tissue destruction. Our finding that this response is CFTR dependent suggests that an important host defence mechanism would be dysfunctional in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. Loss of this compensatory protective mechanism could expose the CF lung to ROS for extended periods, which could be important in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. PMID:12181292

  10. Oxidant stress stimulates anion secretion from the human airway epithelial cell line Calu-3: implications for cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2002-08-15

    Exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with tissue damage in the lung and may be a common element in the pathogenesis of all inflammatory lung diseases. Exposure to the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) evoked a rapid increase in transepithelial anion secretion across monolayers of the human submucosal gland serous cell line Calu-3. This increase was almost entirely abolished by the addition of diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC), implicating the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel in the response. The response was also reduced by inhibitors of basolateral K+ channels. Studies of electrically isolated apical and basolateral membranes revealed that H2O2 stimulated both apical Cl- and basolateral K+ conductances (G(Cl) and G(K)). Apical G(Cl) was sensitive to DPC, but unaffected by 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), suggesting that CFTR is the major anion conduction pathway mediating the response to H2O2. Additionally, H2O2 had no effect on G(Cl) in the presence of the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 or following maximal stimulation of G(Cl) with forskolin, implicating the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway in the apical response to H2O2. Basolateral G(K) was reduced by the K+ channel inhibitors clotrimazole and clofilium, indicating roles for KCNN4 and KCNQ1 in the H2O2-stimulated response. We propose that ROS-stimulated anion secretion from serous cells plays an important role in keeping the airways clear from damaging radicals that could potentially initiate tissue destruction. Our finding that this response is CFTR dependent suggests that an important host defence mechanism would be dysfunctional in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. Loss of this compensatory protective mechanism could expose the CF lung to ROS for extended periods, which could be important in the pathogenesis of CF lung disease. PMID:12181292

  11. Chlorinated pool attendance, airway epithelium defects and the risks of allergic diseases in adolescents: Interrelationships revealed by circulating biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Alfred; Nickmilder, Marc; Dumont, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    It has been suggested that allergic diseases might be epithelial disorders driven by various environmental stressors but the epidemiological evidence supporting this concept is limited. In a cross-sectional study of 835 school adolescents (365 boys; mean age, 15.5 yr), we measured the serum concentrations of Club cell protein (CC16), surfactant-associated protein D (SP-D) and of total and aeroallergen-specific IgE. We used the serum CC16/SP-D concentration ratio as an index integrating changes in the permeability (SP-D) and secretory function (CC16) of the airway epithelium. In both sexes, early swimming in chlorinated pools emerged as the most consistent and strongest predictor of low CC16 and CC16/SP-D ratio in serum. Among girls, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds (lowest vs. highest tertile) for pet sensitization (OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.19-8.22) and for hay fever in subjects sensitized to pollen (OR 4.12, 95% CI 1.28-14.4). Among boys, a low CC16/SP-D ratio was associated with increased odds for house-dust mite (HDM) sensitization (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.11-3.73), for allergic rhinitis in subjects sensitized to HDM (OR 3.52, 95% CI 1.22-11.1) and for asthma in subjects sensitized to any aeroallergen (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.17-11.0), HDM (OR 5.20, 95% CI 1.40-24.2) or pollen (OR 5.82, 95% CI 1.51-27.4). Odds for allergic sensitization or rhinitis also increased with increasing SP-D or decreasing CC16 in serum. Our findings support the hypothesis linking the development of allergic diseases to epithelial barrier defects due to host factors or environmental stressors such as early swimming in chlorinated pools. PMID:25863185

  12. Estimating the time interval between exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and incident diagnoses of obstructive airway disease.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Michelle S; Webber, Mayris P; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kelly, Kerry J; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D; Prezant, David J; Hall, Charles B

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13-24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk. PMID:24980522

  13. Comparison between the disease-specific Airways Questionnaire 20 and the generic 15D instruments in COPD

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Given that the assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an essential outcome measure to optimize chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient management, there is a need for a short and fast, reliable and valid instrument for routine use in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to analyse the relationship between the disease-specific Airways questionnaire (AQ20) and the generic 15D health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument simultaneously in a large cohort of patients with COPD. We also compare the HRQoL of COPD patients with that of the general population. Methods The AQ20 and 15D were administered to 739 COPD patients representing an unselected hospital-based COPD population. The completion rates and validity of, and correlations among the questions and dimension scores were examined. A factor analysis with varimax rotation was performed in order to find subsets of highly correlating items of the questionnaires. Results The summary scores of AQ20 and 15D were highly correlated (r = - 0.71, p < 0.01). In AQ20 over 50% of patients reported frequent cough, breathlessness during domestic work, and chest problem limiting their full enjoyment of life. 15D results showed a noteworthy decrease of HRQoL in breathing, mobility, sleeping, usual activities, discomfort and symptoms, vitality, and sexual activity (scores ≤ 0.75). Compared to the age- and gender-standardized Finnish general population, the COPD patients were statistically significantly worse off on 13 of 15 dimensions. Conclusions The AQ20 and 15D summary scores are comparable in terms of measuring HRQoL in COPD patients. The data support the validity of 15D to measure the quality of life in COPD. COPD compromises the HRQoL broadly, as reflected by the generic instrument. Both questionnaires are simple and short, and could easily be used in clinical practice with high completion rates. PMID:21235818

  14. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  16. Aspergillus tubingensis: a major filamentous fungus found in the airways of patients with lung disease.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Magali; Normand, Anne-Cécile; L'Ollivier, Coralie; Cassagne, Carole; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Dubus, Jean-Christophe; Brégeon, Fabienne; Hendrickx, Marijke; Gomez, Carine; Ranque, Stéphane; Piarroux, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    The black Aspergillus group comprises A. niger and 18 other species, which are morphologically indistinguishable. Among this species subset, A. tubingensis, described in less than 30 human cases before 2014, is primarily isolated from ear, nose, and throat samples. Recently, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique to identify microbes in diagnostic settings. We applied this method to identify 1,720 filamentous fungi routinely isolated from clinical samples our laboratory over a two-year study period. Accordingly, we found 85 isolates of A. niger, 58 of A. tubingensis, and six other black Aspergillus (4 A. carbonarius and 2 A. japonicus). A. tubingensis was the fifth most frequent mold isolated in our mycology laboratory, primarily isolated from respiratory samples (40/58 isolates). In this study, we mainly aimed to describe the clinical pattern of Aspergillus tubingensisWe analyzed the clinical features of the patients in whom A. tubingensis had been isolated from 40 respiratory samples. Thirty patients suffered from cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or other types of chronic respiratory failure. Strikingly, 20 patients were experiencing respiratory acute exacerbation at the time the sample was collected. Antifungal susceptibility testing of 36 A. tubingensis isolates showed lower amphotericin B MICs (P < 10(-4)) and higher itraconazole and voriconazole MICs (P < 10(-4) and P = .0331, respectively) compared with 36 A. niger isolates. Further studies are required to better establish the role that this fungus plays in human diseases, especially in the context of cystic fibrosis and chronic pulmonary diseases. PMID:26773134

  17. Airway oxidative stress in chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of chronic cough are unclear. Many reactive oxygen species affect airway sensory C-fibres which are capable to induce cough. Several chronic lung diseases are characterised by cough and oxidative stress. In asthma, an association between the cough severity and airway oxidative stress has been demonstrated. The present study was conducted to investigate whether airway oxidative stress is associated with chronic cough in subjects without chronic lung diseases. Methods Exhaled breath condensate samples were obtained in 43 non-smoking patients with chronic cough and 15 healthy subjects. Exclusion criteria included a doctor’s diagnosis of any lung disorders and any abnormality in lung x-ray. The concentration of 8-isoprostane was measured. In addition, the patients filled in Leicester Cough Questionnaire and underwent hypertonic saline cough provocation test, spirometry, ambulatory peak flow monitoring, nitric oxide measurement, and histamine airway challenge. In a subgroup of patients the measurements were repeated during 12 weeks’ treatment with inhaled budesonide, 800 ug/day. Results The 8-isoprostane concentrations were higher in the cough patients than in the healthy subjects (24.6 ± 1.2 pg/ml vs. 10.1 ± 1.7 pg/ml, p = 0.045). The 8-isoprostane concentration was associated with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score (p = 0.044) but not with the cough sensitivity to saline or other tests. Budesonide treatment did not affect the 8-isoprostane concentrations. Conclusions Chronic cough seems to be associated with airway oxidative stress in subjects with chronic cough but without chronic lung diseases. This finding may help to develop novel antitussive drugs. Trial registration The study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (KUH5801112), identifier NCT00859274. PMID:24294924

  18. Air pollution and chronic airway diseases: what should people know and do?

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xu-Qin; Feng, Di

    2016-01-01

    The health effects of air pollution remain a public health concern worldwide. Exposure to air pollution has many substantial adverse effects on human health. Globally, seven million deaths were attributable to the joint effects of household and ambient air pollution. Subjects with chronic respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma are especially vulnerable to the detrimental effects of air pollutants. Air pollution can induce the acute exacerbation of COPD and onset of asthma, increase the respiratory morbidity and mortality. The health effects of air pollution depend on the components and sources of pollutants, which varied with countries, seasons, and times. Combustion of solid fuels is a major source of air pollutants in developing countries. To reduce the detrimental effects of air pollution, people especially those with COPD or asthma should be aware of the air quality and take extra measures such as reducing the time outdoor and wearing masks when necessary. For reducing the air pollutants indoor, people should use clean fuels and improve the stoves so as to burn fuel more efficiently and vent emissions to the outside. Air cleaners that can improve the air quality efficiently are recommended. PMID:26904251

  19. A sensory neuronal ion channel essential for airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in asthma.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Ana I; Brackmann, Marian; Elia, Maxwell D; Bessac, Bret F; del Camino, Donato; D'Amours, Marc; Witek, JoAnn S; Fanger, Chistopher M; Chong, Jayhong A; Hayward, Neil J; Homer, Robert J; Cohn, Lauren; Huang, Xiaozhu; Moran, Magdalene M; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-06-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disorder caused by airway exposures to allergens and chemical irritants. Studies focusing on immune, smooth muscle, and airway epithelial function revealed many aspects of the disease mechanism of asthma. However, the limited efficacies of immune-directed therapies suggest the involvement of additional mechanisms in asthmatic airway inflammation. TRPA1 is an irritant-sensing ion channel expressed in airway chemosensory nerves. TRPA1-activating stimuli such as cigarette smoke, chlorine, aldehydes, and scents are among the most prevalent triggers of asthma. Endogenous TRPA1 agonists, including reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation products, are potent drivers of allergen-induced airway inflammation in asthma. Here, we examined the role of TRPA1 in allergic asthma in the murine ovalbumin model. Strikingly, genetic ablation of TRPA1 inhibited allergen-induced leukocyte infiltration in the airways, reduced cytokine and mucus production, and almost completely abolished airway hyperreactivity to contractile stimuli. This phenotype is recapitulated by treatment of wild-type mice with HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist. HC-030031, when administered during airway allergen challenge, inhibited eosinophil infiltration and prevented the development of airway hyperreactivity. Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed deficiencies in chemically and allergen-induced neuropeptide release in the airways, providing a potential explanation for the impaired inflammatory response. Our data suggest that TRPA1 is a key integrator of interactions between the immune and nervous systems in the airways, driving asthmatic airway inflammation following inhaled allergen challenge. TRPA1 may represent a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of asthma and other allergic inflammatory conditions. PMID:19458046

  20. Lymphocyte Gene Expression Characteristic of Immediate Airway Responses (IAR) and Methacholine (MCH) Hyperresponsiveness in Mice Sensitized and Challenged with Isocyanates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to isocyanates has been associated with occupational airway diseases, including asthma. Previously we reported on respiratory and immune responses following dermal sensitization and intranasal challenge of BALB/c mice with 6 different isocyanates. The purpose of this st...

  1. Cigarette smoke makes airway and early parenchymal asbestos-induced lung disease worse in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Tron, V.; Wright, J.L.; Harrison, N.; Wiggs, B.; Churg, A.

    1987-08-01

    In order to assess the effects of cigarette smoke and asbestos exposure, we divided guinea pigs into 4 groups: smoking or nonsmoking, and asbestos-exposed or not asbestos-exposed groups. Asbestos-exposed animals were given a single intratracheal instillation of 5 mg UICC amosite, a dose and method of administration that we have previously shown produces morphologic changes in the small airways as well as minimal interstitial fibrosis. Animals were smoked 5 days per week for 6 months. By itself, smoking did not affect lung collagen content, small airways wall thickness, or the volume fraction of tissue surrounding airways, but it did cause a significant increase in alveolar mean linear intercept (Lm). Asbestos alone increased collagen content, airway wall thickness, and tissue volume fraction surrounding airways, the latter measure used to assess interstitial fibrosis. An unexpected finding was that asbestos also increased Lm. The two agents administered together caused more severe changes of all types than were produced by either agent alone, and the interaction between the 2 was generally synergistic. Smoke-exposed animals retained 3 times the asbestos fiber burden of those not smoke-exposed; the increase in retention was greater for short than for long fibers. We conclude that cigarette smoke can potentiate the fibrosis induced by asbestos, possibly because of increased fiber retention. As well, in this model, asbestos or asbestos plus cigarette smoke produces increases in alveolar size.

  2. Chronic effects of mechanical force on airways.

    PubMed

    Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Drazen, Jeffrey M

    2006-01-01

    Airways are embedded in the mechanically dynamic environment of the lung. In utero, this mechanical environment is defined largely by fluid secretion into the developing airway lumen. Clinical, whole lung, and cellular studies demonstrate pivotal roles for mechanical distention in airway morphogenesis and cellular behavior during lung development. In the adult lung, the mechanical environment is defined by a dynamic balance of surface, tissue, and muscle forces. Diseases of the airways modulate both the mechanical stresses to which the airways are exposed as well as the structure and mechanical behavior of the airways. For instance, in asthma, activation of airway smooth muscle abruptly changes the airway size and stress state within the airway wall; asthma also results in profound remodeling of the airway wall. Data now demonstrate that airway epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts respond to their mechanical environment. A prominent role has been identified for the epithelium in transducing mechanical stresses, and in both the fetal and mature airways, epithelial cells interact with mesenchymal cells to coordinate remodeling of tissue architecture in response to the mechanical environment. PMID:16460284

  3. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S H; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies. PMID:26119831

  4. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G.; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies. PMID:26119831

  5. Toxicity of aged gasoline exhaust particles to normal and diseased airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Künzi, Lisa; Krapf, Manuel; Daher, Nancy; Dommen, Josef; Jeannet, Natalie; Schneider, Sarah; Platt, Stephen; Slowik, Jay G.; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kalberer, Markus; Strähl, Christof; Dümbgen, Lutz; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Geiser, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a leading cause of premature death, particularly in those with pre-existing lung disease. A causative link between particle properties and adverse health effects remains unestablished mainly due to complex and variable physico-chemical PM parameters. Controlled laboratory experiments are required. Generating atmospherically realistic aerosols and performing cell-exposure studies at relevant particle-doses are challenging. Here we examine gasoline-exhaust particle toxicity from a Euro-5 passenger car in a uniquely realistic exposure scenario, combining a smog chamber simulating atmospheric ageing, an aerosol enrichment system varying particle number concentration independent of particle chemistry, and an aerosol deposition chamber physiologically delivering particles on air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures reproducing normal and susceptible health status. Gasoline-exhaust is an important PM source with largely unknown health effects. We investigated acute responses of fully-differentiated normal, distressed (antibiotics-treated) normal, and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelia (HBE), and a proliferating, single-cell type bronchial epithelial cell-line (BEAS-2B). We show that a single, short-term exposure to realistic doses of atmospherically-aged gasoline-exhaust particles impairs epithelial key-defence mechanisms, rendering it more vulnerable to subsequent hazards. We establish dose-response curves at realistic particle-concentration levels. Significant differences between cell models suggest the use of fully-differentiated HBE is most appropriate in future toxicity studies.

  6. Prevalence of obstructive airway disease by spirometric indices in non-smoker subjects with IHD and HTN

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Virendra C.; Pujari, Bhupal N.; Patil, Harsha V.; Munjal, Amit; Agrawal, Vaibhav

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have found that there is a strong association between ischemic heart disease (IHD) and hypertension (HTN) with spirometric indices. Aims: To study the prevalence of obstructive airway disease (OAD) in non-smoker subjects with IHD and HTN and to compare them with healthy population. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, case–control, and observational study. Subjects and Methods: A total of 100 patients (cases) (n = 100) admitted in medicine department were recruited for this study. Controls (n = 100) were apparently healthy age- and sex-matched without HTN and IHD, recruited from March 2007 to July 2008. All eligible subjects were subjected to spirometric examination on a turbine-based spirometer (MIR spirolab-II) according to ATS/ERS guidelines. Forced expiratory volume/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio <70% was used to make a diagnosis of OAD. Statistical Analysis Used: All analyses were carried out using Statistical Software Package for Social Sciences trial version (SPSS 10 version). Results: Out of 100 cases, 18 were with FEV1/FVC ratio <70% (OAD) and 82 had >70% FEV1/FVC ratio. Out of 100 controls, 2 were with FEV1/FVC ratio <70% (OAD) and 98 had >70% FEV1/FVC ratio. Eleven patients out of 66 from the case population with HTN had FEV1/FVC ratio <70% (Odds ratio 8.044). Prevalence of OAD in the hypertensive individuals was 16.66%. Twelve patients out of 62 from the case population with IHD had FEV1/FVC ratio <70% (Odds ratio of 9.333). Prevalence of OAD in the IHD individuals was 19.35%. In multiple correlation results for case population, when pulmonary function test variables were correlated with various dependant (age) and independent variables [HTN, IHD, height, weight, body mass index (BMI)], they were significantly reduced (P = 0.00017). In multivariate analysis (MANOVA), spirometric variables like FEV1, FEV1/FVC%, FVC, forced expiratory flow (FEF) 25–75%, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were compared with

  7. Supraglottic airway devices.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Satya Krishna; Kumar, Anjana M

    2014-06-01

    Supraglottic airway devices (SADs) are used to keep the upper airway open to provide unobstructed ventilation. Early (first-generation) SADs rapidly replaced endotracheal intubation and face masks in > 40% of general anesthesia cases due to their versatility and ease of use. Second-generation devices have further improved efficacy and utility by incorporating design changes. Individual second-generation SADs have allowed more dependable positive-pressure ventilation, are made of disposable materials, have integrated bite blocks, are better able to act as conduits for tracheal tube placement, and have reduced risk of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. SADs now provide successful rescue ventilation in > 90% of patients in whom mask ventilation or tracheal intubation is found to be impossible. However, some concerns with these devices remain, including failing to adequately ventilate, causing airway damage, and increasing the likelihood of pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. Careful patient selection and excellent technical skills are necessary for successful use of these devices. PMID:24891199

  8. Biofilm-dependent airway infections: a role for ambroxol?

    PubMed

    Cataldi, M; Sblendorio, V; Leo, A; Piazza, O

    2014-08-01

    Biofilms are a key factor in the development of both acute and chronic airway infections. Their relevance is well established in ventilator associated pneumonia, one of the most severe complications in critically ill patients, and in cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians. Accumulating evidence suggests that biofilms could have also a role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and their involvement in bronchiectasis has been proposed as well. When they grow in biofilms, microorganisms become multidrug-resistant. Therefore the treatment of biofilm-dependent airway infections is problematic. Indeed, it still largely based on measures aiming to prevent the formation of biofilms or remove them once that they are formed. Here we review recent evidence suggesting that the mucokinetic drug ambroxol has specific anti-biofilm properties. We also discuss how additional pharmacological properties of this drug could be beneficial in biofilm-dependent airway infections. Specifically, we review the evidence showing that: 1-ambroxol exerts anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting at multiple levels the activity of neutrophils, and 2-it improves mucociliary clearance by interfering with the activity of airway epithelium ion channels and transporters including sodium/bicarbonate and sodium/potassium/chloride cotransporters, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and aquaporins. As a whole, the data that we review here suggest that ambroxol could be helpful in biofilm-dependent airway infections. However, considering the limited clinical evidence available up to date, further clinical studies are required to support the use of ambroxol in these diseases. PMID:24252805

  9. Airway basal stem cells: a perspective on their roles in epithelial homeostasis and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jason R; Randell, Scott H; Hogan, Brigid L M

    2010-01-01

    The small airways of the human lung undergo pathological changes in pulmonary disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiolitis obliterans and cystic fibrosis. These clinical problems impose huge personal and societal healthcare burdens. The changes, termed 'pathological airway remodeling', affect the epithelium, the underlying mesenchyme and the reciprocal trophic interactions that occur between these tissues. Most of the normal human airway is lined by a pseudostratified epithelium of ciliated cells, secretory cells and 6-30% basal cells, the proportion of which varies along the proximal-distal axis. Epithelial abnormalities range from hypoplasia (failure to differentiate) to basal- and goblet-cell hyperplasia, squamous- and goblet-cell metaplasia, dysplasia and malignant transformation. Mesenchymal alterations include thickening of the basal lamina, smooth muscle hyperplasia, fibrosis and inflammatory cell accumulation. Paradoxically, given the prevalence and importance of airway remodeling in lung disease, its etiology is poorly understood. This is due, in part, to a lack of basic knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate the differentiation, maintenance and repair of the airway epithelium. Specifically, little is known about the proliferation and differentiation of basal cells, a multipotent stem cell population of the pseudostratified airway epithelium. This Perspective summarizes what we know, and what we need to know, about airway basal cells to evaluate their contributions to normal and abnormal airway remodeling. We contend that exploiting well-described model systems using both human airway epithelial cells and the pseudostratified epithelium of the genetically tractable mouse trachea will enable crucial discoveries regarding the pathogenesis of airway disease. PMID:20699479

  10. TRP channels and temperature in airway disease—clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Millqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Temperatures above and below what is generally regarded as “comfortable” for the human being have long been known to induce various airway symptoms, especially in combination with exercise in cold climate with temperatures below 0°C, which is naturally since exercise is followed by enhanced ventilation and thus greater amounts of inhaled cold air. The aim was to highlight the knowledge we have today on symptoms from the airways (here also including the eyes) arisen from various temperatures; the mechanisms, the pathophysiology and their clinical significance. The most common eye and airway conditions related to temperature changes are dry eye disease, rhinitis, laryngeal dysfunction, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic cough. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are probably involved in all temperature induced airway symptoms but via different pathways, which are now beginning to be mapped out. In asthma, the most persuasive hypothesis today is that cold-induced asthmatic bronchoconstriction is induced by dehydration of the airway mucosa, from which it follows that provocations with osmotic stimuli like hypertonic saline and mannitol can be used as a surrogate for exercise provocation as well as dry air inhalation. In chronic unexplained cough there seems to be a direct influence of cold air on the TRP ion channels followed by coughing and increased cough sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin. Revelations in the last decades of the ability of several airway TRP ion channels to sense and react to ambient air temperature have opened new windows for the understanding of the pathogenesis in a diversity of airway reactions appearing in many common respiratory diseases. PMID:27227021

  11. Educating the Educator: Teaching Airway Adjunct Techniques in Athletic Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David C.; Seitz, S. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" ("Competencies") now requires athletic training educators (ATEs) to introduce into the curriculum various types of airway adjuncts including: (1) oropharyngeal airways (OPA), (2) nasopharyngeal airways (NPA), (3) supraglottic airways (SGA), and (4) suction. The addition of these…

  12. Outcome of 'Kissing Stents' for Aortoiliac Atherosclerotic Disease, Including the Effect on the Non-diseased Contralateral Iliac Limb

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Faheez; Sarkar, B.; Timmons, G.; Mudawi, A.; Ashour, H.; Uberoi, R.

    2002-12-15

    Purpose: To assess outcomes following 'kissing stents' for aortoiliac atherosclerotic disease,particularly in the non-diseased/non-symptomatic limb. Methods: Twenty-four patients underwent kissing stenting over 36 months. There were 36 symptomatic and 12 non-symptomatic/non-diseased limbs. Patients were prospectively followed with 3-monthly clinical assessment as well as duplex ultrasound. Results: At 23.5 months follow-up (range 3-36 months), 75% of patients had improvement in symptoms, 20% no change and 5% had deterioration. Sixty-one percent of limbs maintained an increase in ankle-brachial pressure index of >0.1. There were 15 reinterventions in nine patients, including three in non-symptomatic/non-diseased limbs. Primary patency at 6, 12 and 24 months was 94%, 81% and 58%, respectively. Primary assisted and secondary patency rates were 96%, 84% and 84% respectively for diseased limbs, and 92% and 100% for non-symptomatic/non-diseased limbs. Although reinterventions were required, there were no long-term occlusions in the non-diseased/non-symptomatic limb. Conclusion: Kissing stents offer an invaluable alternative to surgery. There were no long-term occlusions following kissing stents in a previously non-symptomatic/non-diseased limb.

  13. Cardiovascular risk and mortality in end-stage renal disease patients undergoing dialysis: sleep study, pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics, upper airway collapsibility, autonomic nervous activity, depression, anxiety, stress and quality of life: a prospective, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the most serious public health problems. The increasing prevalence of CKD in developed and developing countries has led to a global epidemic. The hypothesis proposed is that patients undergoing dialysis would experience a marked negative influence on physiological variables of sleep and autonomic nervous system activity, compromising quality of life. Methods/Design A prospective, consecutive, double blind, randomized controlled clinical trial is proposed to address the effect of dialysis on sleep, pulmonary function, respiratory mechanics, upper airway collapsibility, autonomic nervous activity, depression, anxiety, stress and quality of life in patients with CKD. The measurement protocol will include body weight (kg); height (cm); body mass index calculated as weight/height2; circumferences (cm) of the neck, waist, and hip; heart and respiratory rates; blood pressures; Mallampati index; tonsil index; heart rate variability; maximum ventilatory pressures; negative expiratory pressure test, and polysomnography (sleep study), as well as the administration of specific questionnaires addressing sleep apnea, excessive daytime sleepiness, depression, anxiety, stress, and quality of life. Discussion CKD is a major public health problem worldwide, and its incidence has increased in part by the increased life expectancy and increasing number of cases of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Sleep disorders are common in patients with renal insufficiency. Our hypothesis is that the weather weight gain due to volume overload observed during interdialytic period will influence the degree of collapsibility of the upper airway due to narrowing and predispose to upper airway occlusion during sleep, and to investigate the negative influences of haemodialysis in the physiological variables of sleep, and autonomic nervous system, and respiratory mechanics and thereby compromise the quality of life of patients. Trial registration The

  14. Airway Surface Dehydration Aggravates Cigarette Smoke-Induced Hallmarks of COPD in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seys, Leen J. M.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Dupont, Lisa L.; Desauter, Elke; Duerr, Julia; Seyhan Agircan, Ayca; Conickx, Griet; Joos, Guy F.; Brusselle, Guy G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Airway surface dehydration, caused by an imbalance between secretion and absorption of ions and fluid across the epithelium and/or increased epithelial mucin secretion, impairs mucociliary clearance. Recent evidence suggests that this mechanism may be implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the role of airway surface dehydration in the pathogenesis of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced COPD remains unknown. Objective We aimed to investigate in vivo the effect of airway surface dehydration on several CS-induced hallmarks of COPD in mice with airway-specific overexpression of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC). Methods βENaC-Tg mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were exposed to air or CS for 4 or 8 weeks. Pathological hallmarks of COPD, including goblet cell metaplasia, mucin expression, pulmonary inflammation, lymphoid follicles, emphysema and airway wall remodelling were determined and lung function was measured. Results Airway surface dehydration in βENaC-Tg mice aggravated CS-induced airway inflammation, mucin expression and destruction of alveolar walls and accelerated the formation of pulmonary lymphoid follicles. Moreover, lung function measurements demonstrated an increased compliance and total lung capacity and a lower resistance and hysteresis in βENaC-Tg mice, compared to WT mice. CS exposure further altered lung function measurements. Conclusions We conclude that airway surface dehydration is a risk factor that aggravates CS-induced hallmarks of COPD. PMID:26066648

  15. Intranasal administration of a combination of choline chloride, vitamin C, and selenium attenuates the allergic effect in a mouse model of airway disease.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Preeti; Saw, Sanjay; Govindaraj, Dhanapal; Arora, Naveen

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory allergic disease is an inflammatory condition accompanied by oxidative stress. Supplementation of an anti-inflammatory agent with antioxidants may have a therapeutic effect. In this study, the effects of choline chloride in combination with antioxidants were evaluated via the intranasal route in a mouse model of allergic airway disease. Balb/c mice were sensitized on days 0, 7, and 14 and challenged on days 25-30 with cockroach extract (CE) and with a booster challenge on day 38. They were treated with choline chloride (ChCl; 1mg/kg), vitamin C (Vit C; 308.33 mg/kg), and selenium (Se; 1mg/kg) alone or in combination via the intranasal route on days 31, 33, 35, 37, and 39. The mice were sacrificed on day 40 to collect blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, lungs, and spleen. Mice immunized with CE showed a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung inflammation, Th2 cytokines, and the oxidative stress markers intracellular reactive oxygen species and 8-isoprostanes compared to the phosphate-buffered saline control group. A significant decrease was observed in these parameters with all the treatments (p<0.01). The highest decrease was noticed in the ChCl+Vit C+Se-treated group, with AHR decreased to the normal level. This group also showed the highest decrease in airway inflammation (p<0.001), IL-4 and IL-5 (p<0.001), IgE and IgG1 (p<0.001), NF-κB (p<0.001), and 8-isoprostane levels (p<0.001). Glutathione peroxidase activity, which was decreased significantly in CE-immunized mice, was restored to normal levels in this group (p<0.001). IL-10 level was decreased in CE-immunized mice and was restored to normal by combination treatment. The combination treatment induced FOXP3(+) cells in splenocyte culture, responsible for the upregulation of IL-10. In conclusion, the combination of choline chloride, vitamin C, and selenium via the intranasal route reduces AHR, inflammation, and oxidative stress, probably by causing IL-10 production by FOXP

  16. Airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness.

    PubMed

    Gauld, Leanne Maree

    2009-05-01

    Impaired airway clearance leads to recurrent chest infections and respiratory deterioration in neuromuscular weakness. It is frequently the cause of death. Cough is the major mechanism of airway clearance. Cough has several components, and assessment tools are available to measure the different components of cough. These include measuring peak cough flow, respiratory muscle strength, and inspiratory capacity. Each is useful in assessing the ability to generate an effective cough, and can be used to guide when techniques of assisting airway clearance may be effective for the individual and which are most effective. Techniques to assist airway clearance include augmenting inspiration by air stacking, augmenting expiration by assisting the cough, and augmenting both inspiration and expiration with the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator or by direct suctioning via a tracheostomy. Physiotherapists are invaluable in assisting airway clearance, and in teaching patients and their families how to use these techniques. Use of the mechanical insufflator-exsufflator has gained popularity in recent times, but several simpler, more economical methods are available to assist airway clearance that can be used effectively alone or in combination. This review examines the literature available on the assessment and management of impaired airway clearance in neuromuscular weakness. PMID:19379290

  17. Apoptosis and the Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    White, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The airway epithelium functions as a barrier and front line of host defense in the lung. Apoptosis or programmed cell death can be elicited in the epithelium as a response to viral infection, exposure to allergen or to environmental toxins, or to drugs. While apoptosis can be induced via activation of death receptors on the cell surface or by disruption of mitochondrial polarity, epithelial cells compared to inflammatory cells are more resistant to apoptotic stimuli. This paper focuses on the response of airway epithelium to apoptosis in the normal state, apoptosis as a potential regulator of the number and types of epithelial cells in the airway, and the contribution of epithelial cell apoptosis in important airways diseases. PMID:22203854

  18. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... Emergency airway puncture is done in an emergency situation, when someone is choking and all other efforts ...

  19. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  20. The Airway Microbiome at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H.; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A.; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  1. The Airway Microbiome at Birth.

    PubMed

    Lal, Charitharth Vivek; Travers, Colm; Aghai, Zubair H; Eipers, Peter; Jilling, Tamas; Halloran, Brian; Carlo, Waldemar A; Keeley, Jordan; Rezonzew, Gabriel; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Bhandari, Vineet; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of pulmonary microbiome have been recognized in multiple respiratory disorders. It is critically important to ascertain if an airway microbiome exists at birth and if so, whether it is associated with subsequent lung disease. We found an established diverse and similar airway microbiome at birth in both preterm and term infants, which was more diverse and different from that of older preterm infants with established chronic lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia). Consistent temporal dysbiotic changes in the airway microbiome were seen from birth to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants. Genus Lactobacillus was decreased at birth in infants with chorioamnionitis and in preterm infants who subsequently went on to develop lung disease. Our results, taken together with previous literature indicating a placental and amniotic fluid microbiome, suggest fetal acquisition of an airway microbiome. We speculate that the early airway microbiome may prime the developing pulmonary immune system, and dysbiosis in its development may set the stage for subsequent lung disease. PMID:27488092

  2. Effects of second hand smoke on airway secretion and mucociliary clearance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanyan; Di, Y. Peter

    2012-01-01

    The airway acts as the first defense against inhaled pathogens and particulate matter from the environment. One major way for the airway to clear inhaled foreign objects is through mucociliary clearance (MCC), an important component of the respiratory innate immune defense against lung disease. MCC is characterized by the upward movement of mucus by ciliary motion that requires a balance between the volume and composition of the mucus, adequate periciliary liquid (PCL) volume, and normal ciliary beat frequency (CBF). Airway surface fluid (ASL) is a thin layer liquid that consists of the highly viscous mucus upper “gel” layer, and the watery lubricating lower “sol” layer. Mucus production, secretion and clearance are considered to play a critical role in maintenance of airway health because it maintains hydration in the airway and traps particulates, bacteria, and viruses. Different types of epithelial cells, including secretory cells, and ciliated cells, contribute to the MCC function. Cigarette smoke (CS) contains chemicals and particulates that significantly affect airway secretion. Active and passive CS-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently associated with hyperplasia of goblet cells and submucosal glands (SMGs), thus increasing the secretory capacity of the airways that impairs MCC. PMID:22973232

  3. The footprint of TGF-β in airway remodeling of the mustard lung.

    PubMed

    Shahriary, Alireza; Seyedzadeh, Mir Hadi; Ahmadi, Ali; Salimian, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    Mustard lung is a major pulmonary complication in individuals exposed to sulfur mustard (SM) gas during the Iran-Iraq war. It shares common pathological and clinical features with some chronic inflammatory lung disorders, particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Airway remodeling, which is one of the main causes of lung dysfunction and the dominant phenomenon of chronic pulmonary diseases, is seen in the mustard lung. Among all mediators involved in the remodeling process, the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β plays a pivotal role in lung fibrosis and consequently in the airway remodeling. Regarding the high levels of this mediator detected in mustard lung patients, in the present study, we have discussed the possible roles of TGF-β in airway remodeling (including epithelial layer damage, subepithelial fibrosis and angiogenesis). Finally, based on TGF-β targeting, we have reviewed new airway remodeling therapeutic approaches. PMID:26606948

  4. A fungal protease allergen provokes airway hyper-responsiveness in asthma.

    PubMed

    Balenga, Nariman A; Klichinsky, Michael; Xie, Zhihui; Chan, Eunice C; Zhao, Ming; Jude, Joseph; Laviolette, Michel; Panettieri, Reynold A; Druey, Kirk M

    2015-01-01

    Asthma, a common disorder that affects >250 million people worldwide, is defined by exaggerated bronchoconstriction to inflammatory mediators including acetylcholine (ACh), bradykinin and histamine-also termed airway hyper-responsiveness. Nearly 10% of people with asthma have severe, treatment-resistant disease, which is frequently associated with immunoglobulin-E sensitization to ubiquitous fungi, typically Aspergillus fumigatus (Af). Here we show that a major Af allergen, Asp f13, which is a serine protease, alkaline protease 1 (Alp 1), promotes airway hyper-responsiveness by infiltrating the bronchial submucosa and disrupting airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Alp 1-mediated ECM degradation evokes pathophysiological RhoA-dependent Ca(2+) sensitivity and bronchoconstriction. These findings support a pathogenic mechanism in asthma and other lung diseases associated with epithelial barrier impairment, whereby ASM cells respond directly to inhaled environmental allergens to generate airway hyper-responsiveness. PMID:25865874

  5. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  6. Airway Management and Endoscopic Treatment of Subglottic and Tracheal Stenosis: The Laryngeal Mask Airway Technique

    PubMed Central

    Vorasubin, Nopawan; Vira, Darshni; Jamal, Nausheen; Chhetri, Dinesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective is to present clinical outcomes of subglottic and tracheal stenosis treated by flexible bronchoscopic delivery of carbon dioxide (CO2) laser via laryngeal mask airway (LMA). Methods All consecutive, nontracheotomy dependent cases of subglottic and tracheal stenosis treated endoscopically over a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical approach consisted of radial incisions using a flexible fiber-based CO2 laser, balloon dilation, and topical application of mitomycin C. Ventilation during the procedure occurred through the LMA, and the CO2 laser fiber was delivered through the working channel of a flexible bronchoscope passed through the LMA. Number of dilations, period between dilations, and operative times were reviewed. Results Eleven patients who underwent airway intervention during the study period were identified. Average follow-up was 28 months. Etiologies of airway stenosis included intubation injury (6), idiopathic (4), or autoimmune disease (1), requiring an average of 1.3, 1.5, and 3 dilations, respectively. Average operative time was 67 minutes. Autoimmune etiology correlated with more frequent dilations. Conclusion LMA is an effective way to manage ventilation while simultaneously allowing unencumbered flexible bronchoscopic access for laser surgery, balloon dilation, and mitomycin C application for airway stenosis. Long-term success in treating stenosis is achievable using this technique. PMID:24671485

  7. Origins of increased airway smooth muscle mass in asthma.

    PubMed

    Berair, Rachid; Saunders, Ruth; Brightling, Christopher E

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by both chronic inflammation and airway remodeling. Remodeling--the structural changes seen in asthmatic airways--is pivotal in the pathogenesis of the disease. Although significant advances have been made recently in understanding the different aspects of airway remodeling, the exact biology governing these changes remains poorly understood. There is broad agreement that, in asthma, increased airway smooth muscle mass, in part due to smooth muscle hyperplasia, is a very significant component of airway remodeling. However, significant debate persists on the origins of these airway smooth muscle cells. In this review article we will explore the natural history of airway remodeling in asthma and we will discuss the possible contribution of progenitors, stem cells and epithelial cells in mesenchymal cell changes, namely airway smooth muscle hyperplasia seen in the asthmatic airways. PMID:23742314

  8. Microvascular remodelling in chronic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Thurston, G; Maas, K; Labarbara, A; Mclean, J W; McDonald, D M

    2000-10-01

    1. Chronic inflammation is associated with blood vessel remodelling, including vessel proliferation and enlargement, and changes in vessel phenotype. We sought to characterize these changes in chronic airway inflammation and to determine whether corticosteroids that inhibit inflammation, such as dexamethasone, can also reduce microvascular remodelling. 2. Chronic airway inflammation was induced in C3H mice by infection with Mycoplasmapulmonis and the tracheal vessels treatment also decreased the immunoreactivity for P-selectin and the number of adherent leucocytes (595 +/- 203 vs 2,024 +/- 393 cells/ mm2 in treated and non-treated infected mice, respectively). 6. We conclude that microvascular enlargement and changes in vessel phenotype are features of some types of chronic inflammation and, furthermore, that dexamethasone reverses the microvascular enlargement, changes in vessel phenotype and leucocyte influx associated with chronic inflammatory airway disease. PMID:11022979

  9. Development of a regional-scale pollen emission and transport modeling framework for investigating the impact of climate change on allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Duhl, Tiffany; Salam, Muhammad T; House, James M; Flagan, Richard C; Avol, Edward L; Gilliland, Frank D; Guenther, Alex; Chung, Serena H; Lamb, Brian K; VanReken, Timothy M

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to bioaerosol allergens such as pollen can cause exacerbations of allergenic airway disease (AAD) in sensitive populations, and thus cause serious public health problems. Assessing these health impacts by linking the airborne pollen levels, concentrations of respirable allergenic material, and human allergenic response under current and future climate conditions is a key step toward developing preventive and adaptive actions. To that end, a regional-scale pollen emission and transport modeling framework was developed that treats allergenic pollens as non-reactive tracers within the WRF/CMAQ air-quality modeling system. The Simulator of the Timing and Magnitude of Pollen Season (STaMPS) model was used to generate a daily pollen pool that can then be emitted into the atmosphere by wind. The STaMPS is driven by species-specific meteorological (temperature and/or precipitation) threshold conditions and is designed to be flexible with respect to its representation of vegetation species and plant functional types (PFTs). The hourly pollen emission flux was parameterized by considering the pollen pool, friction velocity, and wind threshold values. The dry deposition velocity of each species of pollen was estimated based on pollen grain size and density. An evaluation of the pollen modeling framework was conducted for southern California for the period from March to June 2010. This period coincided with observations by the University of Southern California's Children's Health Study (CHS), which included O3, PM2.5, and pollen count, as well as measurements of exhaled nitric oxide in study participants. Two nesting domains with horizontal resolutions of 12 km and 4 km were constructed, and six representative allergenic pollen genera were included: birch tree, walnut tree, mulberry tree, olive tree, oak tree, and brome grasses. Under the current parameterization scheme, the modeling framework tends to underestimate walnut and peak oak pollen concentrations, and tends

  10. Development of a regional-scale pollen emission and transport modeling framework for investigating the impact of climate change on allergic airway disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Duhl, T.; Salam, M. T.; House, J. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Avol, E. L.; Gilliland, F. D.; Guenther, A.; Chung, S. H.; Lamb, B. K.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-03-01

    Exposure to bioaerosol allergens such as pollen can cause exacerbations of allergenic airway disease (AAD) in sensitive populations, and thus cause serious public health problems. Assessing these health impacts by linking the airborne pollen levels, concentrations of respirable allergenic material, and human allergenic response under current and future climate conditions is a key step toward developing preventive and adaptive actions. To that end, a regional-scale pollen emission and transport modeling framework was developed that treats allergenic pollens as non-reactive tracers within the coupled Weather Research and Forecasting Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF/CMAQ) modeling system. The Simulator of the Timing and Magnitude of Pollen Season (STaMPS) model was used to generate a daily pollen pool that can then be emitted into the atmosphere by wind. The STaMPS is driven by species-specific meteorological (temperature and/or precipitation) threshold conditions and is designed to be flexible with respect to its representation of vegetation species and plant functional types (PFTs). The hourly pollen emission flux was parameterized by considering the pollen pool, friction velocity, and wind threshold values. The dry deposition velocity of each species of pollen was estimated based on pollen grain size and density. An evaluation of the pollen modeling framework was conducted for southern California (USA) for the period from March to June 2010. This period coincided with observations by the University of Southern California's Children's Health Study (CHS), which included O3, PM2.5, and pollen count, as well as measurements of exhaled nitric oxide in study participants. Two nesting domains with horizontal resolutions of 12 and 4 km were constructed, and six representative allergenic pollen genera were included: birch tree, walnut tree, mulberry tree, olive tree, oak tree, and brome grasses. Under the current parameterization scheme, the modeling framework tends to

  11. Development of a regional-scale pollen emission and transport modeling framework for investigating the impact of climate change on allergic airway disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Duhl, T.; Salam, M. T.; House, J. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Avol, E. L.; Gilliland, F. D.; Guenther, A.; Chung, S. H.; Lamb, B. K.; VanReken, T. M.

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to bioaerosol allergens such as pollen can cause exacerbations of allergenic airway disease (AAD) in sensitive populations, and thus cause serious public health problems. Assessing these health impacts by linking the airborne pollen levels, concentrations of respirable allergenic material, and human allergenic response under current and future climate conditions is a key step toward developing preventive and adaptive actions. To that end, a regional-scale pollen emission and transport modeling framework was developed that treats allergenic pollens as non-reactive tracers within the WRF/CMAQ air-quality modeling system. The Simulator of the Timing and Magnitude of Pollen Season (STaMPS) model was used to generate a daily pollen pool that can then be emitted into the atmosphere by wind. The STaMPS is driven by species-specific meteorological (temperature and/or precipitation) threshold conditions and is designed to be flexible with respect to its representation vegetation species and plant functional types (PFTs). The hourly pollen emission flux was parameterized by considering the pollen pool, friction velocity, and wind threshold values. The dry deposition velocity of each species of pollen was estimated based on pollen grain size and density. An evaluation of the pollen modeling framework was conducted for southern California for the period from March to June 2010. This period coincided with observations by the University of Southern California's Children's Health Study (CHS), which included O3, PM2.5, and pollen count, as well as measurements of exhaled nitric oxide in study participants. Two nesting domains with horizontal resolutions of 12 km and 4 km were constructed, and six representative allergenic pollen genera were included: birch tree, walnut tree, mulberry tree, olive tree, oak tree, and brome grasses. Under the current parameterization scheme, the modeling framework tends to underestimate walnut and peak oak pollen concentrations, and tends to

  12. Development of a regional-scale pollen emission and transport modeling framework for investigating the impact of climate change on allergic airway disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Duhl, Tiffany; Salam, Muhammad T.; House, James M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Avol, Edward L.; Gilliland, Frank D.; Guenther, Alex; Chung, Serena H.; Lamb, Brian K.; VanReken, Timothy M.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to bioaerosol allergens such as pollen can cause exacerbations of allergenic airway disease (AAD) in sensitive populations, and thus cause serious public health problems. Assessing these health impacts by linking the airborne pollen levels, concentrations of respirable allergenic material, and human allergenic response under current and future climate conditions is a key step toward developing preventive and adaptive actions. To that end, a regional-scale pollen emission and transport modeling framework was developed that treats allergenic pollens as non-reactive tracers within the WRF/CMAQ air-quality modeling system. The Simulator of the Timing and Magnitude of Pollen Season (STaMPS) model was used to generate a daily pollen pool that can then be emitted into the atmosphere by wind. The STaMPS is driven by species-specific meteorological (temperature and/or precipitation) threshold conditions and is designed to be flexible with respect to its representation of vegetation species and plant functional types (PFTs). The hourly pollen emission flux was parameterized by considering the pollen pool, friction velocity, and wind threshold values. The dry deposition velocity of each species of pollen was estimated based on pollen grain size and density. An evaluation of the pollen modeling framework was conducted for southern California for the period from March to June 2010. This period coincided with observations by the University of Southern California's Children's Health Study (CHS), which included O3, PM2.5, and pollen count, as well as measurements of exhaled nitric oxide in study participants. Two nesting domains with horizontal resolutions of 12 km and 4 km were constructed, and six representative allergenic pollen genera were included: birch tree, walnut tree, mulberry tree, olive tree, oak tree, and brome grasses. Under the current parameterization scheme, the modeling framework tends to underestimate walnut and peak oak pollen concentrations, and tends

  13. Brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meola, Stacy D

    2013-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome is a common finding in brachycephalic breeds. A combination of primary and secondary changes can progress to life-threatening laryngeal collapse. Early recognition of primary anatomic abnormalities that include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea would allow the clinician to make early recommendations for medical and surgical management, which can improve the quality of life in affected animals. PMID:24182996

  14. The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench.

    PubMed

    Quammen, Cory W; Taylor Ii, Russell M; Krajcevski, Pavel; Mitran, Sorin; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Superfine, Richard; Davis, Brad; Davis, Stephanie; Zdanski, Carlton

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench (VPAW) is a patient-centered surgical planning software system targeted to pediatric patients with airway obstruction. VPAW provides an intuitive surgical planning interface for clinicians and supports quantitative analysis regarding prospective surgeries to aid clinicians deciding on potential surgical intervention. VPAW enables a full surgical planning pipeline, including importing DICOM images, segmenting the airway, interactive 3D editing of airway geometries to express potential surgical treatment planning options, and creating input files for offline geometric analysis and computational fluid dynamics simulations for evaluation of surgical outcomes. In this paper, we describe the VPAW system and its use in one case study with a clinician to successfully describe an intended surgery outcome. PMID:27046595

  15. Analysis of the Airway Microbiota of Healthy Individuals and Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease by T-RFLP and Clone Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zakharkina, Tetyana; Heinzel, Elke; Koczulla, Rembert A.; Greulich, Timm; Rentz, Katharina; Pauling, Josch K.; Baumbach, Jan; Herrmann, Mathias; Grünewald, Christiane; Dienemann, Hendrik; von Müller, Lutz; Bals, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, inflammatory lung disease that affects a large number of patients and has significant impact. One hallmark of the disease is the presence of bacteria in the lower airways. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the detailed structure of microbial communities found in the lungs of healthy individuals and patients with COPD. Nine COPD patients as compared and 9 healthy individuals underwent flexible bronchoscopy and BAL was performed. Bacterial nucleic acids were subjected to terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length polymorphism and clone library analysis. Overall, we identified 326 T-RFLP band, 159 in patients and 167 in healthy controls. The results of the TRF analysis correlated partly with the data obtained from clone sequencing. Although the results of the sequencing showed high diversity, the genera Prevotella, Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Fusobacterium, Megasphaera, Veillonella, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus constituted the major part of the core microbiome found in both groups. A TRF band possibly representing Pseudomonas sp. monoinfection was associated with a reduction of the microbial diversity. Non-cultural methods reveal the complexity of the pulmonary microbiome in healthy individuals and in patients with COPD. Alterations of the microbiome in pulmonary diseases are correlated with disease. PMID:23874580

  16. Smad molecules expression pattern in human bronchial airway induced by sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Adelipour, Maryam; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Yazdani, Samaneh; Vahedi, Ensieh; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohammad Reza

    2011-09-01

    Airway remodelling is characterized by the thickening and reorganization of the airways seen in mustard lung patients. Mustard lung is the general description for the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease induced by sulfur mustard(SM). Pulmonary disease was diagnosed as the most important disorder in individuals that had been exposed to sulfur mustard. Sulfur mustard is a chemical warfare agent developed during Wars. Iraqi forces frequently used it against Iranian during Iran -Iraq in the 1980-1988. Peribronchial fibrosis result from airway remodeling that include excess of collagen of extracellular matrix deposition in the airway wall. Some of Smads families in association with TGF-β are involved in airway remodeling due to lung fibrosis. In the present study we compared the mRNA expression of Smad2, Smad3, and Smad4 and Smad7 genes in airway wall biopsies of chemical-injured patients with non-injured patients as control. We used airway wall biopsies of ten unexposed patients and fifteen SM-induced patients. Smads expression was evaluated by RT-PCR followed by bands densitometry. Expression levels of Smad3 and Smad4 in SM exposed patients were upregulated but Smad2 and Smad7 was not significantly altered. Our results revealed that Smad3, and 4 may be involved in airway remodeling process in SM induced patients by activation of TGF-β. Smad pathway is the most represented signaling mechanism for airway remodeling and peribronchial fibrosis. The complex of Smads in the nucleus affects a series of genes that results in peribronchial fibrosis in SM-induced patients. PMID:21891820

  17. Should pulse oximetry be included in GPs’ assessment of patients with obstructive lung disease?

    PubMed Central

    Dalbak, Lene G.; Straand, Jørund; Melbye, Hasse

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the associations between decreased pulse oximetry values (SpO2) and clinical, laboratory, and demographic variables in general practice patients diagnosed with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including those with both COPD and asthma in combination. Design/setting: A cross-sectional study in seven Norwegian general practices of patients aged 40 years or over who were diagnosed by their general practitioner (GP) with asthma and/or COPD. The patients were examined during a stable phase of their disease. Patients diagnosed with COPD (including those with combined COPD/asthma) and those diagnosed with asthma only were analysed separately. Main outcome measures: Decreased SpO2 values (≤ 95% and ≤ 92%). Results: Of 372 patients included (mean age 61.5 years, 62% women), 82 (22.0%) had SpO2 ≤ 95%, of which 11 had SpO2 ≤ 92%. In both asthma and COPD patients, SpO2 ≤ 95% was significantly associated with reduced lung function (spirometry), a diagnosis of coronary heart disease and older age (≥ 65 years). In the COPD group, haemoglobin above normal was associated with SpO2 ≤ 95%. These associations were confirmed by multivariable logistic regression, where FEV1% predicted < 50 was the strongest predictor of SpO2 ≤ 95% (odds ratio 6.8, 95% confidence interval 2.8–16.4). Conclusion. Pulse oximetry represents a useful diagnostic adjunct for assessing the severity of obstructive pulmonary disease. Decreased pulse oximetry values in stable-phase patients with asthma and/or COPD should prompt the GP to consider revising the diagnosis and treatment and to look for co-morbidities.Key PointsDespite its common use in general practice, the diagnostic benefits of pulse oximetry remain to be established.Decreased pulse oximetry values are associated with both reduced lung function (spirometry) and with a diagnosis of coronary heart disease.Decreased pulse oximetry values may reflect suboptimal

  18. Delivery of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin to Airways.

    PubMed

    Griese, Matthias; Scheuch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with exogenous alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a potent serine protease inhibitor, was developed originally for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency; however, other lung conditions involving neutrophilic inflammation and proteolytic tissue injury related to neutrophil elastase and other serine proteases may also be considered for AAT therapy. These conditions include bronchiectasis caused by primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis, and other diseases associated with an increased free elastase activity in the airways. Inhaled AAT may be a viable option to counteract proteolytic tissue damage. This form of treatment requires efficient drug delivery to the targeted pulmonary compartment. Aerosol technology meeting this requirement is currently available and offers an alternative therapeutic approach to systemic AAT administration. To date, early studies in humans have shown biochemical efficacy and have established the safety of inhaled AAT. However, to bring aerosol AAT therapy to patients, large phase 3 protocols in carefully selected patient populations (i.e., subgroups of patients with AAT deficiency, cystic fibrosis, or other lung diseases with bronchiectasis) will be needed with clinical end points in addition to the measurement of proteolytic activity in the airway. The outcomes likely will have to include lung function, lung structure assessed by computed tomography imaging, disease exacerbations, health status, and mortality. PMID:27564672

  19. Comprehensive functional characterization of murine infantile Batten disease including Parkinson-like behavior and dopaminergic markers.

    PubMed

    Dearborn, Joshua T; Harmon, Steven K; Fowler, Stephen C; O'Malley, Karen L; Taylor, George T; Sands, Mark S; Wozniak, David F

    2015-01-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL, Infantile Batten disease) is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency in palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1). The PPT1-deficient mouse (Cln1(-/-)) is a useful phenocopy of human INCL. Cln1(-/-) mice display retinal dysfunction, seizures, motor deficits, and die at ~8 months of age. However, little is known about the cognitive and behavioral functions of Cln1(-/-) mice during disease progression. In the present study, younger (~1-2 months of age) Cln1(-/-) mice showed minor deficits in motor/sensorimotor functions while older (~5-6 months of age) Cln1(-/-) mice exhibited more severe impairments, including decreased locomotor activity, inferior cued water maze performance, decreased running wheel ability, and altered auditory cue conditioning. Unexpectedly, certain cognitive functions such as some learning and memory capabilities seemed intact in older Cln1(-/-) mice. Younger and older Cln1(-/-) mice presented with walking initiation defects, gait abnormalities, and slowed movements, which are analogous to some symptoms reported in INCL and parkinsonism. However, there was no evidence of alterations in dopaminergic markers in Cln1(-/-) mice. Results from this study demonstrate quantifiable changes in behavioral functions during progression of murine INCL and suggest that Parkinson-like motor/sensorimotor deficits in Cln1(-/-) mice are not mediated by dopamine deficiency. PMID:26238334

  20. Immunofluorescence Patterns in Selected Dermatoses, Including Blistering Skin Diseases Utilizing Multiple Fluorochromes

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Velez, Ana Maria; Calle-Isaza, Juliana; Howard, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune vesiculobullous disorders represent a heterogeneous group of dermatoses whose diagnosis is made based on clinical history, histologic features, and immunopathologic features. The most commonly used techniques for the diagnosis of these diseases are direct and indirect immunofluorescence (DIF and IIF), including salt-split processing. NaCl split skin is used to determine the level of blister formation, and the localization of autoantibodies relative to the split. Classically, immunofluorescence has been performed with one fluorochrome in the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Aims: To compare DIF and IIF of the skin, using a single fluorochrome versus multiple fluorochromes. Materials and Methods: We studied 20 autoimmune skin disease cases using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) alone, in comparison to multiple fluorochromes (with or without DNA counterstaining). Results: The use of multiple fluorochromes helped to simultaneously visualize reactivity in multiple skin areas, in contrast to using FITC alone. Conclusions: Using multiple fluorochromes allows simultaneous labeling of two or more antigens within the same cell/or tissue section, assists in colocalization of unknown antigens with known molecules, and helps in ruling out “background” staining. PMID:26605203

  1. Comprehensive functional characterization of murine infantile Batten disease including Parkinson-like behavior and dopaminergic markers

    PubMed Central

    Dearborn, Joshua T.; Harmon, Steven K.; Fowler, Stephen C.; O’Malley, Karen L.; Taylor, George T.; Sands, Mark S.; Wozniak, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL, Infantile Batten disease) is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency in palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1). The PPT1-deficient mouse (Cln1−/−) is a useful phenocopy of human INCL. Cln1−/− mice display retinal dysfunction, seizures, motor deficits, and die at ~8 months of age. However, little is known about the cognitive and behavioral functions of Cln1−/− mice during disease progression. In the present study, younger (~1–2 months of age) Cln1−/− mice showed minor deficits in motor/sensorimotor functions while older (~5–6 months of age) Cln1−/− mice exhibited more severe impairments, including decreased locomotor activity, inferior cued water maze performance, decreased running wheel ability, and altered auditory cue conditioning. Unexpectedly, certain cognitive functions such as some learning and memory capabilities seemed intact in older Cln1−/− mice. Younger and older Cln1−/− mice presented with walking initiation defects, gait abnormalities, and slowed movements, which are analogous to some symptoms reported in INCL and parkinsonism. However, there was no evidence of alterations in dopaminergic markers in Cln1−/− mice. Results from this study demonstrate quantifiable changes in behavioral functions during progression of murine INCL and suggest that Parkinson-like motor/sensorimotor deficits in Cln1−/− mice are not mediated by dopamine deficiency. PMID:26238334

  2. Early effects of climate change: do they include changes in vector-borne disease?

    PubMed

    Kovats, R S; Campbell-Lendrum, D H; McMichael, A J; Woodward, A; Cox, J S

    2001-07-29

    The world's climate appears now to be changing at an unprecedented rate. Shifts in the distribution and behaviour of insect and bird species indicate that biological systems are already responding to this change. It is well established that climate is an important determinant of the spatial and temporal distribution of vectors and pathogens. In theory, a change in climate would be expected to cause changes in the geographical range, seasonality (intra-annual variability), and in the incidence rate (with or without changes in geographical or seasonal patterns). The detection and then attribution of such changes to climate change is an emerging task for scientists. We discuss the evidence required to attribute changes in disease and vectors to the early effects of anthropogenic climate change. The literature to date indicates that there is a lack of strong evidence of the impact of climate change on vector-borne diseases (i.e. malaria, dengue, leishmaniasis, tick-borne diseases). New approaches to monitoring, such as frequent and long-term sampling along transects to monitor the full latitudinal and altitudinal range of specific vector species, are necessary in order to provide convincing direct evidence of climate change effects. There is a need to reassess the appropriate levels of evidence, including dealing with the uncertainties attached to detecting the health impacts of global change. PMID:11516383

  3. Eosinophilic airway disease in a patient with a negative skin prick test, but a positive patch test with platinum salts--implications for medical surveillance.

    PubMed

    Merget, Rolf; Fartasch, Manigé; Sander, Ingrid; Van Kampen, Vera; Raulf, Monika; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a 52-year-old woman with a topic dermatitis since adolescence who developed work-related hand eczema, cough and runny nose 12 years after she had started working as a laboratory technician at a precious metals refinery. While skin prick test with sodium hexachloroplatinate (SPTPt ) was negative, patch testing with ammonium tetrachloroplatinate was positive after 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr. Inhalation challenge with sodium hexachloroplatinate yielded cough, mild shortness of breath, and a maximal decrease of FEV1 of 8% from baseline 24 hr after the challenge. Significant increases of bronchial hyperresponsiveness, exhaled nitric monoxide and sputum eosinophils were documented after the challenge. We conclude that eosinophilic airway disease due to platinum salts may occur in SPTPt negative subjects. Both, patch testing and inhalation challenge with platinum salts should be considered in SPT negative subjects with occupational exposure to precious metal salts and work-related allergic symptoms. PMID:26010732

  4. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction. PMID:25583659

  5. Recent insights into the relationship between airway inflammation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Siva, R; Berry, M; Pavord, I D

    2003-01-01

    There have been important recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway dysfunction. Observational studies have shown that eosinophilic airway inflammation is not always present in asthma nor is it an exclusive feature of asthma. Its presence seems to be more closely linked to the presence of corticosteroid responsive airways disease and the occurrence of severe exacerbations than the presence of symptoms or the extent of airway dysfunction--indeed recent evidence suggests that in asthma these features may be more closely linked to the site of localisation of mast cells in the airway wall. One implication of this new understanding of the significance of eosinophilic airway inflammation is that it predicts that measuring airway inflammation might provide information that it is not readily available from a more traditional clinical assessment, and that patients might do better if this information is available. Recent studies support this view, showing a marked reduction in asthma exacerbation in patients with moderate to severe disease who are managed with reference to markers of airway inflammation as well as symptoms and simple tests of airway function. The development of new agents that have the potential to modulate specific aspects of airway inflammation, together with refinements in non-invasive techniques to assess the efficacy of these agents offers the prospect of further refining our understanding of the role of this aspect of the inflammatory response in asthma and other airway diseases. PMID:15148839

  6. Ionotropic and Metabotropic Proton-Sensing Receptors Involved in Airway Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Haruka; Mogi, Chihiro; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2014-01-01

    An acidic microenvironment has been shown to evoke a variety of airway responses, including cough, bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lung, and stimulation of mucus hyperproduction. Except for the participation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in severe acidic pH (of less than 6.0)-induced cough and bronchoconstriction through sensory neurons, the molecular mechanisms underlying extracellular acidic pH-induced actions in the airways have not been fully understood. Recent studies have revealed that ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1)-family G protein-coupled receptors, which sense pH of more than 6.0, are expressed in structural cells, such as airway smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells, and in inflammatory and immune cells, such as eosinophils and dendritic cells. They function in a variety of airway responses related to the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including allergic asthma. In the present review, we discuss the roles of ionotropic TRPV1 and ASICs and metabotropic OGR1-family G protein-coupled receptors in the airway inflammation and AHR in asthma and respiratory diseases. PMID:25197168

  7. The relation of airway size to lung function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Bon, Jessica M.; Park, Sang C.; Pu, Jiantao; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may cause airway remodeling, and small airways are the mostly likely site of associated airway flow obstruction. Detecting and quantifying airways depicted on a typical computed tomography (CT) images is limited by spatial resolution. In this study, we examined the association between lung function and airway size. CT examinations and spirometry measurement of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percent predicted (FEV I%) from 240 subjects were used in this study. Airway sections depicted in axial CT section were automatically detected and quantified. Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) were computed to compare lung function across three size categories: (1) all detected airways, (2) the smallest 50% of detected airways, and (3) the largest 50% of detected airways using the CORANOVA test. The mean number of all airways detected per subject was 117.4 (+/- 40.1) with mean size ranging from 20.2 to 50.0 mm2. The correlation between lung function (i.e., FEV I) and airway morphometry associated with airway remodeling and airflow obstruction (i.e., lumen perimeter and wall area as a percent of total airway area) was significantly stronger for smaller compared to larger airways (p < 0.05). The PCCs between FEV I and all airways, the smallest 50%, and the largest 50% were 0.583, 0.617, 0.523, respectively, for lumen perimeter and -0.560, -0.584, and -0.514, respectively, for wall area percent. In conclusion, analyzing a set of smaller airways compared to larger airways may improve detection of an association between lung function and airway morphology change.

  8. Automated lobe-based airway labeling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Suicheng; Wang, Zhimin; Siegfried, Jill M; Wilson, David; Bigbee, William L; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-01-01

    Regional quantitative analysis of airway morphological abnormalities is of great interest in lung disease investigation. Considering that pulmonary lobes are relatively independent functional unit, we develop and test a novel and efficient computerized scheme in this study to automatically and robustly classify the airways into different categories in terms of pulmonary lobe. Given an airway tree, which could be obtained using any available airway segmentation scheme, the developed approach consists of four basic steps: (1) airway skeletonization or centerline extraction, (2) individual airway branch identification, (3) initial rule-based airway classification/labeling, and (4) self-correction of labeling errors. In order to assess the performance of this approach, we applied it to a dataset consisting of 300 chest CT examinations in a batch manner and asked an image analyst to subjectively examine the labeled results. Our preliminary experiment showed that the labeling accuracy for the right upper lobe, the right middle lobe, the right lower lobe, the left upper lobe, and the left lower lobe is 100%, 99.3%, 99.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Among these, only two cases are incorrectly labeled due to the failures in airway detection. It takes around 2 minutes to label an airway tree using this algorithm. PMID:23093951

  9. Tachykinin antagonists and the airways.

    PubMed

    Joos, G F; Kips, J C; Peleman, R A; Pauwels, R A

    1995-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence for the presence of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) in human airway nerves. Studies on autopsy tissue, on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and on sputum suggest that SP may be present in increased amounts in the asthmatic airway. Substance P and NKA are potent bronchoconstrictors of human airways, asthmatics being more sensitive than normal persons. The major enzyme responsible for the degradation of the tachykinins, the neutral endopeptidase, is present in the airways and is involved in the breakdown of exogenously administered SP and NKA, both in normal and asthmatic persons. Other, less well documented airway effects of SP and NKA include mucus secretion, vasodilation and plasma extravasation, as well as the chemoattraction and stimulation of various cells presumed to be involved in asthmatic airway inflammation. NK2 receptors and, to a lesser extent, NK1 receptors have been shown to be involved in bronchoconstriction, whereas NK1 receptors were found to be involved in mucus secretion, microvascular leakage and vasodilatation, and in most of the effects on inflammatory cells. The first clinical trial with FK224, a peptide NK1 and NK2 receptor antagonist, and CP99994, a nonpeptide NK1 receptor antagonist, are negative. However, FK224 failed to block the bronchoconstrictor effect of NKA in asthmatics and the dose of CP99994, needed to antagonize tachykinin effects in man, remains to be determined. PMID:7543746

  10. Effects of reduced mucus oxygen concentration in airway Pseudomonas infections of cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Worlitzsch, Dieter; Tarran, Robert; Ulrich, Martina; Schwab, Ute; Cekici, Aynur; Meyer, Keith C.; Birrer, Peter; Bellon, Gabriel; Berger, Jürgen; Weiss, Tilo; Botzenhart, Konrad; Yankaskas, James R.; Randell, Scott; Boucher, Richard C.; Döring, Gerd

    2002-01-01

    Current theories of CF pathogenesis predict different predisposing “local environmental” conditions and sites of bacterial infection within CF airways. Here we show that, in CF patients with established lung disease, Psuedomonas aeruginosa was located within hypoxic mucopurulent masses in airway lumens. In vitro studies revealed that CF-specific increases in epithelial O2 consumption, linked to increased airway surface liquid (ASL) volume absorption and mucus stasis, generated steep hypoxic gradients within thickened mucus on CF epithelial surfaces prior to infection. Motile P. aeruginosa deposited on CF airway surfaces penetrated into hypoxic mucus zones and responded to this environment with increased alginate production. With P. aeruginosa growth in oxygen restricted environments, local hypoxia was exacerbated and frank anaerobiosis, as detected in vivo, resulted. These studies indicate that novel therapies for CF include removal of hypoxic mucus plaques and antibiotics effective against P. aeruginosa adapted to anaerobic environments. PMID:11827991

  11. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond both passively and actively to the mechanical stimulation induced by smooth muscle contraction. In this review, we summarize the factors that regulate airway narrowing and provide insight into the relative contributions of different constituents of the extracellular matrix and their biomechanical impact on airway obstruction. We then review the changes in extracellular matrix composition in the airway and parenchymal compartments at different stages of COPD, and finally discuss how these changes impact airway narrowing and the development of airway hyperresponsiveness. Finally, we position these data in the context of therapeutic research focused on defective tissue repair. As a conclusion, we propose that future works should primarily target mild or early COPD, prior to the widespread structural changes in the alveolar compartment that are more characteristic of severe COPD. PMID:26696894

  12. Upper airway resistance syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasan, N; Fletcher, E C

    1998-07-01

    Many clinicians are familiar with the clinical symptoms and signs of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In its most blatant form, OSA is complete airway obstruction with repetitive, prolonged pauses in breathing, arterial oxyhemoglobin desaturation; followed by arousal with resumption of breathing. Daytime symptoms of this disorder include excessive daytime somnolence, intellectual dysfunction, and cardiovascular effects such as systemic hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, and stroke. It has been recently recognized that increased pharyngeal resistance with incomplete obstruction can lead to a constellation of symptoms identical to OSA called "upper airway resistance syndrome" (UARS). The typical findings of UARS on sleep study are: (1) repetitive arousals from EEG sleep coinciding with a (2) waxing and waning of the respiratory airflow pattern and (3) increased respiratory effort as measured by esophageal pressure monitoring. There may be few, if any, obvious apneas or hypopneas with desaturation, but snoring may be a very prominent finding. Treatment with nasal positive airway pressure (NCPAP) eliminates the symptoms and confirms the diagnosis. Herein we describe two typical cases of UARS. PMID:9676067

  13. Structured Regions of Alpha-synuclein Fibrils Include the Early Onset Parkinson's Disease Mutation Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Comellas Canal, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Ebisu, Reika; Woods, Wendy S.; Lipton, Andrew S.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-08-26

    Alpha-Synuclein (AS) fibrils constitute the major proteinaceous component of Lewy bodies (LBs), the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Three single point mutations in the AS gene, as well as multiplication of the wild-type (WT) AS allele, have been previously identified in families with early-onset PD. Although AS fibrils have been the subject of intense study, critical details about their structure including the precise location of the B-strands and the extent of the core, the three-dimensional structure and the effects of the mutations—remain unknown. Here, we have used magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy to present a detailed characterization of the full-length WT AS fibrils. With improved sample preparations, isotopic labeling patterns and NMR experiments, we have confidently assigned more than 90% of the 13C and 15N backbone and sidechain chemical shifts of the detected residues from residue 39 to 97, and quantified the conformational dynamics throughout this region. Our results demonstrate that the core of AS fibrils extends with a repeated motif and that residues 30, 46 and 53-the early-onset PD mutant sites-are located in structured regions of AS fibrils.

  14. Acupuncture Alleviated the Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease including Pain, Depression, and Autonomic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Iseki, Chifumi; Furuta, Taiga; Suzuki, Masao; Koyama, Shingo; Suzuki, Keiji; Suzuki, Tomoko; Kaneko, Akiyo

    2014-01-01

    A woman started to feel intractable pain on her lower legs when she was 76. At the age of 78, she was diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease (PD). The leg pain was suspected to be a symptom of PD after eliminating other causes. The patient also suffered from nonmotor symptoms, depression, anxiety, hot flashes, and paroxysmal sweating. Though the patient had received pharmacotherapy including levodopa for 5 years, she still suffered from the nonmotor symptoms and was referred to our department. We treated her with acupuncture based on the Chinese traditional medicine and electroacupuncture five times per week. After the 2-week treatment, the assessment for the symptoms was as follows; visual analogue scale (VAS) score of the leg pain was 16 mm (70 mm, before), Hamilton's rating scales for depression (HAM-D) score was 9 (18, before), timed 3 m Up and Go took 20 steps in 30 sec (24 steps in 38 sec, before), and the Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) Part 1 score was 13 (21, before). Autonomic symptoms, hot flashes and paroxysmal sweating, were also alleviated. Acupuncture may be a good treatment modality for nonmotor symptoms in PD. PMID:25628905

  15. African American Participation in Alzheimer’s Disease Research that Includes Brain Donation

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Kathryn R.; McGuire, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Historically, minority groups have been underrepresented in research and clinical trials. The lack of participation by minorities has been attributed to variety of factors including a mistrust of the predominately white research establishments and a lack of education about the purpose of research. The current study was designed to determine African-American interest in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research and to recruit African Americans as normal controls in current AD studies with the goal of eventually gaining consent for brain donation upon death. Participants were 46 African Americans aged 65 or older who were interviewed about knowledge of medical procedures and experience with research. After initial recruitment interviews, 31.7% of participants agreed to yearly testing with eventual brain donation. Study findings suggest a moderate relationship between participants’ knowledge of medical procedures used to prolong life and willingness to donate one’s brain. PMID:22009227

  16. TLR2, TLR4 AND MyD88 Mediate Allergic Airway Disease (AAD) and Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Suppression of AAD

    PubMed Central

    Thorburn, Alison N.; Tseng, Hsin-Yi; Donovan, Chantal; Hansbro, Nicole G.; Jarnicki, Andrew G.; Foster, Paul S.; Gibson, Peter G.; Hansbro, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exposure to non-pathogenic Streptococcus pneumoniae and vaccination are inversely associated with asthma. Studies in animal models demonstrate that airway administration of S. pneumoniae (live or killed), or its vaccines or components, suppresses the characteristic features of asthma in mouse models of allergic airway disease (AAD). These components could be developed into immunoregulatory therapies. S. pneumoniae components are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and TLR4, and both induce inflammatory cell responses through the adaptor protein myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88). The involvement of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 in the pathogenesis of AAD and asthma is incompletely understood, and has not been studied in S. pneumoniae-mediated suppression of AAD. We investigated the role of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 in the development of AAD and S. pneumoniae-mediated suppression of AAD. Methods and Findings OVA-induced AAD and killed S. pneumoniae-mediated suppression of AAD were assessed in wild-type, TLR2-/-, TLR4-/-, TLR2/4-/- and MyD88-/- BALB/c mice. During OVA-induced AAD, TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 were variously involved in promoting eosinophil accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and blood, and T-helper type (Th)2 cytokine release from mediastinal lymph node T cells and splenocytes. However, all were required for the induction of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR). In S. pneumoniae-mediated suppression of AAD, TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 were variously involved in the suppression of eosinophilic and splenocyte Th2 responses but all were required for the reduction in AHR. Conclusions These results highlight important but complex roles for TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 in promoting the development of OVA-induced AAD, but conversely in the S. pneumoniae-mediated suppression of AAD, with consistent and major contributions in both the induction and suppression of AHR. Thus, TLR signaling is likely required for both the development of asthma and the

  17. Difficult Airway Response Team: A Novel Quality Improvement Program for Managing Hospital-Wide Airway Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Lynette J.; Herzer, Kurt R.; Cover, Renee; Pandian, Vinciya; Bhatti, Nasir I.; Berkow, Lauren C.; Haut, Elliott R.; Hillel, Alexander T.; Miller, Christina R.; Feller-Kopman, David J.; Schiavi, Adam J.; Xie, Yanjun J.; Lim, Christine; Holzmueller, Christine; Ahmad, Mueen; Thomas, Pradeep; Flint, Paul W.; Mirski, Marek A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Difficult airway cases can quickly become emergencies, increasing the risk of life-threatening complications or death. Emergency airway management outside the operating room is particularly challenging. Methods We developed a quality improvement program—the Difficult Airway Response Team (DART)—to improve emergency airway management outside the operating room. DART was implemented by a team of anesthesiologists, otolaryngologists, trauma surgeons, emergency medicine physicians, and risk managers in 2005 at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. The DART program had three core components: operations, safety, and education. The operations component focused on developing a multidisciplinary difficult airway response team, standardizing the emergency response process, and deploying difficult airway equipment carts throughout the hospital. The safety component focused on real-time monitoring of DART activations and learning from past DART events to continuously improve system-level performance. This objective entailed monitoring the paging system, reporting difficult airway events and DART activations to a web-based registry, and using in situ simulations to identify and mitigate defects in the emergency airway management process. The educational component included development of a multispecialty difficult airway curriculum encompassing case-based lectures, simulation, and team building/communication to ensure consistency of care. Educational materials were also developed for non-DART staff and patients to inform them about the needs of patients with difficult airways and ensure continuity of care with other providers after discharge. Results Between July 2008 and June 2013, DART managed 360 adult difficult airway events comprising 8% of all code activations. Predisposing patient factors included body mass index > 40, history of head and neck tumor, prior difficult intubation, cervical spine injury, airway edema, airway bleeding, and previous

  18. Airway Gland Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Wine, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Submucosal glands contribute to airway surface liquid (ASL), a film that protects all airway surfaces. Glandular mucus comprises electrolytes, water, the gel-forming mucin MUC5B, and hundreds of different proteins with diverse protective functions. Gland volume per unit area of mucosal surface correlates positively with impaction rate of inhaled particles. In human main bronchi, the volume of the glands is ∼ 50 times that of surface goblet cells, but the glands diminish in size and frequency distally. ASL and its trapped particles are removed from the airways by mucociliary transport. Airway glands have a tubuloacinar structure, with a single terminal duct, a nonciliated collecting duct, then branching secretory tubules lined with mucous cells and ending in serous acini. They allow for a massive increase in numbers of mucus-producing cells without replacing surface ciliated cells. Active secretion of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) by serous cells produces most of the fluid of gland secretions. Glands are densely innervated by tonically active, mutually excitatory airway intrinsic neurons. Most gland mucus is secreted constitutively in vivo, with large, transient increases produced by emergency reflex drive from the vagus. Elevations of [cAMP]i and [Ca(2+)]i coordinate electrolyte and macromolecular secretion and probably occur together for baseline activity in vivo, with cholinergic elevation of [Ca(2+)]i being mainly responsive for transient increases in secretion. Altered submucosal gland function contributes to the pathology of all obstructive diseases, but is an early stage of pathogenesis only in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26336032

  19. Mechanisms of BDNF regulation in asthmatic airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin produced by airway smooth muscle (ASM), enhances inflammation effects on airway contractility, supporting the idea that locally produced growth factors influence airway diseases such as asthma. We endeavored to dissect intrinsic mechanisms regulating endogenous, as well as inflammation (TNF-α)-induced BDNF secretion in ASM of nonasthmatic vs. asthmatic humans. We focused on specific Ca(2+) regulation- and inflammation-related signaling cascades and quantified BDNF secretion. We find that TNF-α enhances BDNF release by ASM cells, via several mechanisms relevant to asthma, including transient receptor potential channels TRPC3 and TRPC6 (but not TRPC1), ERK 1/2, PI3K, PLC, and PKC cascades, Rho kinase, and transcription factors cAMP response element binding protein and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Basal BDNF expression and secretion are elevated in asthmatic ASM and increase further with TNF-α exposure, involving many of these regulatory mechanisms. We conclude that airway BDNF secretion is regulated at multiple levels, providing a basis for autocrine effects of BDNF under conditions of inflammation and disease, with potential downstream influences on contractility and remodeling. PMID:27317689

  20. Airway Epithelial NF-κB Activation Promotes Mycoplasma pneumoniae Clearance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Di; Nelson, Mark L.; Gally, Fabienne; Smith, Sean; Wu, Qun; Minor, Maisha; Case, Stephanie; Thaikoottathil, Jyoti; Chu, Hong Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objective Respiratory infections including atypical bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) contribute to the pathobiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mp infection mainly targets airway epithelium and activates various signaling pathways such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). We have shown that short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) serves as a novel host defense protein and is up-regulated upon Mp infection through NF-κB activation in cultured human and mouse primary airway epithelial cells. However, the in vivo role of airway epithelial NF-κB activation in host defense against Mp infection has not been investigated. In the current study, we investigated the effects of in vivo airway epithelial NF-κB activation on lung Mp clearance and its association with airway epithelial SPLUNC1 expression. Methodology/Main Results Non-antimicrobial tetracycline analog 9-t-butyl doxycycline (9-TB) was initially optimized in mouse primary tracheal epithelial cell culture, and then utilized to induce in vivo airway epithelial specific NF-κB activation in conditional NF-κB transgenic mice (CC10-CAIKKβ) with or without Mp infection. Lung Mp load and inflammation were evaluated, and airway epithelial SPLUNC1 protein was examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that 9-TB treatment in NF-κB transgene positive (Tg+), but not transgene negative (Tg−) mice significantly reduced lung Mp load. Moreover, 9-TB increased airway epithelial SPLUNC1 protein expression in NF-κB Tg+ mice. Conclusion By using the non-antimicrobial 9-TB, our study demonstrates that in vivo airway epithelial NF-κB activation promotes lung bacterial clearance, which is accompanied by increased epithelial SPLUNC1 expression. PMID:23285237

  1. 3D mapping of airway wall thickening in asthma with MSCT: a level set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Hartley, Ruth; Grenier, Philippe A.; Brightling, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Assessing the airway wall thickness in multi slice computed tomography (MSCT) as image marker for airway disease phenotyping such asthma and COPD is a current trend and challenge for the scientific community working in lung imaging. This paper addresses the same problem from a different point of view: considering the expected wall thickness-to-lumen-radius ratio for a normal subject as known and constant throughout the whole airway tree, the aim is to build up a 3D map of airway wall regions of larger thickness and to define an overall score able to highlight a pathological status. In this respect, the local dimension (caliber) of the previously segmented airway lumen is obtained on each point by exploiting the granulometry morphological operator. A level set function is defined based on this caliber information and on the expected wall thickness ratio, which allows obtaining a good estimate of the airway wall throughout all segmented lumen generations. Next, the vascular (or mediastinal dense tissue) contact regions are automatically detected and excluded from analysis. For the remaining airway wall border points, the real wall thickness is estimated based on the tissue density analysis in the airway radial direction; thick wall points are highlighted on a 3D representation of the airways and several quantification scores are defined. The proposed approach is fully automatic and was evaluated (proof of concept) on a patient selection coming from different databases including mild, severe asthmatics and normal cases. This preliminary evaluation confirms the discriminative power of the proposed approach regarding different phenotypes and is currently extending to larger cohorts.

  2. Two-dimensional airway analysis using probabilistic neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jun; Zheng, Bin; Park, Sang Cheol; Pu, Jiantao; Sciurba, Frank C.; Leader, Joseph K.

    2010-03-01

    Although 3-D airway tree segmentation permits analysis of airway tree paths of practical lengths and facilitates visual inspection, our group developed and tested an automated computer scheme that was operated on individual 2-D CT images to detect airway sections and measure their morphometry and/or dimensions. The algorithm computes a set of airway features including airway lumen area (Ai), airway cross-sectional area (Aw), the ratio (Ra) of Ai to Aw, and the airway wall thickness (Tw) for each detected airway section depicted on the CT image slice. Thus, this 2-D based algorithm does not depend on the accuracy of 3-D airway tree segmentation and does not require that CT examination encompasses the entire lung or reconstructs contiguous images. However, one disadvantage of the 2-D image based schemes is the lack of the ability to identify the airway generation (Gb) of the detected airway section. In this study, we developed and tested a new approach that uses 2-D airway features to assign a generation number to an airway. We developed and tested two probabilistic neural networks (PNN) based on different sets of airway features computed by our 2-D based scheme. The PNNs were trained and tested on 12 lung CT examinations (8 training and 4 testing). The accuracy for the PNN that utilized Ai and Ra for identifying the generation of airway sections varies from 55.4% - 100%. The overall accuracy of the PNN for all detected airway sections that are spread over all generations is 76.7%. Interestingly, adding wall thickness feature (Tw) to PNN did not improve identification accuracy. This preliminary study demonstrates that a set of 2-D airway features may be used to identify the generation number of an airway with reasonable accuracy.

  3. Treatment of Exudative and Vasogenic Chorioretinal Diseases Including Variants of AMD and Other CNV Related Maculopathy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-24

    Coats' Disease; Idiopathic Retinal Telangiectasia; Retinal Angiomatous Proliferation; Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy; Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum; Pathological Myopia; Multi-focal Choroiditis; Rubeosis Iridis; Von Hippel Lindau Disease; BEST VITELLIFORM MACULAR DYSTROPHY, MULTIFOCAL (Disorder)

  4. Regulation of human airway surface liquid.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, J H; Widdicombe, J G

    1995-01-01

    Human airways are lined with a film of liquid from 5-100 microns in depth, consisting of a periciliary sol around and a mucous gel above the cilia. Microscopical studies have shown the sol to be invariably the same depth as the length of the cilia, and we discuss possible reasons for this. The composition and sources of the airway surface liquid are also described. In addition the forces regulating its volume are analyzed. Several airway diseases are characterised by dramatic changes in the volume and composition of airway liquid. We review recent research suggesting that the accumulation of airway mucous secretions in cystic fibrosis is caused by alterations in active transport of ions and water across both the surface and gland epithelia. PMID:7740210

  5. Comparison of analysis methods for airway quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.

    2012-03-01

    Diseased airways have been known for several years as a possible contributing factor to airflow limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD). Quantification of disease severity through the evaluation of airway dimensions - wall thickness and lumen diameter - has gained increased attention, thanks to the availability of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Novel approaches have focused on automated methods of measurement as a faster and more objective means that the visual assessment routinely employed in the clinic. Since the Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) method of airway measurement was introduced two decades ago [1], several new techniques for quantifying airways have been detailed in the literature, but no approach has truly become a standard for such analysis. Our own research group has presented two alternative approaches for determining airway dimensions, one involving a minimum path and the other active contours [2, 3]. With an increasing number of techniques dedicated to the same goal, we decided to take a step back and analyze the differences of these methods. We consequently put to the test our two methods of analysis and the FWHM approach. We first measured a set of 5 airways from a phantom of known dimensions. Then we compared measurements from the three methods to those of two independent readers, performed on 35 airways in 5 patients. We elaborate on the differences of each approach and suggest conclusions on which could be defined as the best one.

  6. Elastosis during airway wall remodeling explains multiple co-existing instability patterns.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mona; Javili, Ali; Kuhl, Ellen

    2016-08-21

    Living structures can undergo morphological changes in response to growth and alterations in microstructural properties in response to remodeling. From a biological perspective, airway wall inflammation and airway elastosis are classical hallmarks of growth and remodeling during chronic lung disease. From a mechanical point of view, growth and remodeling trigger mechanical instabilities that result in inward folding and airway obstruction. While previous analytical and computational studies have focused on identifying the critical parameters at the onset of folding, few have considered the post-buckling behavior. All prior studies assume constant microstructural properties during the folding process; yet, clinical studies now reveal progressive airway elastosis, the degeneration of elastic fibers associated with a gradual stiffening of the inner layer. Here, we explore the influence of temporally evolving material properties on the post-bifurcation behavior of the airway wall. We show that a growing and stiffening inner layer triggers an additional subsequent bifurcation after the first instability occurs. Evolving material stiffnesses provoke failure modes with multiple co-existing wavelengths, associated with the superposition of larger folds evolving on top of the initial smaller folds. This phenomenon is exclusive to material stiffening and conceptually different from the phenomenon of period doubling observed in constant-stiffness growth. Our study suggests that the clinically observed multiple wavelengths in diseased airways are a result of gradual airway wall stiffening. While our evolving material properties are inspired by the clinical phenomenon of airway elastosis, the underlying concept is broadly applicable to other types of remodeling including aneurysm formation or brain folding. PMID:27211101

  7. JNK-TLR9 signal pathway mediates allergic airway inflammation through suppressing melatonin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Mei; Shen, Qi-Ying; Fang, Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hai; Shen, Pei-Ting; Liu, Ya-Jing; Liu, Rong-Yu

    2016-05-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic airway diseases such as asthma. TLR9 is one of the most extensively studied TLRs as an approach to treat asthma. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR9 in the allergic airway inflammation and the underlying mechanism. Wild-type (WT) mice and TLR9(-/-) mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA to establish allergic airway disease model. We found that the expression of TLR9 was elevated concomitantly with airway inflammation post-OVA challenge, and TLR9 deficiency effectively inhibited airway inflammation, including serum OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE), pulmonary inflammatory cell recruitment, mucus secretion, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) inflammatory cytokine production. Meanwhile, the protein expression of hydroxyindole-o-methyltransferase (HIOMT) in lung tissues, the level of melatonin in serum, and BALF were reduced in OVA-challenged WT mice, while these reductions were significantly restored by TLR9 deficiency. Additionally, we showed that although TLR9 deficiency had no effect on OVA-induced phosphorylation of JNK, inhibition of JNK by specific inhibitor SP600125 significantly decreased OVA-induced expression of TLR9, suggesting that JNK is the upstream signal molecular of TLR9. Furthermore, SP600125 treatment promoted resolution of allergic airway inflammation in OVA-challenged WT mice, but not further ameliorated allergic airway inflammation in OVA-challenged TLR9(-/-) mice. Similarly, SP600125 significantly restored the protein expression of HIOMT and the level of melatonin in OVA-challenged WT mice, while such effect was not further enhanced by TLR9 deficiency. Collectively, our results indicated that JNK-TLR9 signal pathway mediates allergic airway inflammation through suppressing melatonin biosynthesis. PMID:26914888

  8. Cephalometric norms for the upper airway in a healthy North Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Shastri, Dipti; Tandon, Pradeep; Nagar, Amit; Singh, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to obtain normative data for cephalometric measurements of the upper airway in the North Indian population. Design: Observational study. Setting: University department and teaching hospital out-patient clinic. Subjects and Methods: A total of 180 healthy patients were included out of which 90 were males (age range, 8-16 years), and 90 were females (age range, 8-16 years), with normal skeletal facial profile, no history of snoring, sleep apnea, upper airway disease, tonsillectomy or adenoidectomy, obesity, or pathology in the pharynx. Twenty cephalometric airway measurements, including size of the tongue, soft palate, nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and relative position of the hyoid bone and valleculae were obtained. Landmarks on cephalometric radiographs were digitized and measurements were made using a specially designed computer program. Error analysis of measurements was performed and comparison of measurements according to sex was made. Results: Significant sex dimorphism was seen for the majority of measurements, with the exception of minimal depth of the airway, oropharyngeal depth of the airway, and the soft palate angle with the hard palate. Conclusion: A minimum sagittal dimension of the upper airway was evident despite differences in measurements between sexes. Findings from this study should be a useful reference for the assessment of sleep apnea in the North Indian population. PMID:26097352

  9. Upper airway test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    An upper airway biopsy is obtained by using a flexible scope called a bronchoscope. The scope is passed down through ... may be performed when an abnormality of the upper airway is suspected. It may also be performed as ...

  10. Brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wykes, P M

    1991-06-01

    This is a complex condition, recognized primarily in brachycephalic breeds, that results in varying degrees of upper airway obstruction. The signs consist of respiratory distress, stridor, reduced exercise tolerance, and in more severe cases, cyanosis and collapse. The inherent anatomy of the brachycephalic skull contributes to the development of these signs. Such anatomic features include: a shortened and distorted nasopharynx, stenotic nares, an elongated soft palate, and everted laryngeal saccules. The increased negative pressure created in the pharyngolaryngeal region, as a result of these obstructing structures, ultimately results in distortion and collapse of the arytenoid cartilages of the larynx. PMID:1802247

  11. Molecular insights into the physiology of the ‘thin film’ of airway surface liquid

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, R C

    1999-01-01

    The epithelia that line the airways of the lung exhibit two general functions: (1) airway epithelia in all regions ‘defend’ the lung against infectious and noxious agents; and (2) airway epithelia in the proximal regions replenish water lost from airway surfaces, i.e. the ‘insensible water loss’, consequent to conditioning inspired air. How airway epithelia perform both functions, and co-ordinate them in health and disease, is the subject of this review. PMID:10200413

  12. Mathematical model of nucleotide regulation on airway epithelia. Implications for airway homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Peiying; Picher, Maryse; Okada, Seiko F; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Button, Brian; Boucher, Richard C; Elston, Timothy C

    2008-09-26

    In the airways, adenine nucleotides support a complex signaling network mediating host defenses. Released by the epithelium into the airway surface liquid (ASL) layer, they regulate mucus clearance through P2 (ATP) receptors, and following surface metabolism through P1 (adenosine; Ado) receptors. The complexity of ASL nucleotide regulation provides an ideal subject for biochemical network modeling. A mathematical model was developed to integrate nucleotide release, the ectoenzymes supporting the dephosphorylation of ATP into Ado, Ado deamination into inosine (Ino), and nucleoside uptake. The model also includes ecto-adenylate kinase activity and feed-forward inhibition of Ado production by ATP and ADP. The parameters were optimized by fitting the model to experimental data for the steady-state and transient concentration profiles generated by adding ATP to polarized primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. The model captures major aspects of ATP and Ado regulation, including their >4-fold increase in concentration induced by mechanical stress mimicking normal breathing. The model also confirmed the independence of steady-state nucleotide concentrations on the ASL volume, an important regulator of airway clearance. An interactive approach between simulations and assays revealed that feed-forward inhibition is mediated by selective inhibition of ecto-5'-nucleotidase. Importantly, the model identifies ecto-adenylate kinase as a key regulator of ASL ATP and proposes novel strategies for the treatment of airway diseases characterized by impaired nucleotide-mediated clearance. These new insights into the biochemical processes supporting ASL nucleotide regulation illustrate the potential of this mathematical model for fundamental and clinical research. PMID:18662982

  13. Careers in Airway Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has initiated the Airway Science curriculum as a method of preparing the next generation of aviation technicians and managers. This document: (1) discusses the FAA's role in the Airway Science program; (2) describes some of the career fields that FAA offers to Airway Science graduates (air traffic control…

  14. Novel therapeutic strategies for lung disorders associated with airway remodelling and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Royce, Simon G; Moodley, Yuben; Samuel, Chrishan S

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine release, epithelial damage, airway/lung remodelling and fibrosis are central features of inflammatory lung disorders, which include asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute respiratory distress syndrome and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Although the lung has some ability to repair itself from acute injury, in the presence of ongoing pathological stimuli and/or insults that lead to chronic disease, it no longer retains the capacity to heal, resulting in fibrosis, the final common pathway that causes an irreversible loss of lung function. Despite inflammation, genetic predisposition/factors, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and mechanotransduction being able to independently contribute to airway remodelling and fibrosis, current therapies for inflammatory lung diseases are limited by their ability to only target the inflammatory component of the disease without having any marked effects on remodelling (epithelial damage and fibrosis) that can cause lung dysfunction independently of inflammation. Furthermore, as subsets of patients suffering from these diseases are resistant to currently available therapies (such as corticosteroids), novel therapeutic approaches are required to combat all aspects of disease pathology. This review discusses emerging therapeutic approaches, such as trefoil factors, relaxin, histone deacetylase inhibitors and stem cells, amongst others that have been able to target airway inflammation and airway remodelling while improving related lung dysfunction. A better understanding of the mode of action of these therapies and their possible combined effects may lead to the identification of their clinical potential in the setting of lung disease, either as adjunct or alternative therapies to currently available treatments. PMID:24513131

  15. Role of EP2 and EP4 receptors in airway microvascular leak induced by prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Victoria C; Birrell, Mark A; Maher, Sarah A; Griffiths, Mark; Grace, Megan; O'Donnell, Valerie B; Clark, Stephen R

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Airway microvascular leak (MVL) involves the extravasation of proteins from post‐capillary venules into surrounding tissue. MVL is a cardinal sign of inflammation and an important feature of airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma. PGE2, a product of COX‐mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid, binds to four receptors, termed EP1–4. PGE2 has a wide variety of effects within the airway, including modulation of inflammation, sensory nerve activation and airway tone. However, the effect of PGE2 on airway MVL and the receptor/s that mediate this have not been described. Experimental Approach Evans Blue dye was used as a marker of airway MVL, and selective EP receptor agonists and antagonists were used alongside EP receptor‐deficient mice to define the receptor subtype involved. Key Results PGE2 induced significant airway MVL in mice and guinea pigs. A significant reduction in PGE2‐induced MVL was demonstrated in Ptger2 −/− and Ptger4 −/− mice and in wild‐type mice pretreated simultaneously with EP2 (PF‐04418948) and EP4 (ER‐819762) receptor antagonists. In a model of allergic asthma, an increase in airway levels of PGE2 was associated with a rise in MVL; this change was absent in Ptger2 −/− and Ptger4 −/− mice. Conclusions and Implications PGE2 is a key mediator produced by the lung and has widespread effects according to the EP receptor activated. Airway MVL represents a response to injury and under ‘disease’ conditions is a prominent feature of airway inflammation. The data presented highlight a key role for EP2 and EP4 receptors in MVL induced by PGE2. PMID:26639895

  16. Newcastle disease: An in-depth review including epidemiology and molecular diagnostics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections of birds with strains of avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), (synonyms: Newcastle disease virus (NDV), pigeon PMV-1 (PPMV-1)) are associated with two clinical outcomes: 1) Newcastle disease (ND) results from infections with virulent APMV-1, and is also called Exotic ND (END) in U. S...

  17. Airway compliance and dynamics explain the apparent discrepancy in length adaptation between intact airways and smooth muscle strips.

    PubMed

    Dowie, Jackson; Ansell, Thomas K; Noble, Peter B; Donovan, Graham M

    2016-01-01

    Length adaptation is a phenomenon observed in airway smooth muscle (ASM) wherein over time there is a shift in the length-tension curve. There is potential for length adaptation to play an important role in airway constriction and airway hyper-responsiveness in asthma. Recent results by Ansell et al., 2015 (JAP 2014 10.1152/japplphysiol.00724.2014) have cast doubt on this role by testing for length adaptation using an intact airway preparation, rather than strips of ASM. Using this technique they found no evidence for length adaptation in intact airways. Here we attempt to resolve this apparent discrepancy by constructing a minimal mathematical model of the intact airway, including ASM which follows the classic length-tension curve and undergoes length adaptation. This allows us to show that (1) no evidence of length adaptation should be expected in large, cartilaginous, intact airways; (2) even in highly compliant peripheral airways, or at more compliant regions of the pressure-volume curve of large airways, the effect of length adaptation would be modest and at best marginally detectable in intact airways; (3) the key parameters which control the appearance of length adaptation in intact airways are airway compliance and the relaxation timescale. The results of this mathematical simulation suggest that length adaptation observed at the level of the isolated ASM may not clearly manifest in the normal intact airway. PMID:26376002

  18. Automated airway evaluation system for multi-slice computed tomography using airway lumen diameter, airway wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.; Lerallut, Jean-Francois

    2006-03-01

    Pulmonary diseases such as bronchiectasis, asthma, and emphysema are characterized by abnormalities in airway dimensions. Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) has become one of the primary means to depict these abnormalities, as the availability of high-resolution near-isotropic data makes it possible to evaluate airways at oblique angles to the scanner plane. However, currently, clinical evaluation of airways is typically limited to subjective visual inspection only: systematic evaluation of the airways to take advantage of high-resolution data has not proved practical without automation. We present an automated method to quantitatively evaluate airway lumen diameter, wall thickness and broncho-arterial ratios. In addition, our method provides 3D visualization of these values, graphically illustrating the location and extent of disease. Our algorithm begins by automatic airway segmentation to extract paths to the distal airways, and to create a map of airway diameters. Normally, airway diameters decrease as paths progress distally; failure to taper indicates abnormal dilatation. Our approach monitors airway lumen diameters along each airway path in order to detect abnormal profiles, allowing even subtle degrees of pathologic dilatation to be identified. Our method also systematically computes the broncho-arterial ratio at every terminal branch of the tree model, as a ratio above 1 indicates potentially abnormal bronchial dilatation. Finally, the airway wall thickness is computed at corresponding locations. These measurements are used to highlight abnormal branches for closer inspection, and can be summed to compute a quantitative global score for the entire airway tree, allowing reproducible longitudinal assessment of disease severity. Preliminary tests on patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis demonstrated rapid identification of lack of tapering, which also was confirmed by corresponding demonstration of elevated broncho-arterial ratios.

  19. Airways disorders and the swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Concerns have been expressed about the possible detrimental effects of chlorine derivatives in indoor swimming pool environments. Indeed, a controversy has arisen regarding the possibility that chlorine commonly used worldwide as a disinfectant favors the development of asthma and allergic diseases. The effects of swimming in indoor chlorinated pools on the airways in recreational and elite swimmers are presented. Recent studies on the influence of swimming on airway inflammation and remodeling in competitive swimmers, and the phenotypic characteristics of asthma in this population are reviewed. Preventative measures that could potentially reduce the untoward effects of pool environment on airways of swimmers are discussed. PMID:23830132

  20. [Orthodontics and the upper airway].

    PubMed

    Cobo Plana, J; de Carlos Villafranca, F; Macías Escalada, E

    2004-03-01

    One of the general aims of orthodontic treatment and of the combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery is to achieve good occlusion and aesthetic improvement, especially in cases of severe dentoskeletal deformities. However, on many occasions, the parameters of the upper airways are not taken into account when the aims of conventional treatment are fulfilled. Patients with obstructive alterations during sleep represent for the orthodontist a type of patient who differs from the normal; for them, treatment should include the objective of improving oxygen saturation. Here, functional considerations should outweigh purely aesthetic ones. It is important, when making an orthodontic, surgical or combined diagnosis for a patient, to bear in mind the impact that treatment may have on the upper airways. Good aesthetics should never be achieved for some of our patients at the expense of diminishing the capacity of their upper airways. PMID:15301356

  1. Assessing mucus and airway morphology in response to a segmental allergen challenge using OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Asthma affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and the prevalence of the disease appears to be increasing. One of the most important aspects of asthma is the excessive bronchoconstriction that results in many of the symptoms experienced by asthma sufferers, but the relationship between bronchoconstriction and airway morphology is not clearly established. We present the imaging results of a study involving a segmental allergen challenge given to both allergic asthmatic (n = 12) and allergic non-asthmatic (n = 19) human volunteers. Using OCT, we have imaged and assessed baseline morphology in a right upper lobe (RUL) airway, serving as the control, and a right middle lobe (RML) airway, in which the allergen was to be administered. After a period of 24 hours had elapsed following the administration of the allergen, both airways were again imaged and the response morphology assessed. A number of airway parameters were measured and compared, including epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness and buckling, lumen area, and mucus content. We found that at baseline epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness, and mucosal buckling were greater in AAs than ANAs. We also observed statistically significant increases in these values 24 hours after the allergen had been administered for both the ANA and AA sets. In comparison, the control airway which received a diluent showed no statistically significant change.

  2. Small Airways Dysfunction in Asthma: Evaluation and Management to Improve Asthma Control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The small airways have been neglected for many years, but interest in the topic has been rekindled with recent advances in measurement techniques to assess this region and also the ability to deliver therapeutics to the distal airways. Current levels of disease control in asthmatic patients remain poor and there are several contributory factors including; poor treatment compliance, heterogeneity of asthma phenotypes and associated comorbidities. However, the proposition that we may not be targeting all the inflammation that is present throughout the whole respiratory tree may also be an important factor. Indeed decades ago, pathologists and physiologists clearly identified the importance of small airways dysfunction in asthmatic patients. With improved inhaler technology to deliver drug to target the whole respiratory tree and more sensitive measures to assess the distal airways, we should certainly give greater consideration to treating the small airway region when seeing our asthmatic patients in clinic. The aim of this review is to address the relevance of small airways dysfunction in the daily clinical management of patients with asthma. In particular the role of small particle aerosols in the management of patients with asthma will be explored. PMID:25228994

  3. Epithelium damage and protection during reopening of occluded airways in a physiologic microfluidic pulmonary airway model.

    PubMed

    Tavana, Hossein; Zamankhan, Parsa; Christensen, Paul J; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2011-08-01

    Airways of the peripheral lung are prone to closure at low lung volumes. Deficiency or dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant during various lung diseases compounds this event by destabilizing the liquid lining of small airways and giving rise to occluding liquid plugs in airways. Propagation of liquid plugs in airways during inflation of the lung exerts large mechanical forces on airway cells. We describe a microfluidic model of small airways of the lung that mimics airway architecture, recreates physiologic levels of pulmonary pressures, and allows studying cellular response to repeated liquid plug propagation events. Substantial cellular injury happens due to the propagation of liquid plugs devoid of surfactant. We show that addition of a physiologic concentration of a clinical surfactant, Survanta, to propagating liquid plugs protects the epithelium and significantly reduces cell death. Although the protective role of surfactants has been demonstrated in models of a propagating air finger in liquid-filled airways, this is the first time to study the protective role of surfactants in liquid plugs where fluid mechanical stresses are expected to be higher than in air fingers. Our parallel computational simulations revealed a significant decrease in mechanical forces in the presence of surfactant, confirming the experimental observations. The results support the practice of providing exogenous surfactant to patients in certain clinical settings as a protective mechanism against pathologic flows. More importantly, this platform provides a useful model to investigate various surface tension-mediated lung diseases at the cellular level. PMID:21487664

  4. The role of the OIE in information exchange and the control of animal diseases, including zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Poissonnier, C; Teissier, M

    2013-08-01

    The growing importance of animal diseases and zoonoses at a time when globalisation has increased movements of people, animals and animal products across the globe, has strengthened the role of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) in animal disease control. The OIE's mandate since its establishment in 1924 has been to facilitate the exchange of public health, animal health and scientific information, and to further the control and eradication of animal diseases. The OIE is recognised by the World Trade Organization Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures as the international reference organisation for animal diseases and zoonoses, especially for standard setting. The standards adopted by the World Assembly of OIE Delegates on veterinary public health and animal health feature in the OlE Terrestrial Animal Health Code, the Aquatic Animal Health Code, the Manual of Diagnostic Tests and Vaccines for Terrestrial Animals and the Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals. The OlE is also a reference organisation for the exchange of public and animal health information among Member Countries, through an information, reporting and warning system based on transparent communication between countries. The OIE provides scientific expertise in ascertaining countries' status with regard to notifiable diseases, enabling them to secure official recognition as being free from foot and mouth disease, African horse sickness, contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. The OIE also contributes its scientific expertise to stakeholder training on the surveillance and control of animal diseases and zoonoses and to the evaluation of the performance of Veterinary Services, to enhance theirwork asthe cornerstone of their countries' disease control efforts. PMID:24547648

  5. Linkage analyses of chromosome 6 loci, including HLA, in familial aggregations of Crohn disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hugot, J.P.; Laurent-Puig, P.; Gower-Rousseau, C.; Caillat-Zueman, S.; Beaugerie, L.; Dupas, J.L.; Van Gossum, A.; Bonaiti-Pellie, C.; Cortot, A.

    1994-08-15

    Segregation analyses of familial aggregations of Crohn disease have provided consistent results pointing to the involvement of a predisposing gene with a recessive mode of inheritance. Although extensively investigated, the role played by human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes in this inflammatory bowel disease remains elusive and the major histocompatibility complex is a candidate region for the mapping of the Crohn disease susceptibility gene. A total of 25 families with multiple cases of Crohn disease was genotyped for HLA DRB1 and for 16 highly polymorphic loci evenly distributed on chromosome 6. The data were subjected to linkage analysis using the lod score method. Neither individual nor combined lod scores for any family and for any locus tested reached values suggesting linkage or genetic heterogeneity. The Crohn disease predisposing locus was excluded from the whole chromosome 6 with lod scores less than -2. It was excluded from the major histocompatibility complex and from 91% of the chromosome 6 genetic map with lod scores less than -4. The major recessive gene involved in genetic predisposition to Crohn disease does not reside on the major histocompatibility complex nor on any locus mapping to chromosome 6. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Awake Craniotomy: A New Airway Approach.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Chitra; Schlichter, Rolf A; Baranov, Dimitry; Kofke, W Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Awake craniotomies have been performed regularly at the University of Pennsylvania since 2004. Varying approaches to airway management are described for this procedure, including intubation with an endotracheal tube and use of a laryngeal mask airway, simple facemask, or nasal cannula. In this case series, we describe the successful use (i.e., no need for endotracheal intubation related to inadequate gas exchange) of bilateral nasopharyngeal airways in 90 patients undergoing awake craniotomies. The use of nasopharyngeal airways can ease the transition between the asleep and awake phases of the craniotomy without the need to stimulate the airway. Our purpose was to describe our experience and report adverse events related to this technique. PMID:26579845

  7. Anaesthetic management of acute airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Patrick; Wong, Jolin; Mok, May Un Sam

    2016-01-01

    The acutely obstructed airway is a medical emergency that can potentially result in serious morbidity and mortality. Apart from the latest advancements in anaesthetic techniques, equipment and drugs, publications relevant to our topic, including the United Kingdom’s 4th National Audit Project on major airway complications in 2011 and the updated American Society of Anesthesiologists’ difficult airway algorithm of 2013, have recently been published. The former contained many reports of adverse events associated with the management of acute airway obstruction. By analysing the data and concepts from these two publications, this review article provides an update on management techniques for the acutely obstructed airway. We discuss the principles and factors relevant to the decision-making process in formulating a logical management plan. PMID:26996162

  8. Anaesthetic management of acute airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Patrick; Wong, Jolin; Mok, May Un Sam

    2016-03-01

    The acutely obstructed airway is a medical emergency that can potentially result in serious morbidity and mortality. Apart from the latest advancements in anaesthetic techniques, equipment and drugs, publications relevant to our topic, including the United Kingdom's 4th National Audit Project on major airway complications in 2011 and the updated American Society of Anesthesiologists' difficult airway algorithm of 2013, have recently been published. The former contained many reports of adverse events associated with the management of acute airway obstruction. By analysing the data and concepts from these two publications, this review article provides an update on management techniques for the acutely obstructed airway. We discuss the principles and factors relevant to the decision-making process in formulating a logical management plan. PMID:26996162

  9. Continuous mucociliary transport by primary human airway epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Patrick R.; Yin, Wei-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance (MCC) is an important innate defense mechanism that continuously removes inhaled pathogens and particulates from the airways. Normal MCC is essential for maintaining a healthy respiratory system, and impaired MCC is a feature of many airway diseases, including both genetic (cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia) and acquired (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis) disorders. Research into the fundamental processes controlling MCC, therefore, has direct clinical application, but has been limited in part due to the difficulty of studying this complex multicomponent system in vitro. In this study, we have characterized a novel method that allows human airway epithelial cells to differentiate into a mucociliary epithelium that transports mucus in a continuous circular track. The mucociliary transport device allows the measurement and manipulation of all features of mucociliary transport in a controlled in vitro system. In this initial study, the effect of ciliary beat frequency and mucus concentration on the speed of mucociliary transport was investigated. PMID:25979076

  10. Gene-environment interaction from international cohorts: impact on development and evolution of occupational and environmental lung and airway disease.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam; Christiani, David C

    2015-06-01

    Environmental and occupational pulmonary diseases impose a substantial burden of morbidity and mortality on the global population. However, it has been long observed that only some of those who are exposed to pulmonary toxicants go on to develop disease; increasingly, it is being recognized that genetic differences may underlie some of this person-to-person variability. Studies performed throughout the globe are demonstrating important gene-environment interactions for diseases as diverse as chronic beryllium disease, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, silicosis, asbestosis, byssinosis, occupational asthma, and pollution-associated asthma. These findings have, in many instances, elucidated the pathogenesis of these highly complex diseases. At the same time, however, translation of this research into clinical practice has, for good reasons, proceeded slowly. No genetic test has yet emerged with sufficiently robust operating characteristics to be clearly useful or practicable in an occupational or environmental setting. In addition, occupational genetic testing raises serious ethical and policy concerns. Therefore, the primary objective must remain ensuring that the workplace and the environment are safe for all. PMID:26024343

  11. Gene Expression Changes Associated with the Airway Wall Response to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yahaya, Badrul; McLachlan, Gerry; McCorquodale, Caroline; Collie, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the way in which the airway heals in response to injury is fundamental to dissecting the mechanisms underlying airway disease pathology. As only limited data is available in relation to the in vivo characterisation of the molecular features of repair in the airway we sought to characterise the dynamic changes in gene expression that are associated with the early response to physical injury in the airway wall. Methodology/Principal Findings We profiled gene expression changes in the airway wall using a large animal model of physical injury comprising bronchial brush biopsy in anaesthetised sheep. The experimental design featured sequential studies in the same animals over the course of a week and yielded data relating to the response at 6 hours, and 1, 3 and 7 days after injury. Notable features of the transcriptional response included the early and sustained preponderance of down-regulated genes associated with angiogenesis and immune cell activation, selection and differentiation. Later features of the response included the up-regulation of cell cycle genes at d1 and d3, and the latter pronounced up-regulation of extracellular matrix-related genes at d3 and d7. Conclusions/Significance It is possible to follow the airway wall response to physical injury in the same animal over the course of time. Transcriptional changes featured coordinate expression of functionally related genes in a reproducible manner both within and between animals. This characterisation will provide a foundation against which to assess the perturbations that accompany airway disease pathologies of comparative relevance. PMID:23593124

  12. Airway uric acid is a sensor of inhaled protease allergens and initiates type 2 immune responses in respiratory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenichiro; Iijima, Koji; Elias, Martha K; Seno, Satoshi; Tojima, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-05-01

    Although type 2 immune responses to environmental Ags are thought to play pivotal roles in asthma and allergic airway diseases, the immunological mechanisms that initiate the responses are largely unknown. Many allergens have biologic activities, including enzymatic activities and abilities to engage innate pattern-recognition receptors such as TLR4. In this article, we report that IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin were produced quickly in the lungs of naive mice exposed to cysteine proteases, such as bromelain and papain, as a model for allergens. IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin sensitized naive animals to an innocuous airway Ag OVA, which resulted in production of type 2 cytokines and IgE Ab, and eosinophilic airway inflammation when mice were challenged with the same Ag. Importantly, upon exposure to proteases, uric acid (UA) was rapidly released into the airway lumen, and removal of this endogenous UA by uricase prevented type 2 immune responses. UA promoted secretion of IL-33 by airway epithelial cells in vitro, and administration of UA into the airways of naive animals induced extracellular release of IL-33, followed by both innate and adaptive type 2 immune responses in vivo. Finally, a potent UA synthesis inhibitor, febuxostat, mitigated asthma phenotypes that were caused by repeated exposure to natural airborne allergens. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the development of type 2 immunity to airborne allergens and recognize airway UA as a key player that regulates the process in respiratory mucosa. PMID:24663677

  13. A standardized aqueous extract of Anoectochilus formosanus modulated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-inhaled murine model.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, C-C; Hsiao, H-B; Lin, W-C

    2010-07-01

    Anoectochilus formosanus HAYATA, a Chinese herb, is a valued folk medicine for fever, pain, and diseases of the lung and liver. Allergic asthma is characterized by increased serum IgE level and inflammation of the airways with high levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). Constriction of airway smooth muscle and development of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) are the most important symptoms of allergic asthma. In our previous study, a standardized aqueous extract of A. formosanus (SAEAF) was used to modulate innate immunity of normal mice. In this study, airway inflammatory infiltrations, including T cell differentiation, cytokine modulation, allergic antibodies estimation, pulmonary pathology, and enhanced pause (Penh) of AHR were used to evaluate SAEAF treatment of an ovalbumin (OVA)-inhaled airway allergic murine model. The resulting cytokine profiles demonstrated that SAEAF can significantly reduce Th2 polarization after administration of SAEAF in OVA inhalation. These results also suggest that SAEAF modulates cytokine secretion in allergic asthma. Modulated natural T regulatory cells (CD25+/CD4+, Treg) were also shown to increase immuno-suppression in the allergic lung inflammation and further down-regulate airway inflammatory infiltration in eosinophils and macrophages. Finally, decreased airway anti-OVA IgE secretion and reduced AHR were observed. Our results indicate that the administration of SAEAF can modulate cytokines and T cell subpopulation by regulating inflammatory cell infiltration and modulating the allergic response. PMID:20092984

  14. Production of 3-D Airway Organoids From Primary Human Airway Basal Cells and Their Use in High-Throughput Screening.

    PubMed

    Hild, Marc; Jaffe, Aron B

    2016-01-01

    The ability of human airway basal cells to serve as progenitor cells in the conducting airway makes them an attractive target in a number of respiratory diseases associated with epithelial remodeling. This unit describes a protocol for the culture of 'bronchospheres', three-dimensional (3-D) organoids that are derived from primary human airway basal cells. Mature bronchospheres are composed of functional multi-ciliated cells, mucin-producing goblet cells, and airway basal cells. In contrast to existing methods used for the culture of well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells, bronchospheres do not require growth on a permeable support and can be cultured in 384-well assay plates. The system provides a mechanism for investigating the regulation of basal cell fate during airway epithelial morphogenesis, as well as a basis for studying the function of the human airway epithelium in high-throughput assays. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27171795

  15. Use of procalcitonin in patients with various degrees of chronic kidney disease including renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Grace, Eddie; Turner, R Mackenzie

    2014-12-15

    Procalcitonin (PCT) has been shown to be a useful surrogate marker in identifying patients with various bacterial infections. PCT has been studied as a diagnostic marker in differentiating bacterial pneumonia from other respiratory conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations or viral pneumonia. Differentiating bacterial from nonbacterial pneumonia using PCT has shown to reduce antibiotic usage, length of stay, and antibiotic-related adverse effects. PCT has also been studied in patients with sepsis in an effort to reduce unnecessary antibiotic usage and decrease the length of antibiotic therapy. This article focuses on the use of PCT in patients with various degrees of chronic kidney disease in addition to various forms of dialysis, as chronic kidney disease may alter baseline levels of PCT and thus result in inappropriate use of PCT in this population. PMID:25228701

  16. Sensory neuropeptides and airway function.

    PubMed

    Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1991-12-01

    Sensory nerves synthesize tachykinins and calcitonin-gene related peptide and package these neuropeptides together in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation of these C-fibers by a range of chemical and physical factors results in afferent neuronal conduction that elicits central parasympathetic reflexes and in antidromic conduction that results in local release of neuropeptides through the axon reflex. In the airways, sensory neuropeptides act on bronchial smooth muscle, the mucosal vasculature, and submucosal glands to promote airflow obstruction, hyperemia, microvascular hyperpermeability, and mucus hypersecretion. In addition, tachykinins potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission. Proinflammatory effects of these peptides also promote the recruitment, adherence, and activation of granulocytes that may further exacerbate neurogenic inflammation (i.e., neuropeptide-induced plasma extravasation and vasodilation). Enzymatic degradation limits the physiological effects of tachykinins but may be impaired by respiratory infection or other factors. Given their sensitivity to noxious compounds and physical stimuli and their potent effects on airway function, it is possible that neuropeptide-containing sensory nerves play an important role in mediating airway responses in human disease. Supporting this view are the striking phenomenological similarities between hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB) in guinea pigs and HIB in patients with exercise-induced asthma. Endogenous tachykinins released from airway sensory nerves mediate HIB in guinea pigs and also cause hyperpnea-induced bronchovascular hyperpermeability in these animals. On the basis of these observations, it is reasonable to speculate that sensory neuropeptides participate in the pathogenesis of hyperpnea-induced airflow obstruction in human asthmatic subjects as well. PMID:1663932

  17. Electrolyte transport properties in distal small airways from cystic fibrosis pigs with implications for host defense.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Vargas Buonfiglio, Luis G; Comellas, Alejandro P; Thornell, Ian M; Ramachandran, Shyam; Karp, Philip H; Taft, Peter J; Sheets, Kelsey; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H; Welsh, Michael J; Meyerholz, David K; Stoltz, David A; Zabner, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    While pathological and clinical data suggest that small airways are involved in early cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease development, little is known about how the lack of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function contributes to disease pathogenesis in these small airways. Large and small airway epithelia are exposed to different airflow velocities, temperatures, humidity, and CO2 concentrations. The cellular composition of these two regions is different, and small airways lack submucosal glands. To better understand the ion transport properties and impacts of lack of CFTR function on host defense function in small airways, we adapted a novel protocol to isolate small airway epithelial cells from CF and non-CF pigs and established an organotypic culture model. Compared with non-CF large airways, non-CF small airway epithelia cultures had higher Cl(-) and bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) short-circuit currents and higher airway surface liquid (ASL) pH under 5% CO2 conditions. CF small airway epithelia were characterized by minimal Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) transport and decreased ASL pH, and had impaired bacterial killing compared with non-CF small airways. In addition, CF small airway epithelia had a higher ASL viscosity than non-CF small airways. Thus, the activity of CFTR is higher in the small airways, where it plays a role in alkalinization of ASL, enhancement of antimicrobial activity, and lowering of mucus viscosity. These data provide insight to explain why the small airways are a susceptible site for the bacterial colonization. PMID:26801568

  18. Lung Transplantation: The State of the Airways.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aliya N; Garrity, Edward R

    2016-03-01

    Context .- Lung transplantation has become a viable option for definitive treatment of several end-stage lung diseases for which there are no other options available. However, long-term survival continues to be limited by chronic lung allograft dysfunction, which primarily affects the airways. Objective . -To highlight the complications occurring mainly in the airways of the lung transplant recipient from the early to late posttransplant periods. Data Sources .- Review literature focusing on the airways in patients with lung transplants and clinical experience of the authors. Conclusions .- Postsurgical complications and infections of the airways have decreased because of better techniques and management. Acute cellular rejection of the airways can be distinguished from infection pathologically and on cultures. Separating small from large airways need not be an issue because both are risk factors for bronchiolitis obliterans. Grading of airway rejection needs to be standardized. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction consists of both bronchiolitis obliterans and restrictive allograft syndrome, neither of which can be treated very effectively at present. PMID:26927718

  19. Breath tests and airway gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joseph C; Hlastala, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    Measuring soluble gas in the exhaled breath is a non-invasive technique used to estimate levels of respiratory, solvent, and metabolic gases. The interpretation of these measurements is based on the assumption that the measured gases exchange in the alveoli. While the respiratory gases have a low blood-solubility and exchange in the alveoli, high blood-soluble gases exchange in the airways. The effect of airway gas exchange on the interpretation of these exhaled breath measurements can be significant. We describe airway gas exchange in relation to exhaled measurements of soluble gases that exchange in the alveoli. The mechanisms of airway gas exchange are reviewed and criteria for determining if a gas exchanges in the airways are provided. The effects of diffusion, perfusion, temperature and breathing maneuver on airway gas exchange and on measurement of exhaled soluble gas are discussed. A method for estimating the impact of airway gas exchange on exhaled breath measurements is presented. We recommend that investigators should carefully control the inspired air conditions and type of exhalation maneuver used in a breath test. Additionally, care should be taken when interpreting breath tests from subjects with pulmonary disease. PMID:16413216

  20. Long-term effects of acupuncture treatment on airway smooth muscle in a rat model of smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Wu, Song; Tang, Hongtu; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lushan; Zhou, Huanjiao; Zhou, Miao; Wang, Hua; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases. It is a chronic inflammatory process characterised by airway obstruction and progressive lung inflammation, associated with difficulty breathing and insensitivity to corticosteroid therapy. Although there is some preliminary evidence to suggest a beneficial effect of acupuncture on COPD, its mechanism of action has not been investigated. Our aim was to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of acupuncture in a rat model of COPD induced by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS). Methods Sixty Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to the smoke of 15 cigarettes for 1 h/day, 6 days/week for 3 months to induce COPD and treated with acupuncture at BL13 (Feishu), BL23 (Shenshu) and Dingchuan (COPD+Acupuncture, n=15), sham acupuncture (COPD+Sham, n=15) or left untreated (n=15). Exposed rats were compared with controls not exposed to CS (control, n=15). Pulmonary function was measured, and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by ELISA. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) protein and mRNA expression were examined in lung tissue and in bronchus. Results Acupuncture treatment appeared to protect pulmonary function and reduce the COPD-induced inflammatory response by decreasing cell inflammation and the production of TNF-α and IL-8. Acupuncture also enhanced HDAC2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting a possible direct effect on protein structure through post-translational modifications. Conclusions Our results suggest that acupuncture regulates inflammatory cytokines and contributes to lung protection in a rat model of smoke-induced COPD by modulating HDAC2. PMID:26345700

  1. The Duration of an Exposure Response Gradient between Incident Obstructive Airways Disease and Work at the World Trade Center Site: 2001-2011

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Charles B.; Liu, Xiaoxue; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Webber, Mayris P.; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Weakley, Jessica; Schwartz, Theresa; Cohen, Hillel W.; Glaser, Michelle S.; Olivieri, Brianne L.; Weiden, Michael D.; Nolan, Anna; Kelly, Kerry J.; Prezant, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adverse respiratory effects of World Trade Center (WTC) exposure have been widely documented, but the length of time that exposure remains associated with disease is uncertain. We estimate the incidence of new cases of physician-diagnosed obstructive airway disease (OAD) as a function of time since 9/11/2001 in WTC-exposed firefighters. Methods: Exposure was categorized by first WTC arrival time: high (9/11/2001 AM); moderate (9/11/2001 PM or 9/12/2001); or low (9/13-24/2001). We modeled relative rates (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 10 years post-9/11/2001, estimating the time(s) of change in the RR with change point models. We further examined the relationship between self-reported lower respiratory symptoms and physician diagnoses. Results: Change points were observed at 15 and 84 months post-9/11/2001, with relative incidence rates for the high versus low exposure group of 4.02 (95% CI 2.62-6.16) prior to 15 months, 1.90 (95% CI 1.49-2.44) from months 16 to 84, and 1.20 (95% CI 0.92-1.56) thereafter. Incidence in all exposure groups increased after the WTC health program began to offer free coverage of OAD medications in month 63. Self-reported lower respiratory symptoms in the first 15 months had 80.6% sensitivity, but only 35.9% specificity, for eventual OAD diagnoses. Conclusions: New OAD diagnoses are associated with WTC exposure for at least seven years. Some portion of the extended duration of that association may be due to delayed diagnoses. Nevertheless, our results support recognizing OAD among rescue workers as WTC-related even when diagnosed years after exposure. PMID:26064784

  2. Anti-inflammatory properties of the monoterpene 1.8-cineole: current evidence for co-medication in inflammatory airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Juergens, U R

    2014-12-01

    1,8-cineole is a natural monoterpene, also known as eucalyptol. It is a major compound of many plant essential oils, mainly extracted from Eucalyptus globulus oil. As an isolated compound, 1,8-cineole is known for its mucolytic and spasmolytic action on the respiratory tract, with proven clinical efficacy. 1,8-cineole has also shown therapeutic benefits in inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This clinical evidence refers to its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant mode of action, which has been proven in numerous pre-clinical studies. In vitro studies found strong evidence that 1,8-cineole controls inflammatory processes and mediator production of infection- or inflammation-induced mucus hypersecretion by its action as anti-inflammatory modifier rather than a simple mucolytic agent. The aim of this review is to present these preclinical studies performed with the pure monoterpene, and to summarize the current knowledge on the mode of action of 1,8-cineole. The actual understanding of the pure 1,8-cineole compared to mixtures of natural volatile oils containing 1,8-cineole as a major compound and to mixtures of natural terpenes, known as essential oils, will be discussed. Based on the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, recent clinical trials with 1,8-cineole have shown first evidence for the beneficial use of 1,8-cineole as long-term therapy in the prevention of COPD-exacerbations and to improve asthma control. PMID:24831245

  3. Airway registry: a performance improvement surveillance project of emergency department airway management.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Michael P; Glauser, Jonathan; Yuen, Ho-Wang A; Sturges-Smith, Elizabeth; Schrump, Stefanie E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if use of a standardized airway data collection sheet can survey airway management practices in an emergency department. Success rates and trends from the authors' facility have been benchmarked against the National Emergency Airway Registry (NEAR). This study included all patients requiring invasive airway management during a 21-month period (July 1, 2005, through March 31, 2007). An audit form was developed and implemented to collect data on intubations. During the study period, 224 patients required invasive airway control. Of all airways managed by emergency medicine residents, the intubation success rate was 99% (200/203; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 96%-100%), with 3% of those (6/203; 95% CI = 1%-6%) requiring more than 3 attempts; 3 patients (1%; 95% CI = 0%-4%) could not be intubated and required a surgical airway. Use of an airway registry based on the NEAR registry as a benchmark of rates and types of successful intubation allows comparison of airway practices. PMID:20505111

  4. Heparanase: a rainbow pharmacological target associated to multiple pathologies including rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Rivara, Silvia; Milazzo, Ferdinando M; Giannini, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, heparanase has attracted considerable attention as a promising target for innovative pharmacological applications. Heparanase is a multifaceted protein endowed with enzymatic activity, as an endo-β-D-glucuronidase, and nonenzymatic functions. It is responsible for the cleavage of heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans, resulting in structural alterations of the extracellular matrix. Heparanase appears to be involved in major human diseases, from the most studied tumors to chronic inflammation, diabetic nephropathy, bone osteolysis, thrombosis and atherosclerosis, in addition to more recent investigation in various rare diseases. The present review provides an overview on heparanase, its biological role, inhibitors and possible clinical applications, covering the latest findings in these areas. PMID:27057774

  5. Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) vs eosinophil count in induced sputum (IS) in parenchymal vs airways lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Fireman, Elizabeth; Shtark, Moshe; Priel, Israel E; Shiner, Robert; Mor, Ram; Kivity, Shmuel; Fireman, Zvi

    2007-04-01

    We compared exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and induced sputum (IS) for assessing inflammation in pulmonary diseases in patients with obstructive lung disease (n = 20), persistent cough >6 months (n = 20), interstitial lung disease (n = 25) and controls (n = 10). EBC was collected by suspending a Teflon perfluoroalkoxy tube installed in an ice-filled container and connected to a polypropylene test tube. IS was recovered after 20' inhalation of 3% saline with an ultrasonic nebulizer, and 300 cells were differentially counted in cytospin Giemsa-stained slides. H(2)0(2) was measured by a method based on oxidation of phenolsulfonphthalein (phenol red) mediated by horseradish peroxidases and H(2)0(2). Pulmonary function tests were performed by conventional methods. H(2)0(2) levels in EBC and % eosinophils in IS were significantly different between groups. A positive and significant correlation was found between % eosinophils in IS and the levels of H(2)0(2) in EBC for each group and for all patients combined. PMID:17372840

  6. Development of an integral assessment approach of health status in patients with obstructive airway diseases: the CORONA study

    PubMed Central

    van den Akker, Edmée FMM; van ‘t Hul, Alex J; Chavannes, Niels H; Braunstahl, Gert-Jan; van Bruggen, Alie; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen PMH; in ‘t Veen, Johannes CCM

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional assessment of patients with obstructive lung diseases (asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; COPD) relies on physiological tests. The COPD and Asthma Rotterdam Integrated Care Approach (CORONA) study aims to develop a diagnostic pathway with a more comprehensive approach to the assessment of patients with asthma and COPD in secondary care. Methods An eight-step method was used to develop and implement the pathway for patients with asthma or COPD referred to an outpatient hospital setting. Results The diagnostic pathway consists of an evidence-based set of measurements prioritized by a Delphi procedure. The pathway incorporates three innovative diagnostics: the metronome-paced hyperventilation test to measure dynamic hyperinflation, an activity monitor to objectively evaluate physical activity in daily life, and the Nijmegen Clinical Screening Instrument as a comprehensive assessment tool to acquire detailed insight into symptoms, functional limitations, and quality of life. Conclusion An innovative diagnostic pathway was developed and implemented for patients with obstructive lung diseases referred to secondary care. As this pathway aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of health status, it focuses on biomedical aspects and also reviews behavioral aspects that further elucidate the patient’s health status. The added value of the diagnostic pathway needs to be determined from both an organizational perspective and from the individual patient’s viewpoint. PMID:26609228

  7. Soft TCPTP Agonism—Novel Target to Rescue Airway Epithelial Integrity by Exogenous Spermidine

    PubMed Central

    Ghisalberti, Carlo A.; Borzì, Rosa M.; Cetrullo, Silvia; Flamigni, Flavio; Cairo, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    A reparative approach of disrupted epithelium in obstructive airway diseases, namely asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), may afford protection and long-lasting results compared to conventional therapies, e.g., corticosteroids or immunosuppressant drugs. Here, we propose the polyamine spermidine as a novel therapeutic agent in airways diseases, based on a recently identified mode of action: T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP) agonism. It may include and surpass single-inhibitors of stress and secondary growth factor pathway signaling, i.e., the new medicinal chemistry in lung diseases. Enhanced polyamine biosynthesis has been charged with aggravating prognosis by competing for L-arginine at detriment of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis with bronchoconstrictive effects. Although excess spermine, a higher polyamine, is harmful to airways physiology, spermidine can pivot the cell homeostasis during stress conditions by the activation of TCPTP. In fact, the dephosphorylating activity of TCPTP inhibits the signaling cascade that leads to the expression of genes involved in detachment and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and increases the expression of adhesion and tight junction proteins, thereby enhancing the barrier functionality in inflammation-prone tissues. Moreover, a further beneficial effect of spermidine may derive from its ability to promote autophagy, possibly in a TCPTP-dependent way. Since doses of spermidine in the micromolar range are sufficient to activate TCPTP, low amounts of spermidine administered in sustained release modality may provide an optimal pharmacologic profile for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases. PMID:27375482

  8. Soft TCPTP Agonism-Novel Target to Rescue Airway Epithelial Integrity by Exogenous Spermidine.

    PubMed

    Ghisalberti, Carlo A; Borzì, Rosa M; Cetrullo, Silvia; Flamigni, Flavio; Cairo, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    A reparative approach of disrupted epithelium in obstructive airway diseases, namely asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), may afford protection and long-lasting results compared to conventional therapies, e.g., corticosteroids or immunosuppressant drugs. Here, we propose the polyamine spermidine as a novel therapeutic agent in airways diseases, based on a recently identified mode of action: T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP) agonism. It may include and surpass single-inhibitors of stress and secondary growth factor pathway signaling, i.e., the new medicinal chemistry in lung diseases. Enhanced polyamine biosynthesis has been charged with aggravating prognosis by competing for L-arginine at detriment of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis with bronchoconstrictive effects. Although excess spermine, a higher polyamine, is harmful to airways physiology, spermidine can pivot the cell homeostasis during stress conditions by the activation of TCPTP. In fact, the dephosphorylating activity of TCPTP inhibits the signaling cascade that leads to the expression of genes involved in detachment and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and increases the expression of adhesion and tight junction proteins, thereby enhancing the barrier functionality in inflammation-prone tissues. Moreover, a further beneficial effect of spermidine may derive from its ability to promote autophagy, possibly in a TCPTP-dependent way. Since doses of spermidine in the micromolar range are sufficient to activate TCPTP, low amounts of spermidine administered in sustained release modality may provide an optimal pharmacologic profile for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases. PMID:27375482

  9. Molecular basis for pH-dependent mucosal dehydration in cystic fibrosis airways.

    PubMed

    Garland, Alaina L; Walton, William G; Coakley, Raymond D; Tan, Chong D; Gilmore, Rodney C; Hobbs, Carey A; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Clunes, Lucy A; Bencharit, Sompop; Stutts, M Jackson; Betts, Laurie; Redinbo, Matthew R; Tarran, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The ability to maintain proper airway surface liquid (ASL) volume homeostasis is vital for mucus hydration and clearance, which are essential aspects of the mammalian lung's innate defense system. In cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the most common life-threatening genetic disorders, ASL dehydration leads to mucus accumulation and chronic infection. In normal airways, the secreted protein short palate lung and nasal epithelial clone 1 (SPLUNC1) effectively inhibits epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC)-dependent Na(+) absorption and preserves ASL volume. In CF airways, it has been hypothesized that increased ENaC-dependent Na(+) absorption contributes to ASL depletion, and hence increased disease. However, this theory is controversial, and the mechanism for abnormal ENaC regulation in CF airways has remained elusive. Here, we show that SPLUNC1 is a pH-sensitive regulator of ENaC and is unable to inhibit ENaC in the acidic CF airway environment. Alkalinization of CF airway cultures prevented CF ASL hyperabsorption, and this effect was abolished when SPLUNC1 was stably knocked down. Accordingly, we resolved the crystal structure of SPLUNC1 to 2.8 Å. Notably, this structure revealed two pH-sensitive salt bridges that, when removed, rendered SPLUNC1 pH-insensitive and able to regulate ASL volume in acidic ASL. Thus, we conclude that ENaC hyperactivity is secondary to reduced CF ASL pH. Together, these data provide molecular insights into the mucosal dehydration associated with a range of pulmonary diseases, including CF, and suggest that future therapy be directed toward alkalinizing the pH of CF airways. PMID:24043776

  10. IL-17RA Signaling in Airway Inflammation and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Willis, Cynthia R; Siegel, Lori; Leith, Anh; Mohn, Deanna; Escobar, Sabine; Wannberg, Sharon; Misura, Kira; Rickel, Erika; Rottman, James B; Comeau, Michael R; Sullivan, John K; Metz, Daniela P; Tocker, Joel; Budelsky, Alison L

    2015-12-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease characterized by airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) is a shared receptor subunit required for activity of IL-17 family cytokines, including IL-17A and IL-25. IL-17A and IL-25 induce different proinflammatory responses, and concentrations are elevated in subjects with asthma. However, the individual contributions of IL-17A and IL-25 to disease pathogenesis are unclear. We explored proinflammatory activities of the IL-17 pathway in models of pulmonary inflammation and assessed its effects on contractility of human bronchial airway smooth muscle. In two mouse models, IL-17RA, IL-17RB, or IL-25 blockade reduced airway inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. Individually, IL-17A and IL-25 enhanced contractility of human bronchial smooth muscle induced by methacholine or carbachol. IL-17A had more pronounced effects on methacholine-induced contractility in bronchial rings from donors with asthma compared with donors without asthma. Blocking the IL-17 pathway via IL-17RA may be a useful therapy for some patients with asthma by reducing pulmonary inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. PMID:25919006

  11. Engineering Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Soleas, John P.; Paz, Ana; Marcus, Paula; McGuigan, Alison; Waddell, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Airway epithelium is constantly presented with injurious signals, yet under healthy circumstances, the epithelium maintains its innate immune barrier and mucociliary elevator function. This suggests that airway epithelium has regenerative potential (I. R. Telford and C. F. Bridgman, 1990). In practice, however, airway regeneration is problematic because of slow turnover and dedifferentiation of epithelium thereby hindering regeneration and increasing time necessary for full maturation and function. Based on the anatomy and biology of the airway epithelium, a variety of tissue engineering tools available could be utilized to overcome the barriers currently seen in airway epithelial generation. This paper describes the structure, function, and repair mechanisms in native epithelium and highlights specific and manipulatable tissue engineering signals that could be of great use in the creation of artificial airway epithelium. PMID:22523471

  12. Airway management for cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Farag, Ehab

    2016-03-01

    Cervical spine surgery is one of the most commonly performed spine surgeries in the United States, and 90% of the cases are related to degenerative cervical spine disease (the rest to cervical spine trauma and/or instability). The airway management for cervical spine surgery represents a crucial step in the anesthetic management to avoid injury to the cervical cord. The crux for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery is maintaining the neck in a neutral position with minimal neck movement during endotracheal intubation. Therefore, the conventional direct laryngoscopy (DL) can be unsuitable for securing the upper airway in cervical spine surgery, especially in cases of cervical spine instability and myelopathy. This review discusses the most recent evidence-based facts of the main advantages and limitations of different techniques available for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery. PMID:27036600

  13. Regulation of Airway Mucin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Philip; Loukoianov, Artem; Wachi, Shinichiro; Wu, Reen

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are important components that exert a variety of functions in cell-cell interaction, epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, and airways protection. In the conducting airways of the lungs, mucins are the major contributor to the viscoelastic property of mucous secretion, which is the major barrier to trapping inhaled microbial organism, particulates, and oxidative pollutants. The homeostasis of mucin production is an important feature in conducting airways for the maintenance of mucociliary function. Aberrant mucin secretion and accumulation in airway lumen are clinical hallmarks associated with various lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer. Among 20 known mucin genes identified, 11 of them have been verified at either the mRNA and/or protein level in airways. The regulation of mucin genes is complicated, as are the mediators and signaling pathways. This review summarizes the current view on the mediators, the signaling pathways, and the transcriptional units that are involved in the regulation of airway mucin gene expression. In addition, we also point out essential features of epigenetic mechanisms for the regulation of these genes. PMID:17961085

  14. An overview of anthrax infection including the recently identified form of disease in injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Caitlin W.; Sweeney, Daniel A.; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Bacillus anthracis infection (anthrax) can be highly lethal. Two recent outbreaks related to contaminated mail in the USA and heroin in the UK and Europe and its potential as a bioterrorist weapon have greatly increased concerns over anthrax in the developed world. Methods This review summarizes the microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of anthrax. Results and conclusions Anthrax, a gram-positive bacterium, has typically been associated with three forms of infection: cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and inhalational. However, the anthrax outbreak among injection drug users has emphasized the importance of what is now considered a fourth disease form (i.e., injectional anthrax) that is characterized by severe soft tissue infection. While cutaneous anthrax is most common, its early stages are distinct and prompt appropriate treatment commonly produces a good outcome. However, early symptoms with the other three disease forms can be nonspecific and mistaken for less lethal conditions. As a result, patients with gastrointestinal, inhalational, or injectional anthrax may have advanced infection at presentation that can be highly lethal. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with gram stain and culture from blood or tissue followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR). While antibiotics are the mainstay of anthrax treatment, use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists are a consideration. Prompt surgical therapy appears to be important for successful management of injectional anthrax. PMID:22527064

  15. Lifestyle Interventions Including Nutrition, Exercise, and Supplements for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children.

    PubMed

    Africa, Jonathan A; Newton, Kimberly P; Schwimmer, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver disease among children. Lifestyle interventions, such as diet and exercise, are frequently recommended. Children with NAFLD have a distinct physiology that is different from obesity alone and has the potential to influence lifestyle treatments. Studies of diet alone in the treatment of pediatric NAFLD have focused on sugar and carbohydrate, but did not indicate any one dietary approach that was superior to another. For children who are obese and have NAFLD, weight loss may have a beneficial effect regardless of the diet used. Exercise is widely believed to improve NAFLD because a sedentary lifestyle, poor aerobic fitness, and low muscle mass are all risk factors for NAFLD. However, there have been no randomized controlled trials of exercise as a treatment for children with NAFLD. Studies of the combination of diet and exercise suggest a potential for improvement in serum alanine aminotransferase activity and/or magnetic resonance imaging liver fat fraction with intervention. There is also enthusiasm for the use of dietary supplements; however, studies in children have shown inconsistent effects of vitamin E, fish oil, and probiotics. This review presents the available data from studies of lifestyle intervention and dietary supplements published to date and highlights challenges that must be addressed in order to advance the evidence base for the treatment of pediatric NAFLD. PMID:27041377

  16. SMALL AIRWAYS FUNCTION RESPONSE IN SMOKERS AND PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE LUNG DISEASE FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous field and epidemiological studies have shown significant associations between particulate matter (PM) exposure and various morbidity outcomes including hospital admissions for bronchitis and asthma. These population based studies indicate that persons with chronic obstru...

  17. Inhaled Antibiotics for Lower Airway Infections

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Bradley S.; Goss, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled antibiotics have been used to treat chronic airway infections since the 1940s. The earliest experience with inhaled antibiotics involved aerosolizing antibiotics designed for parenteral administration. These formulations caused significant bronchial irritation due to added preservatives and nonphysiologic chemical composition. A major therapeutic advance took place in 1997, when tobramycin designed for inhalation was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Attracted by the clinical benefits observed in CF and the availability of dry powder antibiotic formulations, there has been a growing interest in the use of inhaled antibiotics in other lower respiratory tract infections, such as non-CF bronchiectasis, ventilator-associated pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mycobacterial disease, and in the post–lung transplant setting over the past decade. Antibiotics currently marketed for inhalation include nebulized and dry powder forms of tobramycin and colistin and nebulized aztreonam. Although both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency have approved their use in CF, they have not been approved in other disease areas due to lack of supportive clinical trial evidence. Injectable formulations of gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, ceftazidime, and amphotericin are currently nebulized “off-label” to manage non-CF bronchiectasis, drug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and post-transplant airway infections. Future inhaled antibiotic trials must focus on disease areas outside of CF with sample sizes large enough to evaluate clinically important endpoints such as exacerbations. Extrapolating from CF, the impact of eradicating organisms such as P. aeruginosa in non-CF bronchiectasis should also be evaluated. PMID:24673698

  18. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: pathophysiology and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-07-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Primary malformations include stenotic nares, elongated soft palate, and hypoplastic trachea, which cause an increase in negative pressure within the upper airways that can eventually lead to secondary abnormalities such as everted laryngeal saccules, everted tonsils, and laryngeal and tracheal collapse. Abnormal nasopharyngeal turbinates are also encountered, but have not been classified as primary or secondary. BAS is readily diagnosed, and quality of life is improved with appropriate medical and/or surgical management. PMID:22847322

  19. Dynamics of airway response in lung microsections: a tool for studying airway-extra cellular matrix interactions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Afzal

    2016-01-01

    The biological configuration of extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a key role in how mechanical interactions of the airway with its parenchymal attachments affect the dynamics of airway responses in different pulmonary disorders including asthma, emphysema and chronic bronchitis. It is now recognized that mechanical interactions between airway tissue and ECM play a key regulatory role on airway physiology and kinetics that can lead to the reorganization and remodeling of airway connective tissue. A connective tissue is composed of airway smooth muscle cells (ASM) and the ECM, which includes variety of glycoproteins and therefore the extent of interactions between ECM and ASM affects airway dynamics during exacerbations of major pulmonary disorders. Measurement of the velocity and magnitude of airway closure or opening provide important insights into the functions of the airway contractile apparatus and the interactions with its surrounding connective tissues. This review highlights suitability of lung microsection technique in studying measurements of airway dynamics (narrowing/opening) and associated structural distortions in airway compartments. PMID:27176036

  20. Muc5b is required for airway defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Michelle G.; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A.; McElwee, Melissa M.; Evans, Scott E.; Boerner, Ryan M.; Alexander, Samantha N.; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K.; Song, Alfred S.; Petrova, Youlia M.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S.; Bowden, M. Gabriela; Sisson, Joseph H.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Thornton, David J.; Rousseau, Karine; de La Garza, Maria M.; Moghaddam, Seyed J.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R.; Drouin, Scott M.; Davis, C. William; Terrell, Kristy A.; Grubb, Barbara R.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Flores, Sonia C.; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Donnelly, Jody M.; Watson, Alan M.; Hennessy, Corinne E.; Keith, Rebecca C.; Yang, Ivana V.; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.; Schwartz, David A.; Boucher, Richard C.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them through mucociliary clearance (MCC). However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that mouse Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in mouse lungs, whereas Muc5ac is dispensable. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and interleukin-23 (IL-23) production was reduced in Muc5b-/- mice. By contrast, in mice that transgenically overexpress Muc5b, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC.

  1. Muc5b Is Required for Airway Defense

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Michelle G.; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A.; McElwee, Melissa M.; Evans, Scott E.; Boerner, Ryan M.; Alexander, Samantha N.; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K.; Song, Alfred S.; Petrova, Youlia M.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S.; Gabriela Bowden, M.; Sisson, Joseph H.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Thornton, David J.; Rousseau, Karine; De la Garza, Maria M.; Moghaddam, Seyed J.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R.; Drouin, Scott M.; William Davis, C.; Terrell, Kristy A.; Grubb, Barbara R.; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Flores, Sonia C.; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Donnelly, Jody M.; Watson, Alan M.; Hennessy, Corinne E.; Keith, Rebecca C.; Yang, Ivana V.; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.; Schwartz, David A.; Boucher, Richard C.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them via mucociliary clearance (MCC)1,2. However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases1. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus1,3. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases4-6, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in the lungs. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally7. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and IL-23 production was reduced inMuc5b−/− mice. By contrast, in Muc5b transgenic (Tg) mice, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum1,8. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%9-11. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC. PMID:24317696

  2. Apolipoprotein E Sets the Stage: Response to Injury Triggers Neuropathology, Including Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.; Huang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and is associated with poor clinical outcome following traumatic brain injury and other neuropathological disorders. Protein instability and an isoform-specific apoE property called domain interaction are responsible for these neuropathological effects. ApoE4 is the most neurotoxic isoform and can induce neuropathology through various cellular pathways. Neuronal damage or stress induces apoE synthesis as part of the repair response; however, when apoE4 is expressed in neurons, its unique conformation makes it susceptible to proteolysis, resulting in the generation of neurotoxic fragments. These fragments cause pathological mitochondrial dysfunction and cytoskeletal alterations. Here, we review data supporting the hypothesis that apoE4 (> apoE3 > apoE2) has direct neurotoxic effects and highlight studies showing that blocking domain interaction reverses these detrimental effects. PMID:23217737

  3. Acute effects of different levels of continuous positive airway pressure on cardiac autonomic modulation in chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Michel S.; Sampaio, Luciana M.M.; Lacerda, Diego; De Oliveira, Luis V.F.; Pereira, Guilherme B.; Pantoni, Camila B.F.; Thommazo, Luciana Di; Catai, Aparecida M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive ventilation may improve autonomic modulation and ventilatory parameters in severely disabled patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the physiological influence of acute treatment with different levels of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the autonomic balance of heart and respiratory responses in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Materials and methods A COPD group (n = 10), CHF group (n = 8) and healthy subjects (n = 10) were evaluated. The participants were randomized to receive three different levels of CPAP on the same day: sham ventilation (Sham), 5 cmH20 (CPAP5) and 10 cmH20 (CPAP10) for 10 min. Respiratory rate, end tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate (HR), blood pressure and heart rate variability in the time and frequency domains were measured during spontaneous breathing and under the sham, CPAP5 and CPAP10 conditions. Results All groups experienced a reduction in ETCO2 values during treatment with CPAP (p < 0.05). CPAP increased SpO2 and HR in the COPD group (p < 0.05). The COPD group also had lower RMSSD values during treatment with different levels of CPAP when compared to the control group (p < 0.05). In the CHF group, CPAP5 and CPAP10 increased the SDNN value (p < 0.05). CPAP10 reduced the SDNN value in the COPD group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The findings suggest that CPAP may cause improvements in the neural control of heart rate in patients with stable COPD and CHF. For each patient, the “best CPAP level” should be defined as the best respiratory response and autonomic balance. PMID:22419931

  4. B Cell-Activating Transcription Factor Plays a Critical Role in the Pathogenesis of Anti-Major Histocompatibility Complex-Induced Obliterative Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Ramachandran, S; Gunasekaran, M; Nayak, D; Benshoff, N; Hachem, R; Gelman, A; Mohanakumar, T

    2016-04-01

    Antibodies (Abs) against major histocompatibility complex (MHC) results in T helper-17 (Th17)-mediated immunity against lung self-antigens (SAgs), K-α1 tubulin and collagen V and obliterative airway disease (OAD). Because B cell-activating transcription factor (BATF) controls Th17 and autoimmunity, we proposed that BATF may play a critical role in OAD. Anti-H2K(b) was administered intrabronchially into Batf (-/-) and C57BL/6 mice. Histopathology of the lungs on days 30 and 45 after Ab administration to Batf (-/-) mice resulted in decreased cellular infiltration, epithelial metaplasia, fibrosis, and obstruction. There was lack of Abs to SAgs, reduction of Sag-specific interleukin (IL)-17 T cells, IL-6, IL-23, IL-17, IL-1β, fibroblast growth factor-6, and CXCL12 and decreased Janus kinase 2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and retinoid-related orphan receptor γT. Further, micro-RNA (miR)-301a, a regulator of Th17, was reduced in Batf (-/-) mice in contrast to upregulation of miR-301a and downregulation of protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3) in anti-MHC-induced OAD animals. We also demonstrate an increase in miR-301a in the bronchoalveolar lavage cells from lung transplant recipients with Abs to human leukocyte antigen. This was accompanied by reduction in PIAS3 mRNA. Therefore, we conclude that BATF plays a critical role in the immune responses to SAgs and pathogenesis of anti-MHC-induced rejection. Targeting BATF should be considered for preventing chronic rejection after human lung transplantation. PMID:26844425

  5. Pneumococcal components induce regulatory T cells that attenuate the development of allergic airways disease by deviating and suppressing the immune response to allergen.

    PubMed

    Thorburn, Alison N; Brown, Alexandra C; Nair, Prema M; Chevalier, Nina; Foster, Paul S; Gibson, Peter G; Hansbro, Philip M

    2013-10-15

    The induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) to suppress aberrant inflammation and immunity has potential as a therapeutic strategy for asthma. Recently, we identified key immunoregulatory components of Streptococcus pneumoniae, type 3 polysaccharide and pneumolysoid (T+P), which suppress allergic airways disease (AAD) in mouse models of asthma. To elucidate the mechanisms of suppression, we have now performed a thorough examination of the role of Tregs. BALB/c mice were sensitized to OVA (day 0) i.p. and challenged intranasal (12-15 d later) to induce AAD. T+P was administered intratracheally at the time of sensitization in three doses (0, 12, and 24 h). T+P treatment induced an early (36 h-4 d) expansion of Tregs in the mediastinal lymph nodes, and later (12-16 d) increases in these cells in the lungs, compared with untreated allergic controls. Anti-CD25 treatment showed that Treg-priming events involving CD25, CCR7, IL-2, and TGF-β were required for the suppression of AAD. During AAD, T+P-induced Tregs in the lungs displayed a highly suppressive phenotype and had an increased functional capacity. T+P also blocked the induction of IL-6 to prevent the Th17 response, attenuated the expression of the costimulatory molecule CD86 on myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), and reduced the number of DCs carrying OVA in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Therefore, bacterial components (T+P) drive the differentiation of highly suppressive Tregs, which suppress the Th2 response, prevent the Th17 response and disable the DC response resulting in the effective suppression of AAD. PMID:24048894

  6. Urologists' Perceptions and Practice Patterns in Peyronie's Disease: A Korean Nationwide Survey Including Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Hwii; Moon, Ki Hak; Lee, Sung Won; Kim, Sae Woong; Yang, Dae Yul; Moon, Du Geon; Chung, Woo Sik; Oh, Kyung Jin; Hyun, Jae Seog; Ryu, Ji Kan; Park, Hyun Jun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A nationwide survey was conducted of Korean urologists to illustrate physicians' perceptions and real practical patterns regarding Peyronie disease (PD). Materials and Methods A specially designed questionnaire exploring practice characteristics and attitudes regarding PD, as well as patient satisfaction with each treatment modality, was e-mailed to 2,421 randomly selected urologists. Results Responses were received from 385 practicing urologists (15.9%) with a median time after certification as an urologist of 12 years. Regarding the natural course, 87% of respondents believed that PD is a progressive disease, and 82% replied that spontaneous healing in PD occurred in fewer than 20% of patients. Regarding diagnosis of PD, the methods used were, in order, history taking with physical examination (98%), International Index of Erectile Function questionnaires (40%), intracavernous injection and stimulation (35%), and duplex sonography (28%). Vitamin E was most preferred as an initial medical management (80.2%), followed by phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (27.4%) and Potaba (aminobenzoate potassium, 20.1%). For urologists who administered intralesional injection, the injected agent was, in order, corticosteroid (72.2%), verapamil (45.1%), and interferon (3.2%). The most frequently performed surgical procedure was plication (84.1%), followed by excision and graft (42.9%) and penile prosthesis implantation (14.2%). Among the most popular treatments in each modality, the urologists' perceptions regarding the suitability of treatment and patient satisfaction were significantly different, favoring plication surgery. Conclusions The practice pattern of urologists depicted in this survey is in line with currently available Western guidelines, which indicates the need for development of further local guidelines based on solid clinical data. PMID:24466399

  7. Airway anastomosis for lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Diso, Daniele; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Venuta, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LT) is the only viable option for a selected group of patients with end stage pulmonary diseases. During the recent years satisfactory results in terms of long-term survival and quality of life have been achieved with improvements in surgical technique, immunosuppression and perioperative management. Since the beginning, the airway anastomosis has been considered crucial and significant efforts have been made to understand the healing process. A number of experimental studies allowed improving the surgical technique by modifying the technique of suturing, the anastomotic protection and type and dose of immunosuppression, reducing the risk of airway complications. Furthermore, a huge progress has been made in the management of such complications. Early diagnosis of bronchial complications and their prompt and correct management are crucial to achieve long-term survival. PMID:26981271

  8. Variations of oral microbiota are associated with pancreatic diseases including pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, James J; Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Hui; Chia, David; Elashoff, David; Akin, David; Paster, Bruce J; Joshipura, Kaumudi; Wong, David T W

    2012-01-01

    Objective The associations between oral diseases and increased risk of pancreatic cancer have been reported in several prospective cohort studies. In this study, we measured variations of salivary microbiota and evaluated their potential associations with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. Methods This study was divided into three phases: (1) microbial profiling using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray to investigate salivary microbiota variation between 10 resectable patients with pancreatic cancer and 10 matched healthy controls, (2) identification and verification of bacterial candidates by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and (3) validation of bacterial candidates by qPCR on an independent cohort of 28 resectable pancreatic cancer, 28 matched healthy control and 27 chronic pancreatitis samples. Results Comprehensive comparison of the salivary microbiota between patients with pancreatic cancer and healthy control subjects revealed a significant variation of salivary microflora. Thirty-one bacterial species/clusters were increased in the saliva of patients with pancreatic cancer (n=10) in comparison to those of the healthy controls (n=10), whereas 25 bacterial species/clusters were decreased. Two out of six bacterial candidates (Neisseria elongata and Streptococcus mitis) were validated using the independent samples, showing significant variation (p<0.05, qPCR) between patients with pancreatic cancer and controls (n=56). Additionally, two bacteria (Granulicatella adiacens and S mitis) showed significant variation (p<0.05, qPCR) between chronic pancreatitis samples and controls (n=55). The combination of two bacterial biomarkers (N elongata and S mitis) yielded a receiver operating characteristic plot area under the curve value of 0.90 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.96, p<0.0001) with a 96.4% sensitivity and 82.1% specificity in distinguishing patients with pancreatic cancer from healthy subjects. Conclusions The authors observed associations between

  9. Noninvasive methods, including transient elastography, for the detection of liver disease in adults with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Matthew D; Crotty, Pam; Fatovich, Linda; Wilson, Stephanie; Rabin, Harvey R; Myers, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver disease is the third leading cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, detection of CF-associated liver disease (CFLD) is challenging. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of noninvasive methods for the detection of CFLD with a focus on transient elastography (TE). METHODS: Patients at the Adult CF Clinic of Calgary and Southern Alberta (n=127) underwent liver stiffness measurement (LSM) by TE using the FibroScan (FS, Ecosens, France) M probe; aspartate amino-transferase to platelet ratio index (APRI) and FibroTest (FT) scores were also calculated. The diagnostic performance of these tools for the detection of CFLD (defined as two or more the following criteria: abnormal liver biochemistry, hepatomegaly or sonographic abnormalities other than steatosis) were compared using the area under ROC curves. RESULTS: Forty-seven percent of the cohort was male. The median age was 27 years (interquartile range [IQR] 22 to 37 years) and body mass index 21 kg/m2 (IQR 19 kg/m2 to 23 kg/m2); 25% of patients were on ursodeoxycholic acid and 12% had undergone lung transplantation. The prevalence of CFLD was 14% (n=18). FS was successful in all patients; one (0.8%) patient had poorly reliable results (IQR/M >30% and LSM ≥7.1kPa). Compared with patients without CFLD (n=109), individuals with CFLD had higher median LSM according to FS (3.9 kPa [IQR 3.4 to 4.9 kPa] versus 6.4 kPa [IQR 4.4 to 8.0 kPa]), APRI (0.24 [IQR 0.17 to 0.31] versus 0.50 [IQR 0.22 to 1.18]) and FT scores (0.08 [IQR 0.05 to 1.5] versus 0.18 [IQR 0.11 to 0.35]; all P<0.05). Area under ROC curve for FS, APRI and FT for the detection of CFLD were 0.78 (95% CI 0.65 to 0.92), 0.72 (95% CI 0.56 to 0.87) and 0.76 (95% CI 0.62 to 0.90) (P not significant). At a threshold of >5.2 kPa, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of LSM according to FS for detecting CFLD were 67%, 83%, 40% and 94%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: FS, APRI and FT

  10. [Nasal BiPAP (bilevel positive airway pressure) respiration with controlled respiratory mode in neuromuscular diseases and severe kyphoscoliosis].

    PubMed

    Netzer, N; Werner, P; Korinthenberg, R; Matthys, H

    1995-03-01

    The BiPAP-System is a useful ventilatory support for patients with severe sleep apnea and need for high inspiratory pressure. Using the BiPAP as a full ventilatory support is new due to the recent addition of a timed control modus and individual control of inspiratory time. We used the new BiPAP ST-System in one young men with Duchenne-disease, one man with heredo ataxia (Friedreich), one women with spinal muscular atrophy, one man with central sleep apnea due to brainstem infarction as well as two women and one men with severe kyphoscoliosis. All patients had a significant hypoventilation and hypoxemia at night, which was documented by polysomnography. Mechanical ventilation at night with nasal BiPAP increased the baseline oxygen saturation (SaO2) by an average of 11.9% in all seven patients. The frequency of desaturations below 90% diminished by an average of 81%. The lowest SaO2 measured increased by 28% in all seven patients combined. Rhinitis due to the dryness of the inspired air were noticed in only two patients. Two other patients needed adaptation to the customized mask. The nasal BiPAP-System using the T-mode is a useful device to support ventilation at night and thus it could replace ventilatory support by the IPPV-mode in many patients. PMID:7617604

  11. Rare Upper Airway Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Alanna; Clemmens, Clarice; Jacobs, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    A broad spectrum of congenital upper airway anomalies can occur as a result of errors during embryologic development. In this review, we will describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management strategies for a few select, rare congenital malformations of this system. The diagnostic tools used in workup of these disorders range from prenatal tests to radiological imaging, swallowing evaluations, indirect or direct laryngoscopy, and rigid bronchoscopy. While these congenital defects can occur in isolation, they are often associated with disorders of other organ systems or may present as part of a syndrome. Therefore workup and treatment planning for patients with these disorders often involves a team of multiple specialists, including paediatricians, otolaryngologists, pulmonologists, speech pathologists, gastroenterologists, and geneticists. PMID:26277452

  12. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  13. Rigid bronchoscopy and silicone stents in the management of central airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yarmus, Lonny

    2015-01-01

    The field of interventional pulmonology has grown significantly over the past several decades now including the diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of complex airway disease. Rigid bronchoscopy is an invaluable tool in the diagnosis and management of several malignant and non-malignant causes of central airway obstruction (CAO) and has become integral after the inception of airway stenting. The management of CAO can be a complicated endeavor with significant risks making the understanding of basic rigid bronchoscopy techniques, ablative technologies, anesthetic care and stenting of utmost importance in the care of these complex patients. This review article will focus on the history of rigid bronchoscopy, the technical aspects of performing a rigid bronchoscopy as well as the use of silicone stents their indications, complications and placement techniques. PMID:26807283

  14. House dust mite allergen induces asthma via TLR4 triggering of airway structural cells

    PubMed Central

    HAMMAD, Hamida; CHIEPPA, Marcello; PERROS, Frederic; WILLART, Monique A.; GERMAIN, Ronald N.; LAMBRECHT, Bart N.

    2009-01-01

    Barrier epithelial cells and airway dendritic cells (DC) make up the first line of defence against inhaled substances like house dust mite (HDM) allergen and endotoxin. We hypothesized that these cells need to communicate to cause allergic disease. Using irradiated chimeric mice, we demonstrate that TLR4 expression on radioresistant lung structural cells is required and sufficient for DC activation in the lung and for priming of effector T helper responses to HDM. TLR4 triggering on structural cells caused production of the innate proallergic cytokines thymic stromal lymphopoietin, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, interleukin-25 and IL-33. The absence of TLR4 on structural cells, but not on hematopoietic cells, abolished HDM driven allergic airway inflammation. Finally, inhalation of a TLR4 antagonist to target exposed epithelial cells suppressed the salient features of asthma including bronchial hyperreactivity. Our data identify an innate immune function of airway epithelial cells that drives allergic inflammation via activation of mucosal DCs. PMID:19330007

  15. Should spinocerebellar ataxias be included in the differential diagnosis for Huntington's diseases-like syndromes?

    PubMed

    Pedroso, José Luiz; de Freitas, Maria Eliza Thomaz; Albuquerque, Marcus Vinicius Cristino; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Jardim, Laura Bannach; Barsottini, Orlando G P

    2014-12-15

    In this article, we describe three patients with different spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) subtypes presenting with unusual movement disorders predominantly characterized by choreoathetosis, which, together with their autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, resembled the Huntington-like syndromes. From a large SCA cohort, we have observed chorea in 1/35 SCA2, 1/112 SCA3/MJD, and 1/30 SCA7 patients. Twenty-eight patients with SCA1, 11 patients with SCA6, and 3 patients with SCA10 were also evaluated, and none of them presented chorea. We provide a brief report of the three cases, with a video demonstrating chorea. Although a debate regarding the frequency of chorea in SCA patients is a fact, its occurrence, together with the autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance, clearly imposes SCA in the differentials of Huntington-like syndromes. There is some debate about what to include in a list of Huntington-like disorders, with several review articles about Huntington-like syndromes not including SCA in the differential diagnosis, except for SCA17. We believe that SCAs-at least SCA1, SCA2, SCA3/MJD, SCA7 and DRPLA-should be thought in the diagnostic workout of at least the atypical cases, such as those presented in this report. PMID:25456461

  16. Brachycephalic airway syndrome: management.

    PubMed

    Lodato, Dena L; Hedlund, Cheryl S

    2012-08-01

    Brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) is a group of primary and secondary abnormalities that result in upper airway obstruction. Several of these abnormalities can be addressed medically and/or surgically to improve quality of life. This article reviews potential complications, anesthetic considerations, recovery strategies, and outcomes associated with medical and surgical management of BAS. PMID:22935992

  17. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Philippe A; Fetita, Catalin I; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5-10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively. PMID:26981458

  18. Acid-sensing by airway afferent nerves

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Gu, Qihai; Xu, Fadi; Hong, Ju-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation of acid aerosol or aspiration of acid solution evokes a stimulatory effect on airway C-fiber and Aδ afferents, which in turn causes airway irritation and triggers an array of defense reflex responses (e.g., cough, reflex bronchoconstriction, etc.). Tissue acidosis can also occur locally in the respiratory tract as a result of ischemia or inflammation, such as in the airways of asthmatic patients during exacerbation. The action of proton on the airway sensory neurons is generated by activation of two different current species: a transient (rapidly activating and inactivating) current mediated through the acid-sensing ion channels, and a slowly activating and sustained current mediated through the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In view of the recent findings that the expression and/or sensitivity of TRPV1 are up-regulated in the airway sensory nerves during chronic inflammatory reaction, the proton-evoked irritant effects on these nerves may play an important part in the manifestation of various symptoms associated with airway inflammatory diseases. PMID:23524016

  19. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  20. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  1. Bronchial hyperreactivity is correlated with increased baseline airway tone.

    PubMed

    Bergner, A; Kellner, J; Kemp da Silva, A; Fischer, R; Gamarra, F; Huber, R M

    2006-02-21

    Physiologically, airways are not completely relaxed but maintain a baseline airway tone (BAT). Although not fulfilling the criteria for obstructive airway disease, increased BAT may nevertheless be important because the same amount of airway narrowing can be well tolerated or can cause severe airway obstruction depending on the starting point of the narrowing. In this study, we aimed at studying if BAT is correlated with bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). For in vitro studies, airways in murine lung slices were digitally recorded and the change in cross-sectional area with time was quantified. BAT was measured by the amount of relaxation induced by permeabilization of the cell membrane with beta-escin in zero external calcium. BHR was induced by incubation of lung slices with interleukin-13 (IL-13). T-bet knock-out mice served as an additional model for BHR. T-bet knock-out mice show a shift towards TH2-lymphocytes and display histological as well as functional characteristics of asthma. In vivo, the specific airway resistance of healthy non-smoking volunteers was assessed before and after inhalation of formoterol and bronchial challenge was performed using methacholin. In murine lung slices that had been cultivated without serum, only a minimal BAT could be observed. But, after cultivation with 10 % new born calve serum, airways showed a BAT of approximately 13 % that could be reduced by incubation with an IL-13 receptor antagonist. Atropine, isoproterenol and indomethacin failed to relax airways regardless of cultivation with serum. Incubation of lung slices without serum but with IL-13 increased BAT as well as airway responsiveness to acetylcholine and both effects were more pronounced in small compared to large airways. In lung slices from T-bet knock-out mice, airways were hyperreactive compared to airways in slices from wild type mice and BAT was found to be increased. Again, both effects were more pronounced in small compared to large airways. In human non

  2. Basal nucleotide levels, release, and metabolism in normal and cystic fibrosis airways.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, S. H.; Lazarowski, E. R.; Picher, M.; Knowles, M. R.; Stutts, M. J.; Boucher, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a syndrome caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. Despite advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CF, the link between CFTR gene mutations and the pathogenesis of CF lung disease remains poorly defined. CFTR has been assigned a number of putative functions that may contribute to innate airway defense, including the regulation of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) release into the extracellular environment. Because extracellular ATP and uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) may regulate airway mucociliary clearance via interaction with luminal P2Y2 receptors, the loss of CFTR-mediated nucleotide release could explain the defect in CF airway defense. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We tested the physiologic importance of CFTR-mediated nucleotide release in vivo by directly measuring levels of ATP and UTP in nasal airway surface liquid from normal and CF subjects. Because these basal nucleotide levels reflect the net activities of nucleotide release and metabolic pathways, we also measured constitutive rates of nucleotide release and metabolism on well-differentiated normal and CF airway cultures in vitro. The measurement of ATP release rates were paralleled by in vivo studies employing continuous nasal perfusion in normal and CF subjects. Finally, the regulation of ATP release by isoproterenol and methacholine-stimulated submucosal gland secretion was tested. RESULTS: These studies revealed that steady-state ATP and UTP levels were similar in normal (470 +/- 131 nM and 37 +/- 7 nM, respectively) and CF (911 +/- 199 nM and 33 +/- 12 nM, respectively) subjects. The rates of both ATP release and metabolism were also similar in normal and CF airway epithelia both in vitro and in vivo. Airway submucosal glands did not secrete nucleotides, but rather, secreted a soluble nucleotidase in response to cholinergic stimuli. CONCLUSION: The concentration of ATP in airway surface liquid is in a range

  3. Changes in human ecology and behavior in relation to the emergence of diarrheal diseases, including cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, M M; Levine, O S

    1994-01-01

    Human populations throughout the world can be found in diverse conditions. A proportion of the population of developing countries lives in deprived conditions characterized by ramshackle housing, lack of piped water and sanitation, and widespread fecal contamination of the environment. Enteric infections, particularly due to bacterial pathogenes, are readily transmitted under these circumstances. In contrast, the majority of inhabitants of industrialized countries live in a sanitary environment that generally discourages the transmission of enteric pathogenes, particularly bacteria. In both these ecologic niches, changes in human ecology and behavior are leading to the emergence of certain enteric infections. Relevant factors in developing areas include urbanization (leading to periurban slums), diminished breastfeeding, and political upheaval that results in population migrations. In industrialized areas, large-scale food production (e.g., enormous poultry farms), distribution, and retailing (e.g., fast-food chains) create opportunities where widespread and extensive outbreaks of food-borne enteric infection can ensue if a breakdown in food hygiene occurs. PMID:8146128

  4. CD38 and Airway hyperresponsiveness: Studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Alonso GP; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g. TNF-α) that requires activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-ƙB and AP-1 and post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3’ Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in CD38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of CD38 deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared to wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38 deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and/or activity are warranted. PMID:25594684

  5. Nrf2 protects against airway disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hye-Youn; Kleeberger, Steven R.

    2010-04-01

    Nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a ubiquitous master transcription factor that regulates antioxidant response elements (AREs)-mediated expression of antioxidant enzyme and cytoprotective proteins. In the unstressed condition, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) suppresses cellular Nrf2 in cytoplasm and drives its proteasomal degradation. Nrf2 can be activated by diverse stimuli including oxidants, pro-oxidants, antioxidants, and chemopreventive agents. Nrf2 induces cellular rescue pathways against oxidative injury, abnormal inflammatory and immune responses, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. Application of Nrf2 germ-line mutant mice has identified an extensive range of protective roles for Nrf2 in experimental models of human disorders in the liver, gastrointestinal tract, airway, kidney, brain, circulation, and immune or nerve system. In the lung, lack of Nrf2 exacerbated toxicity caused by multiple oxidative insults including supplemental respiratory therapy (e.g., hyperoxia, mechanical ventilation), cigarette smoke, allergen, virus, bacterial endotoxin and other inflammatory agents (e.g., carrageenin), environmental pollution (e.g., particles), and a fibrotic agent bleomycin. Microarray analyses and bioinformatic studies elucidated functional AREs and Nrf2-directed genes that are critical components of signaling mechanisms in pulmonary protection by Nrf2. Association of loss of function with promoter polymorphisms in NRF2 or somatic and epigenetic mutations in KEAP1 and NRF2 has been found in cohorts of patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome or lung cancer, which further supports the role for NRF2 in these lung diseases. In the current review, we address the role of Nrf2 in airways based on emerging evidence from experimental oxidative disease models and human studies.

  6. Generation of ESC-derived Mouse Airway Epithelial Cells Using Decellularized Lung Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Shojaie, Sharareh; Lee, Joyce; Wang, Jinxia; Ackerley, Cameron; Post, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Lung lineage differentiation requires integration of complex environmental cues that include growth factor signaling, cell-cell interactions and cell-matrix interactions. Due to this complexity, recapitulation of lung development in vitro to promote differentiation of stem cells to lung epithelial cells has been challenging. In this protocol, decellularized lung scaffolds are used to mimic the 3-dimensional environment of the lung and generate stem cell-derived airway epithelial cells. Mouse embryonic stem cell are first differentiated to the endoderm lineage using an embryoid body (EB) culture method with activin A. Endoderm cells are then seeded onto decellularized scaffolds and cultured at air-liquid interface for up to 21 days. This technique promotes differentiation of seeded cells to functional airway epithelial cells (ciliated cells, club cells, and basal cells) without additional growth factor supplementation. This culture setup is defined, serum-free, inexpensive, and reproducible. Although there is limited contamination from non-lung endoderm lineages in culture, this protocol only generates airway epithelial populations and does not give rise to alveolar epithelial cells. Airway epithelia generated with this protocol can be used to study cell-matrix interactions during lung organogenesis and for disease modeling or drug-discovery platforms of airway-related pathologies such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:27214388

  7. The active contribution of Toll-like receptors to allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keqiang; Xiang, Yi; Yao, Xiaohong; Liu, Ying; Gong, Wanghua; Yoshimura, Teizo; Wang, Ji Ming

    2011-10-01

    Epithelia lining the respiratory tract represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms and allergens and are equipped with innate and adaptive immune signaling receptors for host protection. These include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize microbial components and evoke diverse responses in cells of the respiratory system. TLR stimulation by microorganism-derived molecules activates antigen presenting cells, control T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 immune cell differentiation, cytokine production by mast cells, and activation of eosinophils. It is clear that TLR are involved in the pathophysiology of allergic airway diseases such as asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs), a kind of antigen presenting cells, which play a key role in the induction of allergic airway inflammation, are privileged targets for pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). During the allergic responses, engagement of TLRs on DCs determines the Th2 polarization of the T cells. TLR signaling in mast cells increases the release of IL-5, and TLR activation of airway epithelial cells forces the generation of proallergic Th2 type of cytokines. Although these responses aim to protect the host, they may also result in inflammatory tissue damage in the airway. Under certain conditions, stimulation of TLRs, in particular, TLR9, may reduce Th2-dependent allergic inflammation by induction of Th1 responses. Therefore, understanding the complex regulatory roles of TLRs in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation should facilitate the development of preventive and therapeutic measures for asthmatic patients. PMID:21624504

  8. Autophagy plays an essential role in cigarette smoke-induced expression of MUC5AC in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie-Sen; Zhao, Yun; Zhou, Hong-Bin; Wang, Yong; Wu, Yin-Fang; Li, Zhou-Yang; Xuan, Nan-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Hua, Wen; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao; Chen, Zhi-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a common pathological feature of chronic airway inflammatory diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the molecular basis for this condition remains incompletely understood. We have previously demonstrated a critical role of autophagy in COPD pathogenesis through mediating apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the function of autophagy as well as its upstream and downstream signals in cigarette smoke-induced mucus production in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and in mouse airways. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE), as well as the classical autophagy inducers starvation or Torin-1, significantly triggered MUC5AC expression, and inhibition of autophagy markedly attenuated CSE-induced mucus production. The CSE-induced autophagy was mediated by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mitoROS), which regulated mucin expression through the JNK and activator protein-1 pathway. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was also required for CSE-induced MUC5AC in HBE cells, but it exerted inconsiderable effects on the autophagy-JNK signaling cascade. Airways of mice with dysfunctional autophagy-related genes displayed a markedly reduced number of goblet cells and attenuated levels of Muc5ac in response to cigarette smoke exposure. These results altogether suggest that mitoROS-dependent autophagy is essential for cigarette smoke-induced mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelial cells, and reemphasize autophagy inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic airway diseases. PMID:27036871

  9. FLLL31, a derivative of curcumin, attenuates airway inflammation in a multi-allergen challenged mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaopeng; Cao, Shuhua; Jiang, Rentao; Liu, Renping; Bai, Jinye; Hou, Qi

    2014-07-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 3 (STAT3), one of the major regulators of inflammation, plays multiple roles in cellular transcription, differentiation, proliferation, and survival in human diseases. Dysregulation of STAT3 is related to the severe airway inflammation associated with asthma. FLLL31 is a newly developed compound based on the herbal medicine curcumin, which specifically suppresses the activation of STAT3. However, the function of FLLL31 on inflammatory diseases, especially on the regulation of airway inflammation, has not been fully studied. In our prior investigations, we developed a mouse model that was challenged with a mixture of DRA allergens (including house dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillums species) to mimic the severe airway inflammation observed in human patients. In this study, we performed a series of experiments on the inflammatory regulation activities of FLLL31 in both in vitro cultured cells and our in vivo DRA-challenged mouse model. Our results show that FLLL31 exhibits anti-inflammatory effects on macrophage activation, lymphocyte differentiation, and pro-inflammatory factor production. Importantly, FLLL31 significantly inhibited airway inflammation and recruitment of inflammatory cells in the DRA-challenged mouse model. Based on these results, we conclude that FLLL31 is a potential therapeutic agent that can be used against severe airway inflammation diseases. PMID:24819716

  10. Differential cellular responses in healthy mice and in mice with established airway inflammation when exposed to hematite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Åsa; Bergström, Ulrika; Ågren, Lina; Österlund, Lars; Sandström, Thomas; Bucht, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory and immunological responses in airways and lung-draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), following lung exposure to iron oxide (hematite) nanoparticles (NPs). The responses to the hematite NPs were evaluated in both healthy non-sensitized mice, and in sensitized mice with an established allergic airway disease. The mice were exposed intratracheally to either hematite NPs or to vehicle (PBS) and the cellular responses were evaluated on days 1, 2, and 7, post-exposure. Exposure to hematite NPs increased the numbers of neutrophils, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the airways of non-sensitized mice on days 1 and 2 post-exposure; at these time points the number of lymphocytes was also elevated in the LDLNs. In contrast, exposing sensitized mice to hematite NPs induced a rapid and unspecific cellular reduction in the alveolar space on day 1 post-exposure; a similar decrease of lymphocytes was also observed in the LDLN. The results indicate that cells in the airways and in the LDLN of individuals with established airway inflammation undergo cell death when exposed to hematite NPs. A possible explanation for this toxic response is the extensive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pro-oxidative environment of inflamed airways. This study demonstrates how sensitized and non-sensitized mice respond differently to hematite NP exposure, and it highlights the importance of including individuals with respiratory disorders when evaluating health effects of inhaled nanomaterials. PMID:26163175

  11. Prognosis and Risk Factors for Congenital Airway Anomalies in Children with Congenital Heart Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Sheng; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Tsao, Pei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background The mortality risk associated with congenital airway anomalies (CAA) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with CAA, and the associated mortality risk, among children with CHD. Methods This nationwide, population-based study evaluated 39,652 children with CHD aged 0–5 years between 2000 and 2011, using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). We performed descriptive, logistic regression, Kaplan–Meier, and Cox regression analyses of the data. Results Among the children with CHD, 1,591 (4.0%) had concomitant CAA. Children with CHD had an increased likelihood of CAA if they were boys (odds ratio [OR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33–1.64), infants (OR, 5.42; 95%CI, 4.06–7.24), or had a congenital musculoskeletal anomaly (OR, 3.19; 95%CI, 2.67–3.81), and were typically identified 0–3 years after CHD diagnosis (OR, 1.33; 95%CI 1.17–1.51). The mortality risk was increased in children with CHD and CAA (crude hazard ratio [HR], 2.05; 95%CI, 1.77–2.37), even after adjusting for confounders (adjusted HR, 1.76; 95%CI, 1.51–2.04). Mortality risk also changed by age and sex (adjusted HR and 95%CI are quoted): neonates, infants, and toddlers and preschool children, 1.67 (1.40–2.00), 1.93 (1.47–2.55), and 4.77 (1.39–16.44), respectively; and boys and girls, 1.62 (1.32–1.98) and 2.01 (1.61–2.50), respectively. Conclusion The mortality risk is significantly increased among children with CHD and comorbid CAA. Clinicians should actively seek CAA during the follow-up of children with CHD. PMID:26334302

  12. Techniques of assessing small airways dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, William; Usmani, Omar S.

    2014-01-01

    The small airways are defined as those less than 2 mm in diameter. They are a major site of pathology in many lung diseases, not least chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The small airways are frequently involved early in the course of these diseases, with significant pathology demonstrable often before the onset of symptoms or changes in spirometry and imaging. Despite their importance, they have proven relatively difficult to study. This is in part due to their relative inaccessibility to biopsy and their small size which makes their imaging difficult. Traditional lung function tests may only become abnormal once there is a significant burden of disease within them. This has led to the term ‘the quiet zone’ of the lung. In recent years, more specialised tests have been developed which may detect these changes earlier, perhaps offering the possibility of earlier diagnosis and intervention. These tests are now moving from the realms of clinical research laboratories into routine clinical practice and are increasingly useful in the diagnosis and monitoring of respiratory diseases. This article gives an overview of small airways physiology and some of the routine and more advanced tests of airway function. PMID:26557240

  13. Airway dysfunction in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Bougault, Valérie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Elite competitive swimmers are particularly affected by airway disorders that are probably related to regular and intense training sessions in a chlorinated environment. Upper and lower airway respiratory symptoms, rhinitis, airway hyper-responsiveness, and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction are highly prevalent in these athletes, but their influence on athletic performance is still unclear. The authors reviewed the main upper and lower respiratory ailments observed in competitive swimmers who train in indoor swimming pools, their pathophysiology, clinical significance and possible effects on performance. Issues regarding the screening of these disorders, their management and preventive measures are addressed. PMID:22247299

  14. Meteorological conditions along airways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W R

    1927-01-01

    This report is an attempt to show the kind of meteorological information that is needed, and is in part available, for the purpose of determining operating conditions along airways. In general, the same factors affect these operating conditions along all airways though in varying degree, depending upon their topographic, geographic, and other characteristics; but in order to bring out as clearly as possible the nature of the data available, a specific example is taken, that of the Chicago-Dallas airway on which regular flying begins this year (1926).

  15. Fatty acid binding protein 4 regulates VEGF-induced airway angiogenesis and inflammation in a transgenic mouse model: implications for asthma.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Yu, Chen-Wei; Elmasri, Harun; Terwelp, Matthew; Lee, Chun G; Bhandari, Vineet; Comhair, Suzy A; Erzurum, Serpil C; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Elias, Jack A; Cataltepe, Sule

    2013-04-01

    Neovascularization of the airways occurs in several inflammatory lung diseases, including asthma. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in vascular remodeling in the asthmatic airways. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 or aP2) is an intracellular lipid chaperone that is induced by VEGF in endothelial cells. FABP4 exhibits a proangiogenic function in vitro, but whether it plays a role in modulation of angiogenesis in vivo is not known. We hypothesized that FABP4 promotes VEGF-induced airway angiogenesis and investigated this hypothesis with the use of a transgenic mouse model with inducible overexpression of VEGF165 under a CC10 promoter [VEGF-TG (transgenic) mice]. We found a significant increase in FABP4 mRNA levels and density of FABP4-expressing vascular endothelial cells in mouse airways with VEGF overexpression. FABP4(-/-) mouse airways showed a significant decrease in neovessel formation and endothelial cell proliferation in response to VEGF overexpression. These alterations in airway vasculature were accompanied by attenuated expression of proinflammatory mediators. Furthermore, VEGF-TG/FABP4(-/-) mice showed markedly decreased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a well-known mediator of VEGF-induced responses, compared with VEGF-TG mice. Finally, the density of FABP4-immunoreactive vessels in endobronchial biopsy specimens was significantly higher in patients with asthma than in control subjects. Taken together, these data unravel FABP4 as a potential target of pathologic airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:23391391

  16. Cigarette smoke inhalation and the acute airway response.

    PubMed Central

    Higenbottam, T; Feyeraband, C; Clark, T J

    1980-01-01

    The acute airway response to smoking varying numbers (one to four) of identical cigarettes in rapid succession and smoking single cigarettes of differing tar/nicotine yields was assessed repeatedly in 13 healthy smokers. The airway response was variable, indicating airway narrowing consistently in only three subjects. There appeared no difference between forced spirometry and measurement of airway resistance in detecting the airway response. No relationship was observed between the airway response and amount of smoke inhaled into the lungs as measured either by changes in venous blood nicotine or percentage carboxyhaemoglobin. When five smokers inhaled smoke directly from a cigarette acute airway narrowing was consistently observed. A normal smoking pattern consisting of an initial drag of smoke into the mouth, followed after a pause by inhalation of smoke diluted with air, did not consistently cause airway narrowing although similar amounts of smoke as the direct drag were inhaled as assessed by changes in venous blood nicotine. The manner of smoke inhalation affects the relative concentrations of the different constituents of smoke reaching the lungs and also appears to be the main determinant of the acute airway response to smoking, which was unrelated to the number of cigarettes smoked or the tar content of the smoke. This suggests that patterns of smoke inhalation may influence the pathogenesis of bronchial disease associated with smoking. PMID:7434266

  17. Basolateral chloride current in human airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Itani, Omar A; Lamb, Fred S; Melvin, James E; Welsh, Michael J

    2007-10-01

    Electrolyte transport by airway epithelia regulates the quantity and composition of liquid covering the airways. Previous data indicate that airway epithelia can absorb NaCl. At the apical membrane, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) provides a pathway for Cl(-) absorption. However, the pathways for basolateral Cl(-) exit are not well understood. Earlier studies, predominantly in cell lines, have reported that the basolateral membrane contains a Cl(-) conductance. However, the properties have varied substantially in different epithelia. To better understand the basolateral Cl(-) conductance in airway epithelia, we studied primary cultures of well-differentiated human airway epithelia. The basolateral membrane contained a Cl(-) current that was inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS). The current-voltage relationship was nearly linear, and the halide selectivity was Cl(-) > Br(-) > I(-). Several signaling pathways increased the current, including elevation of cellular levels of cAMP, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), and reduction of pH. In contrast, increasing cell Ca(2+) and inducing cell swelling had no effect. The basolateral Cl(-) current was present in both cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF airway epithelia. Likewise, airway epithelia from wild-type mice and mice with disrupted genes for ClC-2 or ClC-3 all showed similar Cl(-) currents. These data suggest that the basolateral membrane of airway epithelia possesses a Cl(-) conductance that is not due to CFTR, ClC-2, or ClC-3. Its regulation by cAMP and PKC signaling pathways suggests that coordinated regulation of Cl(-) conductance in both apical and basolateral membranes may be important in controlling transepithelial Cl(-) movement. PMID:17660331

  18. Exercise-induced airways constriction 1

    PubMed Central

    Simonsson, Bo G.; Skoogh, B-E.; Ekström-Jodal, B.

    1972-01-01

    Airway conductance was measured in a body plethysmograph at different lung volumes before and after graded exercise. In 14 out of 19 patients, mostly asthmatics, airway conductance fell significantly after exercise. These subjects also showed other signs of an increased bronchial reactivity to different stimuli, including forced breathing, hyperventilation, and cold air, but they had no exogenous allergy. The exercise-induced bronchoconstriction could be blocked by atropine in six of the nine patients tested. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in patients with clinical and physiological evidence of increased airway reactivity thus seems to be primarily mediated via a vagal reflex, probably from hyperresponsive airway mechanoreceptors reacting to increased ventilatory flow or lung distension. No relation was found between PaCO2 or pH and the severity of airways constriction. Cromoglycic acid failed to block the exercise reaction in five of the six hyperreactive patients tested. In addition to or following the vagal reflex a disturbed relation between beta and alpha receptors in bronchial muscles or a release of humoral spasmogens may contribute to the progression of post-exercise airways constriction. PMID:4624586

  19. The Role of the Extracellular Matrix Protein Mindin in Airway Response to Environmental Airways Injury

    PubMed Central

    Frush, Sarah; Li, Zhuowei; Potts, Erin N.; Du, Wanglei; Eu, Jerry P.; Garantziotis, Stavros; He, You-Wen; Foster, W. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background: Our previous work demonstrated that the extracellular matrix protein mindin contributes to allergic airways disease. However, the role of mindin in nonallergic airways disease has not previously been explored. Objectives: We hypothesized that mindin would contribute to airways disease after inhalation of either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or ozone. Methods: We exposed C57BL/6J and mindin-deficient (–/–) mice to aerosolized LPS (0.9 μg/m3 for 2.5 hr), saline, ozone (1 ppm for 3 hr), or filtered air (FA). All mice were evaluated 4 hr after LPS/saline 
exposure or 24 hr after ozone/FA exposure. We characterized the physiological and biological responses by analysis of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) with a computer-controlled small-animal ventilator (FlexiVent), inflammatory cellular recruitment, total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), proinflammatory cytokine profiling, and ex vivo bronchial ring studies. Results: After inhalation of LPS, mindin–/– mice demonstrated significantly reduced total cell and neutrophil recruitment into the airspace compared with their wild-type counterparts. Mindin–/– mice also exhibited reduced proinflammatory cytokine production and lower AHR to methacholine challenge by FlexiVent. After inhalation of ozone, mice had no detectible differences in cellular inflammation or total BALF protein dependent on mindin. However, mindin–/– mice were protected from increased proinflammatory cytokine production and AHR compared with their C57BL/6J counterparts. After ozone exposure, bronchial rings derived from mindin–/– mice demonstrated reduced constriction in response to carbachol. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that the extracellular matrix protein mindin modifies the airway response to both LPS and ozone. Our data support a conserved role of mindin in production of proinflammatory cytokines and the development of AHR in two divergent models of reactive airways disease, as well as a role of

  20. Reproducibility of airway wall thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Krass, Stefan; Owsijewitsch, Michael; de Hoop, Bartjan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2010-03-01

    Airway remodeling and accompanying changes in wall thickness are known to be a major symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), associated with reduced lung function in diseased individuals. Further investigation of this disease as well as monitoring of disease progression and treatment effect demand for accurate and reproducible assessment of airway wall thickness in CT datasets. With wall thicknesses in the sub-millimeter range, this task remains challenging even with today's high resolution CT datasets. To provide accurate measurements, taking partial volume effects into account is mandatory. The Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum (FWHM) method has been shown to be inappropriate for small airways1,2 and several improved algorithms for objective quantification of airway wall thickness have been proposed.1-8 In this paper, we describe an algorithm based on a closed form solution proposed by Weinheimer et al.7 We locally estimate the lung density parameter required for the closed form solution to account for possible variations of parenchyma density between different lung regions, inspiration states and contrast agent concentrations. The general accuracy of the algorithm is evaluated using basic tubular software and hardware phantoms. Furthermore, we present results on the reproducibility of the algorithm with respect to clinical CT scans, varying reconstruction kernels, and repeated acquisitions, which is crucial for longitudinal observations.

  1. T-bet is induced by interferon-γ to mediate chemokine secretion and migration in human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An inappropriate balance between T-helper (Th)1 and Th2 cytokine production underlies inflammatory changes that result in airway disease. Expression of the T-box transcription factor T-bet regulates differentiation of Th cells and production of Th1 cytokines, particularly IFNγ. T-bet-deficient mice develop airway hyperreactivity, undergo airway remodeling, and exhibit defects in IFNγ production while overproducing Th2 cytokines. T-bet is also reduced in the airways of asthmatic patients, suggesting loss of T-bet expression or activity promotes development of inflammatory airway disease. We present novel data demonstrating T-bet expression is induced in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) by IFNγ. This IFNγ-stimulated expression of T-bet is dependent on signaling through JAK2 and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) and activates T-bet-dependent DNA binding activity. Expression of T-bet stimulates IFNγ-stimulated IFNγ expression, secretion, and promoter activity, while inhibiting IFNγ-stimulated release of chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2, regulated on activation normal T-expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5, and eotaxin/CCL11. This is accompanied by changes in expression of the chemokine receptors CCR3 and IL12Rβ2 and TNFα. T-bet expression also reduces chemotactic migration of ASMC in response to serum and PDGF, which contributes to airway hyperplasia. These results are the first to identify T-bet expression and activity in a structural cell of the lung and may provide new insights into therapeutic targets for inflammatory airway disease. PMID:21239533

  2. EGF shifts human airway basal cell fate toward a smoking-associated airway epithelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Shaykhiev, Renat; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Chao, Ionwa; Fukui, Tomoya; Witover, Bradley; Brekman, Angelika; Crystal, Ronald G

    2013-07-16

    The airway epithelium of smokers acquires pathological phenotypes, including basal cell (BC) and/or goblet cell hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia, structural and functional abnormalities of ciliated cells, decreased number of secretoglobin (SCGB1A1)-expressing secretory cells, and a disordered junctional barrier. In this study, we hypothesized that smoking alters airway epithelial structure through modification of BC function via an EGF receptor (EGFR)-mediated mechanism. Analysis of the airway epithelium revealed that EGFR is enriched in airway BCs, whereas its ligand EGF is induced by smoking in ciliated cells. Exposure of BCs to EGF shifted the BC differentiation program toward the squamous and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like phenotypes with down-regulation of genes related to ciliogenesis, secretory differentiation, and markedly reduced junctional barrier integrity, mimicking the abnormalities present in the airways of smokers in vivo. These data suggest that activation of EGFR in airway BCs by smoking-induced EGF represents a unique mechanism whereby smoking can alter airway epithelial differentiation and barrier function. PMID:23818594

  3. Computed tomography of nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Krystina; O'Brien, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening problem in cats and for which a noninvasive, sensitive method rapid diagnosis is needed. The purposes of this prospective study were to describe a computed tomography (CT) technique for nonanesthetized cats with upper airway obstruction, CT characteristics of obstructive diseases, and comparisons between CT findings and findings from other diagnostic tests. Ten cats with clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited for the study. Four cats with no clinical signs of upper airway obstruction were recruited as controls. All cats underwent computed tomography imaging without sedation or anesthesia, using a 16-slice helical CT scanner and a previously described transparent positional device. Three-dimensional (3D) internal volume rendering was performed on all CT image sets and 3D external volume rendering was also performed on cats with evidence of mass lesions. Confirmation of upper airway obstruction was based on visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, fine-needle aspirate, biopsy, or necropsy. Seven cats were diagnosed with intramural upper airway masses, two with laryngotracheitis, and one with laryngeal paralysis. The CT and 3D volume-rendered images identified lesions consistent with upper airway disease in all cats. In cats with mass lesions, CT accurately identified the mass and location. Findings from this study supported the use of CT imaging as an effective technique for diagnosing upper airway obstruction in nonanesthetized cats. PMID:23441677

  4. Mechanosensitive ATP Release Maintains Proper Mucus Hydration of Airways

    PubMed Central

    Button, Brian; Okada, Seiko F.; Frederick, Charles Brandon; Thelin, William R.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    The clearance of mucus from the airways protects the lungs from inhaled noxious and infectious materials. Proper hydration of the mucus layer enables efficient mucus clearance through beating of cilia on airway epithelial cells, and reduced clearance of excessively concentrated mucus occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Key steps in the mucus transport process are airway epithelia sensing and responding to changes in mucus hydration. We reported that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine were important luminal auto-crine and paracrine signals that regulated the hydration of the surface of human airway epithelial cultures through their action on apical membrane purinoceptors. Mucus hydration in human airway epithelial cultures was sensed by an interaction between cilia and the overlying mucus layer: Changes in mechanical strain, proportional to mucus hydration, regulated ATP release rates, adjusting fluid secretion to optimize mucus layer hydration. This system provided a feedback mechanism by which airways maintained mucus hydration in an optimum range for cilia propulsion. Understanding how airway epithelia can sense and respond to changes in mucus properties helps us to understand how the mucus clearance system protects the airways in health and how it fails in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:23757023

  5. Mechanosensitive ATP release maintains proper mucus hydration of airways.

    PubMed

    Button, Brian; Okada, Seiko F; Frederick, Charles Brandon; Thelin, William R; Boucher, Richard C

    2013-06-11

    The clearance of mucus from the airways protects the lungs from inhaled noxious and infectious materials. Proper hydration of the mucus layer enables efficient mucus clearance through beating of cilia on airway epithelial cells, and reduced clearance of excessively concentrated mucus occurs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis. Key steps in the mucus transport process are airway epithelia sensing and responding to changes in mucus hydration. We reported that extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine were important luminal autocrine and paracrine signals that regulated the hydration of the surface of human airway epithelial cultures through their action on apical membrane purinoceptors. Mucus hydration in human airway epithelial cultures was sensed by an interaction between cilia and the overlying mucus layer: Changes in mechanical strain, proportional to mucus hydration, regulated ATP release rates, adjusting fluid secretion to optimize mucus layer hydration. This system provided a feedback mechanism by which airways maintained mucus hydration in an optimum range for cilia propulsion. Understanding how airway epithelia can sense and respond to changes in mucus properties helps us to understand how the mucus clearance system protects the airways in health and how it fails in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:23757023

  6. Modelling management strategies for a disease including undetected sub-clinical infection: bacterial kidney disease in Scottish salmon and trout farms.

    PubMed

    Murray, Alexander G; Hall, Malcolm; Munro, Lorna A; Wallace, I Stuart

    2011-09-01

    Disease is a major constraint on animal production and welfare in agriculture and aquaculture. Movement of animals between farms is one of the most significant routes of disease transmission and is particularly hard to control for pathogens with subclinical infection. Renibacterium salmoninarum causes bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in salmonid fish, but infection is often sub-clinical and may go undetected with major potential implications for disease control programmes. A Susceptible-Infected model of R. salmoninarum in Scottish aquaculture has been developed that subdivides the infected phase between known and undetected sub-clinically infected farms and diseased farms whose status is assumed to be known. Farms officially known to be infected are subject to movement controls restricting spread of infection. Model results are sensitive to prevalence of undetected infection, which is unknown. However, the modelling suggests that controls that reduce BKD prevalence include improve biosecurity on farms, including those not known to be infected, and improved detection of infection. Culling appears of little value for BKD control. BKD prevalence for rainbow trout farms is less sensitive to controls than it is for Atlantic salmon farms and so different management strategies may be required for the sectors. PMID:22094340

  7. Airway management in trauma.

    PubMed

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration. PMID:19412149

  8. Assessing the applicability of currently available methods for attributing foodborne disease to sources, including food and food commodities.

    PubMed

    Pires, Sara M

    2013-03-01

    A variety of approaches to attribute foodborne diseases to specific sources are available, including hazard occurrence analysis, epidemiological methods, intervention studies, and expert elicitations. The usefulness of each method to attribute disease caused by a foodborne hazard depends on the public health question being addressed, on the data requirements, on advantages and limitations of the method, and on the data availability of the country or region in question. Previous articles have described available methods for source attribution, but have focused only on foodborne microbiological hazards. These articles have described strengths and weaknesses of each method, but no guidance on how to choose the most appropriate tool to address different public health questions has thus far been provided. We reviewed available source attribution methods; assessed their applicability to attribute illness caused by enteric, parasitic, and chemical foodborne hazards to the responsible sources; and renamed some of the approaches. The main objective was to make recommendations on the most appropriate method(s) to attribute human disease caused by different foodborne hazards. We concluded that the proportion of disease that can be attributed to specific foods items or transmission routes may be estimated for the majority of the evaluated hazards by applying one or more of the source attribution methods assessed. It was also recognized that the use of source attribution methods may be limited to specific countries, reflecting the data availability. PMID:23489045

  9. Teduglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-2 analog for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases, including short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yazbeck, Roger

    2010-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is a potent intestinotrophic growth factor with therapeutic potential for the prevention or treatment of an expanding number of gastrointestinal diseases, including short bowel syndrome (SBS). Teduglutide, being developed by NPS Allelix and licensee Nycomed, is a protease-resistant analog of GLP-2 for the potential treatment of gastrointestinal disease. Teduglutide has prolonged biological activity compared with native GLP-2, and preclinical studies demonstrated significant intestinotrophic activity in models of SBS, experimental colitis and chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. Patients with SBS rely on parenteral nutrition (PN) following bowel resection, and in a phase III clinical trial with teduglutide, > 20% reduction in PN was observed in patients with SBS receiving teduglutide. A phase II clinical trial for teduglutide in Crohn's disease observed remission rates of 55.6% in patients. At the time of publication, phase III clinical trials for SBS were ongoing, as were preclinical studies for chemotherapy-induced mucositis and pediatric indications. Teduglutide represents a novel, efficacious drug capable of increasing intestinal growth and improving intestinal function, and may change clinical management of intestinal disease and damage. PMID:21154171

  10. LIGHT is a crucial mediator of airway remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jen-Yu; Chiang, Shyh-Ren; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Chong, Inn-Wen; Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Hsu, Ya-Ling

    2015-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory airway diseases like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are major health problems globally. Airway epithelial cells play important role in airway remodeling, which is a critical process in the pathogenesis of diseases. This study aimed to demonstrate that LIGHT, an inflammatory factor secreted by T cells after allergen exposure, is responsible for promoting airway remodeling. LIGHT increased primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expressing MMP-9. The induction of EMT was associated with increased NF-κB activation and p300/NF-κB association. The interaction of NF-κB with p300 facilitated NF-κB acetylation, which in turn, was bound to the promoter of ZEB1, resulting in E-cadherin downregulation. LIGHT also stimulated HBECs to produce numerous cytokines/chemokines that could worsen airway inflammation. Furthermore, LIGHT enhanced HBECs to secrete activin A, which increased bronchial smooth muscle cell (BSMC) migration. In contrast, depletion of activin A decreased such migration. The findings suggest a new molecular determinant of LIGHT-mediated pathogenic changes in HBECs and that the LIGHT-related vicious cycle involving HBECs and BSMCs may be a potential target for the treatment of chronic inflammation airway diseases with airway remodeling. PMID:25251281

  11. Cine CT technique for dynamic airway studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ell, S.R.; Jolles, H.; Keyes, W.D.; Galvin, J.R.

    1985-07-01

    The advent of cine CT scanning with its 50-msec data acquisition time promises a much wider range of dynamic CT studies. The authors describe a method for dynamic evaluation of the extrathoracic airway, which they believe has considerable potential application in nonfixed upper-airway disease, such as sleep apnea and stridor of unknown cause. Conventional CT is limited in such studies by long data acquisition time and can be used to study only prolonged maneuvers such as phonation. Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction studies are limited by relatively high radiation dose and inability to image all wall motions simultaneously.

  12. Robust airway extraction based on machine learning and minimum spanning tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsutomu; Kitamura, Yoshiro; Li, Yuanzhong; Ito, Wataru

    2013-02-01

    Recent advances in MDCT have improved the quality of 3D images. Virtual Bronchoscopy has been used before and during the bronchoscopic examination for the biopsy. However, Virtual Bronchoscopy has become widely used only for the examination of proximal airway diseases. The reason is that conventional airway extraction methods often fail to extract peripheral airways with low image contrast. In this paper, we propose a machine learning based method which can improve the extraction robustness remarkably. The method consists of 4 steps. In the first step, we use Hessian analysis to detect as many airway candidates as possible. In the second, false positives are reduced effectively by introducing a machine learning method. In the third, an airway tree is constructed from the airway candidates by utilizing a minimum spanning tree algorithm. In the fourth, we extract airway regions by using Graph cuts. Experimental results evaluated by a standardized evaluation framework show that our method can extract peripheral airways very well.

  13. Epidemiology of Clostridium difficile-associated disease at University Hospital Basel including molecular characterisation of the isolates 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Fenner, L; Frei, R; Gregory, M; Dangel, M; Stranden, A; Widmer, A F

    2008-12-01

    A prospective study was conducted during a one-year period between 2006 and 2007 to describe the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) at University Hospital Basel, Switzerland (UHBS) and to determine phenotypic and genotypic features of C. difficile strains isolated at the Microbiology Laboratory UHBS including strains from regional non-university hospitals. We prospectively identified 78 CDAD cases at UHBS with an incidence of 2.65/1,000 hospitalised patients or 2.3/10,000 patient-days. Sixteen patients (20.5%) were infected with clindamycin-resistant strains of PCR-ribotype 027 during an outbreak at the geriatric hospital. Among 124 single-patient isolates, 28 (22.6%) were resistant to moxifloxacin and 34 (27.4%) were resistant to clindamycin, but all remained susceptible to metronidazole and vancomycin. Of 102 toxigenic isolates, 19 (18.7%) had an 18-bp deletion in the tcdC gene, eight (7.8%) a 39-bp deletion, and one (1.0%) a 54-bp deletion. Genes for binary toxin were present in 27 (21.8%). PCR-ribotype 027 was associated with older age (median age 83.5 vs. 65.5 years, p < 0.0001) and longer duration of hospitalisation before onset of disease (median 15.5 vs. 9 days, p = 0.014) with a trend towards higher crude mortality, more severe disease, and previous use of macrolides compared to ribotype non-027. Overall, severe disease correlated with use of a nasogastric tube and surprisingly shorter duration of hospitalisation before onset of disease. Today, laboratory-based and epidemiological surveillance systems are required to monitor CDAD cases and emergence of new epidemic strains. PMID:18560909

  14. Acoustic simulation of a patient's obstructed airway.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, W C P; van Zuijlen, A H; de Jong, A T; Lynch, C T; Hoeve, L J; Bijl, H

    2016-01-01

    This research focuses on the numerical simulation of stridor; a high pitched, abnormal noise, resulting from turbulent airflow and vibrating tissue through a partially obstructed airway. Characteristics of stridor noise are used by medical doctors as indication for location and size of the obstruction. The relation between type of stridor and the various diseases associated with airway obstruction is unclear; therefore, simply listening to stridor is an unreliable diagnostic tool. The overall aim of the study is to better understand the relationship between characteristics of stridor noise and localization and size of the obstruction. Acoustic analysis of stridor may then in future simplify the diagnostic process, and reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as laryngoscopy under general anesthesia. In this paper, the feasibility of a coupled flow, acoustic and structural model is investigated to predict the noise generated by the obstruction as well as the propagation of the noise through the airways, taking into account a one-way coupled fluid, structure, and acoustic interaction components. The flow and acoustic solver are validated on a diaphragm and a simplified airway model. A realistic airway model of a patient suffering from a subglottic stenosis, derived from a real computed tomography scan, is further analyzed. Near the mouth, the broadband noise levels at higher frequencies increased with approximately 15-20 dB comparing the stridorous model with the healthy model, indicating stridorous sound. PMID:25567545

  15. Silibinin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yun Ho; Jin, Guang Yu; Guo, Hui Shu; Piao, Hong Mei; Li, Liang chang; Li, Guang Zhao; Lin, Zhen Hua; Yan, Guang Hai

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin diminishes ovalbumin-induced inflammatory reactions in the mouse lung. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin reduces the levels of various cytokines into the lung of allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin prevents the development of airway hyperresponsiveness in allergic mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silibinin suppresses NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity. -- Abstract: Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease regulated by coordination of T-helper2 (Th2) type cytokines and inflammatory signal molecules. Silibinin is one of the main flavonoids produced by milk thistle, which is reported to inhibit the inflammatory response by suppressing the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. Because NF-{kappa}B activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, we have investigated the effect of silibinin on a mouse ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model. Airway hyperresponsiveness, cytokines levels, and eosinophilic infiltration were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue. Pretreatment of silibinin significantly inhibited airway inflammatory cell recruitment and peribronchiolar inflammation and reduced the production of various cytokines in bronchoalveolar fluid. In addition, silibinin prevented the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and attenuated the OVA challenge-induced NF-{kappa}B activation. These findings indicate that silibinin protects against OVA-induced airway inflammation, at least in part via downregulation of NF-{kappa}B activity. Our data support the utility of silibinin as a potential medicine for the treatment of asthma.

  16. In Vitro Microfluidic Models of Mucus-Like Obstructions in Small Airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Molly K.; Grotberg, James B.; Sznitman, Josué

    2012-11-01

    Liquid plugs can form in the lungs as a result of a host of different diseases, including cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The existence of such fluid obstructions have been found as far down in the bronchiole tree as the sixteenth generation, where bronchiole openings have diameters on the order of a hundred to a few hundred microns. Understanding the propagation of liquid plugs within the bifurcating branches of bronchiole airways is important because their presence in the lungs, and their rupture and break-up, can cause injury to the epithelial cells lining the airway walls as a result of high wall shear stresses. In particular, liquid plug rupture and break-up frequently occurs at airway bifurcations. Until present, however, experimental studies of liquid plugs have generally been restricted to Newtonian fluids that do not reflect the actual pseudoplastic properties of lung mucus. The present work attempts to uncover the propagation, rupture and break-up of mucus-like liquid plugs in the lower generations of the airway tree using microfluidic models. Our approach allows the dynamics of mucus-like plug break-up to be studied in real-time, in a one-to-one in vitro model, as a function of mucus rheology and bronchial tree geometry.

  17. Large-scale gene discovery in human airway epithelia reveals novel transcripts.

    PubMed

    Scheetz, Todd E; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J; Coco, Justin; Eyestone, Mari de Fatima; Bonaldo, Maria; Kucaba, Tamara; Casavant, Thomas L; Soares, M Bento; McCray, Paul B

    2004-03-12

    The airway epithelium represents an important barrier between the host and the environment. It is a first site of contact with pathogens, particulates, and other stimuli, and has evolved the means to dynamically respond to these challenges. In an effort to define the transcript profile of airway epithelia, we created and sequenced cDNA libraries from cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF epithelia and from human lung tissue. Sequencing of these libraries produced approximately 53,000 3'-expressed sequence tags (3'-ESTs). From these, a nonredundant UniGene set of more than 19,000 sequences was generated. Despite the relatively small contribution of airway epithelia to the total mass of the lung, focused gene discovery in this tissue yielded novel results. The ESTs included several thousand transcripts (6,416) not previously identified from cDNA sequences as expressed in the lung. Among the abundant transcripts were several genes involved in host defense. Most importantly, the set also included 879 3'-ESTs that appear to be novel sequences not previously represented in the National Center for Biotechnology Information UniGene collection. This UniGene set should be useful for studies of pulmonary diseases involving the airway epithelium including cystic fibrosis, respiratory infections and asthma. It also provides a reagent for large-scale expression profiling. PMID:14701920

  18. Immunomodulation of airway epithelium cell activation by mesenchymal stromal cells ameliorates house dust mite-induced airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Duong, Khang M; Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, M Ashik; Lynch, Jason P; Zhang, Vivian; Atkinson, Kerry; Sly, Peter D; Phipps, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Allergic asthma is underpinned by T helper 2 (Th2) inflammation. Redundancy in Th2 cytokine function and production by innate and adaptive immune cells suggests that strategies aimed at immunomodulation may prove more beneficial. Hence, we sought to determine whether administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus)-sensitized mice would suppress the development of Th2 inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) after HDM challenge. We report that the intravenous administration of allogeneic donor MSCs 1 hour before allergen challenge significantly attenuated the features of allergic asthma, including tissue eosinophilia, Th2 cytokine (IL-5 and IL-13) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and AHR. The number of infiltrating type 2 innate lymphoid cells was not affected by MSC transfer, suggesting that MSCs may modulate the adaptive arm of Th2 immunity. The effect of MSC administration was long lasting; all features of allergic airway disease were significantly suppressed in response to a second round of HDM challenge 4 weeks after MSC administration. Further, we observed that MSCs decreased the release of epithelial cell-derived alarmins IL-1α and high mobility group box-1 in an IL-1 receptor antagonist-dependent manner. This significantly decreased the expression of the pro-Th2 cytokine IL-25 and reduced the number of activated and antigen-acquiring CD11c(+)CD11b(+) dendritic cells in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Our findings suggest that MSC administration can ameliorate allergic airway inflammation by blunting the amplification of epithelial-derived inflammatory cytokines induced by HDM exposure and may offer long-term protection against Th2-mediated allergic airway inflammation and AHR. PMID:25789608

  19. Effect of mesenchymal stem cells on inhibiting airway remodeling and airway inflammation in chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiahui; Bai, Chong; Yang, Jianming; Lou, Guoliang; Li, Qiang; Chen, Ruohua

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies proved that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) could improve a variety of immune-mediated disease by its immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we investigated the effect on airway remodeling and airway inflammation by administrating BMSCs in chronic asthmatic mice. Forty-eight female BALB/c mice were randomly distributed into PBS group, BMSCs treatment group, BMSCs control group, and asthmatic group. The levels of cytokine and immunoglobulin in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The number of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and morphometric analysis was determined by flow cytometry, hematoxylin-eosin, immunofluorescence staining, periodic-acid Schiff, and masson staining, respectively. We found that airway remodeling and airway inflammation were evident in asthmatic mice. Moreover, low level of IL-12 and high levels of IL-13, IL-4, OVA-specific IgG1, IgE, and IgG2a and the fewer number of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells were present in asthmatic group. However, transplantation of BMSCs significantly decreased airway inflammation and airway remodeling and level of IL-4, OVA-specific IgE, and OVA-specific IgG1, but elevated level of IL-12 and the number of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in asthma (P < 0.05). However, BMSCs did not contribute to lung regeneration and had no significant effect on levels of IL-10, IFN-Y, and IL-13. In our study, BMSCs engraftment prohibited airway inflammation and airway remodeling in chronic asthmatic group. The beneficial effect of BMSCs might involved the modulation imbalance cytokine toward a new balance Th1-Th2 profiles and up-regulation of protective CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells in asthma, but not contribution to lung regeneration. PMID:23334934

  20. Role of upper airway ultrasound in airway management.

    PubMed

    Osman, Adi; Sum, Kok Meng

    2016-01-01

    Upper airway ultrasound is a valuable, non-invasive, simple, and portable point of care ultrasound (POCUS) for evaluation of airway management even in anatomy distorted by pathology or trauma. Ultrasound enables us to identify important sonoanatomy of the upper airway such as thyroid cartilage, epiglottis, cricoid cartilage, cricothyroid membrane, tracheal cartilages, and esophagus. Understanding this applied sonoanatomy facilitates clinician to use ultrasound in assessment of airway anatomy for difficult intubation, ETT and LMA placement and depth, assessment of airway size, ultrasound-guided invasive procedures such as percutaneous needle cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy, prediction of postextubation stridor and left double-lumen bronchial tube size, and detecting upper airway pathologies. Widespread POCUS awareness, better technological advancements, portability, and availability of ultrasound in most critical areas facilitate upper airway ultrasound to become the potential first-line non-invasive airway assessment tool in the future. PMID:27529028

  1. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Tabar, A I; Alvarez, M J; Acero, S; Olaguíbel, J M; García, B E; Quirce, S

    1998-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) is a type of asthma that develops in subjects without prior pulmonary disease, following single or multiple exposure to high levels of nonimmunogenic irritants. The main difference from classic occupational asthma is the absence of a latency period. Non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness is characteristic of the disease and usually persists after cessation of exposure. We report the cases of two subjects in whom RADS developed after occupational exposure to irritants. PMID:9615307

  2. Vitamin A-retinoid signaling in pulmonary development and disease.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Hector A; Cardoso, Wellington V

    2016-12-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active form of vitamin A, regulates key developmental processes in multiple organs. In the developing lung, RA is crucial for normal growth and differentiation of airways. Disruption in RA signaling or vitamin A deficiency (VAD) has been linked to aberrant development of the lung including alterations in the airway smooth muscle (SM) differentiation, development, and function. These alterations have been linked to disease states including asthma in both human and animal models. PMID:27480876

  3. Simulators and difficult airway management skills.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, John J

    2004-01-01

    Although difficult airway management remains one of the leading factors in anaesthetic deaths, there have been tremendous advances in the field in the last few decades. The question is, are advanced airway management skills being taught and used? Of the numerous training tools available, simulators have the advantages of providing whole-task learning with the potential to change behaviour and, when applied to large groups of trainees, the possibility of achieving standardized application of the safest practices for a range of scenarios limited only by the creativity of the program designers. Partial-task trainers include computer-based software programs and simulators. Full-scale simulators include a variety of products from several manufacturers. To take full advantage of simulators as educational tools, curricula should be designed around a set of educational objectives that address the objectives of learning in all three skill domains (cognitive, psychomotor, and affective). Simulation experiences using partial-task or whole-task trainers should be coupled whenever feasible with a structured clinical experience in airway management. This can best be achieved through a dedicated airway management rotation. Monitored procedure logs may also be used. Whether using a simulator or in a clinical rotation, experiences should be graded, for example, gaining experience in an adult population before gaining experience in paediatrics and in each population mastering airway management skills for common scenarios before advancing to more complicated techniques such as fibreoptic bronchoscopy. PMID:14717871

  4. Emphysema- and airway-dominant COPD phenotypes defined by standardised quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Deepak R; Gupta, Sumit; Burggraf, Dorothe; Vom Silberberg, Suzan J; Heimbeck, Irene; Heiss-Neumann, Marion S; Haeussinger, Karl; Newby, Chris; Hargadon, Beverley; Raj, Vimal; Singh, Dave; Kolsum, Umme; Hofer, Thomas P; Al-Shair, Khaled; Luetzen, Niklas; Prasse, Antje; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Benea, Giorgio; Leprotti, Stefano; Boschetto, Piera; Gorecka, Dorota; Nowinski, Adam; Oniszh, Karina; Castell, Wolfgang Zu; Hagen, Michael; Barta, Imre; Döme, Balázs; Strausz, Janos; Greulich, Timm; Vogelmeier, Claus; Koczulla, Andreas R; Gut, Ivo; Hohlfeld, Jens; Welte, Tobias; Lavae-Mokhtari, Mahyar; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Brightling, Christopher; Parr, David G

    2016-07-01

    EvA (Emphysema versus Airway disease) is a multicentre project to study mechanisms and identify biomarkers of emphysema and airway disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this study was to delineate objectively imaging-based emphysema-dominant and airway disease-dominant phenotypes using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) indices, standardised with a novel phantom-based approach.441 subjects with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stages 1-3) were assessed in terms of clinical and physiological measurements, laboratory testing and standardised QCT indices of emphysema and airway wall geometry.QCT indices were influenced by scanner non-conformity, but standardisation significantly reduced variability (p<0.001) and led to more robust phenotypes. Four imaging-derived phenotypes were identified, reflecting "emphysema-dominant", "airway disease-dominant", "mixed" disease and "mild" disease. The emphysema-dominant group had significantly higher lung volumes, lower gas transfer coefficient, lower oxygen (PO2 ) and carbon dioxide (PCO2 ) tensions, higher haemoglobin and higher blood leukocyte numbers than the airway disease-dominant group.The utility of QCT for phenotyping in the setting of an international multicentre study is improved by standardisation. QCT indices of emphysema and airway disease can delineate within a population of patients with COPD, phenotypic groups that have typical clinical features known to be associated with emphysema-dominant and airway-dominant disease. PMID:27230444

  5. Effect of changes in human ecology and behavior on patterns of sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wasserheit, J N

    1994-01-01

    The last 20 years have witnessed six striking changes in patterns of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): emergence of new STD organisms and etiologies, reemergence of old STDs, shifts in the populations in which STDs are concentrated, shifts in the etiological spectra of STD syndromes, alterations in the incidence of STD complications, and increases in antimicrobial resistance. For example, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) emerged to devastate the United States with a fatal pandemic involving at least 1 million people. The incidence of syphilis rose progressively after 1956 to reach a 40-year peak by 1990. In both cases, disease patterns shifted from homosexual men to include minority heterosexuals. Over the last decade, gonorrhea became increasingly concentrated among adolescents, and several new types of antimicrobial resistance appeared. Three interrelated types of environments affect STD patterns. The microbiologic, hormonal, and immunologic microenvironments most directly influence susceptibility, infectiousness, and development of sequelae. These microenvironments are shaped, in part, by the personal environments created by an individual's sexual, substance-use, and health-related behaviors. The personal environments are also important determinants of acquisition of infection and development of sequelae but, in addition, they mediate risk of exposure to infection. These are, therefore, the environments that most directly affect changing disease patterns. Finally, individuals' personal environments are, in turn, molded by powerful macroenvironmental forces, including socioeconomic, demographic, geographic, political, epidemiologic, and technological factors. Over the past 20 years, the profound changes that have occurred in many aspects of the personal environment and the macroenvironment have been reflected in new STD patterns. PMID:8146135

  6. Endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 mediates antigen-induced acute airway inflammation and late-phase airway obstruction in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Gundel, R H; Wegner, C D; Torcellini, C A; Clarke, C C; Haynes, N; Rothlein, R; Smith, C W; Letts, L G

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the role of endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1) in the development of the acute airway inflammation (cell influx) and late-phase airway obstruction in a primate model of extrinsic asthma. In animals sensitive to antigen, a single inhalation exposure induced the rapid expression of ELAM-1 (6 h) exclusively on vascular endothelium that correlated with the influx of neutrophils into the lungs and the onset of late-phase airway obstruction. In contrast, basal levels of ICAM-1 was constitutively expressed on vascular endothelium and airway epithelium before antigen challenge. After the single antigen exposure, changes in ICAM-1 expression did not correlate with neutrophil influx or the change in airway caliber. This was confirmed by showing that pretreatment with a monoclonal antibody to ICAM-1 did not inhibit the acute influx of neutrophils associated with late-phase airway obstruction, whereas a monoclonal antibody to ELAM-1 blocked both the influx of neutrophils and the late-phase airway obstruction. This study demonstrates a functional role for ELAM-1 in the development of acute airway inflammation in vivo. We conclude that, in primates, the late-phase response is the result of an ELAM-1 dependent influx of neutrophils. Therefore, the regulation of ELAM-1 expression may provide a novel approach to controlling the acute inflammatory response, and thereby, affecting airway function associated with inflammatory disorders, including asthma. Images PMID:1717514

  7. Multi-detector computed tomography imaging of large airway pathology: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Jugpal, Tejeshwar Singh; Garg, Anju; Sethi, Gulshan Rai; Daga, Mradul Kumar; Kumar, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    The tracheobronchial tree is a musculo-cartilagenous framework which acts as a conduit to aerate the lungs and consequently the entire body. A large spectrum of pathological conditions can involve the trachea and bronchial airways. These may be congenital anomalies, infections, post-intubation airway injuries, foreign body aspiration or neoplasms involving the airway. Appropriate management of airway disease requires an early and accurate diagnosis. In this pictorial essay review, we will comprehensively describe the various airway pathologies and their imaging findings by multi-detector computed tomography. PMID:26753061

  8. Intrathoracic airway wall detection using graph search and scanner PSF information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Park, Wonkyu; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sonka, Milan

    1997-05-01

    Measurements of the in vivo bronchial tree can be used to assess regional airway physiology. High-resolution CT (HRCT) provides detailed images of the lungs and has been used to evaluate bronchial airway geometry. Such measurements have been sued to assess diseases affecting the airways, such as asthma and cystic fibrosis, to measure airway response to external stimuli, and to evaluate the mechanics of airway collapse in sleep apnea. To routinely use CT imaging in a clinical setting to evaluate the in vivo airway tree, there is a need for an objective, automatic technique for identifying the airway tree in the CT images and measuring airway geometry parameters. Manual or semi-automatic segmentation and measurement of the airway tree from a 3D data set may require several man-hours of work, and the manual approaches suffer from inter-observer and intra- observer variabilities. This paper describes a method for automatic airway tree analysis that combines accurate airway wall location estimation with a technique for optimal airway border smoothing. A fuzzy logic, rule-based system is used to identify the branches of the 3D airway tree in thin-slice HRCT images. Raycasting is combined with a model-based parameter estimation technique to identify the approximate inner and outer airway wall borders in 2D cross-sections through the image data set. Finally, a 2D graph search is used to optimize the estimated airway wall locations and obtain accurate airway borders. We demonstrate this technique using CT images of a plexiglass tube phantom.

  9. Fatty Acid Binding Protein 4 Regulates VEGF-Induced Airway Angiogenesis and Inflammation in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Yu, Chen-Wei; Elmasri, Harun; Terwelp, Matthew; Lee, Chun G.; Bhandari, Vineet; Comhair, Suzy A.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.; Elias, Jack A.; Cataltepe, Sule

    2014-01-01

    Neovascularization of the airways occurs in several inflammatory lung diseases, including asthma. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in vascular remodeling in the asthmatic airways. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 or aP2) is an intracellular lipid chaperone that is induced by VEGF in endothelial cells. FABP4 exhibits a proangiogenic function in vitro, but whether it plays a role in modulation of angiogenesis in vivo is not known. We hypothesized that FABP4 promotes VEGF-induced airway angiogenesis and investigated this hypothesis with the use of a transgenic mouse model with inducible overexpression of VEGF165 under a CC10 promoter [VEGF-TG (transgenic) mice]. We found a significant increase in FABP4 mRNA levels and density of FABP4-expressing vascular endothelial cells in mouse airways with VEGF overexpression. FABP4−/− mouse airways showed a significant decrease in neovessel formation and endothelial cell proliferation in response to VEGF overexpression. These alterations in airway vasculature were accompanied by attenuated expression of proinflammatory mediators. Furthermore, VEGF-TG/FABP4−/− mice showed markedly decreased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, a well-known mediator of VEGF-induced responses, compared with VEGF-TG mice. Finally, the density of FABP4-immunoreactive vessels in endobronchial biopsy specimens was significantly higher in patients with asthma than in control subjects. Taken together, these data unravel FABP4 as a potential target of pathologic airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:23391391

  10. Graph-Based Airway Tree Reconstruction from Chest CT Scans: Evaluation of Different Features on Five Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christian; Eberlein, Michael; Beichel, Reinhard R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a graph-based framework for airway tree reconstruction from CT scans and evaluate the performance of different feature categories and their combinations on five lung cohorts. The approach consists of two main processing steps. First, potential airway branch and connection candidates are identified and represented by a graph structure with weighted nodes and edges, respectively. Second, an optimization algorithm is utilized for generating an airway detection result by selecting a subset of airway branches and connections based on graph weights derived from image features. The performance of the algorithm with different feature categories and their combinations was assessed on a set of 50 lung CT scans from five different cohorts, including normal and diseased lungs. Results show tradeoffs between feature categories/combinations in terms of correctly (true positive) and incorrectly (false positive) identified airways. Also, the performance of features in dependence of lung cohort was analyzed. Across all cohorts, a good trade-off with high true positive rate (TPR) and low false positive rate (FPR) was achieved by a combination of gray-value, local shape, and structural features. This combination enabled extracting 91.80% of reference airways (TPR) in combination with a low FPR of 1.00%. In addition, this variant was evaluated on the public EXACT’09 test set, and a comparison with other airway detection approaches is provided. One of the main advantages of the presented method is that it is robust against local disturbances/artifacts or other ambiguities that are frequently occurring in lung CT scans. PMID:25438305

  11. Hydrogen sulphide inhibits Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors and relaxes airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Piedras, Isabel; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule that appears to regulate diverse cell physiological process in several organs and systems including vascular and airway smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. Decreases in endogenous H2S synthesis have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and asthma. Here we investigated the mechanism of airway SMC relaxation induced by H2S in small intrapulmonary airways using mouse lung slices and confocal and phase-contrast video microscopy. Exogenous H2S donor Na2S (100 μm) reversibly inhibited Ca2+ release and airway contraction evoked by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) uncaging in airway SMCs. Similarly, InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction was inhibited by endogenous H2S precursor l-cysteine (10 mm) but not by l-serine (10 mm) or either amino acid in the presence of dl-propargylglycine (PPG). Consistent with the inhibition of Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors (InsP3Rs), Na2S reversibly inhibited acetylcholine (ACh)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in airway SMCs. In addition, Na2S, the H2S donor GYY-4137, and l-cysteine caused relaxation of airways pre-contracted with either ACh or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Na2S-induced airway relaxation was resistant to a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and a protein kinase G inhibitor (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS). The effects of H2S on InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction as well as on the relaxation of agonist-contracted airways were mimicked by the thiol-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mm) and inhibited by the oxidizing agent diamide (30 μm). These studies indicate that H2S causes airway SMC relaxation by inhibiting Ca2+ release through InsP3Rs and consequent reduction of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in SMCs. The results suggest a novel role for endogenously produced H2S that involves the modulation of InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release – a cell-signalling system of critical importance for many physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID